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Sample records for lbnl bnct facility

  1. Initial Experimental Verification of the Neutron Beam Modeling for the LBNL BNCT Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; McDonald, R.J.; Smith, A.R.; Stone, N.A.; Vuji, J.

    1999-01-19

    In preparation for future clinical BNCT trials, neutron production via the 7Li(p,n) reaction as well as subsequent moderation to produce epithermal neutrons have been studied. Proper design of a moderator and filter assembly is crucial in producing an optimal epithermal neutron spectrum for brain tumor treatments. Based on in-phantom figures-of-merit,desirable assemblies have been identified. Experiments were performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron to characterize epithermal neutron beams created using several microampere of 2.5 MeV protons on a lithium target. The neutron moderating assembly consisted of Al/AlF3 and Teflon, with a lead reflector to produce an epithermal spectrum strongly peaked at 10-20 keV. The thermal neutron fluence was measured as a function of depth in a cubic lucite head phantom by neutron activation in gold foils. Portions of the neutron spectrum were measured by in-air activation of six cadmium-covered materials (Au, Mn, In, Cu, Co, W) with high epithermal neutron absorption resonances. The results are reasonably reproduced in Monte Carlo computational models, confirming their validity.

  2. Low background counting at the LBNL low background facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Hurley, D. L.; Wang, B. S.

    2013-08-08

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to end-users in two unique facilities: locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory space; and a satellite underground station (600 m.w.e) in Oroville, CA. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic and anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via neutron activation analysis for specific applications. A general overview of the facilities, services, and capabilities will be discussed. Recent activities will also be presented, including the recent installation of a 3π muon veto at the surface facility, cosmogenic activation studies of TeO{sub 2} for CUORE, and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout.

  3. Demonstration of the importance of a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system for BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Chao, Der-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The neutron beam monitoring system is indispensable to BNCT facility in order to achieve an accurate patient dose delivery. The neutron beam monitoring of a reactor-based BNCT (RB-BNCT) facility can be implemented through the instrumentation and control system of a reactor provided that the reactor power level remains constant during reactor operation. However, since the neutron flux in reactor core is highly correlative to complicated reactor kinetics resulting from such as fuel depletion, poison production, and control blade movement, some extent of variation may occur in the spatial distribution of neutron flux in reactor core. Therefore, a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system is needed to be installed in the vicinity of the beam path close to the beam exit of the RB-BNCT facility, where it can measure the BNCT beam intensity as closely as possible and be free from the influence of the objects present around the beam exit. In this study, in order to demonstrate the importance of a dedicated BNCT neutron beam monitoring system, the signals originating from the two in-core neutron detectors installed at THOR were extracted and compared with the three dedicated neutron beam monitors of the THOR BNCT facility. The correlation of the readings between the in-core neutron detectors and the BNCT neutron beam monitors was established to evaluate the improvable quality of the beam intensity measurement inferred by the in-core neutron detectors. In 29 sampled intervals within 16 days of measurement, the fluctuations in the mean value of the normalized ratios between readings of the three BNCT neutron beam monitors lay within 0.2%. However, the normalized ratios of readings of the two in-core neutron detectors to one of the BNCT neutron beam monitors show great fluctuations of 5.9% and 17.5%, respectively.

  4. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

    2011-03-23

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  5. Gel dosimetry in the BNCT facility for extra-corporeal treatment of liver cancer at the HFR Petten.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Daquino, G G; Moss, R L; Carrara, M; Nievaart, V A; Vanossi, E

    2007-01-01

    A thorough evaluation of the dose inside a specially designed and built facility for extra-corporeal treatment of liver cancer by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten (The Netherlands) is the necessary step before animal studies can start. The absorbed doses are measured by means of gel dosemeters, which help to validate the Monte Carlo simulations of the spheroidal liver holder that will contain the human liver for irradiation with an epithermal neutron beam. These dosemeters allow imaging of the dose due to gammas and to the charged particles produced by the (10)B reaction. The thermal neutron flux is extrapolated from the boron dose images and compared to that obtained by the calculations. As an additional reference, Au, Cu and Mn foil measurements are performed. All results appear consistent with the calculations and confirm that the BNCT liver facility is able to provide an almost homogeneous thermal neutron distribution in the liver, which is a requirement for a successful treatment of liver metastases.

  6. Clinical Requirements and Accelerator Concepts for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

    1997-05-01

    Accelerator-driven epithermal neutron sources are an attractive alternative to nuclear reactors for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In BNCT the goal of delivering a sufficient dose to the tumor without exceeding the dose limits of the surrounding normal tissues is achieved by administering a ^10B-containing compound which is selectively taken up in the tumor cells. Subsequent irradiation with epithermal neutrons leads to the release of short ranged (< 10 μm) ionizing particles via the ^10B(n,α)^7Li neutron-capture reaction. By carefully shaping the neutron spectrum the background dose, partially due to recoil protons and external gamma radiation, can be minimized and the depth dose distribution optimized. Excellent epithermal neutron beams for BNCT can be produced by bombarding a Li-target with a high current proton beam at energies ranging from the (p,n) reaction threshold to 2.5 MeV and subsequent moderation and filtering of the primary neutrons. In comparison the use of Be-targets and higher proton or deuteron energies, up to 20 MeV, leads to higher neutron yields but also to higher primary neutron energies requiring more moderation and resulting in less desirable neutron spectra. Accelerator options for possible neutron sources include dc-accelerators, RFQs, LINACs and cyclotrons. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator has been chosen to provide a 2.5 MeV proton beam for the BNCT facility currently being designed at LBNL. An ESQ-accelerator is ideally suited to provide the high beam currents which are desired for producing high quality neutron beams for BNCT treatments. A novel power supply based on the air-coupled transformer concept is under development. It will enable the accelerator to deliver proton beam currents up to about 50 mA. A Li-target has been designed which can handle beam power in excess of 50 kW establishing the practicability of this approach. Monte Carlo simulation studies have shown that at a proton beam current of 20 mA high

  7. Tests of photocathodes for high repetition rate x-ray FELs at the APEX facility at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Filippetto, Daniele; Qian, Houjun; Papadopoulos, Christos F.; Wells, Russell; Kramasz, Toby; Padmore, Howard; Feng, Jun; Nasiatka, James; Huang, Ruixuan; Zolotorev, Max; Staples, John W.

    2015-05-01

    After the formidable results of X-ray 4th generation light sources based on free electron lasers around the world, a new revolutionary step is undergoing to extend the FEL performance from the present few hundred Hz to MHz-class repetition rates. In such facilities, temporally equi-spaced pulses will allow for a wide range of previously non-accessible experiments. The Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment (APEX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is devoted to test the capability of a novel scheme electron source, the VHF-Gun, to generate the required electron beam brightness at MHz repetition rates. In linac-based FELs, the ultimate performance in terms of brightness is defined at the injector, and in particular, cathodes play a major role in the game. Part of the APEX program consists in testing high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable to operate at the conditions required by such challenging machines. Results and status of these tests at LBNL are presented.

  8. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-05-31

    Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams for industry, radiation therapy and inertial fusion applications were discussed. The highlights include ion beam lithography, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers using multiple linacs.

  9. INEL BNCT Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1991-08-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for August 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and updates to the animal data charts.

  10. Neutronics analysis of three beam-filter assemblies for an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Costes, S.V.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Three moderator materials, AlF{sub 3}/Al, D{sub 2}O and LiF, have been analyzed for clinical usefulness using the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n) as an accelerator driven neutron source. Proton energies between 2.1 MeV and 2.6 MeV have been investigated. Radiation transport in the reflector/moderator assembly is simulated using the MCNP program. Depth-dose distributions in a head phanton are calculated with the BNCT-RTPE patient treatment planning program from INEEL using the MCNP generated neutron and photon spectra as the subsequent source. Clinical efficacy is compared using the current BMRR protocol for all designs. Depth-dose distributions are compared for a fixed normal tissue tolerance dose of 12.5 Gy-Eq. Radiation analyses also include a complete anthropomorphic phantom. Results of organ and whole body dose components are presented for several designs. Results indicate that high quality accelerator beams may produce clinically favorable treatments to deep-seated tumors when compared to the BMRR beam. Also discussed are problems identified in comparing accelerator and reactor based designs using in-air figures of merit as well as some results of spectrum-averaged RBE`s.

  11. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  12. The Berkeley accelerator space effects facility (BASE) - A newmission for the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.

    2005-09-06

    In FY04, the 88-Inch Cyclotron began a new operating mode that supports a local research program in nuclear science, R&D in accelerator technology and a test facility for the National Security Space (NSS) community (the U.S. Air Force and NRO). The NSS community (and others on a cost recovery basis) can take advantage of both the light- and heavy-ion capabilities of the Cyclotron to simulate the space radiation environment. A significant portion of this work involves the testing of microcircuits for single event effects. The experimental areas within the building that are used for the radiation effects testing are now called the Berkeley Accelerator and Space Effects (BASE) facility. Improvements to the facility to provide increased reliability, quality assurance and new capabilities are underway and will be discussed. These include a 16 AMeV ''cocktail'' of beams for heavy ion testing, a neutron beam, more robust dosimetry, and other upgrades.

  13. LBNL Computational Research and Theory Facility Groundbreaking. February 1st, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Yelick, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  14. LBNL Computational Research and Theory Facility Groundbreaking. February 1st, 2012

    ScienceCinema

    Yelick, Kathy

    2016-07-12

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  15. LBNL Computational Research & Theory Facility Groundbreaking - Full Press Conference. Feb 1st, 2012

    ScienceCinema

    Yelick, Kathy

    2016-07-12

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  16. LBNL LLRF Controls Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Doolittle, Lawrence R.

    2005-03-18

    This package provides a complete set of FPGA logic and driver software for the LBNL Interim SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) LLRF (Low Level Radio Frequency) cavity control system, plus a hardware-software cosimulation framework that can demonstrate correct operation of the code. The controls are organized in a traditional three-tier layout. Tier 1 (hardware access): Verilog code targeted at the XC2S15O FPGA that lies at the center of the custom hardware, Includes a direct digital frequency synthesizer (DDS), a low-latency vector PI feedback control loop, four-channel vector waveform capture, and support for on-board housekeeping circuitry. Tier 2 (network presentation): C code targeted at a 32-bit microcontroller, which has a direct connection to both the FPGA and to Ethemet. This layer is itself divided into a HAL (hardware abstraction layer) to mediate access to the FPGA registers, a driver to organize all the application-specific computations (including a waveform curve fit that determines cavity detuning), and a toy network access protocol. Tier 3 (operator interface): A Tcl program that exchanges data with tier 2, and gives the operator a virtual control panel for the hardware In the production SNS installation, the toy network access protocol and tier 3 are replaced with EPICS (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/). The code given here is dramatically smaller and simpler than EPICS, yet gives enough functionality to demonstrate proper operation of an RF cavity. The SNS facility now uses three generations of LLRF control hardware. This package is intended to be used in all of them, but is so far only tested on the second ("Interim") generation hardware. It may also be adaptable to future LLRF projects at LBNL, other National Labs, and worldwide.

  17. A toolkit for epithermal neutron beam characterisation in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Auterinen, Iiro; Serén, Tom; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Kosunen, Antti; Savolainen, Sauli

    2004-01-01

    Methods for dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been developed and utilised within the Finnish BNCT project as well as within a European project for a code of practise for the dosimetry of BNCT. One outcome has been a travelling toolkit for BNCT dosimetry. It consists of activation detectors and ionisation chambers. The free-beam neutron spectrum is measured with a set of activation foils of different isotopes irradiated both in a Cd-capsule and without it. Neutron flux (thermal and epithermal) distribution in phantoms is measured using activation of Mn and Au foils, and Cu wire. Ionisation chamber (IC) measurements are performed both in-free-beam and in-phantom for determination of the neutron and gamma dose components. This toolkit has also been used at other BNCT facilities in Europe, the USA, Argentina and Japan.

  18. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  19. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  20. INEL BNCT Program: Volume 5, No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for September 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and updates to the animal data charts.

  1. The Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility A new mission for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, M. A.

    2005-12-01

    In FY04, the 88-Inch Cyclotron began a new operating mode that supports a local research program in nuclear science, R&D in accelerator technology and a test facility for the National Security Space (NSS) community (the US Air Force and NRO). The NSS community (and others on a cost recovery basis) can take advantage of both the light- and heavy-ion capabilities of the cyclotron to simulate the space radiation environment. A significant portion of this work involves the testing of microcircuits for single event effects. The experimental areas within the building that are used for the radiation effects testing are now called the Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility. Improvements to the facility to provide increased reliability, quality assurance and new capabilities are underway and will be discussed. These include a 16 A MeV "cocktail" of beams for heavy ion testing, a neutron beam, more robust dosimetry, and other upgrades.

  2. Installation of a muon veto for low background gamma spectroscopy at the LBNL low-background facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.

    2013-10-01

    An active veto system consisting of plastic scintillation panels was installed outside the Pb shielding of a 115% n-type HPGe detector in an effort to reduce background continuum generated by cosmic ray muons on the surface. The Low Background Facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performs low level assay (generally of primordial U, Th, K) of candidate construction materials for experiments that require a high level of radiopurity. The counting is performed in two facilities: one local surface site and a remote underground site of approximately 600 m.w.e. For the recently installed veto system at the surface location, the top scintillator panel has been in use for nearly 1 year and the full 3π anticoincidence shield was commissioned into normal counting operations in January 2013. The integrated background from 20 to 3600 keV is reduced overall by a factor of 8, where most of the energy spectrum above 100 keV achieves an overall reduction that varies from 8 to 10. A dramatic improvement of peak-to-background across the entire continuum is observed, greatly enhancing low-level peaks that would otherwise be obscured.

  3. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions {open_quotes}How much?{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}What kind?{close_quotes} of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room, patient {open_quotes}scatterer,{close_quotes} and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h{sup {minus}1} was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions "How much?" and "What kind?" of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room , patient "scatterer," and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel.

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in Finland: technological and physical prospects after 20 years of experiences.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Sauli; Kortesniemi, Mika; Timonen, Marjut; Reijonen, Vappu; Kuusela, Linda; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Salli, Eero; Koivunoro, Hanna; Seppälä, Tiina; Lönnroth, Nadja; Välimäki, Petteri; Hyvönen, Heini; Kotiluoto, Petri; Serén, Tom; Kuronen, Antti; Heikkinen, Sami; Kosunen, Antti; Auterinen, Iiro

    2013-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiotherapy method developed to treat patients with certain malignant tumours. To date, over 300 treatments have been carried out at the Finnish BNCT facility in various on-going and past clinical trials. In this technical review, we discuss our research work in the field of medical physics to form the groundwork for the Finnish BNCT patient treatments, as well as the possibilities to further develop and optimize the method in the future. Accordingly, the following aspects are described: neutron sources, beam dosimetry, treatment planning, boron imaging and determination, and finally the possibilities to detect the efficacy and effects of BNCT on patients.

  6. BNCT-RTPE: BNCT radiation treatment planning environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wessol, D.E.; Wheeler, F.J.; Babcock, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    Several improvements have been developed for the BNCT radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) during 1994. These improvements have been incorporated into Version 1.0 of BNCT-Rtpe which is currently installed at the INEL, BNL, Japanese Research Center (JRC), and Finland`s Technical Research Center. Platforms supported by this software include Hewlett-Packard (HP), SUN, International Business Machines (IBM), and Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI). A draft version of the BNCT-Rtpe user manual is available. Version 1.1 of BNCT-Rtpe is scheduled for release in March 1995. It is anticipated that Version 2.x of BNCT-Rtpe, which includes the nonproprietary NURBS library and data structures, will be released in September 1995.

  7. Present status of Accelerator-Based BNCT

    PubMed Central

    Kreiner, Andres Juan; Bergueiro, Javier; Cartelli, Daniel; Baldo, Matias; Castell, Walter; Asoia, Javier Gomez; Padulo, Javier; Suárez Sandín, Juan Carlos; Igarzabal, Marcelo; Erhardt, Julian; Mercuri, Daniel; Valda, Alejandro A.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Debray, Mario E.; Somacal, Hector R.; Capoulat, María Eugenia; Herrera, María S.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Gagetti, Leonardo; Anzorena, Manuel Suarez; Canepa, Nicolas; Real, Nicolas; Gun, Marcelo; Tacca, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Aim This work aims at giving an updated report of the worldwide status of Accelerator-Based BNCT (AB-BNCT). Background There is a generalized perception that the availability of accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of BNCT. Accordingly, in recent years a significant effort has started to develop such machines. Materials and methods A variety of possible charged-particle induced nuclear reactions and the characteristics of the resulting neutron spectra are discussed along with the worldwide activity in suitable accelerator development. Results Endothermic 7Li(p,n)7Be and 9Be(p,n)9B and exothermic 9Be(d,n)10B are compared. In addition to having much better thermo-mechanical properties than Li, Be as a target leads to stable products. This is a significant advantage for a hospital-based facility. 9Be(p,n)9B needs at least 4–5 MeV bombarding energy to have a sufficient yield, while 9Be(d,n)10B can be utilized at about 1.4 MeV, implying the smallest possible accelerator. This reaction operating with a thin target can produce a sufficiently soft spectrum to be viable for AB-BNCT. The machines considered are electrostatic single ended or tandem accelerators or radiofrequency quadrupoles plus drift tube Linacs. Conclusions 7Li(p,n)7Be provides one of the best solutions for the production of epithermal neutron beams for deep-seated tumors. However, a Li-based target poses significant technological challenges. Hence, Be has been considered as an alternative target, both in combination with (p,n) and (d,n) reactions. 9Be(d,n)10B at 1.4 MeV, with a thin target has been shown to be a realistic option for the treatment of deep-seated lesions. PMID:26933390

  8. Building of scientific information system for sustainable development of BNCT in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Mitev, M; Ilieva, K; Apostolov, T

    2009-07-01

    Building a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility is foreseen within the reconstruction of the Research Reactor IRT (IRT) of the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgaria Academy of Sciences (INRNE). The development of BNCT at IRT plays a very significant role in the plan for sustainable application of the reactor. A centralized scientific information system on BNCT is being built at the INRNE with the purpose to collect and sort new information as knowledge accumulated during more than thirty years history of BNCT. This BNCT information system will help the creation and consolidation of a well informed and interconnected interdisciplinary team of physicists, chemists, biologists, and radio-oncologists for establishing BNCT cancer treatment in Bulgaria. It will strengthen more intensive development of the national network as well as its enlargement to the Balkan region countries. Furthermore, to acquaint the public at large with the opportunity for BNCT cancer treatment will be addressed. Human, social, and economics results due to BNCT for many patients from Balkan region are expected.

  9. INEL BNCT Program: Volume 5, No. 9. Bulletin, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1991-12-31

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for September 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and updates to the animal data charts.

  10. LBNL SecureMessaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pery, Marcia; Agarwal, Deb

    2003-03-17

    The LBNLSecureMessaging application enables collaboration among colocated or geograhically dispersed users by supporting secure synchronous and asynchronous communication. This application is the graphical user interface client that is meant to be used in conjunction with servers (LBNL's PCCEServer and a customized IRC server) to allow group and one-to-one conversations via text-based instant messaging. Conversations may be private (by invitation only) or public (open to any member of a collaboratory group_ and they may be permanent and on-going or temporary and ad hoc. Users may leave notes for other people who are online or offline. By providing presence and awareness information, collaborators can easily locate each other and rendezvous. Written in Java/Swing, this application is cross-platform. To gain access to functionality, users have to be registered with an authorization server (PCCEServer) that maintains an access control list. Thus a collaboration group is comprised of a set of PCCE-registered users. Registered users can log in via either X.509 certificate or a username and password combination. PKI and SSL are used to authenticate servers and clients and to encrypt messages sent over the network. The LBNLSecureMessaging application offers instant messaging capabilities in a secure environment that provides data integrity, privacyk authorization, and authentication.

  11. INEL BNCT research program: Annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1995. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, physics (treatment planning software, real-time neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (large animal models efficacy studies). Design of a reactor based epithermal neutron extraction facility is discussed in detail. Final results of boron magnetic resonance imagining is included for both borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) in rats, and BSH in humans. Design of an epithermal neutron facility using electron linear accelerators is presented, including a treatise on energy removal from the beam target. Information on the multiple fraction injection of BSH in rats is presented.

  12. Increase of the beam intensity for BNCT by changing the core configuration at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Peir, J J; Liu, Y H; Tsai, P E; Jiang, S H

    2009-07-01

    In this article, we will consider several core configurations and run the core calculation with MCNP to obtain the neutrons distribution at THOR. The thermal neutron flux inside the vertical tubes (VT-B-VT-E) and the fast neutron flux in the first row facing to the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility (I3-I5) were tallied for indication. Based on these simulation results, the fuel elements were rearranged during the annual repair period in 2007. The epithermal neutron flux at the center of BNCT beam exit in air was measured again, and the results showed that the beam intensity increased by 50%. Comparing the neutron intensities both in reactor core and at the BNCT beam exit for several core configurations, the results show that the BNCT beam intensity can be increased without decreasing the neutron intensity in core.

  13. Clinical requirements and accelerator concepts for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Bleuel, D.L.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Kwan, J.; Leung, K.N.; Reginato, L.L.; Wells, R.P.

    1997-05-01

    Accelerator-based neutron sources are an attractive alternative to nuclear reactors for providing epithermal neutron beams for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Based on clinical requirements and neutronics modeling the use of proton and deuteron induced reactions in {sup 7}Li and {sup 9}Be targets has been compared. Excellent epithermal neutron beams can be produced via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction at proton energies of {approximately}2.5 MeV. An electrostatic quadrupole accelerator and a lithium target, which can deliver and handle 2.5 MeV protons at beam currents up to 50 mA, are under development for an accelerator-based BNCT facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  14. FY2014 LBNL LDRD Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Darren

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE’s National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE’s missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation. The LDRD program supports Berkeley Lab’s mission in many ways. First, because LDRD funds can be allocated within a relatively short time frame, Berkeley Lab researchers can support the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and serve the needs of the nation by quickly responding to forefront scientific problems. Second, LDRD enables Berkeley Lab to attract and retain highly qualified scientists and to support their efforts to carry out worldleading research. In addition, the LDRD program also supports new projects that involve graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, thus contributing to the education mission of Berkeley Lab.

  15. A feasibility study of the Tehran research reactor as a neutron source for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Yaser; Khalafi, Hossein; Rahmani, Faezeh; Ezati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Hossnirokh, Ashkan; Shamami, Mehrdad Azizi; Monshizadeh, Mahdi

    2014-08-01

    Investigation on the use of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) as a neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been performed by calculating and measuring energy spectrum and the spatial distribution of neutrons in all external irradiation facilities, including six beam tubes, thermal column, and the medical room. Activation methods with multiple foils and a copper wire have been used for the mentioned measurements. The results show that (1) the small diameter and long length beam tubes cannot provide sufficient neutron flux for BNCT; (2) in order to use the medical room, the TRR core should be placed in the open pool position, in this situation the distance between the core and patient position is about 400 cm, so neutron flux cannot be sufficient for BNCT; and (3) the best facility which can be adapted for BNCT application is the thermal column, if all graphite blocks can be removed. The epithermal and fast neutron flux at the beginning of this empty column are 4.12×10(9) and 1.21×10(9) n/cm(2)/s, respectively, which can provide an appropriate neutron beam for BNCT by designing and constructing a proper Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) structure.

  16. Quality management in BNCT at a nuclear research reactor.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Moss, Raymond; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Rassow, Jürgen; Wittig, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Each medical intervention must be performed respecting Health Protection directives, with special attention to Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC). This is the basis of safe and reliable treatments. BNCT must apply QA programs as required for performance and safety in (conventional) radiotherapy facilities, including regular testing of performance characteristics (QC). Furthermore, the well-established Quality Management (QM) system of the nuclear reactor used has to be followed. Organization of these complex QM procedures is offered by the international standard ISO 9001:2008.

  17. Computational study of room scattering influence in the THOR BNCT treatment room.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Chen; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    BNCT dosimetry has often employed heavy Monte Carlo calculations for the beam characterization and the dose determination. However, these calculations commonly ignored the scattering influence between the radiations and the room structure materials in order to facilitate the calculation speed. The aim of this article attempts to explore how the room scattering affects the physical quantities such as the capture reaction rate and the gamma-ray dose rate under in-phantom and free-air conditions in the THOR BNCT treatment room. The geometry and structure materials of the treatment room were simulated in detail. The capture reaction rates per atom, as well as the gamma-ray dose rate were calculated in various sizes of phantoms and in the free-air condition. Results of this study showed that the room scattering has significant influence on the physical quantities, whether in small phantoms or in the free-air condition. This paper may be of importance in explaining the discrepancies between measurements and calculations in the BNCT dosimetry using small phantoms, in addition to provide a useful consideration with a better understanding of how the room scattering influence acts in a BNCT facility.

  18. Progress on the accelerator based SPES-BNCT project at INFN Legnaro

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, J.; Colautti, P.; Pisent, A.; Conte, V.; Moro, D.; De Nardo, L.; Agosteo, S.; Rosi, G.

    2007-02-12

    In the framework of an advanced Exotic Ion Beam facility, named SPES (Study and Production of Exotic Species), that will allow a frontier program both in nuclear and interdisciplinary physics, an intense thermal neutron beam facility, devoted to perform Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) experimental treatments on skin melanoma tumor, is currently under construction based on the SPES proton driver. A vast radiobiological investigation in vitro and in vivo has started with the new 10B carriers developed. Special microdosimetric detectors have been constructed to properly measure all the BNCT dose components and their qualities. Both microdosimetric and radiobiological measurements are being performed at the new HYTHOR beam shaping assembly at the Enea-Casaccia TAPIRO reactor.

  19. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  20. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; ...

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  1. "Sequential" boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): a novel approach to BNCT for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Miller, Marcelo; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Quintana, Jorge; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2011-04-01

    In the present study the therapeutic effect and potential toxicity of the novel "Sequential" boron neutron capture therapy (Seq-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer was evaluated in the hamster cheek pouch model at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with "Sequential" BNCT, i.e., BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (Seq-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (Seq-48h-BNCT) later. In an additional group of animals, BPA and GB-10 were administered concomitantly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT]. The single-application BNCT was to the same total physical tumor dose as the "Sequential" BNCT treatments. At 28 days post-treatment, Seq-24h-BNCT and Seq-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor responses of 95 ± 2% and 91 ± 3%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Overall response for the single treatment with (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75 ± 5%, significantly lower than for Seq-BNCT. Both Seq-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in the dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47 ± 12% and 60 ± 22% of the animals, respectively. No normal tissue toxicity was associated with tumor response for any of the protocols. "Sequential" BNCT enhanced tumor response without an increase in mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  2. DUSEL-related Science at LBNL -- Program and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Christian; Detweiler, Jason; Freedman, Stuart; Gilchriese, Murdock; Kadel, Richard; Koch, Volker; Kolomensky, Yury; Lesko, Kevin; von der Lippe, Henrik; Marks, Steve; Nomura, Yasunori; Plate, David; Roe, Natalie; Sichtermann, Ernst; Ligeti, Zoltan

    2009-08-01

    The National Science Foundation is advancing the design of a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at the former Homestake mine in South Dakota. UC Berkeley and LBNL are leading the design effort for the facility and coordinating the definition and integration of the suite of experiments to be coupled to the facility design in the creation of an MREFC (Major Research Equipment and Facility Construction) proposal. The State of South Dakota has marshaled $120M to prepare the site and begin a modest science program at the 4850 ft level. The first physics experiment is anticipated to begin installation in 2009. The current timetable calls for the MREFC Preliminary Design to be assembled by 2010 to be presented to the National Science Board in 2011. This, in turn, indicates that the earliest DUSEL construction start would be FY2013. The MREFC is estimated (before the inclusion of the long baseline neutrino components) at $500--600M, roughly divided evenly between the experimental program and support for the facility. Construction was estimated at 6--8 years. The DOE and NSF are establishing a Joint Oversight Group (JOG) to coordinate the experimental programs and participation in DUSEL. It is anticipated that the JOG would mirror the similar function for the NSF and DOE participation in the LHC, and that DOE-HEP, DOE-NP, and NSF will all participate in the JOG. In parallel with the NSF efforts, DOE-HEP plans to develop a long baseline neutrino program with neutrino beams created at FNAL and aimed at DUSEL. In the P5 report the focus of the program is to pursue CP violation in the lepton sector. The same detectors can also be used for nucleon decay experiments. DOE has indicated that FNAL would be the ''lead lab'' for the long baseline neutrino program and be charged with designing and implementing the neutrino beamline. BNL is to be charged with designing and implementing the detector. The P5 report also emphasizes the importance of dark matter and

  3. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    DOE Data Explorer

    Torn, Margaret

    2008-01-15

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  4. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  5. Application to BNCT to endocrine-mediated tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Binney, S.E.; Martsolf, S.W.; Albertson, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been experiencing a recent resurgence in interest as a cancer treatment modality. Most of the focus involves brain tumors, specifically grade III/IV gliomas and metastatic melanoma. However, BNCT can also be considered for other tumors. Recent experiments by Oregon Health Sciences University and Oregon State University (OSU) investigators have explored the efficacy of BNCT for treating tumors found in endocrine glands. These tumors offer a unique advantage for BNCT because the tumor cells can be targeted by boron-loaded hormones through specific cell membrane receptors.

  6. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  7. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of liver metastases: biodistribution studies of boron compounds in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Garabalino, Marcela A; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Molinari, Ana J; Heber, Elisa M; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Cardoso, Jorge E; Colombo, Lucas L; Nievas, Susana; Nigg, David W; Aromando, Romina F; Itoiz, Maria E; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2011-03-01

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of different boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) protocols in an experimental model of oral cancer. BNCT is based on the selective accumulation of (10)B carriers in a tumor followed by neutron irradiation. Within the context of exploring the potential therapeutic efficacy of BNCT for the treatment of liver metastases, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in an experimental model of liver metastases in rats. Different boron compounds and administration conditions were assayed to determine which administration protocols would potentially be therapeutically useful in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 nuclear reactor. A total of 70 BDIX rats were inoculated in the liver with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb to induce the development of subcapsular tumor nodules. Fourteen days post-inoculation, the animals were used for biodistribution studies. We evaluated a total of 11 administration protocols for the boron compounds boronophenylalanine (BPA) and GB-10 (Na(2)(10)B(10)H(10)), alone or combined at different dose levels and employing different administration routes. Tumor, normal tissue, and blood samples were processed for boron measurement by atomic emission spectroscopy. Six protocols proved potentially useful for BNCT studies in terms of absolute boron concentration in tumor and preferential uptake of boron by tumor tissue. Boron concentration values in tumor and normal tissues in the liver metastases model show it would be feasible to reach therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  8. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1994. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor studies, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, ICP-AES analysis of biological samples), physics (treatment planning software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of BSH and BPA is presented and results of 21 spontaneous tumor bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are discussed. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors is presented. Highlights from the First International Workshop on Accelerator-Based Neutron Sources for BNCT are included. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. “Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Silvia I. Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated the therapeutic effect and/or potential radiotoxicity of the novel “Tandem” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (T-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model at RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with “Tandem BNCT”, i.e. BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (T-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (T-48h-BNCT) later. A total tumor dose-matched single application of BNCT mediated by BPA and GB-10 administered jointly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT] was administered to an additional group of animals. At 28 days post-treatment, T-24h-BNCT and T-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor control (OTC) of 95% and 91%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Tumor response for the single application of (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75%, significantly lower than for T-BNCT. The T-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47% and 60% of the animals respectively. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was associated to tumor control for any of the protocols. “Tandem” BNCT enhances tumor control in oral cancer and reduces or, at worst, does not increase, mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  11. The LBNL Water Heater Retail Price Database

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Glover, Julie; Lutz, Jim

    2000-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed the LBNL Water Heater Price Database to compile and organize information used in the revision of U.S. energy efficiency standards for water heaters. The Database contains all major components that contribute to the consumer cost of water heaters, including basic retail prices, sales taxes, installation costs, and any associated fees. In addition, the Database provides manufacturing data on the features and design characteristics of more than 1100 different water heater models. Data contained in the Database was collected over a two-year period from 1997 to 1999.

  12. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1992. Contributions from all the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor targeting compounds, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of biological samples), physics (radiation dosimetry software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine is presented, results of 21 spontaneous-tumor-bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) are discussed, and predictions for an epithermal-neutron beam at the Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) are shown. Cellular-level boron detection and localization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, low atomization resonance ionization spectroscopy, and alpha track are presented. Boron detection by ICP-AES is discussed in detail. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors with BNCT is presented. Measurement of the epithermal-neutron flux at BNL and comparison to predictions are shown. Calculations comparing the GTRR and BMRR epithermal-neutron beams are also presented. Individual progress reports described herein are separately abstracted and indexed for the database.

  13. Carborane-containing metalloporphyrins for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Michiko; Joel, D.D.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Micca, P.L.

    1996-12-31

    For BNCT of malignant brain tumors, it is crucial that there be relatively high boron concentrations in tumor compared with normal tissues within the neutron-irradiated treatment volume. Fairchild and Bond estimated that major advances in BNCT should be possible if ratios of {sup 10}B concentrations in tumor to those in normal tissue (e.g. brain and blood) were at least 5: 1. Given that the only current boron carrier being tested clinically in the U.S., p-boronophenyl-alanine[BPA], yields tumor blood and tumor brain ratios of about 3:1, the criteria for new boronated compounds should be to at least match these ratios and maintain tumor boron concentrations greater than 30 {mu}g B/g. Although previously tested boronated porphyrins have not only matched but surpassed these ratios, it was at a cost of greater toxicity. Chemical and hematological assays of blood analytes; showed marked thrombocytopenia, a decrease to about one-tenth the normal concentration of platelets circulating in the blood, in addition to abnormalities in concentrations of circulating enzymes, that indicated liver toxicity. The physical appearance and behavior of the affected mice were different from those of mice injected with solvent only. Although thrombocytopenia and other toxic effects had disappeared after a few days, previously tested porphyrins would not be safe to infuse into patients for BNCT of potentially hemorrhagic malignant tumors in the brain such as glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma. We synthesized a different boronated porphyrin, tetracarboranylphenylporphyrin, [TCP] and inserted nickel, copper, or manganese into its coordination center. Biological studies of NiTCP in mice and of CuTCP in rats show that these compounds elicit little or no toxicity when given at potentially therapeutic doses.

  14. Secondary Contribution Effects on BNCT Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, E.; Goncalves, M.; Pereira, W.

    2004-10-03

    The aimed of this work consists of evaluating the influence of the dose secondary components (thermal neutrons dose, epithermal neutrons dose, fast neutrons dose and photon dose) in treatment planning with BNCT. MCNP4B Code was used to calculate RBE-Gy doses through the irradiation of the modified Snyder head phantom. A reduction of the therapeutical gain of monoenergetic neutron beans was observed in non invasive treatments, provoked for the predominance of the fast neutron dose component in the skin, showing that the secondary components of dose can to contribute more for to raise the healthy-tissue dose of that in the tumor, reducing the treatment efficiency.

  15. Spatial characterization of BNCT beams.

    PubMed

    Marek, M; Viererbl, L

    2004-11-01

    The space distribution of the epithermal neutron flux was determined for the epithermal neutron beams of several NCT facilities in USA (FCB at MIT), Europe (HFR at JRC, Petten; FiR at VTT, Espoo; LVR-15 at NRI, Rez) and Japan (JRR-4 at JAERI, Tokai). Using p-n diodes with (6)Li radiator and the set of Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) the beams were quantified in-air. Axial beam profiles along the beam axes and the radial distributions at two distances from the beam aperture were measured. Except for the well-collimated HFR beam, the spatial characteristics of the other studied beams were found generally similar, which results from their similar designs.

  16. American brain tumor patients treated with BNCT in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Laramore, G.E.; Griffin, B.R.; Spence, A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish and maintain a database for patients from the United States who have received BNCT in Japan for malignant gliomas of the brain. This database will serve as a resource for the DOE to aid in decisions relating to BNCT research in the United States, as well as assisting the design and implementation of clinical trials of BNCT for brain cancer patients in this country. The database will also serve as an information resource for patients with brain tumors and their families who are considering this form of therapy.

  17. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Mitchell, H.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1995-11-01

    Therapeutically-useful epithermal-neutron beams for BNCT are currently generated by nuclear reactors. Various accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed and some low intensity prototypes of such sources, generally featuring the use of proton beams and beryllium or lithium targets have been constructed. This paper describes an alternate approach to the realization of a clinically useful accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons for BNCT that reconciles the often conflicting objectives of target cooling, neutron beam intensity, and neutron beam spectral purity via a two stage photoneutron production process.

  18. Critical review, with an optimistic outlook, on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Moss, Raymond L

    2014-06-01

    The first BNCT trials took place in the USA in the early 1960's, yet BNCT is still far from mainstream medicine. Nonetheless, in recent years, reported results in the treatment of head and neck cancer and recurrent glioma, coupled with the progress in developing linear accelerators specifically for BNCT applications, have given some optimism to the future of BNCT. This article provides a brief reminder on the ups and downs of the history of BNCT and supports the view that controlled and prospective clinical trials with a modern design will make BNCT an evidence-based treatment modality within the coming decade.

  19. INEL BNCT Program: Bulletin, Volume 5, No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1991-07-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for June, 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and animal data charts. Specific highlights include: final-dosage-form BSH samples were analyzed for purity, with the sample from Centronic Ltd the most free from contamination and oxidation products; MRI spectroscopy will be upgraded to provide a potential for boron resolution of 0.75 cm/pixel; neutron and gamma measurements were made for the HFR epithermal neutron beam; the current status of six spontaneous brain-tumor dogs; production of MoAbs against the pituitary CRF receptor; growth of BL6 in low Phe/Tyr medium; an altered synthetic pathway for carboranyl alanine; and encapsulation of {ital i}-B{sub 20}H{sub 18}{sup 2-} into liposomes for baseline murine studies. 2 figs., 4 tabs. (MHB)

  20. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CENTRAL SUPPORT COLUMN EXTENDING THROUGH CRANES AND ROOF SUPPORT TRUSS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. 14. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 22, 1963. BEV-3467. ACCELERATION DIAGRAM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. 15. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). George Kagawa, Photographer. November 22, 1963. BEV-3468. INJECTION SYSTEM DIAGRAM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR MOTORS OPPOSITE SWITCHGEAR RACKS, MECHANIC SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CABLE RACEWAYS, CATWALK, AND WINDOWS OF OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ROOF BLOCKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. 8. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. July 2, 1953. BEV-574. QUADRANT POLE TIP INSTALLATION. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. REMNANTS OF HYDRAULIC FIXTURES, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. 30. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 6, 1955. BEV-943. ANTI-PROTON EXPERIMENT. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. 9. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). July, 1960. 4BOOQ002. QUADRANT MAP - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. PUMP MOUNTS, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STUB OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF 51A TO SECOND FLOOR EXTERIOR EXIT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. 3. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 22, 1963. BEV-3470 INTERNAL BEAM EXPERIMENT DIAGRAM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. 2. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 22, 1963. BEV-3469 EXTERNAL BEAM EXPERIMENT DIAGRAM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR ROOM, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. 27. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. August 18, 1958. Bubble Chamber 605. BUBBLE CHAMBER ASSEMBLY - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. 24. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). George Kagawa, Photographer. B-51. November 6, 1961. BEV-2497 ION GUN II, EMERY ZAJEC - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. January 12, 1950. BEV-195. ION GUN INJECTOR. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. 23. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. March 26, 1953. BEV-551. OVERALL VIEW OF ION GUN. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. 37. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). May, 1986. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA TOPOGRAPHIC MAP - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. 48. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. February 10, 1960. BEV-2003. COAXIAL, MAIN CONTROL ROOM CONSOLE MODIFICATIONS. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. 39. Photocopy of engineering drawing (LBNL Archives and Records Collection). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Photocopy of engineering drawing (LBNL Archives and Records Collection). December 10, 1948. 2 BEVATRON EXTERIOR PRELIMINARY PERSPECTIVE - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. 41. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. August 29, 1949. BEV-101. BEVATRON AREA LOOKING SOUTHEAST. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. 40. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. March, 1949. BEV 4903-00020. GRADING-SITE WORK FOR BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. 12. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. February 5, 1954. BEV-681. GENERATOR ROOM FOR BEVATRON MAGNET. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. 10. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 11, 1950. BEV-336. MAGNET CORE SHOWING FOUNDATION AND SUPPORTS. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. WALL AND WINDOW OVERLOOKING MAGNET ROOM, SECOND STORY OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. 6. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 31, 1950. BEV-331. MAGNET ROOM. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. MAGNET OF BEAMLINE, EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. 7. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. November 29, 1950. BEV-360. GENERAL VIEW, MAGNET ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. END OF BEAMLINE LEAVING SHIELDING, MAGNET COILS IN EPOXY, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON IN CENTER OF MAGNET ROOM - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 4, 1957. BEV-128. PROGRESS--MAGNET REPAIR. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. 5. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. August 25, 1950. BEV-307. BEVATRON MAGNET FOUNDATION. B-51 - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ENTRANCE TO STAIRWAY TO TUNNEL UNDER MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SIDE OF MAGNET OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. FLOOR AND CEILING OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. 38. Photocopy of engineering drawing (LBNL Archives and Records Collection). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photocopy of engineering drawing (LBNL Archives and Records Collection). December 10, 1948. 1 BEVATRON EXTERIOR PRELIMINARY PERSPECTIVE-BIRD'S-EYE VIEW - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. 44. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. May 4, 1949. PERSPECTIVE DRAWING, BIRD'S-EYE VIEW - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR TO SECOND FLOOR OF MECHANICAL WINE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-087). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-012). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER QUADRANT AND DIFFUSION PUMPS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection XBD200503-00117-089). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, CONCRETE FOUNDATION FOR EQUIPMENT MOUNTS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-054). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-006). March 2005. JACKBOLTS BETWEEN MAGNET AND MAGNET FOUNDATION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-158). March 2005. CONNECTION OF MAGNET ROOM CRANE TO OUTER TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-050). March 2005. DIFFUSION PUMPS UNDER WEST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-106). March 2005. SOUTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-052). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-110). March 2005. SOUTH FAN FROM MEZZANINE, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-066). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-026). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, LOOKING TOWARD EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-004). March 2005. ENTRY TO IGLOO, ILLUSTRATING THICKNESS OF IGLOO WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-027). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-005). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, AIR DUCT OPENINGS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-107). March 2005. NORTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-015). March 2005. INTERIOR WALL OF MAGNET INSIDE CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-108). March 2005. FAN ROOM WITH STAIR TO FILTER BANKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-047). March 2005. AREA OF MAGNET REMOVAL, NORTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-082). June 2005. CEILING AND CRANE OF BUILDING 51A, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-043). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, PLUNGING MECHANISM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-077). March 2005. STUB OF SUPERHILAC BEAM, ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-143). March 2005. BUILDING 51A, EXTERIOR WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. 16. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. December 29, 1953. BEV-654. INJECTOR, INJECTOR TANK-WIDE ANGLE; MARIO CAROTTA. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. 17. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 20, 1958. BEV-1654. OVERALL VIEW WITH PROTON INJECTOR. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, D.; Bussat, J.-M.; Denes, P.; Greiner, L.; Kim, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Wieman, H.; Battaglia, M.; Hooberman, B.; Tompkins, L.

    2007-12-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS pixel sensors are also reported, and future plans and activities are discussed.

  10. Comparisons of TORT and MCNP dose calculations for BNCT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersol, D.T.; Slater, C.O.; Williams, L.R.; Redmond, E.L., II; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The relative merit of using a deterministic code to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications were examined. The TORT discrete deterministic ordinated code was used in comparison to MCNP4A to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications

  11. An irradiation facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application based on a radio frequency driven D-T neutron source and a new beam shaping assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Nicola; Esposito, Juan; Leung, Ka Ngo; Custodero, Salvatore

    2002-10-01

    A line of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research program aimed at the treatment of brain tumors, carried on at the Nuclear Departments of Pisa and Genova Universities (DIMNP and DITEC), is being focused on a new, 3H(d,n)4He (D-T), accelerator-based neutron source concept, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Simple and compact accelerator designs, using mixed D+ T+ ion beam with relatively low energy, ˜100 keV, have been developed which, in turn, can generate high neutron yields. New approaches have thus been started to design an epithermal neutron irradiation facility able to selectively slow the 14.1 MeV D-T neutrons down to the epithermal (1 eV-10 KeV) energy range. New neutron spectrum shifter and filtering materials, as well as different facility layout approaches have been tested. Possible beam shaping assembly models have also been designed. The research demonstrates that a D-T neutron source could be successfully implemented to provide a ˜1×109 n/cm2 s epithermal neutron flux, in spite of its hard spectrum, although a generator device, able to yield ˜1014 n/s is, at present, not yet available. The latest Monte Carlo simulation of an accelerator-based facility, which relies on a single or multiple rf driven DT fusion neutron generator, is presented.

  12. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  13. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  14. INEEL BNCT Research Program Annual Report, CY-2000

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2001-03-01

    This report is a summary of the activities conducted in conjunction with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 2000. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, neutron source design and demonstration, and support the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National BNCT Program goals are the goals of this Program. Contributions from the individual contributors about their projects are included, specifically described are the following, chemistry: analysis of biological samples and an infrared blood-boron analyzer, and physics: progress in the patient treatment planning software, measurement of neutron spectra for the Argentina RA-6 reactor, and recalculation of the Finnish research reactor FiR 1 neutron spectra, BNCT accelerator technology, and modification to the research reactor at Washington State University for an epithermal-neutron beam.

  15. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  16. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design of a 6-MV X-ray treatment room was inadequate to protect personnel from an accelerator neutron source operating at 30 mA, we decided to analyze and determine the shielding requirements of a treatment room for an ANIF. We determined the amount of shielding that would be sufficient to protect facility personnel from excessive radiation exposure caused by operation of the accelerator at 30 mA.

  17. Feasibility of the utilization of BNCT in the fast neutron therapy beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Katja; Lennox, Arlene J.; Kroc, Thomas K.; DeLuca, Jr., Paul M.

    2000-06-23

    The Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab has treated cancer patients since 1976. Since then more than 2,300 patients have been treated and a wealth of clinical information accumulated. The therapeutic neutron beam at Fermilab is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 66 MeV protons. The resulting continuous neutron spectrum ranges from thermal to 66 MeV in neutron energy. It is clear that this spectrum is not well suited for the treatment of tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) only However, since this spectrum contains thermal and epithermal components the authors are investigating whether BNCT can be used in this beam to boost the tumor dose. There are clinical scenarios in which a selective tumor dose boost of 10 - 15% could be clinically significant. For these cases the principal treatment would still be fast neutron therapy but a tumor boost could be used either to deliver a higher dose to the tumor tissue or to reduce the dose to the normal healthy tissue while maintaining the absorbed dose level in the tumor tissue.

  18. Feasibility of the Utilization of BNCT in the Fast Neutron Therapy Beam at Fermilab

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Langen, Katja; Lennox, Arlene J.; Kroc, Thomas K.; DeLuca, Jr., Paul M.

    2000-06-01

    The Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab has treated cancer patients since 1976. Since then more than 2,300 patients have been treated and a wealth of clinical information accumulated. The therapeutic neutron beam at Fermilab is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 66 MeV protons. The resulting continuous neutron spectrum ranges from thermal to 66 MeV in neutron energy. It is clear that this spectrum is not well suited for the treatment of tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) only However, since this spectrum contains thermal and epithermal components the authors are investigating whether BNCT can be used in this beam to boost the tumor dose. There are clinical scenarios in which a selective tumor dose boost of 10 - 15% could be clinically significant. For these cases the principal treatment would still be fast neutron therapy but a tumor boost could be used either to deliver a higher dose to the tumor tissue or to reduce the dose to the normal healthy tissue while maintaining the absorbed dose level in the tumor tissue.

  19. Boron Neutron Capture Therapty (BNCT) in an Oral Precancer Model: Therapeutic Benefits and Potential Toxicity of a Double Application of BNCT with a Six-Week Interval

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Monti Hughes; Emiliano C.C. Pozzi; Elisa M. Heber; Silvia Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; Ana J. Molinari; Marcela A. Garabalino; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-11-01

    Given the clinical relevance of locoregional recurrences in head and neck cancer, we developed a novel experimental model of premalignant tissue in the hamster cheek pouch for long-term studies and demonstrated the partial inhibitory effect of a single application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on tumor development from premalignant tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a double application of BNCT with a 6 week interval in terms of inhibitory effect on tumor development, toxicity and DNA synthesis. We performed a double application, 6 weeks apart, of (1) BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT); (2) BNCT mediated by the combined application of decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) and BPA [(GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT] or (3) beam-only, at RA-3 nuclear reactor and followed the animals for 8 months. The control group was cancerized and sham-irradiated. BPA-BNCT, (GB- 10 + BPA)-BNCT and beam-only induced a reduction in tumor development from premalignant tissue that persisted until 8, 3, and 2 months respectively. An early maximum inhibition of 100% was observed for all 3 protocols. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was detected. Reversible mucositis was observed in premalignant tissue, peaking at 1 week and resolving by the third week after each irradiation. Mucositis after the second application was not exacerbated by the first application. DNA synthesis was significantly reduced in premalignant tissue 8 months post-BNCT. A double application of BPA-BNCT and (GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT, 6 weeks apart, could be used therapeutically at no additional cost in terms of radiotoxicity in normal and dose-limiting tissues.

  20. 25. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). February 18, 1969. 4B51BK001. EXTERNAL PROTRON BEAM HALL. B51B FIRST FLOOR PLAN. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. 4. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. August, 1955. XBB 689-5508. BEVATRON MODEL (L. TO R.) WITH L. SMITH, McMILLAN, E.O. LAWRENCE, LOFGREN, BROBECK, AND SEWELL - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. 31. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 6, 1955. BEV-933. ANTI-PROTON SET-UP, INTERIOR VIEW. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. 28. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 1, 1959. Bubble Chamber 722. BUBBLE CHAMBER, WIDE-ANGLE INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 59 - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. 33. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 10, 1958. BEV-1515. ANTI-PROTON SET-UP; BRUCE CORK, GLENN LAMBERTSON. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. 20. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). George Kagawa, Photographer. November 15, 1962. BEV-3121. OVERALL VIEW OF LINAC II; GLEN WHITE, FOSS CROSBY, BOB RICHTER. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. 21. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Don Bradley, Photographer. January 31, 1963. BEV-3286 ALTERATIONS PROGRESS; OLLIE OLSON, PAT CALLAHAN. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. 32. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 6, 1955. BEV-937. ANTI-PROTON SET-UP, EXTERIOR VIEW. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. 29. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. July, 1959. Morgue 1959-46 (P-1). ALVAREZ BUBBLE CHAMBER GROUP (L. TO R.) HERNANDEZ, McMILLAN, ALVAREZ, GOW - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. 22. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). September 29, 1964. 4B51K007 SECOND FLOOR PLAN. B51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. 26. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). October 24, 1956. 3/8'=1' 4B51S011. BEVATRON SHIELDING FOUNDATION - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. 1. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). January 1961. Dwg No. 6B 00D 005 CONTRACT 48 LEASE AND OCCUPANCY MAP - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. 50. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). June 6, 1949. 1/18'=1'. 5N51A002. BEVATRON SUB FLOOR PLAN - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. 46. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). July 15, 1955. B51A0084. BEVATRON CONTROL ROOM - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. 49. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). June 6, 1949. B51A0354. BEVATRON PLOT PLAN (MASTEN AND HURD) - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. 47. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). July 15, 1955. B51A0084. BEVATRON CONTROL ROOM CEILING TREATMENT AND RELOCATION OF LIGHTS - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. 60. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Photocopy of engineering drawing (original drawing located in LBNL Building 90F Architecture and Engineering As-Built Collection). September 20, 1964. 4B51K001A. MAIN FLOOR PLAN B-51-51A - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. 59. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 25, 1957. BEV-1311. VACUUM SNOUT IN NORTH TARGET AREA; BOB RICHTER. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. 34. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. October 6, 1955. BEV-938. ANTI-PROTON SET-UP WITH WORK GROUP; E. SEGRE, C. WIEGAND, E. LOFGREN, O. CHAMBERLAIN, T. YPSILANTIS. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. 35. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. April 27, 1960. BEV-2050. CLYDE WIEGAND; ANTI-PROTON SET-UP. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY BETWEEN MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM AND SECOND FLOOR OF OFFICE-AND-SHOP SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. 11. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. December 17, 1952. BEV-517. MOVING CURVE TANK INTO MAGNET FOR STORAGE. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM TO TOP OF OUTER LAYER OF CONCRETE SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, BUILDING 51 ROOF TRUSS, AND CENTRAL RING TRACK FOR MAGNET ROOM CRANE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. 36. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). Photographer unknown. September 21, 1956. BEV-1154. DISCOVERERS OF ANTI-NEUTRON--(L. to R.) W. WENZEL, B. CORK, G. LAMBERTSON, AND O. PICCIONI, WITH FOCUS MAGNET. B-51. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-009). March 2005. OPENINGS OF AIR DUCTS INTO PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-046). March 2005. ROOF SHIELDING BLOCK AND I-BEAM SUPPORT CONSTRUCTION, CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-031). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, WITH COVER OPEN, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-08). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, SOUTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-176). March 2005. CENTRAL COLUMN SUPPORT TO ROOF SHOWING CRANES CENTER SUPPORT TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-139). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, INCLUDING WOOD STAIRWAY FROM OUTER EDGE OF SHIELDING TO TOP OF ROOF BLOCK SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-049). March 2005. TUNNEL ENTRY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM INTO CENTER OF BEVATRON, BENEATH SOUTHWEST QUADRANT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-034). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT WITH COVER CLOSED, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-11). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, NORTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-129). March 2005. ENTRY TO ROOM 24, MAIN FLOOR, OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00218-12). June 2005. DEEP TUNNEL INTO FOUNDATION UNDER BEVATRON, VIEW OF CART ON RAILS FOR TRANSPORTING EQUIPMENT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-035). March 2005. WEST TANGENT VIEWED FROM INTERIOR OF BEVATRON. EQUIPMENT ACCESS STAIRWAY ON LEFT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. 19. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (original print located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). George Kagawa/Don Bradley, Photographers. December 4, 1961. BEV-2548. LINAC II DRIFT TUBES. B-64. - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy program for cancer treatment, Volume 4, No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses the monthly progress of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNLT) program for cancer treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during July 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support and PBF operations.

  19. Use of the CT images for BNCT calculation: development of BNCT treatment planning system and its applications to dose calculation for voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Ho; Han, Chi Young; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2004-01-01

    A BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) treatment planning system (BTPS) was developed for BNCT study and treatment planning. Three kinds of CT images, VHP, PINNACLE and DICOM images, were employed to make voxel phantoms for BNCT patient treatment using the BTPS. The thermal neutron, fast neutron, gamma and boron doses are calculated and background, tissue, and tumour doses for idealised standard reactor neutron field (ISRNF) neutron beam were calculated by using BTPS and MCNP code. It was noted that the total computing times needed for BNCT analysis could be greatly reduced since the BTPS system provides a dose analysis tool and a lengthy MCNP input in a short time. It is, thus, expected that the BTPS can significantly contribute the BNCT study for the treatment of patients.

  20. BNCT of skin tumors using the high-energy D-T neutrons.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, S Farhad; Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Ghasemi, Marjan

    2017-04-01

    Owing to the continuing need for providing improved and universally accepted facilities to be used in radiation therapies, a number of recently published BNCT-related studies have focused on investigating appropriate neutron sources as alternatives for nuclear reactors. Of special interest are D-T neutron generators, which theoretically have shown the potential to be utilized as neutron sources for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. This work is devoted to investigate the feasibility of using the high-energy neutrons emitted from these generators for treatment of surface tumors, especially skin. Using a set of MCNPX simulations, the D-T neutrons are passed through an optimized arrangement of materials to slow-down toward the desired energy range, and to remove the neutron and gamma contamination considering the IAEA recommended criteria, especially determined for pre-clinical survey for treatment of surface tumors. By assessment with these parameters, it is shown that the designed beam, corresponding to a configuration composed of natural uranium as neutron multiplier, D2O as moderator, Pb as reflector, Bi as gamma filter, and polyethylene and BeO as collimators provides high-intensity of desired neutrons, and low-background doses as well. It was found that an appropriate material for collimator, if accompanied with an optimized geometry, is an important parameter for keeping the undesired components to the recommended level. A typical simulated phantom, subjected to the irradiation of the designed spectrum, is used to study the performance of the resultant beam in shallow tissue. For an arbitrary chosen (10)B concentration, the evaluated depth-dose curves show that the proposed configuration establishes acceptable agreement between the appropriate neutron intensity and penetration to desired depth in tissue in a reasonable treatment time of about 25-38min. Considering the simulations carried out, the total dose delivered to the tumor is expected to be of about 4.2 times

  1. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  2. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Cook, Jeremy L.

    1999-01-01

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  3. Measurement and simulation of the TRR BNCT beam parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza; Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser; Golshanian, Mohadeseh; Ghods, Hossein; Ezzati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Haddadi, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the configuration of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) thermal column has been modified and a proper thermal neutron beam for preclinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been obtained. In this study, simulations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the BNCT beam parameters including the beam uniformity, the distribution of the thermal neutron dose, boron dose, gamma dose in a phantom and also the Therapeutic Gain (TG). To do this, the entire TRR structure including the reactor core, pool, the thermal column and beam tubes have been modeled using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. To measure in-phantom dose distribution a special head phantom has been constructed and foil activation techniques and TLD700 dosimeter have been used. The results show that there is enough uniformity in TRR thermal BNCT beam. TG parameter has the maximum value of 5.7 at the depth of 1 cm from the surface of the phantom, confirming that TRR thermal neutron beam has potential for being used in treatment of superficial brain tumors. For the purpose of a clinical trial, more modifications need to be done at the reactor, as, for example design, and construction of a treatment room at the beam exit which is our plan for future. To date, this beam is usable for biological studies and animal trials. There is a relatively good agreement between simulation and measurement especially within a diameter of 10 cm which is the dimension of usual BNCT beam ports. This relatively good agreement enables a more precise prediction of the irradiation conditions needed for future experiments.

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis: therapeutic efficacy in an experimental model

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. The present study evaluates tumor control and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in an experimental model of liver metastasis. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA–BNCT, boronophenylalanine (BPA) ? neutron irradiation; Beam only, neutron irradiation; Sham, matched manipulation. The total absorbed dose administered with BPA–BNCT was 13 ± 3 Gy in tumor and 9 ± 2 Gy in healthy liver. Three weeks posttreatment, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 0.46 ± 0.20 for BPA–BNCT, 2.7 ± 1.8 for Beam only and 4.5 ± 3.1 for Sham. The pre-treatment tumor nodule mass of 48 ± 19 mgfell significantly to 19 ± 16 mg for BPA–BNCT, but rose significantly to 140 ± 106 mg for Beam only and to 346 ± 302 mg for Sham. For both end points, the differences between the BPA–BNCT group and each of the other groups were statistically significant (ANOVA). No clinical, macroscopic or histological normal liver radiotoxicity was observed. It is concluded that BPA– BNCT induced a significant remission of experimental colorectal tumor nodules in liver with no contributory liver toxicity.

  5. Improvement of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by the previous administration of the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate for the treatment of thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Perona, M; Rodríguez, C; Carpano, M; Thomasz, L; Nievas, S; Olivera, M; Thorp, S; Curotto, P; Pozzi, E; Kahl, S; Pisarev, M; Juvenal, G; Dagrosa, A

    2013-08-01

    We have shown that boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could be an alternative for the treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) like sodium butyrate (NaB) cause hyperacetylation of histone proteins and show capacity to increase the gamma irradiation effect. The purpose of these studies was to investigate the use of the NaB as a radiosensitizer of the BNCT for PDTC. Follicular thyroid carcinoma cells (WRO) and rat thyroid epithelial cells (FRTL-5) were incubated with 1 mM NaB and then treated with boronophenylalanine ¹⁰BPA (10 μg ¹⁰B ml⁻¹) + neutrons, or with 2, 4-bis (α,β-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ¹⁰BOPP (10 μg ¹⁰B ml⁻¹) + neutrons, or with a neutron beam alone. The cells were irradiated in the thermal column facility of the RA-3 reactor (flux = (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10¹⁰ n cm⁻² s⁻¹). Cell survival decreased as a function of the physical absorbed dose in both cell lines. Moreover, the addition of NaB decreased cell survival (p < 0.05) in WRO cells incubated with both boron compounds. NaB increased the percentage of necrotic and apoptotic cells in both BNCT groups (p < 0.05). An accumulation of cells in G2/M phase at 24 h was observed for all the irradiated groups and the addition of NaB increased this percentage. Biodistribution studies of BPA (350 mg kg⁻¹ body weight) 24 h after NaB injection were performed. The in vivo studies showed that NaB treatment increases the amount of boron in the tumor at 2-h post-BPA injection (p < 0.01). We conclude that NaB could be used as a radiosensitizer for the treatment of thyroid carcinoma by BNCT.

  6. Prospects of A and Z identification experiments at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Jacklyn M.

    2016-12-01

    The identification of six new elements within the last 15 years and with proton numbers, Z = 113-118 has transformed the heavy element field. However, one key piece of information on these nuclei remains unmeasured: their proton and mass numbers, A. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the heavy element group has undertaken a program to study these new elements to perform experiments aimed at measuring the Z and A.Here, an overview of recent experiments aimed towards identifying the Z of SHE, and the prospects for Z and A identification experiments at LBNL are presented.

  7. Investigations of recombination chambers for BNCT beam dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tulik, P; Golnik, N; Zielczynski, M

    2007-01-01

    A set of cylindrical recombination chambers, including a tissue-equivalent chamber and three graphite chambers filled with different gases-CO(2), N(2) and (10)BF(3), was designed for the dosimetry of therapeutic neutron radiation beams used for BNCT. The separation of the dose components is based on differences of the shape of the saturation curve depending on the LET spectrum of the investigated radiation. The measurements using all the chambers were performed in a reactor beam of NRI ReZ (Czech Republic) and in the reference radiation fields of a (252)Cf radiation source free in air or in filters.

  8. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  9. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT.

  10. Benchmark experiments for cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Yonai, S; Itoga, T; Baba, M; Nakamura, T; Yokobori, H; Tahara, Y

    2004-11-01

    In the previous study, we found the feasibility of a cyclotron-based BNCT using the Ta(p,n) neutrons at 90 degrees bombarded by 50 MeV protons, and the iron, AlF(3), Al and (6)LiF moderators by simulations using the MCNPX code. In order to validate the simulations to realize the cyclotron-based BNCT, we measured the epithermal neutron energy spectrum passing through the moderators with our new spectrometer consisting of a (3)He gas counter covered with a silicon rubber loaded with (nat)B and polyethylene moderator and the depth distribution of the reaction rates of (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au in an acrylic phantom set behind the rear surface of the moderators. The measured results were compared with the calculations using the MCNPX code. We obtained the good agreement between the calculations and measurements within approximately 10% for the neutron energy spectra and within approximately 20% for the depth distribution of the reaction rates of (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au in the phantom. The comparison clarified a good accuracy of the calculation of the neutron energy spectrum passing through the moderator and the thermalization in a phantom. These experimental results will be a good benchmark data to evaluate the accuracy of the calculation code.

  11. Boron dose determination for BNCT using Fricke and EPR dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ciesielski, B.

    1995-02-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) the dominant dose delivered to the tumor is due to {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles resulting from a neutron capture by {sup 10}B and is referred to herein as the boron dose. Boron dose is directly attributable to the following two independent factors, one boron concentration and the neutron capture energy dependent cross section of boron, and two the energy spectrum of the neutrons that interact with boron. The neutron energy distribution at a given point is dictated by the incident neutron energy distribution, the depth in tissue, geometrical factors such as beam size and patient`s dimensions. To account for these factors can be accommodated by using Monte Carlo theoretical simulations. However, in conventional experimental BNCT dosimetry, e.g., using TLDs or ionization chambers, it is only possible to estimate the boron dose. To overcome some of the limitations in the conventional dosimetry, modifications in ferrous sulfate dosimetry (Fricke) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry in alanine, enable to measure specifically boron dose in a mixed gamma neutron radiation fields. The boron dose, in either of the dosimeters, is obtained as a difference between measurements with boronated and unboronated dosimeters. Since boron participates directly in the measurements, the boron dosimetry reflects the true contribution, integral of the neutron energy spectrum with boron cross section, of the boron dose to the total dose. Both methods are well established and used extensively in dosimetry, they are presented briefly here.

  12. Boron delivery with liposomes for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): biodistribution studies in an experimental model of oral cancer demonstrating therapeutic potential

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-05-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combines selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumor tissue with subsequent neutron irradiation. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Optimization of BNCT depends largely on improving boron targeting to tumor cells. Seeking to maximize the potential of BNCT for the treatment for head and neck cancer, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in the oral cancer model employing two different liposome formulations that were previously tested for a different pathology, i.e., in experimental mammary carcinoma in BALB/c mice: (1) MAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a hypertonic buffer, administered intravenously at 6 mg B per kg body weight, and (2) MAC-TAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a concentrated aqueous solution of the hydrophilic species Na3 [ae-B20H17NH3], administered intravenously at 18 mg B per kg body weight. Samples of tumor, precancerous and normal pouch tissue, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood were taken at different times post-administration and processed to measure boron content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No ostensible clinical toxic effects were observed with the selected formulations. Both MAC and MAC-TAC delivered boron selectively to tumor tissue. Absolute tumor values for MAC-TAC peaked to 66.6 {+-} 16.1 ppm at 48 h and to 43.9 {+-} 17.6 ppm at 54 h with very favorable ratios of tumor boron relative to precancerous and normal tissue, making these protocols particularly worthy of radiobiological assessment. Boron concentration values obtained would result in therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in precancerous/normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  13. SU-E-J-100: Reconstruction of Prompt Gamma Ray Three Dimensional SPECT Image From Boron Neutron Capture Therapy(BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, D; Jung, J; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: In case of simulation, the pixelated SPECT detector, collimator and phantom were simulated using Monte Carlo n particle extended (MCNPX) simulation tool. A thermal neutron source (<1 eV) was used to react with the boron uptake region (BUR) in the phantom. Each geometry had a spherical pattern, and three different BURs (A, B and C region, density: 2.08 g/cm3) were located in the middle of the brain phantom. The data from 128 projections for each sorting process were used to achieve image reconstruction. The ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain a tomographic image with eight subsets and five iterations. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the geometric accuracy of reconstructed image. Results: The OSEM image was compared with the original phantom pattern image. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated as the gross area under each ROC curve. The three calculated AUC values were 0.738 (A region), 0.623 (B region), and 0.817 (C region). The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm and 1.4 cm. Conclusion: The possibility of extracting a 3D BNCT SPECT image was confirmed using the Monte Carlo simulation and OSEM algorithm. The prospects for obtaining an actual BNCT SPECT image were estimated from the quality of the simulated image and the simulation conditions. When multiple tumor region should be treated using the BNCT, a reasonable model to determine how many useful images can be obtained from the SPECT could be provided to the BNCT facilities. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research

  14. Boron delivery with liposomes for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): biodistribution studies in an experimental model of oral cancer demonstrating therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Heber, Elisa M; Kueffer, Peter J; Lee, Mark W; Hawthorne, M Frederick; Garabalino, Marcela A; Molinari, Ana J; Nigg, David W; Bauer, William; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2012-05-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combines selective accumulation of (10)B carriers in tumor tissue with subsequent neutron irradiation. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Optimization of BNCT depends largely on improving boron targeting to tumor cells. Seeking to maximize the potential of BNCT for the treatment for head and neck cancer, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in the oral cancer model employing two different liposome formulations that were previously tested for a different pathology, i.e., in experimental mammary carcinoma in BALB/c mice: (1) MAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH(3)(CH(2))(15)-7,8-C(2)B(9)H(11)] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a hypertonic buffer, administered intravenously at 6 mg B per kg body weight, and (2) MAC-TAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH(3)(CH(2))(15)-7,8-C(2)B(9)H(11)] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a concentrated aqueous solution of the hydrophilic species Na(3) [ae-B(20)H(17)NH(3)], administered intravenously at 18 mg B per kg body weight. Samples of tumor, precancerous and normal pouch tissue, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood were taken at different times post-administration and processed to measure boron content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No ostensible clinical toxic effects were observed with the selected formulations. Both MAC and MAC-TAC delivered boron selectively to tumor tissue. Absolute tumor values for MAC-TAC peaked to 66.6 ± 16.1 ppm at 48 h and to 43.9 ± 17.6 ppm at 54 h with very favorable ratios of tumor boron relative to precancerous and normal tissue, making these protocols particularly worthy of radiobiological assessment. Boron concentration values obtained would result in therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in precancerous/normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  15. The LBNL High School Student Research Participation Program (HSSRPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, M. A.

    2007-04-01

    The HSSRPP, which has been in operation at LBNL since 2001, places 25-35 students each year in summer research internships at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a multi-purpose Department of Energy laboratory. The paid six-week internships, which are restricted to students who have completed their junior or senior year of high school, are highly sought over, with nearly 300 applications in 2006. With funding from Bechtel, the success of the program has been assessed through surveys and tracking of the student participants. In addition, as part of the application process, the students are asked the essay question, ``If you were in charge of the Science Department at your High School, what changes would you make to motivate more students to pursue careers in science and why?'' The responses of all applicants for 2004-2006 have been analyzed by gender and school district. The results will be discussed.

  16. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  17. INEEL BNCT research program. Annual report, January 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1996. Contributions from the individual investigators about their projects are included, specifically, physics: treatment planning software, real-time neutron beam measurement dosimetry, measurement of the Finnish research reactor epithermal neutron spectrum, BNCT accelerator technology; and chemistry: analysis of biological samples and preparation of {sup 10}B enriched decaborane.

  18. Microdosimetry study of THOR BNCT beam using tissue equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F Y; Hsiao, H W; Tung, C-J; Liu, H M; Chou, F I

    2009-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer treatment modality using a nuclear reactor and a boron compound drug. In Taiwan, Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) has been modulated for the basic research of BNCT for years. A new BNCT beam port was built in 2004 and used to prepare the first clinical trial in the near future. This work reports the microdosimetry study of the THOR BNCT beam by means of the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Two self-fabricated TEPCs (the boron-doped versus the boron-free counter wall) were introduced. These dual TEPCs were applied to measure the lineal energy distributions in air and water phantom irradiated by the THOR BNCT mixed radiation field. Dose contributions from component radiations of different linear energy transfers (LETs) were analyzed. Applying a lineal energy dependent biological weighting function, r(y), to the total and individual lineal energy distributions, the effective relative biological effectiveness (RBE), neutron RBE, photon RBE, and boron capture RBE (BNC RBE) were all determined at various depths of the water phantom. Minimum and maximum values of the effective RBE were 1.68 and 2.93, respectively. The maximum effective RBE occurred at 2cm depth in the phantom. The average neutron RBE, photon RBE, and BNC RBE values were 3.160+/-0.020, 1.018+/-0.001, and 1.570+/-0.270, respectively, for the THOR BNCT beam.

  19. INEL BNCT Research Program, September--October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-12-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotain. carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor call culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophonylalanine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  20. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): A radiation oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1994-03-30

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) offers considerable promise in the search for the ideal cancer therapy, a therapy which selectively and maximally damages malignant cells while sparing normal tissue. This bimodal treatment modality selectivity concentrates a boron compound in malignant cells, and then [open quotes]activates[close quotes] this compound with slow neutrons resulting in a highly lethal event within the cancer cell. This article reviews this treatment modality from a radiation oncology, biology, and physics perspective. The remainder of the articles in this special issue provide a survey of the current [open quotes]state-of-the-art[close quotes] in this rapidly expanding field, including information with regard to boron compounds and their localization. 118 refs., 3 figs.

  1. INEL BNCT Research Program, March/April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murino screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor call culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronopheoylalanine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  2. INEL BNCT Research Program, May/June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylaianine (IBPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  3. INEL BNCT research program, July--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  4. INEL BNCT Research Program, January/February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylaianine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  5. TIDBIT - the INEL database of BNCT information and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, C.A.

    1995-11-01

    The INEL Database of BNCT Information and Treatment (TIDBIT) has been under development for several years. Late in 1993, a new software development team took over the project and did and assessment of the current implementation status, and determined that the user interface was unsatisfactory for the expected users and that the data structures were out of step with the current state of reality. The team evaluated several tools that would improve the user interface to make the system easier to use. Uniface turned out to be the product of choice. During 1994, TIDBIT got its name, underwent a complete change of appearance, had a major overhaul to the data structures that support the application, and system documentation was begun. A prototype of the system was demonstrated in September 1994.

  6. Biodistribution of sodium borocaptate (BSH) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in an oral cancer model.

    PubMed

    Garabalino, Marcela A; Heber, Elisa M; Monti Hughes, Andrea; González, Sara J; Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Nievas, Susana; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Bauer, William; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2013-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective accumulation of ¹⁰B carriers in tumor followed by neutron irradiation. We previously proved the therapeutic success of BNCT mediated by the boron compounds boronophenylalanine and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Based on the clinical relevance of the boron carrier sodium borocaptate (BSH) and the knowledge that the most effective way to optimize BNCT is to improve tumor boron targeting, the specific aim of this study was to perform biodistribution studies of BSH in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and evaluate the feasibility of BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3. The general aim of these studies is to contribute to the knowledge of BNCT radiobiology and optimize BNCT for head and neck cancer. Sodium borocaptate (50 mg ¹⁰B/kg) was administered to tumor-bearing hamsters. Groups of 3-5 animals were killed humanely at nine time-points, 3-12 h post-administration. Samples of blood, tumor, precancerous pouch tissue, normal pouch tissue and other clinically relevant normal tissues were processed for boron measurement by optic emission spectroscopy. Tumor boron concentration peaked to therapeutically useful boron concentration values of 24-35 ppm. The boron concentration ratio tumor/normal pouch tissue ranged from 1.1 to 1.8. Pharmacokinetic curves showed that the optimum interval between BSH administration and neutron irradiation was 7-11 h. It is concluded that BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3 would be feasible.

  7. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  8. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-22

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, {alpha}) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg {sup 10}B/g blood.

  9. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  10. Radiation shielding design of BNCT treatment room for D-T neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pouryavi, Mehdi; Farhad Masoudi, S; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that D-T neutron generator can be used as a proper neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of deep-seated brain tumors. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations have been conducted based on the computational method for designing a BNCT treatment room for a recent proposed D-T neutron source. By using the MCNP-4C code, the geometry of the treatment room has been designed and optimized in such a way that the equivalent dose rate out of the treatment room to be less than 0.5μSv/h for uncontrolled areas. The treatment room contains walls, monitoring window, maze and entrance door. According to the radiation protection viewpoint, dose rate results of out of the proposed room showed that using D-T neutron source for BNCT is safe.

  11. An international dosimetry exchange for BNCT part II: computational dosimetry normalizations.

    PubMed

    Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Harling, O K; Albritton, J R; Kiger, W S; Rezaei, A; Sköld, K; Seppälä, T; Savolainen, S; Auterinen, I; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Nievaart, V A; Moss, R L

    2008-12-01

    The meaningful sharing and combining of clinical results from different centers in the world performing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires improved precision in dose specification between programs. To this end absorbed dose normalizations were performed for the European clinical centers at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Petten (The Netherlands), Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic), VTT, Espoo (Finland), and Studsvik, Nyköping (Sweden). Each European group prepared a treatment plan calculation that was bench-marked against Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) dosimetry performed in a large, water-filled phantom to uniformly evaluate dose specifications with an estimated precision of +/-2%-3%. These normalizations were compared with those derived from an earlier exchange between Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and MIT in the USA. Neglecting the uncertainties related to biological weighting factors, large variations between calculated and measured dose are apparent that depend upon the 10B uptake in tissue. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) in normal tissue, differences in the evaluated maximum dose to brain for the same nominal specification of 10 Gy(w) at the different facilities range between 7.6 and 13.2 Gy(w) in the trials using boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron delivery compound and between 8.9 and 11.1 Gy(w) in the two boron sulfhydryl (BSH) studies. Most notably, the value for the same specified dose of 10 Gy(w) determined at the different participating centers using BPA is significantly higher than at BNL by 32% (MIT), 43% (VTT), 49% (JRC), and 74% (Studsvik). Conversion of dose specification is now possible between all active participants and should be incorporated into future multi-center patient analyses.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): implications of neutron beam and boron compound characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, F J; Nigg, D W; Capala, J; Watkins, P R; Vroegindeweij, C; Auterinen, I; Seppälä, T; Bleuel, D

    1999-07-01

    The potential efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant glioma is a significant function of epithermal-neutron beam biophysical characteristics as well as boron compound biodistribution characteristics. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to evaluate the relative significance of these factors on theoretical tumor control using a standard model. The existing, well-characterized epithermal-neutron sources at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR), and the Finnish Research Reactor (FiR-1) were compared. Results for a realistic accelerator design by the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) are also compared. Also the characteristics of the compound p-Boronophenylaline Fructose (BPA-F) and a hypothetical next-generation compound were used in a comparison of the BMRR and a hypothetical improved reactor. All components of dose induced by an external epithermal-neutron beam fall off quite rapidly with depth in tissue. Delivery of dose to greater depths is limited by the healthy-tissue tolerance and a reduction in the hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose allow for longer irradiation and greater dose at a depth. Dose at depth can also be increased with a beam that has higher neutron energy (without too high a recoil dose) and a more forward peaked angular distribution. Of the existing facilities, the FiR-1 beam has the better quality (lower hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose) and a penetrating neutron spectrum and was found to deliver a higher value of Tumor Control Probability (TCP) than other existing beams at shallow depth. The greater forwardness and penetration of the HFR the FiR-1 at greater depths. The hypothetical reactor and accelerator beams outperform at both shallow and greater depths. In all cases, the hypothetical compound provides a significant improvement in efficacy but it is shown that the full benefit of improved compound is not realized until the neutron beam is fully

  13. Might iodomethyl-{alpha}-tyrosine be a surrogate for BPA in BNCT?

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Michiko; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    A single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] imaging agent that is an analogue of a boron carrier for boron neutron-capture therapy [BNCT] of cerebral gliomas would be useful for assessing the kinetics of boron uptake in tumors and in the surrounding brain tissues noninvasively. BNCT is based on the interaction of thermalized neutrons with {sup 10}B nuclei in the targeted tumor. For BNCT of brain tumors, it is crucial that {sup 10}B concentrations in radiosensitive regions of the brain be minimal since malignant cells and vital brain tissues are often inter-mingled at the margins of the tumor. Currently, boronophenylalanine [BPA]-mediated BNCT is undergoing preliminary clinical study for postoperative radiotherapy of glioblastorna multiforme at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Investigators in Japan are developing {sup 18}F-fluoroboronophenylaianine [FBPA] as a positron {sup 18}F (T{sub 1/2} = 110 min), which is usually emission tomography [PET] surrogate for BPA. generated at a cyclotron dedicated to PET, is generally a minimally perturbing substitute for the 2-H on the aromatic ring because of its small size and the strong covalent bond it forms with carbon. However, SPECT has potential advantages over PET: (1) SPECT is clinically more widely available at lower cost; (2) most radioisotopes for the synthesis of SPECT agents can be purchased; (3) SPECT is less difficult to implement. It is thought that the quality of images derived from the two techniques would each be sufficiently informative for BNCT treatment planning purposes, provided that the SPECT and PET agents being considered were both pharmacokinetic surrogates for BPA. This study evaluated the use of {sup 123}I alpha methyltyrosine as a surrogate for BPA in BNCT.

  14. A treatment planning comparison of BPA- or BSH-based BNCT of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Accurate delivery of the prescribed dose during clinical BNCT requires knowledge (or reasonably valid assumptions) about the boron concentrations in tumor and normal tissues. For conversion of physical dose (Gy) into photon-equivalent dose (Gy-Eq), relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and/or compound-adjusted biological effectiveness (CBE) factors are required for each tissue. The BNCT treatment planning software requires input of the following values: the boron concentration in blood and tumor, RBEs in brain, tumor and skin for the high-LET beam components, the CBE factors for brain, tumor, and skin, and the RBE for the gamma component.

  15. Tandem-ESQ for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Burlon, A. A.; Di Paolo, H.; Minsky, D.; Debray, M.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H. R.

    2007-02-12

    A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed as a machine for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT). The machine is shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep seated tumors in less than an hour.

  16. Theta13 Neutrino Experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, LBNL Engineering Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Oshatz, Daryl

    2004-03-12

    This summary document describes the results of conceptual design and cost estimates performed by LBNL Engineering staff between October 10, 2003 and March 12, 2004 for the proposed {theta}{sub 13} neutrino experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). This document focuses on the detector room design concept and mechanical engineering issues associated with the neutrino detector structures. Every effort has been made not to duplicate information contained in the last LBNL Engineering Summary Report dated October 10, 2003. Only new or updated information is included in this document.

  17. "Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Maria E. Itoiz; Silvia I. Thorp; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz

    2011-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that involves the selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumors followed by irradiation with a thermal or epithermal neutron beam. The minor abundance stable isotope of boron, 10B, interacts with low energy (thermal) neutrons to produce high linear energy transfer (LET) a-particles and 7Li ions. These disintegration products are known to have a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Their short range (<10 {micro}m) would limit the damage to cells containing 10B (1,2). Thus, BNCT would target tumor tissue selectively, sparing normal tissue. Clinical trials of BNCT for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and/or melanoma and, more recently, head and neck tumors and liver metastases, using boronophenylalanine (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborane (BSH) as the 10B carriers, have been performed or are underway in Argentina, Japan, the US and Europe (e.g. 3-8). To date, the clinical results have shown a potential, albeit inconclusive, therapeutic advantage for this technique. Contributory translational studies have been carried out employing a variety of experimental models based on the implantation of tumor cells in normal tissue (e.g. 5).

  18. Comments on cathode contaminants and the LBNL test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.; Baca, D.; Greenway, W.; Leitner, M.; Kwan, J.W.

    2006-11-13

    This report collects information on cathode contaminants we have gathered in the process of operating the LBNL DARHT cathode test stand. Information on contaminants is compiled from several sources. The attachment, ''Practical Aspects of Modern Dispenser Cathodes'', is from Heat Wave Corp. (TB-134) and was originally published in Microwave Journal, September 1979. Cathode contamination depends on both material choices and residual gases. Table 1 of TB-134 lists materials that can poison dispenser cathodes. These include reactive residual gases or vapors such as oxygen, water vapor, benzene, chlorine, fluorine, sulfur, silicon, and most metals other than molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten, and copper. The metals interact with the cathode surface through their vapor pressure. A paper by Nexsen and Turner, J. Appl. Phys. 68, 298-303 (1990) shows the threshold effects of some common residual gases or vapors on cathode performance. The book by Walter H. Kohl, Handbook of Materials and Techniques for Vacuum Devices, also contains useful information on cathodes and poisoning agents. A plot of the vapor pressures and poisoning effect of certain metals (from Kohl) is shown below. Note that the vapor pressure of zinc is 1.1 x 10{sup -8} Torr at 400 K = 127 C, and 2.7 x 10{sup -5} at 500 K = 227 C. By contrast iron reaches a vapor pressure 1 x 10{sup -8} between 800 and 900 C. Therefore it is important to eliminate any brass parts that could exceed a temperature of 100 C. Many structural components of the cathode assembly contain steel. At 500-600 C in an oxygen atmosphere chromium oxide may outgas from the steel. [Cho, et.al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 19, p. 998 (2001)]. Steel may also contain silicon, and sulfur at low concentrations. Therefore use of steel should be limited or avoided at high temperature near the cathode. Materials that should be avoided in the vicinity of the cathode include brass, silver, zinc, non-OFHC copper, silicates, and sulfur-containing lubricants such

  19. Boron biodistribution for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: Combined administration of BSH and BPA

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Nigg; William Bauer; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is being investigated clinically for BNCT. We examined the biodistribution of BSH and BPA administered jointly in different proportions in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The 3 assayed protocols were non-toxic, and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus precancerous and normal tissue and therapeutic tumor boron concentration values (70–85 ppm). All 3 protocols warrant assessment in BNCT studies to contribute to the knowledge of (BSH+BPA)-BNCT radiobiology for head and neck cancer and optimize therapeutic efficacy.

  20. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  1. Boron biodistribution for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: combined administration of BSH and BPA.

    PubMed

    Garabalino, Marcela A; Heber, Elisa M; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Molinari, Ana J; Nigg, David W; Bauer, William; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-06-01

    Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is being investigated clinically for BNCT. We examined the biodistribution of BSH and BPA administered jointly in different proportions in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The 3 assayed protocols were non-toxic, and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus precancerous and normal tissue and therapeutic tumor boron concentration values (70-85ppm). All 3 protocols warrant assessment in BNCT studies to contribute to the knowledge of (BSH+BPA)-BNCT radiobiology for head and neck cancer and optimize therapeutic efficacy.

  2. Enhanced blood boron concentration estimation for BPA-F mediated BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kortesniemi, M; Seppälä, T; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2004-11-01

    The blood boron concentration regulates directly the BNCT irradiation time in which the prescribed dose to the patient is delivered. Therefore a proper estimation of the blood boron concentration for the treatment field based on the measured blood samples before irradiation is required. The bi-exponential model fit using Levenberg-Marquardt method was implemented for this purpose to provide the blood boron concentration estimates directly to the treatment data flow during the BNCT procedure. The harmonic mean bi-exponential decay half-lives of the studied patient data (n=28) were 15+/-8 and 320+/-70 min for the faster and slower half-life. The model uncertainty (n=28) was reasonably low, 0.7+/-0.1 microg/g (about 5%). The implemented algorithm provides a robust method for temporal blood boron concentration estimation for BPA-F mediated BNCT. Utilization of the infusion data improves the reliability of the estimate. The overall data flow during the treatment fulfills the practical requirements concerning the BNCT procedure.

  3. A D-D/D-T fusion reaction based neutron generator system for liver tumor BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunoro, H.; Lou, T.P.; Leung, K. N.; Reijonen, J.

    2003-04-02

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiation treatment modality used for highly malignant tumor treatments. Prior to irradiation with low energetic neutrons, a 10B compound is located selectively in the tumor cells. The effect of the treatment is based on the high LET radiation released in the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction with thermal neutrons. BNCT has been used experimentally for brain tumor and melanoma treatments. Lately applications of other severe tumor type treatments have been introduced. Results have shown that liver tumors can also be treated by BNCT. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, various compact neutron generators based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions are being developed. The earlier theoretical studies of the D-D or D-T fusion reaction based neutron generators have shown that the optimal moderator and reflector configuration for brain tumor BNCT can be created. In this work, the applicability of 2.5 MeV neutrons for liver tumor BNCT application was studied. The optimal neutron energy for external liver treatments is not known. Neutron beams of different energies (1eV < E < 100 keV) were simulated and the dose distribution in the liver was calculated with the MCNP simulation code. In order to obtain the optimal neutron energy spectrum with the D-D neutrons, various moderator designs were performed using MCNP simulations. In this article the neutron spectrum and the optimized beam shaping assembly for liver tumor treatments is presented.

  4. Radiotherapy dose enhancement using BNCT in conventional LINACs high-energy treatment: Simulation and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Alikaniotis, Katia; Borla, Oscar; Monti, Valeria; Vivaldo, Gianna; Zanini, Alba; Giannini, Gianrossano

    2016-01-01

    Aim To employ the thermal neutron background that affects the patient during a traditional high-energy radiotherapy treatment for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) in order to enhance radiotherapy effectiveness. Background Conventional high-energy (15–25 MV) linear accelerators (LINACs) for radiotherapy produce fast secondary neutrons in the gantry with a mean energy of about 1 MeV due to (γ, n) reaction. This neutron flux, isotropically distributed, is considered as an unavoidable undesired dose during the treatment. Considering the moderating effect of human body, a thermal neutron fluence is localized in the tumour area: this neutron background could be employed for BNCT by previously administering 10B-Phenyl-Alanine (10BPA) to the patient. Materials and methods Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP4B-GN code) were performed to estimate the total amount of neutrons outside and inside human body during a traditional X-ray radiotherapy treatment. Moreover, a simplified tissue equivalent anthropomorphic phantom was used together with bubble detectors for thermal and fast neutron to evaluate the moderation effect of human body. Results Simulation and experimental results confirm the thermal neutron background during radiotherapy of 1.55E07 cm−2 Gy−1. The BNCT equivalent dose delivered at 4 cm depth in phantom is 1.5 mGy-eq/Gy, that is about 3 Gy-eq (4% of X-rays dose) for a 70 Gy IMRT treatment. Conclusions The thermal neutron component during a traditional high-energy radiotherapy treatment could produce a localized BNCT effect, with a localized therapeutic dose enhancement, corresponding to 4% or more of photon dose, following tumour characteristics. This BNCT additional dose could thus improve radiotherapy, acting as a localized radio-sensitizer. PMID:26933394

  5. Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on Normal Liver Regeneration: Towards a Novel Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge E. Cardoso; Elisa M. Heber; David W. Nigg; Osvaldo Calzetta; Herman Blaumann; Juan Longhino; Maria E. Itoiz; Eduardo Bumaschny; Emiliano Pozzi; Amanda E.Schwint; Verónica A. Trivillin

    2007-10-01

    The “TAORMINA project” developed a new method for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of human multifocal unresectable liver metastases based on whole liver ex-situ BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), followed by whole liver autograft. This technique involved a high risk, prolonged anhepatic phase. The Roffo Institute liver surgeons (JEC) herein propose a novel technique to pursue ex-situ liver BNCT studies with a drastically lower surgical risk for the patient. The technique would involve, sequentially, ex-situ BNCT of left liver segments II and III, partial liver autograft, and induction of partial atrophy of the untreated right liver. The working hypothesis is that the atrophy of the right, untreated, diseased liver would stimulate regeneration of the left, treated, “cured” liver to yield a healthy liver mass, allowing for the resection of the remaining portion of diseased liver. This technique does not involve an anhepatic phase and would thus pose a drastically lower surgical risk to the patient but requires sine qua non that BNCT should not impair the regenerative capacity of normal hepatocytes. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of therapeutic doses of BNCT mediated by BPA, GB-10 (Na2 10B10H10) or (GB- 10 + BPA) on normal liver regeneration in the Wistar rat employing partial hepatectomy as a regenerative stimulus. BNCT did not cause alterations in the outcome of normal liver regeneration, regenerated liver function or histology. We provide proof of principle to support the development of a novel, promising BNCT technique for the treatment of liver metastases.

  6. Simulation studies of a XUV/soft X-ray harmonic-cascade FEL for the proposed LBNL recirculating linac*

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Zholents, A.

    2003-06-02

    Presently there is significant interest at LBNL in designing and building a facility for ultrafast (i.e. femtosecond time scale) x-ray science based upon a superconducting, recirculating RF linac (see Corlett et al. for more details). In addition to producing synchrotron radiation pulses in the 1-15 keV energy range, we are also considering adding one or more free-electron laser (FEL) beamlines using a harmonic cascade approach to produce coherent XUV soft X-ray emission beginning with a strong input seed at {approx}200 nm wavelength obtained from a ''conventional'' laser. Each cascade is composed of a radiator together with a modulator section, separated by a magnetic chicane. The chicane temporally delays the electron beam pulse in order that a ''virgin'' pulse region (with undegraded energy spread) be brought into synchronism with the radiation pulse, which together then undergo FEL action in the modulator. We present various results obtained with the GINGER simulation code examining final output sensitivity to initial electron beam parameters. We also discuss the effects of spontaneous emission and shot noise upon this particular cascade approach which can limit the final output coherence.

  7. Focused neutron beam dose deposition profiles in tissue equivalent materials: a pilot study for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Welsh, James; Chen-Mayer, Huaiyu H.

    1997-02-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been limited by the inability to direct neutrons toward the therapeutic target and away from sensitive normal tissues. The recently developed Kumakhov lens has focused a broad incident low energy neutron beam in air to a sub-mm spot. This study examines the radiation does distribution of a converging beam passing through tissue equivalent materials. A neutron beam exiting a focusing lens is directed toward a stack of thin radiochromic media sandwiched between plastic sheets. The depth dose and beam profile within the tissue equivalent materials are determined by optical scanning and image processing of the individual radiochromic media sheets, a polymer based dosimetry medium which darkens upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The alpha particle emission from boron is examined by substituting a plastic sheet with a 6Li enriched lithium carbonate sheet positioned at the focal plane. The information will help determine the feasibility of applying the focused neutron beam to BNCT for therapy.

  8. Design of photon converter and photoneutron target for High power electron accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Seifi, Samaneh; Anbaran, Hossein Tavakoli; Ghasemi, Farshad

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerator, ILU-14, with current of 10 mA and 100 kW in power has been considered as one of the options for neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The final design of neutron target has been obtained using MCNPX to optimize the neutron production. Tungsten in strip shape and D2O in cylindrical form have been proposed as the photon converter and the photoneutron target, respectively. In addition calculation of heat deposition in the photon target design has been considered to ensure mechanical stability of target. The results show that about 8.37×10(12) photoneutron/s with average energy of 615 keV can be produced by this neutron source design. In addition, using an appropriate beam shaping assembly an epithermal neutron flux of the order of 1.24×10(8) cm(-2) s(-1) can be obtained for BNCT applications.

  9. Near threshold ⁷Li(p,n) ⁷Be reaction as neutron source for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2015-12-01

    (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be is an endothermic reaction and working near its threshold (1.88 MeV) has the advantage of neutron spectra with maximum energies of about 100 keV, considerably lower than at higher beam energies, or than using other neutron-producing reactions or as for the uranium fission spectrum, relevant for BNCT based on nuclear reactors. With this primary energy it is much easier to obtain the energies needed for treating deep seated tumors by BNCT (about 10 keV). This work studies bombarding energies up to 2.05 MeV, different beam incidence angles and the effect of the undesirable gamma production via the (7)Li(p,γp') (7)Li reaction.

  10. Hyaluronic acid as a potential boron carrier for BNCT: Preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zaboronok, A; Yamamoto, T; Nakai, K; Yoshida, F; Uspenskii, S; Selyanin, M; Zelenetskii, A; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a nonimmunogenic, biocompatible polymer found in different biological tissues, has the potential to attach to CD44 receptors on the surface of certain cancer cells, where the receptor is overexpressed compared with normal cells. Boron-hyaluronic acid (BHA) was tested for its feasibility as a potential agent for BNCT. BHA with low-viscosity 30 kDa HA could be administered by intravenous injection. The compound showed a certain degree of cytotoxicity and accumulation in C6 rat glioma cells in vitro. Instability of the chelate bonds between boron and HA and/or insufficient specificity of CD44 receptors on C6 cells to BHA could account for the insufficient in vitro accumulation. To ensure the future eligibility of BHA for BNCT experiments, using alternative tumor cell lines and chemically securing the chelate bonds or synthesizing BHA with boron covalently attached to HA might be required.

  11. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality.

  12. Comparison of different MC techniques to evaluate BNCT dose profiles in phantom exposed tovarious neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Durisi, E; Koivunoro, H; Visca, L; Borla, O; Zanini, A

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose in BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) consists of several radiation components with different physical properties and biological effectiveness. In order to assess the clinical efficacy of the beams, determining the dose profiles in tissues, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used. This paper presents a comparison between dose profiles calculated in different phantoms using two techniques: MC radiation transport code, MCNP-4C2 and BNCT MC treatment planning program, SERA (simulation environment for radiotherapy application). In this study MCNP is used as a reference tool. A preliminary test of SERA is performed using six monodirectional and monoenergetic beams directed onto a simple water phantom. In order to deeply investigate the effect of the different cross-section libraries and of the dose calculation methodology, monoenergetic and monodirectional beams directed toward a standard Snyder phantom are simulated. Neutron attenuation curves and dose profiles are calculated with both codes and the results are compared.

  13. Monte Carlo modelling of the influence of boron microdistribution on BNCT microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hugtenburg, Richard P; Baker, Adam E R; Green, Stuart

    2009-07-01

    The ion transport Monte Carlo code SRIM has been used to calculate single event lineal energy spectra for the products of the boron-neutron capture reaction in a water-based medium. The event spectra have been benchmarked against spectra measured with a boron-loaded tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Agreement is excellent and supports the use of Monte Carlo methods in understanding the influence of boron delivery on the effectiveness of boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  14. Bioremediation: Hope/Hype for Environmental Cleanup (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry

    2007-07-18

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Terry Hazen, Senior Staff Scientists and Head of the LBNL Ecology Department, discusses when it's best to resort to engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites, and when it's best to rely on natural attenuation. Recent advances have greatly broadened the potential applications for bioremediation. At the same time, scientists' knowledge of biogeochemical processes has advanced and they can better gauge how quickly and completely contaminants can be degraded without human intervention.

  15. Bioremediation: Hope/Hype for Environmental Cleanup (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry

    2008-03-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Terry Hazen, Senior Staff Scientists and Head of the LBNL Ecology Department, discusses when it's best to resort to engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites, and when it's best to rely on natural attenuation. Recent advances have greatly broadened the potential applications for bioremediation. At the same time, scientists' knowledge of biogeochemical processes has advanced and they can better gauge how quickly and completely contaminants can be degraded without human intervention.

  16. Bioremediation: Hope/Hype for Environmental Cleanup (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Hazen, Terry [LBNL, Ecology Department

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Terry Hazen, Senior Staff Scientists and Head of the LBNL Ecology Department, discusses when it's best to resort to engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites, and when it's best to rely on natural attenuation. Recent advances have greatly broadened the potential applications for bioremediation. At the same time, scientists' knowledge of biogeochemical processes has advanced and they can better gauge how quickly and completely contaminants can be degraded without human intervention.

  17. Nuclear Science and Physics Data from the Isotopes Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Isotopes Project pages at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been a source of nuclear data and reference information since the mid-nineties. Almost all of the data, the results of analyses, the specialized charts and interfaces, and the extensive bibiographic references are fed to the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and maintained there. The Isotope Project pages at LBNL provide a glimpse of early versions for many of the nuclear data resources.

  18. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  19. Some Recent Developments in Treatment Planning Software and Methodology for BNCT

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nigg, D. W.; Wheeler, F. J.; Wessol, D. E.; et al.

    1996-01-01

    Over the past several years the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has led the development of a unique, internationally-recognized set of software modules (BNCT-rtpe) for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The computational capability represented by this software is essential to the proper administration of all forms of radiotherapy for cancer. Such software addresses the need to perform pretreatment computation and optimization of the radiation dose distribution in the target volume. This permits the achievement of the optimal therapeutic ratio (tumor dose relative to critical normal tissue dose) for each individual patient via a systematic procedure for specifying the appropriate irradiation parameters to be employed for a given treatment. These parameters include angle of therapy beam incidence, beam aperture and shape, and beam intensity as a function of position across the beam front. The INEL software is used for treatment planning in the current series of human glioma trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and has also been licensed for research and developmental purposes to several other BNCT research centers in the US and in Europe.

  20. RADIOSYNTHESIS AND CHIRAL SEPARATION OF C-11 LABELED BORONOPHENYLALANINE FOR BNCT STUDIES WITH PET.

    SciTech Connect

    STUDENOV,A.; DING,Y.S.; FERRIERI,R.; MIURA,M.; CODERRE,J.; FOWLER,J.S.

    2001-06-10

    The overall goal of this research is to combine two powerful methodologies, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and positron emission tomography (PET), to advance the treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors. BNCT is a method to selectively deliver lethal alpha radiation to a tumor through the administration of a boron-10 containing drug, and irradiation of the tumor area with neutrons [1]. L-Boronophenylalanine (L-{sup 10}BPA) is a boron-10 containing amino acid currently used for BNCT [4]. In order to perform neutron dosimetry, it is essential to determine tumor boron-10 levels in the course of the therapy. PET has the ability to measure the concentration of drugs labeled with positron-emitting isotopes in the human body [2]. 2-Fluoro-4-borono-phenylalanine ([{sup 18}F]FBPA) has been labeled as a surrogate marker for L-BPA for pharmacokinetic studies in brain tumor patients [3]. However, [{sup 18}F]FBPA is a different drug than L-BPA because it contains a fluorine atom. We report here the labeling of L-BPA with C-11, which has the advantage of being chemically identical to L-BPA. Carbon-11 is also well suited to repeated studies within the same PET scanning session.

  1. Some recent developments in treatment planning software and methodology for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past several years the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has led the development of a unique, internationally-recognized set of software modules (BNCT-rtpe) for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The computational capability represented by this software is essential to the proper administration of all forms of radiotherapy for cancer. Such software addresses the need to perform pretreatment computation and optimization of the radiation dose distribution in the target volume. This permits the achievement of the optimal therapeutic ratio (tumor dose relative to critical normal tissue dose) for each individual patient via a systematic procedure for specifying the appropriate irradiation parameters to be employed for a given treatment. These parameters include angle of therapy beam incidence, beam aperture and shape, and beam intensity as a function of position across the beam front. The INEL software is used for treatment planning in the current series of human glioma trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and has also been licensed for research and developmental purposes to several other BNCT research centers in the US and in Europe.

  2. Some recent developments in treatment planning software and methodology for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.; Wemple, C.A.; Babcock, R.; Capala, J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past several years/the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has led the development of a unique, internationally-recognized set of software modules (BNCT rtpe) for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The computational capability represented by this software is essential to the proper administration of all forms of radiotherapy for cancer. Such software addresses the need to perform pretreatment computation and optimization of the radiation dose distribution in the target volume. This permits the achievement of the optimal therapeutic ratio (tumor dose relative to critical normal tissue dose) for each individual patient via a systematic procedure for specifying the appropriate irradiation parameters to be employed for a given treatment. These parameters include angle of therapy beam incidence, beam aperture and shape,and beam intensity as a function of position across the beam front. The INEL software is used for treatment planning in the current series of human glioma trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and has also been licensed for research and developmental purposes to several other BNCT research centers in the US and in Europe.

  3. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  4. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  5. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.; Shan, C.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  6. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Miller, Marcelo; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Blood vessel normalization was induced by two doses of thalidomide in tumor-bearing hamsters on 2 consecutive days. All studies in thalidomide-treated animals were performed 48 h after the first dose of thalidomide, previously established as the window of normalization. Biodistribution studies were performed with BPA at a dose of 15.5 mg (10)B/kg in thalidomide-treated (Th+) and untreated (Th-) tumor-bearing hamsters. The effect of blood vessel normalization prior to BPA administration on the efficacy of BNCT was assessed in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor in tumor-bearing hamsters. Group I was treated with BPA-BNCT after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BPA-BNCT). Group II was treated with BPA-BNCT alone (Th- BPA-BNCT). Group III was treated with the beam only after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BO), and Group IV was treated with the beam only (Th- BO). Groups I and II were given the same dose of BPA (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), and all groups (I-IV) were exposed to the same neutron fluence. Two additional groups were treated with the beam only at a higher dose to exacerbate mucositis in precancerous tissue and to explore the potential direct protective effect of thalidomide on radiation-induced mucositis in a scenario of more severe toxicity, i.e. Group V (Th+ hdBO) and Group

  7. Project for the development of the linac based NCT facility in University of Tsukuba.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Sakurai, H; Sakae, T; Yoshioka, M; Kobayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Kiyanagi, Y; Shibata, T; Nakashima, H

    2014-06-01

    A project team headed by University of Tsukuba launched the development of a new accelerator based BNCT facility. In the project, we have adopted Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ)+Drift Tube Linac (DTL) type linac as proton accelerators. Proton energy generated from the linac was set to 8MeV and average current was 10mA. The linac tube has been constructed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. For neutron generator device, beryllium is selected as neutron target material; high intensity neutrons are generated by the reaction with beryllium and the 80kW proton beam. Our team chose beryllium as the neutron target material. At present beryllium target system is being designed with Monte-Carlo estimations and heat analysis with ANSYS. The neutron generator consists of moderator, collimator and shielding. It is being designed together with the beryllium target system. We also acquired a building in Tokai village; the building has been renovated for use as BNCT treatment facility. It is noteworthy that the linac tube had been installed in the facility in September 2012. In BNCT procedure, several medical devices are required for BNCT treatment such as treatment planning system, patient positioning device and radiation monitors. Thus these are being developed together with the linac based neutron source. For treatment planning system, we are now developing a new multi-modal Monte-Carlo treatment planning system based on JCDS. The system allows us to perform dose estimation for BNCT as well as particle radiotherapy and X-ray therapy. And the patient positioning device can navigate a patient to irradiation position quickly and properly. Furthermore the device is able to monitor movement of the patient׳s position during irradiation.

  8. LBNL Institutional Plan, FY 1996--2001. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The FY 1996-2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  9. Unifying dose specification between clinical BNCT centers in the Americas

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, K. J.; Binns, P. J.; Harling, O. K.; Kiger, W. S. III; Gonzalez, S. J.; Casal, M. R.; Longhino, J.; Larrieu, O. A. Calzetta; Blaumann, H. R.

    2008-04-15

    A dosimetry intercomparison between the boron neutron capture therapy groups of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Argentina was performed to enable combined analyses of NCT patient data between the different centers. In-air and dose versus depth measurements in a rectangular water phantom were performed at the hyperthermal neutron beam facility of the RA-6 reactor, Bariloche. Calculated dose profiles from the CNEA treatment planning system NCTPlan that were calibrated against in-house measurements required normalizations of 1.0 (thermal neutrons), 1.13 (photons), and 0.74 (fast neutrons) to match the dosimetry of MIT.

  10. Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Neil

    2010-10-20

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a high repetition rate free-electron laser facility proposed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The proposed facility will provide multiple FEL lines with varying spectral characteristics to satisfy a broad soft X-ray physics programme. At this stage of the project a number of FEL technologies and concepts are being investigated for possible implementation on the facility. In this report we consider a free-electron laser seeded by a Higher Harmonic Generation (HHG) source in which a high power (and consequently relatively low repetition rate) laser pulse is injected into a chamber of inert gas. Through a process of ionisation and recombination coherent higher harmonics of the laser are emitted from the gas and can be injected into an FEL system as a seed field. Further harmonic upconversion can be done within the FEL system to enable temporally coherent FEL output at wavelengths much shorter than, and pulse energies orders of magnitude higher than, the HHG source emission. The harmonic conversion within the FEL works in the following way. The seed field induces an energy modulation within the electron bunch at the start of the modulator. This energy modulation grows within the modulator due to the FEL interaction and starts to convert into a density modulation, or bunching, at the seed wavelength. However, this bunching also has components at higher harmonics which retain the longitudinal coherence of the initial seed. The beam passes through a magnetic chicane, which shears the longitudinal phase space to maximise the bunching at the required harmonic, then a further undulator which is tuned to this harmonic. If this second undulator is short it acts as a further modulator, and because the beam is pre-bunched at the modulator resonance there is a strong coherent burst of radiation which acts to modulate the electron beam energy in much the same way the input laser seed field acted in the first modulator

  11. Numerical simulation studies of the LBNL heavy-ion beam combiner experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Seidl, P.; Haber, I.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy drivers. A major area of interest, both theoretically and experimentally, is the resultant transverse phase space dilution during the beam merging process. Currently, a prototype combining experiment is underway at LBNL and we have employed a variety of numerical descriptions to aid in both the initial design of the experiment data. These range from simple envelope codes to detailed 2- and 3-D PIC simulations. We compare the predictions of the different numerical models to each other and to experimental data at different longitudinal positions.

  12. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors.

  13. Modification of the radial beam port of ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications.

    PubMed

    Akan, Zafer; Türkmen, Mehmet; Çakir, Tahir; Reyhancan, İskender A; Çolak, Üner; Okka, Muhittin; Kiziltaş, Sahip

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims to describe the modification of the radial beam port of ITU (İstanbul Technical University) TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications. Radial beam port is modified with Polyethylene and Cerrobend collimators. Neutron flux values are measured by neutron activation analysis (Au-Cd foils). Experimental results are verified with Monte Carlo results. The results of neutron/photon spectrum, thermal/epithermal neutron flux, fast group photon fluence and change of the neutron fluxes with the beam port length are presented.

  14. Reprint of Bioneutronics: Thermal scattering in organics tissues and its impact on BNCT dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ramos, R L; Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, M L; Cantargi, F

    2015-12-01

    Neutron transport calculation is a key factor in BNCT numerical dosimetry assessments where thermal neutron flux is intimately related to the neutron dose, specially, the therapeutic boron dose. In this work, numerical calculations in phantoms were performed to determine the importance of utilizing the appropriate thermal scattering treatment for different organic tissues. Two thermal treatments for the neutron scattering were included in the simulations: hydrogen bounded in bulk water and hydrogen bounded in a lipid like carbon chain (polyethylene). The results showed difference between both thermal treatments that can reach several percent points depending on the type of source and irradiated geometry.

  15. 124Sb-Be photo-neutron source for BNCT: Is it possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshanian, Mohadeseh; Rajabi, Ali Akbar; Kasesaz, Yaser

    2016-11-01

    In this research a computational feasibility study has been done on the use of 124SbBe photo-neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. For this purpose, a special beam shaping assembly has been designed to provide an appropriate epithermal neutron beam suitable for BNCT. The final result shows that using 150 kCi of 124Sb, the epithermal neutron flux at the designed beam exit is 0.23×109 (n/cm2 s). In-phantom dose analysis indicates that treatment time for a brain tumor is about 40 min which is a reasonable time. This high activity 124Sb could be achieved using three 50 kCi rods of 124Sb which can be produced in a research reactor. It is clear, that as this activity is several hundred times the activity of a typical cobalt radiotherapy source, issues related to handling, safety and security must be addressed.

  16. INEL and ISU BNCT research using a 2 MeV RFQ-based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Y. D.; Harmon, J. F.; Irwin, G. W.

    1995-05-01

    A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) proton linear accelerator manufactured by AccSys Corp. was purchased by the U.S. Department of Energy and was installed in the Particle Beam Laboratory at Idaho State University (ISU). It is available for physics studies consistent with the INEL mission such as those related to accelerator produced neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and waste interrogation. It is an AccSys model PL-1 and is designed to produce 2 MeV protons at an average current of 150 μA. The overall objective of the INEL BNCT/ISU collaborative program is to evaluate neutron filter design concepts which use a 2 MeV proton accelerator with a lithium target as the neutron source. This paper will discuss the overall plan of INEL/ISU collaborative program and how it relates to other university and government laboratory studies, the methods being employed in this study and results of neutron spectra and angular distribution measurements for different lithium target configurations.

  17. Boron imaging with a microstrip silicon detector for applications in BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattera, A.; Basilico, F.; Bolognini, D.; Borasio, P.; Cappelletti, P.; Chiari, P.; Conti, V.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Giannini, G.; Hasan, S.; Mascagna, V.; Mauri, P.; Monti, A. F.; Mozzanica, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Vallazza, E.; Zanini, A.

    2009-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapic technique exploiting the α particles produced after the irradiation of the isotope 10 of boron with thermal neutrons in the capture reaction B(n,α)710Li. It is used to treat tumours that for their features (radioresistance, extension, localization near vital organs) cannot be treated through conventional photon-beams radiotherapy. One of the main limitations of this technique is the lack of specificity (i.e. the ability of localizing in tumour cells, saving the healthy tissues) of the compounds used to carry the 10B isotope in the organs to be treated. This work, developed in the framework of the INFN PhoNeS project, describes the possibility of boron imaging performed exploiting the neutrons photoproduced by a linac (the Clinac 2100C/D of the S. Anna Hospital Radiotherapy Unit in Como, Italy) and detecting the α s with a non-depleted microstrip silicon detector: the result is a 1D scan of the boron concentration. Several boron doped samples have been analysed, from solutions of H3BO3 (reaching a minimum detectable amount of 25 ng of 10B) to biological samples of urine containing BPA and BSH (the two molecules currently used for the clinical trials in BNCT) in order to build kinetic curves (showing the absolute 10B concentration as a function of time). Further measurements are under way to test the imaging system with 10BPA-Fructose complex perfused human lung samples.

  18. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  19. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  20. A multi-dimensional procedure for BNCT filter optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lille, R.A.

    1998-02-01

    An initial version of an optimization code utilizing two-dimensional radiation transport methods has been completed. This code is capable of predicting material compositions of a beam tube-filter geometry which can be used in a boron neutron capture therapy treatment facility to improve the ratio of the average radiation dose in a brain tumor to that in the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The optimization algorithm employed by the code is very straightforward. After an estimate of the gradient of the dose ratio with respect to the nuclide densities in the beam tube-filter geometry is obtained, changes in the nuclide densities are made based on: (1) the magnitude and sign of the components of the dose ratio gradient, (2) the magnitude of the nuclide densities, (3) the upper and lower bound of each nuclide density, and (4) the linear constraint that the sum of the nuclide density fractions in each material zone be less than or equal to 1.0. A local optimal solution is assumed to be found when one of the following conditions is satisfied in every material zone: (1) the maximum positive component of the gradient corresponds to a nuclide at its maximum density and the sum of the density fractions equals 1.0 or, and (2) the positive and negative components of the gradient correspond to nuclides densities at their upper and lower bounds, respectively, and the remaining components of the gradient are sufficiently small. The optimization procedure has been applied to a beam tube-filter geometry coupled to a simple tumor-patient head model and an improvement of 50% in the dose ratio was obtained.

  1. Positron emission tomography and [18F]BPA: a perspective application to assess tumour extraction of boron in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, L; Cionini, L; Sauerwein, W A; Altieri, S; Solin, O; Minn, H; Salvadori, P A

    2009-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a key imaging tool in clinical practice and biomedical research to quantify and study biochemical processes in vivo. Physiologically active compounds are tagged with positron emitters (e.g. (18)F, (11)C, (124)I) while maintaining their biological properties, and are administered intravenously in tracer amounts (10(-9)-10(-12)M quantities). The recent physical integration of PET and computed tomography (CT) in hybrid PET/CT scanners allows a combined anatomical and functional imaging: nowadays PET molecular imaging is emerging as powerful pharmacological tool in oncology, neurology and for treatment planning as guidance for radiation therapy. The in vivo pharmacokinetics of boron carrier for BNCT and the quantification of (10)B in living tissue were performed by PET in the late nineties using compartmental models based on PET data. Nowadays PET and PET/CT have been used to address the issue of pharmacokinetic, metabolism and accumulation of BPA in target tissue. The added value of the use of L-[(18)F]FBPA and PET/CT in BNCT is to provide key data on the tumour extraction of (10)B-BPA versus normal tissue and to predict the efficacy of the treatment based on a single-study patient analysis. Due to the complexity of a binary treatment like BNCT, the role of PET/CT is currently to design new criteria for patient enrolment in treatment protocols: the L-[(18)F]BPA/PET methodology could be considered as an important tool in newly designed clinical trials to better estimate the concentration ratio of BPA in the tumour as compared to neighbouring normal tissues. Based on these values for individual patients the decision could be made whether BNCT treatment could be advantageous due to a selective accumulation of BPA in an individual tumour. This approach, applicable in different tumour entities like melanoma, glioblastoma and head and neck malignancies, make this methodology as reliable prognostic and therapeutic indicator for

  2. The therapeutic ratio in BNCT: Assessment using the Rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor and spinal cord models

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Fisher, C.D.; Bywaters, A.; Morris, G.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1996-10-01

    During any radiation therapy, the therapeutic tumor dose is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. The short ranges of the products of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction produced during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) present an opportunity to increase the therapeutic ratio (tumor dose/normal tissue dose) to levels unprecedented in photon radiotherapy. The mixed radiation field produced during BNCT comprises radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) and different relative biological effectiveness (RBE). The short ranges of the two high-LET products of the `B(n,a)`Li reaction make the microdistribution of the boron relative to target cell nuclei of particular importance. Due to the tissue specific distribution of different boron compounds, the term RBE is inappropriate in defining the biological effectiveness of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction. To distinguish these differences from true RBEs we have used the term {open_quotes}compound biological effectiveness{close_quotes} (CBE) factor. The latter can be defined as the product of the true, geometry-independent, RBE for these particles times a {open_quotes}boron localization factor{close_quotes}, which will most likely be different for each particular boron compound. To express the total BNCT dose in a common unit, and to compare BNCT doses with the effects of conventional photon irradiation, multiplicative factors (RBEs and CBEs) are applied to the physical absorbed radiation doses from each high-LET component. The total effective BNCT dose is then expressed as the sum of RBE-corrected physical absorbed doses with the unit Gray-equivalent (Gy-Eq).

  3. Autoradiographic and histopathological studies of boric acid-mediated BNCT in hepatic VX2 tumor-bearing rabbits: Specific boron retention and damage in tumor and tumor vessels.

    PubMed

    Yang, C H; Lin, Y T; Hung, Y H; Liao, J W; Peir, J J; Liu, H M; Lin, Y L; Liu, Y M; Chen, Y W; Chuang, K S; Chou, F I

    2015-12-01

    Hepatoma is a malignant tumor that responds poorly to conventional therapies. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) may provide a better way for hepatoma therapy. In this research, (10)B-enriched boric acid (BA, 99% (10)B) was used as the boron drug. A multifocal hepatic VX2 tumor-bearing rabbit model was used to study the mechanisms of BA-mediated BNCT. Autoradiography demonstrated that BA was selectively targeted to tumors and tumor vessels. Histopathological examination revealed the radiation damage to tumor-bearing liver was concentrated in the tumor regions during BNCT treatment. The selective killing of tumor cells and the destruction of the blood vessels in tumor masses may be responsible for the success of BA-mediated BNCT for liver tumors.

  4. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-04

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (~;;10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10^13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  5. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Gruener, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by a high-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source ({approx}10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (> or approx.10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10{sup 13} photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  6. On-line reconstruction of low boron concentrations by in vivo gamma-ray spectroscopy for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Verbakel, W F; Stecher-Rasmussen, F

    2001-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiation therapy in which the neutron capture reaction of 10B is used for the selective destruction of tumours. At the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, a therapy facility with an epithermal neutron beam has been built. In the first instance, patients with brain tumours will be treated. The doses delivered to the tumour and to the healthy tissue depend on the thermal neutron fluence and on the boron concentrations in these regions. An accurate determination of the patient dose during therapy requires knowledge of these time-dependent concentrations. For this reason, a gamma-ray telescope system, together with a reconstruction formalism, have been developed. By using a gamma-ray detector in a telescope configuration, boron neutron capture gamma-rays of 478 keV emitted by a small specific region can be detected. The reconstruction formalism can calculate absolute boron concentrations using the measured boron gamma-ray detection rates. Besides the boron gamma-rays, a large component of 2.2 MeV gamma-rays emitted at thermal neutron capture in hydrogen is measured. Since the hydrogen distribution is almost homogeneous within the head, this component can serve as a measure of the total number of thermal neutrons in the observed volume. By using the hydrogen gamma-ray detection rate for normalization of the boron concentration, the reconstruction tool eliminates the greater part of the influence of the inhomogeneity of the thermal neutron distribution. MCNP calculations are used as a tool for the optimization of the detector configuration. Experiments on a head phantom with 5 ppm 10B in healthy tissue showed that boron detection with a standard deviation of 3% requires a minimum measuring time of 2 min live time. From two position-dependent measurements, boron concentrations in two compartments (healthy tissue and tumour) can be determined. The reconstruction of the boron concentration in healthy tissue can be done with a

  7. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis in an experimental model: dose–response at five-week follow-up based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Trivillin, Verónica A; Colombo, Lucas L; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Thorp, Silvia I; Cardoso, Jorge E; Garabalino, Marcela A; Molinari, Ana J; Heber, Elisa M; Curotto, Paula; Miller, Marcelo; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Schwint, Amanda E

    2013-11-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. Employing an experimental model of liver metastases in rats, we recently demonstrated that BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT) at 13 Gy prescribed to tumor is therapeutically useful at 3-week follow-up. The aim of the present study was to evaluate dose–response at 5-week follow-up, based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA-BNCT (n = 19), Beam only (n = 8) and Sham (n = 7) (matched manipulation, no treatment). For each rat, neutron flux was measured in situ and boron content was measured in a pre-irradiation blood sample for retrospective individual dose assessment. For statistical analysis (ANOVA), individual data for the BPA-BNCT group were pooled according to absorbed tumor dose, BPA-BNCT I: 4.5–8.9 Gy and BPA-BNCT II: 9.2–16 Gy. At 5 weeks post-irradiation, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 12.2 ± 6.6 for Sham, 7.8 ± 4.1 for Beam only, 4.4 ± 5.6 for BPA-BNCT I and 0.45 ± 0.20 for BPA-BNCT II; tumor nodule weight was 750 ± 480 mg for Sham, 960 ± 620 mg for Beam only, 380 ± 720 mg for BPA-BNCT I and 7.3 ± 5.9 mg for BPA-BNCT II. The BPA-BNCT II group exhibited statistically significant tumor control with no contributory liver toxicity. Potential threshold doses for tumor response and significant tumor control were established at 6.1 and 9.2 Gy, respectively.

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis in an experimental model: dose–response at five-week follow-up based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats

    SciTech Connect

    Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Veronica A. Trivilin; Lucas L. Colombo; Andrea Monti Hughes; Silvia I. Thorp; Jorge E. Cardoso; Marcel A. Garabalino; Ana J. Molinari; Elisa M. Heber; Paula Curotto; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. Employing an experimental model of liver metastases in rats, we recently demonstrated that BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT) at 13 Gy prescribed to tumor is therapeutically useful at 3-week follow-up. The aim of the present study was to evaluate dose–response at 5-week follow-up, based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA-BNCT (n = 19), Beam only (n = 8) and Sham (n = 7) (matched manipulation, no treatment). For each rat, neutron flux was measured in situ and boron content was measured in a pre-irradiation blood sample for retrospective individual dose assessment. For statistical analysis (ANOVA), individual data for the BPA-BNCT group were pooled according to absorbed tumor dose, BPA-BNCT I: 4.5–8.9 Gy and BPA-BNCT II: 9.2–16 Gy. At 5 weeks post-irradiation, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 12.2 +/- 6.6 for Sham, 7.8 +/- 4.1 for Beam only, 4.4 +/- 5.6 for BPA-BNCT I and 0.45 +/- 0.20 for BPA-BNCT II; tumor nodule weight was 750 +/- 480 mg for Sham, 960 +/- 620 mg for Beam only, 380 +/- 720 mg for BPA-BNCT I and 7.3 +/- 5.9 mg for BPA-BNCT II. The BPA-BNCT II group exhibited statistically significant tumor control with no contributory liver toxicity. Potential threshold doses for tumor response and significant tumor control were established at 6.1 and 9.2 Gy, respectively.

  9. a New Method to Measure 10B Uptake in Lung Adenocarcinoma in Hospital Bnct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donegani, E. M.; Basilico, F.; Bolognini, D.; Borasio, P.; Capelli, E.; Cappelletti, P.; Chiari, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Giannini, G.; Hasan, S.; Mattera, A.; Mauri, P.; Monti, A. F.; Ostinelli, A.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Zanini, A.

    2010-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapic technique still under development that could become crucial in the fight against some types of cancer (extended ones, located near vital organs or radio resistant). This binary technique requires the administration to the patient of a boron delivery agent and the irradiation with a thermal neutron beam. The high LET particles produced in the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction are exploited to destroy the tumour cells. This work presents a new system based on neutron autoradiography with a non-depleted self-triggering microstrip silicon detector, using a neutron beam produced by a hospital Linac. The system is fast, real time and allows the detection of 10B contents down to 25 ng. The main results on the study of 10B uptake in biological samples will be described in terms of kinetic curves (10B uptake as a function of time).

  10. Measuring the stopping power of α particles in compact bone for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, L.; Rodríguez, L. M.; Fregenal, D.; Bernardi, G.; Olivares, C.; Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; González, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The stopping power of α particles in thin films of decalcified sheep femur, in the range of 1.5 to 5.0 MeV incident energy, was measured by transmission of a backscattered beam from a heavy target. Additionally, the film elemental composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). These data will be used to measure boron concentration in thin films of bone using a spectrometry technique developed by the University of Pavia, since the concentration ratio between healthy tissue and tumor is of fundamental importance in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The present experimental data are compared with numerical simulation results and with tabulated stopping power data of non-decalcified human bone.

  11. A novel design of beam shaping assembly to use D-T neutron generator for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Yaser; Karimi, Marjan

    2016-12-01

    In order to use 14.1MeV neutrons produced by d-T neutron generators, two special and novel Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), including multi-layer and hexagonal lattice have been suggested and the effect of them has been investigated by MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The results show that the proposed BSA can provide the qualified epithermal neutron beam for BNCT. The final epithermal neutron flux is about 6e9 n/cm2.s. The final proposed BSA has some different advantages: 1) it consists of usual and well-known materials (Pb, Al, Fluental and Cd); 2) it has a simple geometry; 3) it does not need any additional gamma filter; 4) it can provide high flux of epithermal neutrons. As this type of neutron source is under development in the world, it seems that they can be used clinically in a hospital considering the proposed BSA.

  12. Determination of radiobiological parameters for the safe clinical application of BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Hopewell, J.W.; Morris, G.M.; Coderre, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    In the present report the effects of BNCT irradiation on the skin and spinal cord of Fischer 344 rats, for known concentrations of {sup 10}B in the blood and these normal tissues, are compared with the effects of the neutron beam alone or photon irradiation. The biological effectiveness of irradiation in the presence of the capture agents BSH and BPA have been compared. Irradiations were carried out using the thermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Therapy experiments were also carried out as part of this study, using the rat 9L-gliosarcoma cell line, in order to establish the potential therapeutic advantage that might be achieved using the above capture agents. This cell line grows as a solid tumor in vivo as well as in vitro. The implications of these findings, with respect to the clinical use of the Petten HBII based epithermal neutron beam, will be discussed.

  13. Confirmation of a realistic reactor model for BNCT dosimetry at the TRIGA Mainz

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegner, Markus; Schmitz, Tobias; Hampel, Gabriele; Khan, Rustam; Blaickner, Matthias; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Böck, Helmuth

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In order to build up a reliable dose monitoring system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applications at the TRIGA reactor in Mainz, a computer model for the entire reactor was established, simulating the radiation field by means of the Monte Carlo method. The impact of different source definition techniques was compared and the model was validated by experimental fluence and dose determinations. Methods: The depletion calculation code ORIGEN2 was used to compute the burn-up and relevant material composition of each burned fuel element from the day of first reactor operation to its current core. The material composition of the current core was used in a MCNP5 model of the initial core developed earlier. To perform calculations for the region outside the reactor core, the model was expanded to include the thermal column and compared with the previously established ATTILA model. Subsequently, the computational model is simplified in order to reduce the calculation time. Both simulation models are validated by experiments with different setups using alanine dosimetry and gold activation measurements with two different types of phantoms. Results: The MCNP5 simulated neutron spectrum and source strength are found to be in good agreement with the previous ATTILA model whereas the photon production is much lower. Both MCNP5 simulation models predict all experimental dose values with an accuracy of about 5%. The simulations reveal that a Teflon environment favorably reduces the gamma dose component as compared to a polymethyl methacrylate phantom. Conclusions: A computer model for BNCT dosimetry was established, allowing the prediction of dosimetric quantities without further calibration and within a reasonable computation time for clinical applications. The good agreement between the MCNP5 simulations and experiments demonstrates that the ATTILA model overestimates the gamma dose contribution. The detailed model can be used for the planning of structural

  14. Clinical lessons from the first applications of BNCT on unresectable liver metastases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonta, A.; Prati, U.; Roveda, L.; Ferrari, C.; Zonta, S.; Clerici, Am; Zonta, C.; Pinelli, T.; Fossati, F.; Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Bruschi, P.; Nano, R.; Barni, S.; Chiari, P.; Mazzini, G.

    2006-05-01

    After a long series of studies on the effects of neutron irradiation of 10B loaded neoplastic cells both in culture and in animal experiments, we started the clinical application of BNCT on humans affected by liver metastases of a radically resected colon adenocarcinoma. The procedure we adopted includes a first surgical phase, with hepatectomy; a radiotherapeutic phase, in which the isolated liver, washed and chilled, is extracorporeally irradiated with thermal neutrons; and then a second surgical phase for the reconnection of the liver to the patient. Until now two patients have been subjected to the BNCT treatment. The first one survived 44 months with a good quality of life, and died because of diffuse recurrences of his intestinal tumour. The second patient had the same early perioperative course, but after 33 days a worsening of a dilatative cardiomyopaty, from which he was suffering, determined a cardiac failure and eventually death. This clinical experience, although limited, has shown that extracorporeal neutron irradiation of the liver is a feasible procedure, able to ensure the complete destruction of liver metastases and a possible long lasting survival. In our patients neutron irradiation caused massive cellular necrosis highly specific to tumour cells, whereas normal cells were mostly spared. Nevertheless, the impact of such a traumatic operation on the patient's organism must be taken into account. Finally, we have to be aware that the fight against tumour rarely leads to a complete victory. We now have an innovative weapon which is both powerful and partly unsettled: it must be refined and above all used.

  15. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source.

  16. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values.

  17. Feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma from a viewpoint of dose distribution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Minoru . E-mail: msuzuki@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Nagata, Kenji; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) from a viewpoint of dose distribution analysis using Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications (SERA), a currently available BNCT treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: The BNCT treatment plans were constructed for 3 patients with MPM using the SERA system, with 2 opposed anterior-posterior beams. The {sup 1}B concentrations in the tumor and normal lung in this study were assumed to be 84 and 24 ppm, respectively, and were derived from data observed in clinical trials. The maximum, mean, and minimum doses to the tumors and the normal lung were assessed for each plan. The doses delivered to 5% and 95% of the tumor volume, D{sub 05} and D{sub 95}, were adopted as the representative dose for the maximum and minimum dose, respectively. Results: When the D{sub 05} to the normal ipsilateral lung was 5 Gy-Eq, the D{sub 95} and mean doses delivered to the normal lung were 2.2-3.6 and 3.5-4.2 Gy-Eq, respectively. The mean doses delivered to the tumors were 22.4-27.2 Gy-Eq. The D{sub 05} and D{sub 95} doses to the tumors were 9.6-15.0 and 31.5-39.5 Gy-Eq, respectively. Conclusions: From a viewpoint of the dose-distribution analysis, BNCT has the possibility to be a promising treatment for MPM patients who are inoperable because of age and other medical illnesses.

  18. Neutron Generators Developed at LBNL for Homeland Security andImaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, Jani

    2006-08-13

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed various types of advanced D-D (neutron energy 2.5 MeV), D-T (14 MeV) and T-T (0-9 MeV) neutron generators for wide range of applications. These applications include medical (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), homeland security (Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis, Fast Neutron Activation Analysis and Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy) and planetary exploration with a sub-surface material characterization on Mars. These neutron generators utilize RF induction discharge to ionize the deuterium/tritium gas. This discharge method provides high plasma density for high output current, high atomic species from molecular gases, long life operation and versatility for various discharge chamber geometries. Four main neutron generator developments are discussed here: high neutron output co-axial neutron generator for BNCT applications, point neutron generator for security applications, compact and sub-compact axial neutron generator for elemental analysis applications. Current status of the neutron generator development with experimental data will be presented.

  19. Reconstitution and Upgrade of the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility in the Basement Medical Room of the MIT Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, Otto, K.; Riley, Kent, J.; Binns, Peter J.

    2004-12-31

    The M-011 thermal neutron beam has been reconstituted and upgraded to provide a high intensity and high quality facility for preclinical and certain clinical studies. Intensities of thermal neutrons in the beam range from 5.0-8.5 x 109 n cm-2 s-1. Beam contamination is at a low level where it has no practical influence on beam performance. New computer controlled dose and beam monitoring systems have been implemented which assure precise dose delivery and redundant safety interlocks. An additional beam shutter and massive shielding in the back of the medical room have been added which significantly reduce room background and now permit staff entry without the necessity for lowering the reactor power. This system is needed for BNCT research by the MIT group as well as other US groups. This need became acute with the closure of the BMRR which previously had the only high quality thermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT in the USA.

  20. Microdosimetric measurements in the thermal neutron irradiation facility of LENA reactor.

    PubMed

    Colautti, P; Moro, D; Chiriotti, S; Conte, V; Evangelista, L; Altieri, S; Bortolussi, S; Protti, N; Postuma, I

    2014-06-01

    A twin TEPC with electric-field guard tubes has been constructed to be used to characterize the BNCT field of the irradiation facility of LENA reactor. One of the two mini TEPC was doped with 50ppm of (10)B in order to simulate the BNC events occurring in BNCT. By properly processing the two microdosimetric spectra, the gamma, neutron and BNC spectral components can be derived with good precision (~6%). However, direct measurements of (10)B in some doped plastic samples, which were used for constructing the cathode walls, point out the scarce accuracy of the nominal (10)B concentration value. The influence of the Boral(®) door, which closes the irradiation channel, has been measured. The gamma dose increases significantly (+51%) when the Boral(®) door is closed. The crypt-cell-regeneration weighting function has been used to measure the quality, namely the RBEµ value, of the radiation field in different conditions. The measured RBEµ values are only partially consistent with the RBE values of other BNCT facilities.

  1. Schlieren, Phase-Contrast, and Spectroscopy Diagnostics for the LBNL HIF Plasma Channel Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, D. M.; Niemann, C.; Fessenden, T. J.; Leemans, W.; Vandersloot, K.; Dahlbacka, G.; Yu, S. S.; Sharp, W. M.; Tauschwitz, A.

    1999-11-01

    The LBNL Plasma Channel experiment has demonstrated stable 42-cm Z-pinch discharge plasma channels with peak currents in excess of 50 kA for a 7 torr nitrogen, 30 kV discharge. These channels offer the possibility of transporting heavy-ion beams for inertial fusion. We postulate that the stability of these channels resides in the existance of a neutral-gas density depresion created by a pre-pulse discharge before the main capacitor bank discharge is created. Here, we present the results and experimental diagnostics setup used for the study of the pre-pulse and main bank channels. Observation of both the plasma and neutral gas dynamics is achieved. Schlieren, Zernike's phase-contrast, and spectroscopic techniques are used. Preliminary Schlieren results show a gas shockwave moving radially at a rate of ≈ 10^6 mm/sec as a result of the fast and localized deposited energy during the evolution of the pre-pulse channel. This data will be used to validate simulation codes (BUCKY and CYCLOPS).

  2. A 1 GeV Laser Wakefield Accelerator: Experimental Progress at the l'OASIS Facility of LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C. S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nagler, B.; Michel, P.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A.; Spence, D. J.; Hooker, S. M.; Filip, C.; Cowan, T.

    2004-11-01

    Experimental progress towards a 1 GeV laser-driven plasma-based accelerator will be discussed. The design of the 1 GeV accelerator module consists of two components: (1) an all-optical electron injector and (2) a plasma channel for laser guiding and electron acceleration to high energy via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. Experimental results on the injector development include the demonstration of laser guiding at relativistic intensities in preformed plasmas and production of quasi-monochromatic electron beams with energy around 100 MeV. Progress on guiding 100 TW laser pulses in capillary-discharge-based plasma channels will be discussed and integration of these channels with the all-optical injector will be reported.

  3. Dose calculation and in-phantom measurement in BNCT using response matrix method.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Shahriari, Majid

    2011-12-01

    In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) planning validation. If any changes take place in therapeutic neutron beam due to the beam shaping assembly (BSA) change, the dose will be changed so another group of simulations should be carried out for dose calculation. To avoid this time consuming procedure and speed up the dose calculation to help patients not wait for a long time, response matrix method was used. This procedure was performed for neutron beam of the optimized BSA as a reference beam. These calculations were carried out using the MCNPX, Monte Carlo code. The calculated beam parameters were measured for a SNYDER head phantom placed 10 cm away from beam the exit of the BSA. The head phantom can be assumed as a linear system and neutron beam and dose distribution can be assumed as an input and a response of this system (head phantom), respectively. Neutron spectrum energy was digitized into 27 groups. Dose response of each group was calculated. Summation of these dose responses is equal to a total dose of the whole neutron/gamma spectrum. Response matrix is the double dimension matrix (energy/dose) in which each parameter represents a depth-dose resulted from specific energy. If the spectrum is changed, response of each energy group may be differed. By considering response matrix and energy vector, dose response can be calculated. This method was tested for some BSA, and calculations show statistical errors less than 10%.

  4. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Burlon, A A; Kreiner, A J; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon, and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  5. Spectromicroscopy of boron for the optimization of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, B.; Redondo, J.; Baudat, P.-A.; Lorusso, G. F.; Andres, R.; Van Meir, E. G.; Brunet, J.-F.; Hamou, M.-F.; Suda, T.; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, M. Teresa; Droubay, T. C.; Tonner, B. P.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, M.; DeStasio, Gelsomina

    1998-10-01

    We used synchrotron spectromicroscopy to study the microscopic distribution of boron in rat brain tumour and healthy tissue in the field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The success of this experimental cancer therapy depends on the preferential uptake of ? in tumour cells after injection of a boron compound (in our case ?, or BSH). With the Mephisto (microscope à emission de photoélectrons par illumination synchrotronique de type onduleur) spectromicroscope, high-magnification imaging and chemical analysis was performed on brain tissue sections from a rat carrying an implanted brain tumour and the results were compared with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) detection of boron in bulk tissue. Boron was found to have been taken up more favourably by regions of tumour rather than healthy tissue, but the resulting boron distribution in the tumour was inhomogeneous. The results demonstrate that Mephisto can perform microchemical analysis of tissue sections, detect and localize the presence of boron with submicron spatial resolution. The application of this technique to boron in brain tissue can therefore be used to evaluate the current efforts to optimize BNC therapy.

  6. Development of a treatment planning system for BNCT based on positron emission tomography data: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, N.; Daquino, G. G.; Muzi, L.; Esposito, J.

    2004-01-01

    Present standard treatment planning (TP) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM - a kind of brain tumor), used in all boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) trials, requires the construction (based on CT and/or MRI images) of a 3D model of the patient head, in which several regions, corresponding to different anatomical structures, are identified. The model is then employed by a computer code to simulate radiation transport in human tissues. The assumption is always made that considering a single value of boron concentration for each specific region will not lead to significant errors in dose computation. The concentration values are estimated "indirectly", on the basis of previous experience and blood sample analysis. This paper describes an original approach, with the introduction of data on the in vivo boron distribution, acquired by a positron emission tomography (PET) scan after labeling the BPA (borono-phenylalanine) with the positron emitter 18F. The feasibility of this approach was first tested with good results using the code CARONTE. Now a complete TPS is under development. The main features of the first version of this code are described and the results of a preliminary study are presented. Significant differences in dose computation arise when the two different approaches ("standard" and "PET-based") are applied to the TP of the same GBM case.

  7. RF cavity R&D at LBNL for the NLC damping rings, FY1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.

    1999-11-01

    This report contains a summary of the R&D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal year19999. These activities include the optimization of the RF design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order (HOMs), by systematic study of the cavity profile, the effect of the beam pipe diameter, nosecone angle and gap, the cross section and position of the HOM damping waveguides and the coupler. The effect of the shape of the HOM waveguides and their intersection with the cavity wall on the local surface heating is also an important factor, since it determines the highest stresses in the cavity body. This was taken into account during the optimization so that the stresses could be reduced at the same time as the HOP damping was improved over previous designs. A new method of calculating the RF heating was employed, using a recently released high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS. This greatly facilitates the thermal and stress analysis of the design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. Preliminary designs are described for the cavity ancillary components including the RF window, HOM loads, and tuners. A preliminary manufacturing plan is included, with an initial estimate of the resource requirements. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either lower the R/Q, for reduced transient response, or lower the residual HOM impedance to reduce coupled-bunch growth rates further still.

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a new approach for clear cell sarcoma (CCS) treatment: Trial using a lung metastasis model of CCS.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tooru; Fujimoto, Takuya; Suzuki, Minoru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Sakuma, Toshiko; Sasai, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Teruya; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Akisue, Toshihiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In the present study, we established a lung metastasis animal model of CCS and investigated the therapeutic effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA). Biodistribution data revealed tumor-selective accumulation of (10)B. Unlike conventional gamma-ray irradiation, BNCT significantly suppressed tumor growth without damaging normal tissues, suggesting that it may be a potential new therapeutic option to treat CCS lung metastases.

  9. Beam shaping assembly of a D-T neutron source for BNCT and its dosimetry simulation in deeply-seated tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, F.; Khalili, S.

    2013-08-01

    This article involves two aims for BNCT. First case includes a beam shaping assembly estimation for a D-T neutron source to find epi-thermal neutrons which are the goal in the BNCT. Second issue is the percent depth dose calculation in the adult Snyder head phantom. Monte-Carlo simulations and verification of a suggested beam shaping assembly (including internal neutron multiplier, moderator, filter, external neutron multiplier, collimator, and reflector dimensions) for thermalizing a D-T neutron source as well as increasing neutron flux are carried out and our results are given herein. Finally, we have simulated its corresponding doses for treatment planning of a deeply-seated tumor.

  10. Biodistribution of the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and/or decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Nigg; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    BNCT was proposed for the treatment of diffuse, non-resectable tumors in the lung. We performed boron biodistribution studies with 5 administration protocols employing the boron carriers BPA and/or GB-10 in an experimental model of disseminated lung metastases in rats. All 5 protocols were non-toxic and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus lung. Absolute tumor boron concentration values were therapeutically useful (25–76 ppm) for 3 protocols. Dosimetric calculations indicate that BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic without exceeding radiotolerance in the lung.

  11. Mock-up experiment at Birmingham University for BNCT project of Osaka University--Neutron flux measurement with gold foil.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, S; Sakai, M; Yoshihashi, S; Manabe, M; Zushi, N; Murata, I; Hoashi, E; Kato, I; Kuri, S; Oshiro, S; Nagasaki, M; Horiike, H

    2015-12-01

    Mock-up experiment for development of accelerator based neutron source for Osaka University BNCT project was carried out at Birmingham University, UK. In this paper, spatial distribution of neutron flux intensity was evaluated by foil activation method. Validity of the design code system was confirmed by comparing measured gold foil activities with calculations. As a result, it was found that the epi-thermal neutron beam was well collimated by our neutron moderator assembly. Also, the design accuracy was evaluated to have less than 20% error.

  12. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones.

  13. A comparison of the dose RBE and the biological dosimetry approaches for treatment planning in BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, B.H. University Hospital, Stony Brook, NY . Dept. of Radiation Oncology); Liu, H.B.; Gordon, C.R.; Bond, V.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Treatment planning for clinical trials with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is complicated substantially by the fact that the radiation field generated by the activating external neutron beam is composed of several different types of radiation, i.e., fast neutrons, recoil protons from elastic collisions with hydrogen, gamma rays from the reactor and from neutron capture by body hydrogen, protons from nitrogen capture, and the products of the NCT interaction. Furthermore, the relative contribution of each type of radiation varies with depth in tissue. Because each of these radiations has its own RBE, and the RBE of the fast neutron component will not be constant as the neutron spectrum changes with depth, the problem of predicting the severity of the biological effect, in depth, becomes complex indeed. In order to attack this problem, Monte Carlo calculations of dose, checked against benchmark measurements, are employed. Two approaches are then used to assess the severity of the effect. In the first, the effective dose (D[sub EF]) is determined by summing the products of (D[center dot]RBE) for each radiation. The other approach involves placing cells at the location for which the D[sub EF] was calculated. Using a dose-response curvefrom a low-LET radiation, e.g. [sup 137]Cs gamma rays (D[sub [gamma]Ca]), the photon equivalent dose (PED, or D[sub P]) can be determined. If the RBE values used are correct, the D[sub EF] and the D[sub P] should be essentially identical.

  14. A comparison of the dose RBE and the biological dosimetry approaches for treatment planning in BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, B.H. |; Liu, H.B.; Gordon, C.R.; Bond, V.P.

    1992-12-31

    Treatment planning for clinical trials with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is complicated substantially by the fact that the radiation field generated by the activating external neutron beam is composed of several different types of radiation, i.e., fast neutrons, recoil protons from elastic collisions with hydrogen, gamma rays from the reactor and from neutron capture by body hydrogen, protons from nitrogen capture, and the products of the NCT interaction. Furthermore, the relative contribution of each type of radiation varies with depth in tissue. Because each of these radiations has its own RBE, and the RBE of the fast neutron component will not be constant as the neutron spectrum changes with depth, the problem of predicting the severity of the biological effect, in depth, becomes complex indeed. In order to attack this problem, Monte Carlo calculations of dose, checked against benchmark measurements, are employed. Two approaches are then used to assess the severity of the effect. In the first, the effective dose (D{sub EF}) is determined by summing the products of (D{center_dot}RBE) for each radiation. The other approach involves placing cells at the location for which the D{sub EF} was calculated. Using a dose-response curvefrom a low-LET radiation, e.g. {sup 137}Cs gamma rays (D{sub {gamma}Ca}), the photon equivalent dose (PED, or D{sub P}) can be determined. If the RBE values used are correct, the D{sub EF} and the D{sub P} should be essentially identical.

  15. The 28 GHZ, 10 KW, CW Gyrotron Generator for the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.; Evans, S.; Jory, H.; Holstein, D.; Rizzo, R.; Beck, P.; Cisto, B.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Collins, D.; Dwinell, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The VIA-301 Heatwave{sup TM} gyrotron generator was specifically designed to meet the requirements of the Venus ECR Ion Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end].This VIA-301 Heatwave{sup TM} gyrotron system provides 100 watts to 10 kW continuous wave (CW) RF output at 28 GHz. The RF output level is smoothly controllable throughout this entire range. The power can be set and maintained to within 10 watts at the higher power end of the power range and to within 30 watts at the lower power end of the power range. A dual directional coupler, analog conditioning circuitry, and a 12-bit analog input to the embedded controller are used to provide a power measurement accurate to within 2%. The embedded controller completes a feedback loop using an external command set point for desired power output. Typical control-loop-time is on the order of 500 mS. Hard-wired interlocks are provided for personnel safety and for protection of the generator system. In addition, there are software controlled interlocks for protection of the generator from high ambient temperature, high water temperature, and other conditions that would affect the performance of the generator or reduce the lifetime of the gyrotron. Cooling of the gyrotron and power supply is achieved using both water and forced circulation of ambient air. Water-cooling provides about 80% of the cooling requirement. Input power to the generator from the prime power line is less than 60 kW at full power. The Heatwave{sup TM} may be operated locally via its front panel or remotely via either RS-232 and/or Ethernet connections. Through the RS-232 the forward power, the reflected power

  16. The 28 GHZ, 10 KW, CW Gyrotron Generator for the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, M.; Evans, S.; Jory, H.; Holstein, D.; Rizzo, R.; Beck, P.; Cisto, B.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Collins, D.; Dwinell, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The VIA-301 Heatwave™ gyrotron generator was specifically designed to meet the requirements of the Venus ECR Ion Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end [1]. This VIA-301 Heatwave™ gyrotron system provides 100 watts to 10 kW continuous wave (CW) RF output at 28 GHz. The RF output level is smoothly controllable throughout this entire range. The power can be set and maintained to within 10 watts at the higher power end of the power range and to within 30 watts at the lower power end of the power range. A dual directional coupler, analog conditioning circuitry, and a 12-bit analog input to the embedded controller are used to provide a power measurement accurate to within 2%. The embedded controller completes a feedback loop using an external command set point for desired power output. Typical control-loop-time is on the order of 500 mS. Hard-wired interlocks are provided for personnel safety and for protection of the generator system. In addition, there are software controlled interlocks for protection of the generator from high ambient temperature, high water temperature, and other conditions that would affect the performance of the generator or reduce the lifetime of the gyrotron. Cooling of the gyrotron and power supply is achieved using both water and forced circulation of ambient air. Water-cooling provides about 80% of the cooling requirement. Input power to the generator from the prime power line is less than 60 kW at full power. The Heatwave™ may be operated locally via its front panel or remotely via either RS-232 and/or Ethernet connections. Through the RS-232 the forward power, the reflected power, the

  17. Neutron intensity monitor with activation foil for p-Li neutron source for BNCT--Feasibility test of the concept.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isao; Otani, Yuki; Sato, Fuminobu

    2015-12-01

    Proton-lithium (p-Li) reaction is being examined worldwide as a candidate nuclear production reaction for accelerator based neutron source (ABNS) for BNCT. In this reaction, the emitted neutron energy is not so high, below 1 MeV, and especially in backward angles the energy is as low as about 100 keV. The intensity measurement was thus known to be difficult so far. In the present study, a simple method was investigated to monitor the absolute neutron intensity of the p-Li neutron source by employing the foil activation method based on isomer production reactions in order to cover around several hundreds keV. As a result of numerical examination, it was found that (107)Ag, (115)In and (189)Os would be feasible. Their features found out are summarized as follows: (107)Ag: The most convenient foil, since the half life is short. (115)In: The accuracy is the best at 0°, though it cannot be used for backward angles. And (189)Os: Suitable nuclide which can be used in backward angles, though the gamma-ray energy is a little too low. These would be used for p-Li source monitoring depending on measuring purposes in real BNCT scenes.

  18. Optimization of Neutron Spectrum in Northwest Beam Tube of Tehran Research Reactor for BNCT, by MCNP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Shayesteh, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to gain the neutron spectrum with proper components specification for BNCT, it is necessary to design a Beam Shape Assembling (BSA), include of moderator, collimator, reflector, gamma filter and thermal neutrons filter, in front of the initial radiation beam from the source. According to the result of MCNP4C simulation, the Northwest beam tube has the most optimized neuron flux between three north beam tubes of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). So, it has been chosen for this purpose. Simulation of the BSA has been done in four above mentioned phases. In each stage, ten best configurations of materials with different length and width were selected as the candidates for the next stage. The last BSA configuration includes of: 78 centimeters of air as an empty space, 40 centimeters of Iron plus 52 centimeters of heavy-water as moderator, 30 centimeters of water or 90 centimeters of Aluminum-Oxide as a reflector, 1 millimeters of lithium (Li) as thermal neutrons filter and finally 3 millimeters of Bismuth (Bi) as a filter of gamma radiation. The result of Calculations shows that if we use this BSA configuration for TRR Northwest beam tube, then the best neutron flux and spectrum will be achieved for BNCT. (authors)

  19. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  20. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  1. First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Crivello, Martin; Perona, Marina; Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto; Pozzi, Emiliano; Casal, Mariana; Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a

  2. Validation of the scanning γ-ray telescope for in vivo dosimetry and boron measurements during BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbakel, W. F. A. R.

    2001-12-01

    γ-ray telescope scans of a box phantom with inhomogeneous boron concentrations have proven the feasibility of in vivo measurements of different boron distributions in the head of a patient during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Small structures with enhanced boron concentration can be reconstructed in a head phantom, even if the brain compartment of the phantom is surrounded by a skin layer with a ten times higher boron concentration. The motor-controlled telescope can scan the head/phantom, detecting boron and hydrogen prompt γ-rays emitted at neutron capture reactions with a two-dimensional spatial resolution of 14 mm full width at half maximum. For reconstruction of the boron concentrations from the measured γ-ray detection rates, a mathematical reconstruction algorithm is derived and discussed. Proper reconstruction requires position-dependent γ-ray measurements combined with treatment planning programme calculations of the thermal neutron distribution. In a head phantom, in which the brain and the skull (bulk) were represented using a homogeneous boron distribution of 5.2 +/- 0.5 ppm 10B, surrounded by a skin layer with a ten times higher boron concentration, the bulk concentration was reconstructed to 4.7 +/- 0.3 ppm 10B. Telescope scans along and perpendicular to the beam axis showed the influence of inhomogeneities with a high boron concentration such as skin and a simulated blood vessel, respectively with a low boron concentration such as white matter. The profiles of the boron and hydrogen γ-ray detection rates indicate how future patient measurements can be interpreted. In clinical trials, the telescope can then be used to investigate the averaged boron concentration in the bulk of a patient and local enhanced boron concentrations (e.g. in tumour tissue) in order to relate the measured boron dose distributions to the clinical effects of BNCT. Simultaneously, it can serve as quality control of the dosimetry during the irradiation.

  3. Measurement of the 33S(n,α) cross-section at n_TOF(CERN): Applications to BNCT

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté-Gilarte, Marta; Praena, Javier; Porras, Ignacio; Quesada, José Manuel; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Aim The main purpose of this work is to present a new (n,α) cross-section measurement for a stable isotope of sulfur, 33S, in order to solve existing discrepancies. Background 33S has been studied as a cooperating target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) because of its large (n,α) cross-section in the epithermal neutron energy range, the most suitable one for BNCT. Although the most important evaluated databases, such as ENDF, do not show any resonances in the cross-section, experimental measurements which provided data from 10 keV to 1 MeV showed that the lowest-lying and strongest resonance of 33S(n,α) cross-section occurs at 13.5 keV. Nevertheless, the set of resonance parameters that describe such resonance shows important discrepancies (more than a factor of 2) between them. Materials and methods A new measurement of the 33S(n,α)30Si reaction cross-section was proposed to the ISOLDE and Neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee of CERN. It was performed at n_TOF(CERN) in 2012 using MicroMegas detectors. Results In this work, we will present a brief overview of the experiment as well as preliminary results of the data analysis in the neutron energy range from thermal to 100 keV. These results will be taken into account to calculate the kerma-fluence factors corresponding to 33S in addition to 10B and those of a standard four-component ICRU tissue. Conclusions MCNP simulations of the deposited dose, including our experimental data, shows an important kerma rate enhancement at the surface of the tissue, mainly due to the presence of 33S. PMID:26933393

  4. Neutron flux assessment of a neutron irradiation facility based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, M L; Miller, M E

    2015-12-01

    Neutron generators based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion were considered for the design of a neutron irradiation facility for explanted organ Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) that could be installed in a health care center as well as in research areas. The chosen facility configuration is "irradiation chamber", a ~20×20×40 cm(3) cavity near or in the center of the facility geometry where samples to be irradiated can be placed. Neutron flux calculations were performed to study different manners for improving scattering processes and, consequently, optimize neutron flux in the irradiation position. Flux distributions were assessed through numerical simulations of several models implemented in MCNP5 particle transport code. Simulation results provided a wide spectrum of combinations of net fluxes and energy spectrum distributions. Among them one can find a group that can provide thermal neutron fluxes per unit of production rate in a range from 4.1·10(-4) cm(-2) to 1.6·10(-3) cm(-2) with epithermal-to-thermal ratios between 0.3% and 13% and fast-to-thermal ratios between 0.01% to 8%. Neutron generators could be built to provide more than 10(10) n s(-1) and, consequently, with an arrangement of several generators appropriate enough neutron fluxes could be obtained that would be useful for several BNCT-related irradiations and, eventually, for clinical practice.

  5. A carborane-derivative "click" reaction under heterogeneous conditions for the synthesis of a promising lipophilic MRI/GdBNCT agent.

    PubMed

    Toppino, Antonio; Bova, Maria Elena; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Alberti, Diego; Diana, Eliano; Barge, Alessandro; Aime, Silvio; Venturello, Paolo; Deagostino, Annamaria

    2013-01-07

    In this study, the Huisgen reaction has been used to functionalise a carborane cage with a lipophilic moiety and a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) ligand to obtain a new Gd boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent. The introduction of the triazole units has been accomplished under both heterogeneous conditions, by the use of a Cu-supported ionic-liquid catalyst, and homogeneous conditions. The ability of the Gd complex of the synthesised ligand to form stable adducts with low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) has been evaluated and then MRI has been performed on tumour melanoma cells incubated in the presence of a Gd-complex/LDL imaging probe. It has been concluded that the high amount of intracellular boron necessary to perform BNCT can be reached even in the presence of a relatively low-boron-containing LDL concentration.

  6. A noninvasive dose estimation system for clinical BNCT based on PG-SPECT--conceptual study and fundamental experiments using HPGe and CdTe semiconductor detectors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Sakurai, Y; Ishikawa, M

    2000-09-01

    A noninvasive method for measuring the absorbed dose distribution during the administration of clinical boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using an online three-dimensional (3D) imaging system is presented. This system is designed to provide more accurate information for treatment planning and dosimetry. The single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technique is combined with prompt gamma-ray analysis (PGA) to provide an ideal dose estimation system for BNCT. This system is termed PG-SPECT. The fundamental feasibility of the PG-SPECT system for BNCT is confirmed under the following conditions: (1) a voxel size of 1 x 1 x 1 cm3, comparable to the spatial resolution of our standard dosimetric technique using gold wire activation, where data are available for every 5-10 mm of wire length; (2) a reaction rate of 10B(n,alpha)7Li within the measurement volume is greater than 1.1 x l0(6) interactions/cm3/s, corresponding to a thermal neutron flux of 5 x 10(8) n/cm2/s and a 10B concentration of greater than 10 ppm for the deepest part of the tumor volume under typical BNCT clinical conditions; (3) statistical uncertainty of the count rate for 10B(n,alpha)7Li prompt gamma rays is 10% or less. The desirable characteristics of a detector for the PG-SPECT system were determined by basic experiments using both HPGe and CdTe semiconductor detectors. The CdTe semiconductor detector has the greatest potential for this system because of its compactness and simplicity of maintenance.

  7. Therapy region monitoring based on PET using 478 keV single prompt gamma ray during BNCT: A Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joo-Young; Lu, Bo; Yoon, Do-Kun; Hong, Key Jo; Jang, HongSeok; Liu, Chihray; Suh, Tae Suk

    2016-04-01

    We confirmed the feasibility of using our proposed system to extract two different kinds of functional images from a positron emission tomography (PET) module by using an insertable collimator during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Coincidence events from a tumor region that included boron particles were identified by a PET scanner before BNCT; subsequently, the prompt gamma ray events from the same tumor region were collected after exposure to an external neutron beam through an insertable collimator on the PET detector. Five tumor regions that contained boron particles and were located in the water phantom and in the BNCT system with the PET module were simulated with Monte Carlo simulation code. The acquired images were quantitatively analyzed. Based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in the five boron regions, A, B, C, D, and E, the PET and single-photon images were 10.2%, 11.7%, 8.2% (center region), 12.6%, and 10.5%, respectively. We were able to acquire simultaneously PET and single prompt photon images for tumor regions monitoring by using an insertable collimator without any additional isotopes.

  8. Suitability of boron carriers for BNCT: accumulation of boron in malignant and normal liver cells after treatment with BPA, BSH and BA.

    PubMed

    Chou, F I; Chung, H P; Liu, H M; Chi, C W; Lui, W Y

    2009-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma remains widely prevalent in tropical Africa and south-east Asia. At present, there are no effective treatments for hepatoma and its prognosis is extremely poor unless the tumor was diagnosed in an early stage and resected before metastasis. Therefore, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) may provide an alternative therapy for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, the intracellular concentrations of L-boronophenylalanine (BPA), sodium borocaptate (BSH) and boric acid (BA) were examined in human hepatoma HepG2 and liver Clone 9 cell cultures. With the use of 25 microgB/mL media of BPA, BSH and BA, the intracellular uptake of boron in HepG2 and Clone 9 cells was compared. The suitability of BPA, BSH and BA were further evaluated on the basis of organ-specific boron distribution in normal rat tissues. BPA, BSH and BA were administered via intraperitoneal injection into rats with corresponding boron concentrations of 7, 25, and 25mg/kg body weight, respectively. The accumulation rates of BPA, BSH and BA in HepG2 cells were higher than that of Clone 9 cells. Boron concentration in BPA, BSH and BA treated HepG2 cells were 1.8, 1.5, and 1.6-fold of Clone 9 cells at 4h, respectively. In both HepG2 and Clone 9 cells, although the concentration of boron in BPA-treated cells exceeded that in BA-treated ones, however, cells treated with BPA had similar surviving fraction as those treated with BA after neutron irradiation. The accumulation ratios of boron in liver, pancreas and kidney to boron in blood were 0.83, 4.16 and 2.47, respectively, in BPA treated rats, and 0.75, 0.35 and 2.89, respectively, in BSH treated rats at 3h after treatment. However, boron does not appear to accumulate specifically in soft tissues in BA treated rats. For in situ BNCT of hepatoma, normal organs with high boron concentration and adjacent to liver may be damaged in neutron irradiation. BPA showed high retention in pancreas and may not be a good drug for

  9. The Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Norman, Eric; Smith, Alan; Poon, Alan; Chan, Yuen-Dat

    2015-10-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility at LBNL provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors, such as those studying dark matter or neutrinos. The BLBF also makes a variety of environmental measurements in search of other radioisotopes, such as fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 and other radioisotope monitoring activities. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. In 2015, the BLBF will be relocating its underground counting stations to a new, dedicated space on the 4850L of SURF. The Black Hills State University Underground Campus will host several low background counting stations and operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC will be presented.

  10. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  11. Solar Fridges and Personal Power Grids: How Berkeley Lab is Fighting Global Poverty (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Buluswar, Shashi; Gadgil, Ashok

    2012-11-26

    At this November 26, 2012 Science at the Theater, scientists discussed the recently launched LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies (LIGTT) at Berkeley Lab. LIGTT is an ambitious mandate to discover and develop breakthrough technologies for combating global poverty. It was created with the belief that solutions will require more advanced R&D and a deep understanding of market needs in the developing world. Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil, Shashi Buluswar and seven other LIGTT scientists discussed what it takes to develop technologies that will impact millions of people. These include: 1) Fuel efficient stoves for clean cooking: Our scientists are improving the Berkeley Darfur Stove, a high efficiency stove used by over 20,000 households in Darfur; 2) The ultra-low energy refrigerator: A lightweight, low-energy refrigerator that can be mounted on a bike so crops can survive the trip from the farm to the market; 3) The solar OB suitcase: A low-cost package of the five most critical biomedical devices for maternal and neonatal clinics; 4) UV Waterworks: A device for quickly, safely and inexpensively disinfecting water of harmful microorganisms.

  12. RF cavity R&D at LBNL for the NLC Damping Rings,FY2000/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Atkinson, D.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.; Weidenbach, W.

    2001-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the R&D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal years 2000/2001. This work is a continuation of the NLC RF system R&D of the previous year [1]. These activities include the further optimization and fine tuning of the RF cavity design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order modes (HOMs). The cavity wall surface heating and stresses were reduced at the same time as the HOM damping was improved over previous designs. Final frequency tuning was performed using the high frequency electromagnetic analysis capability in ANSYS. The mechanical design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. The cavity ancillary components including the RF window, coupling box, HOM loads, and tuners have been studied in more detail. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either further lower the HOM impedance or increase the stored energy for reduced transient response. Superconducting designs and the use of external ''energy storage'' cavities are discussed. A section is included in which the calculation method is summarized and its accuracy assessed by comparisons with the laboratory measurements of the PEP-II cavity, including errors, and with the beam-sampled spectrum.

  13. Investigating a cyclotron HM-30 based neutron source for BNCT of deep-seated tumors by using shifting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suharyana; Riyatun; Octaviana, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    We have successfully proposed a simulation of a neutron beam-shaping assembly using MCNPX Code. This simulation study deals with designing a compact, optimized, and geometrically simple beam shaping assembly for a neutron source based on a proton cyclotron for BNCT purpose. Shifting method was applied in order to lower the fast neutron energy to the epithermal energy range by choosing appropriate materials. Based on a set of MCNPX simulations, it has been found that the best materials for beam shaping assembly are 3 cm Ni layered with 7 cm Pb as the reflector and 13 cm AlF3 the moderator. Our proposed beam shaping assembly configuration satisfies 2 of 5 of the IAEA criteria, namely the epithermal neutron flux 1.25 × 109 n.cm-2 s-1 and the gamma dose over the epithermal neutron flux is 0.18×10 -13 Gy.cm 2 n -1. However, the ratio of the fast neutron dose rate over neutron epithermal flux is still too high. We recommended that the shifting method must be accompanied by the filter method to reduce the fast neutron flux.

  14. Biokinetic analysis of tissue boron (¹⁰B) concentrations of glioma patients treated with BNCT in Finland.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Hippeläinen, E; Auterinen, I; Kankaanranta, L; Kulvik, M; Laakso, J; Seppälä, T; Savolainen, S; Joensuu, H

    2015-12-01

    A total of 98 patients with glioma were treated with BPA-F-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in Finland from 1999 to 2011. Thirty-nine (40%) had undergone surgery for newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 59 (60%) had malignant glioma recurrence after surgery. In this study we applied a closed 3-compartment model based on dynamic (18)F-BPA-PET studies to estimate the BPA-F concentrations in the tumor and the normal brain with time. Altogether 22 patients with recurrent glioma, treated within the context of a clinical trial, were evaluated using their individual measured whole blood (10)B concentrations as an input to the model. The delivered radiation doses to tumor and the normal brain were recalculated based on the modeled (10)B concentrations in the tissues during neutron irradiation. The model predicts from -7% to +29% (average, +11%) change in the average tumor doses as compared with the previously estimated doses, and from 17% to 61% (average, 36%) higher average normal brain doses than previously estimated due to the non-constant tumor-to-blood concentration ratios and considerably higher estimated (10)B concentrations in the brain at the time of neutron irradiation.

  15. Coarse-scaling adjustment of fine-group neutron spectra for epithermal neutron beams in BNCT using multiple activation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-01-01

    In order to provide an improved and reliable neutron source description for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a spectrum adjustment procedure named coarse-scaling adjustment has been developed and applied to the neutron spectrum measurements of both the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) epithermal neutron beam in Taiwan and the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in The Netherlands, using multiple activation detectors. The coarse-scaling adjustment utilizes a similar idea as the well-known two-foil method, which adjusts the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes according to the Maxwellian distribution for thermal neutrons and 1/ E distribution over the epithermal neutron energy region. The coarse-scaling adjustment can effectively suppress the number of oscillations appearing in the adjusted spectrum and provide better smoothness. This paper also presents a sophisticated 9-step process utilizing twice the coarse-scaling adjustment which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with satisfactory continuity and excellently matched reaction rates between measurements and calculation. The spectrum adjustment algorithm applied in this study is the same as the well-known SAND-II.

  16. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  17. Hope or Hype? What is Next for Biofuels? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay; Bristow, Jim; Tringe, Susannah Green

    2009-09-28

    Science at the Theater: From the sun to your gas tank: A new breed of biofuels may help solve the global energy challenge and reduce the impact of fossil fuels on global warming. KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who are developing ways to convert the solar energy stored in plants into liquid fuels. Jay Keasling is one of the foremost authorities in the field of synthetic biology. He is applying this research toward the production of advanced carbon-neutral biofuels that can replace gasoline on a gallon-for-gallon basis. Keasling is Berkeley Labs Acting Deputy Director and the Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. Department of Energys Joint BioEnergy Institute. Jim Bristow is deputy director of programs for the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility in Walnut Creek, CA. He developed and implemented JGIs Community Sequencing Program, which provides large-scale DNA sequencing and analysis to advance genomics related to bioenergy and environmental characterization and cleanup. Susanna Green Tringe is a computational biologist with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). She helped pioneer the field of metagenomics, a new strategy for isolating, sequencing, and characterizing DNA extracted directly from environmental samples, such as the contents of the termite gut, which yielded enzymes responsible for breakdown of wood into fuel.

  18. Hope or Hype? What is Next for Biofuels? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay; Bristow, Jim; Tringe, Susannah Green

    2016-07-12

    Science at the Theater: From the sun to your gas tank: A new breed of biofuels may help solve the global energy challenge and reduce the impact of fossil fuels on global warming. KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who are developing ways to convert the solar energy stored in plants into liquid fuels. Jay Keasling is one of the foremost authorities in the field of synthetic biology. He is applying this research toward the production of advanced carbon-neutral biofuels that can replace gasoline on a gallon-for-gallon basis. Keasling is Berkeley Labs Acting Deputy Director and the Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. Department of Energys Joint BioEnergy Institute. Jim Bristow is deputy director of programs for the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility in Walnut Creek, CA. He developed and implemented JGIs Community Sequencing Program, which provides large-scale DNA sequencing and analysis to advance genomics related to bioenergy and environmental characterization and cleanup. Susanna Green Tringe is a computational biologist with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). She helped pioneer the field of metagenomics, a new strategy for isolating, sequencing, and characterizing DNA extracted directly from environmental samples, such as the contents of the termite gut, which yielded enzymes responsible for breakdown of wood into fuel.

  19. Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Milliron, Delia; Sanili, Babak; Weber-Bargioni, Alex; Xu, Ting

    2011-06-06

    Science at the Theater, June 6th, 2011: Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Alex Weber-Bargioni: How can we see things at the nanoscale? Alex is pioneering new methods that provide unprecedented insight into nanoscale materials and molecular interactions. The goal is to create rules for building nanoscale materials. Babak Sanii: Nature is an expert at making nanoscale devices such as proteins. Babak is developing ways to see these biological widgets, which could help scientists develop synthetic devices that mimic the best that nature has to offer. Ting Xu: How are we going to make nanoscale devices? A future in which materials and devices are able to assemble themselves may not be that far down the road. Ting is finding ways to induce a wide range of nanoscopic building blocks to assemble into complex structures. Delia Milliron: The dividends of nanoscience could reshape the way we live, from smart windows and solar cells to artificial photosynthesis and improved medical diagnosis. Delia is at the forefront of converting fundamental research into nanotechnology. Moderated by Jim DeYoreo, interim director of the Molecular Foundry, a facility located at Berkeley Lab where scientists from around the world address the myriad challenges in nanoscience.

  20. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  1. Summary of Information and Resources Related to Energy Use in Healthcare Facilities - Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Coughlin, Jennifer L.; Mathew, Paul A.

    2009-09-08

    This document presents the results of a review of publicly available information on energy use in health care facilities. The information contained in this document and in the sources cited herein provides the background and context for efforts to reduce energy use and costs in health care. Recognizing the breadth and diversity of relevant information, the author acknowledges that the report is likely not comprehensive. It is intended only to present a broad picture of what is currently known about health care energy use. This review was conducted as part of a 'High Performance Health Care Buildings' research study funded by the California Energy Commission. The study was motivated by the recognition that health care facilities collectively account for a substantial fraction of total commercial building energy use, due in large part to the very high energy intensity of hospitals and other inpatient care facilities. The goal of the study was to develop a roadmap of research, development and deployment (RD&D) needs for the health care industry. In addition to this information review, the road map development process included interviews with industry experts and a full-day workshop at LBNL in March 2009. This report is described as 'Version 1' with the intent that it will be expanded and updated as part of an ongoing LBNL program in healthcare energy efficiency. The document is being released in this form with the hope that it can assist others in finding and accessing the resources described within.

  2. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-02-01

    care, airport, and manufacturing facilities.

  3. LBNL 2011 Inter-Laboratory Comparison for Laboratories Submitting Specular Data to the International Glazings Database (IGDB)

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, Jacob C.

    2012-08-01

    Laboratories that submit data to the International Glazings Database (IGDB) have to participate in an inter-laboratory comparison (ILC) every four years. This is a procedure that allow both contributors and database maintainers to confirm that the measurement capabilities of the laboratories are of high quality. All laminate and applied film samples are manufactured using the same batch of clear glass to allow for an investigation of the accuracy in the Optics 5 laminate deconstruction process. The IGDB contains optical information in the wavelength region between 300-2500 nm where transmittance as well as reflectance for both the front and the back surface is recorded. In addition to that emissivity, obtained through measurement of reflectance between 5 and 25 m, is recorded for both the front and back surface. The goal for submitters is to pass within the tolerances dictated by NFRC document 302 which states that transmittances should be within 1% and reflectance/emissivity withing 2%. As an organizing entity LBNL aims to educate and help submitters troubleshoot any issues that give rise to systematic errors. The ILC is a living ILC and does not necessarily contain the first result submitted by a lab. As errors are found submitters are encouraged to correct procedures or update equipment so that they are allowed to submit data to the IGDB. The risk of this practice is that if any of the recommended solutions introduces new systematic errors this will start to influence the average. Therefore this report tries to highlight the recommendations made so that they can be challenged.

  4. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for HER2+ breast cancers: A feasibility study evaluating BNCT for potential role in breast conservation therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Peter Anthony

    A novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) regimen for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancers has been proposed as an alternative to whole breast irradiation for breast conservation therapy patients. The proposed therapy regimen is based on the assumed production of boron delivery agents that would be synthesized from compounds of Trastuzumab (Herceptin ®) and oligomeric phosphate diesters (OPDs). The combination of the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody and the high boron loading capability of OPDs has led to the assumption that boron could be delivered to the HER2+ cancer cells at Tumor to Healthy Tissue ratios (T:H) of up to 35:1 and boron concentrations above 50 μg/g. This significantly increased boron delivery efficiency has opened new BNCT possibilities. This proof of concept study examined treatment parameters derived as the results in previous efforts in the context of patient-specific geometry and compared calculated dose results to those observed during actual patient therapy. These results were based on dose calculations performed with a set of calculated Kerma coefficients derived from tissues specific to the regions of interest for breast cancer. A comparison was made of the dose to the tumor region, the patient's skin, and the peripheral organs. The results of this study demonstrated that, given the performance of the proposed boron delivery agent, the BNCT treatment regimen is feasible. The feasibility is based on the findings that the equivalent dose could be delivered to the treatment volume with less dose to the skin and peripheral organs. This is anticipated to improve the treatment outcomes by maintaining local control of tumor cells while reducing dose to healthy tissues.

  5. L-DOPA Preloading Increases the Uptake of Borophenylalanine in C6 Glioma Rat Model: A New Strategy to Improve BNCT Efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Capuani, Silvia Gili, Tommaso; Bozzali, Marco; Russo, Salvatore; Porcari, Paola; Cametti, Cesare; D'Amore, Emanuela; Colasanti, Marco; Venturini, Giorgio; Maraviglia, Bruno; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Pastore, Francesco S.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapeutic modality based on {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, for the treatment of malignant gliomas. One of the main limitations for BNCT effectiveness is the insufficient intake of {sup 10}B nuclei in the tumor cells. This work was aimed at investigating the use of L-DOPA as a putative enhancer for {sup 10}B-drug 4-dihydroxy-borylphenylalanine (BPA) uptake in the C6-glioma model. The investigation was first performed in vitro and then extended to the animal model. Methods and Materials: BPA accumulation in C6-glioma cells was assessed using radiowave dielectric spectroscopy, with and without L-DOPA preloading. Two L-DOPA incubation times (2 and 4 hours) were investigated, and the corresponding effects on BPA accumulation were quantified. C6-glioma cells were also implanted in the brain of 32 rats, and tumor growth was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. Rats were assigned to two experimental branches: (1) BPA administration; (2) BPA administration after pretreatment with L-DOPA. All animals were sacrificed, and assessments of BPA concentrations in tumor tissue, normal brain, and blood samples were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: L-DOPA preloading induced a massive increase of BPA concentration in C6-glioma cells only after a 4-hour incubation. In the animal model, L-DOPA pretreatment produced a significantly higher accumulation of BPA in tumor tissue but not in normal brain and blood samples. Conclusions: This study suggests the potential use of L-DOPA as enhancer for BPA accumulation in malignant gliomas eligible for BNCT. L-DOPA preloading effect is discussed in terms of membrane transport mechanisms.

  6. Design study of multi-imaging plate system for BNCT irradiation field at Kyoto university reactor.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Endo, Satoru

    2016-09-01

    The converter configuration for a multi-imaging plate system was investigated for the application of quality assurance in the irradiation field profile for boron neutron capture therapy. This was performed by the simulation calculation using the PHITS code in the fields at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. The converter constituents investigated were carbon for gamma rays, and polyethylene with and without LiF at varied (6)Li concentration for thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. Consequently, potential combinations of the converters were found for two components, gamma rays and thermal neutrons, for the standard thermal neutron mode and three components of gamma rays, epithermal neutrons, and thermal or fast neutrons, for the standard mixed or epithermal neutron modes, respectively.

  7. RADIATION DOSIMETRY IN THE BNCT PATIENT TREATMENT ROOM AT THE BMRR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.-P.

    2005-05-08

    The Medical Research Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BMRR) was a heterogeneous, tank type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was operated on demand at a power level up to 3 mega-watts (MW) for medical and biological research [1]. The reactor first went critical on March 15, 1959, with 17 fresh fuel elements (2.52 kg uranium-235 in a total of 2.7 kg uranium) in the center core. The BMRR had two treatment rooms on opposite sides of the core. It had a predominately thermal neutron beam in the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNE) on the west side of the core. By early 1990, a redesigned beam line had a predominately epithermal neutron beam in the Epithermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (ENIF) on the east side of the core [2]. The ENP was approximately 11 feet by 21 feet in size with its focal point consisting of a bismuth plate mounted in the wall adjacent to the reactor shield about 36 inches above the floor. The beam originated at a shutter constructed of 0.75 inch steel filled with concrete and weighing {approx}21 tons. Access to the ENIF was through a pair of hand operated steel shielding doors, each 42 inches wide, 84 inches high and 5 inches thick. The inner door had a 4-inch thick layer of paraffin on the side facing the reactor. The doors 5000 pounds weighed each. Additional shielding material had been added to the entire beam port at reactor wall within the ENIF. The shielding material consisted of 2-inch thick polyethylene sheets, which were impregnated with 95%-enriched {sup 6}Li in lithium carbonate (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). The shielding sheets around the port face were designed to allow the insertion of a variety of different beam collimators.

  8. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling.

  9. Exploration of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing Through Neutron Activator Design for Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Formation in (99)Mo Production and BNCT Applications.

    PubMed

    Khorshidi, Abdollah

    2015-10-01

    A feasibility study was performed to design thermal and epithermal neutron sources for radioisotope production and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by moderating fast neutrons. The neutrons were emitted from the reaction between (9)Be, (181)Ta, and (184)W targets and 30 MeV protons accelerated by a small cyclotron at 300 μA. In this study, the adiabatic resonance crossing (ARC) method was investigated by means of (207)Pb and (208)Pb moderators, graphite reflector, and boron absorber around the moderator region. Thermal/epithermal flux, energy, and cross section of accumulated neutrons in the activator were examined through diverse thicknesses of the specified regions. Simulation results revealed that the (181)Ta target had the highest neutron yield, and also tungsten was found to have the highest values in both surface and volumetric flux ratio. Transmutation in the (98)Mo sample through radiative capture was investigated for the natural lead moderator. When the sample radial distance from the target was increased inside the graphite region, the production yield had the greatest value of activity. The potential of the ARC method is a replacement or complements the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes.

  10. Application of an octa-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetra[3,5-(nido-carboranylmethyl)phenyl]porphyrin (H2OCP) as dual sensitizer for BNCT and PDT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The applications of the octa-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetra[3,5-(nidocarboranylmethyl) phenyl]porphyrin (H2OCP) as a boron delivery agent in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been investigated. Using F98 Rat glioma cells, we evaluated the cytotox...

  11. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-07

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  12. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is

  13. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  14. Experimental Studies of Boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) Biodistribution for the Individual Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for Malignant Melanoma Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Carpano, Marina; Perona, Marina; Rodriguez, Carla; Nievas, Susana; Olivera, Maria; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Brandizzi, Daniel; Cabrini, Romulo; Pisarev, Mario; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with the same histopathologic diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma treated with identical protocols of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have shown different clinical outcomes. The objective of the present studies was to evaluate the biodistribution of boronophenilalanina ({sup 10}BPA) for the potential application of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma on an individual basis. Methods and Materials: The boronophenilalanine (BPA) uptake was evaluated in 3 human melanoma cell lines: MEL-J, A375, and M8. NIH nude mice were implanted with 4 10{sup 6} MEL-J cells, and biodistribution studies of BPA (350 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were performed. Static infrared imaging using a specially modified infrared camera adapted to measure the body infrared radiance of small animals was used. Proliferation marker, Ki-67, and endothelial marker, CD31, were analyzed in tumor samples. Results: The in vitro studies demonstrated different patterns of BPA uptake for each analyzed cell line (P<.001 for MEL-J and A375 vs M8 cells). The in vivo studies showed a maximum average boron concentration of 25.9 ± 2.6 μg/g in tumor, with individual values ranging between 11.7 and 52.0 μg/g of {sup 10}B 2 hours after the injection of BPA. Tumor temperature always decreased as the tumors increased in size, with values ranging between 37°C and 23°C. A significant correlation between tumor temperature and tumor-to-blood boron concentration ratio was found (R{sup 2} = 0.7, rational function fit). The immunohistochemical studies revealed, in tumors with extensive areas of viability, a high number of positive cells for Ki-67, blood vessels of large diameter evidenced by the marker CD31, and a direct logistic correlation between proliferative status and boron concentration difference between tumor and blood (R{sup 2} = 0.81, logistic function fit). Conclusion: We propose that these methods could be suitable for designing new screening protocols applied before melanoma BNCT

  15. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Aghajanzadeh, Arian; Wray, Craig; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-30

    Previous research over a period of six years has identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response (DR), automated demand response (Auto-­DR), and Energy Efficiency (EE) measures. This report summarizes that work, including the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy used and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and automated demand response opportunities. Furthermore, this report summarizes the DR potential of three wastewater treatment facilities. In particular, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has collected data at these facilities from control systems, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. The collected data were then used to generate a summary of wastewater power demand, factors affecting that demand, and demand response capabilities. These case studies show that facilities that have implemented energy efficiency measures and that have centralized control systems are well suited to shed or shift electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. In summary, municipal wastewater treatment energy demand in California is large, and energy-­intensive equipment offers significant potential for automated demand response. In particular, large load reductions were achieved by targeting effluent pumps and centrifuges. One of the limiting factors to implementing demand response is the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration at an earlier stage of the process. Another limiting factor is that cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities, limit a facility’s potential to participate in other DR activities.

  16. In-phantom dosimetry for the 13C(d,n)14N reaction as a source for accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Burlon, A A; Kreiner, A J; White, S M; Blackburn, B W; Gierga, D P; Yanch, J C

    2001-05-01

    The use of the 13C(d,n) 14N reaction at Ed=1.5 MeV for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (AB-BNCT) is investigated. Among the deuteron-induced reactions at low incident energy, the 3C(d,n)14N reaction turns out to be one of the best for AB-BNCT because of beneficial materials properties inherent to carbon and its relatively large neutron production cross section. The deuteron beam was produced by a tandem accelerator at MIT's Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA) and the neutron beam shaping assembly included a heavy water moderator and a lead reflector. The resulting neutron spectrum was dosimetrically evaluated at different depths inside a water-filled brain phantom using the dual ionization chamber technique for fast neutrons and photons and bare and cadmium-covered gold foils for the thermal neutron flux. The RBE doses in tumor and healthy tissue were calculated from experimental data assuming a tumor 10B concentration of 40 ppm and a healthy tissue 10B concentration of 11.4 ppm (corresponding to a reported ratio of 3.5:1). All results were simulated using the code MCNP, a general Monte Carlo radiation transport code capable of simulating electron, photon, and neutron transport. Experimental and simulated results are presented at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 cm depths along the brain phantom centerline. An advantage depth of 5.6 cm was obtained for a treatment time of 56 min assuming a 4 mA deuteron current and a maximum healthy tissue dose of 12.5 RBE Gy.

  17. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find…

  18. Final report for the 1996 DOE grant supporting research at the SLAC/LBNL/LLNL B factory

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D.; Wright, D.

    1997-08-08

    This final report discusses Department of Energy-supported research funded through Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) which was performed as part of a collaboration between LLNL and Prairie View A and M University to develop part of the BaBar detector at the SLAC B Factory. This work focuses on the Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) subsystem of BaBar and involves a full range of detector development activities: computer simulations of detector performance, creation of reconstruction algorithms, and detector hardware R and D. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a leading role in the IFR subsystem and has established on-site computing and detector facilities to conduct this research. By establishing ties with the existing LLNL Research Collaboration Program and leveraging LLNL resources, the experienced Prairie View group was able to quickly achieve a more prominent role within the BaBar collaboration and make significant contributions to the detector design. In addition, this work provided the first entry point for Historically Black Colleges and Universities into the B Factory collaboration, and created an opportunity to train a new generation of minority students at the premier electron-positron high energy physics facility in the US.

  19. A Small-Animal Irradiation Facility for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the RA-3 Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Emiliano Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Marcelo Miller; Silvia I. Thorp; Amanda E. Schwint; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica A. Trivillin; Leandro Zarza; Guillermo Estryk

    2007-11-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) has constructed a thermal neutron source for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CNEA have jointly conducted some initial neutronic characterization measurements for one particular configuration of this source. The RA-3 reactor (Figure 1) is an open pool type reactor, with 20% enriched uranium plate-type fuel and light water coolant. A graphite thermal column is situated on one side of the reactor as shown. A tunnel penetrating the graphite structure enables the insertion of samples while the reactor is in normal operation. Samples up to 14 cm height and 15 cm width are accommodated.

  20. Downgrading Nuclear Facilities to Radiological Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jarry, Jeffrey F.; Farr, Jesse Oscar; Duran, Leroy

    2015-08-01

    Based on inventory reductions and the use of alternate storage facilities, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) downgraded 4 SNL Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) nuclear facilities to less-than-HC-3 radiological facilities. SNL’s Waste Management and Pollution Prevention Department (WMPPD) managed the HC-3 nuclear facilities and implemented the downgrade. This paper will examine the downgrade process,

  1. Design and optimization of a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation using a simulated head phantom.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2012-12-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to design a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator. The optimization of this configuration has been realized in different steps. This proposed system consists of metallic uranium as neutron multiplier, TiF(3) and Al(2)O(3) as moderators, Pb as reflector, Ni as shield and Li-Poly as collimator to guide neutrons toward the patient position. The in-air parameters recommended by IAEA were assessed for this proposed configuration without using any filters which enables us to have a high epithermal neutron flux at the beam port. Also a simulated Snyder head phantom was used to evaluate dose profiles due to the irradiation of designed beam. The dose evaluation results and depth-dose curves show that the neutron beam designed in this work is effective for deep-seated brain tumor treatments even with D-T neutron generator with a neutron yield of 2.4×10(12) n/s. The Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4C is used in order to perform these calculations.

  2. Synthesis and in-vivo detection of boronated compounds for use in BNCT. Final progress report, August 1, 1989--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1993-08-01

    Carboranes contain ten boron atoms in a three-dimensional space equivalent to a benzene ring; consequently, the carborane isomers can be utilized to prepare a variety of boron-rich agents for potential use in boron-neutron capture therapy. We developed synthetic methodology suitable for use with carboranes preparing amino acids and other physio-logically active compounds of potential use in BNCT. The methodology involves the conversion of simple carboranes into more complex, reactive organometallic reagents which can then be utilized to prepare agents which will target the nuclei of tumor cells. Specific examples include the projected syntheses of boron analogs of known intercolators such as Diazaquone (AZQ) which have been proven effectiveness in chemotherapy. We have also synthesized and carried out biodistribution studies of gadolinium labeled liposomes (GLL) which were developed in our laboratory. Gadolinium like boron-10, has an excellent neutron cross section and is considered to be of potential use in neutron capture therapy. GLL are constructed by adding gadolinium based amphiphiles.

  3. Do the various radiations present in BNCT act synergistically? Cell survival experiments in mixed alpha-particle and gamma-ray fields.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Ben; Green, Stuart; Hill, Mark A; Jones, Bleddyn; Mill, Andrew; Stevens, David L

    2009-07-01

    In many radiotherapy situations patients are exposed to mixed field radiation. In particular in BNCT, as with all neutron beam exposures, a significant fraction of the dose is contributed by low LET gamma ray photons. The components of such a mixed field may show a synergistic interaction and produce a greater cell kill effect than would be anticipated from the independent action of the different radiation types. Such a synergy would have important implications for treatment planning and in the interpretation of clinical results. An irradiation setup has been created at the Medical Research Council in Harwell to allow simultaneous irradiation of cells by cobalt-60 gamma rays and plutonium-238 alpha-particles. The setup allows for variation of dose and dose rates for both sources along with variation of the alpha particle energy. A series of cell survival assays for this mixed field have been carried out using V79-4 cells and compared to exposures to the individual components of the field under identical conditions. In the experimental setup described no significant synergistic effect was observed.

  4. Breadboard Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In the sixties, Chrysler was NASA's prime contractor for the Saturn I and IB test launch vehicles. The company installed and operated at Huntsville what was known as the Saturn I/IB Development Breadboard Facility. "Breadboard," means an array of electrical and electronic equipment for performing a variety of development and test functions. This work gave Chrysler a broad capability in computerized testing to assure quality control in development of solid-state electronic systems. Today that division is manufacturing many products not destined for NASA, most of them being associated with the company's automotive line. A major project is production and quality-control testing of the "lean-burn" engine, one that has a built-in Computer to control emission timing, and allow the engine to run on a leaner mixture of fuel and air. Other environment-related products include vehicle emission analyzers. The newest of the line is an accurate, portable solid state instrument for testing auto exhaust gases. The exhaust analyzers, now being produced for company dealers and for service

  5. Computational assessment of deep-seated tumor treatment capability of the 9Be(d,n)10B reaction for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (AB-BNCT).

    PubMed

    Capoulat, M E; Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-03-01

    The 9Be(d,n)10B reaction was studied as an epithermal neutron source for brain tumor treatment through Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In BNCT, neutrons are classified according to their energies as thermal (<0.5 eV), epithermal (from 0.5 eV to 10 keV) or fast (>10 keV). For deep-seated tumors epithermal neutrons are needed. Since a fraction of the neutrons produced by this reaction are quite fast (up to 5-6 MeV, even for low-bombarding energies), an efficient beam shaping design is required. This task was carried out (1) by selecting the combinations of bombarding energy and target thickness that minimize the highest-energy neutron production; and (2) by the appropriate choice of the Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) geometry, for each of the combinations found in (1). The BSA geometry was determined as the configuration that maximized the dose deliverable to the tumor in a 1 h treatment, within the constraints imposed by the healthy tissue dose adopted tolerance. Doses were calculated through the MCNP code. The highest dose deliverable to the tumor was found for an 8 μm target and a deuteron beam of 1.45 MeV. Tumor weighted doses ≥40 Gy can be delivered up to about 5 cm in depth, with a maximum value of 51 Gy at a depth of about 2 cm. This dose performance can be improved by relaxing the treatment time constraint and splitting the treatment into two 1-h sessions. These good treatment capabilities strengthen the prospects for a potential use of this reaction in BNCT.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular-scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    PubMed

    Chandra, S; Ahmad, T; Barth, R F; Kabalka, G W

    2014-06-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 ((10)B) atoms to individual tumour cells. Cell killing results from the (10)B (n, α)(7) Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of (10)B atoms are localized in the tumour cells. Intranuclear (10)B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of (10)B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumour cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular-scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, a secondary ion mass spectrometry based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high-grade gliomas, recurrent tumours of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumour cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This

  7. Facility Focus: Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines projects that demonstrate three different commitments administrators make to their athletic facilities: convenience; excellence; and comfort. Projects discussed involve a fitness center, a football stadium, and a multi-sport indoor practice facility. (GR)

  8. Modification of the University of Washington Neutron Radiotherapy Facility for optimization of neutron capture enhanced fast-neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Nigg, D W; Wemple, C A; Risler, R; Hartwell, J K; Harker, Y D; Laramore, G E

    2000-02-01

    A modified neutron production target assembly has been developed to provide improved performance of the proton-cyclotron-based neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington for applications involving neutron capture enhanced fast-neutron therapy. The new target produces a neutron beam that yields essentially the same fast-neutron physical depth-dose distribution as is produced by the current UW clinical system, but that also has an increased fraction of BNCT enhancement relative to the total therapeutic dose. The modified target is composed of a 5-millimeter layer of beryllium, followed by a 2.5-millimeter layer of tungsten, with a water-cooled copper backing. Measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum of the beam produced by the new target were performed using activation foils with a direct spectral unfolding technique. Water phantom measurements were performed using a tissue-equivalent ion chamber to characterize the fast-neutron depth-dose curve and sodium activation in soda-lime glass beads to characterize the thermal-neutron flux (and thus the expected neutron capture dose enhancement) as a function of depth. The results of the various measurements were quite consistent with expectations based on the design calculations for the modified target. The spectrum of the neutron beam produced by the new target features an enhanced low-energy flux component relative to the spectrum of the beam produced by the standard UW target. However, it has essentially the same high-energy neutron flux, with a reduced flux component in the mid-range of the energy spectrum. As a result, the measured physical depth-dose curve in a large water phantom has the same shape compared to the case of the standard UW clinical beam, but approximately twice the level of BNCT enhancement per unit background neutron dose at depths of clinical interest. In-vivo clinical testing of BNCT-enhanced fast-neutron therapy for canine lung tumors using the new beam was recently

  9. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  10. Near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutrons on the practical conditions using thick Li-target and Gaussian proton energies for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kenichi; Bengua, Gerard; Nakao, Noriaki; Kosako, Kazuaki

    2014-06-01

    The near threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutrons generated by incident proton energy having Gaussian distribution with mean energies from 1.85 to 1.95MeV, were studied as a practical neutron source for BNCT wherein an RFQ accelerator and a thick Li-target are used. Gaussian energy distributions with the standard deviation of 0, 10, 20 and 40keV for mean proton energies from 1.85 to 1.95MeV were surveyed in 0.01MeV increments. A thick liquid Li-target whose dimensions were established in our previous experiments (i.e., 1mm-thick with 50mm width and 50mm length) was considered in this study. The suitable incident proton energy and physical dimensions of Pb layer which serves as a gamma absorber and a Polyethylene layer which is used as a BDE were surveyed by means of the concepts of TPD. Dose distribution were calculated by using MCNP5. A proton beam with mean energy of 1.92MeV and a Gaussian energy distribution with a standard deviation of 20keV at a current of 10mA was selected from the viewpoint of irradiation time and practically achievable proton current. The suitable thicknesses of Pb gamma absorber was estimated to be about 3cm. The estimated thickness of the polyethylene BDE was about 24mm for an ideal proton current of 13mA, and was 18mm for a practical proton current of 10mA.

  11. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  12. Low Background Counting with the Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Alan; Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Smith, Alan; Norman, Eric; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Berkeley Low Background Facility Team; Black Hills State University Underground Campus Team

    2016-09-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and 4,850 feet underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD in a dedicated cleanroom at the Black Hills State University Underground Campus (BHUC). A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors. Experiments utilizing these needs often include those studying dark matter, neutrinos, or neutrinoless double beta decay. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. The BHUC will ultimately host several HPGe low background counting stations and other sensitive instruments from several incoming low background groups and projects that will operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC facility, status, and future plans will also be discussed.

  13. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  14. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  15. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  16. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  17. TPD-based evaluation of near threshold mono-energetic proton energies for the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be production of neutrons for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bengua, Gerard; Kobayashi, Tooru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Unesaki, Hironobu

    2006-08-21

    An evaluation of mono-energetic proton energies ranging from 1.885 MeV to 1.920 MeV was carried out to determine the viability of these near threshold energies in producing neutrons for BNCT via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. Neutron fields generated at these proton energies were assessed using the treatable protocol depth (TPD) and the maximum TPD (TPD(max)) as evaluation indices. The heavy charged particle (HCP) dose rate to tumour was likewise applied as a figure of merit in order to account for irradiation time and required proton current. Incident proton energies closer to the reaction threshold generated deeper TPDs compared to higher energy protons when no boron dose enhancers (BDE) were placed in the irradiation field. Introducing a BDE resulted in improved TPDs for high proton energies but their achievable TPD(max) were comparatively lower than that obtained for lower proton energies. In terms of the HCP dose rate to tumour, higher proton energies generated neutron fields that yielded higher dose rates both at TPD(max) and at fixed depths of comparison. This infers that higher currents are required to deliver the prescribed treatment dose to tumours for proton beams with energies closer to the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction threshold and more achievable proton currents of around 10 mA or less for proton energies from 1.900 MeV and above. The dependence on incident proton energy of the TPD, TPD(max) and the HCP dose rate to tumour with respect to the (10)B concentration in tumour and healthy tissues were also clarified in this study. Increasing the (10)B concentration in tumour while maintaining a constant T/N ratio resulted in deeper TPD(max) where a greater change in TPD(max) was obtained for proton energies closer to the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction threshold. The HCP dose rates to tumour for all proton energies also went up, with the higher proton energies benefiting more from the increased (10)B concentration.

  18. Extra-corporeal liver BNCT for the treatment of diffuse metastases: what was learned and what is still to be learned.

    PubMed

    Zonta, A; Pinelli, T; Prati, U; Roveda, L; Ferrari, C; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Mazzini, G; Dionigi, P; Altieri, S; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Fossati, F

    2009-07-01

    Almost eight years ago, in December 2001, we performed for the first time in the world thermal neutron irradiation on an isolated liver of a patient. The organ was affected by diffuse metastases of a colon carcinoma and had been previously loaded with a (10)B compound. In July 2003, the same procedure was applied again on a patient for the treatment of unresectable and incurable hepatic metastases of a carcinoma of the rectum. Both patients are dead at present. Now we can analyze in depth the clinical history of these patients and evaluate the effectiveness of this therapy. From this exciting experience we learned much, and we also found out about complications till then unknown, which need to be studied and addressed experimentally. Unfortunately we can base our conclusions just on the experience we had with these two patients. We could have been much more detailed and firm in our statements if the number of clinical cases was larger. The BNCT Pavia project has been suspended, but it is more than likely to resume in a short time. Good findings were many. The procedure is feasible; the original concept of complete immersion of the diseased liver in a homogeneous neutron field proved effective and winning. The tumor masses resulted completely necrotic and unknown metastases too appeared radically treated; healthy hepatic tissue was preserved from both morphological and functional points of view; no symptoms of cirrhosis appeared even four years after treatment. For the long term surviving patient, quality of life was excellent. Other findings require to be tackled in depth. The "post-irradiation syndrome" we observed in both patients, with identical symptoms and biochemical derangements, creates a dramatic--even though totally reversible--clinical condition, that is the probable cause of death for our second patient, suffering from cardiomyopathy, 33 days after treatment. For the first patient, recurrences were a late yet fatal complication, for which even a further

  19. Research and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

  20. Spacelab Data Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SPDPF) are highlighted. The capturing, quality monitoring, processing, accounting, and forwarding of vital Spacelab data to various user facilities around the world are described.

  1. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  2. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program Consumer Information (MQSA) Search for a Certified Facility Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on Search ...

  3. Facility safety study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

  4. Facilities maintenance handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and

  5. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  6. Facilities Engineering in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagluiso, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    An overview of NASA facilities is given outlining some of the more interesting and unique aspects of engineering and facilities associated with the space program. Outlined are some of the policies under which the Office of Facilities conducts its business. Included are environmental quality control measures.

  7. Considerations on Facilities Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Most facilities renovation projects occur because someone at the executive or board level has lobbied successfully for them. Often in public schools, the voters have agreed to the project as well via a building referendum. Therefore, facilities projects are highly visible to the community. Unlike many other issues in schools, facilities projects…

  8. Indoor Athletic Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, E. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Examines the concept of shared-use facilities to help financially support and meet the demand for athletic facilities. Shared-use considerations are explored including cost sharing of ongoing operations, aesthetics, locker rooms, support facilities, parking and site access, and building access and security. (GR)

  9. The effects of ionizing radiation and dexamethasone on the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-tumor-barrier (BTB): Implications for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Spickard, J.H.; Griebenow, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Currently envisioned techniques for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors rely on the increased permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) (more specifically, the blood-tumor-barrier (BTB)) which occurs around the malignant tumor. As a result of this increased permeability, higher boron concentrations (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) should be obtainable in the tumor than in the surrounding normal brain. The effects on the BBB and BTB by the ionizing component of this radiation and by the steroid dexamethasone (almost universally used in the clinical management of these patients) must be considered in the formulation of this treatment technique. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Developing a facility strategy.

    PubMed

    Capps, D M

    1994-05-01

    Successful planning for capital investment relies upon the ability of the management team to establish a cogent and comprehensive direction for facility development. The selection of an appropriate strategy integrates multiple issues: mission, service needs of the community, the external environment, the organization's ethos, current physical resources, operational systems, and vision. This paper will identify and discuss key components and data integral to formulating a facility strategy that outlines the basic direction for developing a facility master plan. The process itself will be presented as a working methodology that can be applied to the organization's resources and vision to generate a coherent facility strategy.

  11. Relocatale Learning Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This document supplies guidelines for the future design of structures within one category of relocatable learning facilities--divisible facilities. The current use and average cost of portables; and teacher, student, and community reactions are discussed. Four types of relocatable structures are described: portable, mobile, divisible, and…

  12. INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cincinnati-based Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA operates the Incineration Research Facility *IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. This facility's pilot-scale experimental incineration systems include a Rotary Kiln System and a Liquid Injection System. Each syste...

  13. Florida Educational Facilities, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…

  14. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FACILITIES INFORMATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    PERSONNEL OF THE FACILITIES INFORMATION SERVICE OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF JUNIOR COLLEGES COMPILED THIS LISTING OF BOOKS, ARTICLES, MONOGRAPHS, AND OTHER PRINTED MATERIALS RELEVANT TO JUNIOR COLLEGE FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN, AND CONSTRUCTION. IN ADDITION TO A "GENERAL" CATEGORY, REFERENCES ARE GROUPED UNDER HEADINGS OF AUDITORIUMS, COLLEGE…

  15. Shaping Campus Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calcara, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Explains how colleges and universities, faced with emerging trends and increased competition, can utilize their facilities as strategic resources. Examines technology changes in the classroom and the effects on user needs, the trend toward real-world learning environments, and facility design planning that responds to social interaction and…

  16. Future User Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Lee

    2002-10-01

    The southeastern part of the U.S. is blessed with an array of national user facilities that are accessible to scientists in the region. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates 17 officially designated user facilities for the Department of Energy, the Jefferson Lab operates the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and a number of universities have forefront experimental facilities that are widely accessible. The long lead time necessary to originate and construct new user facilities makes it imperative to consider the needs of the physical sciences 10 to 20 years in the future. The construction of the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL positions the southeast to lead in neutron science. Upgrades are desired for CEBAF and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (ORNL). The more future possibilities are less clear, but are becoming a focus of strategic planning among the national laboratories. Possibilities may arise in the U.S. for next-generation light sources, large computational centers, advanced fusion devices, nanotechnology centers, and perhaps facilities that are not yet contemplated. A regional discussion of the needs for large-scale user facilities in the southeast is important.

  17. Long Range Facilities Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Richard Muther range facilities Many alterna- analysis indi- cated that if NASSCO ever expected to surpass its output of the last several years, current...Marine Engineers (SNAME) SP-1 Panel Meeting. The Maritime Administration had Richard Muther (an authority on long range facility planning) address a

  18. 17. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards south. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  19. 18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards west. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  20. Biotechnology Facility: An ISS Microgravity Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will support several facilities dedicated to scientific research. One such facility, the Biotechnology Facility (BTF), is sponsored by the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Division (MSAD) and developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The BTF is scheduled for delivery to the ISS via Space Shuttle in April 2005. The purpose of the BTF is to provide: (1) the support structure and integration capabilities for the individual modules in which biotechnology experiments will be performed, (2) the capability for human-tended, repetitive, long-duration biotechnology experiments, and (3) opportunities to perform repetitive experiments in a short period by allowing continuous access to microgravity. The MSAD has identified cell culture and tissue engineering, protein crystal growth, and fundamentals of biotechnology as areas that contain promising opportunities for significant advancements through low-gravity experiments. The focus of this coordinated ground- and space-based research program is the use of the low-gravity environment of space to conduct fundamental investigations leading to major advances in the understanding of basic and applied biotechnology. Results from planned investigations can be used in applications ranging from rational drug design and testing, cancer diagnosis and treatments and tissue engineering leading to replacement tissues.

  1. GRC Ground Support Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintOnge, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    The ISS Program is conducting an "ISS Research Academy' at JSC the first week of August 2010. This Academy will be a tutorial for new Users of the International Space Station, focused primarily on the new ISS National Laboratory and its members including Non-Profit Organizations, other government agencies and commercial users. Presentations on the on-orbit research facilities accommodations and capabilities will be made, as well as ground based hardware development, integration and test facilities and capabilities. This presentation describes the GRC Hardware development, test and laboratory facilities.

  2. National Facilities study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This study provides a set of recommendations for improving the effectiveness of our nation's aeronautics and space facilities. The study plan considers current and future government and commercial needs as well as DOD and NASA mission requirements through the year 2023. It addresses shortfalls in existing capabilities, new facility requirements, upgrades, consolidations, and phase-out of existing facilities. If the recommendations are implemented, they will provide world-class capability where it is vital to our country's needs and make us more efficient in meeting future needs.

  3. Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... denied message goes here Share Share Print Share Facility List From: Receiver(s): Add Receiver Message: Additional Comments: ... Sort Filter and Sort Sort by: Filter by: Facility name Facility address Phone number Apply Clear Cancel ...

  4. Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

  5. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  6. Future School Facility Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck, Dan

    1994-01-01

    Educational facility planners can work with educators to design learning environments for the future as places that will be flexible, adaptable, and readily reconfigured when appropriate. Planners and educators need to understand the effectiveness of learners, teachers, and organizations. (MLF)

  7. Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida marked the finish line for space shuttle missions since 1984. It is also staffed by a group of air traffic controllers who wor...

  8. A cryogenic test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenendaal, Ian

    The next generation, space-borne instruments for far infrared spectroscopy will utilize large diameter, cryogenically cooled telescopes in order to achieve unprecedented sensitivities. Low background, ground-based cryogenic facilities are required for the cryogenic testing of materials, components and subsystems. The Test Facility Cryostat (TFC) at the University of Lethbridge is a large volume, closed cycle, 4K cryogenic facility, developed for this purpose. This thesis discusses the design and performance of the facility and associated external instrumentation. An apparatus for measuring the thermal properties of materials is presented, and measurements of the thermal expansion and conductivity of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) at cryogenic temperatures are reported. Finally, I discuss the progress towards the design and fabrication of a demonstrator cryogenic, far infrared Fourier transform spectrometer.

  9. Facility Focus: Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines three renovated college facilities that offer student-friendly dining space. Renovation problems in the areas of food and entertainment, service and choice, and image versus architectural history preservation are addressed. (GR)

  10. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Mammography Quality Standards Act and Program Consumer Information (MQSA) ... it Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on ...

  11. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  12. Special Feature: Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, George; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Planning Laboratory Design" (Storm); "Perkins Money for Automotive Programs" (Cash); "Stretching a Budget" (Warren); "Video Teleconferencing--Powerful Communication for Occupational Educators" (Major); "Danger: Hazardous Materials" (Brown); and "Keeping Facilities Safe--Electrical…

  13. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  14. Hanford Facility contingency plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.; Miskho, A.G.; Brunke, R.C.

    1993-10-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit-specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous materials spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases as a result of transportation activities, movement of materials, packaging, and storage of hazardous materials.

  15. ATTO SECOND ELECTRON BEAMS GENERATION AND CHARACTERIZATION EXPERIMENT AT THE ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZOLOTOREV, M.; ZHOLENTS, A.; WANG, X.J.; BABZIEN, M.; SKARITKA, J.; RAKOWSKY, G.; YAKIMENKO, V.

    2002-02-01

    We are proposing an Atto-second electron beam generation and diagnostics experiment at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test facility (ATF) using 1 {micro}m Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). The proposed experiment will be carried out by an BNL/LBNL collaboration, and it will be installed at the ATF beam line II. The proposed experiment will employ a one-meter long undulator with 1.8 cm period (VISA undulator). The electron beam energy will be 63 MeV with emittance less than 2 mm-mrad and energy spread less than 0.05%. The ATF photocathode injector driving laser will be used for energy modulation by Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). With 10 MW laser peak power, about 2% total energy modulation is expected. The energy modulated electron beam will be further bunched through either a drift space or a three magnet chicane into atto-second electron bunches. The attosecond electron beam bunches will be analyzed using the coherent transition radiation (CTR).

  16. An accelerator facility for WDM, HEDP, and HIF investigations in Nazarbayev University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaikanov, M.; Baigarin, K.; Tikhonov, A.; Urazbayev, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Remnev, G.; Shubin, B.; Stepanov, A.; Shamanin, V.; Waldron, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nazarbayev University (NU) in Astana, Kazakhstan, is planning to build a new multi-MV, ∼10 to several hundred GW/cm2 ion accelerator facility which will be used in studies of material properties at extreme conditions relevant to ion-beam-driven inertial fusion energy, and other applications. Two design options have been considered. The first option is a 1.2 MV induction linac similar to the NDCX-II at LBNL, but with modifications, capable of heating a 1 mm spot size thin targets to a few eV temperature. The second option is a 2 - 3 MV, ∼200 kA, single-gap-diode proton accelerator powered by an inductive voltage adder. The high current proton beam can be focused to ∼1 cm spot size to obtain power densities of several hundred GW/cm2, capable of heating thick targets to temperatures of tens of eV. In both cases, a common requirement to achieving high beam intensity on target and pulse length compression is to utilize beam neutralization at the final stage of beam focusing. Initial experiments on pulsed ion beam neutralization have been carried out on a 0.3 MV, 1.5 GW single-gap ion accelerator at Tomsk Polytechnic University with the goal of creating a plasma region in front of a target at densities exceeding ∼1012 cm-3.

  17. Business Planning Core Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Itzkowitz, G.N.

    2014-01-01

    Thoughtful business planning is pivotal to the success of any business/operational venture. When planned in a thoughtful and detailed manner there are very few operational or financial surprises for an institution or facility (service center) to contend with. At Stony Brook Medicine we include SWOT analysis and a detailed Market Analysis as part of the process. This is bolstered by an initiative to ensure institutional policies are met so that facilities remain in compliance throughout their lifecycle. As we operate 14 facilities we have had the opportunity to become creative in our approach to coordinate activities, virtualize services, integrate new software business-to-business partners, and finally coordinate plans for phased consolidation instead of outright termination of services when required. As the Associate Dean for Scientific Operations and Research Facilities, the shared research facilities (cores) of the Medical School are in my direct line of sight. We understand their value to the meeting our overall research mission. We have found that an active process of monitoring to predict trouble as much as possible is the best approach for facilities. Some case analysis of this type of interaction will be presented as well.

  18. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and poor

  19. Comprehensive facilities plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  20. Mars ultraviolet simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Zill, L P; Mack, R; DeVincenzi, D L

    1979-12-01

    A facility was established for long-duration ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure of natural and synthetic materials in order to test hypotheses concerning Martian soil chemistry observed by the Viking Mars landers. The system utilized a 2500 watt xenon lamp as the radiation source, with the beam passing through a heat-dissipating water filter before impinging upon an exposure chamber containing the samples to be irradiated. The chamber was designed to allow for continuous tumbling of the samples, maintenance of temperatures below 0 degrees C during exposure, and monitoring of beam intensity. The facility also provided for sample preparation under a variety of atmospheric conditions, in addition to the Mars nominal. As many as 33 sealed sample ampules have been irradiated in a single exposure. Over 100 samples have been irradiated for approximately 100 to 700 h. The facility has performed well in providing continuous UV irradiation of multiple samples for long periods of time under simulated Mars atmospheric and thermal conditions.

  1. Facility capability assessment.

    PubMed

    McCandless, J

    1994-06-01

    An inspection and evaluation procedure has been developed to assess the capabilities of contract toxicology laboratories. This procedure has been used for the inspection of 18 different contract toxicology laboratories. There are 10 areas inspected: 1. Facility 2. Personnel 3. Operations 4. Animals/Animal Care 5. Standard Operating Procedures 6. Quality Assurance 7. Equipment 8. Test Article 9. Data 10. Archives. Each of these areas is divided into categories with each category divided further into specific topics. Points are assigned to each topic. The points earned by the laboratory reflect the inspector's assessment of the laboratory's quality in each area. Area scores are added and a percentage score for the facility is calculated. This approach provides a clear distinction among the laboratories evaluated. The facility inspection and rating system played an important role in screening laboratories when the author worked for the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) corporate toxicology department. It highlighted strengths and weaknesses of individual laboratories.

  2. Modernizing sports facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, R.

    1996-09-01

    Modernization and renovation of sports facilities challenge the design team to balance a number of requirements: spectator and owner expectations, existing building and site conditions, architectural layouts, code and legislation issues, time constraints and budget issues. System alternatives are evaluated and selected based on the relative priorities of these requirements. These priorities are unique to each project. At Alexander Memorial Coliseum, project schedules, construction funds and facility usage became the priorities. The ACC basketball schedule and arrival of the Centennial Olympics dictated the construction schedule. Initiation and success of the project depended on the commitment of the design team to meet coliseum funding levels established three years ago. Analysis of facility usage and system alternative capabilities drove the design team to select a system that met the project requirements and will maximize the benefits to the owner and spectators for many years to come.

  3. A Materials Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Avery, Don E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Materials Exposure Facility (MEF) is to provide a test bed in space for conducting long-term (greater than one year) materials experiments which require exposure to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment. The proposed MEF is planned to be an integral part of the agency's Space Environments and Effects Research Program. The facility will provide experiment trays similar to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Each tray location is planned to have a power and data interface and robotic installation and removal provisions. Space environmental monitoring for each side of the MEF will also be provided. Since routine access to MEF for specimen retrieval is extremely important to the materials research, Space Station Freedom has been chosen as the preferred MEF carrier.

  4. Modular space station facilities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The modular space station will operate as a general purpose laboratory (GPL). In addition, the space station will be able to support many attached or free-flying research and application modules that would be dedicated to specific projects like astronomy or earth observations. The GPL primary functions have been organized into functional laboratories including an electrical/electronics laboratory, a mechanical sciences laboratory, an experiment and test isolation laboratory, a hard data process facility, a data evaluation facility, an optical sciences laboratory, a biomedical and biosciences laboratory, and an experiment/secondary command and control center.

  5. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  6. Administering the Preschool Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonrod, Debbie

    Securing the right environment for a preschool program requires planning and research. Administrators or searching parties are advised to study zoning codes to become acquainted with state sanitation and safety regulations and laws, to involve teachers in cooperative planning, to design facilities which discourage vandalism, facilitate…

  7. Optimal Facility-Location.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A J

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall's research at NBS/NIST.

  8. Food Service Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rifenbark, Ray

    This annotated bibliography included summaries of 14 articles and one report dealing with the topic of school and college food service programs. A brief introduction discusses the current trend toward more diversified use of food service facilities and describes recent innovations in the preparation and distribution of students' meals. Many of the…

  9. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  10. Calibration facility safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    A set of requirements is presented to insure the highest practical standard of safety for the Apollo 17 Calibration Facility in terms of identifying all critical or catastrophic type hazard areas. Plans for either counteracting or eliminating these areas are presented. All functional operations in calibrating the ultraviolet spectrometer and the testing of its components are described.

  11. Aid for Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Even before the state fire marshal ordered the Somersworth (N.H.) School District in 2007 to abandon the top two floors of Hilltop Elementary School because of safety concerns, folks in the city of 12,000 had been debating whether the aging facility should be replaced--and how to pay for it. Finally, in February 2009, the city council approved…

  12. Facilities of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The bricks-and-mortar infrastructure of community colleges has not nearly kept pace with increases in student enrollments. Not only are colleges bursting at the proverbial seams, but, according to the American Graduation Initiative, many two-year institutions "face large needs due to deferred maintenance or lack the modern facilities and…

  13. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  14. QF monitoring. [Qualifying Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, S. ); Hoffman, B. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines the effects on project financing of independent power projects of the California Public Utilities Commission decision to grant authority to California utilities to monitor and enforce compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Qualifying Facility standards. The topics of the article include monitoring proposals, monitoring guidelines, the effects of monitoring, minimizing status loss and monitoring requirements.

  15. Facility effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  16. Revitalization of School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Andrea Barlow

    This study analyzed current practices in the revitalization of school buildings and assimilates data that can be used by school administrators when deciding on revitalization issues. Data from nine revitalized schools since 1985 and a literature review of the elements for planning the revitalization of school facilities indicate that structural…

  17. Facilities Data System Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acridge, Charles W.; Ford, Tim M.

    The purposes of this manual are to set forth the scope and procedures for the maintenance and operation of the University of California facilities Data System (FDX) and to serve as a reference document for users of the system. FDX is an information system providing planning and management data about the existing physical plant. That is, it…

  18. Science and Technology Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moonen, Jean-Marie; Buono, Nicolas; Handfield, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    These four articles relate to science and technology infrastructure for secondary and tertiary institutions. The first article presents a view on approaches to teaching science in school and illustrates ideal science facilities for secondary education. The second piece reports on work underway to improve the Science Complex at the "Universite…

  19. Facilities of Environmental Distinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Three of nine school buildings that have won the latest Educational Facility Design Awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Architecture for Education stand out from the crowd of other school buildings because they are sustainable and are connected to the nature that surrounds them. They are: (1) Thurston Elementary…

  20. Facility Focus: Science Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of five custom designs used in university science buildings. Descriptions include renovation to a mechanical engineering lab, construction of a new building for molecular biology, the reconstruction of chemistry labs, the renovation of a vision lab, and a new research and education facility. Includes photos. (RJM)

  1. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  2. Industrial Education Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Public Instruction, Lansing.

    Factors for consideration by an industrial education planning committee are discussed. Selection, purchasing, and storage of new types of equipment and supplies, in addition to students' project storage, are noted as worthy of consideration in planning the shop facility. Planning factors for the various types of industrial arts laboratories are…

  3. Financing School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeyman, David S., Ed.

    Millions of students are attending classes in substandard schools, a condition that is becoming a major concern for many public school parents, teachers, students, and administrators. This report is the result of research investigating school facility issues, assessing the scope of the problem, and making recommendations to the membership of the…

  4. NRL Tropical Exposure Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-04-01

    canal. To the east, on the opposite side of Limon Bay, lies Cristobal , Coco Solo, and Colon . Travel between Fort Sherman and Cristobal is accomplished...precision equipment. I 4 NRL TROPICAL EXPOSURE FACILITIES 5 Accessibility Proximity of the station to the port of Cristobal and to the Naval Air Station

  5. Surveying School Facilities Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Harry J.; Dennell, James

    1990-01-01

    Ralston (Nebraska) Public School District's communitywide survey helped set school facilities priorities while keeping the district's finite resources firmly in mind. With an outline of maintenance costs for the next 10 years, the district can develop a strategic construction schedule. The board also has the option of financing projects through a…

  6. Feasibility study for a recirculating linac-based facility for femtosecond dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Barletta, W.A.; Byrd, J.M.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.; Green, M.A.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; Kairan, D.; Kujawski, E.; Li, D.; Lidia, S.; Luft, P.; McClure, R.; Parmigiani, F.; Petroff, Y.; Pirkl, W.; Placidi, M.; Reavill, D.; Reichel, I.; Rimmer, R.A.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.E.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Truchlikova, D.; Wan, W.; Wang, S.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2002-12-21

    LBNL is pursuing design studies and the scientific program for a facility dedicated to the production of x-ray pulses with ultra-short time duration, for application in dynamical studies of processes in physics, biology, and chemistry. The proposed x-ray facility has the short x-ray pulse length ({approx}60 fs FWHM) necessary to study very fast dynamics, high flux (up to approximately 10E11 photons/sec/0.1 percentBW) to study weakly scattering systems, and tuneability over 1-12 keV photon energy. The hard x-ray photon production section of the machine accommodates seven 2-m long undulators. Design studies for longer wavelength sources, using high-gain harmonic generation, are in progress. The x-ray pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz is matched to studies of dynamical processes (initiated by ultra-short laser pulses) that typically have a long recovery time or are not generally cyclic or reversible and need time to allow relaxation, replacement, or flow of the sample. The technique for producing ultra-short x-ray pulses uses relatively long electron bunches to minimize high-peak-current collective effects, and the ultimate x-ray duration is achieved by a combination of bunch manipulation and optical compression. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to sample excitation signals is expected to be of order 50 - 100 fs. Techniques for making use of the recirculating geometry to provide beam-based signals from early passes through the machine are being studied.

  7. High-Flux Neutron Generator Facility for Geochronology and Nuclear Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, Cory; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being commissioned at UC Berkeley. The generator is designed to produce monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at outputs exceeding 1011 n/s. The HFNG is designed around two RF-driven multi-cusp ion sources that straddle a titanium-coated copper target. D + ions, accelerated up to 150 keV from the ion sources, self-load the target and drive neutron generation through the d(d,n)3 He fusion reaction. A well-integrated cooling system is capable of handling beam power reaching 120 kW impinging on the target. The unique design of the HFNG target permits experimental samples to be placed inside the target volume, allowing the samples to receive the highest neutron flux (1011 cm-2 s-1) possible from the generator. In addition, external beams of neutrons will be available simultaneously, ranging from thermal to 2.45 MeV. Achieving the highest neutron yields required carefully designed schemes to mitigate back-streaming of high energy electrons liberated from the cathode target by deuteron bombardment. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40 Ar/39 Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science, and education. An end goal is to become a user facility for researchers. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  8. Test facilities for VINCI®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greuel, Dirk; Schäfer, Klaus; Schlechtriem, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    With the replacement of the current upper-stage ESC-A of the Ariane 5 launcher by an enhanced cryogenic upper-stage, ESA's Ariane 5 Midterm Evolution (A5-ME) program aims to raise the launcher's payload capacity in geostationary transfer orbit from 10 to 12 tons, an increase of 20 %. Increasing the in-orbit delivery capability of the A5-ME launcher requires a versatile, high-performance, evolved cryogenic upper-stage engine suitable for delivering multiple payloads to all kinds of orbits, ranging from low earth orbit to geostationary transfer orbit with increased perigee. In order to meet these requirements the re-ignitable liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen expander cycle engine VINCI® currently under development is designated to power the future upper stage, featuring a design performance of 180 kN of thrust and 464 s of specific impulse. Since 2010 development tests for the VINCI® engine have been conducted at the test benches P3.2 and P4.1 at DLR test site in Lampoldshausen under the ESA A5-ME program. For the VINCI® combustion chamber development the P3.2 test facility is used, which is the only European thrust chamber test facility. Originally erected for the development of the thrust chamber of the Vulcain engine, in 2003 the test facility was modified that today it is able to simulate vacuum conditions for the ignition and startup of the VINCI® combustion chamber. To maintain the test operations under vacuum conditions over an entire mission life of the VINCI® engine, including re-ignition following long and short coasting phases, between 2000 and 2005 the test facility P4.1 was completely rebuilt into a new high-altitude simulation facility. During the past two P4.1 test campaigns in 2010 and 2011 a series of important milestones were reached in the development of the VINCI® engine. In preparation for future activities within the frame of ESA's A5-ME program DLR has already started the engineering of a stage test facility for the prospective upper stage

  9. The Multistage Compressor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie

    2004-01-01

    Research and developments of new aerospace technologies is one of Glenn Research Center's specialties. One facility that deals with the research of aerospace technologies is the High-speed Multistage Compressor Facility. This facility will be testing the performance and efficiency of an Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) two-stage compressor. There is a lot of preparation involved with testing something of this caliber. Before the test article can be installed into the test rig, the facility must be fully operational and ready to run. Meaning all the necessary instrumentation must be calibrated and installed in the facility. The test rig should also be in safe operating condition, and the proper safety permits obtained. In preparation for the test, the Multistage Compressor Facility went through a few changes. For instance the facility will now be utilizing slip rings, the gearbox went through some maintenance, new lubrications systems replaced the old ones, and special instrumentation needs to be fine tuned to achieve the maximum amount of accurate data. Slips rings help gather information off of a rotating device - in this case from a shaft - onto stationary contacts. The contacts (or brushes) need to be cooled to reduce the amount of frictional heat produced between the slip ring and brushes. The coolant being run through the slip ring is AK-225, a material hazardous to the ozone. To abide by the safety regulations the coolant must be run through a closed chiller system. A new chiller system was purchased but the reservoir that holds the coolant was ventilated which doesn t make the system truly closed and sealed. My task was to design and have a new reservoir built for the chiller system that complies with the safety guidelines. The gearbox had some safety issues also. Located in the back of the gearbox an inching drive was set up. When the inching drive is in use the gears and chain are bare and someone can easily get caught up in it. So to prevent

  10. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING FACILITY NO. 525 AND HOSPITAL (FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING FACILITY NO. 525 AND HOSPITAL (FACILITY No. 515) BEYOND. See CA-2398-CP-8 for detail of the stairway in the distance - Hamilton Field, Amphitheater, North Oakland Drive near East Hospital Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  11. View of Facility 222 (on right) and Facility 221 through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Facility 222 (on right) and Facility 221 through trees (parapet of latter above trees) from the parade ground. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Gymnasium & Theater, Neville Way, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughery, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  13. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  14. Facilities evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, P.A.; Edinborough, C.R.

    1992-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development whose mission is to evaluate different new and existing technologies and determine how well they address DOE community waste remediation problems. Twenty-three Technical Task Plans (TTPs) have been identified to support this mission during FY-92; 10 of these have identified some support requirements when demonstrations take place. Section 1 of this report describes the tasks supported by BWID, determines if a technical demonstration is proposed, and if so, identifies the support requirements requested by the TTP Principal Investigators. Section 2 of this report is an evaluation identifying facility characteristics of existing Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities that may be considered for use in BWID technology demonstration activities.

  15. Spacelab Data Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SDPF) processes, monitors, and accounts for the payload data from Spacelab and other Shuttle missions and forwards relevant data to various user facilities worldwide. The SLDPF is divided into the Spacelab Input Processing System (SIPS) and the Spacelab Output Processing System (SOPS). The SIPS division demultiplexes, synchronizes, time tags, quality checks, accounts for the data, and formats the data onto tapes. The SOPS division further edits, blocks, formats, and records the data on tape for shipment to users. User experiments must conform to the Spacelab's onboard High Rate Multiplexer (HRM) format for maximum process ability. Audio, analog, instrumentation, high density, experiment data, input/output data, quality control and accounting, and experimental channel tapes along with a variety of spacelab ancillary tapes are provided to the user by SLDPF.

  16. UNISOR Nuclear Orientation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Girit, I.C.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of an on-line isotope separator and a dilution refrigerator has increased the applicability of the nuclear orientation technique to a wide range of nuclei, especially those very far from stability. The UNISOR Nuclear Orientation Facility (UNISOR/NOF) is among the two (the other being NICOLE at CERN) that have recently become operational. The following is an overall view of the UNISOR system and recent results. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Future Facilities Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Albert De Roeck, Rolf Ent

    2009-10-01

    For the session on future facilities at DIS09 discussions were organized on DIS related measurements that can be expected in the near and medium –or perhaps far– future, including plans from JLab, CERN and FNAL fixed target experiments, possible measurements and detector upgrades at RHIC, as well as the plans for possible future electron proton/ion colliders such as the EIC and the LHeC project.

  18. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. ORNL calibrations facility

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Gupton, E.D.; Lane, B.H.; Miller, J.H.; Nichols, S.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL.

  20. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  1. TACS Central Control Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-12

    Central Control Facility 6 3. System Management Data Flow 7 B. Hardware Operating Environment 9 1. Computer 9 2. TACS Interfaces 9 3. Other Central...TERMINATION TIMING 131 Appendix C SYSTEM MANAGEMENT DATA FORMATS 135 Appendix D FIVE- AND NINE-SLOT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION DIFFERENCES 147 Appendix E...control burst management ) 26 2-7 Call Progress Messages 29 2-8 Flowchart of Assignment/Blockage Decision Process for All-Member Net Requests 30 2-9

  2. Microgravity Simulation Facility (MSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The Microgravity Simulator Facility (MSF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was established to support visiting scientists for short duration studies utilizing a variety of microgravity simulator devices that negate the directional influence of the "g" vector (providing simulated conditions of micro or partial gravity). KSC gravity simulators can be accommodated within controlled environment chambers allowing investigators to customize and monitor environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, CO2, and light exposure.

  3. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  4. NEP facilities (LeRC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetrone, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the Electric Propulsion Research Building (no. 16) the Electric Power Laboratory (BLDG. 301); the Tank 6 Vacuum Facility; and test facilities for electric propulsion and LeRC.

  5. Robot Serviced Space Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A robot serviced space facility includes multiple modules which are identical in physical structure, but selectively differing in function. and purpose. Each module includes multiple like attachment points which are identically placed on each module so as to permit interconnection with immediately adjacent modules. Connection is made through like outwardly extending flange assemblies having identical male and female configurations for interconnecting to and locking to a complementary side of another flange. Multiple rows of interconnected modules permit force, fluid, data and power transfer to be accomplished by redundant circuit paths. Redundant modules of critical subsystems are included. Redundancy of modules and of interconnections results in a space complex with any module being removable upon demand, either for module replacement or facility reconfiguration. without eliminating any vital functions of the complex. Module replacement and facility assembly or reconfiguration are accomplished by a computer controlled articulated walker type robotic manipulator arm assembly having two identical end-effectors in the form of male configurations which are identical to those on module flanges and which interconnect to female configurations on other flanges. The robotic arm assembly moves along a connected set or modules by successively disconnecting, moving and reconnecting alternate ends of itself to a succession of flanges in a walking type maneuver. To transport a module, the robot keeps the transported module attached to one of its end-effectors and uses another flange male configuration of the attached module as a substitute end-effector during walking.

  6. The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-02-06

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5-ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  7. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    W. David Swank

    2007-02-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  8. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  9. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W. David; Carmack, Jon; Werner, James E.; Pink, Robert J.; Haggard, DeLon C.; Johnson, Ryan

    2007-01-30

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISP. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500 deg. C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test low activity uranium containing materials but is also suited for testing cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  10. The Francium facility at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, S.; Behr, J. A.; Chen, G.; Collister, R.; Flambaum, V. V.; Gomez, E.; Gwinner, G.; Jackson, K. P.; Melconian, D.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Ruiz, M. C.; Sheng, D.; Shin, Y. H.; Sprouse, G. D.; Tandecki, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We present the current status of the Francium Trapping Facility at ISAC at TRIUMF. The facility will enable future experiments on the weak interaction with measurements of atomic parity non-conservation laser-cooled samples of artificially produced francium. These experiments require a precisely controlled environment, which the facility is designed to provide. The facility has been constructed and is being prepared for a series of commissioning runs.

  11. A3 Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulreix, Lionel J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

  12. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, the total floor space of all building construction started was 188.87 million m2 (1.5% increase y/y), marking the fourth straight year of increase. Many large-scale buildings under construction in central Tokyo become fully occupied by tenants before completion. As for office buildings, it is required to develop comfortable and functional office spaces as working styles are becoming more and more diversified, and lighting is also an element of such functionalities. The total floor space of construction started for exhibition pavilions, multipurpose halls, conference halls and religious architectures decreased 11.1% against the previous year. This marked a decline for 10 consecutive years and the downward trend continues. In exhibition pavilions, the light radiation is measured and adjusted throughout the year so as not to damage the artworks by lighting. Hospitals, while providing higher quality medical services and enhancing the dwelling environment of patients, are expected to meet various restrictions and requirements, including the respect for privacy. Meanwhile, lighting designs for school classrooms tend to be homogeneous, yet new ideas are being promoted to strike a balance between the economical and functional aspects. The severe economic environment continues to be hampering the growth of theaters and halls in both the private and public sectors. Contrary to the downsizing trend of such facilities, additional installations of lighting equipment were conspicuous, and the adoption of high efficacy lighting appliances and intelligent function control circuits are becoming popular. In the category of stores/commercial facilities, the construction of complex facilities is a continuing trend. Indirect lighting, high luminance discharge lamps with excellent color rendition and LEDs are being effectively used in these facilities, together with the introduction of lighting designs

  13. School Nutrition Facility Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy VanEgmond

    This publication is designed to help superintendents, local facilities coordinators, and food-service directors in planning the remodeling of an outdated food-service facility or the building of a new one. The introduction describes the roles of the local facility coordinator, the local child-nutrition director, the architect, the food-service…

  14. Physical Recreation Facilities. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    New goals in physical education are leading instructors to seek new kinds of athletic facilities. School administrators are in the process of rethinking the classical facilities, i.e., the box-shaped gymnasium -- facilities designed without sensitivity to the students' desire to participate in the games they can continue to play after graduation.…

  15. DTRA National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-16

    DTRA National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) ___________________________________ JSR-08- 800 September 29...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DTRA National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...only). 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT JASON was asked to address the utility of the National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) to the Defense Threat

  16. Workforce Development Education Facilities Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This publication, a supplement to the "North Carolina Public Schools Facilities Guidelines," describes work force development education programs and facilities. It is intended as a resource that can assist design professionals in planning facilities that meet the evolving needs of public schools in the state. The first part of the guide…

  17. Industrial Arts Facility Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Thomas A., Jr.; And Others

    This guidebook presents facility guidelines to aid the school planner in determining appropriate facilities for a model curriculum. The first of four major sections, The Intent of Industrial Arts, discusses the mission and goals, instructional objectives, function of industrial arts, and the model curriculum. Section 2 focuses on facilities for…

  18. Education Funding for Residential Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    About 167 residential facilities in Ohio serve approximately 7,000 youth on any given day. Youth are placed in residential facilities because they have committed a crime or have behavioral problems. An "education provider" operates an on-grounds school in most facilities. Because of ongoing concerns about education funding for youth in…

  19. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  20. The assess facility descriptor module

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.E.; Winblad, A.; Key, B.; Walker, S.; Renis, T.; Saleh, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Facility Descriptor (Facility) module is part of the Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS). Facility is the foundational software application in the ASSESS system for modelling a nuclear facility's safeguards and security system to determine the effectiveness against theft of special nuclear material. The Facility module provides the tools for an analyst to define a complete description of a facility's physical protection system which can then be used by other ASSESS software modules to determine vulnerability to a spectrum of insider and outsider threats. The analyst can enter a comprehensive description of the protection system layout including all secured areas, target locations, and detailed safeguards specifications. An extensive safeguard component catalog provides the reference data for calculating delay and detection performance. Multiple target locations within the same physical area may be specified, and the facility may be defined for two different operational states such as dayshift and nightshift. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Thermal Simulation Facilities Handbook.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    DOE tests is not expected. 4.4.3 Costs The cost of a test at the CRTF solar furnace will be based on the time of the manpower, materials, and utilities ...fires, JP-4 fuel fires, and con- centrated solar radiation. The facility has several different types of sources for thermal radiant energy . The two... optical axis. Normally the solar image can be stablilzed to within *0.1 inch (25 mm) of the optical axis. Winds in excess of 15 miles per hour (7 cm/sec

  2. 310 Facility chemical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerty, K.J.

    1997-05-21

    The 300 area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) was designed and built to treat the waste water from the 300 area process sewer system. Several treatment technologies are employed to remove the trace quantities of contaminants in the stream, including iron coprecipitation, clarification, filtration, ion exchange, and ultra violet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation of organics. The chemicals that will be utilized in the treatment process are hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, and ferric chloride. This document annotates the required chemical characteristics of TEDF bulk chemicals as well as the criteria that were used to establish these criteria. The chemical specifications in appendix B are generated from this information.

  3. Constellation Training Facility Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing the next set of vehicles that will take men back to the moon under the Constellation Program. The Constellation Training Facility (CxTF) is a project in development that will be used to train astronauts, instructors, and flight controllers on the operation of Constellation Program vehicles. It will also be used for procedure verification and validation of flight software and console tools. The CxTF will have simulations for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Crew Module (CM), CEV Service Module (SM), Launch Abort System (LAS), Spacecraft Adapter (SA), Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), Pressurized Cargo Variant CM, Pressurized Cargo Variant SM, Cargo Launch Vehicle, Earth Departure Stage (EDS), and the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The Facility will consist of part-task and full-task trainers, each with a specific set of mission training capabilities. Part task trainers will be used for focused training on a single vehicle system or set of related systems. Full task trainers will be used for training on complete vehicles and all of its subsystems. Support was provided in both software development and project planning areas of the CxTF project. Simulation software was developed for the hydraulic system of the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the ARES I launch vehicle. The TVC system is in charge of the actuation of the nozzle gimbals for navigation control of the upper stage of the ARES I rocket. Also, software was developed using C standards to send and receive data to and from hand controllers to be used in CxTF cockpit simulations. The hand controllers provided movement in all six rotational and translational axes. Under Project Planning & Control, support was provided to the development and maintenance of integrated schedules for both the Constellation Training Facility and Missions Operations Facilities Division. These schedules maintain communication between projects in different levels. The Cx

  4. The LERIX User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G.T.; Fister, T.T.; Cross, J.O.; Nagle, K.P.

    2007-01-18

    We describe the lower energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (LERIX) spectrometer, located at sector 20 PNC-XOR of the Advanced Photon Source. This instrument, which is now available to general users, is the first user facility optimized for high throughput measurements of momentum transfer dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from the core shell electrons of relatively light elements or the less-tightly bound electrons of heavier elements. By means of example, we present new NRIXS measurements of the near-edge structure for the L-edges of Al and the K-edge in Si.

  5. Large coil test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Final design of the facility is nearing completion, and 20% of the construction has been accomplished. A large vacuum chamber, houses the test assembly which is coupled to appropriate cryogenic, electrical, instrumentation, diagnostc systems. Adequate assembly/disassembly areas, shop space, test control center, offices, and test support laboratories are located in the same building. Assembly and installation operations are accomplished with an overhead crane. The major subsystems are the vacuum system, the test stand assembly, the cryogenic system, the experimental electric power system, the instrumentation and control system, and the data aquisition system.

  6. 9 CFR 3.27 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.27 Facilities, outdoor. (a) Hamsters shall not be housed in outdoor facilities. (b) Guinea pigs shall not be housed in outdoor facilities...

  7. 42 CFR 483.374 - Facility reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for the Use of Restraint or Seclusion in Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.374 Facility reporting. (a) Attestation of facility compliance. Each psychiatric residential treatment facility that provides inpatient...

  8. 42 CFR 483.374 - Facility reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for the Use of Restraint or Seclusion in Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.374 Facility reporting. (a) Attestation of facility compliance. Each psychiatric residential treatment facility that provides inpatient...

  9. 42 CFR 483.374 - Facility reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for the Use of Restraint or Seclusion in Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.374 Facility reporting. (a) Attestation of facility compliance. Each psychiatric residential treatment facility that provides inpatient...

  10. 42 CFR 483.374 - Facility reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for the Use of Restraint or Seclusion in Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.374 Facility reporting. (a) Attestation of facility compliance. Each psychiatric residential treatment facility that provides inpatient...

  11. 42 CFR 483.374 - Facility reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for the Use of Restraint or Seclusion in Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.374 Facility reporting. (a) Attestation of facility compliance. Each psychiatric residential treatment facility that provides inpatient...

  12. NVESD mine lane facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habersat, James D.; Marshall, Christopher; Maksymonko, George

    2003-09-01

    The NVESD Mine Lane Facility has recently undergone an extensive renovation. It now consists of an indoor, dry lane portion, a greenhouse portion with moisture-controlled lanes, a control room, and two outdoor lanes. The indoor structure contains six mine lanes, each approximately 2.5m (width) × 1.2m (depth) × 33m(length). These lanes contain six different soil types: magnetite/sand, silt, crusher run gravel (bluestone gravel), bank run gravel (tan gravel), red clay, and white sand. An automated trolley system is used for mounting the various mine detection systems and sensors under test. Data acquisition and data logging is fully automated. The greenhouse structure was added to provide moisture controlled lanes for measuring the effect of moisture on sensor effectiveness. A gantry type crane was installed to permit remotely controlled positioning of a sensor package over any portion of the greenhouse lanes at elevations from ground level up to 5m without shadowing the target area. The roof of the greenhouse is motorized, and can be rolled back to allow full solar loading. A control room overlooking the lanes is complete with recording and monitoring devices and contains controls to operate the trolleys. A facility overview is presented and typical results from recent data collection exercises are presented.

  13. Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Steven Derek

    2014-03-01

    The Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) is an operating deep underground research facility with six active projects, and greater than 50 trained researchers. KURF is 30 minutes from the Virginia Tech (VT) campus in an operating limestone mine with drive-in access (eg: roll-back truck, motor coach), over 50 miles of drifts (all 40' × 20 +' the current lab is 35' × 22' × 100'), and 1700' of overburden (1450m.w.e.). The laboratory was built in 2007 and offers fiber optic internet, LN2, 480/220/110 V power, ample water, filtered air, 55 F constant temp, low Rn levels, low rock background activity, and a muon flux of only ~0.004 muons per square meter, per second, per steradian. The current users are funded by NSF, DOE, and NNSA. Current user group: 1) mini-LENS (VT, Louisiana State University, BNL); 2) Double Beta Decay to Excited States (Duke University); 3) HPGe Low-Background Screening (University of North Carolina (UNC), VT); 4) MALBEK (UNC); 5&6) Watchman - 5) Radionuclide Detector and 6) MARS detector (LLNL, SNL, UC-Davis, UC-Berkeley, UH, Hawaii Pacific, UC-Irvine, VT).

  14. Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2011-10-01

    A new deep underground research facility is open and operating only 30 minutes from the Virginia Tech campus. It is located in an operating limestone mine, and has drive-in access (eg: roll-back truck, motor coach), over 50 miles of drifts (all 40' x 20' x 100'; the current lab is 35'x100'x22'), and is located where there is a 1700' overburden. The laboratory was built in 2007 and offers fiber optic internet, LN2, 480/220/110 V power, ample water, filtered air, 55 F constant temp, low Rn levels, low rock background activity, and a muon flux of only ˜ 0.004 muons per square meter, per second, per steradian. There are currently six projects using the facility: mini-LENS - Low Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (Virginia Tech, Louisiana State University, BNL); Neutron Spectrometer (University of Maryland, NIST); Double Beta Decay to Excited States (Duke University); HPGe Low-Background Screening (North Carolina State University, University of North Carolina, Virginia Tech); MALBEK - Majorana neutrinoless double beta decay (University of North Carolina); Ar-39 Depleted Argon (Princeton University). I will summarize the current program, and exciting plans for the future.

  15. Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, S. Derek; Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2012-03-01

    A new deep underground research facility is open and operating only 30 minutes from the Virginia Tech campus. It is located in an operating limestone mine, and has drive-in access (eg: roll-back truck, motor coach), over 50 miles of drifts (all 40' x 20+'; the current lab is 35' x 22' x 100'), and is located where there is a 1700' overburden. The laboratory was built in 2007 and offers fiber optic internet, LN2, 480/220/110 V power, ample water, filtered air, 55 F constant temp, low Rn levels, low rock background activity, and a muon flux of only ˜0.004 muons per square meter, per second, per steradian. There are currently six projects using the facility: mini-LENS - Low Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (Virginia Tech, Louisiana State University, BNL); Neutron Spectrometer (University of Maryland, NIST); Double Beta Decay to Excited States (Duke University); HPGe Low-Background Screening (North Carolina State University, University of North Carolina, Virginia Tech); MALBEK - Majorana neutrinoless double beta decay (University of North Carolina); Ar-39 Depleted Argon (Princeton University). I will summarize the current program and exciting potential for the future.

  16. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  17. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Eight fourth-year engineering design students formed two teams to study methods of varying the perceived gravity level in a variable gravity research facility. A tether system and an arm system were the chosen topics. Both teams have produced and built scale models of their design. In addition, a three-credit Special Topics Course (Aviation 370) was formed, as the project offers an excellent opportunity to build a multi-disciplinary program around the initial conceptualization process. Fifty students were registered in the Special Topics course. Each week during a three hour class, a guest lecturer covered one or more of the many areas associated with the concept of a variable-gravity facility. The students formed small groups organized on a multi-disciplinary basis (there were twelve separate disciplines represented by one or more students) where they discussed among themselves the various issues involved. These groups also met outside class for three or more hours each week. During class each group presented oral reports on their findings during a one-hour general question and answer period.

  18. The ASTROCULTURE Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Research with plants in microgravity offers many exciting opportunities to gain new insights and could improve products on Earth ranging from crop production to fragrances and food flavorings. The ASTROCULTURE facility is a lead commercial facility for plant growth and plant research in microgravity and was developed by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WSCAR), a NASA Commercial Space Center. On STS-95 it will support research that could help improve crop development leading to plants that are more disease resistant or have a higher yield and provide data on the production of plant essential oils---oils that contain the essence of the plant and provide both fragrance and flavoring. On STS-95, a flowering plant will be grown in ASTROCULTURE and samples taken using a method developed by the industry partner for this investigation. On Earth, the samples will be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the data used to evaluate both the production of fragrant oils in microgravity and in the development of one or more products. The ASTROCULTURE payload uses these pourous tubes with precise pressure sensing and control for fluid delivery to the plant root tray.

  19. The ASTROCULTURE Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Research with plants in microgravity offers many exciting opportunities to gain new insights and could improve products on Earth ranging from crop production to fragrances and food flavorings. The ASTROCULTURE facility is a lead commercial facility for plant growth and plant research in microgravity and was developed by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WSCAR), a NASA Commercial Space Center. On STS-95 it will support research that could help improve crop development leading to plants that are more disease resistant or have a higher yield and provide data on the production of plant essential oils---oils that contain the essence of the plant and provide both fragrance and flavoring. On STS-95, a flowering plant will be grown in ASTROCULTURE and samples taken using a method developed by the industry partner for this investigation. On Earth the samples will be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the data used to evaluate both the production of fragrant oils in microgravity and in the development of one or more products.

  20. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  1. PUREX facility hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-09-23

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities.

  2. Studsvik Processing Facility Update

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

    2003-02-25

    Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

  3. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  4. The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H

    2003-12-19

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10'' bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5 ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper discusses NIF's current and future experimental capability, plans for diagnostics, cryogenic target systems, specialized optics for experiments, and potential enhancements to NIF such as multi-color laser operation and high-energy short pulse operation.

  5. Succinonitrile Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Succinonitrile (SCN) Purification Facility provides succinonitrile and succinonitrile alloys to several NRA selected investigations for flight and ground research at various levels of purity. The purification process employed includes both distillation and zone refining. Once the appropriate purification process is completed, samples are characterized to determine the liquidus and/or solidus temperature, which is then related to sample purity. The lab has various methods for measuring these temperatures with accuracies in the milliKelvin to tenths of milliKelvin range. The ultra-pure SCN produced in our facility is indistinguishable from the standard material provided by NIST to well within the stated +/- 1.5mK of the NIST triple point cells. In addition to delivering material to various investigations, our current activities include process improvement, characterization of impurities and triple point cell design and development. The purification process is being evaluated for each of the four vendors to determine the efficacy of each purification step. We are also collecting samples of the remainder from distillation and zone refining for analysis of the constituent impurities. The large triple point cells developed will contain SCN with a melting point of 58.0642 C +/- 1.5mK for use as a calibration standard for Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometers (SPRTs).

  6. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility/Effluent Treatment Facility Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Simiele, G.A.

    1994-09-29

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and Effluent Treatment Facility the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J M; Dahl, N R

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  9. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics on building construction floor area from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, the total floor area of building construction started in Japan in 2007 was 160,991 thousand square meters, or 14.8% less than the area of the previous year, and the reduction was the first reduction in the past five years. The office markets in Tokyo and Nagoya were active, as represented by the supplies of skyscrapers, and energy saving measures, such as the adoption of high efficiency lighting equipment, the control for initial stage illuminance, daylight harvesting, and the use of occupancy sensors, were well established. In the field of public construction, including museums, multi-purpose halls, and religious buildings, the total area of the new construction was 10.8% less than the total for the previous year, and this reduction was a continuation of an eleven-year trend. In spaces with high ceiling, the innovation for easy replacement of light sources used with reflection mirror systems and optical fibers was noted. Hospitals adapted to the expectation for improved services in their selection of lighting facilities to improve the residential environment for patients while taking into consideration the needs of the aging population, by their use of devices in corridors to help maintain a continuity of light. In libraries, a pendant system was developed to illuminate both ceilings and book shelves. In the field of theaters and halls, the time limit for repairing existing systems had come for the large facilities that were opened during the theater and hall construction boom of the 1960s through 1980s, and around 26 renovations were done. Almost all the renovations were conversions to intelligent dimming systems and lighting control desks. In the field of stores and commercial facilities, the atmosphere and glitter of the selling floor was produced by new light sources, such as ceramic metal halide lamps and LEDs, which have high

  10. Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wieneke, R.E.; Bowser, R.P.; Hedley, W.H.; Kissner, T.J.; Lamberger, P.H.; Morgan, F.G.; Van Patten, J.F.; Williams, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF) will be a system for the continuous processing of tritium containing gases collected from various operations at Mound. The basis of the system operation will be the oxidation of elemental hydrogen isotopes and organic molecules at elevated temperatures on precious metal catalyst beds, and the adsorption of the resulting oxide (water) on molecular sieve dryers. The TERF will be expected to handle from 400,000 to 1,000,000 curies of tritium per year in the process gas stream and release no more than 200 curies per year to the atmosphere. Consequently, the TERF will need to convert and capture tritium at low concentrations in gas efficiently and reliably. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  12. The Booster Applications Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, David P.

    2001-02-01

    In support of the human exploration program, NASA is providing $33 million to the U.S. Department of Energy to construct a radiation simulator, known as the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The BAF justification is briefly reviewed (e.g., to reduce the radiation risk uncertainties from its present factor of 4 to 15). The BAF beam specifications are provided, as are discussions of the BAF construction schedule and anticipated operating schedules (e.g., initial operation anticipated for October 1, 2002). A breakdown of the BAF construction costs is included and the operating costs are discussed (e.g., $5 to $6 million per year). The BAF laboratory layout and the various types of DOE support for the BAF are summarized, as are the peer reviews of the project. The characteristic parameters of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron are also included. .

  13. Temperature dependent BRDF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airola, Marc B.; Brown, Andrea M.; Hahn, Daniel V.; Thomas, Michael E.; Congdon, Elizabeth A.; Mehoke, Douglas S.

    2014-09-01

    Applications involving space based instrumentation and aerodynamically heated surfaces often require knowledge of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an exposed surface at high temperature. Addressing this need, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) developed a BRDF facility that features a multiple-port vacuum chamber, multiple laser sources covering the spectral range from the longwave infrared to the ultraviolet, imaging pyrometry and laser heated samples. Laser heating eliminates stray light that would otherwise be seen from a furnace and requires minimal sample support structure, allowing low thermal conduction loss to be obtained, which is especially important at high temperatures. The goal is to measure the BRDF of ceramic-coated surfaces at temperatures in excess of 1000°C in a low background environment. Most ceramic samples are near blackbody in the longwave infrared, thus pyrometry using a LWIR camera can be very effective and accurate.

  14. Space Communications Emulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Chante A.

    2004-01-01

    Establishing space communication between ground facilities and other satellites is a painstaking task that requires many precise calculations dealing with relay time, atmospheric conditions, and satellite positions, to name a few. The Space Communications Emulation Facility (SCEF) team here at NASA is developing a facility that will approximately emulate the conditions in space that impact space communication. The emulation facility is comprised of a 32 node distributed cluster of computers; each node representing a satellite or ground station. The objective of the satellites is to observe the topography of the Earth (water, vegetation, land, and ice) and relay this information back to the ground stations. Software originally designed by the University of Kansas, labeled the Emulation Manager, controls the interaction of the satellites and ground stations, as well as handling the recording of data. The Emulation Manager is installed on a Linux Operating System, employing both Java and C++ programming codes. The emulation scenarios are written in extensible Markup Language, XML. XML documents are designed to store, carry, and exchange data. With XML documents data can be exchanged between incompatible systems, which makes it ideal for this project because Linux, MAC and Windows Operating Systems are all used. Unfortunately, XML documents cannot display data like HTML documents. Therefore, the SCEF team uses XML Schema Definition (XSD) or just schema to describe the structure of an XML document. Schemas are very important because they have the capability to validate the correctness of data, define restrictions on data, define data formats, and convert data between different data types, among other things. At this time, in order for the Emulation Manager to open and run an XML emulation scenario file, the user must first establish a link between the schema file and the directory under which the XML scenario files are saved. This procedure takes place on the command

  15. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  16. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  17. National Icing Facilities Requirements Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    managing and funding the icing facilities requirements. 1-5 2.0 INTRODUCTION 2.1 BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES This analytical investigation of National Icing... conservative , the FAA is reexamining the criteria. Applicability of the Appendix C Envelope Through the 1990s The ensuing years since the definition of the...the development and construction schedule of the proposed facility. 3) Provide the additional funding required to design a facility with a new

  18. The QUASAR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, David

    2013-10-01

    The QUAsi-Axisymmetric Research (QUASAR) stellarator is a new facility which can solve two critical problems for fusion, disruptions and steady-state, and which provides new insights into the role of magnetic symmetry in plasma confinement. If constructed it will be the only quasi-axisymmetric stellarator in the world. The innovative principle of quasi-axisymmetry (QA) will be used in QUASAR to study how ``tokamak-like'' systems can be made: 1) Disruption-free, 2) Steady-state with low recirculating power, while preserving or improving upon features of axisymmetric tokamaks, such as 1) Stable at high pressure simultaneous with 2) High confinement (similar to tokamaks), and 3) Scalable to a compact reactor Stellarator research is critical to fusion research in order to establish the physics basis for a magnetic confinement device that can operate efficiently in steady-state, without disruptions at reactor-relevant parameters. The two large stellarator experiments - LHD in Japan and W7-X under construction in Germany are pioneering facilities capable of developing 3D physics understanding at large scale and for very long pulses. The QUASAR design is unique in being QA and optimized for confinement, stability, and moderate aspect ratio (4.5). It projects to a reactor with a major radius of ~8 m similar to advanced tokamak concepts. It is striking that (a) the EU DEMO is a pulsed (~2.5 hour) tokamak with major R ~ 9 m and (b) the ITER physics scenarios do not presume steady-state behavior. Accordingly, QUASAR fills a critical gap in the world stellarator program. This work supported by DoE Contract No. DEAC02-76CH03073.

  19. Safe design of healthcare facilities

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, J

    2006-01-01

    The physical environment has a significant impact on health and safety; however, hospitals have not been designed with the explicit goal of enhancing patient safety through facility design. In April 2002, St Joseph's Community Hospital of West Bend, a member of SynergyHealth, brought together leaders in healthcare and systems engineering to develop a set of safety‐driven facility design recommendations and principles that would guide the design of a new hospital facility focused on patient safety. By introducing safety‐driven innovations into the facility design process, environmental designers and healthcare leaders will be able to make significant contributions to patient safety. PMID:17142606

  20. Making of the NSTX Facility

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; M. Ono; S.M. Kaye; Y.-K.M. Peng; et al

    1999-11-01

    The NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) facility located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is the newest national fusion science experimental facility for the restructured US Fusion Energy Science Program. The NSTX project was approved in FY 97 as the first proof-of-principle national fusion facility dedicated to the spherical torus research. On Feb. 15, 1999, the first plasma was achieved 10 weeks ahead of schedule. The project was completed on budget and with an outstanding safety record. This paper gives an overview of the NSTX facility construction and the initial plasma operations.