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Sample records for lcdm mass redshift

  1. Galaxy Mergers and Dark Matter Halo Mergers in LCDM: Mass, Redshift, and Mass-Ratio Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    We employ a high-resolution LCDM N-body simulation to present merger rate predictions for dark matter halos and investigate how common merger-related observables for galaxies - such as close pair counts, starburst counts, and the morphologically disturbed fraction - likely scale with luminosity, stellar mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift from z = 0 to z = 4. We provide a simple 'universal' fitting formula that describes our derived merger rates for dark matter halos a function of dark halo mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift, and go on to predict galaxy merger rates using number density-matching to associate halos with galaxies. For example, we find that the instantaneous merger rate of m/M > 0.3 mass ratio events into typical L {approx}> fL{sub *} galaxies follows the simple relation dN/dt {approx_equal} 0.03(1+f)Gyr{sup -1} (1+z){sup 2.1}. Despite the rapid increase in merger rate with redshift, only a small fraction of > 0.4L{sub *} high-redshift galaxies ({approx} 3% at z = 2) should have experienced a major merger (m/M > 0.3) in the very recent past (t < 100 Myr). This suggests that short-lived, merger-induced bursts of star formation should not contribute significantly to the global star formation rate at early times, in agreement with observational indications. In contrast, a fairly high fraction ({approx} 20%) of those z = 2 galaxies should have experienced a morphologically transformative merger within a virial dynamical time. We compare our results to observational merger rate estimates from both morphological indicators and pair-fraction based determinations between z = 0-2 and show that they are consistent with our predictions. However, we emphasize that great care must be made in these comparisons because the predicted observables depend very sensitively on galaxy luminosity, redshift, overall mass ratio, and uncertain relaxation timescales for merger remnants. We show that the majority of bright galaxies at z = 3 should have undergone a major

  2. The Local Group in LCDM - Shapes and masses of dark halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos Andrés

    2013-01-01

    In dit proefschrift bestuderen we de eigenschappen van donkere materie halo's in het LCDM paradigma. Het eerste deel richt zich op de vorm van de massadistributie van dergelijke objecten. We hebben gevonden dat de vorm van ge"isoleerde Melkweg-achtige donkere materie halo's significant afwijkt van bolsymmetrie. De lokale omgeving heeft invloed op de halo's en deze worden daarbij sterk be"invloed door de manier waarop massa aangroeit. We hebben ook de structuur en de baanstructuur van de satellieten van dergelijke halo's in detail onderzocht. In het algemeen zijn deze objecten sferischer dan de halo's zelf. Ze vertonen ook duidelijke afdrukken van getijdenwerking in zowel hun geometrische vorm als in de baanstructuur. Daarna gebruiken we het aantal massieve objecten rond de Melkweg om limieten te zetten op de totale massa van de donkere materie halo van de Melkweg. De eigenschappen van de massaverdeling van de Melkweg worden verder onderzocht in het laatste hoofdstuk. Daar maken we gebruik van de Sagittarius sterstroom om de vorm van de galactische potentiaal beter te bepalen. We komen met een nieuw model dat rekening houdt met de galactische schijf en de invloed van satellietstelsels en die bovendien consistent is met het LCDM paradigma.

  3. Galaxy Cluster Masses at Moderate Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, E.

    1998-01-01

    The masses of galaxy clusters are dominated by dark matter, and a robust determination of their masses has the potential of indicating how much dark matter exists on large scales in the universe, and the cosmological parameter Omega. X-ray observations of galaxy clusters provide a direct measure of both the gas mass in the intra-cluster medium, and also the total gravitating mass of the cluster. We used new and archival ROSAT observations to measure these quantities for a sample of intermediate redshift clusters which have also been subject to intensive dynamical studies, in order to compare the mass estimates from different methods. We used data from 14 of the CNOC cluster sample at 0.18 less than z less than 0.55 for this study. A direct comparison of dynamical mass estimates from Carlberg, Yee & Ellingson (1997) yielded surprisingly good results. The X-ray/dynamical mass ratios have a mean of 0.96+/- 0.10, indicating that for this sample, both methods are probably yielding very robust mass estimates. Comparison with mass estimates from gravitational lensing studies from the literature showed a small systematic with weak lensing estimates, and large discrepancies with strong lensing estimates. This latter is not surprising, given that these measurement are made close to the central core, where optical and X-ray estimates are less certain, and where substructure and the effects of individual galaxies will be more pronounced. These results are presented in Lewis, Ellingson, Morris/Carlberg, 1998, submitted to the Astrophysical Journal. (Note that Lewis is Ellingson's Ph.D. thesis, who received direct support from this grant and is using this investigation as part of his thesis.) Three additional papers are in preparation. The first provides a comparison of the mass profiles as measured in X- rays and in galaxy dynamics. These profiles are difficult to determine for individual clusters, and are subject to asphericity and other individual quirks of each cluster

  4. A Characteristic Mass in the Low Redshift Tully Fisher Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Raymond; Kassin, S. A.; Weiner, B. J.; Lee, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    We study the stellar mass Tully Fisher relation (TFR; rotation velocity versus stellar mass) without pre-selecting morphologies for a sample of star forming galaxies at redshifts 0.1 < z < 0.375 from Kassin et al. (2007). Spectra are from Keck/DEIMOS (DEEP2 Survey) and images are from Hubble (AEGIS and CANDELS Surveys). In particular, we study the role morphology plays in the TFR, using qualitative and quantitative measures. Kassin et al found that the TFR at these redshifts is relatively tight for galaxies with stellar masses log M* > 9.5, but has significant scatter to low rotation velocities for less massive galaxies which are disturbed/compact. We show quantitatively that the low mass galaxies log M* < 9.5 which scatter from the TFR at these redshifts are compact and asymmetric. We perform a careful review of literature on the TFR at log M* < 9.5 and find that the vast majority of galaxies have quantitative morphologies indicating disks. We argue that a sample without pre-selection reveals that a significant population of star forming galaxies at these masses (locally and in our relatively low redshift range) are actually compact and asymmetric with large components of disordered motions. It is unclear whether the disorder in these low redshift systems is a result of external dynamic interactions (tidal forces, merger history) or if these galaxies are in a less evolved state.

  5. Mass-size relation at high redshift in different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, L.; Huertas-Company, M.; Mei, S.

    2012-12-01

    We study cluster early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the HAWK-I cluster survey in the redshift range 0.8mass-size relation and size evolution of passive ETGs. We find no evidence for an environmental effect within 1σ level for passive ETGs with stellar masses above 3 × 10^{10} M_⊙.

  6. Investigating the Initial Mass Function with Increased Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Danielle; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Stevans, Matthew L.; Tristan, Isaiah

    2017-01-01

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is generally assumed to be universal but there are several factors that could alter it; one being that lower metallicities at higher redshift could lead to an increased production of higher mass stars. Understanding the IMF is crucial because inferred stellar population properties of galaxies from integrated photometry is heavily dependent on the assumed IMF. We present the initial findings of an investigation using the 3D-HST survey catalog to search for variations of the IMF for galaxies with redshift 0.7 < z < 1.5. We calculate the ratio of H-alpha luminosity to the UV luminosity, which probes the ratio of ionizing to non-ionizing UV light, which is dependent on the slope of the upper mass portion of the IMF. While the majority of our galaxies are consistent with having stars distributed according to a Saltpeter IMF (albeit with a range of star-formation histories resulting in significant scatter in the H-alpha/UV luminosity ratio), we do find eight galaxies with a luminosity ratio that is significantly higher than that expected for a Salpeter IMF. This increase in the expected amount of ionized photons could be caused by several factors that we will address, including but not limited to, Active Galactic Nuclei, varying star formation histories, or an increased production of high mass stars.

  7. THE 2MASS REDSHIFT SURVEY-DESCRIPTION AND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Huchra, John P.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael; Falco, Emilio; Mink, Jessica D.; Tokarz, Susan; Macri, Lucas M.; Masters, Karen L.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Crook, Aidan C.; Cutri, Roc; Erdogdu, Pirin; Lahav, Ofer; George, Teddy; Hutcheson, Conrad M.; Mader, Jeff; Martimbeau, Nathalie; Schneider, Stephen; Skrutskie, Michael; Westover, Michael E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS), a ten-year project to map the full three-dimensional distribution of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) was completed in 2003 and its final data products, including an extended source catalog (XSC), are available online. The 2MASS XSC contains nearly a million galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 13.5 mag and is essentially complete and mostly unaffected by interstellar extinction and stellar confusion down to a galactic latitude of |b| = 5 Degree-Sign for bright galaxies. Near-infrared wavelengths are sensitive to the old stellar populations that dominate galaxy masses, making 2MASS an excellent starting point to study the distribution of matter in the nearby universe. We selected a sample of 44,599 2MASS galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 11.75 mag and |b| {>=} 5 Degree-Sign ({>=}8 Degree-Sign toward the Galactic bulge) as the input catalog for our survey. We obtained spectroscopic observations for 11,000 galaxies and used previously obtained velocities for the remainder of the sample to generate a redshift catalog that is 97.6% complete to well-defined limits and covers 91% of the sky. This provides an unprecedented census of galaxy (baryonic mass) concentrations within 300 Mpc. Earlier versions of our survey have been used in a number of publications that have studied the bulk motion of the Local Group, mapped the density and peculiar velocity fields out to 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, detected galaxy groups, and estimated the values of several cosmological parameters. Additionally, we present morphological types for a nearly complete sub-sample of 20,860 galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 11.25 mag and |b| {>=} 10 Degree-Sign .

  8. OPTIMAL MASS CONFIGURATIONS FOR LENSING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the gravitational lensing properties of lines of sight containing multiple cluster-scale halos, motivated by their ability to lens very high redshift (z {approx} 10) sources into detectability. We control for the total mass along the line of sight, isolating the effects of distributing the mass among multiple halos and of varying the physical properties of the halos. Our results show that multiple-halo lines of sight can increase the magnified source-plane region compared to the single cluster lenses typically targeted for lensing studies and thus are generally better fields for detecting very high redshift sources. The configurations that result in optimal lensing cross sections benefit from interactions between the lens potentials of the halos when they overlap somewhat on the sky, creating regions of high magnification in the source plane not present when the halos are considered individually. The effect of these interactions on the lensing cross section can even be comparable to changing the total mass of the lens from 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. The gain in lensing cross section increases as the mass is split into more halos, provided that the lens potentials are projected close enough to interact with each other. A nonzero projected halo angular separation, equal halo mass ratio, and high projected halo concentration are the best mass configurations, whereas projected halo ellipticity, halo triaxiality, and the relative orientations of the halos are less important. Such high-mass, multiple-halo lines of sight exist in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  9. Star formation and mass assembly in high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, P.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Salimbeni, S.; Fiore, F.; Fontanot, F.; Boutsia, K.; Castellano, M.; Cristiani, S.; de Santis, C.; Gallozzi, S.; Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Vanzella, E.

    2009-09-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to infer the star formation properties and the mass assembly process of high redshift (0.3 ≤ z < 2.5) galaxies from their IR emission using the 24 μm band of MIPS-Spitzer. Methods: We used an updated version of the GOODS-MUSIC catalog, which has multiwavelength coverage from 0.3 to 24 μm and either spectroscopic or accurate photometric redshifts. We describe how the catalog has been extended by the addition of mid-IR fluxes derived from the MIPS 24 μm image. We compared two different estimators of the star formation rate (SFR hereafter). One is the total infrared emission derived from 24 μm, estimated using both synthetic and empirical IR templates. The other one is a multiwavelength fit to the full galaxy SED, which automatically accounts for dust reddening and age-star formation activity degeneracies. For both estimates, we computed the SFR density and the specific SFR. Results: We show that the two SFR indicators are roughly consistent, once the uncertainties involved are taken into account. However, they show a systematic trend, IR-based estimates exceeding the fit-based ones as the star formation rate increases. With this new catalog, we show that: a) at z>0.3, the star formation rate is correlated well with stellar mass, and this relationship seems to steepen with redshift if one relies on IR-based estimates of the SFR; b) the contribution to the global SFRD by massive galaxies increases with redshift up to ≃ 2.5, more rapidly than for galaxies of lower mass, but appears to flatten at higher z; c) despite this increase, the most important contributors to the SFRD at any z are galaxies of about, or immediately lower than, the characteristic stellar mass; d) at z≃ 2, massive galaxies are actively star-forming, with a median {SFR} ≃ 300 M_⊙ yr-1. During this epoch, our targeted galaxies assemble a substantial part of their final stellar mass; e) the specific SFR (SSFR) shows a clear bimodal distribution. Conclusions

  10. Galaxy Groups in the 2Mass Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Yang, Xiaohu; Shi, Feng; Mo, H. J.; Tweed, Dylan; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Youcai; Li, Shijie; Lim, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    A galaxy group catalog is constructed from the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) with the use of a halo-based group finder. The halo mass associated with a group is estimated using a “GAP” method based on the luminosity of the central galaxy and its gap with other member galaxies. Tests using mock samples show that this method is reliable, particularly for poor systems containing only a few members. On average, 80% of all the groups have completeness \\gt 0.8, and about 65% of the groups have zero contamination. Halo masses are estimated with a typical uncertainty of ∼ 0.35 {dex}. The application of the group finder to the 2MRS gives 29,904 groups from a total of 43,246 galaxies at z≤slant 0.08, with 5286 groups having two or more members. Some basic properties of this group catalog is presented, and comparisons are made with other group catalogs in overlap regions. With a depth to z∼ 0.08 and uniformly covering about 91% of the whole sky, this group catalog provides a useful database to study galaxies in the local cosmic web, and to reconstruct the mass distribution in the local universe.

  11. Low Masses and High Redshifts: The Evolution of the Mass-Metallicity Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Alaina; Scarlata, Claudia; Dominguez, Alberto; Malkan, Matthew; Martin, Crystal L.; Siana, Brian; Atek, Hakim; Bedregal, Alejandro G.; Colbert, James W.; Rafelski, Marc; Ross, Nathaniel; Teplitz, Harry; Bunker, Andrew J.; Dressler, Alan; Hathi, Nimish; Masters, Daniel; McCarthy, Patrick; Straughn, Amber

    2013-01-01

    We present the first robust measurement of the high redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at 10(exp 8) < M/Stellar Mass < or approx. 10(exp 10), obtained by stacking spectra of 83 emission-line galaxies with secure redshifts between 1.3 < or approx. z < or approx. 2.3. For these redshifts, infrared grism spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 is sensitive to the R23 metallicity diagnostic: ([O II] (lambda)(lambda)3726, 3729 + [OIII] (lambda)(lambda)4959, 5007)/H(beta). Using spectra stacked in four mass quartiles, we find a MZ relation that declines significantly with decreasing mass, extending from 12+log(O/H) = 8.8 at M = 10(exp 9.8) Stellar Mass to 12+log(O/H)= 8.2 at M = 10(exp 8.2) Stellar Mass. After correcting for systematic offsets between metallicity indicators, we compare our MZ relation to measurements from the stacked spectra of galaxies with M > or approx. 10(exp 9.5) Stellar Mass and z approx. 2.3. Within the statistical uncertainties, our MZ relation agrees with the z approx. 2.3 result, particularly since our somewhat higher metallicities (by around 0.1 dex) are qualitatively consistent with the lower mean redshift (z = 1.76) of our sample. For the masses probed by our data, the MZ relation shows a steep slope which is suggestive of feedback from energy-driven winds, and a cosmological downsizing evolution where high mass galaxies reach the local MZ relation at earlier times. In addition, we show that our sample falls on an extrapolation of the star-forming main sequence (the SFR-M* relation) at this redshift. This result indicates that grism emission-line selected samples do not have preferentially high star formation rates (SFRs). Finally, we report no evidence for evolution of the mass-metallicity-SFR plane; our stack-averaged measurements show excellent agreement with the local relation.

  12. Reconstructing the galaxy density field with photometric redshifts. I. Methodology and validation on stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, N.; Pozzetti, L.; Cucciati, O.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Measuring environment for large numbers of galaxies in the distant Universe is an open problem in astrophysics, as environment is important in determining many properties of galaxies during their formation and evolution. In order to measure galaxy environments, we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic redshifts. Aims: We study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how the reconstruction of the density field may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Methods: Through the use of mock galaxy catalogues, we measured galaxy environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the parameters defining the fixed aperture volume and explored different configurations. We also used photometric redshifts with different uncertainties to simulate the case of various surveys. We then computed GSMF of the mock galaxy catalogues as a function of redshift and environment to see how the environmental estimate based on photometric redshifts affects their analysis. Results: We found that the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with σΔz/ (1 + z) ≲ 0.01, with a fraction ≥ 60 ÷ 80% of galaxies placed in the correct density quartile and a contamination of ≤10% by opposite quartile interlopers. A length of the volume in the radial direction comparable to the ±1.5σ error of photometric redshifts and a fixed aperture radius of a size similar to the physical scale of the studied environment grant a better reconstruction than other volume configurations. When using this kind of an estimate of the density field, we found that any difference between the starting GSMF (divided accordingly to the true galaxy environment

  13. The mass-concentration-redshift relation of cold and warm dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, Aaron D.; Bose, Sownak; Angulo, Raúl E.; Wang, Lan; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2016-08-01

    We use a suite of cosmological simulations to study the mass-concentration-redshift relation, c(M, z), of dark matter haloes. Our simulations include standard Λ-cold dark matter (CDM) models, and additional runs with truncated power spectra, consistent with a thermal warm dark matter (WDM) scenario. We find that the mass profiles of CDM and WDM haloes are self-similar and well approximated by the Einasto profile. The c(M, z) relation of CDM haloes is monotonic: concentrations decrease with increasing virial mass at fixed redshift, and decrease with increasing redshift at fixed mass. The mass accretion histories (MAHs) of CDM haloes are also scale-free, and can be used to infer concentrations directly. These results do not apply to WDM haloes: their MAHs are not scale-free because of the characteristic scale imposed by the power spectrum suppression. Further, the WDM c(M, z) relation is non-monotonic: concentrations peak at a mass scale dictated by the truncation scale, and decrease at higher and lower masses. We show that the assembly history of a halo can still be used to infer its concentration, provided that the total mass of its progenitors is considered (the `collapsed mass history'; CMH), rather than just that of its main ancestor. This exploits the scale-free nature of CMHs to derive a simple scaling that reproduces the mass-concentration-redshift relation of both CDM and WDM haloes over a vast range of halo masses and redshifts. Our model therefore provides a robust account of the mass, redshift, cosmology and power spectrum dependence of dark matter halo concentrations.

  14. Lensing convergence and the neutrino mass scale in galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Wilmar; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin; Montanari, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the importance of including the lensing contribution in galaxy clustering analyses with large galaxy redshift surveys. It is well known that radial cross-correlations between different redshift bins of galaxy surveys are dominated by lensing. But we show here that also neglecting lensing in the autocorrelations within one bin severely biases cosmological parameter estimation with redshift surveys. It leads to significant shifts for several cosmological parameters, most notably the scalar spectral index and the neutrino mass scale. Especially the latter parameter is one of the main targets of future galaxy surveys.

  15. Dark matter inside early-type galaxies as function of mass and redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigoche-Netro, A.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Lagos, P.; Ruelas-Mayorga, A.; de la Fuente, E.; Kemp, S. N.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.; Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the behaviour of the dynamical and stellar mass inside the effective radius (re) of early-type galaxies (ETGs). We use several samples of ETGs - ranging from 19 000 to 98 000 objects - from the ninth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We consider Newtonian dynamics, different light profiles and different initial mass functions (IMF) to calculate the dynamical and stellar mass. We assume that any difference between these two masses is due to dark matter and/or a non-universal IMF. The main results for galaxies in the redshift range 0.0024 < z < 0.3500 and in the dynamical mass range 9.5 < log(M) < 12.5 are: (i) a significant part of the intrinsic dispersion of the distribution of dynamical versus stellar mass is due to redshift; (ii) the difference between dynamical and stellar mass increases as a function of dynamical mass and decreases as a function of redshift; (iii) the difference between dynamical and stellar mass goes from approximately 0 to 70 per cent of the dynamical mass depending on mass and redshift; (iv) these differences could be due to dark matter or a non-universal IMF or a combination of both; (v) the amount of dark matter inside ETGs would be equal to or less than the difference between dynamical and stellar mass depending on the impact of the IMF on the stellar mass estimation; (vi) the previous results go in the same direction of some results of the Fundamental Plane (FP) found in the literature in the sense that they could be interpreted as an increase of dark matter along the FP and a dependence of the FP on redshift.

  16. Evolution of dwarf galaxies simulated in the cosmological LCDM scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Samaniego, Alejandro; Colin, Pedro; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Valenzuela, Octavio

    2014-03-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of low-mass galaxies with the aim to explore the way their stellar masses are assembled. We analyze how the mass assembly histories of the parent halo determine the growth of their host galaxy and its implications on the current paradigm of formation and evolution of low-mass structures in the LCDM scenario. We have found that low-mass galaxies simulated in this scenario assemble their stellar masses following roughly the dark matter halo assembly, which seems to be in tension with the downsizing trend suggested by current observational inferences. We show that there is no more room to increase the strength of feedback from astrophysical processes in order to deviate strongly the stellar mass assembly from the dark halo one, as has been recently invoked to solve some of the potential issues faced by CDM-based simulations of dwarf galaxies. Alejandro González acknowledges finacial support from UNAM, Fundacion UNAM, and the APS to attend this meeting.

  17. The relation between mass and concentration in X-ray galaxy clusters at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodeo, S.; Ettori, S.; Capasso, R.; Sereno, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters are the most recent, gravitationally bound products of the hierarchical mass accretion over cosmological scales. How the mass is concentrated is predicted to correlate with the total mass in the halo of the cluster, wherein systems at higher mass are less concentrated at given redshift and, for any given mass, systems with lower concentration are found at higher redshifts. Aims: Through a spatial and spectral X-ray analysis, we reconstruct the total mass profile of 47 galaxy clusters observed with Chandra in the redshift range 0.4 mass and dark matter concentration and the evolution of this relation with redshift. This sample is the largest investigated so far at z> 0.4, and is well suited to providing the first constraint on the concentration-mass relation at z> 0.7 from X-ray analysis. Methods: Under the assumption that the distribution of the X-ray emitting gas is spherically symmetric and in the hydrostatic equilibrium with the underlined gravitational potential, we combine the deprojected gas density and spectral temperature profiles through the hydrostatic equilibrium equation to recover the parameters that describe a Navarro-Frenk-White total mass distribution. The comparison with results from weak-lensing analysis reveals a very good agreement both for masses and concentrations. The uncertainties are however too large to make any robust conclusion about the hydrostatic bias of these systems. Results: The distribution of concentrations is well approximated by a log-normal function in all the mass and redshift ranges investigated. The relation is well described by the form c ∝ MB(1 + z)C with B = -0.50 ± 0.20, C = 0.12 ± 0.61 (at 68.3% confidence). This relation is slightly steeper than that predicted by numerical simulations (B ~ -0.1) and does not show any evident redshift evolution. We obtain the first constraints on the properties of

  18. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): colour- and luminosity-dependent clustering from calibrated photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, L.; Eminian, C.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Baldry, I. K.; Hurley, P. D.; Driver, S. P.; Bamford, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; Peacock, J. A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cameron, E.; Conselice, C. J.; Croom, S. M.; Frenk, C. S.; Gunawardhana, M.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L. S.; Kuijken, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Parkinson, H.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Sharp, R. G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Taylor, E. N.; Thomas, D.; Tuffs, R. J.; van Kampen, E.; Wijesinghe, D.

    2012-09-01

    We measure the two-point angular correlation function of a sample of 4289 223 galaxies with r < 19.4 mag from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as a function of photometric redshift, absolute magnitude and colour down to Mr - 5 log h = -14 mag. Photometric redshifts are estimated from ugriz model magnitudes and two Petrosian radii using the artificial neural network package ANNz, taking advantage of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic sample as our training set. These photometric redshifts are then used to determine absolute magnitudes and colours. For all our samples, we estimate the underlying redshift and absolute magnitude distributions using Monte Carlo resampling. These redshift distributions are used in Limber's equation to obtain spatial correlation function parameters from power-law fits to the angular correlation function. We confirm an increase in clustering strength for sub-L* red galaxies compared with ˜L* red galaxies at small scales in all redshift bins, whereas for the blue population the correlation length is almost independent of luminosity for ˜L* galaxies and fainter. A linear relation between relative bias and log luminosity is found to hold down to luminosities L ˜ 0.03L*. We find that the redshift dependence of the bias of the L* population can be described by the passive evolution model of Tegmark & Peebles. A visual inspection of a random sample from our r < 19.4 sample of SDSS galaxies reveals that about 10 per cent are spurious, with a higher contamination rate towards very faint absolute magnitudes due to over-deblended nearby galaxies. We correct for this contamination in our clustering analysis.

  19. Supermassive Black Hole Mass and Spiral Galaxy Pitch Angle at Intermediate to High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John A.; Barrows, R. S.; Berrier, J. C.; Davis, B. L.; Kennefick, D.; Kennefick, J. D.; Lacy, C. H. S.; Seigar, M. S.; Shields, D. W.; Zoldak, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    A possible correlation between spiral galaxy pitch angle (P) and the mass of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) of the galaxy (M) was reported (Seigar et al. 2008) from a sample of 27 nearby galaxies. Here we investigate the extension of this result to intermediate and high redshifts. We have selected AGN showing spiral structure in their host galaxies from the GOODS fields and from a sample of AGN with reverberation mapping SMBH mass estimates. After careful measure of the pitch angle of these galaxies, we compare the mass found from the M-P relation to that reported from reverberation mapping or estimated from their MgII profiles. By extending the sample to higher redshift, we demonstrate how the M-P relationship can be used to estimate the mass of SMBHs in the center of galaxies with imaging data alone, a useful tool in the study of galaxy evolution.

  20. A Gravitational Redshift Determination of the Mean Mass of White Dwarfs. DA Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcon, Ross E.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Williams, Kurtis A.

    2010-03-01

    We measure apparent velocities (v app) of the Hα and Hβ Balmer line cores for 449 non-binary thin disk normal DA white dwarfs (WDs) using optical spectra taken for the European Southern Observatory SN Ia progenitor survey (SPY). Assuming these WDs are nearby and comoving, we correct our velocities to the local standard of rest so that the remaining stellar motions are random. By averaging over the sample, we are left with the mean gravitational redshift, [vg]: we find [vg] = [vapp] = 32.57 ± 1.17 km s-1. Using the mass-radius relation from evolutionary models, this translates to a mean mass of 0.647+0.013 -0.014 Msun. We interpret this as the mean mass for all DAs. Our results are in agreement with previous gravitational redshift studies but are significantly higher than all previous spectroscopic determinations except the recent findings of Tremblay & Bergeron. Since the gravitational redshift method is independent of surface gravity from atmosphere models, we investigate the mean mass of DAs with spectroscopic T eff both above and below 12,000 K fits to line profiles give a rapid increase in the mean mass with decreasing Teff. Our results are consistent with no significant change in mean mass: [M]hot = 0.640 ± 0.014 M⊙ and [M]cool = 0.686+0.035 -0.039 M⊙.

  1. Galaxy formation in LCDM: numerical models for CANDELS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly

    2011-10-01

    We propose to create a large library of high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxies forming in the standard LCDM cosmology with the goal to provide theoretical support for the interpretation of HST observations, especially in connection with the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}, focused on galaxies at z=2-8. The simulations will provide a statistical sample of galaxies in different environments and with different degrees of interaction. Our hydrodynamic plus N-body code ART models numerous physical processes including molecular cooling, radiation pressure due to young stars, feedback due to SNII and SNI, metal enrichment, and fueling of and feedback from AGN. We plan to produce hundreds of simulations of Milky- Way-size galaxies run to redshift different z's with hundreds of additional dwarf and satellites galaxies in surrounding regions. The simulations have extremely high resolution of 20-50 parsec - the best currently available. Using radiative-transfer code SUNRISE we will produce many observable properties of the simulated galaxies, including images in many wavebands including the effects of stellar evolution and dust, SEDs out to the far-IR, star-formation histories, and kinematics. For years, understanding galaxy formation suffered from two big obstacles: lack of data on the underlying "stellar scaffolding" of galaxies beyond z 1 and lack of realistic codes to model early stages of galaxy formation. The WFC3-IR camera is solving the first problem, and now is the right moment to invest in the first extensive realistic suite of hydrodynamic models, without which the precious new data cannot be properly used.

  2. Evolution of Intermediate Redshift Galaxies Physical Properties and Mass-Metallicity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lifang

    The first part of this dissertation presents the implementation of Bayesian statistics with galaxy surface luminosity (SL) prior probabilities to improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts. The addition of the SL prior probability helps break the degeneracy of spectro-photometric redshifts (SPZs) between low redshift 4000 A break galaxies and high redshift Lyman break galaxies which are mostly catastrophic outliers. For a sample of 1138 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the GOODS North and South fields at z < 1.6, the application of the surface luminosity prior reduces the fraction of galaxies with redshift deviation sigma(z) > 0.2 from 15.0% to 10.4%. The second part of this dissertation presents the study of the chemical evolution of the star-forming galaxies. The Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) grism Survey effectively selects emission line galaxies (ELGs) to m AB ˜ 27. Follow-up Magellan LDSS3+IMACS spectroscopy of the HST/ACS PEARS ELGs confirms an accuracy of sigma_z = 0.006 for the HST/ACS PEARS grism redshifts. The luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) relation and the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relation of the PEARS ELGs at z ˜ 0.6 are offset by ˜ - 0.8 dex in metallicity for a given rest-frame B absolute magnitude and stellar mass relative to the local relations from SDSS galaxies. The offsets in both relations are ˜ - 0.4 dex larger than that given by other samples at same redshifts, which are demonstrated to be due to the selection of different physical properties of the PEARS ELGs: low metallicities, very blue colors, small sizes, compact disturbed morphologies, high SSFR > 10-9 yr-1, and high gas fraction. The downsizing effect, the tidal interacting induced inflow of metal-poor gas, and the SNe driven galactic winds outflows, may account for the significant offset of the PEARS galaxies in the L-Z and the M-Z relations relative to the local relations. The detection of the emission lines of ELGs down

  3. The Metallicity Evolution of Low Mass Galaxies: New Contraints at Intermediate Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Alaina; Martin, Crystal L.; Finlator, Kristian; Dressler, Alan

    2013-01-01

    We present abundance measurements from 26 emission-line-selected galaxies at z approx. 0.6-0.7. By reaching stellar masses as low as 10(exp 8) M stellar mass, these observations provide the first measurement of the intermediate-redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation below 10(exp 9)M stellar mass. For the portion of our sample above M is greater than 10(exp 9)M (8/26 galaxies), we find good agreement with previous measurements of the intermediate-redshift MZ relation. Compared to the local relation, we measure an evolution that corresponds to a 0.12 dex decrease in oxygen abundances at intermediate redshifts. This result confirms the trend that metallicity evolution becomes more significant toward lower stellar masses, in keeping with a downsizing scenario where low-mass galaxies evolve onto the local MZ relation at later cosmic times. We show that these galaxies follow the local fundamental metallicity relation, where objects with higher specific (mass-normalized) star formation rates (SFRs) have lower metallicities. Furthermore, we show that the galaxies in our sample lie on an extrapolation of the SFR-M* relation (the star-forming main sequence). Leveraging the MZ relation and star-forming main sequence (and combining our data with higher-mass measurements from the literature), we test models that assume an equilibrium between mass inflow, outflow, and star formation.We find that outflows are required to describe the data. By comparing different outflow prescriptions, we show that momentum, driven winds can describe the MZ relation; however, this model underpredicts the amount of star formation in low-mass galaxies. This disagreement may indicate that preventive feedback from gas heating has been overestimated, or it may signify a more fundamental deviation from the equilibrium assumption.

  4. Forecasts on neutrino mass constraints from the redshift-space two-point correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petracca, F.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Cimatti, A.; Carbone, C.; Angulo, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    We provide constraints on the accuracy with which the neutrino mass fraction, fν, can be estimated when exploiting measurements of redshift-space distortions, describing in particular how the error on neutrino mass depends on three fundamental parameters of a characteristic galaxy redshift survey: density, halo bias and volume. In doing this, we make use of a series of dark matter halo catalogues extracted from the BASICC simulation. The mock data are analysed via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis. We find a fitting function that well describes the dependence of the error on bias, density and volume, showing a decrease in the error as the bias and volume increase, and a decrease with density down to an almost constant value for high-density values. This fitting formula allows us to produce forecasts on the precision achievable with future surveys on measurements of the neutrino mass fraction. For example, a Euclid-like spectroscopic survey should be able to measure the neutrino mass fraction with an accuracy of δfν ≈ 3.1 × 10-3 (which is equivalent to δ∑mν ≈ 0.039eV), using redshift-space clustering once all the other cosmological parameters are kept fixed to the ΛCDM case.

  5. The binary Feige 24 - The mass, radius, and gravitational redshift of the DA white dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Vennes, S.; Shipman, H.L.; Thorstensen, J.R.; Thejll, P. Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH NORDITA, Copenhagen, Denmark )

    1991-05-01

    Observations are reported which refine the binary ephemeris of the Feige 24 system, which contains a peculiar hot DA white dwarf and an M dwarf with an atmosphere illuminated by extreme ultraviolet radiation from the white dwarf. With the new ephemeris and a set of IUE high-dispersion spectra, showing phase-dependent redshifted C IV, N V, and Si IV resonance lines, the orbital velocity, and hence the mass (0.54 + or {minus} 0.20 solar masses), and the gravitational redshift of the white dwarf (14.1 + or {minus} 5.2 km/s) are determined independently. It is shown that the measured Einstein redshift is consistent with an estimated radius for the white dwarf obtained from a model atmosphere solid angle and a parallax measurement. This radius is twice the Hamada-Salpeter radius for the given mass and offers a prospect to investigate the presence of a massive hydrogen envelope in that white dwarf star. 27 refs.

  6. A GRAVITATIONAL REDSHIFT DETERMINATION OF THE MEAN MASS OF WHITE DWARFS. DA STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon, Ross E.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Williams, Kurtis A. E-mail: dew@astro.as.utexas.ed E-mail: kurtis@astro.as.utexas.ed

    2010-03-20

    We measure apparent velocities (v{sub app}) of the Halpha and Hbeta Balmer line cores for 449 non-binary thin disk normal DA white dwarfs (WDs) using optical spectra taken for the European Southern Observatory SN Ia progenitor survey (SPY). Assuming these WDs are nearby and comoving, we correct our velocities to the local standard of rest so that the remaining stellar motions are random. By averaging over the sample, we are left with the mean gravitational redshift, (v{sub g}): we find (v{sub g}) = (v{sub app}) = 32.57 +- 1.17 km s{sup -1}. Using the mass-radius relation from evolutionary models, this translates to a mean mass of 0.647{sup +0.013}{sub -0.014} M{sub sun}. We interpret this as the mean mass for all DAs. Our results are in agreement with previous gravitational redshift studies but are significantly higher than all previous spectroscopic determinations except the recent findings of Tremblay and Bergeron. Since the gravitational redshift method is independent of surface gravity from atmosphere models, we investigate the mean mass of DAs with spectroscopic T{sub eff} both above and below 12,000 K; fits to line profiles give a rapid increase in the mean mass with decreasing T{sub eff}. Our results are consistent with no significant change in mean mass: (M){sup hot} = 0.640 +- 0.014 M{sub sun} and (M){sup cool} = 0.686{sup +0.035}{sub -0.039} M{sub sun}.

  7. Physical properties of low-mass star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z <1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Pacifici, C.; Tresse, L.; Charlot, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Barro, G.; Villar, V.

    2015-05-01

    In this poster we present the physical properties of a sample of low-mass star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z<1). We selected a population of dwarf galaxies because dwarf galaxies play a key role in galaxy formation and evolution: (1) they resemble the first structures that hierarchical models predict to form first in the Universe (Dekel & Silk 1986) and that are responsible for the reionization process (Bouwens et al. 2012); and (2) the way or epoch they form and how they evolve are still open questions of modern astrophysics. We selected the sample on the CDFS field. Photometry (40 bands, from UV to far-IR) and preliminary photometric redshifts and stellar masses were obtained from RAINBOW database (Pérez-González et al. 2008). Morphology fom Griffith et al. (2012). Main selection was done by stellar mass, selecting those galaxies with stellar mass M_*<10^8 {M}_⊙. Spectroscopic redshifts were obtained from deep (4 h) MOS spectroscopy with the VIMOS spectrograph at VLT. The average spectrum is characterized by a faint, blue and flat continuum and strong emission lines, revealing that the systems are dominated by an undergoing star formation burst. SFRs and stellar masses are consistent with the SF main-squence over a 2 dex range. More massive objects show higher SFRs than low-mass objects, following the SF main sequence. Distant dwarfs and BCDs follow the overall star-forming sequence in the excitation-luminosity diagram, populating the high excitation, low metallicity and high strength region.

  8. Obtaining mass parameters of compact objects from redshifts and blueshifts emitted by geodesic particles around them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerril, Ricardo; Valdez-Alvarado, Susana; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2016-12-01

    The mass parameters of compact objects such as boson stars, Schwarzschild, Reissner-Nordström, and Kerr black holes are computed in terms of the measurable redshift-blueshift (zred , zblue ) of photons emitted by particles moving along circular geodesics around these objects and the radius of their orbits. We find bounds for the values of (zred , zblue ) that may be observed. For the case of the Kerr black hole, recent observational estimates of Sgr A* mass and rotation parameter are employed to determine the corresponding values of these red-blue shifts.

  9. The mass-metallicity relation of absorption selected high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lise; Møller, P.; Rhodin, Henrik; Krogager, Jens-Kristian; Fynbo, Johan P. U.

    2017-03-01

    Strong absorption lines in quasar spectra primarily probe low-mass galaxies and detecting these in emission has previously been difficult. Dedicated surveys for the host galaxies of damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems have often resulted in non-detections and upper limits. Targeting the most metal-rich absorbers has proven to be a viable method, because these galaxies are brighter. By combining DLA metallicities and deriving host galaxy stellar masses, we find that metal-rich DLAs (with >10% solar metallicity) and their host galaxies follow the same redshift-dependent scaling relation between stellar mass and metallicity as luminosity-selected galaxies. We derive a prediction for an absorber galaxy mass that depends on the DLA metallicity.

  10. The Properties of the Interstellar Medium in Low-Mass Galaxies at Low Redshifts and Their Strong Similarities to High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, M. A.; Nagao, T.; Kashikawa, N.; Hayashi, M.; Shimasaku, K.

    2013-01-01

    We present rest-frame optical spectroscopy for ~200 low-mass galaxies at z ≤ 0.7. Our sample of emission-line galaxies were selected by their excess in narrowband filters from the Subaru Deep Field. We construct the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich (BPT) and Mass-Excitation (MEx; Juneau et al.) diagrams, simultaneously determine gas-phase metallicity and the ionization parameter from available emission lines, and determine the electron density from Sulfur emission lines where available. We find that the majority of our galaxies are photo-ionized by stars. Their emission-line flux ratios occupy the upper left end of the BPT and MEx diagnostic diagrams. This is in stark comparison to the local SDSS sample, and suggests a higher ionization state in low-mass galaxies. Our measurements of the [OIII] λ5007/[OII] λ3727 flux ratio are also consistent with this statement where we find ionization parameter of log(U) = -2.4 ± 0.3. We also estimate the electron density from the [SII] λλ6717,6732 emission-line ratio for a dozen of our galaxies, and find a median electron density of 900 cm-3. These measurements on the physical properties of the interstellar medium for emission-line galaxies are all similar to those seen in high-redshift galaxies, suggesting that our low-mass galaxies may in fact be low-redshift analogs to the high-redshift population.

  11. A break in the high-redshift stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lise; Hjorth, Jens

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) between the stellar mass and the integrated gas velocity dispersion, quantified by the kinematic estimator S0.5 measured from strong emission lines in spectra of galaxies at 0 < z < 5. We combine luminosity-selected galaxies ('high-luminosity sample') with galaxies selected in other ways ('low-luminosity sample') to cover a range in stellar mass that spans almost five orders of magnitude: 7.0 ≲ log M*/M⊙ ≲ 11.5. We find that the logarithmic power-law slope and normalization of the TFR are independent of redshift out to z ∼ 3. The scatter in the TFR is <0.5 dex such that the gas velocity dispersion can be used as a proxy for the stellar mass of a galaxy independently of its redshift. At z > 3, the scatter increases and the existence of a correlation is not obvious. The high-luminosity sample exhibits a flatter slope of 1.5 ± 0.2 at z < 3 compared to the low-luminosity sample slope of 2.9 ± 0.3, suggesting a turnover in the TFR. The combined sample is well fit with a break in the TFR at a characteristic stellar-mass scale of M* ∼ 1010 M⊙, with no significant evolution out to z ∼ 3. We demonstrate that a break in the TFR with a steeper slope at the low-mass end is a natural consequence of galaxy models with a mass-dependent stellar-to-halo mass ratio.

  12. The C IV Mass Density of the Universe at Redshift 5(exp 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettini, Max; Madau, Piero; Bolte, Michael; Prochaska, Jason X.; Ellison, Sara L.; Fan, Xiao-Hui

    2003-01-01

    In order to search for metals in the Ly alpha forest at redshifts z(sub abs) > 4, we have obtained spectra of high signal-to-noise ratio and moderately high resolution of three QSOs at z(sub em) > 5.4 discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These data allow us to probe to metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium at early times with higher sensitivity than previous studies. We find 16 C IV absorption systems with column densities logN(C IV) = 12.50-13.98 over a total redshift path Delta X = 3.29. In the redshift interval z = 4.5-5.0, where our statistics are most reliable, we deduce a comoving mass density of C(3+) ions Omega(sub C IV) = (4.3 +/- 2.5) x 10(exp -8) (90% confidence limits) for absorption systems with log N(C IV) > or = 13.0 (for an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology with h = 0.65). This value of Omega(sub C IV) is entirely consistent with those measured at z < 4; we confirm the earlier finding by Songaila that neither the column density distribution of C IV absorbers nor its integral show significant redshift evolution over a period of time that stretches from approx. 1.25 to approx. 4.5 Gyr after the big bang. This somewhat surprising conclusion may be an indication that the intergalactic medium was enriched in metals at z >> 5, perhaps by the sources responsible for its reionization. Alternatively, the C IV systems we see may be associated with outflows from massive star-forming galaxies at later times, while the truly intergalactic metals may reside in regions of the Ly alpha forest of lower density than those probed up to now.

  13. The C IV Mass Density of the Universe at Redshift 5(exp 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettini, Max; Madau, Piero; Bolte, Michael; Prochaska, Jason X.; Ellison, Sara L.; Fan, Xiao-Hui

    2003-01-01

    In order to search for metals in the Ly alpha forest at redshifts z(sub abs) > 4, we have obtained spectra of high signal-to-noise ratio and moderately high resolution of three QSOs at z(sub em) > 5.4 discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These data allow us to probe to metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium at early times with higher sensitivity than previous studies. We find 16 C IV absorption systems with column densities logN(C IV) = 12.50-13.98 over a total redshift path Delta X = 3.29. In the redshift interval z = 4.5-5.0, where our statistics are most reliable, we deduce a comoving mass density of C(3+) ions Omega(sub C IV) = (4.3 +/- 2.5) x 10(exp -8) (90% confidence limits) for absorption systems with log N(C IV) > or = 13.0 (for an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology with h = 0.65). This value of Omega(sub C IV) is entirely consistent with those measured at z < 4; we confirm the earlier finding by Songaila that neither the column density distribution of C IV absorbers nor its integral show significant redshift evolution over a period of time that stretches from approx. 1.25 to approx. 4.5 Gyr after the big bang. This somewhat surprising conclusion may be an indication that the intergalactic medium was enriched in metals at z >> 5, perhaps by the sources responsible for its reionization. Alternatively, the C IV systems we see may be associated with outflows from massive star-forming galaxies at later times, while the truly intergalactic metals may reside in regions of the Ly alpha forest of lower density than those probed up to now.

  14. The Metallicity Evolution of Low-mass Galaxies: New Constraints at Intermediate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Alaina; Martin, Crystal L.; Finlator, Kristian; Dressler, Alan

    2013-06-01

    We present abundance measurements from 26 emission-line-selected galaxies at z ~ 0.6-0.7. By reaching stellar masses as low as 108 M ⊙, these observations provide the first measurement of the intermediate-redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation below 109 M ⊙. For the portion of our sample above M > 109 M ⊙ (8/26 galaxies), we find good agreement with previous measurements of the intermediate-redshift MZ relation. Compared to the local relation, we measure an evolution that corresponds to a 0.12 dex decrease in oxygen abundances at intermediate redshifts. This result confirms the trend that metallicity evolution becomes more significant toward lower stellar masses, in keeping with a downsizing scenario where low-mass galaxies evolve onto the local MZ relation at later cosmic times. We show that these galaxies follow the local fundamental metallicity relation, where objects with higher specific (mass-normalized) star formation rates (SFRs) have lower metallicities. Furthermore, we show that the galaxies in our sample lie on an extrapolation of the SFR-M * relation (the star-forming main sequence). Leveraging the MZ relation and star-forming main sequence (and combining our data with higher-mass measurements from the literature), we test models that assume an equilibrium between mass inflow, outflow, and star formation. We find that outflows are required to describe the data. By comparing different outflow prescriptions, we show that momentum, driven winds can describe the MZ relation; however, this model underpredicts the amount of star formation in low-mass galaxies. This disagreement may indicate that preventive feedback from gas heating has been overestimated, or it may signify a more fundamental deviation from the equilibrium assumption. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National

  15. A Gravitational Redshift Determination of the Mean Mass of DBA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcon, Ross E.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Williams, Kurtis A.

    2010-11-01

    We measure apparent velocities (νapp) of the Hα and Hβ Balmer line cores for 16 helium-dominated white dwarfs (WDs) using optical spectra taken for the European Southern Observatory SN Ia progenitor survey (SPY). Following the gravitational redshift method employed by Falcon et al. [1], we find a mean apparent velocity of <νapp> = 39.58+/-4.41 km s-1 and use it to derive a mean mass of = 0.701-0.046+0.042Msolar. Though the sample is small, the mean mass appears to be larger than the mean mass of DAs derived using the same method [0.647-0.014+0.013Msolar,1].

  16. QUENCHING STAR FORMATION AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS: DOWNSIZING OF THE MASS FLUX DENSITY IN THE GREEN VALLEY

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, Thiago S.; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Martin, D. Christopher; Wyder, Ted K.; Koekemoer, Anton

    2012-11-01

    The bimodality in galaxy properties has been observed at low and high redshifts, with a clear distinction between star-forming galaxies in the blue cloud and passively evolving objects in the red sequence; the absence of galaxies with intermediate properties indicates that the quenching of star formation and subsequent transition between populations must happen rapidly. In this paper, we present a study of over 100 transiting galaxies in the so-called green valley at intermediate redshifts (z {approx} 0.8). By using very deep spectroscopy with the DEIMOS instrument at the Keck telescope we are able to infer the star formation histories of these objects and measure the stellar mass flux density transiting from the blue cloud to the red sequence when the universe was half its current age. Our results indicate that the process happened more rapidly and for more massive galaxies in the past, suggesting a top-down scenario in which the massive end of the red sequence is forming first. This represents another aspect of downsizing, with the mass flux density moving toward smaller galaxies in recent times.

  17. MEASURING THE ULTIMATE HALO MASS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS: REDSHIFTS AND MASS PROFILES FROM THE HECTOSPEC CLUSTER SURVEY (HeCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Rines, Kenneth; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2013-04-10

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a {Lambda}CDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these halos. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1 < z < 0.3. The survey includes 22,680 unique MMT/Hectospec redshifts for individual galaxies; 10,145 of these galaxies are cluster members. For each cluster, we acquired high signal-to-noise spectra for {approx}200 cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. We demonstrate that the determination of velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a {Lambda}CDM universe) is on average (1.99 {+-} 0.11)M{sub 200}, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in M{sub 200} and in L{sub X} demonstrate that the predicted Navarro-Frenk-White form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.

  18. The C IV Mass Density of the Universe at Redshift 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, Max; Madau, Piero; Bolte, Michael; Prochaska, Jason X.; Ellison, Sara L.; Fan, Xiaohui

    2003-09-01

    In order to search for metals in the Lyα forest at redshifts zabs>4, we have obtained spectra of high signal-to-noise ratio and moderately high resolution of three QSOs at zem>5.4 discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These data allow us to probe to metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium at early times with higher sensitivity than previous studies. We find 16 C IV absorption systems with column densities logN(CIV)=12.50-13.98 over a total redshift path ΔX=3.29. In the redshift interval z=4.5-5.0, where our statistics are most reliable, we deduce a comoving mass density of C3+ ions ΩCIV=(4.3+/-2.5)×10-8 (90% confidence limits) for absorption systems with logN(CIV)>=13.0 (for an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology with h=0.65). This value of ΩCIV is entirely consistent with those measured at z<4 we confirm the earlier finding by Songaila that neither the column density distribution of C IV absorbers nor its integral show significant redshift evolution over a period of time that stretches from ~1.25 to ~4.5 Gyr after the big bang. This somewhat surprising conclusion may be an indication that the intergalactic medium was enriched in metals at z>>5, perhaps by the sources responsible for its reionization. Alternatively, the C IV systems we see may be associated with outflows from massive star-forming galaxies at later times, while the truly intergalactic metals may reside in regions of the Lyα forest of lower density than those probed up to now. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  19. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Environmental effects shaping the galaxy stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidzon, I.; Cucciati, O.; Bolzonella, M.; De Lucia, G.; Zamorani, G.; Arnouts, S.; Moutard, T.; Ilbert, O.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; de la Torre, S.; Di Porto, C.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Granett, B. R.; Guennou, L.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.

    2016-02-01

    We exploit the first public data release of VIPERS to investigate environmental effects in the evolution of galaxies between z ~ 0.5 and 0.9. The large number of spectroscopic redshifts (more than 50 000) over an area of about 10 deg2 provides a galaxy sample with high statistical power. The accurate redshift measurements (σz = 0.00047(1 + zspec)) allow us to robustly isolate galaxies living in the lowest and highest density environments (δ< 0.7 and δ> 4, respectively) as defined in terms of spatial 3D density contrast δ. We estimate the stellar mass function of galaxies residing in these two environments and constrain the high-mass end (ℳ ≳ 1011 ℳ⊙) with unprecedented precision. We find that the galaxy stellar mass function in the densest regions has a different shape than was measured at low densities, with an enhancement of massive galaxies and a hint of a flatter (less negative) slope at z< 0.8. We normalise each mass function to the comoving volume occupied by the corresponding environment and relate estimates from different redshift bins. We observe an evolution of the stellar mass function of VIPERS galaxies in high densities, while the low-density one is nearly constant. We compare these results to semi-analytical models and find consistent environmental signatures in the simulated stellar mass functions. We discuss how the halo mass function and fraction of central/satellite galaxies depend on the environments considered, making intrinsic and environmental properties of galaxies physically coupled, hence difficult to disentangle. The evolution of our low-density regions is described well by the formalism introduced by Peng et al. (2010, ApJ, 721, 193), and is consistent with the idea that galaxies become progressively passive because of internal physical processes. The same formalism could also describe the evolution of the mass function in the high density regions, but only if a significant contribution from dry mergers is considered. Based on

  20. Age-dating Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies at intermediate redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Jesus; Rodriguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Pacifici, Camilla; Tresse, Laurence; Charlot, Stéphane; Gil de Paz, Armando; Barro, Guillermo; Gomez-Guijarro, Carlos; Villar, Víctor

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a key role in galaxy formation and evolution: (1) hierarchical models predict that low-mass systems merged to form massive galaxies (building block paradigm; Dekel & Silk 1986); (2) dwarf systems might have been responsible for the reionization of the Universe (Wyithe & Loeb 2006); (3) theoretical models are particularly sensitive to the density of low-mass systems at diferent redshifts (Mamon et al. 2011), being one of the key science cases for the future E-ELT (Evans et al. 2013). While the history of low-mass dark matter halos is relatively well understood, the formation history of dwarf galaxies is still poorly reproduced by the models due to the distinct evolution of baryonic and dark matter.We present physical properties and constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of low-mass Star-Forming Galaxies (LMSFGs; 7.3 < log M∗/Mo < 8.0, at 0.3 < zspec < 0.9) selected by photometric stellar mass and apparent magnitude. The SFHs were obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach (Pacifici et al. 2012) that (1) consistently combines photometric (HST and ground-based multi-broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines from VLT and GTC spectroscopy) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time.The median SFH of our LMSFGs appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the ˜0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for dwarf SFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for a slightly more massive secondary sample 8.0 < log M∗/Mo < 9.1).

  1. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): curation and reanalysis of 16.6k redshifts in the G10/COSMOS region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, L. J. M.; Driver, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Baldry, I. K.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Meyer, M.; Popping, A.; Wilkins, S. M.; Wright, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    We discuss the construction of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) 10h region (G10) using publicly available data in the Cosmic Evolution Survey region (COSMOS) in order to extend the GAMA survey to z ˜ 1 in a single deg2 field. In order to obtain the maximum number of high precision spectroscopic redshifts we re-reduce all archival zCOSMOS-bright data and use the GAMA automatic cross-correlation redshift fitting code AUTOZ. We use all available redshift information (AUTOZ, zCOSMOS-bright 10k, PRIMUS, VVDS, SDSS and photometric redshifts) to calculate robust best-fitting redshifts for all galaxies and visually inspect all 1D and 2D spectra to obtain 16 583 robust redshifts in the full COSMOS region. We then define the G10 region to be the central ˜1 deg2 of COSMOS, which has relatively high spectroscopic completeness, and encompasses the CHILES VLA region. We define a combined r < 23.0 mag and i < 22.0 mag G10 sample (selected to have the highest bijective overlap) with which to perform future analysis, containing 9861 sources with reliable high-precision VLT-VIMOS spectra. All tables, spectra and imaging are available at http://ict.icrar.org/cutout/G10.

  2. Properties and Star Formation Histories of Intermediate Redshift Dwarf Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Gallego, J.; Pacifici, C.; Tresse, L.; Charlot, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Barro, G.; Villar, V.

    2017-03-01

    The epoch when low-mass star-forming galaxies (LMSFGs) form the bulk of their stellar mass is uncertain. While some models predict an early formation, others favor a delayed scenario until later ages of the Universe. We present improved constraints on the physical properties and star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of intermediate redshift LMSFGs selected by their stellar mass or blue-compact-dwarf-like properties. Our work takes advantage of the deep UV-to-FIR photometric coverage available on the Extended-Chandra Deep Field South and our own dedicated deep VLT/VIMOS optical spectroscopy programs. On the one hand, we estimate the stellar mass (M_{*}), star formation rate (SFR), and SFH of each galaxy modeling its spectral energy distribution. We use a novel approach by Pacifici et al. 2012, that (1) consistently combines photometric (broad-band) and spectroscopic (emission line fluxes and equivalent widths) data, and (2) uses physically-motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the SFR as a function of time. On the other hand, we characterize the properties of their interstellar medium by analyzing the emission line features visible in the VIMOS spectroscopy. The final sample includes 91 spectroscopically confirmed LMSFGs (7.3 ≤ logM_{*}/M_{⊙} ≤ 9.5) at 0.3 mass, and high specific-SFR. Furthermore, they are characterized by strong emission lines, low metallicity, and an enhanced level of excitation. Our selection criterion based on mass gathers galaxies within a wide range of properties, and possibly, different evolutionary stages. Despite the individual differences, the average SFH that we obtain suggests a late and fast (˜2 Gyr prior their observation) assembly scenario for this type of system.

  3. H{alpha} EQUIVALENT WIDTHS FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY: EVOLUTION WITH REDSHIFT AND DEPENDENCE ON STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Brammer, Gabriel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Lundgren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Nelson, Erica; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Kriek, Mariska

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of the H{alpha} equivalent width, EW(H{alpha}), with redshift and its dependence on stellar mass, using the first data from the 3D-HST survey, a large spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. Combining our H{alpha} measurements of 854 galaxies at 0.8 < z < 1.5 with those of ground-based surveys at lower and higher redshift, we can consistently determine the evolution of the EW(H{alpha}) distribution from z = 0 to z = 2.2. We find that at all masses the characteristic EW(H{alpha}) is decreasing toward the present epoch, and that at each redshift the EW(H{alpha}) is lower for high-mass galaxies. We find EW(H{alpha}) {approx}(1 + z){sup 1.8} with little mass dependence. Qualitatively, this measurement is a model-independent confirmation of the evolution of star-forming galaxies with redshift. A quantitative conversion of EW(H{alpha}) to specific star formation rate (sSFR) is model dependent because of differential reddening corrections between the continuum and the Balmer lines. The observed EW(H{alpha}) can be reproduced with the characteristic evolutionary history for galaxies, whose star formation rises with cosmic time to z {approx} 2.5 and then decreases to z = 0. This implies that EW(H{alpha}) rises to 400 A at z = 8. The sSFR evolves faster than EW(H{alpha}), as the mass-to-light ratio also evolves with redshift. We find that the sSFR evolves as (1 + z){sup 3.2}, nearly independent of mass, consistent with previous reddening insensitive estimates. We confirm previous results that the observed slope of the sSFR-z relation is steeper than the one predicted by models, but models and observations agree in finding little mass dependence.

  4. Galaxy groups in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: luminosity and mass statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, H. J.; Zandivarez, A.; Merchán, M. E.; Domínguez, M. J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Several statistics are applied to groups and galaxies in groups in the 2° Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. First, we estimate the luminosity functions for different subsets of galaxies in groups. The results are well fitted by a Schechter function with parameters M*- 5 log (h) =-19.90 +/- 0.03 and α=-1.13 +/- 0.02 for all galaxies in groups, which is quite consistent with the results of Norberg et al. for field galaxies. When considering the four different spectral types defined by Madgwick et al. we find that the characteristic magnitude is typically brighter than in the field. We also observe a steeper value, α=-0.76 +/- 0.03, of the faint end slope for low star-forming galaxies when compared with the corresponding field value. This steepening is more conspicuous, α=-1.10 +/- 0.06, for those galaxies in more massive groups than that obtained in the lower-mass subset, . Secondly, we compute group total luminosities using the prescriptions of Moore, Frenk & White. We define a flux-limited group sample using a new statistical tool developed by Rauzy. The resulting group sample is used to determine the group luminosity function and we find a good agreement with previous determinations and semi-analytical models. Finally, the group mass function for the flux-limited sample is derived. An excellent agreement is obtained when comparing our determination with analytical predictions over two orders of magnitude in mass.

  5. SUPERDENSE GALAXIES AND THE MASS-SIZE RELATION AT LOW REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Poggianti, B. M.; Calvi, R.; Fasano, G.; Vulcani, B.; Bettoni, D.; Gullieuszik, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Bindoni, D.; D'Onofrio, M.; Moretti, A.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Fritz, J.; De Lucia, G.

    2013-01-10

    We search for massive and compact galaxies (superdense galaxies, hereafter SDGs) at z = 0.03-0.11 in the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue, a spectroscopically complete sample representative of the general field population of the local universe. We find that compact galaxies with radii and mass densities comparable to high-z massive and passive galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies with stellar masses above 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }, yielding a number density of 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3}. Most of them are S0s (70%) or ellipticals (23%), are red, and have intermediate-to-old stellar populations, with a median luminosity-weighted age of 5.4 Gyr and a median mass-weighted age of 9.2 Gyr. Their velocity dispersions and dynamical masses are consistent with the small radii and high stellar mass estimates. Comparing with the WINGS sample of cluster galaxies at similar redshifts, the fraction of SDGs is three times smaller in the field than in clusters, and cluster SDGs are on average 4 Gyr older than field SDGs. We confirm the existence of a universal trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. As a consequence, the median mass-size relation shifts toward smaller radii for galaxies with older stars, but the effect is much more pronounced in clusters than in the field. Our results show that, on top of the well-known dependence of stellar age on galaxy mass, the luminosity-weighted age of galaxies depends on galaxy compactness at fixed mass and, for a fixed mass and radius, on environment. This effect needs to be taken into account in order not to overestimate the evolution of galaxy sizes from high to low z. Our results and hierarchical simulations suggest that a significant fraction of the massive compact galaxies at high z have evolved into compact galaxies in galaxy clusters today. When stellar age and environmental effects are taken into account, the average amount of

  6. Exploration of a SMBH Mass-Pitch Angle Relation at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Logan H.; Schilling, Amanda; Davis, Benjamin L.; Barrows, Robert S.; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have established a correlation between central black hole mass M and spiral arm pitch angle P in disk galaxies. The mathematical form of this relation was developed for local objects (z < 0.04; Berrier, J. C. et al, 2013, ApJ, 769, 2), but the form at higher redshifts is currently unknown. Here we aim to develop an extended M-P relation in a sample of spiral galaxies with type 1 AGN, using spectroscopic techniques to estimate black hole masses and image analysis to measure pitch angle of the host galaxy. The sample was chosen from a list of 545 X-ray selected objects previously identified as type 1 AGN (Lusso, E. et al., 2010, A&A, 512, A34) and limited to those that had available spectral data (327 of 545) and visible spiral structure (14 of 327). The final sample consisted of thirteen objects with 0.196 < z < 1.34.Black hole masses were measured using optical or UV spectroscopic information from a number of emission lines, including [OIII] l5007, the broad-line component of Hβ, MgII, and CIV. Each spectrum was extinction corrected and fitted with an FeII template, an underlying power law curve, and Gaussian curves for the emission line(s) under consideration. Relationships developed by Vestergaard & Peterson (Vestergaard, M. & Peterson, B., 2006, ApJ, 641, 2) and Salviander & Shields (Salviander, S. & Shields, G. A., 2013, ApJ, 764, 82) use information from these fits to estimate log(MBH).Measurement of pitch angles was accomplished using a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform technique, 2DFFT (Davis, B. et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 2). HST images were formatted for and processed by the 2DFFT program; output was analyzed for ranges of stable P for an appropriate number of spiral arms. Average pitch angle over these ranges were calculated using an extension of 2DFFT.

  7. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  8. The ratio of CO to total gas mass in high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Sternberg, Amiel; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-11-01

    Walter et al. have recently identified the J = 6 - 5, 5 - 4, and 2 - 1 CO rotational emission lines, and [C II] fine-structure emission line from the star-forming interstellar medium (ISM) in the high-redshift submillimetre source HDF 850.1, at z = 5.183. We employ large velocity gradient (LVG) modelling to analyse the spectra of this source assuming the [C II] and CO emissions originate from (i) separate virialized regions, (ii) separate unvirialized regions, (iii) uniformly mixed virialized regions and (iv) uniformly mixed unvirialized regions. We present the best-fitting set of parameters, including for each case the ratio α between the total hydrogen/helium gas mass and the CO(1-0) line luminosity. We also present computations of the ratio of H2 mass to [C II] line luminosity for optically thin conditions, for a range of gas temperatures and densities, for direct conversion of [C II] line luminosities to `CO-dark' H2 masses. For HDF 850.1 we find that a model in which the CO and C+ are uniformly mixed in gas that is shielded from ultraviolet radiation requires a cosmic ray or X-ray ionization rate of ζ ≈ 3 × 10-14 s-1, plausibly consistent with the large star formation rate (˜103 M⊙ yr-1) observed in this source. Enforcing the cosmological constraint posed by the abundance of dark matter haloes in the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology and taking into account other possible contributions to the total gas mass, we find that the two models in which the virialization condition is enforced can be ruled out at the ≳2σ level, while the model assuming mixed unvirialized regions is less likely. We conclude that modelling HDF 850.1's ISM as a collection of unvirialized molecular clouds with distinct CO and C+ layers, for which α = 1.2 M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1 for the CO to H2 mass-to-luminosity ratio (similar to the standard ultraluminous infrared galaxy value), is most consistent with the ΛCDM cosmology.

  9. Stochastic contribution to the growth factor in the LCDM model

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, A. L.B.; Andrade, A. P.A.; Letelier, P. S.

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of noise on the evolution of the growth factor of density perturbations in the context of the LCDM model. Stochasticity is introduced as a Wiener process amplified by an intensity parameter alpha. By comparing the evolution of deterministic and stochastic cases for different values of alpha we estimate the intensity level necessary to make noise relevant for cosmological tests based on large-scale structure data. Our results indicate that the presence of random forces underlying the fluid description can lead to significant deviations from the nonstochastic solution at late times for alpha>0.001.

  10. A lower fragmentation mass scale for clumps in high redshift galaxies: a systematic numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Valentina; Mayer, Lucio; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2015-08-01

    We perform a systematic study of the effect of sub-grid physics, resolution and structural parameters on the fragmentation of gas-rich galaxy discs into massive star forming clumps due to gravitational instability. We use the state-of-the-art zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulation ARGO (Fiacconi et al. 2015) to set up the initial conditions of our models, and then carry out 26 high resolution controlled simulations of high-z galaxies using the GASOLINE2 code, which includes a modern, numerically robust SPH implementation.We find that when blast-wave feedback is included, the formation of long-lived, gravitationally bound clumps requires disc gas fractions of at least 50% and massive discs, which should have Vmax > 200 km/s at z ˜ 2, more massive than the typical galaxies expected at those redshifts.Less than 50 Myr after formation, clumps have stellar masses in the range 4 × 106 - 5 × 107 M⊙.Formation of clumps with mass exceeding ˜108 M⊙ is a rare occurrence, since it requires mergers between multiple massive clumps, as we verified by tracing back in time the particles belonging to such clumps. Such mergers happen after a few orbital times (˜200-300 Myr), but normally clumps migrate inward and are tidally disrupted on shorter timescales.Clump sizes are in the range 100-500 pc. We argue that giant clumps identified in observations (˜109 M⊙ and 1 kpc in size) might either have a different origin, such as minor mergers and clumpy gas accretion, or their sizes and masses may be overestimated due to resolution issues.Using an analytical model, already developed to explain the fragmentation scale in gravitationally unstable 3D protoplanetary discs, we can predict fairly accurately the characteristic gaseous masses of clumps soon after fragmentation, when standard Toome analysis becomes invalid.Due to their modest size, clumps have little effect on bulge growth as they migrate to the center. In our unstable discs a small bulge can form irrespective of

  11. Rest-frame UV Single-epoch Black Hole Mass Estimates of Low-luminosity AGNs at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, Marios; Woo, Jong-Hak; Matsuoka, Kenta; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Onken, Christopher A.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Park, Dawoo; Nagao, Tohru; Kim, Sang Chul

    2015-12-01

    The ability to accurately derive black hole (BH) masses at progressively higher redshifts and over a wide range of continuum luminosities has become indispensable in the era of large-area extragalactic spectroscopic surveys. In this paper, we present an extension of existing comparisons between rest-frame UV and optical virial BH mass estimators to intermediate redshifts and luminosities comparable to the local Hβ reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We focus on the Mg ii, C iv, and C iii] broad emission lines and compare them to both Hα and Hβ. We use newly acquired near-infrared spectra from the Fiber-fed Multi-object Spectrograph instrument on the Subaru telescope for 89 broad-lined AGNs at redshifts between 0.3 and 3.5, complemented by data from the AGES survey. We employ two different prescriptions for measuring the emission line widths and compare the results. We confirm that Mg ii shows a tight correlation with Hα and Hβ, with a scatter of ∼0.25 dex. The C iv and C iii] estimators, while showing larger scatter, are viable virial mass estimators after accounting for a trend with the UV-to-optical luminosity ratio. We find an intrinsic scatter of ∼0.37 dex between Balmer and carbon virial estimators by combining our data set with previous high redshift measurements. This updated comparison spans a total of three decades in BH mass. We calculate a virial factor for C iv/C iii] {log}{f}{{C}{{IV}}/{{C}}{{III}}]}=0.87 with an estimated systematic uncertainty of ∼0.4 dex and find excellent agreement between the local reverberation mapped AGN sample and our high-z sample.

  12. A unified model for the maximum mass scales of molecular clouds, stellar clusters and high-redshift clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina-Campos, Marta; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2017-08-01

    We present a simple, self-consistent model to predict the maximum masses of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), stellar clusters and high-redshift clumps as a function of the galactic environment. Recent works have proposed that these maximum masses are set by shearing motions and centrifugal forces, but we show that this idea is inconsistent with the low masses observed across an important range of local-Universe environments, such as low-surface density galaxies and galaxy outskirts. Instead, we propose that feedback from young stars can disrupt clouds before the global collapse of the shear-limited area is completed. We develop a shear-feedback hybrid model that depends on three observable quantities: the gas surface density, the epicylic frequency and the Toomre parameter. The model is tested in four galactic environments: the Milky Way, the Local Group galaxy M31, the spiral galaxy M83 and the high-redshift galaxy zC406690. We demonstrate that our model simultaneously reproduces the observed maximum masses of GMCs, clumps and clusters in each of these environments. We find that clouds and clusters in M31 and in the Milky Way are feedback-limited beyond radii of 8.4 and 4 kpc, respectively, whereas the masses in M83 and zC406690 are shear-limited at all radii. In zC406690, the maximum cluster masses decrease further due to their inspiral by dynamical friction. These results illustrate that the maximum masses change from being shear-limited to being feedback-limited as galaxies become less gas rich and evolve towards low shear. This explains why high-redshift clumps are more massive than GMCs in the local Universe.

  13. Redshift evolution of stellar mass versus gas fraction relation in 0 < z < 2 regime: observational constraint for galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokuma-Matsui, Kana; Baba, Junichi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the redshift evolution of molecular gas mass fraction (f_mol = M_mol/M_star +M_mol, where Mmol is molecular gas mass and M⋆ is stellar mass) of galaxies in the redshift range of 0 < z < 2 as a function of the stellar mass by combining carbon monoxide (CO) literature data. We observe a stellar-mass dependence of the fmol evolution where massive galaxies have largely depleted their molecular gas at z = 1, whereas the fmol value of less massive galaxies drastically decreases from z = 1. We compare the observed M⋆ - fmol relation with theoretical predictions from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and semi-analytical models for galaxy formation. Although the theoretical studies approximately reproduce the observed mass dependence of the fmol evolution, they tend to underestimate the fmol values, particularly of less massive (<1010 M⊙) and massive galaxies (>1011 M⊙) when compared with the observational values. Our result suggests the importance of the feedback models which suppress the star formation while simultaneously preserving the molecular gas in order to reproduce the observed M⋆ - fmol relation.

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the dependence of the galaxy luminosity function on environment, redshift and colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaught-Roberts, Tamsyn; Norberg, Peder; Baugh, Carlton; Lacey, Cedric; Loveday, J.; Peacock, J.; Baldry, I.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Vázquez-Mata, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    We use 80 922 galaxies in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to measure the galaxy luminosity function (LF) in different environments over the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.26. The depth and size of GAMA allows us to define samples split by colour and redshift to measure the dependence of the LF on environment, redshift and colour. We find that the LF varies smoothly with overdensity, consistent with previous results, with little environmental dependent evolution over the last 3 Gyr. The modified GALFORM model predictions agree remarkably well with our LFs split by environment, particularly in the most overdense environments. The LFs predicted by the model for both blue and red galaxies are consistent with GAMA for the environments and luminosities at which such galaxies dominate. Discrepancies between the model and the data seen in the faint end of the LF suggest too many faint red galaxies are predicted, which is likely to be due to the over-quenching of satellite galaxies. The excess of bright blue galaxies predicted in underdense regions could be due to the implementation of AGN feedback not being sufficiently effective in the lower mass haloes.

  15. The Evolution of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function at z = 4-8: A Steepening Low-mass-end Slope with Increasing Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mimi; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Grazian, A.; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey; Salmon, Brett; Somerville, Rachel S.; Dickinson, Mark; Duncan, K.; Faber, Sandy M.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fontana, Adriano; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Lee, Seong-Kook; Merlin, Emiliano; Willner, S. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) at z = 4-8 from a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) selected sample of ˜4500 galaxies, found via photometric redshifts over an area of ˜280 arcmin2 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS)/Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The deepest Spitzer/IRAC data to date and the relatively large volume allow us to place a better constraint at both the low- and high-mass ends of the GSMFs compared to previous space-based studies from pre-CANDELS observations. Supplemented by a stacking analysis, we find a linear correlation between the rest-frame UV absolute magnitude at 1500 Å ({M}{{UV}}) and logarithmic stellar mass ({log}{M}* ) that holds for galaxies with {log}({M}* /{M}⊙ )≲ 10. We use simulations to validate our method of measuring the slope of the {log}{M}* -M UV relation, finding that the bias is minimized with a hybrid technique combining photometry of individual bright galaxies with stacked photometry for faint galaxies. The resultant measured slopes do not significantly evolve over z = 4-8, while the normalization of the trend exhibits a weak evolution toward lower masses at higher redshift. We combine the {log}{M}* -M UV distribution with observed rest-frame UV luminosity functions at each redshift to derive the GSMFs, finding that the low-mass-end slope becomes steeper with increasing redshift from α =-{1.55}-0.07+0.08 at z = 4 to α =-{2.25}-0.35+0.72 at z = 8. The inferred stellar mass density, when integrated over {M}* ={10}8-1013 M ⊙, increases by a factor of {10}-2+30 between z = 7 and z = 4 and is in good agreement with the time integral of the cosmic star formation rate density.

  16. THE RELATION BETWEEN EJECTA VELOCITY, INTRINSIC COLOR, AND HOST-GALAXY MASS FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, using a large low-redshift sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), we discovered a relation between SN Ia ejecta velocity and intrinsic color that improves the distance precision of SNe Ia and reduces potential systematic biases related to dust reddening. No SN Ia cosmological results have yet made a correction for the 'velocity-color' relation. To test the existence of such a relation and constrain its properties at high redshift, we examine a sample of 75 SNe Ia discovered and observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey and Supernova Legacy Survey. From each spectrum, we measure ejecta velocities at maximum brightness for the Ca H and K and Si II {lambda}6355 features, v{sup 0}{sub CaHandK} and v{sup 0}{sub SiII}, respectively. Using SN light curve parameters, we determine the intrinsic B{sub max} - V{sub max} for each SN. Similar to what was found at low redshift, we find that SNe Ia with higher ejecta velocity tend to be intrinsically redder than SNe Ia with lower ejecta velocity. The distributions of ejecta velocities for SNe Ia at low and high redshift are similar, indicating that current cosmological results should have little bias related to the velocity-color relation. Additionally, we find a slight (2.4{sigma} significant) trend between SN Ia ejecta velocity and host-galaxy mass such that SNe Ia in high-mass host galaxies tend to have lower ejecta velocities as probed by v{sup 0}{sub CaHandK}. These results emphasize the importance of spectroscopy for SN Ia cosmology.

  17. Precise Strong Lensing Mass Modeling of Four Hubble Frontier Field Clusters and a Sample of Magnified High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamata, Ryota; Oguri, Masamune; Ishigaki, Masafumi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami

    2016-03-01

    We conduct precise strong lensing mass modeling of four Hubble Frontier Field (HFF) clusters, Abell 2744, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745, and MACS J1149.6+2223, for which HFF imaging observations are completed. We construct a refined sample of more than 100 multiple images for each cluster by taking advantage of the full-depth HFF images, and conduct mass modeling using the glafic software, which assumes simply parametrized mass distributions. Our mass modeling also exploits a magnification constraint from the lensed SN Ia HFF14Tom for Abell 2744 and positional constraints from the multiple images S1-S4 of the lensed supernova SN Refsdal for MACS J1149.6+2223. We find that our best-fitting mass models reproduce the observed image positions with rms errors of ˜0.″4, which are smaller than rms errors in previous mass modeling that adopted similar numbers of multiple images. Our model predicts a new image of SN Refsdal with a relative time delay and magnification that are fully consistent with a recent detection of reappearance. We then construct catalogs of z ˜ 6-9 dropout galaxies behind the four clusters and estimate magnification factors for these dropout galaxies with our best-fitting mass models. The dropout sample from the four cluster fields contains ˜120 galaxies at z ≳ 6, about 20 of which are predicted to be magnified by a factor of more than 10. Some of the high-redshift galaxies detected in the HFF have lensing-corrected magnitudes of MUV ˜ -15 to -14. Our analysis demonstrates that the HFF data indeed offer an ideal opportunity to study faint high-redshift galaxies. All lensing maps produced from our mass modeling will be made available on the Space Telescope Science Institute website (https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/frontier/lensmodels/).

  18. ON THE INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT CENTRAL STELLAR MASS-HALO MASS RELATION, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF THE MOST MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Francesco; Buchan, Stewart; Guo, Hong; Zheng, Zheng; Bouillot, Vincent; Rettura, Alessandro; Meert, Alan; Bernardi, Mariangela; Sheth, Ravi; Vikram, Vinu; Kravtsov, Andrey; Marchesini, Danilo; Behroozi, Peter; Maraston, Claudia; Capozzi, Diego; Ascaso, Begoña; Huertas-Company, Marc; Lemaux, Brian C.; Gal, Roy R.; Lubin, Lori M.; and others

    2014-12-20

    The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain under debate. Several recent works support a relation in the local universe steeper than previously thought. Based on comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z ∼ 1 for stellar masses M {sub star} ≳ 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of β ≳ 0.35-0.70 instead of the usual β ≲ 0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (≲ 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for M {sub star} > 3 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the evolution of the most massive galaxies since z ∼ 1.

  19. The Splashback Radius of Halos from Particle Dynamics. II. Dependence on Mass, Accretion Rate, Redshift, and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemer, Benedikt; Mansfield, Philip; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; More, Surhud

    2017-07-01

    The splashback radius R sp, the apocentric radius of particles on their first orbit after falling into a dark matter halo, has recently been suggested to be a physically motivated halo boundary that separates accreting from orbiting material. Using the Sparta code presented in Paper I, we analyze the orbits of billions of particles in cosmological simulations of structure formation and measure R sp for a large sample of halos that span a mass range from dwarf galaxy to massive cluster halos, reach redshift 8, and include WMAP, Planck, and self-similar cosmologies. We analyze the dependence of R sp/R 200m and M sp/M 200m on the mass accretion rate Γ, halo mass, redshift, and cosmology. The scatter in these relations varies between 0.02 and 0.1 dex. While we confirm the known trend that R sp/R 200m decreases with Γ, the relationships turn out to be more complex than previously thought, demonstrating that R sp is an independent definition of the halo boundary that cannot trivially be reconstructed from spherical overdensity definitions. We present fitting functions for R sp/R 200m and M sp/M 200m as a function of accretion rate, peak height, and redshift, achieving an accuracy of 5% or better everywhere in the parameter space explored. We discuss the physical meaning of the distribution of particle apocenters and show that the previously proposed definition of R sp as the radius of the steepest logarithmic density slope encloses roughly three-quarters of the apocenters. Finally, we conclude that no analytical model presented thus far can fully explain our results.

  20. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.1-1.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-09-01

    We present galaxy cluster mass-richness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These mass-richness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ≤ 0.4, 0.4 < z ≤ 0.7, 0.7 < z ≤ 1.0 and 0.1 < z ≤ 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stacked weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present mass-richness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the mass-richness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (α) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 ± 0.526, 14.1 ± 1.78, 30.2 ± 8.74 and 9.23 ± 0.525 × 1013 h-1 M⊙ for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. We find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 ± 0.0585, 0.948 ± 0.100, 1.33 ± 0.260 and 0.883 ± 0.0500, respectively.

  1. PROSPECTS FOR MEASURING THE MASS OF BLACK HOLES AT HIGH REDSHIFTS WITH RESOLVED KINEMATICS USING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.

    2014-08-20

    Application of the most robust method of measuring black hole masses, spatially resolved kinematics of gas and stars, is presently limited to nearby galaxies. The Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) and 30m class telescopes (the Thirty Meter Telescope, the Giant Magellan Telescope, and the European Extremely Large Telescope) with milli-arcsecond resolution are expected to extend such measurements to larger distances. Here, we study the possibility of exploiting the angular magnification provided by strong gravitational lensing to measure black hole masses at high redshifts (z ∼ 1-6), using resolved gas kinematics with these instruments. We show that in ∼15% and ∼20% of strongly lensed galaxies, the inner 25 and 50 pc could be resolved, allowing the mass of ≳ 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} black holes to be dynamically measured with ALMA, if moderately bright molecular gas is present at these small radii. Given the large number of strong lenses discovered in current millimeter surveys and future optical surveys, this fraction could constitute a statistically significant population for studying the evolution of the M-σ relation at high redshifts.

  2. An ultraluminous quasar with a twelve-billion-solar-mass black hole at redshift 6.30.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yi, Weimin; Zuo, Wenwen; Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D; Wang, Ran; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Thompson, David; Beletsky, Yuri

    2015-02-26

    So far, roughly 40 quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 have been discovered. Each quasar contains a black hole with a mass of about one billion solar masses (10(9) M Sun symbol). The existence of such black holes when the Universe was less than one billion years old presents substantial challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the coevolution of black holes and galaxies. Here we report the discovery of an ultraluminous quasar, SDSS J010013.02+280225.8, at redshift z = 6.30. It has an optical and near-infrared luminosity a few times greater than those of previously known z > 6 quasars. On the basis of the deep absorption trough on the blue side of the Lyman-α emission line in the spectrum, we estimate the proper size of the ionized proximity zone associated with the quasar to be about 26 million light years, larger than found with other z > 6.1 quasars with lower luminosities. We estimate (on the basis of a near-infrared spectrum) that the black hole has a mass of ∼1.2 × 10(10) M Sun symbol, which is consistent with the 1.3 × 10(10) M Sun symbol derived by assuming an Eddington-limited accretion rate.

  3. Constraints from Galaxy-AGN Clustering on the Correlation between Galaxy and Black Hole Mass at Redshift 2 <~ z <~ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelberger, Kurt L.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2005-07-01

    We use the clustering of galaxies around distant active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to derive an estimate of the relationship between galaxy and black hole mass that obtained during the ancient quasar epoch, at redshifts 2<~z<~3, when giant black holes accreted much of their mass. Neither the mean relationship nor its scatter differs significantly from what is observed in the local universe, at least over the ranges of apparent magnitude (16<~GAB<~26) and black hole mass (106 Msolar<~MBH<~1010.5 Msolar) that we are able to probe. Based, in part, on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. The rapid assembly of an elliptical galaxy of 400 billion solar masses at a redshift of 2.3.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hai; Cooray, Asantha; Feruglio, C; Ivison, R J; Riechers, D A; Gurwell, M; Bussmann, R S; Harris, A I; Altieri, B; Aussel, H; Baker, A J; Bock, J; Boylan-Kolchin, M; Bridge, C; Calanog, J A; Casey, C M; Cava, A; Chapman, S C; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Cox, P; Farrah, D; Frayer, D; Hopwood, R; Jia, J; Magdis, G; Marsden, G; Martínez-Navajas, P; Negrello, M; Neri, R; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Pérez-Fournon, I; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Smith, A; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Vieira, J D; Viero, M; Wang, L; Wardlow, J L; Zemcov, M

    2013-06-20

    Stellar archaeology shows that massive elliptical galaxies formed rapidly about ten billion years ago with star-formation rates of above several hundred solar masses per year. Their progenitors are probably the submillimetre bright galaxies at redshifts z greater than 2. Although the mean molecular gas mass (5 × 10(10) solar masses) of the submillimetre bright galaxies can explain the formation of typical elliptical galaxies, it is inadequate to form elliptical galaxies that already have stellar masses above 2 × 10(11) solar masses at z ≈ 2. Here we report multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a rare merger of two massive submillimetre bright galaxies at z = 2.3. The system is seen to be forming stars at a rate of 2,000 solar masses per year. The star-formation efficiency is an order of magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, so the gas reservoir will be exhausted and star formation will be quenched in only around 200 million years. At a projected separation of 19 kiloparsecs, the two massive starbursts are about to merge and form a passive elliptical galaxy with a stellar mass of about 4 × 10(11) solar masses. We conclude that gas-rich major galaxy mergers with intense star formation can form the most massive elliptical galaxies by z ≈ 1.5.

  5. Star-forming galaxies in intermediate-redshift clusters: stellar versus dynamical masses of luminous compact blue galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamampandry, S. M.; Crawford, S. M.; Bershady, M. A.; Wirth, G. D.; Cress, C. M.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the stellar masses of the class of star-forming objects known as luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) by studying a sample of galaxies in the distant cluster MS 0451.6-0305 at z ≈ 0.54 with ground-based multicolour imaging and spectroscopy. For a sample of 16 spectroscopically confirmed cluster LCBGs (colour B - V < 0.5, surface brightness μB < 21 mag arcsec-2 and magnitude MB < -18.5), we measure stellar masses by fitting spectral energy distribution (SED) models to multiband photometry, and compare with dynamical masses [determined from velocity dispersion in the range 10 < σv(km s- 1) < 80] we previously obtained from their emission-line spectra. We compare two different stellar population models that measure stellar mass in star-bursting galaxies, indicating correlations between the stellar age, extinction and stellar mass derived from the two different SED models. The stellar masses of cluster LCBGs are distributed similarly to those of field LCBGs, but the cluster LCBGs show lower dynamical-to-stellar mass ratios (Mdyn/M⋆ = 2.6) than their field LCBG counterparts (Mdyn/M⋆ = 4.8), echoing trends noted previously in low-redshift dwarf elliptical galaxies. Within this limited sample, the specific star formation rate declines steeply with increasing mass, suggesting that these cluster LCBGs have undergone vigorous star formation.

  6. How AGN and SN Feedback Affect Mass Transport and Black Hole Growth in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés; Volonteri, Marta; Dubois, Yohan

    2017-02-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we study the effect of supernova (SN) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the mass transport (MT) of gas onto galactic nuclei and the black hole (BH) growth down to redshift z∼ 6. We study the BH growth in relation to the MT processes associated with gravity and pressure torques and how they are modified by feedback. Cosmological gas funneled through cold flows reaches the galactic outer region close to freefall. Then torques associated with pressure triggered by gas turbulent motions produced in the circumgalactic medium by shocks and explosions from SNe are the main source of MT beyond the central ∼100 pc. Due to high concentrations of mass in the central galactic region, gravitational torques tend to be more important at high redshift. The combined effect of almost freefalling material and both gravity and pressure torques produces a mass accretion rate of order ∼ 1 {M}ȯ yr‑1 at approximately parsec scales. In the absence of SN feedback, AGN feedback alone does not affect significantly either star formation or BH growth until the BH reaches a sufficiently high mass of ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ to self-regulate. SN feedback alone, instead, decreases both stellar and BH growth. Finally, SN and AGN feedback in tandem efficiently quench the BH growth, while star formation remains at the levels set by SN feedback alone, due to the small final BH mass, ∼few times {10}5 {M}ȯ . SNe create a more rarefied and hot environment where energy injection from the central AGN can accelerate the gas further.

  7. Sub-millimeter detected z ~ 2 radio-quiet QSOs. Accurate redshifts, black hole masses, and inflow/outflow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, G.; Nagar, N. M.; Isaak, K. G.; Priddey, R.; Maiolino, R.; McMahon, R.; Marconi, A.; Oliva, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. We present near-IR spectroscopy of a sample of luminous (MB - 27.5; Lbol > 1014 L⊙), sub-millimeter-detected, dusty (Md ~ 109 M⊙), radio-quiet quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) at z ~ 2. Aims: A primary aim is to provide a more accurate QSO redshift determination in order to trace kinematics and inflows/outflows in these sub-mm bright QSOs. Additionally, the Hα and continuum properties allow an estimation of the black hole mass and accretion rate, offering insights into the starburst-AGN connection in sub-mm bright QSOs. Methods: We measure the redshift, width, and luminosity of the Hα line, and the continuum luminosity near Hα. Relative velocity differences between Hα and rest-frame UV emission lines are used to study the presence and strength of outflows/inflows. Luminosities and line widths are used to estimate the black hole masses, bolometric luminosities, Eddington fractions, and accretion rates; these are compared to the star-formation-rate (SFR), estimated from the sub-mm derived far-infrared (FIR) luminosity. Finally our sub-mm-bright QSO sample is compared with other QSO samples at similar redshifts. Results: The Hα emission line was strongly detected in all sources. Two components - a very broad (≳5000 km s-1) Gaussian and an intermediate-width (≳1500 km s-1) Gaussian, were required to fit the Hα profile of all observed QSOs. Narrow (≲1000 km s-1) lines were not detected in the sample QSOs. The rest-frame UV emission lines in these sub-mm bright QSOs show larger than average blue-shifted velocities, potentially tracing strong - up to 3000 km s-1 - outflows in the broad line region. With the exception of the one QSO which shows exceptionally broad Hα lines, the black hole masses of the QSO sample are in the range log MBH = 9.0-9.7 and the Eddington fractions are between 0.5 and ~1. In black hole mass and accretion rate, this sub-mm bright QSO sample is indistinguishable from the Shemmer et al. (2004, ApJ, 614, 547) optically

  8. CONSTRAINING SATELLITE GALAXY STELLAR MASS LOSS AND PREDICTING INTRAHALO LIGHT. I. FRAMEWORK AND RESULTS AT LOW REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Douglas F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a new technique that uses galaxy clustering to constrain how satellite galaxies lose stellar mass and contribute to the diffuse 'intrahalo light' (IHL). We implement two models that relate satellite galaxy stellar mass loss to the detailed knowledge of subhalo dark matter mass loss. Model 1 assumes that the fractional stellar mass loss of a galaxy, from the time of merging into a larger halo until the final redshift, is proportional to the fractional amount of dark matter mass loss of the subhalo it lives in. Model 2 accounts for a delay in the time that stellar mass is lost due to the fact that the galaxy resides deep in the potential well of the subhalo and the subhalo may experience dark matter mass loss for some time before the galaxy is affected. We use these models to predict the stellar masses of a population of galaxies and we use abundance matching to predict the clustering of several r-band luminosity threshold samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Abundance matching assuming no stellar mass loss (akin to abundance matching at the time of subhalo infall) overestimates the correlation function on small scales ({approx}< 1 Mpc), while allowing too much stellar mass loss leads to an underestimate of small-scale clustering. For each luminosity threshold sample, we are thus able to constrain the amount of stellar mass loss required to match the observed clustering. We find that satellite galaxy stellar mass loss is strongly luminosity dependent, with less luminous satellite galaxies experiencing substantially more efficient stellar mass loss than luminous satellites. With constrained stellar mass loss models, we can infer the amount of stellar mass that is deposited into the IHL. We find that both of our model predictions for the mean amount of IHL as a function of halo mass are consistent with current observational measurements. However, our two models predict a different amount of scatter in the IHL from halo to halo, with Model 2 being

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure versus redshift and luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Baldry, Ivan; Häußler, Boris; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Moffett, Amanda J.; Popescu, Cristina C.; Taylor, Edward N.; Tuffs, Richard J.; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2015-11-01

    We study how the sizes and radial profiles of galaxies vary with wavelength, by fitting Sérsic functions simultaneously to imaging in nine optical and near-infrared bands. To quantify the wavelength dependence of effective radius we use the ratio, R, of measurements in two rest-frame bands. The dependence of Sérsic index on wavelength, N, is computed correspondingly. Vulcani et al. have demonstrated that different galaxy populations present sharply contrasting behaviour in terms of R and N. Here we study the luminosity dependence of this result. We find that at higher luminosities, early-type galaxies display a more substantial decrease in effective radius with wavelength, whereas late types present a more pronounced increase in Sérsic index. The structural contrast between types thus increases with luminosity. By considering samples at different redshifts, we demonstrate that lower data quality reduces the apparent difference between the main galaxy populations. However, our conclusions remain robust to this effect. We show that accounting for different redshift and luminosity selections partly reconciles the size variation measured by Vulcani et al. with the weaker trends found by other recent studies. Dividing galaxies by visual morphology confirms the behaviour inferred using morphological proxies, although the sample size is greatly reduced. Finally, we demonstrate that varying dust opacity and disc inclination can account for features of the joint distribution of R and N for late-type galaxies. However, dust does not appear to explain the highest values of R and N. The bulge-disc nature of galaxies must also contribute to the wavelength dependence of their structure.

  10. Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Schrabback, T.; et al.

    2016-11-11

    We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing magnification on the source redshift distribution, finding that this is particularly relevant for shallower surveys. Finally, we account for biases in the mass modelling caused by miscentring and uncertainties in the mass-concentration relation using simulations. In combination with temperature estimates from Chandra we constrain the normalisation of the mass-temperature scaling relation ln(E(z) M_500c/10^14 M_sun)=A+1.5 ln(kT/7.2keV) to A=1.81^{+0.24}_{-0.14}(stat.) +/- 0.09(sys.), consistent with self-similar redshift evolution when compared to lower redshift samples. Additionally, the lensing data constrain the average concentration of the clusters to c_200c=5.6^{+3.7}_{-1.8}.

  11. REDSHIFT 6.4 HOST GALAXIES OF 10{sup 8} SOLAR MASS BLACK HOLES: LOW STAR FORMATION RATE AND DYNAMICAL MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline

    2013-06-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations of rest-frame far-infrared continuum and [C II] line emission in two z = 6.4 quasars with black hole masses of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }. CFHQS J0210-0456 is detected in the continuum with a 1.2 mm flux of 120 {+-} 35 {mu}Jy, whereas CFHQS J2329-0301 is undetected at a similar noise level. J2329-0301 has a star formation rate limit of <40 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, considerably below the typical value at all redshifts for this bolometric luminosity. Through comparison with hydro simulations, we speculate that this quasar is observed at a relatively rare phase where quasar feedback has effectively shut down star formation in the host galaxy. [C II] emission is also detected only in J0210-0456. The ratio of [C II] to far-infrared luminosity is similar to that of low-redshift galaxies of comparable luminosity, suggesting that the previous finding of an offset in the relationships between this ratio and far-infrared luminosity at low and high redshifts may be partially due to a selection effect due to the limited sensitivity of previous continuum data. The [C II] line of J0210-0456 is relatively narrow (FWHM = 189 {+-} 18 km s{sup -1}), indicating a dynamical mass substantially lower than expected from the local black hole-velocity dispersion correlation. The [C II] line is marginally resolved at 0.''7 resolution with the blue and red wings spatially offset by 0.''5 (3 kpc) and a smooth velocity gradient of 100 km s{sup -1} across a scale of 6 kpc, possibly due to the rotation of a galaxy-wide disk. These observations are consistent with the idea that stellar mass growth lags black hole accretion for quasars at this epoch with respect to more recent times.

  12. Extreme-mass-ratio inspiral corrections to the angular velocity and redshift factor of a mass in circular orbit about a Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Abhay G.; Friedman, John L.; Keidl, Tobias S.

    2012-10-01

    This is the first of two papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge for a particle of mass m moving in circular, equatorial orbit about a Kerr black hole. In the extreme-mass-ratio inspiral (EMRI) framework, with mode-sum renormalization, we compute the renormalized value of the quantity H≔(1)/(2)hαβuαuβ, gauge-invariant under gauge transformations generated by a helically symmetric gauge vector; here, hαβ is the metric perturbation, uα the particle’s 4-velocity. We find the related order m correction to the particle’s angular velocity at fixed renormalized redshift (and to its redshift at fixed angular velocity), each of which can be written in terms of H. The radiative part of the metric perturbation is constructed from a Hertz potential that is extracted from the Weyl scalar by an algebraic inversion T. S. Keidl , Phys. Rev. D 82, 124012 (2010). We then write the spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics as a sum over spin-weighted spherical harmonics Yℓms and use mode-sum renormalization to find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in L=ℓ+1/2 to the large-L behavior of the expression for H. The nonradiative parts of the perturbed metric associated with changes in mass and angular momentum are calculated in the Kerr gauge.

  13. RECENT STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF LOW-MASS STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT REDSHIFTS 0.3 < z < 0.9

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Gallego, Jesús; De Paz, Armando Gil; Villar, Víctor; Tresse, Laurence; Charlot, Stéphane; Barro, Guillermo

    2015-01-20

    The epoch when low-mass star-forming galaxies (LMSFGs) form the bulk of their stellar mass is uncertain. While some models predict an early formation, others favor a delayed scenario until later ages of the universe. We present constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of LMSFGs obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach that (1) consistently combines photometric (broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time. The sample includes 31 spectroscopically confirmed LMSFGs (7.3 ≤ log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} ≤ 8.0), at 0.3 < z {sub spec} < 0.9, in the Extended-Chandra Deep Field-South field. Among them, 24 were selected with photometric stellar mass log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} < 8.0, 0.3 < z {sub phot} < 1.0, and m {sub NB816,} {sub AB} < 26 mag; the remaining 7 were selected as blue compact dwarfs within the same photometric redshift and magnitude ranges. We also study a secondary sample of 43 more massive spectroscopically confirmed galaxies (8.0 < log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} ≤ 9.1), selected with the same criteria. The SFRs and stellar masses derived for both samples place our targets on the standard main sequence of star-forming galaxies. The median SFH of LMSFGs at intermediate redshifts appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the ∼0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for LMSFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for the more massive secondary sample.

  14. Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric Redshift Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Shaun A.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-07-16

    We present a new limit of (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to and when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w{ne}-1, respectively. These are derived from a new photometric catalogue of over 700 000 luminous red galaxies (MegaZ DR7) with a volume of 3.3 (Gpc h{sup -1}){sup 3} and redshift range 0.45

  15. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE BUILD-UP OF STELLAR MASS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Stott, J. P.; Collins, C. A.; Hilton, M.; Capozzi, D.; Sahlen, M.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Hosmer, M.; Liddle, A. R.; Mehrtens, N.; Romer, A. K.; Miller, C. J.; Stanford, S. A.; Viana, P. T. P.; Davidson, M.; Hoyle, B.; Kay, S. T.; Nichol, R. C.

    2010-07-20

    We present deep J- and K{sub s} -band photometry of 20 high redshift galaxy clusters between z = 0.8 and1.5, 19 of which are observed with the MOIRCS instrument on the Subaru telescope. By using near-infrared light as a proxy for stellar mass we find the surprising result that the average stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) has remained constant at {approx}9 x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun} since z {approx} 1.5. We investigate the effect on this result of differing star formation histories generated by three well-known and independent stellar population codes and find it to be robust for reasonable, physically motivated choices of age and metallicity. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we find that the result is unaffected by any correlation between BCG mass and cluster mass in either the observed or model clusters. The large stellar masses imply that the assemblage of these galaxies took place at the same time as the initial burst of star formation. This result leads us to conclude that dry merging has had little effect on the average stellar mass of BCGs over the last 9-10 Gyr in stark contrast to the predictions of semi-analytic models, based on the hierarchical merging of dark matter halos, which predict a more protracted mass build-up over a Hubble time. However, we discuss that there is potential for reconciliation between observation and theory if there is a significant growth of material in the intracluster light over the same period.

  16. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The decline of cosmic star formation: quenching, mass, and environment connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Bolzonella, M.; Granett, B. R.; De Lucia, G.; Branchini, E.; Zamorani, G.; Iovino, A.; Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Scodeggio, M.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Moutard, T.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Blaizot, J.; Coupon, J.; Hawken, A.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Gargiulo, A.

    2017-06-01

    We use the final data of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) to investigate the effect of the environment on the evolution of galaxies between z = 0.5 and z = 0.9. We characterise local environment in terms of the density contrast smoothed over a cylindrical kernel, the scale of which is defined by the distance to the fifth nearest neighbour. This is performed by using a volume-limited sub-sample of galaxies complete up to z = 0.9, but allows us to attach a value of local density to all galaxies in the full VIPERS magnitude-limited sample to i < 22.5. We use this information to estimate how the distribution of galaxy stellar masses depends on environment. More massive galaxies tend to reside in higher-density environments over the full redshift range explored. Defining star-forming and passive galaxies through their (NUV-r) vs. (r-K) colours, we then quantify the fraction of star-forming over passive galaxies, fap, as a function of environment at fixed stellar mass. fap is higher in low-density regions for galaxies with masses ranging from log (ℳ/ℳ⊙) = 10.38 (the lowest value explored) to at least log (ℳ/ℳ⊙) 11.3, although with decreasing significance going from lower to higher masses. This is the first time that environmental effects on high-mass galaxies are clearly detected at redshifts as high as z 0.9. We compared these results to VIPERS-like galaxy mock catalogues based on a widely used galaxy formation model. The model correctly reproduces fap in low-density environments, but underpredicts it at high densities. The discrepancy is particularly strong for the lowest-mass bins. We find that this discrepancy is driven by an excess of low-mass passive satellite galaxies in the model. In high-density regions, we obtain a better (although not perfect) agreement of the model fap with observations by studying the accretion history of these model galaxies (that is, the times when they become satellites), by assuming either that a non

  17. The dwarfs beyond: The stellar-to-halo mass relation for a new sample of intermediate redshift low-mass galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Sarah H.; Ellis, Richard S.; Newman, Andrew B.; Benson, Andrew

    2014-02-20

    A number of recent challenges to the standard ΛCDM paradigm relate to discrepancies that arise in comparing the abundance and kinematics of local dwarf galaxies with the predictions of numerical simulations. Such arguments rely heavily on the assumption that the Local Volume's dwarf and satellite galaxies form a representative distribution in terms of their stellar-to-halo mass ratios. To address this question, we present new, deep spectroscopy using DEIMOS on Keck for 82 low-mass (10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}), star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 1). For 50% of these we are able to determine resolved rotation curves using nebular emission lines and thereby construct the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation to masses as low as 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. Using scaling relations determined from weak lensing data, we convert this to a stellar-to-halo mass relation for comparison with abundance matching predictions. We find a discrepancy between our observations and the predictions from abundance matching in the sense that we observe 3-12 times more stellar mass at a given halo mass. We suggest possible reasons for this discrepancy, as well as improved tests for the future.

  18. Active galactic nuclei emission line diagnostics and the mass-metallicity relation up to redshift z ∼ 2: The impact of selection effects and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Gobat, Raphael; Jean-Baptiste, Ingrid; Le Floc'h, Émeric; Pannella, Maurilio; Schreiber, Corentin; Trump, Jonathan R.; Dickinson, Mark

    2014-06-10

    Emission line diagnostic diagrams probing the ionization sources in galaxies, such as the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich (BPT) diagram, have been used extensively to distinguish active galactic nuclei (AGN) from purely star-forming galaxies. However, they remain poorly understood at higher redshifts. We shed light on this issue with an empirical approach based on a z ∼ 0 reference sample built from ∼300,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, from which we mimic selection effects due to typical emission line detection limits at higher redshift. We combine this low-redshift reference sample with a simple prescription for luminosity evolution of the global galaxy population to predict the loci of high-redshift galaxies on the BPT and Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagrams. The predicted bivariate distributions agree remarkably well with direct observations of galaxies out to z ∼ 1.5, including the observed stellar mass-metallicity (MZ) relation evolution. As a result, we infer that high-redshift star-forming galaxies are consistent with having normal interstellar medium (ISM) properties out to z ∼ 1.5, after accounting for selection effects and line luminosity evolution. Namely, their optical line ratios and gas-phase metallicities are comparable to that of low-redshift galaxies with equivalent emission-line luminosities. In contrast, AGN narrow-line regions may show a shift toward lower metallicities at higher redshift. While a physical evolution of the ISM conditions is not ruled out for purely star-forming galaxies and may be more important starting at z ≳ 2, we find that reliably quantifying this evolution is hindered by selections effects. The recipes provided here may serve as a basis for future studies toward this goal. Code to predict the loci of galaxies on the BPT and MEx diagnostic diagrams and the MZ relation as a function of emission line luminosity limits is made publicly available.

  19. Active Galactic Nuclei Emission Line Diagnostics and the Mass-Metallicity Relation up to Redshift z ~ 2: The Impact of Selection Effects and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Charlot, Stéphane; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Trump, Jonathan R.; Brinchmann, Jarle; Dickinson, Mark; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Gobat, Raphael; Jean-Baptiste, Ingrid; Le Floc'h, Émeric; Lehnert, M. D.; Pacifici, Camilla; Pannella, Maurilio; Schreiber, Corentin

    2014-06-01

    Emission line diagnostic diagrams probing the ionization sources in galaxies, such as the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich (BPT) diagram, have been used extensively to distinguish active galactic nuclei (AGN) from purely star-forming galaxies. However, they remain poorly understood at higher redshifts. We shed light on this issue with an empirical approach based on a z ~ 0 reference sample built from ~300,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, from which we mimic selection effects due to typical emission line detection limits at higher redshift. We combine this low-redshift reference sample with a simple prescription for luminosity evolution of the global galaxy population to predict the loci of high-redshift galaxies on the BPT and Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagrams. The predicted bivariate distributions agree remarkably well with direct observations of galaxies out to z ~ 1.5, including the observed stellar mass-metallicity (MZ) relation evolution. As a result, we infer that high-redshift star-forming galaxies are consistent with having normal interstellar medium (ISM) properties out to z ~ 1.5, after accounting for selection effects and line luminosity evolution. Namely, their optical line ratios and gas-phase metallicities are comparable to that of low-redshift galaxies with equivalent emission-line luminosities. In contrast, AGN narrow-line regions may show a shift toward lower metallicities at higher redshift. While a physical evolution of the ISM conditions is not ruled out for purely star-forming galaxies and may be more important starting at z >~ 2, we find that reliably quantifying this evolution is hindered by selections effects. The recipes provided here may serve as a basis for future studies toward this goal. Code to predict the loci of galaxies on the BPT and MEx diagnostic diagrams and the MZ relation as a function of emission line luminosity limits is made publicly available.

  20. The SAMI Pilot Survey: the fundamental and mass planes in three low-redshift clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Owers, Matt S.; Croom, Scott M.; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Roger L.; Brough, S.; Pracy, Michael B.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Jones, D. Heath; Allen, J. T.; Bryant, Julia J.; Cortese, Luca; Goodwin, Michael; Green, Andrew W.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Richards, Samuel; Sharp, Rob

    2015-08-01

    Using new integral field observations of 106 galaxies in three nearby clusters, we investigate how the intrinsic scatter of the Fundamental Plane depends on the way in which the velocity dispersion and effective radius are measured. Our spatially resolved spectroscopy, combined with a cluster sample with negligible relative distance errors, allows us to derive a Fundamental Plane with minimal systematic uncertainties. From the apertures we tested, we find that velocity dispersions measured within a circular aperture with radius equal to one effective radius minimizes the intrinsic scatter of the Fundamental Plane. Using simple yet powerful Jeans dynamical models, we determine dynamical masses for our galaxies. Replacing luminosity in the Fundamental Plane with dynamical mass, we demonstrate that the resulting Mass Plane has further reduced scatter, consistent with zero intrinsic scatter. Using these dynamical models, we also find evidence for a possibly non-linear relationship between dynamical mass-to-light ratio and velocity dispersion.

  1. ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF RAPIDLY ROTATING SOLAR-MASS STARS: EMISSION-LINE REDSHIFTS AS A TEST OF THE SOLAR-STELLAR CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Bushinsky, Rachel; Ayres, Tom; France, Kevin

    2012-07-20

    We compare high-resolution ultraviolet spectra of the Sun and thirteen solar-mass main-sequence stars with different rotational periods that serve as proxies for their different ages and magnetic field structures. In this, the second paper in the series, we study the dependence of ultraviolet emission-line centroid velocities on stellar rotation period, as rotation rates decrease from that of the Pleiades star HII314 (P{sub rot} = 1.47 days) to {alpha} Cen A (P{sub rot} = 28 days). Our stellar sample of F9 V to G5 V stars consists of six stars observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and eight stars observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on HST. We find a systematic trend of increasing redshift with more rapid rotation (decreasing rotation period) that is similar to the increase in line redshift between quiet and plage regions on the Sun. The fastest-rotating solar-mass star in our study, HII314, shows significantly enhanced redshifts at all temperatures above log T = 4.6, including the corona, which is very different from the redshift pattern observed in the more slowly rotating stars. This difference in the redshift pattern suggests that a qualitative change in the magnetic-heating process occurs near P{sub rot} = 2 days. We propose that HII314 is an example of a solar-mass star with a magnetic heating rate too large for the physical processes responsible for the redshift pattern to operate in the same way as for the more slowly rotating stars. HII314 may therefore lie above the high activity end of the set of solar-like phenomena that is often called the 'solar-stellar connection'.

  2. GW170104: Observation of a 50-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence at Redshift 0.2.

    PubMed

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    2017-06-02

    We describe the observation of GW170104, a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of a pair of stellar-mass black holes. The signal was measured on January 4, 2017 at 10∶11:58.6 UTC by the twin advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory during their second observing run, with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a false alarm rate less than 1 in 70 000 years. The inferred component black hole masses are 31.2_{-6.0}^{+8.4}M_{⊙} and 19.4_{-5.9}^{+5.3}M_{⊙} (at the 90% credible level). The black hole spins are best constrained through measurement of the effective inspiral spin parameter, a mass-weighted combination of the spin components perpendicular to the orbital plane, χ_{eff}=-0.12_{-0.30}^{+0.21}. This result implies that spin configurations with both component spins positively aligned with the orbital angular momentum are disfavored. The source luminosity distance is 880_{-390}^{+450}  Mpc corresponding to a redshift of z=0.18_{-0.07}^{+0.08}. We constrain the magnitude of modifications to the gravitational-wave dispersion relation and perform null tests of general relativity. Assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum like massive particles, we bound the graviton mass to m_{g}≤7.7×10^{-23}  eV/c^{2}. In all cases, we find that GW170104 is consistent with general relativity.

  3. GW170104: Observation of a 50-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence at Redshift 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bawaj, M.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. 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S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Rynge, M.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahi, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Wald, R. M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.-F.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zimmerman, A.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We describe the observation of GW170104, a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of a pair of stellar-mass black holes. The signal was measured on January 4, 2017 at 10∶11:58.6 UTC by the twin advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory during their second observing run, with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a false alarm rate less than 1 in 70 000 years. The inferred component black hole masses are 31. 2-6.0+8.4M⊙ and 19. 4-5.9+5.3 M⊙ (at the 90% credible level). The black hole spins are best constrained through measurement of the effective inspiral spin parameter, a mass-weighted combination of the spin components perpendicular to the orbital plane, χeff=-0.1 2-0.30+0.21 . This result implies that spin configurations with both component spins positively aligned with the orbital angular momentum are disfavored. The source luminosity distance is 88 0-390+450 Mpc corresponding to a redshift of z =0.1 8-0.07+0.08 . We constrain the magnitude of modifications to the gravitational-wave dispersion relation and perform null tests of general relativity. Assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum like massive particles, we bound the graviton mass to mg≤7.7 ×10-23 eV /c2 . In all cases, we find that GW170104 is consistent with general relativity.

  4. A robust sample of galaxies at redshifts 6.0masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLure, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; de Ravel, L.; Cirasuolo, M.; Ellis, R. S.; Schenker, M.; Robertson, B. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Stark, D. P.; Bowler, R. A. A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of a photometric redshift analysis designed to identify z≥ 6 galaxies from the near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope imaging in three deep fields [Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), HUDF09-2 and Early Release Science] covering a total area of 45 square arcmin. By adopting a rigorous set of criteria for rejecting low-redshift interlopers, and by employing a deconfusion technique to allow the available ultradeep IRAC imaging to be included in the candidate-selection process, we have derived a robust sample of 70 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) spanning the redshift range 6.0 < z < 8.7. Based on our final sample, we investigate the distribution of ultraviolet (UV) spectral slopes (fλ∝λβ), finding a variance-weighted mean value of <β>=-2.05 ± 0.09 which, contrary to some previous results, is not significantly bluer than displayed by lower redshift starburst galaxies. We confirm the correlation between UV luminosity and stellar mass reported elsewhere, but based on fitting galaxy templates featuring a range of star formation histories (SFHs), metallicities and reddening, we find that, at z≥ 6, the range in mass-to-light ratio (M★/LUV) at a given UV luminosity could span a factor of ≃50. Focusing on a subsample of 21 candidates with IRAC detections at ?m, we find that L★ LBGs at z≃ 6.5 have a median stellar mass of M★= (2.1 ± 1.1) × 109 M⊙ (Chabrier initial mass function) and a median specific star formation rate (sSFR) of 1.9 ± 0.8 Gyr-1. Using the same subsample, we have investigated the influence of nebular continuum and line emission, finding that for the majority of candidates (16 out of 21), the best-fitting stellar masses are reduced by less than a factor of 2.5. However, galaxy template fits exploring a plausible range of SFHs and metallicities provide no compelling evidence of a clear connection between SFR and stellar mass at these redshifts. Finally, a detailed comparison of our final sample with the results of previous

  5. The Vimos VLT Deep Survey. Stellar mass segregation and large-scale galaxy environment in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scodeggio, M.; Vergani, D.; Cucciati, O.; Iovino, A.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Lamareille, F.; Bolzonella, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Abbas, U.; Marinoni, C.; Contini, T.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Foucaud, S.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Radovich, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; de La Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Gregorini, L.; Memeo, P.; Perez-Montero, E.; Mellier, Y.; Temporin, S.; Walcher, C. J.

    2009-07-01

    Context: Hierarchical models of galaxy formation predict that the properties of a dark matter halo depend on the large-scale environment surrounding the halo. As a result of this correlation, we expect massive haloes to be present in larger number in overdense regions than in underdense ones. Given that a correlation exists between a galaxy stellar mass and the hosting dark matter halo mass, the segregation in dark matter halo mass should then result in a segregation in the distribution of stellar mass in the galaxy population. Aims: In this work we study the distribution of galaxy stellar mass and rest-frame optical color as a function of the large-scale galaxy distribution using the VLT VIMOS Deep Survey sample, in order to verify the presence of segregation in the properties of the galaxy population. Methods: We use VVDS redshift measurements and multi-band photometric data to derive estimates of the stellar mass, rest-frame optical color, and of the large-scale galaxy density, on a scale of approximately 8 Mpc, for a sample of 5619 galaxies in the redshift range 0.2mass and optical color segregation over the whole redshift interval covered by our sample, such that the median value of the mass distribution is larger and the rest-frame optical color is redder in regions of high galaxy density. The amplitude of the mass segregation changes little with redshift, at least in the high stellar mass regime that we can uniformly sample over the 0.2 < z < 1.4 redshift interval. The color segregation, instead, decreases significantly for z > 0.7. However, when we consider only galaxies in narrow bins of stellar mass, in order to exclude the effects of stellar mass segregation on galaxy properties, we no longer observe any significant color segregation. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, program 070.A-9007(A), and on data obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope

  6. Evidence for nonzero mass photons associated with a vacuum-induced dissipative red-shift mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vigier, J.P. )

    1990-02-01

    Recent laboratory observations that suggest a frequency anisotropy in the direction of the Leo constellation of {delta}{nu}/{nu} {>=} 10{sup {minus} 6} can be interpreted following in terms of a nonzero photon mass m{sub {delta}} {congruent} 10{sup {minus} 65} g. If one then accepts Einstein and de Broglie's Theory of Light (considered as real Maxwellian waves and photons simultaneously), the experimental justification of the existence of real Maxwellian displacement currents implies the existence of m{sub {delta}} > 0 and of a vacuum dissipative mechanism which can interpret a part (or the totality) of Hubble's cosmological red shift.

  7. Velocity-density correlations from the cosmicflows-3 distance catalogue and the 2MASS Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusser, Adi

    2017-09-01

    The peculiar velocity of a mass tracer is on average aligned with the dipole modulation of the surrounding mass density field. We present a first measurement of the correlation between radial peculiar velocities of objects in the cosmicflows-3 catalogue and the dipole moment of the 2MRS galaxy distribution in concentric spherical shells centred on these objects. Limiting the analysis to cosmicflows-3 objects with distances of 100h-1 Mpc, the correlation function is detected at a confidence level of ≳ 4σ. The measurement is found consistent with the standard ΛCDM model at the ≲ 1.7σ level. We formally derive the constraints 0.32 < Ω0.55σ8 < 0.48 (68 per cent confidence level) or equivalently 0.34 < Ω0.55/b < 0.52, where b is the galaxy bias factor. Deeper and improved peculiar velocity catalogues will substantially reduce the uncertainties, allowing tighter constraints from this type of correlations.

  8. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.1–1.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-07-08

    We present galaxy cluster mass–richness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These mass–richness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ≤ 0.4, 0.4 < z ≤ 0.7, 0.7 < z ≤ 1.0 and 0.1 < z ≤ 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stacked weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present mass–richness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the mass–richness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (α) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 ± 0.526, 14.1 ± 1.78, 30.2 ± 8.74 and 9.23 ± 0.525 × 1013 h–1 M for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. As a result, we find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 ± 0.0585, 0.948 ± 0.100, 1.33 ± 0.260 and 0.883 ± 0.0500, respectively.

  9. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.1–1.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    DOE PAGES

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-07-08

    We present galaxy cluster mass–richness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These mass–richness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ≤ 0.4, 0.4 < z ≤ 0.7, 0.7 < z ≤ 1.0 and 0.1 < z ≤ 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stackedmore » weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present mass–richness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the mass–richness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (α) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 ± 0.526, 14.1 ± 1.78, 30.2 ± 8.74 and 9.23 ± 0.525 × 1013 h–1 M⊙ for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. As a result, we find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 ± 0.0585, 0.948 ± 0.100, 1.33 ± 0.260 and 0.883 ± 0.0500, respectively.« less

  10. Upper bound of 0.28 eV on neutrino masses from the largest photometric redshift survey.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shaun A; Abdalla, Filipe B; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-07-16

    We present a new limit of ∑m(v) ≤ 0.28 (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat ΛCDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to ∑m(ν) ≤ 0.34 and ∑m(v) ≤ 0.47 when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w≠ -1, respectively. These are derived from a new photometric catalogue of over 700,000 luminous red galaxies (MegaZ DR7) with a volume of 3.3  (Gpc h(-1))(3) and redshift range 0.45 < z < 0.65. The data are combined with WMAP 5-year CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations, supernovae, and a Hubble Space Telescope prior on h. When combined with WMAP these data are as constraining as adding all supernovae and baryon oscillation data available. The upper limit is one of the tightest constraints on the neutrino from cosmology or particle physics. Further, if these bounds hold, they all predict that current-to-next generation neutrino experiments, such as KATRIN, are unlikely to obtain a detection.

  11. Fluctuating feedback-regulated escape fraction of ionizing radiation in low-mass, high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebitsch, Maxime; Blaizot, Jérémy; Rosdahl, Joakim; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2017-09-01

    Low-mass galaxies are thought to provide the bulk of the ionizing radiation necessary to reionize the Universe. The amount of photons escaping the galaxies is poorly constrained theoretically, and difficult to measure observationally. Yet it is an essential parameter of reionization models. We study in detail how ionizing radiation can leak from high-redshift galaxies. For this purpose, we use a series of high-resolution radiation hydrodynamics simulations, zooming on three dwarf galaxies in a cosmological context. We find that the energy and momentum input from the supernova explosions has a pivotal role in regulating the escape fraction by disrupting dense star-forming clumps, and clearing sightlines in the halo. In the absence of supernovae, photons are absorbed very locally, within the birth clouds of massive stars. We follow the time evolution of the escape fraction and find that it can vary by more than six orders of magnitude. This explains the large scatter in the value of the escape fraction found by previous studies. This fast variability also impacts the observability of the sources of reionization: a survey even as deep as M1500 = -14 would miss about half of the underlying population of Lyman-continuum emitters.

  12. X-ray properties of K-selected galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0: investigating trends with stellar mass, redshift and spectral type

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Therese M.; Kriek, Mariska; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Labbé, Ivo; Greene, Jenny E. E-mail: mkriek@berkeley.edu

    2014-03-01

    We examine how the total X-ray luminosity correlates with stellar mass, stellar population, and redshift for a K-band limited sample of ∼3500 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0 from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey in the COSMOS field. The galaxy sample is divided into 32 different galaxy types, based on similarities between the spectral energy distributions. For each galaxy type, we further divide the sample into bins of redshift and stellar mass, and perform an X-ray stacking analysis using the Chandra COSMOS data. We find that full band X-ray luminosity is primarily increasing with stellar mass, and at similar mass and spectral type is higher at larger redshifts. When comparing at the same stellar mass, we find that the X-ray luminosity is slightly higher for younger galaxies (i.e., weaker 4000 Å breaks), but the scatter in this relation is large. We compare the observed X-ray luminosities to those expected from low- and high-mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). For blue galaxies, XRBs can almost fully account for the observed emission, while for older galaxies with larger 4000 Å breaks, active galactic nuclei (AGN) or hot gas dominate the measured X-ray flux. After correcting for XRBs, the X-ray luminosity is still slightly higher in younger galaxies, although this correlation is not significant. AGN appear to be a larger component of galaxy X-ray luminosity at earlier times, as the hardness ratio increases with redshift. Together with the slight increase in X-ray luminosity this may indicate more obscured AGNs or higher accretion rates at earlier times.

  13. Black hole mass estimates and emission-line properties of a sample of redshift z > 6.5 quasars

    SciTech Connect

    De Rosa, Gisella; Peterson, Bradley M.; Frank, Stephan; Venemans, Bram P.; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Gennaro, Mario; Simcoe, Robert A.; Dietrich, Matthias; McMahon, Richard G.; Hewett, Paul C.; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Simpson, Chris

    2014-08-01

    We present the analysis of optical and near-infrared spectra of the only four z > 6.5 quasars known to date, discovered in the UKIDSS-LAS and VISTA-VIKING surveys. Our data set consists of new Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter and Magellan/FIRE observations. These are the best optical/NIR spectroscopic data that are likely to be obtained for the z > 6.5 sample using current 6-10 m facilities. We estimate the black hole (BH) mass, the Eddington ratio, and the Si IV/C IV, C III]/C IV, and Fe II/Mg II emission-line flux ratios. We perform spectral modeling using a procedure that allows us to derive a probability distribution for the continuum components and to obtain the quasar properties weighted upon the underlying distribution of continuum models. The z > 6.5 quasars show the same emission properties as their counterparts at lower redshifts. The z > 6.5 quasars host BHs with masses of ∼10{sup 9} M{sub ☉} that are accreting close to the Eddington luminosity ((log(L{sub Bol}/L{sub Edd})) = –0.4 ± 0.2), in agreement with what has been observed for a sample of 4.0 < z < 6.5 quasars. By comparing the Si IV/C IV and C III]/C IV flux ratios with the results obtained from luminosity-matched samples at z ∼ 6 and 2 ≤ z ≤ 4.5, we find no evidence of evolution of the line ratios with cosmic time. We compare the measured Fe II/Mg II flux ratios with those obtained for a sample of 4.0 < z < 6.4 sources. The two samples are analyzed using a consistent procedure. There is no evidence that the Fe II/Mg II flux ratio evolves between z = 7 and z = 4. Under the assumption that the Fe II/Mg II traces the Fe/Mg abundance ratio, this implies the presence of major episodes of chemical enrichment in the quasar hosts in the first ∼0.8 Gyr after the Big Bang.

  14. Black Hole Mass Estimates and Emission-line Properties of a Sample of Redshift z > 6.5 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Gisella; Venemans, Bram P.; Decarli, Roberto; Gennaro, Mario; Simcoe, Robert A.; Dietrich, Matthias; Peterson, Bradley M.; Walter, Fabian; Frank, Stephan; McMahon, Richard G.; Hewett, Paul C.; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Simpson, Chris

    2014-08-01

    We present the analysis of optical and near-infrared spectra of the only four z > 6.5 quasars known to date, discovered in the UKIDSS-LAS and VISTA-VIKING surveys. Our data set consists of new Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter and Magellan/FIRE observations. These are the best optical/NIR spectroscopic data that are likely to be obtained for the z > 6.5 sample using current 6-10 m facilities. We estimate the black hole (BH) mass, the Eddington ratio, and the Si IV/C IV, C III]/C IV, and Fe II/Mg II emission-line flux ratios. We perform spectral modeling using a procedure that allows us to derive a probability distribution for the continuum components and to obtain the quasar properties weighted upon the underlying distribution of continuum models. The z > 6.5 quasars show the same emission properties as their counterparts at lower redshifts. The z > 6.5 quasars host BHs with masses of ~109 M ⊙ that are accreting close to the Eddington luminosity (langlog(L Bol/L Edd)rang = -0.4 ± 0.2), in agreement with what has been observed for a sample of 4.0 < z < 6.5 quasars. By comparing the Si IV/C IV and C III]/C IV flux ratios with the results obtained from luminosity-matched samples at z ~ 6 and 2 <= z <= 4.5, we find no evidence of evolution of the line ratios with cosmic time. We compare the measured Fe II/Mg II flux ratios with those obtained for a sample of 4.0 < z < 6.4 sources. The two samples are analyzed using a consistent procedure. There is no evidence that the Fe II/Mg II flux ratio evolves between z = 7 and z = 4. Under the assumption that the Fe II/Mg II traces the Fe/Mg abundance ratio, this implies the presence of major episodes of chemical enrichment in the quasar hosts in the first ~0.8 Gyr after the Big Bang. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, programs 286.A-5025, 087.A-0890, and 088.A-0897. This paper also includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  15. The SL2S Galaxy-scale Lens Sample. IV. The Dependence of the Total Mass Density Profile of Early-type Galaxies on Redshift, Stellar Mass, and Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Suyu, Sherry H.; Marshall, Philip J.; Auger, Matthew W.; Nipoti, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    We present optical and near-infrared spectroscopy obtained at Keck, Very Large Telescope, and Gemini for a sample of 36 secure strong gravitational lens systems and 17 candidates identified as part of the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey. The deflectors are massive early-type galaxies in the redshift range zd = 0.2-0.8, while the lensed sources are at zs = 1-3.5. We combine these data with photometric and lensing measurements presented in the companion paper III and with lenses from the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys and Lènses Structure and Dynamics surveys to investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half the age of the universe. We study the dependence of the slope of the total mass density profile, γ' (\\rho (r)\\propto r^{-\\gamma ^{\\prime }}), on stellar mass, size, and redshift. We find that two parameters are sufficient to determine γ' with less than 6% residual scatter. At fixed redshift, γ' depends solely on the surface stellar mass density ∂γ'/∂Σ* = 0.38 ± 0.07, i.e., galaxies with denser stars also have steeper slopes. At fixed M * and R eff, γ' depends on redshift, in the sense that galaxies at a lower redshift have steeper slopes (∂γ'/∂z = -0.31 ± 0.10). However, the mean redshift evolution of γ' for an individual galaxy is consistent with zero dγ'/dz = -0.10 ± 0.12. This result is obtained by combining our measured dependencies of γ' on z, M *,R eff with the evolution of the R eff-M * taken from the literature, and is broadly consistent with current models of the formation and evolution of massive early-type galaxies. Detailed quantitative comparisons of our results with theory will provide qualitatively new information on the detailed physical processes at work.

  16. Investigating the burstiness of the star formation history of low-mass galaxies at intermediate redshifts with KECK/DEIMOS spectroscopy and CANDELS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, Sandra M.; Rafelski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The history of gas accretion, expulsion, and recycling, and star formation of low-mass galaxies (with stellar mass below 10^9 Msun) is thought to be stochastic and bursty. We combine the deep broad-band images of CANDELS and the high-resolution optical spectroscopy from Keck/DEIMOS surveys --- TKRS, DEEP2, DEEP3, and HALO7D --- to explore the star formation histories of low-mass galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.5≤z≤1.0). We study (1) the stellar mass (M)--gas-phase metallicity (Z) relation (MZR) and its scatter and (2) the ratio of star formation rates (SFRs) measured through FUV to that through Hβ (FUV--Hβ ratio). Our MZR sample is ˜20 times larger than those in previous studies beyond the local universe. This huge gain in sample size enables superior constraints on the MZR and its scatter in the low-mass regime. We find that the scatter of the MZR increases as mass decreases. For the FUV--Hβ ratio, we find that it increases with the decrease of mass and SFR. Both results can be explained by low-mass galaxies having a star formation history with more bursts than massive galaxies having. A simple model shows that the star formation occuring in starburst phases in low-mass galaxies is 5x higher than that in a constant star formation phase, while, for massive galaxies, the bursty phases of star formation is negligible. Finally, we find that our median FUV--Hβ ratio for low-mass galaxies is higher than that of local galaxies of the same mass, implying a redshift evolution.

  17. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). A precise measurement of the galaxy stellar mass function and the abundance of massive galaxies at redshifts 0.5 < z < 1.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidzon, I.; Bolzonella, M.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Arnouts, S.; de la Torre, S.; Fritz, A.; De Lucia, G.; Iovino, A.; Granett, B. R.; Zamorani, G.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Moutard, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2013-10-01

    We measure the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function from z = 1.3 to z = 0.5 using the first 53 608 redshifts of the ongoing VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS). Thanks to its large volume and depth, VIPERS provides a detailed picture of the galaxy distribution at z ≃ 0.8, when the Universe was ≃7 Gyr old. We carefully estimate the uncertainties and systematic effects associated with the SED fitting procedure used to derive galaxy stellar masses. We estimate the galaxy stellar mass function at several epochs between z = 0.5 and 1.3, discussing the amount of cosmic variance affecting our estimate in detail. We find that Poisson noise and cosmic variance of the galaxy mass function in the VIPERS survey are comparable to the statistical uncertainties of large surveys in the local universe. VIPERS data allow us to determine with unprecedented accuracy the high-mass tail of the galaxy stellar mass function, which includes a significant number of galaxies that are too rare to detect with any of the past spectroscopic surveys. At the epochs sampled by VIPERS, massive galaxies had already assembled most of their stellar mass. We compare our results with both previous observations and theoretical models. We apply a photometric classification in the (U - V) rest-frame colour to compute the mass function of blue and red galaxies, finding evidence for the evolution of their contribution to the total number density budget: the transition mass above which red galaxies dominate is found to be about 1010.4 ℳ⊙ at z ≃ 0.55, and it evolves proportionally to (1 + z)3. We are able to separately trace the evolution of the number density of blue and red galaxies with masses above 1011.4 ℳ⊙, in a mass range barely studied in previous work. We find that for such high masses, red galaxies show a milder evolution with redshift, when compared to objects at lower masses. At the same time, we detect a population of similarly massive blue galaxies, which are no

  18. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  19. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) . Luminosity and stellar mass dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.5 < z < 1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, F.; Bolzonella, M.; Branchini, E.; Davidzon, I.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; Moscardini, L.; Pollo, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We investigate the dependence of galaxy clustering on luminosity and stellar mass in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.1, using the first ~ 55 000 redshifts from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Methods: We measured the redshift-space two-point correlation functions (2PCF), ξ(s) and ξ(rp,π) , and the projected correlation function, wp(rp), in samples covering different ranges of B-band absolute magnitudes and stellar masses. We considered both threshold and binned galaxy samples, with median B-band absolute magnitudes - 21.6 ≲ MB - 5log (h) ≲ - 19.5 and median stellar masses 9.8 ≲ log (M⋆ [h-2 M⊙]) ≲ 10.7. We assessed the real-space clustering in the data from the projected correlation function, which we model as a power law in the range 0.2 < rp [h-1 Mpc ] < 20. Finally, we estimated the galaxy bias as a function of luminosity, stellar mass, and redshift, assuming a flat Λ cold dark matter model to derive the dark matter 2PCF. Results: We provide the best-fit parameters of the power-law model assumed for the real-space 2PCF - the correlation length, r0, and the slope, γ - as well as the linear bias parameter, as a function of the B-band absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and redshift. We confirm and provide the tightest constraints on the dependence of clustering on luminosity at 0.5 < z < 1.1. We prove the complexity of comparing the clustering dependence on stellar mass from samples that are originally flux-limited and discuss the possible origin of the observed discrepancies. Overall, our measurements provide stronger constraints on galaxy formation models, which are now required to match, in addition to local observations, the clustering evolution measured by VIPERS galaxies between z = 0.5 and z = 1.1 for a broad range of luminosities and stellar masses. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, under programmes 182.A-0886 (LP) at the Very Large Telescope, and also based on

  20. Constraining star formation through redshifted CO and CII emission in archival CMB data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric

    LCDM is a strikingly successful paradigm to explain the CMB anisotropy and its evolution into observed galaxy clustering statistics. The formation and evolution of galaxies within this context is more complex and only partly characterized. Measurements of the average star formation and its precursors over cosmic time are required to connect theories of galaxy evolution to LCDM evolution. The fine structure transition in CII at 158 um traces star formation rates and the ISM radiation environment. Cold, molecular gas fuels star formation and is traced well by a ladder of CO emission lines. Catalogs of emission lines in individual galaxies have provided the most information about CII and CO to-date but are subject to selection effects. Intensity mapping is an alternative approach to measuring line emission. It surveys the sum of all line radiation as a function of redshift, and requires angular resolution to reach cosmologically interesting scales, but not to resolve individual sources. It directly measures moments of the luminosity function from all emitting objects. Intensity mapping of CII and CO can perform an unbiased census of stars and cold gas across cosmic time. We will use archival COBE-FIRAS and Planck data to bound or measure cosmologically redshifted CII and CO line emission through 1) the monopole spectrum, 2) cross-power between FIRAS/Planck and public galaxy survey catalogs from BOSS and the 2MASS redshift surveys, 3) auto-power of the FIRAS/Planck data itself. FIRAS is unique in its spectral range and all-sky coverage, provided by the space-borne FTS architecture. In addition to sensitivity to a particular emission line, intensity mapping is sensitive to all other contributions to surface brightness. We will remove CMB and foreground spatial and spectral templates using models from WMAP and Planck data. Interlopers and residual foregrounds additively bias the auto-power and monopole, but both can still be used to provide rigorous upper bounds. The

  1. The UV colours of high-redshift early-type galaxies: evidence for recent star formation and stellar mass assembly over the last 8 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, S.; Khochfar, S.; Schawinski, K.; Yi, S. K.; Gawiser, E.; Silk, J.; Virani, S. N.; Cardamone, C. N.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Urry, C. M.

    2008-07-01

    We combine deep optical and NIR (UBVRIzJK) photometry from the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) with redshifts from the COMBO-17 survey to perform a large-scale study of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) properties of 674 high-redshift (0.5 < z < 1) early-type galaxies, drawn from the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDFS). Galaxy morphologies are determined through visual inspection of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken from the GEMS survey. We harness the sensitivity of the UV to young (<1-Gyr old) stars to quantify the recent star formation history of early-type galaxies across a range of luminosities [-23.5 < M(V) < -18]. Comparisons to simple stellar populations forming at high redshift indicate that ~1.1 per cent of early-types in this sample are consistent with purely passive ageing since z = 2 - this value drops to ~0.24 per cent and ~0.15 per cent for z = 3 and 5, respectively. Parametrizing the recent star formation (RSF) in terms of the mass fraction of stars less than a Gyr old, we find that the early-type population as a whole shows a typical RSF between 5 and 13 per cent in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1. Early-types on the broad UV `red sequence' show RSF values less than 5 per cent, while the reddest early-types (which are also the most luminous) are virtually quiescent with RSF values of ~1 per cent. In contrast to their low-redshift (z < 0.1) counterparts, the high-redshift early-types in this sample show a pronounced bimodality in the rest-frame UV-optical colour, with a minor but significant peak centred on the blue cloud. Furthermore, star formation in the most active early-types is a factor of 2 greater at z ~ 0.7 than in the local universe. Given that evolved sources of UV flux (e.g. horizontal branch stars) should be absent at z > 0.5, implying that the UV is dominated by young stars, we find compelling evidence that early-types of all luminosities form stars over the lifetime of the Universe, although the bulk of their

  2. The Subaru FMOS Galaxy Redshift Survey (FastSound): The Mass-Metallicity Relation and the Fundamental Metallicity Relation at z˜1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, K.; Ohta, K.; Akiyama, M.; Tamura, N.; Iwamuro, F.; Totani, T.; Dalton, G.; Bunker, A.; FastSound Team

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a large NIR spectroscopic survey (FastSound) with Subaru/FMOS, consisting of ˜4,000 galaxies at z˜1.4 with significant Hα detection. The resulting mass-metallicity relation generally agrees with those obtained previously in a similar redshift range to our sample. No clear dependence on the mass-metallicity relation on star-formation rate is found, which is not in agreement with the extrapolation of the local fundamental metallicity relation. We estimate the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio (N/O) from the N2S2 index, and find that the N/O in galaxies at z˜1.4 is significantly higher than the local values at a fixed metallicity and stellar mass. The metallicity derived by using the N2 method calibrated in the local universe decreases by ˜0.2 dex if we correct the N/O enhancement.

  3. The Redshift One LDSS-3 Emission line Survey (ROLES): survey method and z ~ 1 mass-dependent star formation rate density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbank, David G.; Balogh, Michael L.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bower, Richard G.; Baldry, I. K.; Davies, G. T.; Hau, G. K. T.; Li, I. H.; McCarthy, P.

    2010-07-01

    Motivated by suggestions of `cosmic downsizing', in which the dominant contribution to the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) proceeds from higher to lower mass galaxies with increasing cosmic time, we describe the design and implementation of the Redshift One LDSS3 Emission line Survey (ROLES). This survey is designed to probe low-mass, z ~ 1 galaxies directly for the first time with spectroscopy. ROLES is a K-selected (22.5 < KAB < 24.0) survey for dwarf galaxies [8.5 <~ log(M*/Msolar) <~ 9.5] at 0.89 < z < 1.15 drawn from two extremely deep fields [Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-S (GOODS-S) and MS1054-Faint Infra-Red Extragalactic Survey]. Using the [OII]λ3727 emission line, we obtain redshifts and star formation rates (SFRs) for star-forming galaxies down to a limit of ~0.3Msolaryr-1. We present the [OII] luminosity function measured in ROLES and find a faint-end slope of αfaint ~ -1.5, similar to that measured at z ~ 0.1 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By combining ROLES with higher mass surveys (Gemini Deep Deep Survey and European Southern Observatory GOOD-S public spectroscopy) we measure the SFRD as a function of stellar mass using [OII] (with and without various empirical corrections) and using spectral energy distribution fitting to obtain the SFR from the rest-frame UV luminosity for galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. Our best estimate of the corrected [OII] SFRD and UV SFRD both independently show that the SFRD evolves equally for galaxies of all masses between z ~ 1 and z ~ 0.1. The exact evolution in normalization depends on the indicator used, with the [OII]-based estimate showing a change of a factor of ~2.6 and the UV-based estimate a factor of ~6. We discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy in normalization between the indicators, but note that the magnitude of this uncertainty is comparable to the discrepancy between indicators seen in other z ~ 1 works. Our result that the shape of the SFRD as a function of stellar

  4. The Systematics of Strong Lens Modeling Quantified: The Effects of Constraint Selection and Redshift Information on Magnification, Mass, and Multiple Image Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Traci L.; Sharon, Keren

    2016-11-01

    Until now, systematic errors in strong gravitational lens modeling have been acknowledged but have never been fully quantified. Here, we launch an investigation into the systematics induced by constraint selection. We model the simulated cluster Ares 362 times using random selections of image systems with and without spectroscopic redshifts and quantify the systematics using several diagnostics: image predictability, accuracy of model-predicted redshifts, enclosed mass, and magnification. We find that for models with >15 image systems, the image plane rms does not decrease significantly when more systems are added; however, the rms values quoted in the literature may be misleading as to the ability of a model to predict new multiple images. The mass is well constrained near the Einstein radius in all cases, and systematic error drops to <2% for models using >10 image systems. Magnification errors are smallest along the straight portions of the critical curve, and the value of the magnification is systematically lower near curved portions. For >15 systems, the systematic error on magnification is ∼2%. We report no trend in magnification error with the fraction of spectroscopic image systems when selecting constraints at random; however, when using the same selection of constraints, increasing this fraction up to ∼0.5 will increase model accuracy. The results suggest that the selection of constraints, rather than quantity alone, determines the accuracy of the magnification. We note that spectroscopic follow-up of at least a few image systems is crucial because models without any spectroscopic redshifts are inaccurate across all of our diagnostics.

  5. The Relative and Absolute Ages of Old Globular Clusters in the LCDM Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenti, Michele; Padoan, Paolo; Jimenez, Raul

    2015-08-01

    Old globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way have ages of about 13 Gyr, placing their formation time in the reionization epoch. We propose a novel scenario for the formation of these systems based on the merger of two or more atomic cooling halos at high redshift (z\\gt 6). First-generation stars are formed as an intense burst in the center of a minihalo that grows above the threshold for hydrogen cooling (halo mass {M}{{h}}˜ {10}8 {M}⊙ ) by undergoing a major merger within its cooling timescale (˜150 Myr). Subsequent minor mergers and sustained gas infall bring a new supply of pristine gas to the halo center, creating conditions that can trigger new episodes of star formation. The dark-matter halo around the GC is then stripped during assembly of the host-galaxy halo. Minihalo merging is efficient only in a short redshift window, set by the {{Λ }}{CDM} parameters, allowing us to make a strong prediction on the age distribution for old GCs. From cosmological simulations, we derive an average merging redshift < z> =9 and a narrow distribution {{Δ }}z=2, implying average GC age < {t}{age}> =13.0+/- 0.2 {Gyr} including ˜0.2 Gyr of star formation delay. Qualitatively, our scenario reproduces other general old GC properties (characteristic masses and number of objects, metallicity versus galactocentric radius anticorrelation, radial distribution), but unlike age, these generally depend on details of baryonic physics. In addition to improved age measurements, direct validation of the model at z˜ 10 may be within reach with ultradeep gravitationally lensed observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  6. The dynamics and internal mass distribution of rich galaxy cluster cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Chervin Fabien Pierre; White, Simon

    2015-08-01

    It has often been argued that the findings of shallow dark matter density profiles in galaxy clusters may be a source of tension between observations and benign expectations in LCDM. In this talk I will present cosmological N-body resimulations of the assembly of the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in rich clusters within LCDM. At z=2, I populate dark matter subhalos with self-gravitating stellar systems whose abundance and structure match observed high-redshift galaxies. I then follow their evolution in the build of the final clusters. By z=0, the dark matter density profiles are shallower than in corresponding dark-matter-only simulations, but their total mass density profiles (stars + dark matter) are quite similar. Differences are found only at radii where the effects of central black holes may be significant. Dark matter density slopes shallower than gamma=1.0 occur for r/r200<0.015, close to the half-light radii of the BCGs. I will illustrate how this solution occurs and how this ties in strongly with the accretion history of the central BCG through mergers. Based on the accretion history in the simulations I will also argue that supermassive black hole mergers could create BCG cores as large as rc~3kpc.Finally I will introduce some new re-simulations which are being currently used to study the evolution of the tidal truncation radii of cluster galaxies and making predictions on the kinematics of BCGs to large radii.

  7. BLAST: THE REDSHIFT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Eales, Stephen; Dye, Simon; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Raymond, Gwenifer; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Rex, Marie; Semisch, Christopher; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P.; Patanchon, Guillaume; Siana, Brian

    2009-12-20

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has recently surveyed approx =8.7 deg{sup 2} centered on Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South at 250, 350, and 500 mum. In Dye et al., we presented the catalog of sources detected at 5sigma in at least one band in this field and the probable counterparts to these sources in other wavebands. In this paper, we present the results of a redshift survey in which we succeeded in measuring redshifts for 82 of these counterparts. The spectra show that the BLAST counterparts are mostly star-forming galaxies but not extreme ones when compared to those found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Roughly one quarter of the BLAST counterparts contain an active nucleus. We have used the spectroscopic redshifts to carry out a test of the ability of photometric redshift methods to estimate the redshifts of dusty galaxies, showing that the standard methods work well even when a galaxy contains a large amount of dust. We have also investigated the cases where there are two possible counterparts to the BLAST source, finding that in at least half of these there is evidence that the two galaxies are physically associated, either because they are interacting or because they are in the same large-scale structure. Finally, we have made the first direct measurements of the luminosity function in the three BLAST bands. We find strong evolution out to z = 1, in the sense that there is a large increase in the space density of the most luminous galaxies. We have also investigated the evolution of the dust-mass function, finding similar strong evolution in the space density of the galaxies with the largest dust masses, showing that the luminosity evolution seen in many wavebands is associated with an increase in the reservoir of interstellar matter in galaxies.

  8. Evolution of the mass, size, and star formation rate in high redshift merging galaxies. MIRAGE - A new sample of simulations with detailed stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, V.; Renaud, F.; Epinat, B.; Amram, P.; Bournaud, F.; Contini, T.; Teyssier, R.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2014-02-01

    Context. In Λ-CDM models, galaxies are thought to grow both through continuous cold gas accretion coming from the cosmic web and episodic merger events. The relative importance of these different mechanisms at different cosmic epochs is nevertheless not yet understood well. Aims: We aim to address questions related to galaxy mass assembly through major and minor wet merging processes in the redshift range 1 < z < 2, an epoch that corresponds to the peak of cosmic star formation history. A significant fraction of Milky Way-like galaxies are thought to have undergone an unstable clumpy phase at this early stage. We focus on the behavior of the young clumpy disks when galaxies are undergoing gas-rich galaxy mergers. Methods: Using the adaptive mesh-refinement code RAMSES, we build the Merging and Isolated high redshift Adaptive mesh refinement Galaxies (MIRAGE) sample. It is composed of 20 mergers and 3 isolated idealized disks simulations, which sample disk orientations and merger masses. Our simulations can reach a physical resolution of 7 parsecs, and include star formation, metal line cooling, metallicity advection, and a recent physically-motivated implementation of stellar feedback that encompasses OB-type stars radiative pressure, photo-ionization heating, and supernovae. Results: The star formation history of isolated disks shows a stochastic star formation rate, which proceeds from the complex behavior of the giant clumps. Our minor and major gas-rich merger simulations do not trigger starbursts, suggesting a saturation of the star formation due to the detailed accounting of stellar feedback processes in a turbulent and clumpy interstellar medium fed by substantial accretion from the circumgalactic medium. Our simulations are close to the normal regime of the disk-like star formation on a Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram. The mass-size relation and its rate of evolution in the redshift range 1 < z < 2 matches observations, suggesting that the inside-out growth

  9. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a limit on

  10. Evidence for a non-universal stellar initial mass function in low-redshift high-density early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Aaron A.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Simard, Luc

    2012-05-01

    We determine an absolute calibration of stellar mass-to-light ratios for the densest ≃3 per cent of early-type galaxies in the local Universe (redshift z≃ 0.08) from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. This sample of ˜4000 galaxies has, assuming a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF), effective stellar surface densities Σe > 2500 M⊙ pc-2, stellar population synthesis (SPS) stellar masses log10(MSPS/M⊙) < 10.8 and aperture velocity dispersions of ? (68 per cent range). In contrast to typical early-type galaxies, we show that these dense early-type galaxies follow the virial Fundamental Plane, which suggests that mass follows light. With the additional assumption that any dark matter does not follow the light, the dynamical masses of dense galaxies provide a direct measurement of stellar masses. Our dynamical masses (Mdyn), obtained from the spherical Jeans equations, are only weakly sensitive to the choice of anisotropy (β) due to the relatively large aperture of the SDSS fibre for these galaxies: Rap≃ 1.5Re. Assuming isotropic orbits (β= 0), we find a median log10(Mdyn/MSPS) = 0.233 ± 0.003, consistent with a Salpeter IMF, while more bottom-heavy IMFs and standard Milky Way IMFs are strongly disfavoured. Our results are consistent with, but do not require, a dependence of the IMF on dynamical mass or velocity dispersion. We find evidence for a colour dependence to the IMF such that redder galaxies have heavier IMFs with Mdyn/MSPS∝ (g-r)1.13 ± 0.09. This may reflect a more fundamental dependence of the IMF on the age or metallicity of a stellar population, or the density at which the stars formed.

  11. Testing the {lambda} cold dark matter model (and more) with the time evolution of the redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, Kayll

    2007-09-15

    With the many ambitious proposals afoot for new generations of very large telescopes, along with spectrographs of unprecedented resolution, there arises the real possibility that the time evolution of the cosmological redshift may, in the not too distant future, prove to be a useful tool rather than merely a theoretical curiosity. Here I contrast this approach with the standard cosmological procedure based on the luminosity (or any other well-defined) distance. I then show that such observations would not only provide a direct measure of all the associated cosmological parameters of the LCDM model, but would also provide wide-ranging internal consistency checks. Further, in a more general context, I show that without introducing further time derivatives of the redshift one could in fact map out the dark energy equation of state should the LCDM model fail. A consideration of brane-world scenarios and interacting dark energy models serves to emphasize the fact that the usefulness of such observations would not be restricted to high redshifts.

  12. A REDSHIFT FOR THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE HLX-1: CONFIRMATION OF ITS ASSOCIATION WITH THE GALAXY ESO 243-49

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersema, K.; Farrell, S. A.; Webb, N. A.; Barret, D.; Godet, O.; Servillat, M.; Maccarone, T. J.

    2010-10-01

    In this Letter, we report a spectroscopic confirmation of the association of HLX-1, the brightest ultra-luminous X-ray (ULX) source, with the galaxy ESO 243-49. At the host galaxy distance of 95 Mpc, the maximum observed 0.2-10 keV luminosity is 1.2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. This luminosity is {approx}400 times above the Eddington limit for a 20 M {sub sun} black hole and has been interpreted as implying an accreting intermediate-mass black hole with a mass in excess of 500 M {sub sun} (assuming that the luminosity is a factor of 10 above the Eddington value). However, a number of other ULX sources have been later identified as background active galaxies or foreground sources. It has recently been claimed that HLX-1 could be a quiescent neutron star X-ray binary at a Galactic distance of only 2.5 kpc, so a definitive association with the host galaxy is crucial in order to confirm the nature of the object. Here, we report the detection of the H{alpha} emission line for the recently identified optical counterpart at a redshift consistent with that of ESO 243-49. This finding definitively places HLX-1 inside ESO 243-49, confirming the extreme maximum luminosity and strengthening the case for it containing an accreting intermediate-mass black hole of more than 500 M {sub sun}.

  13. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Downsizing of the blue cloud and the influence of galaxy size on mass quenching over the last eight billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, C. P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Guzzo, L.; Davidzon, I.; Bolzonella, M.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; De Lucia, G.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Gargiulo, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Moutard, T.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Siudek, M.

    2017-08-01

    We use the full VIPERS redshift survey in combination with SDSS-DR7 to explore the relationships between star-formation history (using d4000), stellar mass and galaxy structure, and how these relationships have evolved since z 1. We trace the extents and evolutions of both the blue cloud and red sequence by fitting double Gaussians to the d4000 distribution of galaxies in narrow stellar mass bins, for four redshift intervals over 0 mass limit of the blue cloud has retreated steadily with time from ℳ 1011.2 M⊙at z 0.9 to ℳ 1010.7 M⊙by the present day. The number density of massive blue-cloud galaxies (ℳ > 1011M⊙, d4000 < 1.55) drops sharply by a factor five between z 0.8 and z 0.5. These galaxies are becoming quiescent at a rate that largely matches the increase in the numbers of massive passive galaxies seen over this period. We examine the size-mass relation of blue-cloud galaxies, finding that its high-mass boundary runs along lines of constant ℳ /reor equivalently inferred velocity dispersion. Larger galaxies can continue to form stars to higher stellar masses than smaller galaxies. As blue-cloud galaxies approach this high-mass limit, entering a narrow diagonal region within the size-mass plane termed the "quenching zone", they start to be quenched, their d4000 values increasing to push them towards the green valley. In parallel, their structures change, showing higher Sérsic indices and central stellar mass densities. For these galaxies, bulge growth is required for them to reach the high-mass limit of the blue cloud and be quenched by internal mechanisms. The blue-cloud galaxies that are being quenched at z 0.8 lie along the same size-mass relation as present day quiescent galaxies and seem the likely progenitors of today's S0s. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and

  14. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; McKee, Christopher F.; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-20

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 {approx}> z {approx}> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec}) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 {mu}m flux {approx}> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }), and 3% of the total SFRD at z {approx} 2.

  15. Photometric Redshifts of Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; McKee, Christopher F.; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-01

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti & McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 >~ z >~ 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z phot)/(1 + z spec) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 μm flux >~ 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L IR >~ 1012 L ⊙), and 3% of the total SFRD at z ~ 2.

  16. High redshift blazars .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.

    Blazars are sources whose jet is pointing at us. Since their jets are relativistic, the flux is greatly amplified in the direction of motion, making blazars the most powerful persistent objects in the Universe. This is true at all frequencies, but especially where their spectrum peaks. Although the spectrum of moderate powerful sources peaks in the ˜GeV range, extremely powerful sources at high redshifts peak in the ˜MeV band. This implies that the hard X-ray band is the optimal one to find powerful blazars beyond a redshift of ˜4. First indications strongly suggest that powerful high-z blazars harbor the most massive and active early black holes, exceeding a billion solar masses. Since for each detected blazars there must exist hundreds of similar, but misaligned, sources, the search for high-z blazars is becoming competitive with the search of early massive black holes using radio-quiet quasars. Finding how the two populations of black holes (one in jetted sources, the other in radio-quiet objects) evolve in redshift will shed light on the growth of the most massive black holes and possibly on the feedback between the central engine and the rest of the host galaxy.

  17. The Subaru FMOS Galaxy Redshift Survey (FastSound). III. The mass-metallicity relation and the fundamental metallicity relation at z ˜ 1.4*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Kiyoto; Ohta, Kouji; Akiyama, Masayuki; Bunker, Andrew; Dalton, Gavin; Ellis, Richard; Glazebrook, Karl; Goto, Tomotsugu; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Takato, Naruhisa; Tamura, Naoyuki; Tonegawa, Motonari; Totani, Tomonori

    2015-12-01

    We present the results from a large near-infrared spectroscopic survey made with Subaru/FMOS (FastSound) consisting of ˜ 4000 galaxies at z ˜ 1.4 with significant Hα detection. We measure the gas-phase metallicity from the [N II]λ6583/Hα emission line ratio of the composite spectra in various stellar mass and star-formation rate bins. The resulting mass-metallicity relation generally agrees with previous studies obtained in a similar redshift range to that of our sample. No clear dependence of the mass-metallicity relation on star-formation rate is found. Our result at z ˜ 1.4 is roughly in agreement with the fundamental metallicity relation at z ˜ 0.1 with a fiber aperture corrected star-formation rate. We detect significant [S II]λλ6716,6731 emission lines from the composite spectra. The electron density estimated from the [S II]λλ6716,6731 line ratio ranges from 10-500 cm-3, which generally agrees with that of local galaxies. On the other hand, the distribution of our sample on [N II]λ6583/Hα vs. [S II]λλ6716,6731/Hα is different to that found locally. We estimate the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio (N/O) from the N2S2 index, and find that the N/O in galaxies at z ˜ 1.4 is significantly higher than the local values at a fixed metallicity and stellar mass. The metallicity at z ˜ 1.4 recalculated with this N/O enhancement taken into account decreases by 0.1-0.2 dex. The resulting metallicity is lower than the local fundamental metallicity relation.

  18. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.

  19. ZFIRE: The Evolution of the Stellar Mass Tully-Fisher Relation to Redshift ˜2.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Labbé, Ivo; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Alcorn, Leo; Cowley, Michael; Kewley, Lisa J.; Spitler, Lee R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Yuan, Tiantian

    2017-04-01

    Using observations made with MOSFIRE on Keck I as part of the ZFIRE survey, we present the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation at 2.0< z< 2.5. The sample was drawn from a stellar-mass-limited, {K}s-band-selected catalog from ZFOURGE over the CANDELS area in the COSMOS field. We model the shear of the Hα emission line to derive rotational velocities at 2.2× the scale radius of an exponential disk ({V}2.2). We correct for the blurring effect of a 2D point-spread function (PSF) and the fact that the MOSFIRE PSF is better approximated by a Moffat than a Gaussian, which is more typically assumed for natural seeing. We find for the Tully-Fisher relation at 2.0< z< 2.5 that {log}{V}2.2=(2.18+/- 0.051)+(0.193 ± 0.108)({log}M/{M}⊙ -10) and infer an evolution of the zero-point of {{Δ }}M/{M}⊙ =-0.25+/- 0.16 {dex} or {{Δ }}M/{M}⊙ =-0.39+/- 0.21 {dex} compared to z = 0 when adopting a fixed slope of 0.29 or 1/4.5, respectively. We also derive the alternative kinematic estimator {S}0.5, with a best-fit relation {log}{S}0.5=(2.06+/- 0.032) + (0.211+/- 0.086) ({log}M/{M}⊙ -10), and infer an evolution of {{Δ }}M/{M}⊙ =-0.45+/- 0.13 {dex} compared to z< 1.2 if we adopt a fixed slope. We investigate and review various systematics, such as PSF effects, projection effects, systematics related to stellar mass derivation, selection biases, and slope. We find that discrepancies between the various literature values are reduced when taking these into account. Our observations correspond well with the gradual evolution predicted by semianalytic models.

  20. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Halo Occupation Number, Mass-to-Light Ratios and Omega(M)

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    Using K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters we examine the near-infrared properties of moderate-redshift (0.19 < z < 0.55) galaxy clusters. We find that the number of K-band selected cluster galaxies within R{sub 500} (the Halo Occupation Number, HON) is well-correlated with the cluster dynamical mass (M{sub 500}) and X-ray Temperature (T{sub x}); however, the intrinsic scatter in these scaling relations is 37% and 46% respectively. Comparison with clusters in the local universe shows that the HON-M{sub 500} relation does not evolve significantly between z = 0 and z {approx} 0.3. This suggests that if dark matter halos are disrupted or undergo significant tidal-stripping in high-density regions as seen in numerical simulations, the stellar mass within the halos is tightly bound, and not removed during the process. The total K-band cluster light (L{sub 200},K) and K-band selected richness (parameterized by B{sub gc,K}) are also correlated with both the cluster T{sub x} and M{sub 200}. The total (intrinsic) scatter in the L{sub 200,K}-M{sub 200} and B{sub gc,K}-M{sub 200} relations are 43%(31%) and 35%(18%) respectively and indicates that for massive clusters both L{sub 200,K} and B{sub gc,K} can predict M{sub 200} with similar accuracy as T{sub x}, L{sub x} or optical richness (B{sub gc}). Examination of the mass-to-light ratios of the clusters shows that similar to local clusters, the K-band mass-to-light ratio is an increasing function of halo mass. Using the K-band mass-to-light ratios of the clusters, we apply the Oort technique and find {Omega}{sub m,0} = 0.22 {+-} 0.02, which agrees well with recent combined concordance cosmology parameters, but, similar to previous cluster studies, is on the low-density end of preferred values.

  1. The COS-Halos survey: physical conditions and baryonic mass in the low-redshift circumgalactic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tejos, Nicolas; Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal; Lehner, Nicolas; O'Meara, John M.; Ford, Amanda Brady; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Davé, Romeel; Weinberg, David H.

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the physical conditions of the cool, photoionized (T ∼10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) using the COS-Halos suite of gas column density measurements for 44 gaseous halos within 160 kpc of L ∼ L* galaxies at z ∼ 0.2. These data are well described by simple photoionization models, with the gas highly ionized (n {sub H} {sub II}/n {sub H} ≳ 99%) by the extragalactic ultraviolet background. Scaling by estimates for the virial radius, R {sub vir}, we show that the ionization state (tracked by the dimensionless ionization parameter, U) increases with distance from the host galaxy. The ionization parameters imply a decreasing volume density profile n {sub H} = (10{sup –4.2±0.25})(R/R {sub vir}){sup –0.8±0.3}. Our derived gas volume densities are several orders of magnitude lower than predictions from standard two-phase models with a cool medium in pressure equilibrium with a hot, coronal medium expected in virialized halos at this mass scale. Applying the ionization corrections to the H I column densities, we estimate a lower limit to the cool gas mass M{sub CGM}{sup cool}>6.5×10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} for the volume within R < R {sub vir}. Allowing for an additional warm-hot, O VI-traced phase, the CGM accounts for at least half of the baryons purported to be missing from dark matter halos at the 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} scale.

  2. Supermassive black hole pairs in clumpy galaxies at high redshift: delayed binary formation and concurrent mass growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Valentina; Capelo, Pedro R.; Mayer, Lucio; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Wadsley, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Massive gas-rich galaxy discs at z ˜ 1-3 host massive star-forming clumps with typical baryonic masses in the range 107-108 M⊙ which can affect the orbital decay and concurrent growth of supermassive black hole (BH) pairs. Using a set of high-resolution simulations of isolated clumpy galaxies hosting a pair of unequal-mass BHs, we study the interaction between massive clumps and a BH pair at kiloparsec scales, during the early phase of the orbital decay. We find that both the interaction with massive clumps and the heating of the cold gas layer of the disc by BH feedback tend to delay significantly the orbital decay of the secondary, which in many cases is ejected and then hovers for a whole gigayear around a separation of 1-2 kpc. In the envelope, dynamical friction is weak and there is no contribution of disc torques: these lead to the fastest decay once the orbit of the secondary BH has circularized in the disc mid-plane. In runs with larger eccentricities the delay is stronger, although there are some exceptions. We also show that, even in discs with very sporadic transient clump formation, a strong spiral pattern affects the decay time-scale for BHs on eccentric orbits. We conclude that, contrary to previous belief, a gas-rich background is not necessarily conducive to a fast BH decay and binary formation, which prompts more extensive investigations aimed at calibrating event-rate forecasts for ongoing and future gravitational-wave searches, such as with Pulsar Timing Arrays and the future evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.

  3. HerMES: The contribution to the cosmic infrared background from galaxies selected by mass and redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Viero, M. P.; Moncelsi, L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Cooray, A.; Quadri, R. F.; Arumugam, V.; Ivison, R. J.; Assef, R. J.; Béthermin, M.; Conley, A.; Glenn, J.; Farrah, D.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ikarashi, S.; Kohno, K.; Marsden, G.; Oliver, S. J.; and others

    2013-12-10

    We quantify the fraction of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) that originates from galaxies identified in the UV/optical/near-infrared by stacking 81,250 (∼35.7 arcmin{sup –2}) K-selected sources (K {sub AB} < 24.0) split according to their rest-frame U – V versus V – J colors into 72,216 star-forming and 9034 quiescent galaxies, on maps from Spitzer/MIPS (24 μm), Herschel/PACS (100, 160 μm), Herschel/SPIRE (250, 350, 500 μm), and AzTEC (1100 μm). The fraction of the CIB resolved by our catalog is (69% ± 15%) at 24 μm, (78% ± 17%) at 70 μm, (58% ± 13%) at 100 μm, (78% ± 18%) at 160 μm, (80% ± 17%) at 250 μm, (69% ± 14%) at 350 μm, (65% ± 12%) at 500 μm, and (45% ± 8%) at 1100 μm. Of that total, about 95% originates from star-forming galaxies, while the remaining 5% is from apparently quiescent galaxies. The CIB at λ ≲ 200 μm appears to be sourced predominantly from galaxies at z ≲ 1, while at λ ≳ 200 μm the bulk originates from 1 ≲ z ≲ 2. Galaxies with stellar masses log(M/M {sub ☉}) = 9.5-11 are responsible for the majority of the CIB, with those in the log(M/M {sub ☉}) = 9.5-10 bin contributing mostly at λ < 250 μm, and those in the log(M/M {sub ☉}) = 10-11 bin dominating at λ > 350 μm. The contribution from galaxies in the log(M/M {sub ☉}) = 9.0-9.5 (lowest) and log(M/M {sub ☉}) = 11.0-12.0 (highest) stellar-mass bins contribute the least—both of order 5%—although the highest stellar-mass bin is a significant contributor to the luminosity density at z ≳ 2. The luminosities of the galaxies responsible for the CIB shifts from combinations of 'normal' and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) at λ ≲ 160 μm, to LIRGs at 160 ≲ λ ≲ 500 μm, to finally LIRGs and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at λ ≳ 500 μm. Stacking analyses were performed using SIMSTACK, a novel algorithm designed to account for possible biases in the stacked flux density due to clustering. It is made available to the public

  4. HerMES: The Contribution to the Cosmic Infrared Background from Galaxies Selected by Mass and Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, M. P.; Moncelsi, L.; Quadri, R. F.; Arumugam, V.; Assef, R. J.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Casey, C. M.; Conley, A.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ikarashi, S.; Ivison, R. J.; Kohno, K.; Marsden, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Schulz, B.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Vaccari, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Wilson, G. W.; Yun, M. S.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-12-01

    We quantify the fraction of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) that originates from galaxies identified in the UV/optical/near-infrared by stacking 81,250 (~35.7 arcmin-2) K-selected sources (K AB < 24.0) split according to their rest-frame U - V versus V - J colors into 72,216 star-forming and 9034 quiescent galaxies, on maps from Spitzer/MIPS (24 μm), Herschel/PACS (100, 160 μm), Herschel/SPIRE (250, 350, 500 μm), and AzTEC (1100 μm). The fraction of the CIB resolved by our catalog is (69% ± 15%) at 24 μm, (78% ± 17%) at 70 μm, (58% ± 13%) at 100 μm, (78% ± 18%) at 160 μm, (80% ± 17%) at 250 μm, (69% ± 14%) at 350 μm, (65% ± 12%) at 500 μm, and (45% ± 8%) at 1100 μm. Of that total, about 95% originates from star-forming galaxies, while the remaining 5% is from apparently quiescent galaxies. The CIB at λ <~ 200 μm appears to be sourced predominantly from galaxies at z <~ 1, while at λ >~ 200 μm the bulk originates from 1 <~ z <~ 2. Galaxies with stellar masses log(M/M ⊙) = 9.5-11 are responsible for the majority of the CIB, with those in the log(M/M ⊙) = 9.5-10 bin contributing mostly at λ < 250 μm, and those in the log(M/M ⊙) = 10-11 bin dominating at λ > 350 μm. The contribution from galaxies in the log(M/M ⊙) = 9.0-9.5 (lowest) and log(M/M ⊙) = 11.0-12.0 (highest) stellar-mass bins contribute the least—both of order 5%—although the highest stellar-mass bin is a significant contributor to the luminosity density at z >~ 2. The luminosities of the galaxies responsible for the CIB shifts from combinations of "normal" and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) at λ <~ 160 μm, to LIRGs at 160 <~ λ <~ 500 μm, to finally LIRGs and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at λ >~ 500 μm. Stacking analyses were performed using SIMSTACK, a novel algorithm designed to account for possible biases in the stacked flux density due to clustering. It is made available to the public at www

  5. X-Ray Properties of K-Selected Galaxies at 0.5 Less than z Less than 2.0: Investigating Trends with Stellar Mass, Redshift and Spectral Type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Therese M.; Kriek, Mariska; vanDokkum, Peter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Greene, Jenny E.; Labbe, Ivo; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    We examine how the total X-ray luminosity correlates with stellar mass, stellar population, and redshift for a K-band limited sample of approximately 3500 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0 from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey in the COSMOS field. The galaxy sample is divided into 32 different galaxy types, based on similarities between the spectral energy distributions. For each galaxy type, we further divide the sample into bins of redshift and stellar mass, and perform an X-ray stacking analysis using the Chandra COSMOS data. We find that full band X-ray luminosity is primarily increasing with stellar mass, and at similar mass and spectral type is higher at larger redshifts. When comparing at the same stellar mass, we find that the X-ray luminosity is slightly higher for younger galaxies (i.e., weaker 4000 angstrom breaks), but the scatter in this relation is large. We compare the observed X-ray luminosities to those expected from low- and high-mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). For blue galaxies, XRBs can almost fully account for the observed emission, while for older galaxies with larger 4000 angstrom breaks, active galactic nuclei (AGN) or hot gas dominate the measured X-ray flux. After correcting for XRBs, the X-ray luminosity is still slightly higher in younger galaxies, although this correlation is not significant. AGN appear to be a larger component of galaxy X-ray luminosity at earlier times, as the hardness ratio increases with redshift. Together with the slight increase in X-ray luminosity this may indicate more obscured AGNs or higher accretion rates at earlier times.

  6. The Evolution Of Size And Stellar Mass Of Passively Evolving Galaxies From Redshift Z 2 To The Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, Paolo; Giavalisco, M.; Guo, Y.; Salimbeni, S.

    2011-01-01

    We study the evolution of the number density and size of passive early-type galaxies from z 2 to z 0, exploiting the unique dataset available in the GOODS fields. In particular, we select a robust sample of 800 massive (M>10^10M_sun) and passive (SSFR<10^-2 Gyr^-1) galaxies at 1mass-size relation from from z 2 to z 1 and from z 1 to z 0, indicating that the size growth of passive galaxies is still ongoing even at z<1. However, even though the number density of all passive early-type galaxies increases by a factor of 10 from z 2 to z 1, and by another factor of 2 from z 1 to z 0, the number density of compact galaxies basically remain unchanged from z 2 to z 0. This implies that either: 1. the compact galaxies at z 2 gradually move onto the local relation, while new compact galaxies are formed at z<2 and are responsible for the number evolution; or 2. the compact galaxies that we see at z 2 evolve passively to z 0 while new larger early-types are assembled at z<2, being responsible for the huge number density evolution.

  7. A 3D Voronoi+Gapper Galaxy Cluster Finder in Redshift Space to z≈ 0.2 I: An Algorithm Optimized for the 2dFGRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Sebastián; Campusano, Luis E.; Hitschfeld-Kahler, Nancy; Pizarro, Daniel; Haines, Christopher P.; Clowes, Roger G.; Marinello, Gabriel; Söchting, Ilona K.

    2017-04-01

    This paper is the first in a series, presenting a new galaxy cluster finder based on a three-dimensional Voronoi Tesselation plus a maximum likelihood estimator, followed by gapping-filtering in radial velocity(VoML+G). The scientific aim of the series is a reassessment of the diversity of optical clusters in the local universe. A mock galaxy database mimicking the southern strip of the magnitude(blue)-limited 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), for the redshift range 0.009 < z < 0.22, is built on the basis of the Millennium Simulation of the LCDM cosmology and a reference catalog of “Millennium clusters,” spannning across the 1.0 × 1012–1.0 × 1015 M ⊙ h ‑1 dark matter (DM) halo mass range, is recorded. The validation of VoML+G is performed through its application to the mock data and the ensuing determination of the completeness and purity of the cluster detections by comparison with the reference catalog. The execution of VoML+G over the 2dFGRS mock data identified 1614 clusters, 22% with N g ≥ 10, 64 percent with 10 > N g ≥ 5, and 14% with N g < 5. The ensemble of VoML+G clusters has a ∼59% completeness and a ∼66% purity, whereas the subsample with N g ≥ 10, to z ∼ 0.14, has greatly improved mean rates of ∼75% and ∼90%, respectively. The VoML+G cluster velocity dispersions are found to be compatible with those corresponding to “Millennium clusters” over the 300–1000 km s‑1 interval, i.e., for cluster halo masses in excess of ∼3.0 × 1013 M ⊙ h ‑1.

  8. THE SLOAN LENS ACS SURVEY. XI. BEYOND HUBBLE RESOLUTION: SIZE, LUMINOSITY, AND STELLAR MASS OF COMPACT LENSED GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Gavazzi, Raphaeel; Bolton, Adam S.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2011-06-20

    We exploit the strong lensing effect to explore the properties of intrinsically faint and compact galaxies at intermediate redshift (z{sub s} {approx_equal} 0.4-0.8) at the highest possible resolution at optical wavelengths. Our sample consists of 46 strongly lensed emission line galaxies (ELGs) discovered by the Sloan Lens ACS Survey (SLACS). The galaxies have been imaged at high resolution with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in three bands (V{sub HST} , I{sub 814}, and H{sub 160}), allowing us to infer their size, luminosity, and stellar mass using stellar population synthesis models. Lens modeling is performed using a new fast and robust code, KLENS, which we test extensively on real and synthetic non-lensed galaxies, and also on simulated galaxies multiply imaged by SLACS-like galaxy-scale lenses. Our tests show that our measurements of galaxy size, flux, and Sersic index are robust and accurate, even for objects intrinsically smaller than the HST point-spread function. The median magnification is 8.8, with a long tail that extends to magnifications above 40. Modeling the SLACS sources reveals a population of galaxies with colors and Sersic indices (median n {approx} 1) consistent with the galaxies detected with HST in the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs (GEMS) and Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) surveys, but that are (typically) {approx}2 mag fainter and {approx}5 times smaller in apparent size than GEMS and {approx}4 mag brighter than but similar in size to HUDF. The size-stellar-mass and size-luminosity relations for the SLACS sources are offset to smaller sizes with respect to both comparison samples. The closest analog are ultracompact ELGs identified by HST grism surveys. The lowest mass galaxies in our sample are comparable to the brightest Milky Way satellites in stellar mass (10{sup 7} M{sub sun}) and have well-determined half-light radii of 0.''05 ({approx}0.3 kpc).

  9. CONSTRAINING SOURCE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, W. A.

    2012-09-10

    We introduce a new method for constraining the redshift distribution of a set of galaxies, using weak gravitational lensing shear. Instead of using observed shears and redshifts to constrain cosmological parameters, we ask how well the shears around clusters can constrain the redshifts, assuming fixed cosmological parameters. This provides a check on photometric redshifts, independent of source spectral energy distribution properties and therefore free of confounding factors such as misidentification of spectral breaks. We find that {approx}40 massive ({sigma}{sub v} = 1200 km s{sup -1}) cluster lenses are sufficient to determine the fraction of sources in each of six coarse redshift bins to {approx}11%, given weak (20%) priors on the masses of the highest-redshift lenses, tight (5%) priors on the masses of the lowest-redshift lenses, and only modest (20%-50%) priors on calibration and evolution effects. Additional massive lenses drive down uncertainties as N{sub lens}{sup -1/2}, but the improvement slows as one is forced to use lenses further down the mass function. Future large surveys contain enough clusters to reach 1% precision in the bin fractions if the tight lens-mass priors can be maintained for large samples of lenses. In practice this will be difficult to achieve, but the method may be valuable as a complement to other more precise methods because it is based on different physics and therefore has different systematic errors.

  10. Discovery of a 12 billion solar mass black hole at redshift 6.3 and its challenge to the black hole/galaxy co-evolution at cosmic dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yi, Weimin; Zuo, Wenwen; Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Wang, Ran; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Thompson, David; Beletsky, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    To date about 40 quasars with redshifts z>6 have been discovered. Each quasar harbors a black hole with a mass of about one billion solar masses. The existence of such black holes when the Universe was less than one billion years after the Big Bang presents significant challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the black hole/galaxy co-evolution. I will report a recent discovery of an ultra-luminous quasar at redshift z=6.30, which has an observed optical and near-infrared luminosity a few times greater than those of previously known z>6 quasars. With near-infrared spectroscopy, we obtain a black hole mass of about 12 billion solar masses, which is well consistent with the mass derived by assuming an Eddington-limited accretion. This ultra-luminous quasar with a 12 billion solar mass black hole at z>6 provides a unique laboratory to the study of the mass assembly and galaxy formation around the most massive black holes in the early Universe. It raises further challenges to the black hole/galaxy co-evolution in the epoch of cosmic reionization because the black hole needs to grow much faster than the host galaxy.

  11. GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC): Star Formation Rates, Stellar Masses, and Dust Attenuations of 700,000 Low-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Samir; Lee, Janice C.; Janowiecki, Steven; da Cunha, Elisabete; Dickinson, Mark; Boquien, Médéric; Burgarella, Denis; Salzer, John J.; Charlot, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present the GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC), a catalog of physical properties (stellar masses, dust attenuations, and star formation rates [SFRs]) for ˜700,000 galaxies with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) redshifts below 0.3. GSWLC contains galaxies within the Galaxy Evolution Explorer footprint, regardless of a UV detection, covering 90% of SDSS. The physical properties were obtained from UV/optical spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting following Bayesian methodology of Salim et al., with improvements such as blending corrections for low-resolution UV photometry, flexible dust attenuation laws, and emission-line corrections. GSWLC also includes mid-IR SFRs derived from IR templates based on 22 μ {{m}} Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations. These estimates are independent of UV/optical SED fitting, in order to separate possible systematics. The paper argues that the comparison of specific SFRs (sSFRs) is more informative and physically motivated than the comparison of SFRs. The sSFRs resulting from the UV/optical SED fitting are compared to the mid-IR sSFRs and to sSFRs from three published catalogs. For “main-sequence” galaxies with no active galactic nucleus (AGN) all sSFRs are in very good agreement (within 0.1 dex on average). In particular, the widely used aperture-corrected SFRs from the MPA/JHU catalog show no systematic offsets, in contrast to some integral field spectroscopy results. For galaxies below the main sequence (log sSFR \\lt -11), mid-IR (s)SFRs based on fixed luminosity-SFR conversion are severely biased (up to 2 dex) because the dust is primarily heated by old stars. Furthermore, mid-IR (s)SFRs are overestimated by up to 0.6 dex for galaxies with AGNs, presumably due to nonstellar dust heating. UV/optical (s)SFRs are thus preferred to IR-based (s)SFRs for quenched galaxies and those that host AGNs.

  12. Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Fournon, I.; Balcells, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Sánchez, F.

    2010-08-01

    Participants; Group photograph; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Galaxy formation and evolution: recent progress R. Ellis; 2. Galaxies at high redshift M. Dickinson; 3. High-redshift galaxies: the far-infrared and sub-millimeter view A. Franceschini; 4. Quasar absorption lines J. Bechtold; 5. Stellar population synthesis models at low and high redshift G. Bruzual A.; 6. Elliptical galaxies K. C. Freeman; 7. Disk galaxies K. C. Freeman; 8. Dark matter in disk galaxies K. C. Freeman.

  13. Simulating high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvaterra, Ruben; Ferrara, Andrea; Dayal, Pratika

    2011-06-01

    Recent observations have gathered a considerable sample of high-redshift galaxy candidates and determined the evolution of their luminosity function (LF). To interpret these findings, we use cosmological SPH simulations including, in addition to standard physical processes, a detailed treatment of the Pop III-Pop II transition in early objects. The simulated high-z galaxies match remarkably well the amplitude and slope of the observed LF in the redshift range 5 < z < 10. The LF shifts towards fainter luminosities with increasing redshift, while its faint-end slope keeps an almost constant value, α≈-2. The stellar populations of high-z galaxies have ages of 100-300 (40-130) Myr at z= 5 (z= 7-8), implying an early (z > 9.4) start of their star formation activity; the specific star formation rate is almost independent of galactic stellar mass. These objects are enriched rapidly with metals and galaxies identified by HST/WFC3 (?) show metallicities ≈0.1 Z⊙ even at z= 7-8. Most of the simulated galaxies at z≈ 7 (noticeably the smallest ones) are virtually dust-free, and none of them has an extinction larger than E(B-V) = 0.01. The bulk (50 per cent) of the ionizing photons is produced by objects populating the faint end of the LF (?), which JWST will resolve up to z= 7.3. Pop III stars continue to form essentially at all redshifts; however, at z= 6 (z= 10) the contribution of Pop III stars to the total galactic luminosity is always less than 5 per cent for ? (?). The typical high-z galaxies closely resemble the GRB host galaxy population observed at lower redshifts, strongly encouraging the use of GRBs to detect the first galaxies.

  14. the-wizz: clustering redshift estimation for everyone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, C. B.; Hildebrandt, H.; Schmidt, S. J.; Baldry, I. K.; Bilicki, M.; Choi, A.; Erben, T.; Schneider, P.

    2017-05-01

    We present the-wizz, an open source and user-friendly software for estimating the redshift distributions of photometric galaxies with unknown redshifts by spatially cross-correlating them against a reference sample with known redshifts. The main benefit of the-wizz is in separating the angular pair finding and correlation estimation from the computation of the output clustering redshifts allowing anyone to create a clustering redshift for their sample without the intervention of an 'expert'. It allows the end user of a given survey to select any subsample of photometric galaxies with unknown redshifts, match this sample's catalogue indices into a value-added data file and produce a clustering redshift estimation for this sample in a fraction of the time it would take to run all the angular correlations needed to produce a clustering redshift. We show results with this software using photometric data from the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) and spectroscopic redshifts from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The results we present for KiDS are consistent with the redshift distributions used in a recent cosmic shear analysis from the survey. We also present results using a hybrid machine learning-clustering redshift analysis that enables the estimation of clustering redshifts for individual galaxies. the-wizz can be downloaded at http://github.com/morriscb/The-wiZZ/.

  15. Properties of the redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tifft, William G.; Cocke, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    Central to any analysis of dynamical systems, or large scale motion, is the interpretation of redshifts of galaxies as classical Doppler velocity shifts. This is a testable assumption and for many years evidence has accumulated that is inconsistent with the assumption. Here, the authors review recent evidence suggesting systematic radial dependence and temporal variation of redshifts.

  16. Highest redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W

    2000-03-14

    At low redshifts powerful radio sources are uniquely associated with massive galaxies, and are thought to be powered by supermassive black holes. Modern 8m-10m telescopes may be used to find their likely progenitors at very high redshifts to study their formation and evolution.

  17. Outflows in low-mass galaxies at z >1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseda, Michael V.; MUSE GTO Consortium

    2017-03-01

    Star formation histories of local dwarf galaxies, derived through resolved stellar populations, appear complex and varied. The general picture derived from hydrodynamical simulations is one of cold gas accretion and bursty star formation, followed by feedback from supernovae and winds that heat and eject the central gas reservoirs. This ejection halts star formation until the material cools and re-accretes, resulting in an episodic SFH, particularly at stellar masses below ~ 109 M⊙. Such feedback has often been cited as the driving force behind the observed slowly-rising rotation curves in local dwarfs, due to an under-density of dark matter compared to theoretical models, which is one of the primary challenges to LCDM cosmology. However, these events have not yet been directly observed at high-redshift. Recently, using HST imaging and grism spectroscopy, we have uncovered an abundant population of low-mass galaxies (M* < 109 M⊙) at z = 1 - 2 that are undergoing strong bursts of star formation, in agreement with the theoretical predictions. These Extreme Emission Line Galaxies, with high specific SFRs and shallow gravitational potential wells, are ideal places to test the theoretical prediction of strong feedback-driven outflows. Here we use deep MUSE spectroscopy to search these galaxies for signatures of outflowing material, namely kinematic offsets between absorption lines (in the restframe optical and UV), which trace cool gas, and the nebular emission lines, which define the systemic redshift of the galaxy. Although the EELGs are intrinsically very faint, stacked spectra reveal blueshifted velocity centroids for Fe II absorption, which is indicative of outflowing cold gas. This represents the first constraint on outflows in M* < 109 M⊙ galaxies at z = 1 - 2. These outflows should regulate the star formation histories of low-mass galaxies at early cosmic times and thus play a crucial role in galaxy growth and evolution.

  18. Redshift differences of galaxies in nearby groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    It is reported that galaxies in nearby groups exhibit anomalous nonvelocity redshifts. In this discussion, (1) four classes of nearby groups of galacies are analyzed, and no significant nonvelocity redshift effect is found; and (2) it is pointed out that transverse velocities (i.e., velocities transverse to the line of sight of the main galaxy, or center of mass) contribute components to the redshift measurements of companion galaxies. The redshifts of galaxies in nearby groups of appreciable angular size are considerably affected by these velocity projection effects. The transverse velocity contributions average out in rich, isotropic groups, and also in large samples of irregular groups of low membership, as in the four classes referred to in (1), but can introduce apparent discrepancies in small samples (as studied by Arp) of nearby groups of low membership.

  19. Redshift differences of galaxies in nearby groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    It is reported that galaxies in nearby groups exhibit anomalous nonvelocity redshifts. In this discussion, (1) four classes of nearby groups of galacies are analyzed, and no significant nonvelocity redshift effect is found; and (2) it is pointed out that transverse velocities (i.e., velocities transverse to the line of sight of the main galaxy, or center of mass) contribute components to the redshift measurements of companion galaxies. The redshifts of galaxies in nearby groups of appreciable angular size are considerably affected by these velocity projection effects. The transverse velocity contributions average out in rich, isotropic groups, and also in large samples of irregular groups of low membership, as in the four classes referred to in (1), but can introduce apparent discrepancies in small samples (as studied by Arp) of nearby groups of low membership.

  20. High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.

    1996-01-01

    The report for this period includes three papers: 'Associated Absorption at Low and High Redshift'; 'Strong X-ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar: PHL5200'; and 'ASCA and ROSAT X-ray Spectra of High-Redshift Radio-Loud Quasars'. The first gives examples from both low and high redshift for combining information on absorbing material in active galactic nuclei from both x-ray and the UV. The second presents ASCA observations of the z = 1.98 prototype broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO): PHL 5200, detected with both the solid-state imaging spectrometers and the gas imaging spectometers. The third paper presents results on the x-ray properties of 9 high-redshift radio-loud quasars observed by ASCA and ROSAT, including ASCA observations of S5 0014+81 (z = 3.38) and S5 0836+71 (z = 2.17) and ROSAT observations of PKS 2126-158.

  1. Stars and gas in high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, Max

    Recent advances in instrumentation and observing techniques have made it possible to begin to study in detail the stellar populations and the interstellar media of galaxies at redshift z=3, when the universe was still in its "teen years". In keeping with the theme of this conference, I show how our knowledge of local star-forming regions can be applied directly to these distant galaxies to deduce their ages, metallicities, initial mass function, and masses. I also discuss areas where current limitations in stellar astrophysics have a direct bearing on the interpretation of the data being gathered, at an ever increasing rate, on the high redshift universe.

  2. MARZ: Redshifting Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    MARZ analyzes objects and produces high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features. The software has an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra, and can be run interactively or from the command line, and runs as a Web application. MARZ can be run on a local server; it is also available for use on a public server.

  3. Comparing the numerical redshift factor to analytic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Lewis, Adam G. M.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2017-01-01

    The redshift factor z is a quantity of fundamental interest in Post-Newtonian and self-force descriptions of binaries, allowing for interconnections between each theory. We have recently implemented a method for extracting the redshift factor from numerical simulations of binary black holes, and compared the redshift factor to analytic theory. I will present an update on our efforts to extend our analysis to high mass ratio simulations, in order to compare to self-force predictions.

  4. Plasma Redshift Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2011-04-01

    The newly discovered plasma redshift cross section explains a long range of phenomena; including the cosmological redshift, and the intrinsic redshift of Sun, stars, galaxies and quasars. It explains the beautiful black body spectrum of the CMB, and it predicts correctly: a) the observed XRB, b) the magnitude redshift relation for supernovae, and c) the surface- brightness-redshift relation for galaxies. There is no need for Big Bang, Inflation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion, and Black Holes. The universe is quasi-static and can renew itself forever (for details, see: http://www.plasmaredshift.org). There is no cosmic time dilation. In intergalactic space, the average electron temperature is T = 2.7 million K, and the average electron density is N = 0.0002 per cubic cm. Plasma redshift is derived theoretically from conventional axioms of physics by using more accurate methods than those conventionally used. The main difference is: 1) the proper inclusion of the dielectric constant, 2) more exact calculations of imaginary part of the dielectric constant, and as required 3) a quantum mechanical treatment of the interactions.

  5. High redshift quasars monitoring campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, Ismael; Lira, Paulina; Martinez, Jorge; Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai

    2014-07-01

    We present an update of the monitoring campaign we have undertaken to probe the most massive black holes in powerful quasars at high redshift through the reverberation mapping technique. Once this campaign has finished, we will be able to directly measure broad line region (BLR) sizes of quasars at z ~ 2-3, improving dramatically the BLR size-luminosity relation, and therefore, black hole mass estimates based on this relationship. So far, we have identified a dozen highly variable sources suitable for future cross-correlation analysis and reverberation measurements.

  6. Photometric Redshifts of Galaxies in COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, B.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N. Z.; Dahlen, T.; Salvato, M.; Aussel, H.; Thompson, D. J.; Feldmann, R.; Tasca, L.; Le Fevre, O.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; McCracken, H.; Mould, J.; Renzini, A.; Sanders, D. B.; Shopbell, P. L.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ajiki, M.; Shioya, Y.; Contini, T.; Giavalisco, M.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Mainieri, V.; Mignoli, M.; Scodeggio, M.

    2007-09-01

    We present photometric redshifts for the COSMOS survey derived from a new code, optimized to yield accurate and reliable redshifts and spectral types of galaxies down to faint magnitudes and redshifts out to z~1.2. The technique uses χ2 template fitting, combined with luminosity function priors and with the option to estimate the internal extinction [or E(B-V)]. The median most probable redshift, best-fit spectral type and reddening, absolute magnitude, and stellar mass are derived in addition to the full redshift probability distributions. Using simulations with sampling and noise similar to those in COSMOS, the accuracy and reliability is estimated for the photometric redshifts as a function of the magnitude limits of the sample, S/N ratios, and the number of bands used. We find from the simulations that the ratio of derived 95% confidence interval in the χ2 probability distribution to the estimated photometric redshift (D95) can be used to identify and exclude the catastrophic failures in the photometric redshift estimates. To evaluate the reliability of the photometric redshifts, we compare the derived redshifts with high-reliability spectroscopic redshifts for a sample of 868 normal galaxies with z<1.2 from zCOSMOS. Considering different scenarios, depending on using prior, no prior, and/or extinction, we compare the photometric and spectroscopic redshifts for this sample. The rms scatter between the estimated photometric redshifts and known spectroscopic redshifts is σ(Δ(z))=0.031, where Δ(z)=(zphot-zspec)/(1+zspec) with a small fraction of outliers (<2.5%) [outliers are defined as objects with Δ(z)>3σ(Δ(z)), where σ(Δ(z)) is the rms scatter in Δ(z)]. We also find good agreement [σ(Δ(z))=0.10] between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts for type II AGNs. We compare results from our photometric redshift procedure with three other independent codes and find them in excellent agreement. We show preliminary results, based on photometric redshifts

  7. Cooperative photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Tortora, C.; Brescia, M.; Longo, G.; Radovich, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Vellucci, C.

    2017-06-01

    In the modern galaxy surveys photometric redshifts play a central role in a broad range of studies, from gravitational lensing and dark matter distribution to galaxy evolution. Using a dataset of ~ 25,000 galaxies from the second data release of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) we obtain photometric redshifts with five different methods: (i) Random forest, (ii) Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm, (iii) Multi Layer Perceptron with an optimization network based on the Levenberg-Marquardt learning rule, (iv) the Bayesian Photometric Redshift model (or BPZ) and (v) a classical SED template fitting procedure (Le Phare). We show how SED fitting techniques could provide useful information on the galaxy spectral type which can be used to improve the capability of machine learning methods constraining systematic errors and reduce the occurrence of catastrophic outliers. We use such classification to train specialized regression estimators, by demonstrating that such hybrid approach, involving SED fitting and machine learning in a single collaborative framework, is capable to improve the overall prediction accuracy of photometric redshifts.

  8. 3D-HST WFC3-SELECTED PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS IN THE FIVE CANDELS/3D-HST FIELDS: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Maseda, Michael V.; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; and others

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin{sup 2} in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu)

  9. Comparing gravitational redshifts of SDSS galaxy clusters with the magnified redshift enhancement of background BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimeno, Pablo; Broadhurst, Tom; Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2015-04-01

    A clean measurement of the evolution of the galaxy cluster mass function can significantly improve our understanding of cosmology from the rapid growth of cluster masses below z < 0.5. Here, we examine the consistency of cluster catalogues selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by applying two independent gravity-based methods using all available spectroscopic redshifts from the DR10 release. First, we detect a gravitational redshift related signal for 20,119 and 13,128 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts contained in the Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) and red-sequence Matched-filter Probabilistic Percolation (redMaPPer) catalogues, respectively, at a level of ˜-10 km s-1. This we show is consistent with the magnitude expected using the richness-mass relations provided by the literature and after applying recently clarified relativistic and flux bias corrections. This signal is also consistent with the richest clusters in the larger catalogue of Wen et al., corresponding to M200m ≳ 2 × 1014 M⊙ h-1; however, we find no significant detection of a gravitational redshift signal for lower richness clusters, which may be related to bulk motions from substructure and spurious cluster detections. Secondly, we find all three catalogues generate mass-dependent levels of lensing magnification bias, which enhances the mean redshift of flux-selected background galaxies from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey survey. The magnitude of this lensing effect is generally consistent with the corresponding richness-mass relations advocated for the surveys. We conclude that all catalogues comprise a high proportion of reliable clusters, and that the GMBCG and redMaPPer cluster finder algorithms favour more relaxed clusters with a meaningful gravitational redshift signal, as anticipated by the red-sequence colour selection of the GMBCG and redMaPPer samples.

  10. Constraining neutrino mass and extra relativistic degrees of freedom in dynamical dark energy models using Planck 2015 data in combination with low-redshift cosmological probes: basic extensions to ΛCDM cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming-Ming; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2017-08-01

    We investigate how the properties of dark energy affect the cosmological measurements of neutrino mass and extra relativistic degrees of freedom. We limit ourselves to the most basic extensions of Λ cold dark matter (CDM) model, i.e. the wCDM model with one additional parameter w, and the w0waCDM model with two additional parameters, w0 and wa. In the cosmological fits, we employ the 2015 cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization data from the Planck mission, in combination with low-redshift measurements such as the baryon acoustic oscillations, Type Ia supernovae and the Hubble constant (H0). Given effects of massive neutrinos on large-scale structure, we further include weak lensing, redshift space distortion, Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts and Planck lensing data. We show that, though the cosmological constant Λ is still consistent with the current data, a phantom dark energy (w < -1) or an early phantom dark energy (i.e. quintom evolving from w < -1 to w > -1) is slightly more favoured by current observations, which leads to the fact that in both wCDM and w0waCDM models we obtain a larger upper limit of ∑mν. We also show that in the three dark energy models, the constraints on Neff are in good accordance with each other, all in favour of the standard value 3.046, which indicates that the dark energy parameters almost have no impact on constraining Neff. Therefore, we conclude that the dark energy parameters can exert a significant influence on the cosmological weighing of neutrinos, but almost cannot affect the constraint on dark radiation.

  11. The Galaxy-Halo Connection in High-redshift Universe: Details and Evolution of Stellar-to-halo Mass Ratios of Lyman Break Galaxies on CFHTLS Deep Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Shogo; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Toshikawa, Jun; Tanaka, Masayuki; Hamana, Takashi; Niino, Yuu; Ichikawa, Kohei; Uchiyama, Hisakazu

    2017-05-01

    We present the results of clustering analyses of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z˜ 3, 4, and 5 using the final data release of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Deep- and wide-field images of the CFHTLS Deep Survey enable us to obtain sufficiently accurate two-point angular correlation functions to apply a halo occupation distribution analysis. The mean halo masses, calculated as < {M}h> ={10}11.7{--}{10}12.8 {h}-1 {M}⊙ , increase with the stellar-mass limit of LBGs. The threshold halo mass to have a central galaxy, {M}\\min , follows the same increasing trend as the low-z results, whereas the threshold halo mass to have a satellite galaxy, M 1, shows higher values at z=3{--}5 than z=0.5{--}1.5, over the entire stellar mass range. Satellite fractions of dropout galaxies, even at less massive halos, are found to drop sharply, from z = 2 down to less than 0.04, at z=3{--}5. These results suggest that satellite galaxies form inefficiently within dark halos at z=3{--}5, even for less massive satellites with {M}\\star < {10}10 {M}⊙ . We compute stellar-to-halo mass ratios (SHMRs) assuming a main sequence of galaxies, which is found to provide SHMRs consistent with those derived from a spectral energy distribution fitting method. The observed SHMRs are in good agreement with model predictions based on the abundance-matching method, within 1σ confidence intervals. We derive observationally, for the first time, {M}{{h}}{pivot}, which is the halo mass at a peak in the star-formation efficiency, at 3< z< 5, and it shows a small increasing trend with cosmic time at z> 3. In addition, {M}{{h}}{pivot} and its normalization are found to be almost unchanged during 0< z< 5. Our study provides observational evidence that galaxy formation is ubiquitously most efficient near a halo mass of {M}{{h}}˜ {10}12 {M}⊙ over cosmic time.

  12. High Redshift GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The Swift mission has opened a new, high redshift window on the universe. In this review we provide an overview of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science, describe the Swift mission, discuss high-z GRBs and tools for high-z studies, and look forward at future capabilities. A new mission concept - Lobster - is described that would monitor the X-ray sky at order of magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions.

  13. On the gravitational redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2014-08-01

    The study of the gravitational redshift-a relative wavelength increase of ≈2×10-6 was predicted for solar radiation by Einstein in 1908-is still an important subject in modern physics. In a dispute whether or not atom interferometry experiments can be employed for gravitational redshift measurements, two research teams have recently disagreed on the physical cause of the shift. Regardless of any discussion on the interferometer aspect-we find that both groups of authors miss the important point that the ratio of gravitational to the electrostatic forces is generally very small. For instance, the ratio of the gravitational force acting on an electron in a hydrogen atom situated in the Sun’s photosphere to the electrostatic force between the proton and the electron in such an atom is approximately 3×10-21. A comparison of this ratio with the predicted and observed solar redshift indicates a discrepancy of many orders of magnitude. With Einstein’s early assumption that the frequencies of spectral lines depend only on the generating ions themselves as starting point, we show that a solution can be formulated based on a two-step process in analogy with Fermi’s treatment of the Doppler effect. It provides a sequence of physical processes in line with the conservation of energy and momentum resulting in the observed shift and does not employ a geometric description. The gravitational field affects the release of the photon and not the atomic transition. The control parameter is the speed of light. The atomic emission is then contrasted with the gravitational redshift of matter-antimatter annihilation events.

  14. SMOOTH(ER) STELLAR MASS MAPS IN CANDELS: CONSTRAINTS ON THE LONGEVITY OF CLUMPS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; McGrath, Elizabeth; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lotz, Jennifer; Hathi, Nimish P.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; and others

    2012-07-10

    We perform a detailed analysis of the resolved colors and stellar populations of a complete sample of 323 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.5 < z < 1.5 and 326 SFGs at 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the ERS and CANDELS-Deep region of GOODS-South. Galaxies were selected to be more massive than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and have specific star formation rates (SFRs) above 1/t{sub H} . We model the seven-band optical ACS + near-IR WFC3 spectral energy distributions of individual bins of pixels, accounting simultaneously for the galaxy-integrated photometric constraints available over a longer wavelength range. We analyze variations in rest-frame color, stellar surface mass density, age, and extinction as a function of galactocentric radius and local surface brightness/density, and measure structural parameters on luminosity and stellar mass maps. We find evidence for redder colors, older stellar ages, and increased dust extinction in the nuclei of galaxies. Big star-forming clumps seen in star formation tracers are less prominent or even invisible in the inferred stellar mass distributions. Off-center clumps contribute up to {approx}20% to the integrated SFR, but only 7% or less to the integrated mass of all massive SFGs at z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 2, with the fractional contributions being a decreasing function of wavelength used to select the clumps. The stellar mass profiles tend to have smaller sizes and M20 coefficients, and higher concentration and Gini coefficients than the light distribution. Our results are consistent with an inside-out disk growth scenario with brief (100-200 Myr) episodic local enhancements in star formation superposed on the underlying disk. Alternatively, the young ages of off-center clumps may signal inward clump migration, provided this happens efficiently on the order of an orbital timescale.

  15. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) . Exploring the dependence of the three-point correlation function on stellar mass and luminosity at 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresco, M.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Davidzon, I.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Carbone, C.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Małek, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: The three-point correlation function (3PCF) is a powerful probe to investigate the clustering of matter in the Universe in a complementary way with respect to lower-order statistics, providing additional information with respect to the two-point correlation function and allowing us to shed light on biasing, non-linear processes, and deviations from Gaussian statistics. In this paper, we analyse the first data release of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), determining the dependence of the three-point correlation function on luminosity and stellar mass at z = [ 0.5,1.1 ]. Methods: We exploit the VIPERS Public Data Release 1, consisting of more than 50 000 galaxies with B-band magnitudes in the range - 21.6 ≲ MB - 5log (h) ≲ - 19.9 and stellar masses in the range 9.8 ≲ log (M⋆ [ h-2M⊙ ] ) ≲ 10.7. We measure both the connected 3PCF and the reduced 3PCF in redshift space, probing different configurations and scales, in the range 2.5 masses in the range we explored. These trends, already observed at low redshifts, are confirmed for the first time to be still valid up to z = 1.1, providing support to the hierarchical scenario for which massive and bright systems are expected to be more clustered. The possibility of using the measured 3PCF to provide independent constraints on the linear galaxy bias b has also been explored, showing promising results in agreement with other probes. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile under programmes 182.A-0886 (LP) at the Very Large Telescope, and also based on observations obtained with Mega

  16. A Deep Search for Faint Galaxies Associated with Very Low Redshift C iv Absorbers. III. The Mass- and Environment-dependent Circumgalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tumlinson, Jason; Willmer, C. N. A.; O'Meara, John; Katz, Neal

    2016-12-01

    Using Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of 89 QSO sightlines through the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint, we study the relationships between C iv absorption systems and the properties of nearby galaxies, as well as the large-scale environment. To maintain sensitivity to very faint galaxies, we restrict our sample to 0.0015\\lt z\\lt 0.015, which defines a complete galaxy survey to L≳ 0.01 L\\ast or stellar mass {M}* ≳ {10}8 {M}⊙ . We report two principal findings. First, for galaxies with impact parameter ρ \\lt 1 {r}{vir}, C iv detection strongly depends on the luminosity/stellar mass of the nearby galaxy. C iv is preferentially associated with galaxies with {M}* \\gt {10}9.5 {M}⊙ ; lower-mass galaxies rarely exhibit significant C iv absorption (covering fraction {f}C={9}-6+12 % for 11 galaxies with {M}* \\lt {10}9.5 {M}⊙ ). Second, C iv detection within the {M}* \\gt {10}9.5 {M}⊙ population depends on environment. Using a fixed-aperture environmental density metric for galaxies with ρ < 160 kpc at z\\lt 0.055, we find that {57}-13+12 % (8/14) of galaxies in low-density regions (regions with fewer than seven L\\gt 0.15 L\\ast galaxies within 1.5 Mpc) have affiliated C iv absorption; however, none (0/7) of the galaxies in denser regions show C iv. Similarly, the C iv detection rate is lower for galaxies residing in groups with dark matter halo masses of {M}{halo}\\gt {10}12.5 {M}⊙ . In contrast to C iv, H i is pervasive in the circumgalactic medium without regard to mass or environment. These results indicate that C iv absorbers with {log} N({{C}} {{IV}})≳ 13.5 {{cm}}-2 trace the halos of {M}* \\gt {10}9.5 {M}⊙ galaxies but also reflect larger-scale environmental conditions.

  17. ON THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF Mg II ABSOPRTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, Jeremy L.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2010-01-20

    We use a halo occupation approach to connect Mg II absorbers to dark matter halos as a function of redshift. Using the model constructed in Tinker and Chen, we parameterize the conditional probability of an absorber of equivalent width W{sub r} being produced by a halo of mass M{sub h} at a given redshift, P(W{sub r} |M{sub h} , z). We constrain the free parameters of the model by matching the observed statistics of Mg II absorbers: the frequency function f(W{sub r} ), the redshift evolution n(z), and the clustering bias b{sub W} . The redshift evolution of W{sub r} >= 1 A absorbers increases from z = 0.4 to z = 2, while the total halo cross section decreases monotonically with redshift. This discrepancy can only be explained if the gaseous halos evolve with respect to their host halos. We make predictions for the clustering bias of absorbers as a function of redshift under different evolutionary scenarios, e.g., the gas cross section per halo evolves or the halo mass scale of absorbers changes. We demonstrate that the relative contribution of these scenarios may be constrained by measurements of absorber clustering at z approx> 1 and z approx 0.1. If we further assume a redshift-independent mass scale for efficient shock heating of halo gas of M{sub crit} = 10{sup 11.5} h {sup -1} M{sub sun}, absorber evolution is predominantly caused by a changing halo mass scale of absorbers. Our model predicts that strong absorbers always arise in approxM{sub crit} halos, independent of redshift, but the mass scale of weak absorbers decreases by 2 dex from 0 < z < 2. Thus, the measured anti-correlation of clustering bias and W{sub r} should flatten by z approx 1.5.

  18. Quasar redshifts: the intrinsic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  19. SHELS: Complete Redshift Surveys of Two Widely Separated Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Zahid, Harus Jabran; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.

    2016-05-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a complete redshift survey covering two well-separated fields (F1 and F2) of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Both fields are more than 94% complete to a Galactic extinction corrected R 0 = 20.2. Here, we describe the redshift survey of the F1 field centered at R.A.2000 = 00h53m25.ˢ3 and decl.2000 = 12°33‧55″ like F2, the F1 field covers ˜4 deg2. The redshift survey of the F1 field includes 9426 new galaxy redshifts measured with Hectospec on the MMT (published here). As a guide to future uses of the combined survey, we compare the mass metallicity relation and the distributions of D n 4000 as a function of stellar mass and redshift for the two fields. The mass-metallicity relations differ by an insignificant 1.6σ. For galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010-1011 M ⊙, the increase in the star-forming fraction with redshift is remarkably similar in the two fields. The seemingly surprising 31%-38% difference in the overall galaxy counts in F1 and F2 is probably consistent with the expected cosmic variance given the subtleties of the relative systematics in the two surveys. We also review the DLS cluster detections in the two fields: poorer photometric data for F1 precluded secure detection of the single massive cluster at z = 0.35 that we find in SHELS. Taken together, the two fields include 16,055 redshifts for galaxies with {R}0≤slant 20.2 and 20,754 redshifts for galaxies with R ≤ 20.6. These dense surveys in two well-separated fields provide a basis for future investigations of galaxy properties and large-scale structure.

  20. Galaxy groups in the low-redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lu, Yi; Wang, Huiyuan; Yang, Xiaohu

    2017-09-01

    We apply a halo-based group finder to four large redshift surveys, the 2MRS (Two Micron All-Sky Redshift Survey), 6dFGS (Six-degree Field Galaxy Survey), SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) and 2dFGRS (Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey), to construct group catalogues in the low-redshift Universe. The group finder is based on that of Yang et al. but with an improved halo mass assignment so that it can be applied uniformly to various redshift surveys of galaxies. Halo masses are assigned to groups according to proxies based on the stellar mass/luminosity of member galaxies. The performances of the group finder in grouping galaxies according to common haloes and in halo mass assignments are tested using realistic mock samples constructed from hydrodynamical simulations and empirical models of galaxy occupation in dark matter haloes. Our group finder finds ∼94 per cent of the correct true member galaxies for 90-95 per cent of the groups in the mock samples; the halo masses assigned by the group finder are un-biased with respect to the true halo masses, and have a typical uncertainty of ∼0.2 dex. The properties of group catalogues constructed from the observational samples are described and compared with other similar catalogues in the literature.

  1. Redshift-space distortions.

    PubMed

    Percival, Will J; Samushia, Lado; Ross, Ashley J; Shapiro, Charles; Raccanelli, Alvise

    2011-12-28

    Comparing measurements of redshift-space distortions (RSDs) with geometrical observations of the expansion of the Universe offers tremendous potential for testing general relativity on very large scales. The basic linear theory of RSDs in the distant-observer limit has been known for 25 years and the effect has been conclusively observed in numerous galaxy surveys. The next generation of galaxy survey will observe many millions of galaxies over volumes of many tens of Gpc(3). They will provide RSD measurements of such exquisite precision that we will have to carefully analyse and correct for many systematic deviations from this simple picture in order to fully exploit the statistical precision obtained. We review RSD theory and show how ubiquitous RSDs actually are, and then consider a number of potential systematic effects, shamelessly highlighting recent work in which we have been involved. This review ends by looking ahead to the future surveys that will make the next generation of RSD measurements.

  2. High redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    High redshift galaxies that host powerful radio sources are examined. An overview is presented of the content of radio surveys: 3CR and 3CRR, 4C and 4C/USS, B2/1 Jy, MG, MRC/1Jy, Parkes/PSR, B3, and ESO Key-Project. Narrow-line radio galaxies in the visible and UV, the source of ionization and excitation of the emission lines, emission-line luminosities, morphology of the line-emitting gas, physical properties and energetics, kinematics of the line-emitting gas, and implications from the emission lines are discussed. The morphologies and environments of the host galaxies, the alignment effect, and spectral energy distributions and ages are also examined.

  3. Redshift Survey Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. W.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Kaiser, N.

    1994-12-01

    In the first half of 1995, the Anglo-Australian Observatory is due to commission a wide field (2.1(deg) ), 400-fiber, double spectrograph system (2dF) at the f/3.3 prime focus of the AAT 3.9m bi-national facility. The instrument should be able to measure ~ 4000 galaxy redshifts (assuming a magnitude limit of b_J ~\\ 20) in a single dark night and is therefore ideally suited to studies of large-scale structure. We have carried out simple 3D numerical simulations to judge the relative merits of sparse surveys and contiguous surveys. We generate a survey volume and fill it randomly with particles according to a selection function which mimics a magnitude-limited survey at b_J = 19.7. Each of the particles is perturbed by a gaussian random field according to the dimensionless power spectrum k(3) P(k) / 2pi (2) determined by Feldman, Kaiser & Peacock (1994) from the IRAS QDOT survey. We introduce some redshift-space distortion as described by Kaiser (1987), a `thermal' component measured from pairwise velocities (Davis & Peebles 1983), and `fingers of god' due to rich clusters at random density enhancements. Our particular concern is to understand how the window function W(2(k)) of the survey geometry compromises the accuracy of statistical measures [e.g., P(k), xi (r), xi (r_sigma ,r_pi )] commonly used in the study of large-scale structure. We also examine the reliability of various tools (e.g. genus) for describing the topological structure within a contiguous region of the survey.

  4. Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F. E.

    2014-10-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in finding and charactering star-forming galaxies at high redshifts across the electromagnetic spectrum, giving us a more complete picture of how galaxies evolve, both in terms of their stellar and gas content, as well as the growth of their central supermassive black holes. A wealth of studies now demonstrate that star formation peaked at roughly half the age of the Universe and drops precariously as we look back to very early times, and that their central monsters apparently growth with them. At the highest-redshifts, we are pushing the boundaries via deep surveys at optical, X-ray, radio wavelengths, and more recently using gamma-ray bursts. I will review some of our accomplishments and failures. Telescope have enabled Lyman break galaxies to be robustly identified, but the UV luminosity function and star formation rate density of this population at z = 6 - 8 seems to be much lower than at z = 2 - 4. High escape fractions and a large contribution from faint galaxies below our current detection limits would be required for star-forming galaxies to reionize the Universe. We have also found that these galaxies have blue rest-frame UV colours, which might indicate lower dust extinction at z > 5. There has been some spectroscopic confirmation of these Lyman break galaxies through Lyman-α emission, but the fraction of galaxies where we see this line drops at z > 7, perhaps due to the onset of the Gunn-Peterson effect (where the IGM is opaque to Lyman-α).

  5. High-redshift major mergers weakly enhance star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensch, J.; Renaud, F.; Bournaud, F.; Duc, P.-A.; Agertz, O.; Amram, P.; Combes, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Elmegreen, B.; Emsellem, E.; Jog, C. J.; Perret, V.; Struck, C.; Teyssier, R.

    2017-02-01

    Galaxy mergers are believed to trigger strong starbursts. This is well assessed by observations in the local Universe. However, the efficiency of this mechanism has poorly been tested so far for high-redshift, actively star-forming, galaxies. We present a suite of pc-resolution hydrodynamical numerical simulations to compare the star formation process along a merging sequence of high- and low-redshift galaxies, by varying the gas mass fraction between the two models. We show that, for the same orbit, high-redshift gas-rich mergers are less efficient than low-redshift ones at producing starbursts; the star formation rate excess induced by the merger and its duration are both around 10 times lower than in the low gas fraction case. The mechanisms that account for the star formation triggering at low redshift - the increased compressive turbulence, gas fragmentation, and central gas inflows - are only mildly, if not at all, enhanced for high gas fraction galaxy encounters. Furthermore, we show that the strong stellar feedback from the initially high star formation rate in high-redshift galaxies does not prevent an increase of the star formation during the merger. Our results are consistent with the observed increase of the number of major mergers with increasing redshift being faster than the respective increase in the number of starburst galaxies.

  6. CO Linewidths and the Black Hole - Bulge Relationship for High Redshift QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, K. L.; Shields, G. A.; Massart, C. A.; vanden Bout, P.

    2005-10-01

    Supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei have masses MBH related to the mass and velocity dispersion σ* of the host galaxy. We examine the MBH - σ* in high redshift QSOs, deriving MBH from the broad emission-line widths and σ* from the radio CO lines. At redshifts z = 4 to 6, gigantic black holes appear to exist in relatively modest galaxies.

  7. Photometric redshifts in the SWIRE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Babbedge, Tom; Oliver, Seb; Trichas, Markos; Berta, Stefano; Lonsdale, Carol; Smith, Gene; Shupe, David; Surace, Jason; Arnouts, Stephane; Ilbert, Olivier; Le Févre, Olivier; Afonso-Luis, Alejandro; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Polletta, Mari; Farrah, Duncan; Vaccari, Mattia

    2008-05-01

    We present the SWIRE Photometric Redshift Catalogue 1025119 redshifts of unprecedented reliability and of accuracy comparable with or better than previous work. Our methodology is based on fixed galaxy and quasi-stellar object templates applied to data at 0.36-4.5 μm, and on a set of four infrared emission templates fitted to infrared excess data at 3.6-170 μm. The galaxy templates are initially empirical, but are given greater physical validity by fitting star formation histories to them, which also allows us to estimate stellar masses. The code involves two passes through the data, to try to optimize recognition of active galactic nucleus (AGN) dust tori. A few carefully justified priors are used and are the key to supression of outliers. Extinction, AV, is allowed as a free parameter. The full reduced χ2ν (z) distribution is given for each source, so the full error distribution can be used, and aliases investigated. We use a set of 5982 spectroscopic redshifts, taken from the literature and from our own spectroscopic surveys, to analyse the performance of our method as a function of the number of photometric bands used in the solution and the reduced χ2ν. For seven photometric bands (5 optical + 3.6, 4.5 μm), the rms value of (zphot - zspec)/(1 + zspec) is 3.5 per cent, and the percentage of catastrophic outliers [defined as >15 per cent error in (1 + z)], is ~1 per cent. These rms values are comparable with the best achieved in other studies, and the outlier fraction is significantly better. The inclusion of the 3.6- and 4.5-μm IRAC bands is crucial in supression of outliers. We discuss the redshift distributions at 3.6 and 24 μm. In individual fields, structure in the redshift distribution corresponds to clusters which can be seen in the spectroscopic redshift distribution, so the photometric redshifts are a powerful tool for large-scale structure studies. 10 per cent of sources in the SWIRE photometric redshift catalogue have z > 2, and 4 per cent

  8. High-redshift Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Foschini, L.; Ghirlanda, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Della Ceca, R.; Haardt, F.; Volonteri, M.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-02-01

    With the release of the first-year Fermi catalogue, the number of blazars detected above 100 MeV lying at high redshift has been largely increased. There are 28 blazars at z > 2 in the `clean' sample. All of them are flat spectrum radio quasars. We study and model their overall spectral energy distribution in order to find the physical parameters of the jet-emitting region, and for all of them, we estimate their black hole masses and accretion rates. We then compare the jet with the accretion disc properties, setting these sources in the broader context of all the other bright γ-ray or hard X-ray blazars. We confirm that the jet power correlates with the accretion luminosity. We find that the high-energy emission peak shifts to smaller frequencies as the observed luminosity increases, according to the blazar sequence, making the hard X-ray band the most suitable for searching the most-luminous and distant blazars.

  9. New explanation of Hubble's redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2012-10-01

    ``Like mass attract, like energy repel each other.'' So the energy can make a repulsive gravity and a negative curvature. There is a balance of a flat universe between a gravity and a repulsive gravity. (1) φm=φd=φg=φrg=0.5. Among it, φm: the density of matter, φd: the density of dark energy, φg: the density of matter of gravity, φrg: the density of matter of repulsive gravity. When the wave travel in the universe, its quantum space-time will conversion to an universal space-time. It will cause the quantum space-time to change. According to the Hubble's redshift, (2)H0 (λD)δν. Among it, H0: Hubble constant, ν: the frequence, λ: the wavelength, D: the universal displacement, λD: the rate of the translation between the quantum space-time and the universal space-time. ``An energy momentum tensor scalar field is a space-time field. The quantum time is the frequance and the quantum space is the amplitude square.'' (see Dayong Cao, ``MEST,'' BAPS.2011.DFD.LA.25, ``MEST,'' BAPS.2010.DFD.QE.2, ``MEST,'' BAPS.2012.MAR.K1.256, ``MEST,'' BAPS.2012.APR.E1.2 and ``MEST,'' BAPS.2010.MAR.S1.240) So the universe do not expanding. Supported by AEEA.

  10. Photometric redshifts for the NGVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Ilbert, O.; Licitra, R.; Ball, N. M.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Chen, Y.-T.; Côté, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Durrell, P. R.; Ferrarese, L.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lancon, A.; Liu, C.; MacArthur, L. A.; Muller, M.; Muñoz, R. P.; Peng, E. W.; Puzia, T. H.; Sawicki, M.; Toloba, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Woods, D.; Zhang, H.

    2014-12-01

    We present the photometric redshift catalog for the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a 104 deg^2 optical imaging survey centered on the Virgo cluster in the u^*, g, r ,i, z bandpasses at point source depth of 25-26 ABmag. It already is the new optical reference survey for the study of the Virgo cluster, and will be also used for multiple ancillary programs. To obtain photometric redshifts, we perform accurate photometry, through the PSF-homogenization of our data. We then estimate the photometric redshifts using Le Phare and BPZ codes, adding a new prior extended down to i_{AB}=12.5 mag. We assess the accuracy of our photometric redshifts as a function of magnitude and redshift using ˜80,000 spectroscopic redshifts from public surveys. For i_{AB} < 23 mag or z_{phot} < 1 galaxies, we obtain photometric redshifts with |bias| < 0.02, a scatter increasing with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05), and less than 5% outliers.

  11. Optimal redshift weighting for redshift-space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Rossana; Percival, Will J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Zhu, Fangzhou; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting

    2017-01-01

    The low-statistical errors on cosmological parameters promised by future galaxy surveys will only be realized with the development of new, fast, analysis methods that reduce potential systematic problems to low levels. We present an efficient method for measuring the evolution of the growth of structure using redshift-space distortions (RSDs), that removes the need to make measurements in redshift shells. We provide sets of galaxy-weights that cover a wide range in redshift, but are optimized to provide differential information about cosmological evolution. These are derived to optimally measure the coefficients of a parametrization of the redshift-dependent matter density, which provides a framework to measure deviations from the concordance ΛCDM cosmology, allowing for deviations in both geometric and/or growth. We test the robustness of the weights by comparing with alternative schemes and investigate the impact of galaxy bias. We extend the results to measure the combined anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillation and RSD signals.

  12. Probing neutrinos from Planck and forthcoming galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka; Kadota, Kenji E-mail: kadota.kenji@f.nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how much the constraints on the neutrino properties can be improved by combining the CMB, the photometric and spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys which include the CMB lensing, galaxy lensing tomography, galaxy clustering and redshift space distortion observables. We pay a particular attention to the constraint on the neutrino mass in view of the forthcoming redshift surveys such as the Euclid satellite and the LSST survey along with the Planck CMB lensing measurements. Combining the transverse mode information from the angular power spectrum and the longitudinal mode information from the spectroscopic survey with the redshift space distortion measurements can determine the total neutrino mass with the projected error of O(0.02) eV. Our analysis fixes the mass splittings among the neutrino species to be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data, and we accordingly study the sensitivity of our parameter estimations on the minimal neutrino mass. The cosmological measurement of the total neutrino mass can distinguish between the normal and inverted mass hierarchy scenarios if the minimal neutrino mass ∼<0.005 eV with the predicted 1–σ uncertainties taken into account.

  13. A novel mechanism for the distance-redshift relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Graur, Or

    2017-02-01

    We consider a novel mechanism to account for the observed distance-redshift relation. This is done by presenting a toy model for the large-scale matter distribution in a static Universe. Our model mainly concerns particles with masses far below those in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. The model is founded on three main assumptions: (1) a mass spectrum \\text{d}{{N}i} /\\text{d}{{m}i}=β mi-α (where α and β are both positive constants) for low-mass particles with {{m}i}\\ll {{10}-22} eV \\ll M P, where M P is the Planck mass; (2) a particle mass-wavelength relation of the form {λi}=\\hbar /{δi}{{m}i} c, where {δi}=η miγ and η and γ are both constants; and (3) for such low-mass particles, locality can only be defined on large spatial scales, comparable to or exceeding the particle wavelengths. We use our model to derive the cosmological redshift characteristic of the Standard Model of Cosmology, which becomes a gravitational redshift in our model. We compare the results of our model to empirical data and show that, in order to reproduce the sub-linear form of the observed distance-redshift relation, our model requires α +γ <0 . We further place our toy model in the context of the Friedmann Universe via a superposition of Einstein Universes, each with its own scale factor a i . Given the overwhelming evidence supporting an expanding Universe, we then address possible modifications to our base model that would be required to account for the available empirical constraints, including the addition of some initial expansion. Finally, we consider potentially observable distinctions between the cosmological redshift and our proposed mechanism to account for the observed distance-redshift relation.

  14. Precision Photometric Redshifts for Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capak, Peter

    The growth of structure as measured by weak lensing has been identified as one of the most sensitive probes of dark energy and dark matter, and is one of the three key dark energy experiments proposed for WFIRST. However, the weak lensing measurement depends strongly on robust photometric redshifts, and is highly sensitive to systematic biases in these redshift estimates. Several methods have been proposed to remove systematic biases based on spectroscopic samples and spatial clustering, but none has been demonstrated to perform at the level required for WFIRST. Making the problem more challenging, at least two independent methods must be developed: one to correct the systematic errors, and another to verify the correction and quantify residual error. Here we propose to develop an informed calibration of the color-redshift relation that will minimize the number of spectroscopic redshifts needed for machine learning algorithms and produce accurate Bayesian priors for template fitting algorithms. The proposed method uses our current knowledge of galaxies and galaxy evolution from existing deep surveys to parameterize where in the WFIRST color space the photometric redshifts are well understood, and where they are not. First, we will develop a method to map from the WFIRST N-dimensional color space to redshift. This will determine which regions of color space map to redshift in a well-behaved way, and which have a more complex behavior. We will make use of the fact that higher-dimensional data (narrower band passes, more sensitive data, and larger spectral coverage) are available in select areas of the sky to determine how much uncertainty exists in WFIRST color regions. Finally, we will develop a statistical method to determine how many spectroscopic redshifts are needed in each cell of WFIRST color space to accurately map from color to redshift, and which color space cells should be excised from the weak lensing analysis due to redshift degeneracy. In addition to

  15. Very high redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.J.M., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) provide unique targets for the study of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters at very high redshifts. We discuss how efficient HzRG samples ae selected, the evidence for strong morphological evolution at near-infracd wavelengths, and for jet-induced star formation in the z = 3 800 HzRG 4C41 17

  16. Bimodal star formation - Constraints from galaxy colors at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that at early epochs the light from elliptical galaxies is dominated by stars with an initial mass function (IMF) which is deficient in low-mass stars, relative to the solar neighborhood is investigated. V-R colors for the optical counterparts of 3CR radio sources offer the most severe constraints on the models. Reasonable fits are obtained to both the blue, high-redshift colors and the redder, low-redshift colors with a model galaxy which forms with initially equal star formation rates in each of two IMF modes: one lacking low-mass stars, and one with stars of all masses. The net effect is that the time-integrated IMF has twice as many high-mass stars as the solar neighborhood IMF, relative to low mass stars. A conventional solar neighborhood IMF does not simultaneously account for both the range in colors at high redshift and the redness of nearby ellipticals, with any single star formation epoch. Models with a standard IMF require half the stellar population to be formed in a burst at low redshift z of about 1.

  17. Gravitational redshift for the Pleiad white dwarf LB 1497

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, G.; Reid, I.N.; Mcmahan, R.K., Jr. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena North Carolina, University, Chapel Hill )

    1991-07-01

    A new gravitational redshift of +84 {plus minus} 9 km/s is derived for the white dwarf WD 0349 + 247 in the Pleiades (LB 1497) using the Hale 5-m telescope and the MMT. For a carbon core this translates to a mass of 1.02 solar masses using the Hamada-Salpeter mass-radius relation. The effective temperature is derived from the H-{alpha} and H-{beta} line profiles and is found to be 32,000 {plus minus} 1000 K. Using 5.54 mag for the Pleiades distance modulus, this yields log (radius/solar radius) = -2.13 {plus minus} 0.03 for the star. This radius combined with the redshift gives 0.98 solar masses for the star's mass. These values agree with the mass-radius relation and can be used to place constraints on the evolution of the star. 40 refs.

  18. Recovering galaxy stellar population properties from broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting - II. The case with unknown redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pforr, Janine; Maraston, Claudia; Tonini, Chiara

    2013-10-01

    In a recent work (Paper I), we explored the dependence of galaxy stellar population properties derived from broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting on the fitting parameters, e.g. star formation histories (SFHs), age grid, metallicity, initial mass function (IMF), dust reddening and reddening law, filter setup and wavelength coverage. In this paper, we consider the case that also redshift is a free parameter in the fit and study whether one can obtain reasonable estimates of photometric redshifts and stellar population properties at once. As in Paper I, we use mock star-forming as well as passive galaxies placed at various redshifts (0.5-3) as test particles. Mock star-forming galaxies are extracted from a semi-analytical galaxy formation model. We show that for high-redshift star-forming galaxies, photometric redshifts, stellar masses and reddening can be determined simultaneously when using a broad wavelength coverage (including the Lyman and the 4000 Å break) and a wide template setup in the fit. Masses are similarly well recovered (median ˜0.2 dex) as at fixed redshift. For old galaxies with little recent star formation (which are at lower redshift in the simulation), masses are better recovered than in the fixed redshift case, such that the median recovered stellar mass improves by up to 0.3 dex (at fixed IMF) whereas the uncertainty in the redshift accuracy increases by only ˜0.05. However, a failure in redshift recovery also means a failure in mass recovery. As at fixed redshift, mismatches in SFH and degeneracies between age, dust and now also redshift cause underestimated ages, overestimated reddening and underestimated masses. Stellar masses are best determined at low redshift without reddening in the fit. Masses are then underestimated by only ˜0.1 dex whereas redshifts are similarly well recovered. Not surprisingly, the recovery of properties is substantially better for passive galaxies, for which e.g. the mass is recovered only slightly

  19. How Accurately Can We Measure Galaxy Environment at High Redshift Using Only Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, Jonathan; Jogee, Shardha; Sherman, Sydney; Papovich, Casey J.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Stevans, Matthew L.; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; SHELA/HETDEX

    2017-06-01

    We use a powerful synergy of six deep photometric surveys (Herschel SPIRE, Spitzer IRAC, NEWFIRM K-band, DECam ugriz, and XMM X-ray) and a future optical spectroscopic survey (HETDEX) in the Stripe 82 field to study galaxy evolution during the 1.9 < z < 3.5 epoch when cosmic star formation and black hole activity peaked, and protoclusters began to collapse. With an area of 24 sq. degrees, a sample size of ~ 0.8 million galaxies complete in stellar mass above M* ~ 10^10 solar masses, and a comoving volume of ~ 0.45 Gpc^3, our study will allow us to make significant advancements in understanding the connection between galaxies and their respective dark matter components. In this poster, we characterize how robustly we can measure environment using only our photometric redshifts. We compare both local and large-scale measures of environment (e.g., projected two-point correlation function, projected nearest neighbor densities, and galaxy counts within some projected aperture) at different photometric redshifts to cosmological simulations in order to quantify the uncertainty in our estimates of environment. We also explore how robustly one can recover the variation of galaxy properties with environment, when using only photometric redshifts. In the era of large photometric surveys, this work has broad implications for studies addressing the impact of environment on galaxy evolution at early cosmic epochs. We acknowledge support from NSF grants AST-1614798, AST-1413652 and NSF GRFP grant DGE-1610403.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VUDS Dicovery of a high-redshift protocluster (Lemaux+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaux, B. C.; Cucciati, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Le Fevre, O.; Zamorani, G.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Capak, P.; Cassara, L.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; Gal, R. R.; Kocevski, D. D.; Lopez-Sanjuan, C.; Lubin, L. M.; Mellier, Y.; Sadibekova, T.; Scoville, N.

    2014-08-01

    Parameters for the 19 secure spectroscopic members and the 6 questionable spectroscopic members of Cl J0227-0421. The given parameters are galaxy equatorial coordinates, all optical and NIR magnitudes, spectroscopic redshifts with a corresponding confidence flag, photometric redshifts, absolute magnitudes in the NUV, r', & J bands, stellar mass, and star formation rate. The latter four quantities only available when the photometry allowed for a fit. Magnitudes are either MAG_AUTO (optical+JHK) or aperture-corrected total magnitudes (Spitzer Channels 1 & 2) and are corrected for Galactic extinction. Stellar masses and SFRs are calculated for a Chabrier (2003PASP..115..763C) initial mass function. Best-fit values from the spectral energy distribution fitting are adopted. For galaxies with a confidence flag 1 or 9, the redshift was not fixed in the spectral energy distribution fitting process. For all other galaxies the redshift was fixed to the spectroscopic redshift. (1 data file).

  1. The Physical Conditions of Atomic Gas at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeleman, Marcel

    In this thesis we provide insight into the chemical composition, physical conditions and cosmic distribution of atomic gas at high redshift. We study this gas in absorption against bright background quasars in absorption systems known as Damped Ly-alpha Systems (DLAs). These systems contain the bulk of the atomic gas at high redshift and are the likely progenitors of modern-day galaxies. In Chapter 2, we find that the atomic gas in DLAs obeys a mass-metallicity relationship that is similar to the mass-metallicity relationship seen in star-forming galaxies. The evolution of this relationship is linear with redshift, allowing for a planar equation to accurately describe this evolution, which provides a more stringent constraint on simulations modeling DLAs. Furthermore, the concomitant evolution of the mass-metallicity relationship of atomic gas and star-forming galaxies suggests an intimate link between the two. We next use a novel way to measure the physical conditions of the gas by using fine-structure line ratios of singly ionized carbon and silicon. By measuring the density of the upper and lower level states, we are able to determine the temperature, hydrogen density and electron density of the gas. We find that the conditions present in this high redshift gas are consistent with the conditions we see in the local interstellar medium (ISM). A few absorbers have higher than expected pressure, which suggests that they probe the ISM of star-forming galaxies. Finally in Chapter 4, we measure the cosmic neutral hydrogen density at redshifts below 1.6. Below this redshift, the Ly-alpha line of hydrogen is absorbed by the atmosphere, making detection difficult. Using the archive of the Hubble Space Telescope, we compile a comprehensive list of quasars for a search of DLAs at redshift below 1.6. We find that the incidence rate of DLAs and the cosmic neutral hydrogen density is smaller than previously measured, but consistent with the values both locally and at

  2. VLBI observations of galaxies at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilizzi, R. T.; Gurvits, L. I.; Miley, G. K.; Bremer, M. A. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Nan, R.; Chambers, K. C.; van Breugel, W. J. M.

    Subsets of fifteen high redshift radio galaxies have been observed with VLBI arrays at 327 MHz, 1.66 GHz or 5 GHz. Here we present results of VLBI imaging of four high redshift radio galaxies, three at 327 MHz and one at 1.66 GHz. Results so far show that 1) compact 1 kpc hotspots dominate the VLA components, 2) the magnetic field strengths in the hotspots are an order of magnitude higher than in Cygnus A, 3) the estimated ages of the sources are considerably longer than the radiative lifetimes of electrons in the hotspots, implying energy resupply, and 4) the ratios of overall size to hotspot size are consistent with the correlations found by Hardcastle et al (1998) for FR II radio galaxies and Snellen et al (1998) for GPS and CSS radio galaxies. We also investigate the possibility that the misalignment of the components to the southwest in 4C41.17 may be caused by deflection of the jet by an interstellar cloud of mass ~ 108 solar masses, possibly a proto globular cluster.

  3. The Galileo solar redshift experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisher, Timothy P.; Morabito, David D.; Anderson, John D.

    1993-04-01

    From the October 1989 launch to the first December 1990 earth gravity assist, we regularly obtained frequency measurements of the spacecraft clock - an ultrastable crystal oscillator (USO) supplied by Frequency Electronics, Inc. The solar gravitational redshift in frequency was readily detectable, and because of the unique variations in heliocentric distance we could separate the general relativistic effects from the USO's intrinsic frequency variations. We have verified the total frequency shift predicted by general relativity to 0.5 percent accuracy, and the solar gravitational redshift to 1 percent accuracy.

  4. Sky Mining - Application to Photomorphic Redshift Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Pragyansmita

    . 4. In addition to the redshift estimate, the likelihood distribution of the estimate is even more useful, and my Bayesian Network models provide that information. This is particularly useful in ensemble methods as well as the kernel for mass distribution in the universe. 5. The generated Bayesian Network models can be applied to any of the variables, not just limited to redshift. Example applications include quality analysis and missing value imputation. Different types of Bayesian Network learning algorithms---constraint-based, score-based and hybrid---were investigated in detail.

  5. The FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE): Ultraviolet to Far-infrared Catalogs, Medium-bandwidth Photometric Redshifts with Improved Accuracy, Stellar Masses, and Confirmation of Quiescent Galaxies to z ˜ 3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Spitler, Lee R.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Labbé, Ivo; Glazebrook, Karl; Persson, S. Eric; Papovich, Casey; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Cowley, Michael; Tomczak, Adam; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Alcorn, Leo; Allen, Rebecca; Broussard, Adam; van Dokkum, Pieter; Forrest, Ben; van Houdt, Josha; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Kelson, Daniel D.; Lee, Janice; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Monson, Andrew; Murphy, David; Rees, Glen; Tilvi, Vithal; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2016-10-01

    The FourStar galaxy evolution survey (ZFOURGE) is a 45 night legacy program with the FourStar near-infrared camera on Magellan and one of the most sensitive surveys to date. ZFOURGE covers a total of 400 arcmin2 in cosmic fields CDFS, COSMOS and UDS, overlapping CANDELS. We present photometric catalogs comprising >70,000 galaxies, selected from ultradeep K s -band detection images (25.5-26.5 AB mag, 5σ, total), and >80% complete to K s < 25.3-25.9 AB. We use 5 near-IR medium-bandwidth filters (J 1, J 2, J 3, H s , H l ) as well as broad-band K s at 1.05-2.16 μm to 25-26 AB at a seeing of ˜0.″5. Each field has ancillary imaging in 26-40 filters at 0.3-8 μm. We derive photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. Comparing with spectroscopic redshifts indicates a photometric redshift uncertainty σ z = 0.010, 0.009, and 0.011 in CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS. As spectroscopic samples are often biased toward bright and blue sources, we also inspect the photometric redshift differences between close pairs of galaxies, finding σ z,pairs = 0.01-0.02 at 1 < z < 2.5. We quantify how σ z,pairs depends on redshift, magnitude, spectral energy distribution type, and the inclusion of FourStar medium bands. σ z,pairs is smallest for bright, blue star-forming samples, while red star-forming galaxies have the worst σ z,pairs. Including FourStar medium bands reduces σ z,pairs by 50% at 1.5 < z < 2.5. We calculate star formation rates (SFRs) based on ultraviolet and ultradeep far-IR Spitzer/MIPS and Herschel/PACS data. We derive rest-frame U - V and V - J colors, and illustrate how these correlate with specific SFR and dust emission to z = 3.5. We confirm the existence of quiescent galaxies at z ˜ 3, demonstrating their SFRs are suppressed by > ×15. This paper contains data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas observatory, Chile

  6. The Weyl Definition of Redshifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Alex

    2012-01-01

    In 1923, Weyl published a (not widely known) protocol for the calculation of redshifts. It is completely independent of the origin of the shift and treats it as a pure Doppler shift. The method is comprehensive and depends solely on the relation between the world lines of source and observer. It has the merit of simplicity of statement and…

  7. The universe at moderate redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Report on the universe at moderate redshift covering the period from 1 Mar. 1988 to 28 Feb. 1991 is presented. Areas of research included: galaxy formation and large-scale structure; intergalactic medium and background radiation fields; quasar statistics and evolution; and gravitational lenses.

  8. Gravitational redshift and asymmetric redshift-space distortions for stacked clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Kaiser, Nick; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    We derive the expression for the observed redshift in the weak field limit in the observer's past light cone, including all relativistic terms up to second order in velocity. We then apply it to compute the cluster-galaxy cross-correlation functions (CGCF) using N-body simulations. The CGCF is asymmetric along the line of sight owing to the presence of the small second-order terms such as the gravitational redshift (GRedshift). We identify two systematics in the modelling of the GRedshift signal in stacked clusters. First, it is affected by the morphology of dark matter haloes and the large-scale cosmic-web. The non-spherical distribution of galaxies around the central halo and the presence of neighbouring clusters systematically reduce the GRedshift signal. This bias is approximately 20 per cent for Mmin ≃ 1014 M⊙ h-1, and is more than 50 per cent for haloes with Mmin ≃ 2 × 1013 M⊙ h-1 at r > 4 Mpc h-1. Secondly, the best-fitting GRedshift profiles as well as the profiles of all other relativistic terms are found to be significantly different in velocity space compared to their real space versions. We find that the relativistic Doppler redshift effect, like other second-order effects, is subdominant to the GRedshift signal. We discuss some subtleties relating to these effects in velocity space. We also find that the S/N of the GRedshift signal increases with decreasing halo mass.

  9. Changing universe model of the cosmic microwave background, early type galaxies, redshift, and discrete redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2005-04-01

    Developing the changing universe model (CUM) toward an alternate cosmological model provides motivation to investigate cosmological observations. The black body nature of the CMB is consistent with the CUM. Since the CUM posits the photons are quantized, positing quantum oscillators in the wall of the black body cavity is unnecessary. The CMB temperature and mass content of our universe is controlled by a feedback mechanism. If our universe is stable, the temperature of the CMB radiation should be 2.718 K. The CUM suggests the higher measured CMB temperature indicates an imbalance between energy injection and energy ejection rates of the Sources and Sinks. Several differences among galaxy types suggest that spiral galaxies are Sources and that early type and irregular galaxies are Sinks. The redshift calculation explored previously (SESAPS '04,session GD 15) is improved. Further, the CUM suggests the discrete variations in redshift, reported by W. G. Tifft, 1997, Astrophy. J. 485, 465 (and references therein) and confirmed by others, are consistent with the Sink's effect on redshift in clusters. Full text: http://web.infoave.net/ scjh.

  10. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo A; Lasky, Paul D; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-11

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳10^{10}M_{⊙} can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms.

  11. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.; Lasky, Paul D.; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳1010M⊙ can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms.

  12. Gravitational microlensing of high-redshift supernovae by compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, K.P. )

    1991-06-01

    An analysis of the effect of microlensing by a cosmologically dominant density of compact objects is performed, using high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) as probes. The compact objects are modeled as a three-dimensional distribution of point masses, and Monte Carlo simulations are done to calculate the resulting amplification probability distributions for several column densities and cosmologies. By combining these distributions with the intrinsic SN Ia luminosity function and comparing with the results for a perfectly smooth universe, estimates are made of the number of supernovae that would need to be observed to confirm or rule out this lensing scenario. It is found that about 1000 SN Ia's with redshifts of z = 1 would be needed to perform this test, which is beyond what current searches can hope to accomplish. Observations of many fewer high-redshift supernovae, used merely as standard candles, appears a promising way of distinguishing between different cosmological models. 35 refs.

  13. Predicting the High Redshift Galaxy Population for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Zoey; Benson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will be launched in Oct 2018 with the goal of observing galaxies in the redshift range of z = 10 - 15. As redshift increases, the age of the Universe decreases, allowing us to study objects formed only a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. This will provide a valuable opportunity to test and improve current galaxy formation theory by comparing predictions for mass, luminosity, and number density to the observed data. We have made testable predictions with the semi-analytical galaxy formation model Galacticus. The code uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to determine viable sets of model parameters that match current astronomical data. The resulting constrained model was then set to match the specifications of the JWST Ultra Deep Field Imaging Survey. Predictions utilizing up to 100 viable parameter sets were calculated, allowing us to assess the uncertainty in current theoretical expectations. We predict that the planned UDF will be able to observe a significant number of objects past redshift z > 9 but nothing at redshift z > 11. In order to detect these faint objects at redshifts z = 11-15 we need to increase exposure time by at least a factor of 1.66.

  14. Photometric Redshifts: 50 Years After

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budavári, Tamás

    2012-03-01

    Almost half a century has passed since Baum [1] first applied a novel method to a handful of galaxies. Using the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of six bright ellipticals in the Virgo cluster, he could accurately estimate the redshifts of other clusters in a comparison that we today call SED fitting or, more generally, photometric redshifts. Owing to the expansion of the Universe, galaxies farther away appear to be redder. Their observed colors are a combination of this redshift and their intrinsic properties. Thanks to the latest detector technology, today we can undertake deep, multicolor surveys to probe statistically meaningful volumes. The yield of photometry in terms of the number of sources is over two orders of magnitude higher than what is achievable by (the more accurate) spectroscopic follow-ups. To exploit the information in the photometric data themselves, several new methods have been developed over the years. One particular successful example is the estimation of photometric redshifts. Baum's motivation for using photometric measurements instead of spectroscopy was the same back then as ours is now: to push the analyses to uncharted territories. His original idea has grown into a research area of its own, which is more important now than ever before. In this chapter, we look at some of the recent advancements of the field. In Section 15.2 we briefly highlight some of the original ideas and the current state of the art in estimating the photometric redshifts. Section 15.3 introduces a Bayesian framework for discussing the traditional methods within a unified context; it explicitly enumerates and identifies their (missing) ingredients. Section 15.4 aims to plant seeds for new ideas for future directions, and Section 15.5 offers some concluding remarks.

  15. The relativistic geoid: redshift and acceleration potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Dennis; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Puetzfeld, Dirk; Hackmann, Eva; Perlick, Volker

    2017-04-01

    We construct a relativistic geoid based on a time-independent redshift potential, which foliates the spacetime into isochronometric surfaces. This relativistic potential coincides with the acceleration potential for isometric congruences. We show that the a- and u- geoid, defined in a post-Newtonian framework, coincide also in a more general setup. Known Newtonian and post-Newtonian results are recovered in the respective limits. Our approach offers a relativistic definition of the Earth's geoid as well as a description of the Earth itself (or observers on its surface) in terms of an isometric congruence. Being fully relativistic, this notion of a geoid can also be applied to other compact objects such as neutron stars. By definition, this relativistic geoid can be determined by a congruence of Killing observers equipped with standard clocks by comparing their frequencies as well as by measuring accelerations of objects that follow the congruence. The redshift potential gives the correct result also for frequency comparison through optical fiber links as long as the fiber is at rest w.r.t. the congruence. We give explicit expressions for the relativistic geoid in the Kerr spacetime and the Weyl class of spacetimes. To investigate the influence of higher order mass multipole moments we compare the results for the Schwarzschild case to those obtained for the Erez-Rosen and q-metric spacetimes.

  16. Calibrating photometric redshifts of luminous red galaxies

    DOE PAGES

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Budavari, Tamas; Schlegel, David J.; ...

    2005-05-01

    We discuss the construction of a photometric redshift catalogue of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), emphasizing the principal steps necessary for constructing such a catalogue: (i) photometrically selecting the sample, (ii) measuring photometric redshifts and their error distributions, and (iii) estimating the true redshift distribution. We compare two photometric redshift algorithms for these data and find that they give comparable results. Calibrating against the SDSS and SDSS–2dF (Two Degree Field) spectroscopic surveys, we find that the photometric redshift accuracy is σ~ 0.03 for redshifts less than 0.55 and worsens at higher redshift (~ 0.06more » for z < 0.7). These errors are caused by photometric scatter, as well as systematic errors in the templates, filter curves and photometric zero-points. We also parametrize the photometric redshift error distribution with a sum of Gaussians and use this model to deconvolve the errors from the measured photometric redshift distribution to estimate the true redshift distribution. We pay special attention to the stability of this deconvolution, regularizing the method with a prior on the smoothness of the true redshift distribution. The methods that we develop are applicable to general photometric redshift surveys.« less

  17. Calibrating photometric redshifts of luminous red galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Budavari, Tamas; Schlegel, David J.; Bridges, Terry; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Cannon, Russell; Connolly, Andrew J.; Croom, Scott M.; Csabai, Istvan; Drinkwater, Michael; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Loveday, Jon; Nichol, Robert C.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; De Propris, Robert; Schneider, Donald P.; Scranton, Ryan; Seljak, Uros; Shanks, Tom; Szapudi, Istvan; Szalay, Alexander S.; Wake, David

    2005-05-01

    We discuss the construction of a photometric redshift catalogue of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), emphasizing the principal steps necessary for constructing such a catalogue: (i) photometrically selecting the sample, (ii) measuring photometric redshifts and their error distributions, and (iii) estimating the true redshift distribution. We compare two photometric redshift algorithms for these data and find that they give comparable results. Calibrating against the SDSS and SDSS–2dF (Two Degree Field) spectroscopic surveys, we find that the photometric redshift accuracy is σ~ 0.03 for redshifts less than 0.55 and worsens at higher redshift (~ 0.06 for z < 0.7). These errors are caused by photometric scatter, as well as systematic errors in the templates, filter curves and photometric zero-points. We also parametrize the photometric redshift error distribution with a sum of Gaussians and use this model to deconvolve the errors from the measured photometric redshift distribution to estimate the true redshift distribution. We pay special attention to the stability of this deconvolution, regularizing the method with a prior on the smoothness of the true redshift distribution. The methods that we develop are applicable to general photometric redshift surveys.

  18. Cosmology with photometric redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Bridle, Sarah

    2005-11-01

    We explore the utility of future photometric redshift imaging surveys for delineating the large-scale structure of the Universe, and assess the resulting constraints on the cosmological model. We perform the following two complementary types of analysis. (i) We quantify the statistical confidence and the accuracy with which such surveys will be able to detect and measure characteristic features in the clustering power spectrum such as the acoustic oscillations and the turnover, in a `model-independent' fashion. We show for example that a 10000-deg2 imaging survey with depth r= 22.5 and photometric redshift accuracy δz/(1 +z) = 0.03 will detect the acoustic oscillations with 99.9 per cent confidence, measuring the associated preferred cosmological scale with 2 per cent precision. Such a survey will also detect the turnover with 95 per cent confidence, determining the corresponding scale with 20 per cent accuracy. (ii) By assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model power spectrum we calculate the confidence with which a non-zero baryon fraction can be deduced from such future galaxy surveys. We quantify `wiggle detection' by calculating the number of standard deviations by which the baryon fraction is measured, after marginalizing over the shape parameter. This is typically a factor of 4 more significant (in terms of number of standard deviations) than the above `model-independent' result. For both analyses, we quantify the variation of the results with magnitude depth and photometric redshift precision, and discuss the prospects for obtaining the required performance with realistic future surveys. We conclude that the precision with which the clustering pattern may be inferred from future photometric redshift surveys will be competitive with contemporaneous spectroscopic redshift surveys, assuming that systematic effects can be controlled. We find that for equivalent wiggle detection power, a photometric redshift survey requires an area approximately 12[δz/(1 +z

  19. High-redshift galaxy populations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Esther M; Cowie, Lennox L

    2006-04-27

    We now see many galaxies as they were only 800 million years after the Big Bang, and that limit may soon be exceeded when wide-field infrared detectors are widely available. Multi-wavelength studies show that there was relatively little star formation at very early times and that star formation was at its maximum at about half the age of the Universe. A small number of high-redshift objects have been found by targeting X-ray and radio sources and most recently, gamma-ray bursts. The gamma-ray burst sources may provide a way to reach even higher-redshift galaxies in the future, and to probe the first generation of stars.

  20. Modifying gravity at low redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas E-mail: c.vandebruck@sheffield.ac.uk E-mail: d.shaw@qmul.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    We consider the growth of cosmological perturbations in modified gravity models where a scalar field mediates a non-universal Yukawa force between different matter species. The growth of the density contrast is altered for scales below the Compton wave-length of the scalar field. As the universe expands, the Compton wave-length varies in time in such a way that scales which were outside the range of the scalar field force may feel it at a lower redshift. In this case, both the exponent γ measuring the growth of Cold Dark Matter perturbations and the slip function representing the ratio of the two Newtonian potentials ψ and φ may differ from their values in General Relativity at low redshift.

  1. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2016-09-01

    A population of quasars at z ˜ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities νL ν (7.8 μm) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio νL ν (0.25 μm)/νL ν (7.8 μm) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust that produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest-frame 7.8 μm are determined for quasars in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 μm sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far-infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest-frame 7.8 μm, but the ratio L ν (100 μm)/L ν (7.8 μm) is about three times higher for obscured quasars than for unobscured, so that far-infrared or submillimeter quasar detections are dominated by obscured quasars. We find that only ˜5% of high-redshift submillimeter sources are quasars and that existing 850 μm surveys or 2 mm surveys should already have detected sources at z ˜ 10 if quasar and starburst luminosity functions remain the same from z = 2 until z = 10.

  2. Cosmology from High Redshift Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter

    The discovery of a correlation between the light curve shape and intrinsic b rightness has made Type Ia supernovae exceptionally accurate distance indicators out to cosmologically interesting redshifts. Ground-based searches and follow-up as well as Hubble S pace Telescope observations of Type Ia supernovae have produced a significant number of object s with redshifts between 0.3 and 1.0. The distant SNe, when combined with a local samp le analyzed in the same way, provide reliable constraints on the deceleration and age of th e Universe. Early this year, an analysis of a handful of Type Ia events indicated that the deceleration was too small for gravitating matter alone to make a flat Universe. A larger sa mple of supernovae gives the surprising result that the Universe is accelerating, implying the exi stence of a cosmological constant or some other exotic form of energy. The success of this research has depended on the development of algorithms and software to register, scale and subtract CCD images taken weeks apart and to search for var iable objects. A good fraction of the point-sources identified are asteroids, variable stars, or AGN, so spectra are needed to confirm the identification as a Type Ia supernova and obt ain a redshift. The best candidates are followed photometrically to construct light curves. The steps to transform the observed light curves into cosmologically interestin g results will also be described.

  3. El Universo a alto redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M. V.

    The Universe we see today is the result of structures and galaxies that have been evolving since earlier times. Looking the evolution of the galaxy population at z ˜ 1 has emphasized the important role played by high redshift data. This is the case of the morphology - density relationship, where the morphological type of galaxies in distant clusters has given us a clear vision of evolutionary processes, partly led by environmental effects. I review part of the data available at high redshifts that are fundamental today to check the validity of galaxy formation models in reproducing local and basic galaxy properties. Briefly, I will comment about high redshift studies, a still little explored portion of the Universe, and the current strategies that allow us the study. In this sense, the epoch of reionization is essential for understanding the formation of structures because it is the phase where the first protogalaxies were formed, creating stars and enriching the intergalactic medium. Because of the great distances involved in these studies, gamma-ray bursts, quasars and Lyman-α galaxies are the best tools to study these earlier times. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  4. Neutrino Redshifts -- A Search for Information.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Charles

    2005-04-01

    Neutrinos will undergo Redshifts due to Doppler and/or Space Expansion effects similar to Electromagnetic Radiation (Photons). However, in some situations (ex., Quasars, etc), Photon Redshifts may be due to cumulative energy-loss mechanisms with the intervening medium. In this situation, the corresponding Neutrino Redshifts will be much smaller since the interaction cross-section for neutrino-medium interactions will be much smaller than any photon-medium cross-section. Thus, observation and comparison of photon redshifts vs corresponding neutrinos redshifts will be very informative. If the photon and neutrino redshifts are similar, then a Doppler and/or Space Expansion interpretation is justified. If the neutrino redshift is much smaller than any corresponding photon redshift, then an interpretation via a cumulative energy-loss mechanism is justified. This is a very definitive experimental test of redshift interpretations. The latest neutrino data will be examined, particularly relevant to quasars and supernova. Reference: ``Redshifts of Cosmological Neutrinos as Definitive Experimental Test of Doppler versus Non-Doppler Redshifts'' by C. F. Gallo in IEEE Trans. Plasma Science, vol. 31, No. 6, pgs. 1230-1231, Dec. 2003.

  5. Photometric Redshifts in the Sloan Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards-Emmerd, D.; McKay, T. A.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    In the past few years, photometric redshifts have proven themselves to be a robust means of estimating redshifts. In the near future, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey will compile high-quality photometric data for 108 galaxies. Photometric redshifts will provide approximate distances to this enormous set of objects. In this poster, we describe results from a preliminary study of photometric redshift calibration on data in the SDSS colors. We present 5 color photometry for 2195 galaxies drawn from the Las Campanas Redshift Survey. Data was obtained on the Curtis Schmidt telescope at CTIO during Aug 97 and Feb/Mar 98 using filters nearly identical to the SDSS system. We also present photometric redshift predictions expressed as polynomial functions of galaxy colors and magnitudes derived from this training set. Finally, applications of photometric redshifts will be considered, including lensing studies, cosmology, and determination of fundamental astrophysical quantities. Support was provided by NSF grant #9703282.

  6. Galaxies at High Redshift and Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, A.; Stanway, E.; Ellis, R.; Lacy, M.; McMahon, R.; Eyles, L.; Stark, D.; Chiu, K.

    2008-08-01

    The quest to discover the most distant galaxies has developed rapidly in the last decade. We are now exploring redshifts of 6 and beyond, when the universe was less than a billion years old, an epoch when the previously neutral intergalactic medium was reionized. The continuing discovery of galaxies at progressively higher and higher redshifts has been driven by the availability of large telescopes on the ground and in space, improvements in detector technology, and new search strategies. Over the past 4 years, the Lyman-break technique has been shown to be effective in isolating z˜ 6 star-forming i'-drop galaxies through spectroscopic confirmation with large ground-based telescopes (Keck, Gemini, and the ESO VLTs). Narrow-band imaging, notably with the wide field of the Subaru telescope, has also produced samples of Lyman-α emitters at these redshifts. Analysis of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF---the deepest images obtained so far, and likely to remain so until the James Webb Space Telescope, JWST), has enabled us to explore the faint end of the luminosity function, which may contribute the bulk of the total star formation. The discovery of this i'-drop galaxy population has been used to infer the global star-formation-rate density at this epoch (z˜ 6), and we are now beginning to constrain the contribution to reionization of the UV flux from these galaxies. Infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope have been used to determine the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the rest-frame UV to the optical of some i'-drops and constrain the previous star-formation histories, masses, and ages of these sources. The indications are that much of the stellar mass of these galaxies might have formed in vigorous bursts at z>6. The next big advances would be to test the population-synthesis modelling of these z˜ 6 galaxies through spectroscopy of the rest-frame optical (rather than crude broad-band SEDs) and also to push the observational horizon for galaxies

  7. Photometric redshifts and clustering of emission line galaxies selected jointly by DES and eBOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Jouvel, S.; et al.

    2015-09-23

    We present the results of the first test plates of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. This paper focuses on the emission line galaxies (ELG) population targetted from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) photometry. We analyse the success rate, efficiency, redshift distribution, and clustering properties of the targets. From the 9000 spectroscopic redshifts targetted, 4600 have been selected from the DES photometry. The total success rate for redshifts between 0.6 and 1.2 is 71\\% and 68\\% respectively for a bright and faint, on average more distant, samples including redshifts measured from a single strong emission line. We find a mean redshift of 0.8 and 0.87, with 15 and 13\\% of unknown redshifts respectively for the bright and faint samples. In the redshift range 0.6redshifts, the mean redshift for the bright and faint sample is 0.85 and 0.9 respectively. Star contamination is lower than 2\\%. We measure a galaxy bias averaged on scales of 1 and 10~Mpc/h of 1.72 \\pm 0.1 for the bright sample and of 1.78 \\pm 0.12 for the faint sample. The error on the galaxy bias have been obtained propagating the errors in the correlation function to the fitted parameters. This redshift evolution for the galaxy bias is in agreement with theoretical expectations for a galaxy population with MB-5\\log h < -21.0. We note that biasing is derived from the galaxy clustering relative to a model for the mass fluctuations. We investigate the quality of the DES photometric redshifts and find that the outlier fraction can be reduced using a comparison between template fitting and neural network, or using a random forest algorithm.

  8. Cosmological limits on neutrino unknowns versus low redshift priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Giusarma, Elena; Mena, Olga; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropy measurements from the Planck mission have significantly improved previous constraints on the neutrino masses as well as the bounds on extended models with massless or massive sterile neutrino states. However, due to parameter degeneracies, additional low redshift priors are mandatory in order to sharpen the CMB neutrino bounds. We explore here the role of different priors on low redshift quantities, such as the Hubble constant, the cluster mass bias, and the reionization optical depth τ . Concerning current priors on the Hubble constant and the cluster mass bias, the bounds on the neutrino parameters may differ appreciably depending on the choices adopted in the analyses. With regard to future improvements in the priors on the reionization optical depth, a value of τ =0.05 ±0.01 , motivated by astrophysical estimates of the reionization redshift, would lead to ∑mν<0.0926 eV at 90% C.L., when combining the full Planck measurements, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Planck clusters data, thereby opening the window to unravel the neutrino mass hierarchy with existing cosmological probes.

  9. Source Redshifts from Gravitational-Wave Observations of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, C.; Takami, Kentaro; Gossan, Sarah; Rezzolla, Luciano; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-10-01

    Inspiraling compact binaries as standard sirens will become an invaluable tool for cosmology when we enter the gravitational-wave detection era. However, a degeneracy in the information carried by gravitational waves between the total rest-frame mass M and the redshift z of the source implies that neither can be directly extracted from the signal; only the combination M(1+z), the redshifted mass, can be directly extracted from the signal. Recent work has shown that for third-generation detectors, a tidal correction to the gravitational-wave phase in the late-inspiral signal of binary neutron star systems can be used to break the mass-redshift degeneracy. Here, we propose to use the signature encoded in the postmerger signal allowing the accurate extraction of the intrinsic rest-frame mass of the source, in turn permitting the determination of source redshift and luminosity distance. The entirety of this analysis method and any subsequent cosmological inference derived from it would be obtained solely from gravitational-wave observations and, hence, would be independent of the cosmological distance ladder. Using numerical simulations of binary neutron star mergers of different mass, we model gravitational-wave signals at different redshifts and use a Bayesian parameter estimation to determine the accuracy with which the redshift and mass can be extracted. We find that for a known illustrative neutron star equation of state and using the Einstein telescope, the median of the 1σ confidence regions in redshift corresponds to ˜10%-20% uncertainties at redshifts of z <0.04.

  10. IMPROVED PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS WITH SURFACE LUMINOSITY PRIORS

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Lifang; Cohen, Seth; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Grogin, Norman; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Pirzkal, Nor; Xu Chun

    2009-07-15

    We apply Bayesian statistics with prior probabilities of galaxy surface luminosity (SL) to improve photometric redshifts. We apply the method to a sample of 1266 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the GOODS North and South fields at 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.0. We start with spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs) based on Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically grism spectra, which cover a wavelength range of 6000-9000 A, combined with (U)BViz(JHK) broadband photometry in the GOODS fields. The accuracy of SPZ redshifts is estimated to be {sigma}({delta}(z)) = 0.035 with an systematic offset of -0.026, where {delta}(z) = {delta}z/(1 + z), for galaxies in redshift range of 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.25. The addition of the SL prior probability helps break the degeneracy of SPZ redshifts between low redshift 4000 A break galaxies and high-redshift Lyman break galaxies which are mostly catastrophic outliers. For the 1138 galaxies at z {approx}< 1.6, the fraction of galaxies with redshift deviation {delta}(z)>0.2 is reduced from 15.0% to 10.4%, while the rms scatter of the fractional redshift error does not change much.

  11. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  12. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  13. Intergalactic stellar populations in intermediate redshift clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, J.; Giraud, E.; Toledo, I.; Selman, F.; Quintana, H.

    2012-11-01

    A substantial fraction of the total stellar mass in rich clusters of galaxies resides in a diffuse intergalactic component usually referred to as the intracluster light (ICL). Theoretical models indicate that these intergalactic stars originate mostly from the tidal interaction of the cluster galaxies during the assembly history of the cluster, and that a significant fraction of these stars could have formed in situ from the late infall of cold metal-poor gas clouds on to the cluster. However, these models also overpredict the fraction of stellar mass in the ICL by a substantial margin, something that is still not well understood. The models also make predictions about the age distribution of the ICL stars, which may provide additional observational constraints. Here we present population synthesis models for the ICL of an intermediate redshift (z = 0.29) X-ray cluster that we have extensively studied in previous papers. The advantage of observing intermediate redshift clusters rather than nearby ones is that the former fit the field of view of multi-object spectrographs in 8-m telescopes and therefore permit us to encompass most of the ICL with only a few well-placed slits. In this paper we show that by stacking spectra at different locations within the ICL it is possible to reach sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratios to fit population synthesis models and derive meaningful results. The models provide ages and metallicities for the dominant populations at several different locations within the ICL and the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) halo, as well as measures of the kinematics of the stars as a function of distance from the BCG. We thus find that the ICL in our cluster is dominated by old metal-rich stars, at odds with what has been found in nearby clusters where the stars that dominate the ICL are old and metal poor. While we see weak evidence of a young, metal-poor component, if real, these young stars would amount to less than 1 per cent of the total ICL

  14. A high deuterium abundance at redshift z = 0.7.

    PubMed

    Webb, J K; Carswell, R F; Lanzetta, K M; Ferlet, R; Lemoine, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Bowen, D V

    1997-07-17

    Of the light elements, the primordial abundance of deuterium relative to hydrogen, (D/H)p, provides the most sensitive diagnostic for the cosmological mass density parameter, omegaB. Recent high-redshift D/H measurements are highly discrepant, although this may reflect observational uncertainties. The larger primordial D/H values imply a low omegaB (requiring the Universe to be dominated by non-baryonic matter), and cause problems for galactic chemical evolution models, which have difficulty in reproducing the steep decline in D/H to the present-day values. Conversely, the lower D/H values measured at high redshift imply an omegaB greater than that derived from 7Li and 4He abundance measurements, and may require a deuterium-abundance evolution that is too low to easily explain. Here we report the first measurement of D/H at intermediate redshift (z = 0.7010), in a gas cloud selected to minimize observational uncertainties. Our analysis yields a value of D/H ((2.0 +/- 0.5) x 10[-4]) which is at the upper end of the range of values measured at high redshifts. This finding, together with other independent observations, suggests that there may be inhomogeneity in (D/H)p of at least a factor of ten.

  15. Theoretical considerations for star formation at low and high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    Star formation processes in strongly self-gravitating cloud cores should be similar at all redshifts, forming single or multiple stars with a range of masses determined by local magneto-hydrodynamics. The formation processes for these cores, however, as well as their structures, temperatures, Mach numbers, etc., and the boundedness and mass distribution functions of the resulting stars, should depend on environment, as should the characteristic mass, density, and column density at which cloud self-gravity dominates other forces. Because the environments for high and low redshift star formation differ significantly, we expect the resulting gas to stellar conversion details to differ also. At high redshift, the universe is denser and more gas-rich, so the active parts of galaxies are denser and more gas rich too, leading to shorter gas consumption timescales, higher cloud pressures, and denser, more massive, bound stellar clusters at the high mass end. With shorter consumption times corresponding to higher relative cosmic accretion rates, and with the resulting higher star formation rates and their higher feedback powers, the ISM has greater turbulent speeds relative to the rotation speeds, thicker gas disks, and larger cloud and star complex sizes at the characteristic Jeans length. The result is a more chaotic appearance at high redshift, bridging the morphology gap between today’s quiescent spirals and today’s major-mergers, with neither spiral nor major-merger processes actually in play at that time. The result is also a thick disk at early times, and after in-plane accretion from relatively large clump torques, a classical bulge. Today’s disks are much thinner and torque-driven accretion is much slower outside of the inner barred regions. This talk will review the basic theoretical processes involved with star formation in order to illustrate its evolution over time and environment.

  16. Theoretical considerations for star formation at low and high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    Star formation processes in strongly self-gravitating cloud cores should be similar at all redshifts, forming single or multiple stars with a range of masses determined by local magneto-hydrodynamics and gravity. The formation processes for these cores, however, as well as their structures, temperatures, Mach numbers, etc., and the boundedness and mass distribution functions of the resulting stars, should depend on environment, as should the characteristic mass, density, and column density at which cloud self-gravity dominates other forces. Because the environments for high and low redshift star formation differ significantly, we expect the resulting gas to stellar conversion details to differ also. At high redshift, the universe is denser and more gas-rich, so the active parts of galaxies are denser and more gas rich too, leading to slightly shorter gas consumption timescales, higher cloud pressures, and denser, more massive, bound stellar clusters at the high mass end. With shorter consumption times corresponding to higher relative cosmic accretion rates, and with the resulting higher star formation rates and their higher feedback powers, the ISM has greater turbulent speeds relative to the rotation speeds, thicker gas disks, and larger cloud and star complex sizes at the characteristic Jeans length. The result is a more chaotic appearance at high redshift, bridging the morphology gap between today's quiescent spirals and today's major-mergers, with neither spiral nor major-merger processes actually in play at that time. The result is also a thick disk at early times, and after in-plane accretion from relatively large clump torques, a classical bulge. Today's disks are thinner, and torque-driven accretion is slower outside of inner barred regions. This paper reviews the basic processes involved with star formation in order to illustrate its evolution over time and environment.

  17. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2-3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass-metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows -0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z˜ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  18. Calibrating photometric redshifts with intensity mapping observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, David; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Moodley, Kavilan

    2017-08-01

    Imaging surveys of galaxies will have a high number density and angular resolution yet a poor redshift precision. Intensity maps of neutral hydrogen will have accurate redshift resolution yet will not resolve individual sources. Using this complementarity, we show how the clustering redshifts approach proposed for spectroscopic surveys can also be used in combination with intensity mapping observations to calibrate the redshift distribution of galaxies in an imaging survey and, as a result, reduce uncertainties in photometric-redshift measurements. We show how the intensity mapping surveys to be carried out with the MeerKAT, HIRAX and SKA instruments can improve photometric-redshift uncertainties to well below the requirements of DES and LSST. The effectiveness of this method as a function of instrumental parameters, foreground subtraction and other potential systematic errors is discussed in detail.

  19. Superluminous supernovae at redshifts of 2.05 and 3.90.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Jeff; Sullivan, Mark; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Barton, Elizabeth J; Carlberg, Raymond G; Ryan-Weber, Emma V; Horst, Chuck; Omori, Yuuki; Díaz, C Gonzalo

    2012-11-08

    A rare class of 'superluminous' supernovae that are about ten or more times more luminous at their peaks than other types of luminous supernova has recently been found at low to intermediate redshifts. A small subset of these events have luminosities that evolve slowly and result in radiated energies of up to about 10(51) ergs. Therefore, they are probably examples of 'pair-instability' or 'pulsational pair-instability' supernovae with estimated progenitor masses of 100 to 250 times that of the Sun. These events are exceedingly rare at low redshift, but are expected to be more common at high redshift because the mass distribution of the earliest stars was probably skewed to high values. Here we report the detection of two superluminous supernovae, at redshifts of 2.05 and 3.90, that have slowly evolving light curves. We estimate the rate of events at redshifts of 2 and 4 to be approximately ten times higher than the rate at low redshift. The extreme luminosities of superluminous supernovae extend the redshift limit for supernova detection using present technology, previously 2.36 (ref. 8), and provide a way of investigating the deaths of the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang.

  20. Broadband Observations of High Redshift Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Stalin, C. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of four high redshift blazars, S5 0014+81 (z = 3.37), CGRaBS J0225+1846 (z = 2.69), BZQ J1430+4205 (z = 4.72), and 3FGL J1656.2-3303 (z = 2.40) using quasi-simultaneous data from the Swift, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) and also archival XMM-Newton observations. Other than 3FGL J1656.2-3303, none of the sources were known as γ-ray emitters, and our analysis of ˜7.5 yr of LAT data reveals the first time detection of statistically significant γ-ray emission from CGRaBS J0225+1846. We generate the broadband spectral energy distributions (SED) of all the objects, centering at the epoch of NuSTAR observations and reproduce them using a one-zone leptonic emission model. The optical-UV emission in all the objects can be explained by radiation from the accretion disk, whereas the X-ray to γ-ray windows of the SEDs are found to be dominated by inverse Compton scattering off the broad line region photons. All of them host black holes that are billions of solar masses. Comparing the accretion disk luminosity and the jet power of these sources with a large sample of blazars, we find them to occupy a high disk luminosity-jet power regime. We also investigate the X-ray spectral properties of the sources in detail with a major focus on studying the causes of soft X-ray deficit, a feature generally seen in high redshift radio-loud quasars. We summarize that this feature could be explained based on the intrinsic curvature in the jet emission rather than being due to the external effects predicted in earlier studies, such as host galaxy and/or warm absorption.

  1. Compact Quiescent Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi

    2014-12-01

    From several searches of the area common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, we have selected 22 luminous galaxies between z ~ 0.4 and z ~ 0.9 that have colors and sizes similar to those of the compact quiescent galaxies at z > 2. By exploring structural parameters and stellar populations, we found that most of these galaxies actually formed most of their stars at z < 2 and are generally less compact than those found at z > 2. Several of these young objects are disk-like or possibly prolate. This lines up with several previous studies that found that massive quiescent galaxies at high redshifts often have disk-like morphologies. If these galaxies were to be confirmed to be disk-like, their formation mechanism must be able to account for both compactness and disks. On the other hand, if these galaxies were to be confirmed to be prolate, the fact that prolate galaxies do not exist in the local universe would indicate that galaxy formation mechanisms have evolved over cosmic time. We also found five galaxies forming over 80% of their stellar masses at z > 2. Three of these galaxies appear to have been modified to have spheroid-like morphologies, in agreement with the scenario of "inside-out" buildup of massive galaxies. The remaining galaxies, SDSS J014355.21+133451.4 and SDSS J115836.93+021535.1, have truly old stellar populations and disk-like morphologies. These two objects would be good candidates for nearly unmodified compact quiescent galaxies from high redshifts that are worth future study.

  2. Compact quiescent galaxies at intermediate redshifts {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi

    2014-12-01

    From several searches of the area common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, we have selected 22 luminous galaxies between z ∼ 0.4 and z ∼ 0.9 that have colors and sizes similar to those of the compact quiescent galaxies at z > 2. By exploring structural parameters and stellar populations, we found that most of these galaxies actually formed most of their stars at z < 2 and are generally less compact than those found at z > 2. Several of these young objects are disk-like or possibly prolate. This lines up with several previous studies that found that massive quiescent galaxies at high redshifts often have disk-like morphologies. If these galaxies were to be confirmed to be disk-like, their formation mechanism must be able to account for both compactness and disks. On the other hand, if these galaxies were to be confirmed to be prolate, the fact that prolate galaxies do not exist in the local universe would indicate that galaxy formation mechanisms have evolved over cosmic time. We also found five galaxies forming over 80% of their stellar masses at z > 2. Three of these galaxies appear to have been modified to have spheroid-like morphologies, in agreement with the scenario of 'inside-out' buildup of massive galaxies. The remaining galaxies, SDSS J014355.21+133451.4 and SDSS J115836.93+021535.1, have truly old stellar populations and disk-like morphologies. These two objects would be good candidates for nearly unmodified compact quiescent galaxies from high redshifts that are worth future study.

  3. Dynamical Analyses of Galaxy Clusters With Large Redshift Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, J. J.; Richstone, D. O.; Wegner, G.

    1998-12-01

    We construct equilibrium models of galaxy orbits in five nearby galaxy clusters to study the distribution of binding mass, the nature of galaxy orbits and the kinematic differences between cluster populations of emission-line and non emission-line galaxies. We avail ourselves of 1718 galaxy redshifts (and 1203 cluster member redshifts) in this Jeans analysis; most of these redshifts are new, coming from multifiber spectroscopic runs on the MDM 2.4m with the Decaspec and queue observing on WIYN with Hydra. In addition to the spectroscopic data we have V and R band CCD mosaics (obtained with the MDM 1.3m) of the Abell region in each of these clusters. Our scientific goals include: (i) a quantitative estimate of the range of binding masses M500 consistent with the optical and X-ray data, (ii) an estimate of the typical galaxy oribital anisotropies required to make the galaxy data consistent with the NFW expectation for the cluster potential, (iii) a better understanding of the systematics inherent in the process of rescaling and ``stacking'' galaxy cluster observations, (iv) a reexamination of the recent CNOC results implying that emission-line (blue) galaxies are an equilibrium population with a more extended radial distribution than their non emission-line (red) galaxy counterparts and (v) a measure of the galaxy contribution to the cluster mass of baryons.

  4. POPULATION III STARS AND REMNANTS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Wise, John H. E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu

    2013-08-20

    Recent simulations of Population III star formation have suggested that some fraction form in binary systems, in addition to having a characteristic mass of tens of solar masses. The deaths of metal-free stars result in the initial chemical enrichment of the universe and the production of the first stellar-mass black holes. Here we present a cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulation of an overdense region that forms a few 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter halos and over 13,000 Population III stars by redshift 15. We find that most halos do not form Population III stars until they reach M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} because this biased region is quickly enriched from both Population III and galaxies, which also produce high levels of ultraviolet radiation that suppress H{sub 2} formation. Nevertheless, Population III stars continue to form, albeit in more massive halos, at a rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} at redshift 15. The most massive starless halo has a mass of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, which could host massive black hole formation through the direct gaseous collapse scenario. We show that the multiplicity of the Population III remnants grows with halo mass above 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, culminating in 50 remnants located in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} halos on average. This has implications that high-mass X-ray binaries and intermediate-mass black holes that originate from metal-free stars may be abundant in high-redshift galaxies.

  5. Element abundances at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe(_), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value.

  6. Diffractive corrections to the cosmological redshift formula

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, D.; Kephart, T.W. )

    1991-05-20

    We calculate the exact frequency redshift for fields coupled to gravity in Robertson-Walker backgrounds. The exact redshift factorizes and is proportional to the naive Doppler shift times a term representing diffractive effects. These diffractive corrections can be large for field modes with wavelengths on the order of the horizon size. Implications for cosmological density perturbations are discussed.

  7. Photometric Redshifts in the IRAC Shallow Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M; Brown, M; Ashby, M; Bian, C; Brand, K; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Eisenstein, D; Gonzalez, A; Huang, J; Kochanek, C; McKenzie, E; Pahre, M; Smith, H; Soifer, B; Stanford, S; Stern, D; Elston, R

    2006-06-13

    Accurate photometric redshifts are calculated for nearly 200,000 galaxies to a 4.5 micron flux limit of {approx} 13 {micro}Jy in the 8.5 deg{sup 2} Spitzer/IRAC Shallow survey. Using a hybrid photometric redshift algorithm incorporating both neural-net and template-fitting techniques, calibrated with over 15,000 spectroscopic redshifts, a redshift accuracy of {sigma} = 0.06 (1+z) is achieved for 95% of galaxies at 0 < z < 1.5. The accuracy is {sigma} = 0.12 (1 + z) for 95% of AGN at 0 < z < 3. Redshift probability functions, central to several ongoing studies of the galaxy population, are computed for the full sample. We demonstrate that these functions accurately represent the true redshift probability density, allowing the calculation of valid confidence intervals for all objects. These probability functions have already been used to successfully identify a population of Spitzer-selected high redshift (z > 1) galaxy clusters. We present one such spectroscopically confirmed cluster at = 1.24, ISCS J1434.2+3426. Finally, we present a measurement of the 4.5 {micro}m-selected galaxy redshift distribution.

  8. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) redshift survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettolani, G.; Zucca, E.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G.; Zamorani, G.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey over about 30 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude bj = 19.4 and consists of more than three thousands galaxies with reliable redshift determination.

  9. The Southern Sky Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, L. Nicolaci; Willmer, C. N. A.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Chaves, O. L.; Rité, C.; Maia, M. A. G.; Geller, M. J.; Latham, D. W.; Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Ramella, M.; Fairall, A. P.; Smith, C.; Lípari, S.

    1998-07-01

    We report redshifts, magnitudes, and morphological classifications for 5369 galaxies with m_B <= 15.5 and for 57 galaxies fainter than this limit, in two regions covering a total of 1.70 sr in the southern celestial hemisphere. The galaxy catalog is drawn primarily from the list of nonstellar objects identified in the Hubble Space Telescope Guide Star Catalog (GSC). The galaxies have positions accurate to ~1" and magnitudes with an rms scatter of ~0.3 mag. We compute magnitudes (m_SSRS2) from the relation between instrumental GSC magnitudes and the photometry by Lauberts & Valentijn. From a comparison with CCD photometry, we find that our system is homogeneous across the sky and corresponds to magnitudes measured at the isophotal level ~26 mag arcsec^-2. The precision of the radial velocities is ~40 km s^-1, and the redshift survey is more than 99% complete to the m_SSRS2 = 15.5 mag limit. This sample is in the direction opposite that of the CfA2; in combination the two surveys provide an important database for studies of the properties of galaxies and their large-scale distribution in the nearby universe. Based on observations obtained at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan; the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, partially under the bilateral ESO-Observatório Nacional agreement; Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory; Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica, Brazil; and the South African Astronomical Observatory.

  10. Gravitational redshift determinations for white dwarfs in common proper-motion binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, G.; Reid, I.N. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1991-07-01

    Gravitational redshifts determined using the 5 m Hale telescope are given for 23 white dwarfs belonging to common proper-motion binary systems and additional velocities are presented for 14 pairs found not to comprise physical binaries or that have unmeasurable velocities. The mass distribution for the common proper-motion pairs using the gravitational redshifts and the mass-radius relation peaks strongly near 0.55 solar mass, and the main details of the shape agree with earlier determinations using other methods although a problem remains with contamination with optical pairs. The redshifts and radii of a subset of these objects with known distances are consistent with the mass-radius relation for white dwarfs. 30 refs.

  11. Dynamical mass modeling of dispersion-supported dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joseph

    The currently favored cold dark matter cosmology (LCDM) has had much success in reproducing the large scale structure of the universe. However, on smaller scales there are some possible discrepancies when attempting to match galactic observations with properties of halos in dissipationless LCDM simulations. One advantageous method to test small scale simulations with observations is through dynamical mass modeling of nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). The stellar tracers of dSphs are dispersion-supported, which poses a significant challenge in accurately deriving mass profiles. Unlike rotationally-supported galaxies, the dynamics of which can be well-approximated by one-dimensional physics, modeling dispersion-supported systems given only line-of-sight data results in a well-known degeneracy between the mass profile and the velocity dispersion anisotropy. The core of this dissertation is rooted in a new advancement which we have discovered: the range of solutions allowed by the mass-anisotropy degeneracy varies as a function of radius, with a considerable minimal near the deprojected half-light radius of almost all observed dispersion-supported galaxies. This finding allows for a wide range of applications in galaxy formation scenarios to be explored in an attempt to address, amongst other hypotheses, whether the LCDM framework needs to be modified in order to reproduce observations on the small scale. This thesis is comprised of both the derivation of this finding, and its applicability to all dispersion-supported systems, ranging from dwarfs galaxies consisting of a few hundred stars to systems of 'intracluster light', containing over a trillion stars. Rarely does one have the privilege of working with systems that span such a large range in luminosity (or any intrinsic property) in a short graduate career. Although the large applicability of this scale-free finding allows for discussion in many subfields, this thesis will mainly focus on one topic: dwarf

  12. Observational Signatures of High-Redshift Quasars and Local Relics of Black Hole Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Comastri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Observational constraints on the birth and early evolution of massive black holes come from two extreme regimes. At high redshift, quasars signal the rapid growth of billion-solar-mass black holes and indicate that these objects began remarkably heavy and/or accreted mass at rates above the Eddington limit. At low redshift, the smallest nuclear black holes known are found in dwarf galaxies and provide the most concrete limits on the mass of black hole seeds. Here, we review current observational work in these fields that together are critical for our understanding of the origin of massive black holes in the Universe.

  13. Real-time cosmography with redshift derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Martinelli, M.; Calabrese, E.; Ramos, M. P. L. P.

    2016-08-01

    The drift in the redshift of objects passively following the cosmological expansion has long been recognized as a key model-independent probe of cosmology. Here, we study the cosmological relevance of measurements of time or redshift derivatives of this drift, arguing that the combination of first and second redshift derivatives is a powerful test of the Λ CDM cosmological model. In particular, the latter can be obtained numerically from a set of measurements of the drift at different redshifts. We show that, in the low-redshift limit, a measurement of the derivative of the drift can provide a constraint on the jerk parameter, which is j =1 for flat Λ CDM , while generically j ≠1 for other models. We emphasize that such a measurement is well within the reach of the ELT-HIRES and SKA Phase 2 array surveys.

  14. CuBANz: Photometric redshift estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samui, Saumyadip; Pal, Shanoli Samui

    2016-09-01

    CuBANz is a photometric redshift estimator code for high redshift galaxies that uses the back propagation neural network along with clustering of the training set, making it very efficient. The training set is divided into several self learning clusters with galaxies having similar photometric properties and spectroscopic redshifts within a given span. The clustering algorithm uses the color information (i.e. u-g, g-r etc.) rather than the apparent magnitudes at various photometric bands, as the photometric redshift is more sensitive to the flux differences between different bands rather than the actual values. The clustering method enables accurate determination of the redshifts. CuBANz considers uncertainty in the photometric measurements as well as uncertainty in the neural network training. The code is written in C.

  15. The kinematic component of the cosmological redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodorowski, Michał J.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely believed that the cosmological redshift is not a Doppler shift. However, Bunn & Hogg have recently pointed out that to solve this problem properly, one has to transport parallelly the velocity four-vector of a distant galaxy to the observer's position. Performing such a transport along the null geodesic of photons arriving from the galaxy, they found that the cosmological redshift is purely kinematic. Here we argue that one should rather transport the velocity four-vector along the geodesic connecting the points of intersection of the world-lines of the galaxy and the observer with the hypersurface of constant cosmic time. We find that the resulting relation between the transported velocity and the redshift of arriving photons is not given by a relativistic Doppler formula. Instead, for small redshifts it coincides with the well-known non-relativistic decomposition of the redshift into a Doppler (kinematic) component and a gravitational one. We perform such a decomposition for arbitrary large redshifts and derive a formula for the kinematic component of the cosmological redshift, valid for any Friedman-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology. In particular, in a universe with Ωm= 0.24 and ΩΛ= 0.76, a quasar at a redshift 6, at the time of emission of photons reaching us today had the recession velocity v= 0.997c. This can be contrasted with v= 0.96c, had the redshift been entirely kinematic. Thus, for recession velocities of such high-redshift sources, the effect of deceleration of the early Universe clearly prevails over the effect of its relatively recent acceleration. Last but not the least, we show that the so-called proper recession velocities of galaxies, commonly used in cosmology, are in fact radial components of the galaxies' four-velocity vectors. As such, they can indeed attain superluminal values, but should not be regarded as real velocities.

  16. A faint galaxy redshift survey behind massive clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Brenda Louise

    1999-05-01

    This thesis is concerned with the gravitational lensing effect by massive galaxy clusters. We have explored a new technique for measuring galaxy masses and for detecting high-z galaxies by their optical colors. A redshift survey has been obtained at the Keck for a magnitude limited sample of objects (I<23) behind three clusters, A1689, A2390, and A2218 within a radius of 0.5M pc. For each cluster we see both a clear trend of increasing flux and redshift towards the center. This behavior is the result of image magnifications, such that at fixed redshift one sees further down the luminosity function. The gradient of this magnification is, unlike measurements of image distortion, sensitive to the mass profile, and found to depart strongly from a pure isothermal halo. We have found that V RI color selection can be used effectively as a discriminant for finding high-z galaxies behind clusters and present five 4.1 < z < 5.1 spectra which are of very high quality due to their high mean magnification of ~20, showing strong, visibly-saturated interstellar metal lines in some cases. We have also investigated the radio ring lens PKS 1830-211, locating the source and multiple images and detected molecular absorption at mm wavelengths. Broad molecular absorption of width 1/40kms is found toward the southwest component only, where surprisingly it does not reach the base of the continuum, which implies incomplete coverage of the SW component by molecular gas, despite the small projected size of the source, less than 1/8h pc at the absorption redshift.

  17. The importance of stellar feedback for high-redshift galaxy populations in hierarchical formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; De Lucia, Gabriella

    2015-08-01

    One major deficiency of most state-of-the-art galaxy formation models consists in their inability of capturing the observed galaxy downsizing trend as they significantly over-estimate the number density of low-mass galaxies at high redshifts. This points towards fundamental modifications in modeling the interplay between star formation and stellar feedback. Employing an enhanced galaxy formation model with a full chemical enrichment scheme, we present an improved model for stellar feedback (based on parametrizations extracted from cosmological zoom simulations), in which strong gas outflows happen due to bursty star formation at high redshift, while star formation is mainly "quiescent" not causing any significant outflows anymore at low redshift. Due to the stronger gas outflows at high z, early star formation is strongly delayed towards later times in good agreement with abundance matching predictions. As a consequence, also metal enrichment gets significantly delayed, resulting in a much more realistic redshift evolution of the gaseous metallicity. Overall, with our new stellar feedback model, we can successfully reproduce many observational constraints, such as the redshift evolution of the stellar mass function and of the SFR function, the gaseous and stellar metallicity content, the cold gas fractions and the fraction of quiescent/red galaxies at both low and high redshifts. The resulting new-generation galaxy catalogues based on that model are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming large-scale surveys (HST, JWST, Euclid) which in turn may also help to further constrain feedback models.

  18. Feedback in high redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Breuck, Carlos; Nesvadba, Nicole; Lehnert, Matthew; Best, Philip

    High redshift radio galaxies are among the best objects to study AGN feedback in action, as they are among the most massive galaxies (1011 - 1012 M ) hosting powerful radio-loud AGN. I will present near-infrared imaging spectroscopy of a sample of over 50 radio galaxies at 2 < z < 5 using SINFONI at the VLT. We identify kpc-sized outflows of few x 1010 M of ionized gas, located along the radio source axis. Velocity fields are consistent with bipolar outflows, with total velocity offsets of 1000 km/s. FWHMs 1000 km/s suggest strong turbulence. The geometry is consistent with the radio source driving these outflows. Over the lifetime of the radio source (˜ 107 yr), these outflows can eject up to 1011 M of gas out of the gravitational potential of the host galaxy. Such mass loss would be sufficient to terminate star formation within the host galaxy. I will also present results from an ongoing follow-up programme to study the molecular gas in these high z radio galaxies using the IRAM interferometer. In several sources, we find a remarkable deficit in cold molecular relative to ionized gas, which may imply that significant fractions of the interstellar medium of these galaxies are participating in the winds.

  19. The effects of spatial resolution on integral field spectrograph surveys at different redshifts - The CALIFA perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, D.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez, S. F.; Vílchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Husemann, B.; Márquez, I.; Marino, R. A.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Galbany, L.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Kehrig, C.; del Olmo, A.; Relaño, M.; Wisotzki, L.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Bekeraitè, S.; Papaderos, P.; Wild, V.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Ziegler, B.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; van de Ven, G.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Over the past decade, 3D optical spectroscopy has become the preferred tool for understanding the properties of galaxies and is now increasingly used to carry out galaxy surveys. Low redshift surveys include SAURON, DiskMass, ATLAS3D, PINGS, and VENGA. At redshifts above 0.7, surveys such as MASSIV, SINS, GLACE, and IMAGES have targeted the most luminous galaxies to study mainly their kinematic properties. The on-going CALIFA survey (z ~ 0.02) is the first of a series of upcoming integral field spectroscopy (IFS) surveys with large samples representative of the entire population of galaxies. Others include SAMI and MaNGA at lower redshift and the upcoming KMOS surveys at higher redshift. Given the importance of spatial scales in IFS surveys, the study of the effects of spatial resolution on the recovered parameters becomes important. Aims: We explore the capability of the CALIFA survey and a hypothetical higher redshift survey to reproduce the properties of a sample of objects observed with better spatial resolution at lower redshift. Methods: Using a sample of PINGS galaxies, we simulated observations at different redshifts. We then studied the behaviour of different parameters as the spatial resolution degrades with increasing redshift. Results: We show that at the CALIFA resolution, we are able to measure and map common observables in a galaxy study: the number and distribution of H ii regions (Hα flux structure), the gas metallicity (using the O3N2 method), the gas ionization properties (through the [N ii]/Hα and [O iii]/Hβ line ratios), and the age of the underlying stellar population (using the D4000 index). This supports the aim of the survey to characterise the observable properties of galaxies in the Local Universe. Our analysis of simulated IFS data cubes at higher redshifts highlights the importance of the projected spatial scale per spaxel as the most important figure of merit in the design of an integral field survey.

  20. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Senger, Robert; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L.; Pforr, Janine; Tojeiro, Rita; Johansson, Jonas; Nichol, Robert C.; Chen, Yan-Mei; Wake, David; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin; Pan, Kaike; and others

    2014-07-10

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ∼180, 000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.6. The typical stellar mass of this sample is M{sub *} ∼2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}. We analyze the evolution of the galaxy parameters effective radius, stellar velocity dispersion, and the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift. As the effective radii of BOSS galaxies at these redshifts are not well resolved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging we calibrate the SDSS size measurements with Hubble Space Telescope/COSMOS photometry for a sub-sample of galaxies. We further apply a correction for progenitor bias to build a sample which consists of a coeval, passively evolving population. Systematic errors due to size correction and the calculation of dynamical mass are assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. At fixed stellar or dynamical mass, we find moderate evolution in galaxy size and stellar velocity dispersion, in agreement with previous studies. We show that this results in a decrease of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift at >2σ significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data, we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z ∼ 0.7 up to z > 2 as M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} ∼(1 + z){sup –0.30±0.12}, further strengthening the evidence for an increase of M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  1. Thermodynamics Insights for the Redshift Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    The secular redshift drift is a potential measurement to directly probe the cosmic expansion. Previous study on the redshift drift mainly focused on the model-dependent simulation. Apparently, the physical insights on the redshift drift are very necessary. So in this paper, it is investigated using thermodynamics on the apparent, Hubble and event horizons. Thermodynamics could analytically present the model-independent upper bounds of redshift drift. For specific assumption on the cosmological parameters, we find that the thermodynamics bounds are nearly one order of magnitude larger than the expectation in standard ΛCDM model. We then examine ten observed redshift drift from Green Bank Telescope at redshift 0.09 < z < 0.69, and find that these observational results are inconsistent with the thermodynamics. The size of the errorbars on these measurements is about three orders of magnitude larger than the effect of thermodynamical bounds for the redshift drift. Obviously, we have not yet hit any instrumental systematics at the shift level of 1m s-1 yr-1.

  2. EAZY: A Fast, Public Photometric Redshift Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Coppi, Paolo

    2008-10-01

    We describe a new program for determining photometric redshifts, dubbed EAZY. The program is optimized for cases where spectroscopic redshifts are not available, or are only available for a biased subset of the galaxies. The code combines features from various existing codes: it can fit linear combinations of templates, it includes optional flux- and redshift-based priors, and its user interface is modeled on the popular HYPERZ code. A novel feature is that the default template set, as well as the default functional forms of the priors, are not based on (usually highly biased) spectroscopic samples, but on semianalytical models. Furthermore, template mismatch is addressed by a novel rest-frame template error function. This function gives different wavelength regions different weights, and ensures that the formal redshift uncertainties are realistic. We introduce a redshift quality parameter, Qz, which provides a robust estimate of the reliability of the photometric redshift estimate. Despite the fact that EAZY is not "trained" on spectroscopic samples, the code (with default parameters) performs very well on existing public data sets. For K-selected samples in CDF-South and other deep fields, we find a 1 σ scatter in Δ z/(1 + z) of 0.034, and we provide updated photometric redshift catalogs for the FIRES, MUSYC, and FIREWORKS surveys.

  3. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: the cluster redshift survey, target selection and cluster properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, M. S.; Allen, J. T.; Baldry, I.; Bryant, J. J.; Cecil, G. N.; Cortese, L.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Green, A. W.; Helmich, E.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Kuijken, K.; Mahajan, S.; McFarland, J.; Pracy, M. B.; Robotham, A. G. S.; Sikkema, G.; Sweet, S.; Taylor, E. N.; Verdoes Kleijn, G.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Colless, M.; Couch, W. J.; Davies, R. L.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Goodwin, M.; Hopkins, A. M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Foster, C.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Medling, A. M.; Metcalfe, N.; Richards, S. N.; van de Sande, J.; Scott, N.; Shanks, T.; Sharp, R.; Thomas, A. D.; Tonini, C.

    2017-06-01

    We describe the selection of galaxies targeted in eight low-redshift clusters (APMCC0917, A168, A4038, EDCC442, A3880, A2399, A119 and A85; 0.029 < z < 0.058) as part of the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object Integral field spectrograph Galaxy Survey (SAMI-GS). We have conducted a redshift survey of these clusters using the AAOmega multi-object spectrograph on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope. The redshift survey is used to determine cluster membership and to characterize the dynamical properties of the clusters. In combination with existing data, the survey resulted in 21 257 reliable redshift measurements and 2899 confirmed cluster member galaxies. Our redshift catalogue has a high spectroscopic completeness (˜94 per cent) for rpetro ≤ 19.4 and cluster-centric distances R < 2R200. We use the confirmed cluster member positions and redshifts to determine cluster velocity dispersion, R200, virial and caustic masses, as well as cluster structure. The clusters have virial masses 14.25 ≤ log(M200/M⊙) ≤ 15.19. The cluster sample exhibits a range of dynamical states, from relatively relaxed-appearing systems, to clusters with strong indications of merger-related substructure. Aperture- and point spread function matched photometry are derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and VLT Survey Telescope/ATLAS imaging and used to estimate stellar masses. These estimates, in combination with the redshifts, are used to define the input target catalogue for the cluster portion of the SAMI-GS. The primary SAMI-GS cluster targets have R masses 9.5 ≤ {log({M}}^*_{approx}/M⊙)≤12. Finally, we give an update on the SAMI-GS progress for the cluster regions.

  4. The Black Hole-Bulge Relationship for QSOs at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, G. A.; Menezes, K. L.; Massart, C. A.; Vanden Bout, P.

    2006-04-01

    We examine the black hole mass-galaxy bulge relationship in high-redshift QSOs. Black hole masses are derived from broad emission lines, and the host galaxy stellar velocity dispersion σ* is estimated from the widths of the radio CO emission lines. At redshifts z>3, the CO line widths are narrower than expected for the black hole mass, indicating that these giant black holes reside in undersized bulges by an order of magnitude or more. The largest black holes (MBH>109 Msolar) evidently grow rapidly in the early universe without commensurate growth of their host galaxies. CO line widths offer a unique opportunity to study AGN host galaxy dynamics at high redshift.

  5. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  6. On VI at intermediate redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simcoe, R.; Sargent, W.; Rauch, M.

    2001-05-01

    Recent observations using the FUSE satellite and HST/STIS have emphasized the contribution of shock-heated O VI to the local baryon budget. Also, photoionized O VI is well known to be an excellent tracer of metal enrichment in the lowest density regions of the IGM. Searches for oxygen at higher redshift from the ground have been limited by severe bending of the doublet with lines in the lyman-alpha and lyman-beta forests. However, there exists a growing body of both direct (at high column density) and statistical (at low column density) evidence that suggests the presence of O VI at a wide range of associated H I column densities, even at large lookback times. We will discuss progress on a systematic, large pathlength search for O VI absorption in the spectra of a sample of quasars observed with the Keck I telescope and HIRES spectrograph, and we will describe our strategy for dealing with the blending problem. Where O VI is unambiguously detected, we compare its abundance and kinematics with those of other highly ionized species. We will also discuss the initial results of statistcial searches for oxygen at the weakest levels of absorption.

  7. Gravitational redshift and other redshift-space distortions of the imaginary part of the power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Patrick

    2009-11-01

    I extend the usual linear-theory formula for large-scale clustering in redshift-space to include gravitational redshift. The extra contribution to the standard galaxy power spectrum is suppressed by k{sub c}{sup −2}, where k{sub c} = ck/aH (k is the wavevector, a the expansion factor, and H = a-dot /a), and is thus effectively limited to the few largest-scale modes and very difficult to detect; however, a correlation, ∝k{sub c}{sup −1}, is generated between the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier space density fields of two different types of galaxy, which would otherwise be zero, i.e., the cross-power spectrum has an imaginary part: P{sub ab}(k,μ)/P(k) = (b{sub a}+fμ{sup 2})(b{sub b}+fμ{sup 2})−i(3/2)Ω{sub m}(μ/k{sub c})(b{sub a}−b{sub b})+O(k{sub c}{sup −2}), where P(k) is the real-space mass-density power spectrum, b{sub i} are the galaxy biases, μ is the cosine of the angle between the wavevector and line of sight, and f = dln D/dln a (D is the linear growth factor). The total signal-to-noise of measurements of this effect is not dominated by the largest scales — it converges at k ∼ 0.05 h Mpc{sup −1}. This gravitational redshift result is pedagogically interesting, but naive in that it is gauge dependent and there are other effects of similar form and size, related to the transformation between observable and proper coordinates. I include these effects, which add other contributions to the coefficient of μ/k{sub c}, and add a μ{sup 3}/k{sub c} term, but don't qualitatively change the picture. The leading source of noise in the measurement is galaxy shot-noise, not sample variance, so developments that allow higher S/N surveys can make this measurement powerful, although it would otherwise be only marginally detectable in a JDEM-scale survey.

  8. Galaxy clusters in the SDSS Stripe 82 based on photometric redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.; Hao, J.; Márquez, I.; Martinet, N.; Maurogordato, S.; Sauvaget, T.; Scepi, N.; Takey, A.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2015-06-10

    Based on a recent photometric redshift galaxy catalogue, we have searched for galaxy clusters in the Stripe ~82 region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by applying the Adami & MAzure Cluster FInder (AMACFI). Extensive tests were made to fine-tune the AMACFI parameters and make the cluster detection as reliable as possible. The same method was applied to the Millennium simulation to estimate our detection efficiency and the approximate masses of the detected clusters. Considering all the cluster galaxies (i.e. within a 1 Mpc radius of the cluster to which they belong and with a photoz differing by less than 0.05 from that of the cluster), we stacked clusters in various redshift bins to derive colour-magnitude diagrams and galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs). For each galaxy with absolute magnitude brighter than -19.0 in the r band, we computed the disk and spheroid components by applying SExtractor, and by stacking clusters we determined how the disk-to-spheroid flux ratio varies with cluster redshift and mass. We also detected 3663 clusters in the redshift range 0.15masses between 1013 and a few 1014 solar masses. Furthermore, by stacking the cluster galaxies in various redshift bins, we find a clear red sequence in the (g'-r') versus r' colour-magnitude diagrams, and the GLFs are typical of clusters, though with a possible contamination from field galaxies. The morphological analysis of the cluster galaxies shows that the fraction of late-type to early-type galaxies shows an increase with redshift (particularly in high mass clusters) and a decrease with detection level, i.e. cluster mass. From the properties of the cluster galaxies, the majority of the candidate clusters detected here seem to be real clusters with typical cluster properties.

  9. Lyman Alpha Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, J. E.; Malhotra, S.; Dawson, S.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Spinrad, H.; Stern, D.; Wang, J. X.; Xu, C.; Brown, M. J. I.; Landes, E.

    2004-05-01

    Because strong Lyman alpha emission is expected from young star forming galaxies at high redshift, it offers an efficient tool for identifying these galaxies. The Large Area Lyman Alpha survey is one of the first and largest successful searches for Lyman alpha emitting galaxies at high redshift. In the LALA Bootes field (which lies within the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey's Bootes field) we have obtained deep narrowband images covering 1/3 square degree in each of eight filters, sampling redshifts z=4.5, 5.7, and 6.5. We focus here on the higher redshift windows, where we have confirmed a luminous Lyman alpha emitting galaxy at z=6.535 and several others in the z=5.7 window. We discuss the physical properties of these objects, including their contribution to star formation rates and metal production. We also discuss the implications of Lyman alpha galaxy observations at z=6.5 for reionization.

  10. Bulge Growth Through Disc Instabilities in High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournaud, Frédéric

    The role of disc instabilities, such as bars and spiral arms, and the associated resonances, in growing bulges in the inner regions of disc galaxies have long been studied in the low-redshift nearby Universe. There it has long been probed observationally, in particular through peanut-shaped bulges (Chap. 14 10.1007/978-3-319-19378-6_14"). This secular growth of bulges in modern disc galaxies is driven by weak, non-axisymmetric instabilities: it mostly produces pseudobulges at slow rates and with long star-formation timescales. Disc instabilities at high redshift (z > 1) in moderate-mass to massive galaxies (1010 to a few 1011 M⊙ of stars) are very different from those found in modern spiral galaxies. High-redshift discs are globally unstable and fragment into giant clumps containing 108-9 M⊙ of gas and stars each, which results in highly irregular galaxy morphologies. The clumps and other features associated to the violent instability drive disc evolution and bulge growth through various mechanisms on short timescales. The giant clumps can migrate inward and coalesce into the bulge in a few 108 years. The instability in the very turbulent media drives intense gas inflows toward the bulge and nuclear region. Thick discs and supermassive black holes can grow concurrently as a result of the violent instability. This chapter reviews the properties of high-redshift disc instabilities, the evolution of giant clumps and other features associated to the instability, and the resulting growth of bulges and associated sub-galactic components.

  11. Differentiating dark energy and modified gravity with galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun

    2008-05-01

    The observed cosmic acceleration today could be due to an unknown energy component (dark energy), or a modification to general relativity (modified gravity). If dark energy models and modified gravity models are required to predict the same cosmic expansion history H(z), they will predict different growth rates for cosmic large scale structure, fg(z). If gravity is not modified, the measured H(z) leads to a unique prediction for fg(z), fgH(z), if dark energy and dark matter are separate. Comparing fgH(z) with the measured fg(z) provides a transparent and straightforward test of gravity. We show that a simple χ2 test provides a general figure of merit for our ability to distinguish between dark energy and modified gravity given the measured H(z) and fg(z). We find that a magnitude-limited NIR galaxy redshift survey covering >10 000 (deg)2 and a redshift range of 0.5redshift-space distortions and the bias factor which describes how light traces mass. We show that if the H(z) data are fitted by both a DGP gravity model and an equivalent dark energy model that predict the same H(z), a survey area of 11 931 (deg)2 is required to rule out the DGP gravity model at the 99.99% confidence level. It is feasible for such a galaxy redshift survey to be carried out by the next generation space missions from NASA and ESA, and it will revolutionize our understanding of the universe by differentiating between dark energy and modified gravity.

  12. Uncertain Photometric Redshifts with Deep Learning Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Isanto, A.

    2017-06-01

    The need for accurate photometric redshifts estimation is a topic that has fundamental importance in Astronomy, due to the necessity of efficiently obtaining redshift information without the need of spectroscopic analysis. We propose a method for determining accurate multi-modal photo-z probability density functions (PDFs) using Mixture Density Networks (MDN) and Deep Convolutional Networks (DCN). A comparison with a Random Forest (RF) is performed.

  13. A statistical investigation of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Harry

    2017-02-01

    We use the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation (the correlation between the ratio of total-to-visible mass and acceleration in galaxies; MDAR) to test the galaxy-halo connection. We analyse the MDAR using a set of 16 statistics that quantify its four most important features: shape, scatter, the presence of a `characteristic acceleration scale', and the correlation of its residuals with other galaxy properties. We construct an empirical framework for the galaxy-halo connection in LCDM to generate predictions for these statistics, starting with conventional correlations (halo abundance matching; AM) and introducing more where required. Comparing to the SPARC data, we find that: (1) the approximate shape of the MDAR is readily reproduced by AM, and there is no evidence that the acceleration at which dark matter becomes negligible has less spread in the data than in AM mocks; (2) even under conservative assumptions, AM significantly overpredicts the scatter in the relation and its normalization at low acceleration, and furthermore positions dark matter too close to galaxies' centres on average; (3) the MDAR affords 2σ evidence for an anticorrelation of galaxy size and Hubble type with halo mass or concentration at fixed stellar mass. Our analysis lays the groundwork for a bottom-up determination of the galaxy-halo connection from relations such as the MDAR, provides concrete statistical tests for specific galaxy formation models, and brings into sharper focus the relative evidence accorded by galaxy kinematics to LCDM and modified gravity alternatives.

  14. A statistical investigation of the mass discrepancy–acceleration relation

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, Harry

    2016-10-08

    We use the mass discrepancy–acceleration relation (the correlation between the ratio of total-to-visible mass and acceleration in galaxies; MDAR) to test the galaxy–halo connection. Here, we analyse the MDAR using a set of 16 statistics that quantify its four most important features: shape, scatter, the presence of a ‘characteristic acceleration scale’, and the correlation of its residuals with other galaxy properties. We construct an empirical framework for the galaxy–halo connection in LCDM to generate predictions for these statistics, starting with conventional correlations (halo abundance matching; AM) and introducing more where required. Comparing to the SPARC data, we find that: (1) the approximate shape of the MDAR is readily reproduced by AM, and there is no evidence that the acceleration at which dark matter becomes negligible has less spread in the data than in AM mocks; (2) even under conservative assumptions, AM significantly overpredicts the scatter in the relation and its normalization at low acceleration, and furthermore positions dark matter too close to galaxies’ centres on average; (3) the MDAR affords 2σ evidence for an anticorrelation of galaxy size and Hubble type with halo mass or concentration at fixed stellar mass. Lastly, our analysis lays the groundwork for a bottom-up determination of the galaxy–halo connection from relations such as the MDAR, provides concrete statistical tests for specific galaxy formation models, and brings into sharper focus the relative evidence accorded by galaxy kinematics to LCDM and modified gravity alternatives.

  15. Spatial Homogeneity and Redshift--Distance Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, J. F.; Segal, I. E.

    1982-06-01

    Spatial homogeneity in the radial direction of low-redshift galaxies is subjected to Kafka-Schmidt V/Vm tests using well-documented samples. Homogeneity is consistent with the assumption of the Lundmark (quadratic redshift-distance) law, but large deviations from homogeneity are implied by the assumption of the Hubble (linear redshift-distance) law. These deviations are similar to what would be expected on the basis of the Lundmark law. Luminosity functions are obtained for each law by a nonparametric statistically optimal method that removes the observational cutoff bias in complete samples. Although the Hubble law correlation of absolute magnitude with redshift is reduced considerably by elimination of the bias, computer simulations show that its bias-free value is nevertheless at a satistically quite significant level, indicating the self-inconsistency of the law. The corresponding Lundmark law correlations are quite satisfactory satistically. The regression of redshift on magnitude also involves radial spatial homogeneity and, according to R. Soneira, has slope determining the redshift-magnitude exponent independently of the luminosity function. We have, however, rigorously proved the material dependence of the regression on this function and here exemplify our treatment by using the bias-free functions indicated, with results consistent with the foregoing argument.

  16. Cosmological constraints with clustering-based redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Raccanelli, Alvise; Rahman, Mubdi

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate that observations lacking reliable redshift information, such as photometric and radio continuum surveys, can produce robust measurements of cosmological parameters when empowered by clustering-based redshift estimation. This method infers the redshift distribution based on the spatial clustering of sources, using cross-correlation with a reference data set with known redshifts. Applying this method to the existing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric galaxies, and projecting to future radio continuum surveys, we show that sources can be efficiently divided into several redshift bins, increasing their ability to constrain cosmological parameters. We forecast constraints on the dark-energy equation of state and on local non-Gaussianity parameters. We explore several pertinent issues, including the trade-off between including more sources and minimizing the overlap between bins, the shot-noise limitations on binning and the predicted performance of the method at high redshifts, and most importantly pay special attention to possible degeneracies with the galaxy bias. Remarkably, we find that once this technique is implemented, constraints on dynamical dark energy from the SDSS imaging catalogue can be competitive with, or better than, those from the spectroscopic BOSS survey and even future planned experiments. Further, constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity from future large-sky radio-continuum surveys can outperform those from the Planck cosmic microwave background experiment and rival those from future spectroscopic galaxy surveys. The application of this method thus holds tremendous promise for cosmology.

  17. Astronomical redshifts of highly ionized regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical or cosmological redshifts are an observable property of extragalactic objects and have historically been wholly attributed to the recessional velocity of that object. The question of other, or intrinsic, components of the redshift has been highly controversial since it was first proposed. This paper investigates one theoretical source of intrinsic redshift that has been identified. The highly ionized regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) are, by definition, plasmas. All plasmas have electromagnetic scattering characteristics that could contribute to the observed redshift. To investigate this possibility, one region of a generalized AGN was selected, the so called Broad Line Region (BLR). Even though unresolvable with current instrumentation, physical estimates of this region have been published for years in the astronomical literature. These data, selected and then averaged, are used to construct an overall model that is consistent with the published data to within an order of magnitude. The model is then subjected to a theoretical scattering investigation. The results suggest that intrinsic redshifts, derivable from the characteristics of the ambient plasma, may indeed contribute to the overall observed redshift of these objects.

  18. Galaxy clusters in the SDSS Stripe 82 based on photometric redshifts

    DOE PAGES

    Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.; ...

    2015-06-10

    Based on a recent photometric redshift galaxy catalogue, we have searched for galaxy clusters in the Stripe ~82 region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by applying the Adami & MAzure Cluster FInder (AMACFI). Extensive tests were made to fine-tune the AMACFI parameters and make the cluster detection as reliable as possible. The same method was applied to the Millennium simulation to estimate our detection efficiency and the approximate masses of the detected clusters. Considering all the cluster galaxies (i.e. within a 1 Mpc radius of the cluster to which they belong and with a photoz differing by less thanmore » 0.05 from that of the cluster), we stacked clusters in various redshift bins to derive colour-magnitude diagrams and galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs). For each galaxy with absolute magnitude brighter than -19.0 in the r band, we computed the disk and spheroid components by applying SExtractor, and by stacking clusters we determined how the disk-to-spheroid flux ratio varies with cluster redshift and mass. We also detected 3663 clusters in the redshift range 0.1513 and a few 1014 solar masses. Furthermore, by stacking the cluster galaxies in various redshift bins, we find a clear red sequence in the (g'-r') versus r' colour-magnitude diagrams, and the GLFs are typical of clusters, though with a possible contamination from field galaxies. The morphological analysis of the cluster galaxies shows that the fraction of late-type to early-type galaxies shows an increase with redshift (particularly in high mass clusters) and a decrease with detection level, i.e. cluster mass. From the properties of the cluster galaxies, the majority of the candidate clusters detected here seem to be real clusters with typical cluster properties.« less

  19. High-Redshift Quasars at the Highest Resolution: VSOP Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, S.; Gurvits, L. I.; Lobanov, A. P.; Schilizzi, R. T.; Paragi, Z.

    2009-08-01

    We studied the radio structure of high-redshift (z>3) quasars with VSOP at 1.6 and 5 GHz. These sources are the most distant objects ever observed with Space VLBI, at rest-frame frequencies up to ˜25 GHz. Here we give an account of the observations and briefly highlight the most interesting cases and results. These observations allowed us, among other things, to estimate the mass of the central black holes powering these quasars, to identify large misalignments between the milli-arcsecond (mas) and sub-mas scale radio structures, and to detect apparent superluminal motion at sub-mas scale.

  20. Peculiar velocities in redshift space: formalism, N-body simulations and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Teppei; Seljak, Uroš; Vlah, Zvonimir; Desjacques, Vincent E-mail: useljak@berkeley.edu E-mail: Vincent.Desjacques@unige.ch

    2014-05-01

    Direct measurements of peculiar velocities of galaxies and clusters of galaxies can in principle provide explicit information on the three dimensional mass distribution, but this information is modulated by the fact that velocity field is sampled at galaxy positions, and is thus probing galaxy momentum. We derive expressions for the cross power spectrum between the density and momentum field and the auto spectrum of the momentum field in redshift space, by extending the distribution function method to these statistics. The resulting momentum cross and auto power spectra in redshift space are expressed as infinite sums over velocity moment correlators in real space, as is the case for the density power spectrum in redshift space. We compute each correlator using Eulerian perturbation theory (PT) and halo biasing model and compare the resulting redshift-space velocity statistics to those measured from N-body simulations for both dark matter and halos. We find that in redshift space linear theory predictions for the density-momentum cross power spectrum as well as for the momentum auto spectrum fail to predict the N-body results at very large scales. On the other hand, our nonlinear PT prediction for these velocity statistics, together with real-space power spectrum for dark matter from simulations, improves the accuracy for both dark matter and halos. We also present the same analysis in configuration space, computing the redshift-space pairwise mean infall velocities and velocity correlation function and compare to nonlinear PT.

  1. ON THE EFFECT OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND IN HIGH-REDSHIFT (SUB-)MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Cunha, Elisabete; Groves, Brent; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Rix, Hans-Walter; Weiss, Axel; Bertoldi, Frank; Carilli, Chris; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark; Maiolino, Roberto; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian

    2013-03-20

    Modern (sub-)millimeter interferometers enable the measurement of the cool gas and dust emission of high-redshift galaxies (z > 5). However, at these redshifts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature is higher, approaching, and even exceeding, the temperature of cold dust and molecular gas observed in the local universe. In this paper, we discuss the impact of the warmer CMB on (sub-)millimeter observations of high-redshift galaxies. The CMB affects the observed (sub-)millimeter dust continuum and the line emission (e.g., carbon monoxide, CO) in two ways: (1) it provides an additional source of (both dust and gas) heating and (2) it is a non-negligible background against which the line and continuum emission are measured. We show that these two competing processes affect the way we interpret the dust and gas properties of high-redshift galaxies using spectral energy distribution models. We quantify these effects and provide correction factors to compute what fraction of the intrinsic dust (and line) emission can be detected against the CMB as a function of frequency, redshift, and temperature. We discuss implications on the derived properties of high-redshift galaxies from (sub-)millimeter data. Specifically, the inferred dust and molecular gas masses can be severely underestimated for cold systems if the impact of the CMB is not properly taken into account.

  2. Lyman Break Analogs: Constraints on the Formation of Extreme Starbursts at Low and High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goncalves, Thiago S.; Overzier, Roderik; Basu-Zych, Antara; Martin, D. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs), characterized by high far-UV luminosities and surface brightnesses as detected by GALEX, are intensely star-forming galaxies in the low-redshift universe (z approximately equal to 0.2), with star formation rates reaching up to 50 times that of the Milky Way. These objects present metallicities, morphologies and other physical properties similar to higher redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs), motivating the detailed study of LBAs as local laboratories of this high-redshift galaxy population. We present results from our recent integral-field spectroscopy survey of LBAs with Keck/OSIRIS, which shows that these galaxies have the same nebular gas kinematic properties as high-redshift LBGs. We argue that such kinematic studies alone are not an appropriate diagnostic to rule out merger events as the trigger for the observed starburst. Comparison between the kinematic analysis and morphological indices from HST imaging illustrates the difficulties of properly identifying (minor or major) merger events, with no clear correlation between the results using either of the two methods. Artificial redshifting of our data indicates that this problem becomes even worse at high redshift due to surface brightness dimming and resolution loss. Whether mergers could generate the observed kinematic properties is strongly dependent on gas fractions in these galaxies. We present preliminary results of a CARMA survey for LBAs and discuss the implications of the inferred molecular gas masses for formation models.

  3. Weighing the Giants - II. Improved calibration of photometry from stellar colours and accurate photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; von der Linden, Anja; Applegate, Douglas E.; Allen, Mark T.; Allen, Steven W.; Burchat, Patricia R.; Burke, David L.; Ebeling, Harald; Capak, Peter; Czoske, Oliver; Donovan, David; Mantz, Adam; Morris, R. Glenn

    2014-03-01

    We present improved methods for using stars found in astronomical exposures to calibrate both star and galaxy colours as well as to adjust the instrument flat-field. By developing a spectroscopic model for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) stellar locus in colour-colour space, synthesizing an expected stellar locus, and simultaneously solving for all unknown zero-points when fitting to the instrumental locus, we increase the calibration accuracy of stellar locus matching. We also use a new combined technique to estimate improved flat-field models for the Subaru SuprimeCam camera, forming `star flats' based on the magnitudes of stars observed in multiple positions or through comparison with available measurements in the SDSS catalogue. These techniques yield galaxy magnitudes with reliable colour calibration (≲0.01-0.02 mag accuracy) that enable us to estimate photometric redshift probability distributions without spectroscopic training samples. We test the accuracy of our photometric redshifts using spectroscopic redshifts zs for ˜5000 galaxies in 27cluster fields with at least five bands of photometry, as well as galaxies in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, finding σ((zp - zs)/(1 + zs)) ≈ 0.03 for the most probable redshift zp. We show that the full posterior probability distributions for the redshifts of galaxies with five-band photometry exhibit good agreement with redshifts estimated from thirty-band photometry in the COSMOS field. The growth of shear with increasing distance behind each galaxy cluster shows the expected redshift-distance relation for a flat Λ cold dark matter (Λ-CDM) cosmology. Photometric redshifts and calibrated colours are used in subsequent papers to measure the masses of 51 galaxy clusters from their weak gravitational shear and determine improved cosmological constraints. We make our PYTHON code for stellar locus matching publicly available at http://big-macs-calibrate.googlecode.com; the code requires only input

  4. SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND SED PARAMETERS: IMPROVED TECHNIQUES AND A REALISTIC ERROR BUDGET

    SciTech Connect

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Raichoor, Anand

    2015-05-01

    We seek to improve the accuracy of joint galaxy photometric redshift estimation and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. By simulating different sources of uncorrected systematic errors, we demonstrate that if the uncertainties in the photometric redshifts are estimated correctly, so are those on the other SED fitting parameters, such as stellar mass, stellar age, and dust reddening. Furthermore, we find that if the redshift uncertainties are over(under)-estimated, the uncertainties in SED parameters tend to be over(under)-estimated by similar amounts. These results hold even in the presence of severe systematics and provide, for the first time, a mechanism to validate the uncertainties on these parameters via comparison with spectroscopic redshifts. We propose a new technique (annealing) to re-calibrate the joint uncertainties in the photo-z and SED fitting parameters without compromising the performance of the SED fitting + photo-z estimation. This procedure provides a consistent estimation of the multi-dimensional probability distribution function in SED fitting + z parameter space, including all correlations. While the performance of joint SED fitting and photo-z estimation might be hindered by template incompleteness, we demonstrate that the latter is “flagged” by a large fraction of outliers in redshift, and that significant improvements can be achieved by using flexible stellar populations synthesis models and more realistic star formation histories. In all cases, we find that the median stellar age is better recovered than the time elapsed from the onset of star formation. Finally, we show that using a photometric redshift code such as EAZY to obtain redshift probability distributions that are then used as priors for SED fitting codes leads to only a modest bias in the SED fitting parameters and is thus a viable alternative to the simultaneous estimation of SED parameters and photometric redshifts.

  5. Detection of molecular gas in the quasar BR1202 - 0725 at redshift z = 4.69.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Yamada, T; Nakanishi, K; Kohno, K; Akiyama, M; Kawabe, R

    1996-08-01

    Although great efforts have been made to locate molecular gas--the material out of which stars form--in the early Universe, there have been only two firm detections at high redshift. Both are gravitationally lensed objects at redshift z approximately = 2.5 (refs 9-14). Here we report the detection of CO emission from the radio-quiet quasar BR1202 - 0725, which is at redshift z = 4.69. From the observed CO luminosity, we estimate that almost 10(11) solar masses of molecular hydrogen are associated with the quasar; this is comparable to the stellar mass of a present-day luminous galaxy. Our results suggest that BR1202 - 0725 is a massive galaxy, in which the gas is largely concentrated in the central region, and that is currently undergoing a large burst of star formation.

  6. A new method to assign galaxy cluster membership using photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castignani, G.; Benoist, C.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new effective strategy to assign group and cluster membership probabilities Pmem to galaxies using photometric redshift information. Large dynamical ranges both in halo mass and cosmic time are considered. The method takes into account the magnitude distribution of both cluster and field galaxies as well as the radial distribution of galaxies in clusters using a non-parametric formalism, and relies on Bayesian inference to take photometric redshift uncertainties into account. We successfully test the method against 1208 galaxy clusters within redshifts z = 0.05-2.58 and masses 1013.29-14.80M⊙ drawn from wide field simulated galaxy mock catalogs mainly developed for the forthcoming Euclid mission. Median purity and completeness values of and are reached for galaxies brighter than 0.25 L∗ within r200 of each simulated halo and for a statistical photometric redshift accuracy σ((zs-zp)/(1 + zs)) = 0.03. The mean values p̅=56% and c̅=93% are consistent with the median and have negligible sub-percent uncertainties. Accurate photometric redshifts (σ((zs-zp)/(1 + zs)) ≲ 0.05) and robust estimates for the cluster redshift and cluster center coordinates are required. The dependence of the assignments on photometric redshift accuracy, galaxy magnitude and distance from the halo center, and halo properties such as mass, richness, and redshift are investigated. Variations in the mean values of both purity and completeness are globally limited to a few percent. The largest departures from the mean values are found for galaxies associated with distant z ≳ 1.5 halos, faint ( 0.25 L∗) galaxies, and those at the outskirts of the halo (at cluster-centric projected distances r200) for which the purity is decreased, Δp ≃ 20% at most, with respect to the mean value. The proposed method is applied to derive accurate richness estimates. A statistical comparison between the true (Ntrue) vs. estimated richness (λ = ∑ Pmem) yields on average to unbiased

  7. Spectra of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae and a Comparison withtheir Low-Redshift Counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Burns,M.S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Folatelli, G.; Garavini, G.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente,P.; Sainton, G.; Schaefer, B.E.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2005-07-20

    We present spectra for 14 high-redshift (0.17 < z < 0.83) supernovae, which were discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project as part of a campaign to measure cosmological parameters. The spectra are used to determine the redshift and classify the supernova type, essential information if the supernovae are to be used for cosmological studies. Redshifts were derived either from the spectrum of the host galaxy or from the spectrum of the supernova itself. We present evidence that these supernovae are of Type Ia by matching to spectra of nearby supernovae. We find that the dates of the spectra relative to maximum light determined from this fitting process are consistent with the dates determined from the photometric light curves, and moreover the spectral time-sequence for SNe Type Ia at low and high redshift is indistinguishable. We also show that the expansion velocities measured from blueshifted Ca H&K are consistent with those measured for low-redshift Type Ia supernovae. From these first-level quantitative comparisons we find no evidence for evolution in SNIa properties between these low- and high-redshift samples. Thus even though our samples may not be complete, we conclude that there is a population of SNe Ia at high redshift whose spectral properties match those at low redshift.

  8. An Investigation of Blazars without Redshifts: Not a Missing Population at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Peiyuan; Urry, C. Megan

    2017-06-01

    We investigate a sample of 622 blazars with measured fluxes at 12 wavebands across the radio-to-gamma-ray spectrum but without spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. This sample includes hundreds of sources with newly analyzed X-ray spectra reported here. From the synchrotron peak frequencies, estimated by fitting the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we find that the fraction of high-synchrotron-peaked blazars in these 622 sources is roughly the same as in larger samples of blazars that do have redshifts. We characterize the no-redshift blazars using their infrared colors, which lie in the distinct locus called the WISE blazar strip, then estimate their redshifts using a KNN regression based on the redshifts of the closest blazars in the WISE color-color plot. Finally, using randomly drawn values from plausible redshift distributions, we simulate the SEDs of these blazars and compare them to known blazar SEDs. Based on all these considerations, we conclude that blazars without redshift estimates are unlikely to be high-luminosity, high-synchrotron-peaked objects, which had been suggested in order to explain the “blazar sequence”—an observed trend of SED shape with luminosity—as a selection effect. Instead, the observed properties of no-redshift blazars are compatible with a causal connection between jet power and electron cooling, i.e., a true blazar sequence.

  9. Spectral Evolution in High Redshift Quasars from the Final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Trey W.; Vivek, M.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Anderson, Scott F.; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brandt, William N.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Green, Paul; Harris, David W.; Kamble, Vikrant; McGreer, Ian D.; Merloni, Andrea; Myers, Adam; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey; Suzuki, Nao

    2016-12-01

    We report on the diversity in quasar spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. After filtering the spectra to mitigate selection effects and Malmquist bias associated with a nearly flux-limited sample, we create high signal-to-noise ratio composite spectra from 58,656 quasars (2.1≤slant z≤slant 3.5), binned by luminosity, spectral index, and redshift. With these composite spectra, we confirm the traditional Baldwin effect (BE, i.e., the anti-correlation of C iv equivalent width (EW) and luminosity) that follows the relation {W}λ \\propto {L}{β w} with slope {β }w=-0.35+/- 0.004, -0.35 ± 0.005, and -0.41 ± 0.005 for z = 2.25, 2.46, and 2.84, respectively. In addition to the redshift evolution in the slope of the BE, we find redshift evolution in average quasar spectral features at fixed luminosity. The spectroscopic signature of the redshift evolution is correlated at 98% with the signature of varying luminosity, indicating that they arise from the same physical mechanism. At a fixed luminosity, the average C iv FWHM decreases with increasing redshift and is anti-correlated with C iv EW. The spectroscopic signature associated with C iv FWHM suggests that the trends in luminosity and redshift are likely caused by a superposition of effects that are related to black hole mass and Eddington ratio. The redshift evolution is the consequence of a changing balance between these two quantities as quasars evolve toward a population with lower typical accretion rates at a given black hole mass.

  10. Discovery of Compact Quiescent Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts in DEEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancato, Kirsten; Chilingarian, Igor; Damjanov, Ivana; Moran, Sean; Katkov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Compact quiescent galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.1 are the missing link needed to complete the evolutionary histories of these objects from the high redshift z ≥ 2 Universe to the local z ~ 0 Universe. We identify the first intermediate redshift compact quiescent galaxies by searching a sample of 1,089 objects in the DEEP2 Redshift Survey that have multi-band photometry, spectral fitting, and readily available structural parameters. We find 27 compact quiescent candidates between z = 0.6 and z = 1.1 where each candidate galaxy has archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging and is visually confirmed to be early-type. The candidates have half-light radii ranging from 0.83 < Re,c < 7.14 kpc (median Re,c = 1.77 kpc) and virial masses ranging from 2.2E10 < Mdyn < 5.6E11 Msun (median Mdyn = 7.7E10 Msun). Of our 27 compact quiescent candidates, 13 are truly compact with sizes at most half of the size of their z ~ 0 counterparts of the same mass. In addition to their structural properties bridging the gap between their high and low redshift counterparts, our sample of intermediate redshift quiescent galaxies span a large range of ages but is drawn from two distinct epochs of galaxy formation: formation at z > 2 which suggests these objects may be the relics of the observed high redshift compact galaxies and formation at z ≤ 2 which suggests there is an additional population of more recently formed massive compact galaxies. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  11. SHELS: A complete galaxy redshift survey with R ≤ 20.6

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Zahid, Harus Jabran E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jabran@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-08-01

    The SHELS (Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey) is a complete redshift survey covering two well-separated fields (F1 and F2) of the Deep Lens Survey to a limiting R = 20.6. Here we describe the redshift survey of the F2 field (R.A.{sub 2000} = 09{sup h}19{sup m}32.4 and decl.{sub 2000} = +30°00'00''). The survey includes 16,294 new redshifts measured with the Hectospec on the MMT. The resulting survey of the 4 deg{sup 2} F2 field is 95% complete to R = 20.6, currently the densest survey to this magnitude limit. The median survey redshift is z = 0.3; the survey provides a view of structure in the range 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 0.6. An animation displays the large-scale structure in the survey region. We provide a redshift, spectral index D {sub n}4000, and stellar mass for each galaxy in the survey. We also provide a metallicity for each galaxy in the range 0.2 mass, and redshift. The known evolutionary and stellar mass dependent properties of the galaxy population are cleanly evident in the data. We also show that the mass-metallicity relation previously determined from these data is robust to the analysis approach.

  12. Type IIn supernovae at redshift z approximately 2 from archival data.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Jeff; Sullivan, Mark; Barton, Elizabeth J; Bullock, James S; Carlberg, Ray G; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Tollerud, Erik

    2009-07-09

    Supernovae have been confirmed to redshift z approximately 1.7 (refs 1, 2) for type Ia (thermonuclear detonation of a white dwarf) and to z approximately 0.7 (refs 1, 3-5) for type II (collapse of the core of the star). The subclass type IIn (ref. 6) supernovae are luminous core-collapse explosions of massive stars and, unlike other types, are very bright in the ultraviolet, which should enable them to be found optically at redshifts z approximately 2 and higher. In addition, the interaction of the ejecta with circumstellar material creates strong, long-lived emission lines that allow spectroscopic confirmation of many events of this type at z approximately 2 for 3-5 years after explosion (ref. 14). Here we report three spectroscopically confirmed type IIn supernovae, at redshifts z = 0.808, 2.013 and 2.357, detected in archival data using a method designed to exploit these properties at z approximately 2. Type IIn supernovae directly probe the formation of massive stars at high redshift. The number found to date is consistent with the expectations of a locally measured stellar initial mass function, but not with an evolving initial mass function proposed to explain independent observations at low and high redshift.

  13. A luminous quasar at a redshift of z = 7.085

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortlock, Daniel J.; Warren, Stephen J.; Venemans, Bram P.; Patel, Mitesh; Hewett, Paul C.; McMahon, Richard G.; Simpson, Chris; Theuns, Tom; Gonzáles-Solares, Eduardo A.; Adamson, Andy; Dye, Simon; Hambly, Nigel C.; Hirst, Paul; Irwin, Mike J.; Kuiper, Ernst; Lawrence, Andy; Röttgering, Huub J. A.

    2011-06-01

    The intergalactic medium was not completely reionized until approximately a billion years after the Big Bang, as revealed by observations of quasars with redshifts of less than 6.5. It has been difficult to probe to higher redshifts, however, because quasars have historically been identified in optical surveys, which are insensitive to sources at redshifts exceeding 6.5. Here we report observations of a quasar (ULASJ112001.48+064124.3) at a redshift of 7.085, which is 0.77 billion years after the Big Bang. ULASJ1120+0641 has a luminosity of 6.3×1013Lsolar and hosts a black hole with a mass of 2×109Msolar (where Lsolar and Msolar are the luminosity and mass of the Sun). The measured radius of the ionized near zone around ULASJ1120+0641 is 1.9megaparsecs, a factor of three smaller than is typical for quasars at redshifts between 6.0 and 6.4. The near-zone transmission profile is consistent with a Lyα damping wing, suggesting that the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium in front of ULASJ1120+0641 exceeded 0.1.

  14. RUNAWAY STARS AND THE ESCAPE OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2012-08-20

    Approximately 30% of all massive stars in the Galaxy are runaways with velocities exceeding 30 km s{sup -1}. Their high speeds allow them to travel {approx}0.1-1 kpc away from their birthplace before they explode at the end of their several Myr lifetimes. At high redshift, when galaxies were much smaller than in the local universe, runaways could venture far from the dense inner regions of their host galaxies. From these large radii, and therefore low column densities, much of their ionizing radiation is able to escape into the intergalactic medium. Runaways may therefore significantly enhance the overall escape fraction of ionizing radiation, f{sub esc}, from small galaxies at high redshift. We present simple models of the high-redshift runaway population and its impact on f{sub esc} as a function of halo mass, size, and redshift. We find that the inclusion of runaways enhances f{sub esc} by factors of Almost-Equal-To 1.1-8, depending on halo mass, galaxy geometry, and the mechanism of runaway production, implying that runaways may contribute 50%-90% of the total ionizing radiation escaping from high-redshift galaxies. Runaways may therefore play an important role in reionizing the universe.

  15. A luminous quasar at a redshift of z = 7.085.

    PubMed

    Mortlock, Daniel J; Warren, Stephen J; Venemans, Bram P; Patel, Mitesh; Hewett, Paul C; McMahon, Richard G; Simpson, Chris; Theuns, Tom; Gonzáles-Solares, Eduardo A; Adamson, Andy; Dye, Simon; Hambly, Nigel C; Hirst, Paul; Irwin, Mike J; Kuiper, Ernst; Lawrence, Andy; Röttgering, Huub J A

    2011-06-29

    The intergalactic medium was not completely reionized until approximately a billion years after the Big Bang, as revealed by observations of quasars with redshifts of less than 6.5. It has been difficult to probe to higher redshifts, however, because quasars have historically been identified in optical surveys, which are insensitive to sources at redshifts exceeding 6.5. Here we report observations of a quasar (ULAS J112001.48+064124.3) at a redshift of 7.085, which is 0.77 billion years after the Big Bang. ULAS J1120+0641 has a luminosity of 6.3 × 10(13)L(⊙) and hosts a black hole with a mass of 2 × 10(9)M(⊙) (where L(⊙) and M(⊙) are the luminosity and mass of the Sun). The measured radius of the ionized near zone around ULAS J1120+0641 is 1.9 megaparsecs, a factor of three smaller than is typical for quasars at redshifts between 6.0 and 6.4. The near-zone transmission profile is consistent with a Lyα damping wing, suggesting that the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium in front of ULAS J1120+0641 exceeded 0.1.

  16. IMAGING REDSHIFT ESTIMATES FOR BL LACERTAE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Romani, Roger W. E-mail: rwr@astro.stanford.ed

    2010-03-20

    We have obtained high dynamic range, good natural seeing i' images of BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) to search for the active galactic nucleus host and thus constrain the source redshift. These objects are drawn from a sample of bright flat-spectrum radio sources that are either known (via recent Fermi Large Area Telescope observations) gamma-ray emitters or similar sources that might be detected in continuing gamma-ray observations. All had spectroscopic confirmation as BL Lac sources, but no redshift solution. We detected hosts for 25/49 objects. As these galaxies have been argued to be standard candles, our measured host magnitudes provide redshift estimates (ranging from 0.2 to 1.0). Lower bounds are established on the redshifts of non-detections. The mean of the fit redshifts (and lower limits) is higher than those of spectroscopic solutions in the radio-loud and gamma-ray-loud parent samples, suggesting corrections may be needed for the luminosity function and evolution of these sources.

  17. Properties of High Redshift Galaxies in the ELTs Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Gullieuszik, Marco; Falomo, Renato; Fantinel, Daniela; Uslenghi, Michela

    2015-08-01

    The extraordinary sensitivity and spatial resolution of the future Extremely Large Telescopes will allow us to characterize the photometric and structural properties of high redshift galaxies, in spite of their small size. In this contribution we present a quantitative analysis of these capabilities thorugh the generation of a large set of simulated images, and their subsequent analysis with GALFIT. In particular, we assess the accuracy with which it will be possible to measure the basic galaxy parameters: Sersic index, half light radius and total magnitude. The simulations adopt the expected performances of the near-IR imagers MICADO at the E-ELT for galaxies at z ~ 2 and z ~ 3, spanning a mass range from 10^9 to 10^11 solar masses, and whose sizes, magnitudes and colors are obtained from presently available scaling relations for high redshift objects. It turns out that with such future facility it will be possible to derive both accurate photometry and detailed morphology for very distant galaxies, that are mandatory to probe fundamental problems on the processes of galaxy formation and evolution. These results are also compared with the expected capabilities of NIRcam at JWST.

  18. Detecting Massive, High-Redshift Galaxy Clusters Using the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Carson; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Loeb, Abraham; Karim, Alexander; Staguhn, Johannes; Erler, Jens; Capak, Peter L.

    2017-01-01

    We develop the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect as a direct astrophysical measure of the mass distribution of dark matter halos. The SZ effect increases with cosmological distance, a unique astronomical property, and is highly sensitive to halo mass. We find that this presents a powerful methodology for distinguishing between competing models of the halo mass function distribution, particularly in the high-redshift domain just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Recent surveys designed to probe this epoch of initial galaxy formation such as CANDELS and SPLASH report an over-abundance of highly massive halos as inferred from stellar ultraviolet (UV) luminosities and the stellar mass to halo mass ratio estimated from nearby galaxies. If these UV luminosity to halo mass relations hold to high-redshift, observations estimate several orders of magnitude more highly massive halos than predicted by hierarchical merging and the standard cosmological paradigm. Strong constraints on the masses of these galaxy clusters are essential to resolving the current tension between observation and theory. We conclude that detections of thermal SZ sources are plausible at high-redshift only for the halo masses inferred from observation. Therefore, future SZ surveys will provide a robust determination between theoretical and observational predictions.

  19. Dusty Galaxies at the Highest Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, David L.; Greenslade, Josh; Riechers, Dominik A.; Wardlow, Julie; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael

    The use of red colour as the basis for selecting candidate high redshift dusty galaxies from surveys made with Herschel has proved highly successful. The highest redshift such object, HFLS3, lies at z = 6.34 and numerous other sources have been found. Spectroscopic followup confirms that most of these lie at z > 4. These sources are found in such numbers that they represent a challenge to current models of galaxy evolution. We also examine the prospects for finding dusty galaxies at still higher redshifts. These would not appear in the SPIRE surveys from Herschel but would be detected in longer wavelength, submm, surveys. Several such `SPIRE-dropouts' have been found and are now subject to followup observations.

  20. SCUBA Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; Rottgering, H; van Breugel, W

    2003-03-11

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) are key targets for studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.The role of dust in these processes is uncertain. We have therefore observed the dust continuum emission from a sample of z > 3 radio galaxies with the SCUBA bolometer array. We confirm and strengthen the result found by Archibald et al. (1), that HzRGs are massive starforming systems and that submillimeter detection rate appears to be primarily a strong function of redshift. We also observed HzRG-candidates that have so far eluded spectroscopic redshift determination. Four of these have been detected, and provide evidence that they may be extremely obscured radio galaxies, possibly in an early stage of their evolution.

  1. Cosmology with large galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodré, Laerte, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Galaxy redshift surveys are a major tool to address the most challenging cosmological problems facing cosmology, like the nature of dark energy and properties dark matter. The same observations are useful for a much larger variety of scientific applications, from the study of small bodies in the solar system, to properties of tidal streams in the Milky Way halo, to galaxy formation and evolution. Here I briefly discuss what is a redshift survey and how it can be used to attack astrophysical and cosmological problems. I finish with a brief description of a new survey, the Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (JPAS), which will use an innovative system of 56 filters to map ~ 8000 square degrees on the sky. JPAS photometric system, besides providing accurate photometric redshifts useful for cosmological parameter estimation, will deliver a low-resolution spectrum at each pixel on the sky, allowing for the first time an almost all-sky IFU science.

  2. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Star formation history of passive red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siudek, M.; Małek, K.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Pollo, A.; Haines, C. P.; Fritz, A.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Marchetti, A.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Ilbert, O.; Gargiulo, A.; Moscardini, L.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We trace the evolution and the star formation history of passive red galaxies, using a subset of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The detailed spectral analysis of stellar populations of intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies allows the build up of their stellar content to be followed over the last 8 billion years. Methods: We extracted a sample of passive red galaxies in the redshift range 0.4 mass range 10 < log (Mstar/M⊙) < 12 from the VIPERS survey. The sample was selected using an evolving cut in the rest-frame U-V color distribution and additional cuts that ensured high quality. The spectra of passive red galaxies were stacked in narrow bins of stellar mass and redshift. We use the stacked spectra to measure the 4000 Å break (D4000) and the Hδ Lick index (HδA) with high precision. These spectral features are used as indicators of the star formation history of passive red galaxies. We compare the results with a grid of synthetic spectra to constrain the star formation epochs of these galaxies. We characterize the formation redshift-stellar mass relation for intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies. Results: We find that at z 1 stellar populations in low-mass passive red galaxies are younger than in high-mass passive red galaxies, similar to what is observed at the present epoch. Over the full analyzed redshift range 0.4 < z < 1.0 and stellar mass range 10 < log (Mstar/M⊙) < 12, the D4000 index increases with redshift, while HδA gets lower. This implies that the stellar populations are getting older with increasing stellar mass. Comparison to the spectra of passive red galaxies in the SDSS survey (z 0.2) shows that the shape of the relations of D4000 and HδA with stellar mass has not changed significantly with redshift. Assuming a single burst formation, this implies that high-mass passive red galaxies formed their stars at zform 1.7, while low-mass galaxies formed their main stellar populations

  3. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacs, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe. Subject headings: galaxies: high-redshift - galaxies: evolution - galaxies: individual (MACS1149- JD) - Interstellar medium (ISM), nebulae: dust, extinction - physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances.

  4. The fate of high redshift massive compact galaxies in dense environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella; Feldmann, Robert; /Fermilab /Chicago U., KICP

    2012-01-01

    Massive compact galaxies seem to be more common at high redshift than in the local universe, especially in denser environments. To investigate the fate of such massive galaxies identified at z {approx} 2 we analyse the evolution of their properties in three cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that form virialized galaxy groups of mass {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} hosting a central massive elliptical/S0 galaxy by redshift zero. We find that at redshift {approx} 2 the population of galaxies with M{sub *} > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} is diverse in terms of mass, velocity dispersion, star formation and effective radius, containing both very compact and relatively extended objects. In each simulation all the compact satellite galaxies have merged into the central galaxy by redshift 0 (with the exception of one simulation where one of such satellite galaxy survives). Satellites of similar mass at z = 0 are all less compact than their high redshift counterparts. They form later than the galaxies in the z = 2 sample and enter the group potential at z < 1, when dynamical friction times are longer than the Hubble time. Also, by z = 0 the central galaxies have increased substantially their characteristic radius via a combination of in situ star formation and mergers. Hence in a group environment descendants of compact galaxies either evolve towards larger sizes or they disappear before the present time as a result of the environment in which they evolve. Since the group-sized halos that we consider are representative of dense environments in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we conclude that the majority of high redshift compact massive galaxies do not survive until today as a result of the environment.

  5. The Parametrized Post-Newtonian Gravitational Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisher, T. P.

    1993-01-01

    A derivation of the gravitational redshift effect to order c ^(-4) is presented. The calculation isperformed within the framework of the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism for analyzing metrictheories of gravity, which includes corrections to second- order in the Newtonian potential,gravitomagnetic contributions, and preferred-frame terms. We briefly discuss how to generalize ourresults to include possible violations of local Lorentz invariance or local position invariance which canarise in nonmetric theories. Our results are useful for analyzing possible new redshift experimentswhich may be sensitive to second-order effects, such as a close solar flyby mission.

  6. GLAST observation of high-redshift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca; Omodei, Nicola

    2007-07-12

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SNIb/c) rates with the observed long-duration Gamma-Ray-Burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift, by assuming different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological types. Due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict a large number of GRBs beyond z > 7. Moreover, based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this burst population is presented.

  7. A search for moderate-redshift survivors from the population of luminous compact passive galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Larson, Kirsten; Mann, Andrew W. E-mail: hsshih@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: amann@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-01-10

    From a search of a ∼2400 deg{sup 2} region covered by both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey databases, we have attempted to identify galaxies at z ∼ 0.5 that are consistent with their being essentially unmodified examples of the luminous passive compact galaxies found at z ∼ 2.5. After isolating good candidates via deeper imaging, we further refine the sample with Keck moderate-resolution spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive-optics imaging. For four of the five galaxies that so far remain after passing through this sieve, we analyze plausible star-formation histories based on our spectra in order to identify galaxies that may have survived with little modification from the population formed at high redshift. We find two galaxies that are consistent with having formed ≳ 95% of their mass at z > 5. We attempt to estimate masses both from our stellar population determinations and from velocity dispersions. Given the high frequency of small axial ratios, both in our small sample and among samples found at high redshifts, we tentatively suggest that some of the more extreme examples of passive compact galaxies may have prolate morphologies.

  8. A Search for Moderate-redshift Survivors from the Population of Luminous Compact Passive Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Larson, Kirsten; Mann, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    From a search of a ~2400 deg2 region covered by both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey databases, we have attempted to identify galaxies at z ~ 0.5 that are consistent with their being essentially unmodified examples of the luminous passive compact galaxies found at z ~ 2.5. After isolating good candidates via deeper imaging, we further refine the sample with Keck moderate-resolution spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive-optics imaging. For four of the five galaxies that so far remain after passing through this sieve, we analyze plausible star-formation histories based on our spectra in order to identify galaxies that may have survived with little modification from the population formed at high redshift. We find two galaxies that are consistent with having formed >~ 95% of their mass at z > 5. We attempt to estimate masses both from our stellar population determinations and from velocity dispersions. Given the high frequency of small axial ratios, both in our small sample and among samples found at high redshifts, we tentatively suggest that some of the more extreme examples of passive compact galaxies may have prolate morphologies. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO THE HIGH-REDSHIFT OVERPRODUCTION OF STARS IN MODELED DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    White, Catherine E.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Ferguson, Henry C.

    2015-02-01

    Both numerical hydrodynamic and semi-analytic cosmological models of galaxy formation struggle to match observed star formation histories of galaxies in low-mass halos (M {sub H} ≲ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}), predicting more star formation at high redshift and less star formation at low redshift than observed. The fundamental problem is that galaxies' gas accretion and star formation rates are too closely coupled in the models: the accretion rate largely drives the star formation rate. Observations point to gas accretion rates that outpace star formation at high redshift, resulting in a buildup of gas and a delay in star formation until lower redshifts. We present three empirical adjustments of standard recipes in a semi-analytic model motivated by three physical scenarios that could cause this decoupling: (1) the mass-loading factors of outflows driven by stellar feedback may have a steeper dependence on halo mass at earlier times, (2) the efficiency of star formation may be lower in low-mass halos at high redshift, and (3) gas may not be able to accrete efficiently onto the disk in low-mass halos at high redshift. These new recipes, once tuned, better reproduce the evolution of f {sub *}≡ M {sub *}/M {sub H} as a function of halo mass as derived from abundance matching over redshifts z = 0 to 3, though they have different effects on cold gas fractions, star formation rates, and metallicities. Changes to gas accretion and stellar-driven winds are promising, while direct modification of the star formation timescale requires drastic measures that are not physically well motivated.

  10. A new method to search for high-redshift clusters using photometric redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A.; Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C.

    2014-09-10

    We describe a new method (Poisson probability method, PPM) to search for high-redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for megaparsec-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. sample, which are selected within the COSMOS survey, and to the specific data set used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. (1) We use two z ∼ 1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z = 2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z = 1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. (2) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e., z = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) in the COSMOS field. We find that the PPM detects the simulated clusters within the considered redshift range with a statistical 1σ redshift accuracy of ∼0.05. The PPM is an efficient alternative method for high-redshift cluster searches that may also be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Accurate photometric redshifts and a survey depth similar or better than that of COSMOS (e.g., I < 25) are required.

  11. Optical galaxy cluster detection across a wide redshift range

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang

    2009-04-01

    The past decade is one of the most exciting period in the history of physics and astronomy. The discovery of cosmic acceleration dramatically changed our understanding about the evolution and constituents of the Universe. To accommodate the new acceleration phase into our well established Big Bang cosmological scenario under the frame work of General Relativity, there must exist a very special substance that has negative pressure and make up about 73% of the total energy density in our Universe. It is called Dark Energy. For the first time people realized that the vast majority of our Universe is made of things that are totally different from the things we are made of. Therefore, one of the major endeavors in physics and astronomy in the coming years is trying to understand, if we can, the nature of dark energy. Understanding dark energy cannot be achieved from pure logic. We need empirical evidence to finally determine about what is dark energy. The better we can constrain the energy density and evolution of the dark energy, the closer we will get to the answer. There are many ways to constrain the energy density and evolution of dark energy, each of which leads to degeneracy in certain directions in the parameter space. Therefore, a combination of complimentary methods will help to reduce the degeneracies and give tighter constraints. Dark energy became dominate over matter in the Universe only very recently (at about z ~ 1.5) and will affect both the cosmological geometry and large scale structure formation. Among the various experiments, some of them constrain the dark energy mainly via geometry (such as CMB, Supernovae) while some others provides constraints from both structures and geometry (such as BAO, Galaxy Clusters) Galaxy clusters can be used as a sensitive probe for cosmology. A large cluster catalog that extends to high redshift with well measured masses is indispensable for precisely constraining cosmological parameters. Detecting clusters in optical

  12. CLUSTER LENSING PROFILES DERIVED FROM A REDSHIFT ENHANCEMENT OF MAGNIFIED BOSS-SURVEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi; Broadhurst, Tom

    2013-07-20

    We report the first detection of a redshift-depth enhancement of background galaxies magnified by foreground clusters. Using 300,000 BOSS survey galaxies with accurate spectroscopic redshifts, we measure their mean redshift depth behind four large samples of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, totaling 5000-15,000 clusters. A clear trend of increasing mean redshift toward the cluster centers is found, averaged over each of the four cluster samples. In addition, we find similar but noisier behavior for an independent X-ray sample of 158 clusters lying in the foreground of the current BOSS sky area. By adopting the mass-richness relationships appropriate for each survey, we compare our results with theoretical predictions for each of the four SDSS cluster catalogs. The radial form of this redshift enhancement is well fitted by a richness-to-mass weighted composite Navarro-Frenk-White profile with an effective mass ranging between M{sub 200} {approx} 1.4-1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the optically detected cluster samples, and M{sub 200} {approx} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the X-ray sample. This lensing detection helps to establish the credibility of these SDSS cluster surveys, and provides a normalization for their respective mass-richness relations. In the context of the upcoming bigBOSS, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph, and EUCLID-NISP spectroscopic surveys, this method represents an independent means of deriving the masses of cluster samples for examining the cosmological evolution, and provides a relatively clean consistency check of weak-lensing measurements, free from the systematic limitations of shear calibration.

  13. Probing the Physical Properties of High-Redshift Lyman-Alpha Emitters with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Keely; Finkelstein, Steven; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta

    2015-08-01

    Abstract: Studies of Lyman Alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) offer insight into an understanding of early galaxies and the build-up of galaxies at early times. To better understand these objects and constrain their stellar properties, we have observed a sample of 162 z=4.5 and 14 z=5.7 LAEs with deep Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging from the Spitzer Lyman Alpha Survey. This is by far the largest sample of high-redshift LAEs imaged with Spitzer, which probes rest-frame optical wavelengths at these redshifts, dramatically improving constraints on the stellar masses and star-formation rates. By fitting the spectral energy distributions of individual LAEs using ground-based optical, HST near-IR, and Spitzer mid-IR imaging, we show that our sample of LAEs has a wide range of stellar properties. For individual LAEs detected with IRAC, stellar mass ranges from 5x10^8 - 10^11 solar masses. In addition, we find a correlation between stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR), similar to trends measured at lower redshift (e.g. Noeske et al. 2007; Daddi et al. 2007). However for this sample of higher redshift LAEs, the LAE sequence is elevated compared to continuum-selected galaxies at the same redshift, meaning that for a given stellar mass, the LAEs tend to have higher star formation rates. However, a subset of massive LAEs sits on the continuum-selected galaxy trend, tentatively implying that there may be two mechanisms for Lyman alpha escape.

  14. THE FIRST HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASAR FROM Pan-STARRS

    SciTech Connect

    Morganson, Eric; De Rosa, Gisella; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chambers, Ken; Burgett, William; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Sweeney, Bill; Waters, Christopher; McGreer, Ian; Fan, Xiaohui; Greiner, Jochen; Price, Paul

    2012-06-15

    We present the discovery of the first high-redshift (z > 5.7) quasar from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1). This quasar was initially detected as an i{sub P1} dropout in PS1, confirmed photometrically with the SAO Wide-field InfraRed Camera at Arizona's Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. The quasar was verified spectroscopically with the MMT Spectrograph, Red Channel and the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. Its near-infrared spectrum was taken at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBT) with the LBT Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research. It has a redshift of 5.73, an AB z{sub P1} magnitude of 19.4, a luminosity of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} erg s{sup -1}, and a black hole mass of 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. It is a broad absorption line quasar with a prominent Ly{beta} peak and a very blue continuum spectrum. This quasar is the first result from the PS1 high-redshift quasar search that is projected to discover more than 100 i{sub P1} dropout quasars and could potentially find more than 10 z{sub P1} dropout (z > 6.8) quasars.

  15. Local gravitational redshifts can bias cosmological measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtak, Radosław; Davis, Tamara M.; Wiis, Jophiel E-mail: tamarad@physics.uq.edu.au

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of cosmological parameters via the distance-redshift relation usually rely on models that assume a homogenous universe. It is commonly presumed that the large-scale structure evident in our Universe has a negligible impact on the measurement if distances probed in observations are sufficiently large (compared to the scale of inhomogeneities) and are averaged over different directions on the sky. This presumption does not hold when considering the effect of the gravitational redshift caused by our local gravitational potential, which alters light coming from all distances and directions in the same way. Despite its small magnitude, this local gravitational redshift gives rise to noticeable effects in cosmological inference using SN Ia data. Assuming conservative prior knowledge of the local potential given by sampling a range of gravitational potentials at locations of Milky-Way-like galaxies identified in cosmological simulations, we show that ignoring the gravitational redshift effect in a standard data analysis leads to an additional systematic error of ∼1% in the determination of density parameters and the dark energy equation of state. We conclude that our local gravitational field affects our cosmological inference at a level that is important in future observations aiming to achieve percent-level accuracy.

  16. Quantum Perturbative Approach to Discrete Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Mark D.

    On the largest scales there is evidence of discrete structure, examples of this are superclusters and voids and also by redshift taking discrete values. In this paper it is proposed that discrete redshift can be explained by using the spherical harmonic integer l; this occurs both in the metric or density perturbations and also in the solution of wave equations in Robertson-Walker spacetime. It is argued that the near conservation of energy implies that l varies regularly for wave equations in Robertson-Walker spacetime, whereas for density perturbations l cannot vary regularly. Once this is assumed then perhaps the observed value of discrete redshift provides the only observational or experimental data that directly requires an explanation using both gravitational and quantum theory. In principle a model using this data could predict the scale factor R (or equivalently the deceleration parameter q). Solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation in Robertson-Walker spacetimes are used to devise models which have redshift taking discrete values, but they predict a microscopic value for R. A model in which the stress of the Klein-Gordon equation induces a metrical perturbation of Robertson-Walker spacetime is devised. Calculations based upon this model predict that the Universe is closed with 2_q0 - 1=10^-4.

  17. Local gravitational redshifts can bias cosmological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Davis, Tamara M.; Wiis, Jophiel

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of cosmological parameters via the distance-redshift relation usually rely on models that assume a homogenous universe. It is commonly presumed that the large-scale structure evident in our Universe has a negligible impact on the measurement if distances probed in observations are sufficiently large (compared to the scale of inhomogeneities) and are averaged over different directions on the sky. This presumption does not hold when considering the effect of the gravitational redshift caused by our local gravitational potential, which alters light coming from all distances and directions in the same way. Despite its small magnitude, this local gravitational redshift gives rise to noticeable effects in cosmological inference using SN Ia data. Assuming conservative prior knowledge of the local potential given by sampling a range of gravitational potentials at locations of Milky-Way-like galaxies identified in cosmological simulations, we show that ignoring the gravitational redshift effect in a standard data analysis leads to an additional systematic error of ~1% in the determination of density parameters and the dark energy equation of state. We conclude that our local gravitational field affects our cosmological inference at a level that is important in future observations aiming to achieve percent-level accuracy.

  18. MARZ: Manual and automatic redshifting software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, S. R.; Davis, Tamara M.; Lidman, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Lewis, G. F.

    2016-04-01

    The Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES) is a 100-night spectroscopic survey underway on the Anglo-Australian Telescope using the fibre-fed 2-degree-field (2dF) spectrograph. We have developed a new redshifting application MARZ with greater usability, flexibility, and the capacity to analyse a wider range of object types than the RUNZ software package previously used for redshifting spectra from 2dF. MARZ is an open-source, client-based, Javascript web-application which provides an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra generated from the AAOmega spectrograph to produce high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. The software can be run interactively or via the command line, and is easily adaptable to other instruments and pipelines if conforming to the current FITS file standard is not possible. Behind the scenes, a modified version of the AUTOZ cross-correlation algorithm is used to match input spectra against a variety of stellar and galaxy templates, and automatic matching performance for OzDES spectra has increased from 54% (RUNZ) to 91% (MARZ). Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be easily redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features.

  19. THE SLOAN BRIGHT ARCS SURVEY: FOUR STRONGLY LENSED GALAXIES WITH REDSHIFT > 2

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H. Thomas; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Kubik, Donna; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Lin Huan; Tucker, Douglas; West, Anderson

    2009-12-10

    We report the discovery of four very bright, strongly lensed galaxies found via systematic searches for arcs in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 and 6. These were followed up with spectroscopy and imaging data from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory and found to have redshift z > 2.0. With isophotal magnitudes r = 19.2-20.4 and 3'' diameter magnitudes r = 20.0-20.6, these systems are some of the brightest and highest surface brightness lensed galaxies known in this redshift range. In addition to the magnitudes and redshifts, we present estimates of the Einstein radii, which range from 5.''0 to 12.''7, and use those to derive the enclosed masses of the lensing galaxies.

  20. Gravitational redshift of photons traversing a collapsing dust cloud and observable consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Néstor; Sarbach, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the frequency shift of photons propagating on an asymptotically flat spacetime describing a collapsing, spherical dust cloud. We focus on the case where the interaction of the photons with the matter can be neglected. Under fairly general assumptions on the initial data characterizing the collapse, we show that photons with zero angular momentum which travel from past to future null infinity, crossing the collapsing cloud through its center, are always redshifted with respect to stationary observers. We compute this redshift as a function of proper time of a distant stationary observer and discuss its dependency on the mass distribution of the cloud. Possible implications of this redshift effect for weak cosmic censorship and light propagation in cosmological spacetimes are also briefly discussed.

  1. Redshift distortions of galaxy correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, J. N.; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    1994-01-01

    To examine how peculiar velocities can affect the two-, three-, and four-point redshift correlation functions, we evaluate volume-average correlations for configurations that emphasize and minimize redshift distortions for four different volume-limited samples from each of the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS redshift catalogs. We present the results as the correlation length r(sub 0) and power index gamma of the two-point correlations, bar-xi(sub 0) = (r(sub 0)/r)(exp gamma), and as the hierarchical amplitudes of the three- and four-point functions, S(sub 3) = bar-xi(sub 3)/bar-xi(exp 2)(sub 2) and S(sub 4) = bar-xi(sub 4)/bar-xi(exp 3)(sub 2). We find a characteristic distortion for bar-xi(sub 2), the slope gamma is flatter and the correlation length is larger in redshift space than in real space; that is, redshift distortions 'move' correlations from small to large scales. At the largest scales (up to 12 Mpc), the extra power in the redshift distribution is compatible with Omega(exp 4/7)/b approximately equal to 1. We estimate Omega(exp 4/7)/b to be 0.53 +/- 0.15, 1.10 +/- 0.16, and 0.84 +/- 0.45 for the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS catalogs. Higher order correlations bar-xi(sub 3) and bar-xi(sub 4) suffer similar redshift distortions but in such a way that, within the accuracy of our ananlysis, the normalized amplitudes S(sub 3) and S(sub 4) are insensitive to this effect. The hierarchical amplitudes S(sub 3) and S(sub 4) are constant as a function of scale between 1 and 12 Mpc and have similar values in all samples and catalogs, S(sub 3) approximately equal to 2 and S(sub 4) approximately equal to 6, despite the fact that bar-xi(sub 2), bar-xi(sub 3), and bar-xi(sub 4) differ from one sample to another by large factors (up to a factor of 4 in bar-xi(sub 2), 8 for bar-xi(sub 3), and 12 for bar-xi(sub 4)). The agreement between the independent estimations of S(sub 3) and S(sub 4) is remarkable given the different criteria in the selection of galaxies and also the difference in the

  2. Redshift distortions of galaxy correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J. N.; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    1994-04-01

    To examine how peculiar velocities can affect the two-, three-, and four-point redshift correlation functions, we evaluate volume-average correlations for configurations that emphasize and minimize redshift distortions for four different volume-limited samples from each of the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS redshift catalogs. We present the results as the correlation length r0 and power index gamma of the two-point correlations, bar-xi0 = (r0/r)gamma, and as the hierarchical amplitudes of the three- and four-point functions, S3 = bar-xi3/bar-xi22 and S4 = bar-xi4/bar-xi32. We find a characteristic distortion for bar-xi2, the slope gamma is flatter and the correlation length is larger in redshift space than in real space; that is, redshift distortions 'move' correlations from small to large scales. At the largest scales (up to 12 Mpc), the extra power in the redshift distribution is compatible with Omega4/7/b approximately equal to 1. We estimate Omega4/7/b to be 0.53 +/- 0.15, 1.10 +/- 0.16, and 0.84 +/- 0.45 for the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS catalogs. Higher order correlations bar-xi3 and bar-xi4 suffer similar redshift distortions but in such a way that, within the accuracy of our analysis, the normalized amplitudes S3 and S4 are insensitive to this effect. The hierarchical amplitudes S3 and S4 are constant as a function of scale between 1 and 12 Mpc and have similar values in all samples and catalogs, S3 approximately equal to 2 and S4 approximately equal to 6, despite the fact that bar-xi2, bar-xi3, and bar-xi4 differ from one sample to another by large factors (up to a factor of 4 in bar-xi2, 8 for bar-xi3, and 12 for bar-xi4). The agreement between the independent estimations of S3 and S4 is remarkable given the different criteria in the selection of galaxies and also the difference in the resulting range of densities, luminosities, and locations between samples.

  3. The high-redshift galaxy population in hierarchical galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzbichler, M. G.; White, S. D. M.

    2007-03-01

    We compare observations of the high-redshift galaxy population to the predictions of the galaxy formation model of Croton et al. and De Lucia & Blaizot. This model, implemented on the Millennium Simulation of the concordance Lambda cold dark matter cosmogony, introduces `radio mode' feedback from the central galaxies of groups and clusters in order to obtain quantitative agreement with the luminosity, colour, morphology and clustering properties of the present-day galaxy population. Here we construct deep light cone surveys in order to compare model predictions to the observed counts and redshift distributions of distant galaxies, as well as to their inferred luminosity and mass functions out to redshift 5. With the exception of the mass functions, all these properties are sensitive to modelling of dust obscuration. A simple but plausible treatment agrees moderately well with most of the data. The predicted abundance of relatively massive (~M*) galaxies appears systematically high at high redshift, suggesting that such galaxies assemble earlier in this model than in the real Universe. An independent galaxy formation model implemented on the same simulation matches the observed mass functions slightly better, so the discrepancy probably reflects incomplete or inaccurate galaxy formation physics rather than problems with the underlying cosmogony.

  4. A supernova origin for dust in a high-redshift quasar.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, R; Schneider, R; Oliva, E; Bianchi, S; Ferrara, A; Mannucci, F; Pedani, M; Sogorb, M Roca

    2004-09-30

    Interstellar dust plays a crucial role in the evolution of the Universe by assisting the formation of molecules, by triggering the formation of the first low-mass stars, and by absorbing stellar ultraviolet-optical light and subsequently re-emitting it at infrared/millimetre wavelengths. Dust is thought to be produced predominantly in the envelopes of evolved (age >1 Gyr), low-mass stars. This picture has, however, recently been brought into question by the discovery of large masses of dust in the host galaxies of quasars at redshift z > 6, when the age of the Universe was less than 1 Gyr. Theoretical studies, corroborated by observations of nearby supernova remnants, have suggested that supernovae provide a fast and efficient dust formation environment in the early Universe. Here we report infrared observations of a quasar at redshift 6.2, which are used to obtain directly its dust extinction curve. We then show that such a curve is in excellent agreement with supernova dust models. This result demonstrates a supernova origin for dust in this high-redshift quasar, from which we infer that most of the dust at high redshifts probably has the same origin.

  5. The Clustering of Quasars at Redshift 2.5 from the Final SDSS-III/BOSS Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; White, Martin; Bovy, Jo; Fan, Xiaohui; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Laurent, Pierre; McBride, Cameron; Miralda-Escude, Jordi; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Petitjean, Patrick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Weinberg, David H.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Viel, Matteo; Yeche, Christophe; York, Don; Zehavi, Idit

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the mass of the dark matter halos that host quasars is a critical question in the field of galaxy evolution. Estimates of how the mean mass of the dark matter halos in which quasars are triggered evolves with time can potentially constrain scenarios in which the quasar phase is triggered in different dark-matter environments as the Universe progresses. Quasar clustering measurements on linear scales across a range of redshifts is a powerful tool with which to estimate the masses of the dark matter halos that are inhabited by the galaxies that host quasars. Although there are many measurements of quasar clustering at redshift z < 2.2, and a few at z > 3, there are very few precise measurements around 2.5, where the quasar phase appears to peak before declining at z < 2. The SDSS-III/BOSS survey targets redshifts of 2.2 < z < 3.5, and should therefore offer the most precise estimates of quasar clustering near the epoch of peak quasar activity. We use data from SDSS-III/BOSS to measure the clustering of quasars over the redshift range 2.2 < z < 2.8 via the real and redshift space two point correlation functions. The data consists of a homogeneously selected sample of 62960 BOSS CORE quasars drawn from SDSS DR11. Our homogeneous sample covers ~4460 (deg)^2 corresponding to a comoving volume of ~12 (Gpc/h)^3. We obtain the correlation length of quasars near 2.5 and derive the bias of the dark matter halos that host quasars. We study the mass of the dark matter environments of quasars using the formalism of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD). We will discuss our results at 2.5, and also results obtained by dividing the BOSS quasar sample into three redshift ranges to study how the correlation length, bias, and dark matter halo mass of quasars evolve over this key redshift range.

  6. Five New High-Redshift Quasar Lenses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-08

    We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z > 2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z{sub s} = 2.237, lens redshift z{sub l} = 0.294, and image separation {theta} = 4.04 inch), SDSS J1254+2235 (z{sub s} = 3.626, {theta} = 1.56 inch), SDSS J1258+1657 (z{sub s} = 2.702, {theta} = 1.28 inch), SDSS J1339+1310 (z{sub s} = 2.243, {theta} = 1.69 cin), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z{sub s} = 3.317, {theta} = 1.74 inch). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z{sub l} = 0.4-0.6 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z{sub s} < 2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.

  7. Real- and redshift-space halo clustering in f(R) cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Norberg, Peder

    2017-01-01

    We present two-point correlation function statistics of the mass and the halos in the chameleon f(R) modified gravity scenario using a series of large volume N-body simulations. Three distinct variations of f(R) are considered (F4, F5 and F6) and compared to a fiducial ΛCDM model in the redshift range z ∈ [0, 1]. We find that the matter clustering is indistinguishable for all models except for F4, which shows a significantly steeper slope. The ratio of the redshift- to real-space correlation function at scales >20 h-1 Mpc agrees with the linear General Relativity (GR) Kaiser formula for the viable f(R) models considered. We consider three halo populations characterized by spatial abundances comparable to that of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) and galaxy clusters. The redshift-space halo correlation functions of F4 and F5 deviate significantly from ΛCDM at intermediate and high redshift, as the f(R) halo bias is smaller or equal to that of the ΛCDM case. Finally we introduce a new model independent clustering statistic to distinguish f(R) from GR: the relative halo clustering ratio - R. The sampling required to adequately reduce the scatter in R will be available with the advent of the next generation galaxy redshift surveys. This will foster a prospective avenue to obtain largely model-independent cosmological constraints on this class of modified gravity models.

  8. Were Progenitors of Local L* Galaxies Lyα Emitters at High Redshift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Li, Yuexing; Zhu, Qirong; Abel, Tom; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin

    2012-08-01

    The Lyα emission has been observed from galaxies over a redshift span z ~ 0-8.6. However, the evolution of high-redshift Lyα emitters (LAEs), and the link between these populations and local galaxies, remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the Lyα properties of progenitors of a local L* galaxy by combining cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations using the new ART2 code. We find that the main progenitor (the most massive one) of a Milky-Way-like galaxy has a number of Lyα properties close to those of observed LAEs at z ~ 2-6, but most of the fainter ones appear to fall below the detection limits of current surveys. The Lyα photon escape fraction depends sensitively on a number of physical properties of the galaxy, such as mass, star formation rate, and metallicity, as well as galaxy morphology and orientation. Moreover, we find that high-redshift LAEs show blueshifted Lyα line profiles characteristic of gas inflow, and that the Lyα emission by excitation cooling increases with redshift, and becomes dominant at z >~ 6. Our results suggest that some observed LAEs at z ~ 2-6 with luminosity of L Lyα ~ 1042-1043 erg s-1 may be similar to the main progenitor of the Milky Way at high redshift, and that they may evolve into present-day L* galaxies.

  9. The Muenster Redshift Project - Automated redshift measurements from low-dispersion objective prism Schmidt plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuecker, Peter

    A three-dimensional galaxy survey at faint magnitudes and over large volumes of space was carried out as part of the Muenster Redshift Project. Three different methods were used to enhance the reliability of the redshifts measured from objective prison plates: the correlation method, the least-squares method, and the break method where continuous breaks are identified directly. The redshift errors of the individual methods turn out to be 0.007 (correlation), 0.011 (direct identification), and 0.016 (least squares). Using the method described in the paper, it is possible to obtain about 6000 galaxy redshifts from one objective prism plate at high galactic latitudes for objects with m(J) less than 20.

  10. On the recovery of the local group motion from galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Nusser, Adi; Davis, Marc; Branchini, Enzo E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu

    2014-06-20

    There is an ∼150 km s{sup –1} discrepancy between the measured motion of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies with respect to the cosmic microwave background and the linear theory prediction based on the gravitational force field of the large-scale structure in full-sky redshift surveys. We perform a variety of tests which show that the LG motion cannot be recovered to better than 150-200 km s{sup –1} in amplitude and within ≈10° in direction. The tests rely on catalogs of mock galaxies identified in the Millennium simulation using semi-analytic galaxy formation models. We compare these results to the K{sub s} = 11.75 Two-Mass Galaxy Redshift Survey, which provides the deepest and most complete all-sky spatial distribution of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts available thus far. In our analysis, we use a new concise relation for deriving the LG motion and bulk flow from the true distribution of galaxies in redshift space. Our results show that the main source of uncertainty is the small effective depth of surveys like the Two-Mass Redshift Survey (2MRS), which prevents a proper sampling of the large-scale structure beyond ∼100 h {sup –1} Mpc. Deeper redshift surveys are needed to reach the 'convergence scale' of ≈250 h {sup –1} Mpc in a ΛCDM universe. Deeper surveys would also mitigate the impact of the 'Kaiser rocket' which, in a survey like 2MRS, remains a significant source of uncertainty. Thanks to the quiet and moderate density environment of the LG, purely dynamical uncertainties of the linear predictions are subdominant at the level of ∼90 km s{sup –1}. Finally, we show that deviations from linear galaxy biasing and shot noise errors provide a minor contribution to the total error budget.

  11. On the Recovery of the Local Group Motion from Galaxy Redshift Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusser, Adi; Davis, Marc; Branchini, Enzo

    2014-06-01

    There is an ~150 km s-1 discrepancy between the measured motion of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies with respect to the cosmic microwave background and the linear theory prediction based on the gravitational force field of the large-scale structure in full-sky redshift surveys. We perform a variety of tests which show that the LG motion cannot be recovered to better than 150-200 km s-1 in amplitude and within ≈10° in direction. The tests rely on catalogs of mock galaxies identified in the Millennium simulation using semi-analytic galaxy formation models. We compare these results to the Ks = 11.75 Two-Mass Galaxy Redshift Survey, which provides the deepest and most complete all-sky spatial distribution of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts available thus far. In our analysis, we use a new concise relation for deriving the LG motion and bulk flow from the true distribution of galaxies in redshift space. Our results show that the main source of uncertainty is the small effective depth of surveys like the Two-Mass Redshift Survey (2MRS), which prevents a proper sampling of the large-scale structure beyond ~100 h -1 Mpc. Deeper redshift surveys are needed to reach the "convergence scale" of ≈250 h -1 Mpc in a ΛCDM universe. Deeper surveys would also mitigate the impact of the "Kaiser rocket" which, in a survey like 2MRS, remains a significant source of uncertainty. Thanks to the quiet and moderate density environment of the LG, purely dynamical uncertainties of the linear predictions are subdominant at the level of ~90 km s-1. Finally, we show that deviations from linear galaxy biasing and shot noise errors provide a minor contribution to the total error budget.

  12. THE FAINT END OF THE CLUSTER-GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Mancone, Conor L.; Baker, Troy; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Snyder, Greg; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Wright, Edward L.

    2012-12-20

    We measure the faint-end slope of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) for cluster galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5 using Spitzer IRAC data. We investigate whether this slope, {alpha}, differs from that of the field LF at these redshifts, and with the cluster LF at low redshifts. The latter is of particular interest as low-luminosity galaxies are expected to undergo significant evolution. We use seven high-redshift spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey to measure the cluster-galaxy LF down to depths of M* + 3 (3.6 {mu}m) and M* + 2.5 (4.5 {mu}m). The summed LF at our median cluster redshift (z = 1.35) is well fit by a Schechter distribution with {alpha}{sub 3.6{mu}m} = -0.97 {+-} 0.14 and {alpha}{sub 4.5{mu}m} = -0.91 {+-} 0.28, consistent with a flat faint-end slope and is in agreement with measurements of the field LF in similar bands at these redshifts. A comparison to {alpha} in low-redshift clusters finds no statistically significant evidence of evolution. Combined with past studies which show that M* is passively evolving out to z {approx} 1.3, this means that the shape of the cluster LF is largely in place by z {approx} 1.3. This suggests that the processes that govern the buildup of the mass of low-mass cluster galaxies have no net effect on the faint-end slope of the cluster LF at z {approx}< 1.3.

  13. Galaxy formation in the Planck cosmology - III. The high-redshift universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Scott J.; Thomas, Peter A.; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.

    2015-08-01

    We present high-redshift predictions of the star formation rate distribution function (SFRDF), UV luminosity function (UVLF), galactic stellar mass function (GSMF), and specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of galaxies from the latest version of the Munich semi-analytic model L-GALAXIES. We find a good fit to both the shape and normalization of the SFRDF at z = 4-7, apart from a slight underprediction at the low-SFR end at z = 4. Likewise, we find a good fit to the faint number counts for the observed UVLF at brighter magnitudes our predictions lie below the observations, increasingly so at higher redshifts. At all redshifts and magnitudes, the raw (unattenuated) number counts for the UVLF lie above the observations. Because of the good agreement with the SFR we interpret our underprediction as an overestimate of the amount of dust in the model for the brightest galaxies, especially at high redshift. While the shape of our GSMF matches that of the observations, we lie between (conflicting) observations at z = 4-5, and underpredict at z = 6-7. The sSFRs of our model galaxies show the observed trend of increasing normalization with redshift, but do not reproduce the observed mass dependence. Overall, we conclude that the latest version of L-GALAXIES, which is tuned to match observations at z ≤ 3, does a fair job of reproducing the observed properties of galaxies at z ≥ 4. More work needs to be done on understanding observational bias at high redshift, and upon the dust model, before strong conclusions can be drawn on how to interpret remaining discrepancies between the model and observations.

  14. Evolution of the real-space correlation function from next generation cluster surveys. Recovering the real-space correlation function from photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, Srivatsan; Maurogordato, Sophie; Benoist, Christophe; Cappi, Alberto; Marulli, Federico

    2017-04-01

    Context. The next generation of galaxy surveys will provide cluster catalogues probing an unprecedented range of scales, redshifts, and masses with large statistics. Their analysis should therefore enable us to probe the spatial distribution of clusters with high accuracy and derive tighter constraints on the cosmological parameters and the dark energy equation of state. However, for the majority of these surveys, redshifts of individual galaxies will be mostly estimated by multiband photometry which implies non-negligible errors in redshift resulting in potential difficulties in recovering the real-space clustering. Aims: We investigate to which accuracy it is possible to recover the real-space two-point correlation function of galaxy clusters from cluster catalogues based on photometric redshifts, and test our ability to detect and measure the redshift and mass evolution of the correlation length r0 and of the bias parameter b(M,z) as a function of the uncertainty on the cluster redshift estimate. Methods: We calculate the correlation function for cluster sub-samples covering various mass and redshift bins selected from a 500 deg2 light-cone limited to H < 24. In order to simulate the distribution of clusters in photometric redshift space, we assign to each cluster a redshift randomly extracted from a Gaussian distribution having a mean equal to the cluster cosmological redshift and a dispersion equal to σz. The dispersion is varied in the range σ(z=0)=\\frac{σz{1+z_c} = 0.005,0.010,0.030} and 0.050, in order to cover the typical values expected in forthcoming surveys. The correlation function in real-space is then computed through estimation and deprojection of wp(rp). Four mass ranges (from Mhalo > 2 × 1013h-1M⊙ to Mhalo > 2 × 1014h-1M⊙) and six redshift slices covering the redshift range [0, 2] are investigated, first using cosmological redshifts and then for the four photometric redshift configurations. Results: From the analysis of the light-cone in

  15. LONG GRBs ARE METALLICITY-BIASED TRACERS OF STAR FORMATION: EVIDENCE FROM HOST GALAXIES AND REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G. E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies and the redshift distribution of long GRBs by considering that long GRBs occur in low-metallicity environments. We calculate the upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy which can produce long GRBs by utilizing the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relation of galaxies. After comparing with the observed GRB host galaxies masses, we find that the observed GRB host galaxy masses can fit the predicted masses well if GRBs occur in low-metallicity 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7. GRB host galaxies have low metallicity, low mass, and high star formation rate compared with galaxies of seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also study the cumulative redshift distribution of the latest Swift long GRBs by adding dark GRBs and 10 new GRBs redshifts from the TOUGH survey. The observed discrepancy between the GRB rate and the star formation history can be reconciled by considering that GRBs tend to occur in low-metallicity galaxies with 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7. We conclude that the metallicity cutoff that can produce long GRBs is about 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7 from the host mass distribution and redshift distribution.

  16. The redshift controversy. [over cosmological origin of quasar red shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbidge, G.

    1973-01-01

    Questions regarding the origin of quasi-stellar objects with their large redshifts are discussed. Evidence concerning the cosmological origin of the redshifts is examined. There appears to be some fairly strong evidence which suggests the presence of noncosmological redshifts. Most astronomers, however, still take the view that all redshifts have a cosmological origin. The different types of evidence currently available are listed in tables.

  17. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  18. Relativistic effects on galaxy redshift samples due to target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Shadab; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Ho, Shirley; Zhu, Hongyu; Giusarma, Elena

    2017-10-01

    In a galaxy redshift survey, the objects to be targeted for spectra are selected from a photometrically observed sample. The observed magnitudes and colours of galaxies in this parent sample will be affected by their peculiar velocities, through relativistic Doppler and relativistic beaming effects. In this paper, we compute the resulting expected changes in galaxy photometry. The magnitudes of the relativistic effects are a function of redshift, stellar mass, galaxy velocity and velocity direction. We focus on the CMASS sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is selected on the basis of colour and magnitude. We find that 0.10 per cent of the sample (∼585 galaxies) has been scattered into the targeted region of colour-magnitude space by relativistic effects, and conversely 0.09 per cent of the sample (∼532 galaxies) has been scattered out. Observational consequences of these effects include an asymmetry in clustering statistics, which we explore in a companion paper. Here, we compute a set of weights that can be used to remove the effect of modulations introduced into the density field inferred from a galaxy sample. We conclude by investigating the possible effects of these relativistic modulation on large-scale clustering of the galaxy sample.

  19. High-redshift Fermi blazars observed by GROND and Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Nardini, M.; Tagliaferri, Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Rau, A.; Foschini, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Ghirlanda, G.; Sbarrato, T.

    2013-01-01

    We observed five γ-ray-loud blazars at redshift greater than 2 with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and the UltraViolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) on-board the Swift satellite, and the Gamma-Ray burst Optical Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) instrument. These observations were quasi-simultaneous, usually within a few hours. For four of these blazars, the near-IR to UV data show the presence of an accretion disc, and we could reliably estimate its accretion rate and black hole mass. One of them, PKS 1348+007, was found in an extraordinarily high IR-optical state, almost two orders of magnitude brighter than at the epoch of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey observations. For all the five quasars, the physical parameters of the jet-emitting zone, derived by applying a one-zone emission model, are similar to that found for the bulk of other γ-ray-loud quasars. With our observations, we have X-ray data for the full sample of blazars at z > 2 present in the Fermi 2-year (2LAC) catalogue. This allows us to have a rather complete view of the spectral energy distribution of all high-redshift Fermi blazars, and to draw some conclusions about their properties, and especially about the relation between the accretion rate and the jet power.

  20. Stellar Population Maps of High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetherolf, Tara; Reddy, Naveen; MOSDEF

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive study of resolved galaxy structure can shed light on the formation and evolution of galactic properties, such as the distribution of stars and interstellar dust that obscures starlight. This requires high-resolution, multi-waveband photometry and spectroscopy to completely characterize the galaxies. Previous studies lacked key spectroscopic information, were comprised of small samples, or focused on the local universe. We use HST ACS/WFC3 high-resolution, multi-waveband imaging from the CANDELS project in parallel with moderate-resolution Keck I MOSFIRE spectra from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey to produce resolved stellar population and dust maps of ~500 galaxies at redshifts 1.4 < z < 2.6—covering the key epoch when galaxies accreted most of their mass. For data preparation and analysis we develop an automated Python program to process our large, comprehensive dataset. From the multi-waveband imaging and spectroscopic redshifts, we model the spectral energy distribution for every resolution element within each galaxy and compare these results to the spectroscopically measured global properties. From our stellar population and dust maps we identify resolved structures within these galaxies. We also investigate if spectroscopically measured galaxy properties are biased when compared with that of localized sub-galactic structures.

  1. Correcting cosmological parameter biases for all redshift surveys induced by estimating and reweighting redshift distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Markus Michael; Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Seitz, Stella

    2017-04-01

    Photometric redshift uncertainties are a major source of systematic error for ongoing and future photometric surveys. We study different sources of redshift error caused by choosing a suboptimal redshift histogram bin width and propose methods to resolve them. The selection of a too large bin width is shown to oversmooth small-scale structure of the radial distribution of galaxies. This systematic error can significantly shift cosmological parameter constraints by up to 6σ for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w. Careful selection of bin width can reduce this systematic by a factor of up to 6 as compared with commonly used current binning approaches. We further discuss a generalized resampling method that can correct systematic and statistical errors in cosmological parameter constraints caused by uncertainties in the redshift distribution. This can be achieved without any prior assumptions about the shape of the distribution or the form of the redshift error. Our methodology allows photometric surveys to obtain unbiased cosmological parameter constraints using a minimum number of spectroscopic calibration data. For a DES-like galaxy clustering forecast, we obtain unbiased results with respect to errors caused by suboptimal histogram bin width selection, using only 5k representative spectroscopic calibration objects per tomographic redshift bin.

  2. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. Reconstruction of the redshift-space galaxy density field&

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granett, B. R.; Branchini, E.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moutard, T.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: Using the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) we aim to jointly estimate the keyparameters that describe the galaxy density field and its spatial correlations in redshift space. Methods: We use the Bayesian formalism to jointly reconstruct the redshift-space galaxy density field, power spectrum, galaxy bias and galaxy luminosity function given the observations and survey selection function. The high-dimensional posterior distribution is explored using the Wiener filter within a Gibbs sampler. We validate the analysis using simulated catalogues and apply it to VIPERS data taking into consideration the inhomogeneous selection function. Results: We present joint constraints on the anisotropic power spectrum, and the bias and number density of red and blue galaxy classes in luminosity and redshift bins as well as the measurement covariances of these quantities. We find that the inferred galaxy bias and number density parameters are strongly correlated although they are only weakly correlated with the galaxy power spectrum. The power spectrum and redshift-space distortion parameters are in agreement with previous VIPERS results with the value of the growth rate fσ8 = 0.38 with 18% uncertainty at redshift 0.7. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Imaging of Three Possible Low-redshift Analogs to High-redshift Compact Red Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2011-05-01

    As part of a larger program to identify and characterize possible low-redshift analogs to massive compact red galaxies found at high redshift, we have examined the morphologies of three low-redshift compact galaxies drawn from the sample of Trujillo et al. Using deeper and higher resolution images, we have found faint and relatively extensive outer structures in addition to the compact cores identified in the earlier measurements. One object appears to have a small companion that may be involved in an ongoing minor merger of the sort that could be responsible for building up the outer parts of these galaxies. The ages of the dominant stellar populations in these objects are found to be around 2-4 Gyr, in good agreement with the previous estimates. The presence of diffuse outer structures in these galaxies indicates that truly compact and massive red galaxies are exceedingly rare at low redshift. The relatively young stellar populations suggest that the accretion of the extensive outer material must occur essentially universally on relatively short timescales of a few billion years or less. These results confirm and extend previous suggestions that the driving mechanism behind the size evolution of high-redshift compact galaxies cannot be highly stochastic processes such as major mergers, which would inevitably leave a non-negligible fraction of survivors at low redshift.

  4. Understanding the dark matter-light connection at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo

    Deep, wide-field surveys have enhanced our understanding of galaxy formation and its close connection to the large-scale structures of dark matter in the universe. At high redshifts ( z > 2), in particular, where it is not possible to observe dark matter structures in other methods such as gravitational lensing or galaxy rotation curves, study of galaxy clustering provides a unique view into the formation of galaxies in large look-back times. In this thesis, I present a clustering study of star-forming galaxies at high redshifts ( z ~ 3- 5), observed and selected from two of the deepest multi-wavelength photometric data to date. First, I show that the UV luminosity (or star formation rate) of these galaxies scales closely with the degree of spatial clustering at all cosmic epochs probed from these surveys. In conjunction with the current, well- established theoretical framework of cold dark matter cosmology, this implies that star formation rate is primarily determined by the total mass of the virialized dark matter structures, or dark matter halos. In addition, I show that the measures of galaxy correlation function exhibits a strong upturn on small scales, which cannot be explained with the clustering of halos hosting these galaxies alone. This strongly suggests that multiple galaxies can share a single massive dark matter halo. A simple scaling law between the number of galaxy occupants and halo mass is sufficient to successfully reproduce the observed shape of the correlation function. However, there is uncertainty in drawing physical parameters of the halo-galaxy association which depends on the assumed form of the scaling law, or the halo occupation distribution (HOD). Physical interpretations are further exacerbated by the unknown degree of "fairness" that color-selected galaxies represent. I present an alternative approach which requires precise measurements of both the luminosity function and correlation function (of various luminosity thresholds). By

  5. An empirical SFR estimator for high redshift galaxies:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnouts, Stephane

    2015-08-01

    At high redshift, most of the SFR indicators are limited to the most massive galaxies (Far-IR, radio) and out of reach of optical spectroscopy (Halpha). The UV continuum is the only one available at all redshifts and for galaxies within a large range of mass. The main question is then to properly account for dust absorption. The SED fitting are always limited in the choice of popular attenuation laws (if not only one, starburst) which relies on the slope of the UV continuum. The alternative is to measure the net budget between the absorbed vs un-absorbed UV light i.e. the infrared excess (IRX= Lir/Luv).By using the deep 24 micron in the COSMOS field, we have observed a remarkable behaviour of IRX stripes within the (NUV-r)o vs (r-K)o color diagram which can be used to derive robust SFR estimates just with the Luv, Lr and Lk luminosities (Arnouts et al, 2013). We have shown that we can explain the correlation if we consider a two component models for the birth clouds and the ISM and also a complete model for galaxy inclination to explain the extrem IRX values. We are now extended the method with Herschel data at higher redshift (z~2) and lower masses (M~10^8Mo) by using stacking techniques and find that the IRX-NUVrK correlation persists (Le Floc’h , in prep). This method allows us to derive an accurate SFR for each individual galaxy based on its location in the NUVrK diagram and with no assumption on dust attenuation law, a main caveat for SED fitting technique.We investigated the behavior of the scatter of the SFR-Mass in GOODS and COSMOS fields and find that both SFR (Lir+Luv) or SFR(NUVrK) estimatesare consistent (Ilbert et al., 2015). Finally will investigate the dust-free UV luminosity functions in between 0

  6. The redshift dependence of the structure of massive Λ cold dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Navarro, Julio F.; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; White, Simon D. M.; Springel, Volker; Jenkins, Adrian; Neto, Angelo F.

    2008-06-01

    We use two very large cosmological simulations to study how the density profiles of relaxed Λ cold dark matter dark haloes depend on redshift and on halo mass. We confirm that these profiles deviate slightly but systematically from the NFW form and are better approximated by the empirical formula, d logρ/d logr ~ rα, first used by Einasto to fit star counts in the Milky Way. The best-fitting value of the additional shape parameter, α, increases gradually with mass, from α ~ 0.16 for present-day galaxy haloes to α ~ 0.3 for the rarest and most massive clusters. Halo concentrations depend only weakly on mass at z = 0, and this dependence weakens further at earlier times. At z ~ 3 the average concentration of relaxed haloes does not vary appreciably over the mass range accessible to our simulations (M >~ 3 × 1011h-1Msolar). Furthermore, in our biggest simulation, the average concentration of the most massive, relaxed haloes is constant at ~ 3.5-4 for 0 <= z <= 3. These results agree well with those of Zhao et al. and support the idea that halo densities reflect the density of the universe at the time they formed, as proposed by Navarro, Frenk & White. With their original parameters, the NFW prescription overpredicts halo concentrations at high redshift. This shortcoming can be reduced by modifying the definition of halo formation time, although the evolution of the concentrations of Milky Way mass haloes is still not reproduced well. In contrast, the much-used revisions of the NFW prescription by Bullock et al. and Eke, Navarro & Steinmetz predict a steeper drop in concentration at the highest masses and stronger evolution with redshift than are compatible with our numerical data. Modifying the parameters of these models can reduce the discrepancy at high masses, but the overly rapid redshift evolution remains. These results have important implications for currently planned surveys of distant clusters.

  7. Measuring a cosmological distance-redshift relationship using only gravitational wave observations of binary neutron star coalescences.

    PubMed

    Messenger, C; Read, J

    2012-03-02

    Detection of gravitational waves from the inspiral phase of binary neutron star coalescence will allow us to measure the effects of the tidal coupling in such systems. Tidal effects provide additional contributions to the phase evolution of the gravitational wave signal that break a degeneracy between the system's mass parameters and redshift and thereby allow the simultaneous measurement of both the effective distance and the redshift for individual sources. Using the population of O(10(3)-10(7)) detectable binary neutron star systems predicted for 3rd generation gravitational wave detectors, the luminosity distance-redshift relation can be probed independently of the cosmological distance ladder and independently of electromagnetic observations. We conclude that for a range of representative neutron star equations of state the redshift of such systems can be determined to an accuracy of 8%-40% for z<1 and 9%-65% for 1

  8. OPTICAL REDSHIFT AND RICHNESS ESTIMATES FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS SELECTED WITH THE SUNYAEV-Zel'dovich EFFECT FROM 2008 SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    High, F. W.; Stalder, B.; Song, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Allam, S. S.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Armstrong, R.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Challis, P.; De Haan, T.

    2010-11-10

    We present redshifts and optical richness properties of 21 galaxy clusters uniformly selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signature. These clusters, plus an additional, unconfirmed candidate, were detected in a 178 deg{sup 2} area surveyed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) in 2008. Using griz imaging from the Blanco Cosmology Survey and from pointed Magellan telescope observations, as well as spectroscopy using Magellan facilities, we confirm the existence of clustered red-sequence galaxies, report red-sequence photometric redshifts, present spectroscopic redshifts for a subsample, and derive R{sub 200} radii and M{sub 200} masses from optical richness. The clusters span redshifts from 0.15 to greater than 1, with a median redshift of 0.74; three clusters are estimated to be at z>1. Redshifts inferred from mean red-sequence colors exhibit 2% rms scatter in {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) with respect to the spectroscopic subsample for z < 1. We show that the M{sub 200} cluster masses derived from optical richness correlate with masses derived from SPT data and agree with previously derived scaling relations to within the uncertainties. Optical and infrared imaging is an efficient means of cluster identification and redshift estimation in large SZ surveys, and exploiting the same data for richness measurements, as we have done, will be useful for constraining cluster masses and radii for large samples in cosmological analysis.

  9. USING THE 1.6 {mu}m BUMP TO STUDY REST-FRAME NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sorba, Robert; Sawicki, Marcin

    2010-10-01

    We explore the feasibility and limitations of using the 1.6 {mu}m bump as a photometric redshift indicator and selection technique, and use it to study the rest-frame H-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions (SMFs) at redshift z {approx} 2. We use publicly available Spitzer/IRAC images in the GOODS fields and find that color selection in the IRAC bandpasses alone is comparable in completeness and contamination to BzK selection. We find that the shape of the 1.6 {mu}m bump is robust, and photometric redshifts are not greatly affected by choice of model parameters. Comparison with spectroscopic redshifts shows photometric redshifts to be reliable. We create a rest-frame NIR-selected catalog of galaxies at z {approx} 2 and construct a galaxy SMF. Comparisons with other SMFs at approximately the same redshift but determined using shorter wavelengths show good agreement. This agreement suggests that selection at bluer wavelengths does not miss a significant amount of stellar mass in passive galaxies. Comparison with SMFs at other redshifts shows evidence for the downsizing scenario of galaxy evolution. We conclude by pointing out the potential for using the 1.6 {mu}m bump technique to select high-redshift galaxies with the JWST, whose {lambda}>0.6 {mu}m coverage will not be well suited to selecting galaxies using techniques that require imaging at shorter wavelengths.

  10. Exploring the SDSS photometric galaxies with clustering redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Mendez, Alexander J.; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Morrison, Christopher B.; Budavári, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    We apply clustering-based redshift inference to all extended sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalogue, down to magnitude r = 22. We map the relationships between colours and redshift, without assumption of the sources' spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We identify and locate star-forming quiescent galaxies, and active galactic nuclei, as well as colour changes due to spectral features, such as the 4000 Å break, redshifting through specific filters. Our mapping is globally in good agreement with colour-redshift tracks computed with SED templates, but reveals informative differences, such as the need for a lower fraction of M-type stars in certain templates. We compare our clustering-redshift estimates to photometric redshifts and find these two independent estimators to be in good agreement at each limiting magnitude considered. Finally, we present the global clustering-redshift distribution of all Sloan extended sources, showing objects up to z ˜ 0.8. While the overall shape agrees with that inferred from photometric redshifts, the clustering-redshift technique results in a smoother distribution, with no indication of structure in redshift space suggested by the photometric-redshift estimates (likely artefacts imprinted by their spectroscopic training set). We also infer a higher fraction of high-redshift objects. The mapping between the four observed colours and redshift can be used to estimate the redshift probability distribution function of individual galaxies. This work is an initial step towards producing a general mapping between redshift and all available observables in the photometric space, including brightness, size, concentration, and ellipticity.

  11. Searching for the Progenitors of High-redshift Compact Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christina; Giavalisco, M.; Cassata, P.; Guo, Y.

    2012-05-01

    High-redshift galaxy surveys have revealed a population of very massive and already evolved early-type galaxies at z > 1, which appear to be ultra-compact in size relative to local galaxies of similar stellar mass. The compactness and stellar masses of these galaxies, which are already in place at high-redshift, pose challenges for theories in which mergers drive the evolution of galaxies. We investigate the properties of Lyman Break Galaxies at z > 3 in CANDELS, among whom must be the progenitor population of these ultra-compact early-type galaxies, to assess the extent to which they were also ultra-compact while building up their stellar mass. Since merging and accretion generally increase the size of galaxies, the progenitors of the ultra-compact ellipticals must be compact star-forming galaxies themselves. Using rest-frame optical imaging from HST and SED fitting, we study the evolution in the mass-radius relation using their morphologies and stellar masses. We also discuss the implications that these ultra-compact star-forming galaxies have on theories of galaxy evolution and the quenching of star-formation at high-redshift.

  12. In Pursuit of High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampazzo, Roberto; D'Onofrio, Mauro; Zaggia, Simone; Djorgovski, Stanislav George; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Calzetti, Daniela; Combes, Françoise; Longair, Malcolm S.; Bromm, Volker

    Some contributions in Chap. 1 have highlighted the impact of the discovery in the 1960s of a handful of radio galaxies and Quasars in the redshift range z ˜ 0.2-0.4. About 40 years later, at the end of the twentieth Century, the systematic exploration of galaxies reached z ˜ 1-3. The combination of HST deep imaging and the coming into operation of the 8-10 m class telescopes with their spectroscopic capabilities, move ahead the limits. At the same time, astronomers greatly improved their strategies to hunt high-redshift galaxies. Today, it is not infrequent the spectroscopic confirmation of galaxies at z ˜ 7-8, pushing the detection limits more or less to the end of the re-ionization era. The gauntlet to observe the so called "first galaxies", i.e. those assembling during the first billion years of the cosmic time, is throw down.

  13. Morphologies at High Redshift from Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Simmons, Brooke; Willett, Kyle; Lintott, Chris

    2015-08-01

    I will present results from Galaxy Zoo classification of galaxies observed in public observed frame optical HST surveys (e.g. COSMOS, GOODS) as well as in observed frame NIR with (ie. CANDELS). Early science results from these classifications have investigated the changing bar fraction in disc galaxies as a function of redshift (to z~1 in Melvin et al. 2014; and at z>1 in Simmons et al. 2015), as well as how the morphologies of galaxies on the red sequence have been changing since z~1 (Melvin et al. in prep.). These unique dataset of quantitative visual classifications for high redshift galaxies will be made public in forthcoming publications (planned as Willett et al. for Galaxy Zoo Hubble, and Simmons et al. for Galaxy Zoo CANDELS).

  14. An Increasing Stellar Baryon Fraction in Bright Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Papovich, Casey; Milosavljević, Miloš; Dekel, Avishai; Narayanan, Desika; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Cooray, Asantha; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salmon, Brett; Willner, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately {M}{UV}*˜ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 173 bright, MUV < -21 galaxies at z = 4-7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that {M}{UV}* galaxies at z = 4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/M⊙) = 9.6-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z = 4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z = 2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation for a fixed dust-attenuation curve. Matching the abundances of these bright z = 4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi ΛCDM simulation implies that the typical halo masses in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies decrease from log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.9 at z = 4 to log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.4 at z = 7. Thus, although we are studying galaxies at a similar stellar mass across multiple redshifts, these galaxies live in lower mass halos at higher redshift. The stellar baryon fraction in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies in units of the cosmic mean Ωb/Ωm rises from 5.1% at z = 4 to 11.7% at z = 7; this evolution is significant at the ˜3σ level. This rise does not agree with simple expectations of how galaxies grow, and implies that some effect, perhaps a diminishing efficiency of feedback, is allowing a higher fraction of available baryons to be converted into stars at high redshifts.

  15. Redshift evolution of Tully-Fisher relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Ismael; Abadi, Mario G.

    2017-03-01

    Using the eagle cosmological simulation of galaxy formation we test the ability of the ΛCDM cosmological model to reproduce the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) and its redshift evolution. We find that our simulated galaxies follow a TFR that is in good agreement with observed results up to z = 1, indicating no evolution in the slope and a weak decrease in the zero-point.

  16. Bayesian photometric redshifts with empirical training sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Christian

    2009-07-01

    We combine in a single framework the two complementary benefits of χ2 template fits and empirical training sets used e.g. in neural nets: χ2 is more reliable when its probability density functions (PDFs) are inspected for multiple peaks, while empirical training is more accurate when calibration and priors of query data and training set match. We present a χ2 empirical method that derives PDFs from empirical models as a subclass of kernel regression methods, and apply it to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample of >75000 quasi-stellar objects, which is full of ambiguities. Objects with single-peak PDFs show <1 per cent outliers, rms redshift errors <0.05 and vanishing redshift bias. At z > 2.5, these figures are two times better. Outliers result purely from the discrete nature and limited size of the model, and rms errors are dominated by the intrinsic variety of object colours. PDFs classed as ambiguous provide accurate probabilities for alternative solutions and thus weights for using both solutions and avoiding needless outliers. E.g. the PDFs predict 78.0 per cent of the stronger peaks to be correct, which is true for 77.9 per cent of them. Redshift incompleteness is common in faint spectroscopic surveys and turns into a massive undetectable outlier risk above other performance limitations, but we can quantify residual outlier risks stemming from size and completeness of the model. We propose a matched χ2 error scale for noisy data and show that it produces correct error estimates and redshift distributions accurate within Poisson errors. Our method can easily be applied to future large galaxy surveys, which will benefit from the reliability in ambiguity detection and residual risk quantification.

  17. Redshift Search of a z~5 Ultra-bright Starburst Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Akio; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Tamura, Yoichi; Iono, Daisuke; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Ikarashi, Soh; Umehata, Hideki; Izumi, Takuma; Makiya, Ryu

    2014-04-01

    We made a serendipitous detection of an ultra-bright source, MMJ1545-34, which has 1.1-mm flux density of 44 mJy, and extremely rare (? 0.1 per square degree) among all of > 1000 SMGs found in our AzTEC/ASTE survey. Photometric redshift estimates reveal that the source is likely located at z~5 and highly magnified by a gravitational lens. However the lack in robust redshift measurements has prevented us from constraining the most fundamental quantities of this galaxy such as gravitational lensing factor, demagnified luminosity, star-formation rate etc. Our proposal aims at; (1) Determining redshift by scanning and identifying the CO(2-1) line across the CABB 7-mm band. The proposed observations cover the redshift range of 3.6 < z < 6.5 (95% confidence interval of photo-z) by just 6 tunings of CABB, which unambiguously determine the redshift. Also the 7-mm continuum observation can accurately estimate gas-to-dust ratio, which is tightly related to metallicity. (2) Revealing star-formation mode by obtaining the ratio of far-infrared luminosity per molecular gas mass. This ratio has unique bimodal distribution, which is thought to represent the burst and disk modes of star-formation. (3) Obtaining gas mass to stellar mass fraction at z>4. This fraction is a robust indicator of the degree of stellar mas assembly, however the fraction at z~5 has not been obtained yet. Therefore it is important to confirm the value, which is related to the nature of early galaxies.

  18. Redshift Search of a z~5 Ultra-bright Starburst Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Akio; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Tamura, Yoichi; Iono, Daisuke; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Ikarashi, Soh; Umehata, Hideki; Izumi, Takuma; Makiya, Ryu

    2013-10-01

    We made a serendipitous detection of an ultra-bright source, MMJ1545-34, which has 1.1-mm flux density of 44 mJy, and extremely rare (? 0.1 per square degree) among all of > 1000 SMGs found in our AzTEC/ASTE survey. Photometric redshift estimates reveal that the source is likely located at z~5 and highly magnified by a gravitational lens. However the lack in robust redshift measurements has prevented us from constraining the most fundamental quantities of this galaxy such as gravitational lensing factor, demagnified luminosity, star-formation rate etc. Our proposal aims at; (1) Determining redshift by scanning and identifying the CO(2-1) line across the CABB 7-mm band. The proposed observations cover the redshift range of 3.6 < z < 6.5 (95% confidence interval of photo-z) by just 6 tunings of CABB, which unambiguously determine the redshift. Also the 7-mm continuum observation can accurately estimate gas-to-dust ratio, which is tightly related to metallicity. (2) Revealing star-formation mode by obtaining the ratio of far-infrared luminosity per molecular gas mass. This ratio has unique bimodal distribution, which is thought to represent the burst and disk modes of star-formation. (3) Obtaining gas mass to stellar mass fraction at z>4. This fraction is a robust indicator of the degree of stellar mas assembly, however the fraction at z~5 has not been obtained yet. Therefore it is important to confirm the value, which is related to the nature of early galaxies.

  19. Clustering of intermediate redshift quasars using the final SDSS III-BOSS sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; White, Martin; Weinberg, David H.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ross, Nicholas P.; Paris, Isabelle; Streblyanska, Alina

    2015-11-01

    We measure the two-point clustering of spectroscopically confirmed quasars from the final sample of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) on comoving scales of 4 ≲ s ≲ 22 h-1 Mpc. The sample covers 6950 deg2 [ ˜ 19 (h- 1Gpc)3] and, over the redshift range 2.2 ≤ z ≤ 2.8, contains 55 826 homogeneously selected quasars, which is twice as many as in any similar work. We deduce bQ = 3.54 ± 0.10; the most precise measurement of quasar bias to date at these redshifts. This corresponds to a host halo mass of ˜2 × 1012 h-1 M⊙ with an implied quasar duty cycle of ˜1 per cent. The real-space projected correlation function is well fitted by a power law of index 2 and correlation length r0 = (8.12 ± 0.22) h- 1 Mpc over scales of 4 ≲ rp ≲ 25 h-1 Mpc. To better study the evolution of quasar clustering at moderate redshift, we extend the redshift range of our study to z ˜ 3.4 and measure the bias and correlation length of three subsamples over 2.2 ≤ z ≤ 3.4. We find no significant evolution of r0 or bias over this range, implying that the host halo mass of quasars decreases somewhat with increasing redshift. We find quasar clustering remains similar over a decade in luminosity, contradicting a scenario in which quasar luminosity is monotonically related to halo mass at z ≈ 2.5. Our results are broadly consistent with previous BOSS measurements, but they yield more precise constraints based upon a larger and more uniform data set.

  20. Redshift-space distortions in massive neutrino and evolving dark energy cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhye, Amol; Kwan, Juliana; Pope, Adrian; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Finkel, Hal; Frontiere, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale structure surveys in the coming years will measure the redshift-space power spectrum to unprecedented accuracy, allowing for powerful new tests of the Λ cold dark matter (Λ CDM ) picture as well as measurements of particle physics parameters such as the neutrino masses. We extend the time-renormalization-group (RG) perturbative framework to redshift space, computing the power spectrum Ps(k ,μ ) in massive neutrino cosmologies with time-dependent dark energy equations of state w (z ). Time-RG is uniquely capable of incorporating scale-dependent growth into the Ps(k ,μ ) computation, which is important for massive neutrinos as well as modified gravity models. Although changes to w (z ) and the neutrino mass fraction both affect the late-time scale dependence of the nonlinear power spectrum, we find that the two effects depend differently on the line-of-sight angle μ . Finally, we use the hacc N-body code to quantify errors in the perturbative calculations. For a Λ CDM model at redshift z =1 , our procedure predicts the monopole (quadrupole) to 1% accuracy up to a wave number 0.19 h /Mpc (0.28 h /Mpc ), compared to 0.08 h /Mpc (0.07 h /Mpc ) for the Kaiser approximation and 0.19 h /Mpc (0.16 h /Mpc ) for the current state-of-the-art perturbation scheme. Our calculation agrees with the simulated redshift-space power spectrum even for neutrino masses above the current bound, and for rapidly evolving dark energy equations of state, |d w /d z |˜1 . Along with this article, we make our redshift-space time-RG implementation publicly available as the code redtime.

  1. Relativistic jet feedback in high-redshift galaxies - I. Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph; Wagner, Alex

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of 3D relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of interaction of active galactic nucleus jets with a dense turbulent two-phase interstellar medium, which would be typical of high-redshift galaxies. We describe the effect of the jet on the evolution of the density of the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). The jet-driven energy bubble affects the gas to distances up to several kiloparsecs from the injection region. The shocks resulting from such interactions create a multiphase ISM and radial outflows. One of the striking result of this work is that low-power jets (Pjet ≲ 1043 ergs-1), although less efficient in accelerating clouds, are trapped in the ISM for a longer time and hence affect the ISM over a larger volume. Jets of higher power drill through with relative ease. Although the relativistic jets launch strong outflows, there is little net mass ejection to very large distances, supporting a galactic fountain scenario for local feedback.

  2. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, Scott; Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: yshen@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-10

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few percent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad Hβ line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [O III] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ∼30°-45°, consistent with simple active galactic nucleus unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  3. Intermediate Redshift Galaxy Clusters from DPOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, P. A. A.

    2003-06-01

    In this thesis we discuss the selection of intermediate redshift galaxy cluster candidates based on the Digitized Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (DPOSS). Clusters are detected using the best DPOSS plates based on seeing and limiting magnitude. The search is further restricted to high galactic latitudes (|b| > 50 °), where stellar contamination is mild and nearly uniform. The input galaxy catalogs used for this search are limited to r = 21.1. The cluster selection is based on two techniques, the adaptive kernel and the voronoi tesselation methods. The final combined catalog contains ~ 10,000 candidates over ~ 2,700 square degrees, with ~ 0.30 and ~ 40 (Ngals is a richness estimate we provide). Rich clusters are detected down to z ~ 0.5. This cluster catalog is a supplement to the previous DPOSS catalogs, being the largest resource of rich clusters in this redshift range to date. In order to optimize the detection algorithms and estimate the contamination and completeness rates, we perform a large number of simulations for both catalogs. Redshift and richness estimates are also provided for all candidates in the two catalogs. As a by-product we present a comparison between the DPOSS and SDSS surveys. This comparison is used to estimate the DPOSS detection limits. Some of the projects to be developed in the future are also discussed.

  4. A Review of Anomalous Redshift Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, H.

    2009-12-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing astrophysics is derivation of remoteness in cosmological objects. At large scales, it is almost entirely dependent upon the well-established Hubble relationship in spectral redshift. The comparison of galactic redshifts with distances arrived at by other means has yielded a useable curve to an acceptable confidence level, and the assumption of scale invariance allows the adoption of redshift as a standard calibration of cosmological distance. However, there have been several fields of study in observational astronomy that consistently give apparently anomalous results from ever-larger statistical samples, and would thus seem to require further careful investigation. This paper presents a review summary of recent independent work, primarily (for galaxies and proto-galaxies) by teams led by, respectively, D. G. Russell, M. Lopez-Corredoira, and H. C. Arp, and for galaxy clusters and large-scale structures, those of N. A. Bahcall, and J.C. Jackson. Included also are several other important contributions that will be fully cited in the text. The observational evidence is presented here per se without attempting theoretical conclusions or extrapolating the data to cosmology.

  5. Photometric Redshift Biases from Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C. Jonathan; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-04-01

    Proposed cosmological surveys will make use of photometric redshifts of galaxies that are significantly fainter than any complete spectroscopic redshift surveys that exist to train the photo-z methods. We investigate the photo-z biases that result from known differences between the faint and bright populations: a rise in active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity toward higher redshift, and a metallicity difference between intrinsically luminous and faint early-type galaxies. We find that even very small mismatches between the mean photometric target and the training set can induce photo-z biases large enough to corrupt derived cosmological parameters significantly. Our results suggest that a metallicity shift of ∼0.003 dex in an old population, or contamination of any galaxy spectrum with ∼0.2% AGN flux, is sufficient to induce a 10-3 bias in photo-z. These results highlight the danger in extrapolating the behavior of bright galaxies to a fainter population, and the desirability of a spectroscopic training set that spans all of the characteristics of the photo-z targets, i.e., extending to the 25th mag or fainter galaxies that will be used in future surveys.

  6. Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jia-Jia; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-08-01

    By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of the Lyman- forest of distant quasars, the Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the "redshift desert" of . Thus this method is definitely an important supplement to the other geometric measurements and will play a crucial role in cosmological constraints. In this paper, we quantify the ability of the SL test signal by a CODEX-like spectrograph for constraining interacting dark energy. Four typical interacting dark energy models are considered: (i) , (ii) , (iii) , and (iv) . The results show that for all the considered interacting dark energy models, relative to the current joint SN BAO CMB observations, the constraints on and would be improved by about 60 and 30-40 %, while the constraints on w and would be slightly improved, with a 30-year observation of the SL test. We also explore the impact of the SL test on future joint geometric observations. In this analysis, we take the model with as an example, and we simulate future SN and BAO data based on the space-based project WFIRST. We find that with the future geometric constraints, the redshift drift observations would help break the geometric degeneracies in a meaningful way, thus the measurement precisions of , , w, and could be substantially improved using future probes.

  7. Clustering-based redshift estimation: application to VIPERS/CFHTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scottez, V.; Mellier, Y.; Granett, B. R.; Moutard, T.; Kilbinger, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Moscardini, L.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the accuracy of the clustering-based redshift estimation proposed by Ménard et al. when applied to VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) real data. This method enables us to reconstruct redshift distributions from measurement of the angular clustering of objects using a set of secure spectroscopic redshifts. We use state-of-the-art spectroscopic measurements with iAB < 22.5 from the VIPERS as reference population to infer the redshift distribution of galaxies from the CFHTLS T0007 release. VIPERS provides a nearly representative sample to a flux limit of iAB < 22.5 at a redshift of >0.5 which allows us to test the accuracy of the clustering-based redshift distributions. We show that this method enables us to reproduce the true mean colour-redshift relation when both populations have the same magnitude limit. We also show that this technique allows the inference of redshift distributions for a population fainter than the reference and we give an estimate of the colour-redshift mapping in this case. This last point is of great interest for future large-redshift surveys which require a complete faint spectroscopic sample.

  8. Hierarchical Bayesian inference of galaxy redshift distributions from photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistedt, Boris; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-08-01

    Accurately characterizing the redshift distributions of galaxies is essential for analysing deep photometric surveys and testing cosmological models. We present a technique to simultaneously infer redshift distributions and individual redshifts from photometric galaxy catalogues. Our model constructs a piecewise constant representation (effectively a histogram) of the distribution of galaxy types and redshifts, the parameters of which are efficiently inferred from noisy photometric flux measurements. This approach can be seen as a generalization of template-fitting photometric redshift methods and relies on a library of spectral templates to relate the photometric fluxes of individual galaxies to their redshifts. We illustrate this technique on simulated galaxy survey data, and demonstrate that it delivers correct posterior distributions on the underlying type and redshift distributions, as well as on the individual types and redshifts of galaxies. We show that even with uninformative priors, large photometric errors and parameter degeneracies, the redshift and type distributions can be recovered robustly thanks to the hierarchical nature of the model, which is not possible with common photometric redshift estimation techniques. As a result, redshift uncertainties can be fully propagated in cosmological analyses for the first time, fulfilling an essential requirement for the current and future generations of surveys.

  9. The growth of massive galaxies and clusters at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert Raymond

    2013-12-01

    Massive galaxies and galaxy clusters gain much of their mass by merging with their neighbors; this hierarchical structure formation is the foundation of our understanding of galaxy evolution. Nevertheless, the detailed evolutionary processes needed to form the structures we see in the local Universe remain poorly understood. This thesis comprises four projects examining the growth of galaxies and clusters at high redshift by using radio, sub/millimeter, and X-ray observations to provide empirical constraints on their cosmic evolution. Chapter 2 presents deep 1.2mm imaging of the inner 20' x 20' of the Lockman Hole North (LHN) field to search for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), rapidly star-forming, high-redshift galaxy mergers. We detect 41 SMGs with S/N>4.0 and use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate their number counts and angular clustering properties. Chapter 3 investigates the nuclear accretion properties of the LHN SMGs. In the sample's average rest-frame X-ray spectrum, we detect strong Fe K alpha emission (equivalent width EW >=1 keV) from highly-ionized Fe species -- evidence that beneath the galaxies' heavy obscuration, supermassive black holes may be growing rapidly. Chapter 4 describes a new 345 GHz and 2.1 GHz imaging campaign to study the intracluster media (ICM) of eleven massive Sunyaev Zel'dovich Effect (SZE)-detected clusters from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. In six of eleven, 345 GHz SZE increments are detected and used to characterize the spatial distribution and energy content of the ICM at high (19.2") resolution. This work helps us understand how SZE-mass scaling relations are affected by contamination from other sources along the line of sight and by dynamical properties of the ICM. Chapter 5 studies the non-thermal radio emission in one exceptional z=0.870 binary cluster merger (ACTJ0102-4915, ``El Gordo'') with the help of newly-acquired radio observations. El Gordo is the highest-redshift cluster known to host

  10. MAPPING THE GALAXY COLOR–REDSHIFT RELATION: OPTIMAL PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CALIBRATION STRATEGIES FOR COSMOLOGY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas; Capak, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Schmidt, Samuel; Longo, Giuseppe; Paltani, Stephane; Coupon, Jean; Mobasher, Bahram; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Speagle, Josh; Kalinich, Adam; Brodwin, Mark; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳10{sup 9} galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  11. Mapping the Galaxy Color-Redshift Relation: Optimal Photometric Redshift Calibration Strategies for Cosmology Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel; Capak, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Schmidt, Samuel; Longo, Giuseppe; Rhodes, Jason; Paltani, Stephane; Mobasher, Bahram; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Coupon, Jean; Steinhardt, Charles; Speagle, Josh; Faisst, Andreas; Kalinich, Adam; Brodwin, Mark; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳109 galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color-redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  12. Redshift distortions of galaxy correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J. N.; Gaztanaga, E.

    1993-05-01

    To examine how peculiar velocities can affect the 2-, 3-, and 4-point correlation functions, we evaluate volume-average correlations for configurations that emphasize and minimize distortions for four different volume-limited samples from each of the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS redshift catalogs. We present the results as the correlation length r0 and power index gamma of the 2-point correlation, bar-xi2 = (r0/r)gamma), and as the hierarchical amplitudes of the 3- and 4-point functions, S3 = bar-xi3/bar-xi22 and S4 = bar-xi/bar-xi)23. We find a characteristic distortion for bar-xi2: The slope gamma is flatter and the correlation length is larger in redshift space than in real space; that is, redshift distortions 'move' correlations from small to large scales. At the largest scales, extra power in the redshift distribution is compatible with Omega4/7/b approx. 1; we find 0.53 plus/minus 0.15, 1.10 plus/minus 0.16 and 0.84 plus/minus 0.45 for the CfA, SSRS and IRAS catalogs. Higher order correlations bar-xi3 and bar-xi4 suffer similar redshift distortions, but in such a way that, within the accuracy of our analysis, the normalized amplitudes S3 and S4 are insensitive to this effect. The hierarchical amplitudes S3 and S4 are constant as a function of scale between 1-12 h-1 Mpc and have similar values in all samples and catalogues, S3 approx. 2 and S4 approx. 6, despite the fact that bar-xi2, bar-xi3, and bar-xi4 differ from one sample to another by large factors. The agreement between the independent estimations of S3 and S4 is remarkable given the different criteria in the selection of galaxies and also the difference in the resulting range of densities, luminosities and locations between samples.

  13. Can Life Survive Gamma-Ray Bursts in the High-redshift Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a possible cause of mass extinctions on Earth. Due to the higher event rate of GRBs at higher redshifts, it has been speculated that life as we know it may not survive above a certain redshift (e.g., z\\gt 0.5). We examine the duty cycle of lethal (life-threatening) GRBs in the solar neighborhood, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, and GRB host galaxies, with the dependence of the long GRB rate on star formation and metallicity properly taken into account. We find that the number of lethal GRBs attacking Earth within the past 500 Myr (˜epoch of the Ordovician mass extinction) is 0.93. The number of lethal GRBs hitting a certain planet increases with redshift, as a result of the increasing star formation rate (SFR) and decreasing metallicity in high-z galaxies. Taking 1 per 500 Myr as a conservative duty cycle for life to survive, as evidenced by our existence, we find that there is still a good fraction of SDSS galaxies beyond z=0.5 where the GRB rate at half-mass radius is lower than this value. We derive the fraction of such benign galaxies as a function of redshift through Monte Carlo simulations, and we find that the fraction is ˜ 50% at z˜ 1.5 and ˜ 10% even at z˜ 3. The mass distribution of benign galaxies is dominated by Milky Way-like ones, due to their commonness, relatively large mass, and low SFR. GRB host galaxies are among the most dangerous ones.

  14. DUST FORMATION, EVOLUTION, AND OBSCURATION EFFECTS IN THE VERY HIGH-REDSHIFT UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Dwek, Eli; Benford, Dominic J.; Staguhn, Johannes; Su, Ting; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacks, Attila

    2014-06-20

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z ≳ 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production compared to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This ''silicate-UV break'' may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxy's photometric redshift. In this Letter we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2 mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high-redshift universe.

  15. Optical Scaling Relations of X-ray Selected Clusters at Moderate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, Dylan; Rines, K.; Svoboda, B. E.; Arnold, R. L.; Welch, T. J.; Finn, R. A.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between dark matter and galaxies is a fundamental problem in astrophysics. Here, we study this relation using optical observations of an X-ray-selected sample of clusters at moderate redshift (z=0.35-0.90). We collected griz images of 30 clusters with WIYN/OPTIC to measure the bright end of the luminosity function. Our imaging extends approximately 2 magnitudes fainter than M*, thus including most of the total cluster light. We use the red sequence and statistical background subtraction to estimate the richnesses and stellar luminosities of the clusters. We measure scaling relations by comparing the optical properties to X-ray mass estimates derived from Chandra observations. At low redshift, some studies indicate that total stellar luminosity is a better predictor of cluster mass than X-ray luminosity. We test whether a similar result holds at moderate redshift. In the future, we will compare the optical and X-ray properties to virial mass estimates from optical spectroscopy and to Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect observations. If photometric properties of clusters are good predictors of cluster mass, these relations could be applied to large surveys like SPT, Planck, DES, eROSITA, and LSST to improve constraints on the properties of dark energy.

  16. Seeding High Redshift QSOs by Collisional Runaway in Primordial Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Harley; Sijacki, Debora; Haehnelt, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The formation and evolution of high mass galaxies across cosmic time is believed to be fundamentally related to the activity and growth of their constituent supermassive black holes. Such black holes with masses of over a billion solar masses were in place in galaxies when the Universe was less than ten percent of its current age, leaving in doubt whether known mechanisms of forming black holes could be responsible for seeding these massive objects and posing the question of how such objects impacted the early Universe. We study a channel, whereby the runaway stellar collisions in high redshift, metal poor, star clusters result in very massive stars of up to ~1000 M⊙, which can then directly collapse into intermediate mass black holes. We present novel, high resolution, hydrodynamical, zoom-in simulations, with non-equilibrium cooling to follow the detailed chemical properties, collapse, and evolution of a pair high redshift dwarf galaxies which subsequently produce a metal enriched, dense, gaseous clump. We then use the spatial configuration of this flattened, asymmetrical birth cloud to set the initial conditions for simulations of an initially non-spherical star cluster with a direct summation code. We find that, for a variety of different parameters, collisional runaway is a promising mechanism to produce large numbers of high redshift seeds required for the formation of super massive black holes by z=6.

  17. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacks, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-togas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe.

  18. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Connolly, A. J.; Kaiser, N.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Luppino, G. A.; Marinoni, C.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg2 divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R AB = 24.1. Objects with z <~ 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 Å doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm-1 grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R ~ 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift

  19. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puraga; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z approx. 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z approx. 1 via approx.90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 Sq. deg divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R(sub AB) = 24.1. Objects with z approx. < 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted approx. 2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z approx. 1.45, where the [O ii] 3727 Ang. doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm(exp -1) grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R approx. 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other

  20. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION, AND REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Harker, Justin J.; Lai, Kamson; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan Renbin; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P. E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu E-mail: koo@ucolick.org E-mail: phillips@ucolick.org; and others

    2013-09-15

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z {approx} 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -20 at z {approx} 1 via {approx}90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg{sup 2} divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R{sub AB} = 24.1. Objects with z {approx}< 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted {approx}2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z {approx} 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 A doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm{sup -1} grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R {approx} 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or

  1. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT METHODS: A CANDELS INVESTIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Mobasher, Bahram; Faber, Sandra M.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Finlator, Kristian; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Pforr, Janine; Dickinson, Mark E.; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; Wiklind, Tommy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Huang, Jiasheng; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; and others

    2013-10-01

    We present results from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) photometric redshift methods investigation. In this investigation, the results from 11 participants, each using a different combination of photometric redshift code, template spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and priors, are used to examine the properties of photometric redshifts applied to deep fields with broadband multi-wavelength coverage. The photometry used includes U-band through mid-infrared filters and was derived using the TFIT method. Comparing the results, we find that there is no particular code or set of template SEDs that results in significantly better photometric redshifts compared to others. However, we find that codes producing the lowest scatter and outlier fraction utilize a training sample to optimize photometric redshifts by adding zero-point offsets, template adjusting, or adding extra smoothing errors. These results therefore stress the importance of the training procedure. We find a strong dependence of the photometric redshift accuracy on the signal-to-noise ratio of the photometry. On the other hand, we find a weak dependence of the photometric redshift scatter with redshift and galaxy color. We find that most photometric redshift codes quote redshift errors (e.g., 68% confidence intervals) that are too small compared to that expected from the spectroscopic control sample. We find that all codes show a statistically significant bias in the photometric redshifts. However, the bias is in all cases smaller than the scatter; the latter therefore dominates the errors. Finally, we find that combining results from multiple codes significantly decreases the photometric redshift scatter and outlier fraction. We discuss different ways of combining data to produce accurate photometric redshifts and error estimates.

  2. Magnetically Regulated Gas Accretion in High-Redshift Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnboim, Yuval

    2009-09-01

    Disk galaxies are in hydrostatic equilibrium along their vertical axis. The pressure allowing for this configuration consists of thermal, turbulent, magnetic, and cosmic-ray components. For the Milky Way the thermal pressure contributes ~10% of the total pressure near the plane, with this fraction dropping toward higher altitudes. Out of the rest, magnetic fields contribute ~1/3 of the pressure to distances of ~3 kpc above the disk plane. In this Letter, we attempt to extrapolate these local values to high-redshift, rapidly accreting, rapidly star-forming disk galaxies and study the effect of the extra pressure sources on the accretion of gas onto the galaxies. In particular, magnetic field tension may convert a smooth cold-flow accretion to clumpy, irregular star formation regions and rates. The infalling gas accumulates on the edge of the magnetic fields, supported by magnetic tension. When the mass of the infalling gas exceeds some threshold mass, its gravitational force cannot be balanced by magnetic tension anymore, and it falls toward the disk's plane, rapidly making stars. Simplified estimations of this threshold mass are consistent with clumpy star formation observed in SINS, UDF, GOODS, and GEMS surveys. We discuss the shortcomings of pure hydrodynamic codes in simulating the accretion of cold flows into galaxies, and emphasize the need for magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  3. An ALMA Survey of Submillimeter Galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: Spectroscopic Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, A. L. R.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Simpson, J. M.; Casey, C. M.; Chapman, S. C.; da Cunha, E.; Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F.; Wardlow, J. L.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; de Breuck, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dickinson, M.; Edge, A. C.; Gawiser, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Karim, A.; Kovacs, A.; Lutz, D.; Menten, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Weiß, A.; van der Werf, P.

    2017-05-01

    We present spectroscopic redshifts of {\\text{}}{S}870μ {{m}} ≳ 2 mJy submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), which have been identified from the ALMA follow-up observations of 870 μm detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (the ALMA-LESS survey). We derive spectroscopic redshifts for 52 SMGs, with a median of z = 2.4 ± 0.1. However, the distribution features a high-redshift tail, with ˜23% of the SMGs at z≥slant 3. Spectral diagnostics suggest that the SMGs are young starbursts, and the velocity offsets between the nebular emission and UV ISM absorption lines suggest that many are driving winds, with velocity offsets of up to 2000 km s-1. Using the spectroscopic redshifts and the extensive UV-to-radio photometry in this field, we produce optimized spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Magphys, and use the SEDs to infer a median stellar mass of {M}\\star = (6 ± 1)× 1010 M {}⊙ for our SMGs with spectroscopic redshift. By combining these stellar masses with the star formation rates (measured from the far-infrared SEDs), we show that SMGs (on average) lie a factor of ˜5 above the so-called “main sequence” at z˜ 2. We provide this library of 52 template fits with robust and uniquely well-sampled SEDs as a resource for future studies of SMGs, and also release the spectroscopic catalog of ˜2000 (mostly infrared-selected) galaxies targeted as part of the spectroscopic campaign.

  4. RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT BY THE COMBO-17+4 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, Marie-Helene; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Wolf, Christian; Tapken, Christian E-mail: meise@mpia.de E-mail: ctapken@aip.de

    2011-01-20

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy population since redshift 2 with a focus on the color bimodality and mass density of the red sequence. We obtain precise and reliable photometric redshifts up to z = 2 by supplementing the optical survey COMBO-17 with observations in four near-infrared bands on 0.2 deg{sup 2} of the COMBO-17 A901-field. Our results are based on an H-band-selected catalog of 10,692 galaxies complete to H = 21fm7. We measure the rest-frame color (U{sub 280}-V) of each galaxy, which across the redshift range of our interest requires no extrapolation and is robust against moderate redshift errors by staying clear of the 4000 A break. We measure the color-magnitude relation of the red sequence as a function of look-back time from the peak in a color-error-weighted histogram, and thus trace the galaxy bimodality out to z {approx_equal} 1.65. The (U{sub 280}-V) of the red sequence is found to evolve almost linearly with look-back time. At high redshift, we find massive galaxies in both the red and the blue population. Red-sequence galaxies with log M{sub *}/M{sub sun}>11 increase in mass density by a factor of {approx}4 from z {approx} 2 to 1 and remain nearly constant at z < 1. However, some galaxies as massive as log M{sub *}/M{sub sun} = 11.5 are already in place at z {approx} 2.

  5. An empirical model for the galaxy luminosity and star formation rate function at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Oesch, Pascal A.; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z ˜ 4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z > 8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass Mh by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z ˜ 4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-Mh relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 ≲ z ≲ 8 and also derive the expected UV LFs at higher redshifts. At z ˜ 9 and z ˜ 10 these model LFs are in excellent agreement with current observed estimates. Our predicted number densities and UV LFs at z > 10 indicate that James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect galaxies out to z ˜ 15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) and associated reionization history by galaxies. Models which integrate down to the current HUDF12/XDF detection limit (MUV ˜ -17.7 mag) result in a SFRD that declines as (1 + z)-10.4 ± 0.3 at high redshift and fail to reproduce the observed cosmic microwave background electron scattering optical depth, τ ≃ 0.066, to within 1σ. On the other hand, we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit (MUV < -5.7 mag) leads to a fully reionized universe by z ˜ 6.5 and an optical depth of τ ≃ 0.054, consistent with the recently derived Planck value at the 1σ level.

  6. Estimating {Omega} from galaxy redshifts: Linear flow distortions and nonlinear clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.C. |; Warren, M.S.; Zurek, W.H.

    1997-02-01

    We propose a method to determine the cosmic mass density {Omega} from redshift-space distortions induced by large-scale flows in the presence of nonlinear clustering. Nonlinear structures in redshift space, such as fingers of God, can contaminate distortions from linear flows on scales as large as several times the small-scale pairwise velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub {nu}}. Following Peacock & Dodds, we work in the Fourier domain and propose a model to describe the anisotropy in the redshift-space power spectrum; tests with high-resolution numerical data demonstrate that the model is robust for both mass and biased galaxy halos on translinear scales and above. On the basis of this model, we propose an estimator of the linear growth parameter {beta}={Omega}{sup 0.6}/b, where b measures bias, derived from sampling functions that are tuned to eliminate distortions from nonlinear clustering. The measure is tested on the numerical data and found to recover the true value of {beta} to within {approximately}10{percent}. An analysis of {ital IRAS} 1.2 Jy galaxies yields {beta}=0.8{sub {minus}0.3}{sup +0.4} at a scale of 1000kms{sup {minus}1}, which is close to optimal given the shot noise and finite size of the survey. This measurement is consistent with dynamical estimates of {beta} derived from both real-space and redshift-space information. The importance of the method presented here is that nonlinear clustering effects are removed to enable linear correlation anisotropy measurements on scales approaching the translinear regime. We discuss implications for analyses of forthcoming optical redshift surveys in which the dispersion is more than a factor of 2 greater than in the {ital IRAS} data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  7. DISCOVERY OF A QUADRUPLE LENS IN CANDELS WITH A RECORD LENS REDSHIFT z = 1.53

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Wel, A.; Van de Ven, G.; Maseda, M.; Rix, H. W.; Rudnick, G. H.; Grazian, A.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Koo, D. C.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, D. D.

    2013-11-01

    Using spectroscopy from the Large Binocular Telescope and imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope we discovered the first strong galaxy lens at z {sub lens} > 1. The lens has a secure photometric redshift of z = 1.53 ± 0.09 and the source is spectroscopically confirmed at z = 3.417. The Einstein radius (0.''35; 3.0 kpc) encloses 7.6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, with an upper limit on the dark matter fraction of 60%. The highly magnified (40×) source galaxy has a very small stellar mass (∼10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}) and shows an extremely strong [O III]{sub 5007Å} emission line (EW{sub 0} ∼ 1000 Å) bolstering the evidence that intense starbursts among very low-mass galaxies are common at high redshift.

  8. Unveiling high redshift structures with Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welikala, Niraj

    2012-07-01

    The Planck satellite, with its large wavelength coverage and all-sky survey, has a unique potential of systematically detecting the brightest and rarest submillimetre sources on the sky. We present an original method based on a combination of Planck and IRAS data which we use to select the most luminous submillimetre high-redshift (z>1-2) cold sources over the sky. The majority of these sources are either individual, strongly lensed galaxies, or represent the combined emission of several submillimetre galaxies within the large beam of Planck. The latter includes, in particular, rapidly growing galaxy groups and clusters. We demonstrate our selection method on the first 5 confirmations that include a newly discovered over-density of 5 submillimetre-bright sources which has been confirmed with Herschel/SPIRE observations and followed up with ground-based observations including VLT/XSHOOTER spectroscopy. Using Planck, we also unveil the nature of 107 high-redshift dusty, lensed submillimetre galaxies that have been previously observed over 940 square degrees by the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We stack these galaxies in the Planck maps, obtaining mean SEDs for both the bright (SPT flux F _{220 GHz} > 20 mJy) and faint (F _{220 GHz} < 20 mJy) galaxy populations. These SEDs and the derived mean redshifts suggest that the bright and faint sources belong to the same population of submillimetre galaxies. Stacking the lensed submillimetre galaxies in Planck also enables us to probe the z~1 environments around the foreground lenses and we obtain estimates of their clustering. Finally, we use the stacks to extrapolate SPT source counts to the Planck HFI frequencies, thereby estimating the contribution of the SPT sources at 220 GHz to the galaxy number counts at 353 and 545 GHz.

  9. Redshift-space distortions around voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Taylor, Andy; Peacock, John A.; Padilla, Nelson

    2016-11-01

    We have derived estimators for the linear growth rate of density fluctuations using the cross-correlation function (CCF) of voids and haloes in redshift space. In linear theory, this CCF contains only monopole and quadrupole terms. At scales greater than the void radius, linear theory is a good match to voids traced out by haloes; small-scale random velocities are unimportant at these radii, only tending to cause small and often negligible elongation of the CCF near its origin. By extracting the monopole and quadrupole from the CCF, we measure the linear growth rate without prior knowledge of the void profile or velocity dispersion. We recover the linear growth parameter β to 9 per cent precision from an effective volume of 3( h-1Gpc)3 using voids with radius >25 h-1Mpc. Smaller voids are predominantly sub-voids, which may be more sensitive to the random velocity dispersion; they introduce noise and do not help to improve measurements. Adding velocity dispersion as a free parameter allows us to use information at radii as small as half of the void radius. The precision on β is reduced to 5 per cent. Voids show diverse shapes in redshift space, and can appear either elongated or flattened along the line of sight. This can be explained by the competing amplitudes of the local density contrast, plus the radial velocity profile and its gradient. The distortion pattern is therefore determined solely by the void profile and is different for void-in-cloud and void-in-void. This diversity of redshift-space void morphology complicates measurements of the Alcock-Paczynski effect using voids.

  10. Detecting Dual AGN at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The existence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in most, if not all, galaxies, along with observations of galaxy mergers, suggests that pairs of SMBHs should exist for some time in the merger remnant. Observational evidence for these systems at kpc-scale separations (i.e. dual AGN) has dramatically increased recently through a combination of spectral and morphological selections. I discuss observations of CXOXBJ142607.6+353351 (CXOJ1426+35), a candidate dual AGN at z=1.175, and put its properties, including significant obscuration, within the context of other candidate/confirmed dual AGN at lower redshifts. Though dual AGN are expected to be more common at higher redshifts, they are more difficult to detect. Furthermore, adding to the difficulties of detection are a number of other physical mechanisms which can mimic the spectroscopic signature of two Type 2 AGN. In particular, I will discuss the possibility of strong outflows from an AGN. These outflow phenomena can be an important feedback mechanism in galaxies and are apparently common in AGN, making them a viable alternative to the dual AGN scenario. Based on our candidate's luminosity and emission line intensities, we find that an outflow is a possibility. If this is the case, such an outflow would be especially strong and has implications for AGN feedback in galaxies. However, the dual AGN scenario cannot be ruled out, and at z=1.175, the two putative AGN could potentially be resolved with Chandra. Other candidate dual AGN at similar redshifts and with significant obscuration could also be confirmed this way. This research was sponsored by the Strategic University Research Partnership Program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Arkansas NASA EPSCoR program.

  11. Powerful Quasar Outflows at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljanahi, Sara; Robert Scott Barrows

    2017-01-01

    Powerful quasar outflows can be driven by radiation pressure or radio jets, and they are capable of effecting the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly at high-redshifts (z~2)) when the quasar density peaks. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 131 quasar outflows at high-redshifts (0.8redshift nature of this sample has pushed the systematic study of quasar outflows closer to the epoch in which quasar feedback is likely to have been important in galaxy evolution.

  12. The Granada workshop on High Redshift Radio Galaxies: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2006-03-01

    The Granada workshop on High Redshift Radio Galaxies (HzRGs) gave an excellent overview of the progress that has been made in this field during the last 3 years. Here we briefly review some of the results, with an emphasis on what studies of HzRGs can teach us about the formation and evolution of massive galaxies, clusters and active galactic nuclei (AGN). Of great relevance for this workshop are scenarios that describe certain aspects of the evolution of radio galaxies, including (i) the sequence of events after merging of galaxies that ultimately lead to extended powerful radio sources and (ii) the mass assembly and virialization of the hosting massive galaxies and their associated (proto-)clusters. Furthermore, I briefly discuss two projects that are important for a further understanding of AGN and high redshift radio galaxies. First, using the MIDI instrument mounted on the VLT Interferometer, the dusty tori of nearby AGN can be studied in the range of 8-13 micron at high angular resolution. The first result on the nearby AGN NGC 1068 as presented by Jaffe et al. (2004) indicated the presence of a hot (T > 800 K), compact (1 pc) component, possible identified with the base of the jet and a warm (270 K), well-resolved (3 × 4 pc) component associated with the alleged torus. Second, LOFAR is a new low frequency radio telescope that is currently being build in the Netherlands and is expected to be operational in 2008. With 50 stations spread over an area of 100 km in diameter, its resolution and sensitivity will be unprecedented in the frequency range 10-240 MHz. LOFAR will be a unique instrument that will impact a broad range of astrophysical topics varying from the epoch of reionisation, to gamma ray bursts and cosmic rays. Surveys with LOFAR will be of paramount importance for studies of HzRGs: It will enable (i) defining samples of radio galaxies with redshifts higher than 6, (ii) observations of starbursting galaxies in proto-clusters, and (iii) mapping out

  13. Evolution of Interstellar Medium, Star Formation, and Accretion at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, N.; Lee, N.; Vanden Bout, P.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Sanders, D.; Darvish, B.; Bongiorno, A.; Casey, C. M.; Murchikova, L.; Koda, J.; Capak, P.; Vlahakis, Catherine; Ilbert, O.; Sheth, K.; Morokuma-Matsui, K.; Ivison, R. J.; Aussel, H.; Laigle, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Armus, L.; Pope, A.; Toft, S.; Masters, D.

    2017-03-01

    ALMA observations of the long wavelength dust continuum are used to estimate the interstellar medium (ISM) masses in a sample of 708 galaxies at z = 0.3 to 4.5 in the COSMOS field. The galaxy sample has known far-infrared luminosities and, hence, star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses ({M}* ) from the optical–infrared spectrum fitting. The galaxies sample SFRs from the main sequence (MS) to 50 times above the MS. The derived ISM masses are used to determine the dependence of gas mass on redshift, {M}* , and specific SFR (sSFR) relative to the MS. The ISM masses increase approximately with the 0.63 power of the rate of increase in SFRs with redshift and the 0.32 power of the sSFR/sSFRMS. The SF efficiencies also increase as the 0.36 power of the SFR redshift evolution and the 0.7 power of the elevation above the MS; thus the increased activities at early epochs are driven by both increased ISM masses and SF efficiency. Using the derived ISM mass function, we estimate the accretion rates of gas required to maintain continuity of the MS evolution (> 100 {M}ȯ yr‑1 at z > 2.5). Simple power-law dependencies are similarly derived for the gas accretion rates. We argue that the overall evolution of galaxies is driven by the rates of gas accretion. The cosmic evolution of total ISM mass is estimated and linked to the evolution of SF and active galactic nucleus activity at early epochs.

  14. Galaxy power spectrum in redshift space: Combining perturbation theory with the halo model

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Teppei; Hand, Nick; Seljak, Uros; Vlah, Zvonimir; Desjacques, Vincent

    2015-11-19

    Theoretical modeling of the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies is crucially important to correctly extract cosmological information from galaxy redshift surveys. The task is complicated by the nonlinear biasing and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects, which change with halo mass, and by the wide distribution of halo masses and their occupations by galaxies. One of the main modeling challenges is the existence of satellite galaxies that have both radial distribution inside the halos and large virial velocities inside halos, a phenomenon known as the Finger-of-God (FoG) effect. We present a model for the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies in which we decompose a given galaxy sample into central and satellite galaxies and relate different contributions to the power spectrum to 1-halo and 2-halo terms in a halo model. Our primary goal is to ensure that any parameters that we introduce have physically meaningful values, and are not just fitting parameters. For the lowest order 2-halo terms we use the previously developed RSD modeling of halos in the context of distribution function and perturbation theory approach. This term needs to be multiplied by the effect of radial distances and velocities of satellites inside the halo. To this one needs to add the 1-halo terms, which are nonperturbative. We show that the real space 1-halo terms can be modeled as almost constant, with the finite extent of the satellites inside the halo inducing a small k2R2 term over the range of scales of interest, where R is related to the size of the halo given by its halo mass. Furthermore, we adopt a similar model for FoG in redshift space, ensuring that FoG velocity dispersion is related to the halo mass. For FoG k2 type expansions do not work over the range of scales of interest and FoG resummation must be used instead. We test several simple damping functions to model the velocity dispersion FoG effect. Applying the formalism to mock

  15. Galaxy power spectrum in redshift space: Combining perturbation theory with the halo model

    DOE PAGES

    Okumura, Teppei; Hand, Nick; Seljak, Uros; ...

    2015-11-19

    Theoretical modeling of the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies is crucially important to correctly extract cosmological information from galaxy redshift surveys. The task is complicated by the nonlinear biasing and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects, which change with halo mass, and by the wide distribution of halo masses and their occupations by galaxies. One of the main modeling challenges is the existence of satellite galaxies that have both radial distribution inside the halos and large virial velocities inside halos, a phenomenon known as the Finger-of-God (FoG) effect. We present a model for the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies in whichmore » we decompose a given galaxy sample into central and satellite galaxies and relate different contributions to the power spectrum to 1-halo and 2-halo terms in a halo model. Our primary goal is to ensure that any parameters that we introduce have physically meaningful values, and are not just fitting parameters. For the lowest order 2-halo terms we use the previously developed RSD modeling of halos in the context of distribution function and perturbation theory approach. This term needs to be multiplied by the effect of radial distances and velocities of satellites inside the halo. To this one needs to add the 1-halo terms, which are nonperturbative. We show that the real space 1-halo terms can be modeled as almost constant, with the finite extent of the satellites inside the halo inducing a small k2R2 term over the range of scales of interest, where R is related to the size of the halo given by its halo mass. Furthermore, we adopt a similar model for FoG in redshift space, ensuring that FoG velocity dispersion is related to the halo mass. For FoG k2 type expansions do not work over the range of scales of interest and FoG resummation must be used instead. We test several simple damping functions to model the velocity dispersion FoG effect. Applying the formalism to mock galaxies modeled after the

  16. Galaxy power spectrum in redshift space: Combining perturbation theory with the halo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Teppei; Hand, Nick; Seljak, Uroš; Vlah, Zvonimir; Desjacques, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Theoretical modeling of the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies is crucially important to correctly extract cosmological information from galaxy redshift surveys. The task is complicated by the nonlinear biasing and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects, which change with halo mass, and by the wide distribution of halo masses and their occupations by galaxies. One of the main modeling challenges is the existence of satellite galaxies that have both radial distribution inside the halos and large virial velocities inside halos, a phenomenon known as the Finger-of-God (FoG) effect. We present a model for the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies in which we decompose a given galaxy sample into central and satellite galaxies and relate different contributions to the power spectrum to 1-halo and 2-halo terms in a halo model. Our primary goal is to ensure that any parameters that we introduce have physically meaningful values, and are not just fitting parameters. For the lowest order 2-halo terms we use the previously developed RSD modeling of halos in the context of distribution function and perturbation theory approach. This term needs to be multiplied by the effect of radial distances and velocities of satellites inside the halo. To this one needs to add the 1-halo terms, which are nonperturbative. We show that the real space 1-halo terms can be modeled as almost constant, with the finite extent of the satellites inside the halo inducing a small k2R2 term over the range of scales of interest, where R is related to the size of the halo given by its halo mass. We adopt a similar model for FoG in redshift space, ensuring that FoG velocity dispersion is related to the halo mass. For FoG k2 type expansions do not work over the range of scales of interest and FoG resummation must be used instead. We test several simple damping functions to model the velocity dispersion FoG effect. Applying the formalism to mock galaxies modeled after the "CMASS" sample of the

  17. Broadband and Narrowband Search for z < 1 Analogs of High Redshift Star Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenwasser, Benjamin; Barger, Amy J.; Wold, Isak; Lauchlan Cowie, Lennox

    2017-01-01

    Studies of high redshift (z > 6) galaxies rely on extreme broadband colors from Spitzer/IRAC to select samples of low-mass star forming galaxies. These broadband excess searches are biased towards galaxies with the strongest emission lines, and the extent to which existing studies miss fainter galaxies with lower star formation rates remains unknown. Using both broadband (BB) and narrowband (NB) imaging from the HyperSuprimeCam (HSC) and SuprimeCam (SC) on the Subaru Telescope, we have performed a search for z < 1 strong emission line galaxies, which are analogs of the high redshift population. The search was performed over roughly 4 square degrees centered on the COSMOS field, and the narrowband filters allow us to probe fainter emission lines than the broadband searches. We carried out spectral followup of our BB excess and NB excess samples using WIYN/Hydra to measure redshifts and line ratios in order to understand the biases in the different selection techniques. We also investigate the rest frame UV properties of our sample using data from GALEX. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of using broadband colors to select intermediate redshift emission line galaxies.

  18. CLASH: accurate photometric redshifts with 14 HST bands in massive galaxy cluster cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molino, A.; Benítez, N.; Ascaso, B.; Coe, D.; Postman, M.; Jouvel, S.; Host, O.; Lahav, O.; Seitz, S.; Medezinski, E.; Rosati, P.; Schoenell, W.; Koekemoer, A.; Jimenez-Teja, Y.; Broadhurst, T.; Melchior, P.; Balestra, I.; Bartelmann, M.; Bouwens, R.; Bradley, L.; Czakon, N.; Donahue, M.; Ford, H.; Graur, O.; Graves, G.; Grillo, C.; Infante, L.; Jha, S. W.; Kelson, D.; Lazkoz, R.; Lemze, D.; Maoz, D.; Mercurio, A.; Meneghetti, M.; Merten, J.; Moustakas, L.; Nonino, M.; Orgaz, S.; Riess, A.; Rodney, S.; Sayers, J.; Umetsu, K.; Zheng, W.; Zitrin, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies observed by the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). CLASH observed 25 massive galaxy cluster cores with the Hubble Space Telescope in 16 filters spanning 0.2-1.7 μm. Photometry in such crowded fields is challenging. Compared to our previously released catalogues, we make several improvements to the photometry, including smaller apertures, intracluster light subtraction, point spread function matching and empirically measured uncertainties. We further improve the Bayesian photometric redshift estimates by adding a redder elliptical template and by inflating the photometric uncertainties of the brightest galaxies. The resulting photometric redshift accuracies are dz/(1+z) ∼ 0.8, 1.0 and 2.0 per cent for galaxies with I-band F814W AB magnitudes < 18, 20 and 23, respectively. These results are consistent with our expectations. They improve on our previously reported accuracies by a factor of 4 at the bright end and a factor of 2 at the faint end. Our new catalogue includes 1257 spectroscopic redshifts, including 382 confirmed cluster members. We also provide stellar mass estimates. Finally, we include lensing magnification estimates of background galaxies based on our public lens models. Our new catalogue of all 25 CLASH clusters is available via Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes. The analysis techniques developed here will be useful in other surveys of crowded fields, including the Frontier Fields and surveys carried out with Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey and James Webb Space Telescope.

  19. The Main Sequences of Star-forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, C.; Lapi, A.; Shi, J.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Béthermin, M.; Danese, L.

    2016-12-01

    We provide a novel, unifying physical interpretation on the origin, average shape, scatter, and cosmic evolution for the main sequences of star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift z≳ 1. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting: (i) the redshift-dependent star formation rate functions based on the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and related statistics of strong gravitationally lensed sources; (ii) deterministic evolutionary tracks for the history of star formation and black hole accretion, gauged on a wealth of multiwavelength observations including the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We further validate these ingredients by showing their consistency with the observed galaxy stellar mass functions and AGN bolometric luminosity functions at different redshifts via the continuity equation approach. Our analysis of the main sequence for high-redshift galaxies and AGNs highlights that the present data are consistently interpreted in terms of an in situ coevolution scenario for star formation and black hole accretion, envisaging these as local, time-coordinated processes.

  20. DUST EXTINCTION AND METALLICITIES OF STAR-FORMING Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES AT LOW REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Papovich, Casey; Cohen, Seth H.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Moustakas, John

    2011-06-01

    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic study of 12 GALEX-discovered star-forming Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) at z {approx} 0.3. We measure the emission-line fluxes from these galaxies by fitting their observed spectra to stellar population models in order to correct for underlying stellar absorption. We revisit earlier stellar population model fitting results, finding that excluding now-known active galactic nuclei lowers the typical stellar population age and stellar mass of this sample to {approx}300 Myr and {approx}4 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}, respectively. We calculate their dust extinction using the Balmer decrement, and find a typical visual attenuation of A{sub V} {approx} 0.3 mag, similar to that seen in some high-redshift LAEs. Comparing the ratios of Ly{alpha}/H{alpha} and the Ly{alpha} equivalent widths to the measured dust extinction, we find that the interstellar media (ISMs) in these objects appear to be neither enhancing nor seriously attenuating the Ly{alpha} equivalent widths, as would be the case in a quasi-clumpy ISM. Lastly, we perform a detailed analysis of the gas-phase metallicities of these galaxies, and we find that most galaxies in our sample have Z {approx}< 0.4 Z{sub sun}. We find that at a fixed stellar mass, these low-redshift LAE analogs are offset by {approx}0.3-0.6 dex lower metallicity from the general galaxy population at similar redshifts based on the local mass-metallicity relationship. This implies that galaxies with Ly{alpha} in emission may be systematically more metal-poor than star-forming galaxies at the same stellar mass and redshift, similar to preliminary results at z {approx} 2.

  1. A study of ten quasars with redshifts greater than four

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Four quasars with redshifts greater than four were detected in a low-resolution CCD grism survey. CCD photometry and high S/N, moderate resolution spectra are presented for these quasars and the six other known quasars with redshifts above 4. The M sub B values of nine of the objects are between -27.5 and -25, with the tenth quasar having an M sub B value of -29. The emission lines and shapes of the continua of these ten quasars are similar to those of lower-redshift quasars. The results suggest that the C IV emission lines in high-redshift quasars may be weaker than those in lower-redshift quasars. The continua of all of the high-redshift quasars display strong depressions blueward of the Ly-alpha emission line.

  2. Redshift distribution of Lyα lines and metal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiański, M.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Turchaninov, V.

    2000-11-01

    The observed redshift distribution of Lyα lines and metal systems is examined in order to discriminate and to trace the evolution of structure elements observed in the galaxy distribution, at small redshifts, and to test the theoretical description of structure evolution. We show that the expected evolution of a filamentary component of structure describes quite well the redshift distribution of metal systems and stronger Lyα lines with log(NHi)>=14, at z<=3. The redshift distribution of weaker Lyα lines can be attributed to the population of poorer structure elements (Zel'dovich pancakes), which were formed at high redshifts from the invisible dark matter and non-luminous baryonic matter, and which at lower redshifts are mainly merged and dispersed.

  3. ANNz: Estimating Photometric Redshifts Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, Adrian A.; Lahav, Ofer

    2004-04-01

    We introduce ANNz, a freely available software package for photometric redshift estimation using artificial neural networks. ANNz learns the relation between photometry and redshift from an appropriate training set of galaxies for which the redshift is already known. Where a large and representative training set is available, ANNz is a highly competitive tool when compared with traditional template-fitting methods. The ANNz package is demonstrated on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1, and for this particular data set the rms redshift error in the range 0<~z<~0.7 is σrms=0.023. Nonideal conditions (spectroscopic sets that are small or brighter than the photometric set for which redshifts are required) are simulated, and the impact on the photometric redshift accuracy is assessed.2

  4. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Sakai, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.; Williams, O.; ...

    2015-06-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to γ-ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by themore » ps CO2 laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5L<0.7, which due to the quadratic dependence of the strength of nonlinear phenomena on aL permits sufficient effects not observed in past 2nd harmonic study with aL ≈ 0.3 laser [M. Babzien et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 054802 (2006)]. The angular spectral characteristics are revealed using K-, L-edge, and high energy attenuation filters. The observation indicates existence of the electrons’ longitudinal motion through frequency redshifting understood as the mass shift effect. The 3rd harmonic radiation has been observed containing on-axis x-ray component that is directly associated with the induced figure-8 motion. These are further supported by an initial evidence of off-axis 2nd harmonic radiation produced in a circularly polarized laser wave field. Total x-ray photon number per pulse, scattered by 65 MeV electron beam of 0.3 nC, at the interaction point is measured to be approximately 109.« less

  5. High-redshift clumpy discs and bulges in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Bournaud, Frederic

    2010-06-01

    We analyse the first cosmological simulations that recover the fragmentation of high-redshift galactic discs driven by cold streams. The fragmentation is recovered owing to an AMR resolution better than 70pc with cooling below 104K. We study three typical star-forming galaxies in haloes of ~5 × 1011Msolar at z ~= 2.3 when they were not undergoing a major merger. The steady gas supply by cold streams leads to gravitationally unstable, turbulent discs, which fragment into giant clumps and transient features on a dynamical time-scale. The disc clumps are not associated with dark-matter haloes. The clumpy discs are self-regulated by gravity in a marginally unstable state. Clump migration and angular-momentum transfer on an orbital time-scale help the growth of a central bulge with a mass comparable to the disc. The continuous gas input keeps the system of clumpy disc and bulge in a near steady state for several Gyr. The average star formation rate, much of which occurs in the clumps, follows the gas accretion rate of ~45Msolaryr-1. The simulated galaxies resemble in many ways the observed star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Their properties are consistent with the simple theoretical framework presented in Dekel, Sari & Ceverino. In particular, a two-component analysis reveals that the simulated discs are indeed marginally unstable, and the time evolution confirms the robustness of the clumpy configuration in a cosmological steady state. By z ~ 1, the simulated systems are stabilized by a dominant stellar spheroid, demonstrating the process of `morphological quenching' of star formation. We demonstrate that the disc fragmentation is not a numerical artefact once the Jeans length is kept larger than nearly seven resolution elements, i.e. beyond the standard Truelove criterion.

  6. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.; Williams, O.; O'Shea, F.; Barber, S.; Gadjev, I.; Duris, J.; Musumeci, P.; Fedurin, M.; Korostyshevsky, A.; Malone, B.; Swinson, C.; Stenby, G.; Kusche, K.; Babzien, M.; Montemagno, M.; Jacob, P.; Zhong, Z.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to γ -ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by the ps CO2 laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5 redshifting understood as the mass shift effect. Thus, the 3rd harmonic radiation has been observed containing on-axis x-ray component that is directly associated with the induced figure-8 motion. These are further supported by an initial evidence of off-axis 2nd harmonic radiation produced in a circularly polarized laser wave field. Total x-ray photon number per pulse, scattered by 65 MeV electron beam of 0.3 nC, at the interaction point is measured to be approximately 109 .

  7. The impact of Spitzer infrared data on stellar mass estimates - and a revised galaxy stellar mass function at 0 < z < 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, F.; Feulner, G.; Hopp, U.

    2008-01-01

    Aims:We estimate stellar masses of galaxies in the high redshift universe with the intention of determining the influence of newly available Spitzer/IRAC infrared data on the analysis. Based on the results, we probe the mass assembly history of the universe. Methods: We use the GOODS-MUSIC catalog, which provides multiband photometry from the U-filter to the 8 μm Spitzer band for almost 15 000 galaxies with either spectroscopic (for ≈7% of the sample) or photometric redshifts, and apply a standard model fitting technique to estimate stellar masses. We than repeat our calculations with fixed photometric redshifts excluding Spitzer photometry and directly compare the outcomes to look for systematic deviations. Finally we use our results to compute stellar mass functions and mass densities up to redshift z = 5. Results: We find that stellar masses tend to be overestimated on average if further constraining Spitzer data are not included into the analysis. Whilst this trend is small up to intermediate redshifts z ⪉ 2.5 and falls within the typical error in mass, the deviation increases strongly for higher redshifts and reaches a maximum of a factor of three at redshift z ≈ 3.5. Thus, up to intermediate redshifts, results for stellar mass density are in good agreement with values taken from literature calculated without additional Spitzer photometry. At higher redshifts, however, we find a systematic trend towards lower mass densities if Spitzer/IRAC data are included.

  8. Are gamma-ray bursts the same at high redshift and low redshift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Willingale, R.; Evans, P. A.; O'Brien, P. T.; Levan, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The majority of Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed at z ≳ 6 have prompt durations of T90 ≲ 30 s, which, at first sight, is surprising given that cosmological time dilation means this corresponds to ≲5 s in their rest frames. We have tested whether the high-redshift GRBs are consistent with being drawn from the same population as those observed at low redshift by comparing them to an artificially redshifted sample of 114 z < 4 bursts. This is accomplished using two methods to produce realistic high-z simulations of light curves based on the observed characteristics of the low-z sample. In Method 1 we use the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) data directly, taking the photons detected in the harder bands to predict what would be seen in the softest energy band if the burst were seen at higher z. In Method 2 we fit the light curves with a model, and use that to extrapolate the expected behaviour over the whole BAT energy range at any redshift. Based on the results of Method 2, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test of their durations finds a ˜1 per cent probability that the high-z GRB sample is drawn from the same population as the bright low-z sample. Although apparently marginally significant, we must bear in mind that this test was partially a posteriori, since the rest-frame short durations of several high-z bursts motivated the study in the first instance.

  9. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  10. On the universality of free fall, the equivalence principle, and the gravitational redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Lucchesi, D. M.; Crosta, M. T.; Shao, M.; Turyshev, S. G.; Peron, R.; Catastini, G.; Anselmi, A.; Zavattini, G.

    2013-07-01

    Through the contributions of Galileo, Newton, and Einstein, we recall the universality of free fall (UFF), the weak equivalence principle (WEP), and the strong equivalence principle (SEP), in order to stress that general relativity requires all test masses to be equally accelerated in a gravitational field; that is, it requires UFF and WEP to hold. The possibility of testing this crucial fact with null, highly sensitive experiments makes these the most powerful tests of the theory. Following Schiff, we derive the gravitational redshift from the WEP and special relativity and show that, as long as clocks are affected by a gravitating body like normal matter, measurement of the redshift is a test of UFF/WEP but cannot compete with direct null tests. A new measurement of the gravitational redshift based on free-falling cold atoms and an absolute gravimeter is not competitive either. Finally, we compare UFF/WEP experiments using macroscopic masses as test bodies in one case and cold atoms in the other. We conclude that there is no difference in the nature of the test and that the merit of any such experiment rests on the accuracy it can achieve and on the physical differences between the elements it can test, macroscopic proof masses being superior in both respects.

  11. SPIDERz: SuPport vector classification for IDEntifying Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Evan; Singal, J.

    2016-08-01

    SPIDERz (SuPport vector classification for IDEntifying Redshifts) applies powerful support vector machine (SVM) optimization and statistical learning techniques to custom data sets to obtain accurate photometric redshift (photo-z) estimations. It is written for the IDL environment and can be applied to traditional data sets consisting of photometric band magnitudes, or alternatively to data sets with additional galaxy parameters (such as shape information) to investigate potential correlations between the extra galaxy parameters and redshift.

  12. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. III. REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, P.; Chapman, R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Starling, R. L. C.; Letawe, G.

    2012-06-10

    We present 10 new gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshifts and another five redshift limits based on host galaxy spectroscopy obtained as part of a large program conducted at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The redshifts span the range 0.345 {<=} z {approx}< 2.54. Three of our measurements revise incorrect values from the literature. The homogeneous host sample researched here consists of 69 hosts that originally had a redshift completeness of 55% (with 38 out of 69 hosts having redshifts considered secure). Our project, including VLT/X-shooter observations reported elsewhere, increases this fraction to 77% (53/69), making the survey the most comprehensive in terms of redshift completeness of any sample to the full Swift depth, analyzed to date. We present the cumulative redshift distribution and derive a conservative, yet small, associated uncertainty. We constrain the fraction of Swift GRBs at high redshift to a maximum of 14% (5%) for z > 6 (z > 7). The mean redshift of the host sample is assessed to be (z) {approx}> 2.2, with the 10 new redshifts reducing it significantly. Using this more complete sample, we confirm previous findings that the GRB rate at high redshift (z {approx}> 3) appears to be in excess of predictions based on assumptions that it should follow conventional determinations of the star formation history of the universe, combined with an estimate of its likely metallicity dependence. This suggests that either star formation at high redshifts has been significantly underestimated, for example, due to a dominant contribution from faint, undetected galaxies, or that GRB production is enhanced in the conditions of early star formation, beyond that usually ascribed to lower metallicity.

  13. The Cosmic Time in Terms of the Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Moshe; Hartnett, John G.; Oliveira, Firmin J.

    2006-04-01

    In cosmology one labels the time t since the Big Bang in terms of the redshift of light emitted at t, as we see it now. In this Note we derive a formula that relates t to z which is valid for all redshifts. One can go back in time as far as one wishes, but not to the Big Bang at which the redshift tends to infinity.

  14. Redshift drift constraints on holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test is a promising method for probing dark energy because it measures the redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman- α forest of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of 2 ≲ z ≲ 5, which is not covered by existing cosmological observations. Therefore, it could provide an important supplement to current cosmological observations. In this paper, we explore the impact of SL test on the precision of cosmological constraints for two typical holographic dark energy models, i.e., the original holographic dark energy (HDE) model and the Ricci holographic dark energy (RDE) model. To avoid data inconsistency, we use the best-fit models based on current combined observational data as the fiducial models to simulate 30 mock SL test data. The results show that SL test can effectively break the existing strong degeneracy between the present-day matter density Ωm0 and the Hubble constant H 0 in other cosmological observations. For the considered two typical dark energy models, not only can a 30-year observation of SL test improve the constraint precision of Ωm0 and h dramatically, but can also enhance the constraint precision of the model parameters c and α significantly.

  15. Survey For Very High-Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemley, S.; MacAlpine, G.

    1997-12-01

    I will present the results from the deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars. The survey involved direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.0 < z < 5.4 were selected based on the detection of the Lyman alpha line and the strong drop in the spectrum blueward of this. Because of this response, quasars are clearly located away from the stellar locus on g - r vs. r - i diagrams. Quasar candidates in this redshift range have large values of g - r and small values of r - i. To confirm the candidates as quasars, the multi-fiber spectroscope Hydra, located on the WIYN telescope, was used. To date, spectral confirmation has been completed for ten degrees out of the approximately fifteen square degress of survey area. Several quasars were discovered, and I will present their spectra and information on the viability of this technique.

  16. High Resolution Science with High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, R.

    I will first review high resolution science that has been done with the Hubble Space Telescope on high redshift galaxies Next I will review the capabilities of the 6 5 meter James Webb Space Telescope JWST which is an optimized infrared telescope that can deploy automatically in space slated for launch to a halo L2 orbit in 2013 I will outline how the JWST can go about measuring First Light Reionization and Galaxy Assembly building on lessons learned from the Hubble Space Telescope I will show what more nearby galaxies observed in their restframe UV--optical light may look like to JWST at high redshifts Last I will summarize the Generation-X mission concept for an X-ray telescope designed to study the very early universe with 1000-times greater sensitivity than current facilities Gen-X will study the first generations of stars and black holes in the epoch z 10-20 the evolution of black holes and galaxies from high z to the present the chemical evolution of the universe and the properties of matter under extreme conditions This requires an effective area of 100 m 2 at 1 keV an angular resolution of 0 1 HPD over 0 1-10 keV

  17. A redshift survey of IRAS galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Beverly J.; Kleinmann, S. G.; Huchra, J. P.; Low, F. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a redshift survey of all 72 galaxies detected by IRAS in Band 3 at flux levels equal to or greater then 2 Jy. The luminosity function at the high luminosity end is proportional to L sup -2, however, a flattening was observed at the low luminosity end indicating that a single power law is not a good description of the entire luminosity function. Only three galaxies in the sample have emission line spectra indicative of AGN's, suggesting that, at least in nearby galaxies, unobscured nuclear activity is not a strong contributor to the far infrared flux. Comparisons between the selected IRAS galaxies and an optically complete sample taken from the CfA redshift survey show that they are more narrowly distributed than those optically selected, in the sence that the IRAS sample includes few galaxies of low absolute blue luminosity. It was also found that the space distributions of the two samples differ: the density enhancement or IRAS galaxies is only approx. 1/3 that of the optically selected galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster.

  18. A redshift survey of IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Beverly J.; Kleinmann, S. G.; Huchra, J. P.; Low, F. J.

    1987-05-01

    Results are presented from a redshift survey of all 72 galaxies detected by IRAS in Band 3 at flux levels equal to or greater then 2 Jy. The luminosity function at the high luminosity end is proportional to L-2, however, a flattening was observed at the low luminosity end indicating that a single power law is not a good description of the entire luminosity function. Only three galaxies in the sample have emission line spectra indicative of AGN's, suggesting that, at least in nearby galaxies, unobscured nuclear activity is not a strong contributor to the far infrared flux. Comparisons between the selected IRAS galaxies and an optically complete sample taken from the CfA redshift survey show that they are more narrowly distributed than those optically selected, in the sence that the IRAS sample includes few galaxies of low absolute blue luminosity. It was also found that the space distributions of the two samples differ: the density enhancement or IRAS galaxies is only approx. 1/3 that of the optically selected galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster.

  19. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  20. Dusty Star Forming Galaxies and Supermassive Black Holes at High Redshifts: In- Situ Coevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    We have exploited the continuity equation approach and the star-formation timescales derived from the observed 'main sequence' relation (Star Formation Rate vs Stellar Mass), to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses ≥ a few 10^10 M⊙ at redshift z ≥ 4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) ψ ≥ 10^2 M⊙ yr^-1 in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for z ≤ 3 in the Far-InfraRed (FIR) band by the Herschel space observatory. We work out specific predictions for the evolution of the corresponding stellar mass and SFR functions out to z ∼10, elucidating that the number density at z ≤ 8 for SFRs ψ ≥ 30 M⊙ yr^-1 cannot be estimated relying on the UltraViolet (UV) luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2 and ALMA-SPT surveys are already digging into it. We substantiate how an observational strategy based on a color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)mm band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data via on-source observations with ALMA, can allow to reconstruct the bright end of the SFR functions out to z ≤ 8. In parallel, such a challenging task can be managed by exploiting current UV surveys in combination with (sub-)mm observations by ALMA and NIKA2. The same could be done with radio observations by SKA and its precursors. In particular we have worked out predictions for the radio counts of star-forming galaxies down to nJy levels, along with redshift distributions down to the detection limits of the phase 1 Square Kilometer Array MID telescope (SKA1-MID) and of its precursors. To do that we

  1. A statistical investigation of the mass discrepancy–acceleration relation

    DOE PAGES

    Desmond, Harry

    2016-10-08

    We use the mass discrepancy–acceleration relation (the correlation between the ratio of total-to-visible mass and acceleration in galaxies; MDAR) to test the galaxy–halo connection. Here, we analyse the MDAR using a set of 16 statistics that quantify its four most important features: shape, scatter, the presence of a ‘characteristic acceleration scale’, and the correlation of its residuals with other galaxy properties. We construct an empirical framework for the galaxy–halo connection in LCDM to generate predictions for these statistics, starting with conventional correlations (halo abundance matching; AM) and introducing more where required. Comparing to the SPARC data, we find that: (1)more » the approximate shape of the MDAR is readily reproduced by AM, and there is no evidence that the acceleration at which dark matter becomes negligible has less spread in the data than in AM mocks; (2) even under conservative assumptions, AM significantly overpredicts the scatter in the relation and its normalization at low acceleration, and furthermore positions dark matter too close to galaxies’ centres on average; (3) the MDAR affords 2σ evidence for an anticorrelation of galaxy size and Hubble type with halo mass or concentration at fixed stellar mass. Lastly, our analysis lays the groundwork for a bottom-up determination of the galaxy–halo connection from relations such as the MDAR, provides concrete statistical tests for specific galaxy formation models, and brings into sharper focus the relative evidence accorded by galaxy kinematics to LCDM and modified gravity alternatives.« less

  2. A massive, quiescent galaxy at a redshift of 3.717.

    PubMed

    Glazebrook, Karl; Schreiber, Corentin; Labbé, Ivo; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Kacprzak, Glenn G; Oesch, Pascal A; Papovich, Casey; Spitler, Lee R; Straatman, Caroline M S; Tran, Kim-Vy H; Yuan, Tiantian

    2017-04-05

    Finding massive galaxies that stopped forming stars in the early Universe presents an observational challenge because their rest-frame ultraviolet emission is negligible and they can only be reliably identified by extremely deep near-infrared surveys. These surveys have revealed the presence of massive, quiescent early-type galaxies appearing as early as redshift z ≈ 2, an epoch three billion years after the Big Bang. Their age and formation processes have now been explained by an improved generation of galaxy-formation models, in which they form rapidly at z ≈ 3-4, consistent with the typical masses and ages derived from their observations. Deeper surveys have reported evidence for populations of massive, quiescent galaxies at even higher redshifts and earlier times, using coarsely sampled photometry. However, these early, massive, quiescent galaxies are not predicted by the latest generation of theoretical models. Here we report the spectroscopic confirmation of one such galaxy at redshift z = 3.717, with a stellar mass of 1.7 × 10(11) solar masses. We derive its age to be nearly half the age of the Universe at this redshift and the absorption line spectrum shows no current star formation. These observations demonstrate that the galaxy must have formed the majority of its stars quickly, within the first billion years of cosmic history in a short, extreme starburst. This ancestral starburst appears similar to those being found by submillimetre-wavelength surveys. The early formation of such massive systems implies that our picture of early galaxy assembly requires substantial revision.

  3. A massive, quiescent galaxy at a redshift of 3.717

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazebrook, Karl; Schreiber, Corentin; Labbé, Ivo; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Oesch, Pascal A.; Papovich, Casey; Spitler, Lee R.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Yuan, Tiantian

    2017-04-01

    Finding massive galaxies that stopped forming stars in the early Universe presents an observational challenge because their rest-frame ultraviolet emission is negligible and they can only be reliably identified by extremely deep near-infrared surveys. These surveys have revealed the presence of massive, quiescent early-type galaxies appearing as early as redshift z ≈ 2, an epoch three billion years after the Big Bang. Their age and formation processes have now been explained by an improved generation of galaxy-formation models, in which they form rapidly at z ≈ 3-4, consistent with the typical masses and ages derived from their observations. Deeper surveys have reported evidence for populations of massive, quiescent galaxies at even higher redshifts and earlier times, using coarsely sampled photometry. However, these early, massive, quiescent galaxies are not predicted by the latest generation of theoretical models. Here we report the spectroscopic confirmation of one such galaxy at redshift z = 3.717, with a stellar mass of 1.7 × 1011 solar masses. We derive its age to be nearly half the age of the Universe at this redshift and the absorption line spectrum shows no current star formation. These observations demonstrate that the galaxy must have formed the majority of its stars quickly, within the first billion years of cosmic history in a short, extreme starburst. This ancestral starburst appears similar to those being found by submillimetre-wavelength surveys. The early formation of such massive systems implies that our picture of early galaxy assembly requires substantial revision.

  4. The 2QDES Pilot: the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehade, Ben; Shanks, T.; Findlay, J.; Metcalfe, N.; Sawangwit, U.; Irwin, M.; González-Solares, E.; Fine, S.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Croom, S.; Jurek, R. J.; Parkinson, D.; Bielby, R.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new redshift survey, the 2dF Quasar Dark Energy Survey pilot (2QDESp), which consists of ≈10 000 quasars from ≈150 deg2 of the southern sky, based on VST-ATLAS imaging and 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy. Combining our optical photometry with the WISE (W1,W2) bands we can select essentially contamination free quasar samples with 0.8 < z < 2.5 and g < 20.5. At fainter magnitudes, optical UVX selection is still required to reach our g ≈ 22.5 limit. Using both these techniques we observed quasar redshifts at sky densities up to 90 deg-2. By comparing 2QDESp with other surveys (SDSS, 2QZ and 2SLAQ) we find that quasar clustering is approximately luminosity independent, with results for all four surveys consistent with a correlation scale of r0 = 6.1 ± 0.1 h-1 Mpc, despite their decade range in luminosity. We find a significant redshift dependence of clustering, particularly when BOSS data with r0 = 7.3 ± 0.1 h-1 Mpc are included at z ≈ 2.4. All quasars remain consistent with having a single host halo mass of ≈2 ± 1 × 1012 h-1 M⊙. This result implies that either quasars do not radiate at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity or AGN black hole and dark matter halo masses are weakly correlated. No significant evidence is found to support fainter, X-ray selected quasars at low redshift having larger halo masses as predicted by the `hot halo' mode AGN model of Fanidakis et al. (2013). Finally, although the combined quasar sample reaches an effective volume as large as that of the original SDSS LRG sample, we do not detect the BAO feature in these data.

  5. Real- and redshift-space halo clustering in f(R) cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Norberg, Peder

    2017-05-01

    We present two-point correlation function statistics of the mass and the haloes in the chameleon f(R) modified gravity scenario using a series of large-volume N-body simulations. Three distinct variations of f(R) are considered (F4, F5 and F6) and compared to a fiducial Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model in the redshift range z ∈ [0, 1]. We find that the matter clustering is indistinguishable for all models except for F4, which shows a significantly steeper slope. The ratio of the redshift- to real-space correlation function at scales >20 h-1 Mpc agrees with the linear General Relativity (GR) Kaiser formula for the viable f(R) models considered. We consider three halo populations characterized by spatial abundances comparable to that of luminous red galaxies and galaxy clusters. The redshift-space halo correlation functions of F4 and F5 deviate significantly from ΛCDM at intermediate and high redshift, as the f(R) halo bias is smaller than or equal to that of the ΛCDM case. Finally, we introduce a new model-independent clustering statistic to distinguish f(R) from GR: the relative halo clustering ratio - R. The sampling required to adequately reduce the scatter in R will be available with the advent of the next-generation galaxy redshift surveys. This will foster a prospective avenue to obtain largely model-independent cosmological constraints on this class of modified gravity models.

  6. Quasar Black Hole Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Amanda; Carlton, A. K.; Kashkanova, A.; Kennefick, J.; Kennefick, D.; Seigar, M. S.; Lacy, C. H.; Galaxy Evolution Survey, Arkansas

    2010-01-01

    We have computed the mass of the central black hole in 145 quasars chosen from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) DR3. The objects were chosen to sample the peak in quasar evolution and have redshifts in the range 1.85 < z < 4.26. Masses were computed using standard gas dynamics techniques with the luminosity at 1350Å and the width (FWHM) of the Doppler broadened Carbon IV emission line. Also, we were able to compare masses calculated from the CIV line with those calculated from the MgII line for one third of our data set. We will discuss how the mass of the SMBHs change over the range of redshifts and how this may be correlated with other quasar properties. This project is funded by a grant from NASA.

  7. Probabilistic selection of high-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortlock, Daniel J.; Patel, Mitesh; Warren, Stephen J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Venemans, Bram P.; McMahon, Richard G.; Simpson, Chris

    2012-01-01

    High-redshift quasars (HZQs) with redshifts of z ≳ 6 are so rare that any photometrically selected sample of sources with HZQ-like colours is likely to be dominated by Galactic stars and brown dwarfs scattered from the stellar locus. It is impractical to re-observe all such candidates, so an alternative approach was developed in which Bayesian model comparison techniques are used to calculate the probability that a candidate is a HZQ, Pq, by combining models of the quasar and star populations with the photometric measurements of the object. This method was motivated specifically by the large number of HZQ candidates identified by cross-matching the UKIRT (United Kingdom Infrared Telescope) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): in the ? covered by the LAS in the UKIDSS Eighth Data Release (DR8) there are ˜9 × 103 real astronomical point sources with the measured colours of the target quasars, of which only ˜10 are expected to be HZQs. Applying Bayesian model comparison to the sample reveals that most sources with HZQ-like colours have Pq≲ 0.1 and can be confidently rejected without the need for any further observations. In the case of the UKIDSS DR8 LAS, there were just 107 candidates with Pq≥ 0.1; these objects were prioritized for re-observation by ranking according to Pq (and their likely redshift, which was also inferred from the photometric data). Most candidates were rejected after one or two (moderate-depth) photometric measurements by recalculating Pq using the new data. That left 12 confirmed HZQs, six of which were previously identified in the SDSS and six of which were new UKIDSS discoveries. The high efficiency of this Bayesian selection method suggests that it could usefully be extended to other HZQ surveys (e.g. searches by the Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System, Pan-STARRS, or the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy, VISTA) as well as to other

  8. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Seljak, Uroš; McDonald, Patrick E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov

    2011-11-01

    We develop a phase space distribution function approach to redshift space distortions (RSD), in which the redshift space density can be written as a sum over velocity moments of the distribution function. These moments are density weighted and have well defined physical interpretation: their lowest orders are density, momentum density, and stress energy density. The series expansion is convergent if kμu/aH < 1, where k is the wavevector, H the Hubble parameter, u the typical gravitational velocity and μ = cos θ, with θ being the angle between the Fourier mode and the line of sight. We perform an expansion of these velocity moments into helicity modes, which are eigenmodes under rotation around the axis of Fourier mode direction, generalizing the scalar, vector, tensor decomposition of perturbations to an arbitrary order. We show that only equal helicity moments correlate and derive the angular dependence of the individual contributions to the redshift space power spectrum. We show that the dominant term of μ{sup 2} dependence on large scales is the cross-correlation between the density and scalar part of momentum density, which can be related to the time derivative of the matter power spectrum. Additional terms contributing to μ{sup 2} and dominating on small scales are the vector part of momentum density-momentum density correlations, the energy density-density correlations, and the scalar part of anisotropic stress density-density correlations. The second term is what is usually associated with the small scale Fingers-of-God damping and always suppresses power, but the first term comes with the opposite sign and always adds power. Similarly, we identify 7 terms contributing to μ{sup 4} dependence. Some of the advantages of the distribution function approach are that the series expansion converges on large scales and remains valid in multi-stream situations. We finish with a brief discussion of implications for RSD in galaxies relative to dark matter

  9. Cosmology with clustering anisotropies: disentangling dynamic and geometric distortions in galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, Federico; Bianchi, Davide; Branchini, Enzo; Guzzo, Luigi; Moscardini, Lauro; Angulo, Raul E.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the impact of different observational effects affecting a precise and accurate measurement of the growth rate of fluctuations from the anisotropy of clustering in galaxy redshift surveys. We focus here on redshift measurement errors, on the reconstruction of the underlying real-space clustering and, most importantly, on the apparent degeneracy existing with the geometrical distortions induced by the cosmology-dependent conversion of redshifts into distances. We use a suite of mock catalogues extracted from large N-body simulations, focusing on the analysis of intermediate, mildly non-linear scales (r < 50 h-1 Mpc) and apply the standard 'dispersion model' to fit the anisotropy of the observed correlation function ξ(r⊥, r∥) . We first verify that redshift errors up to δz ˜ 0.2 per cent (i.e. σz ˜ 0.002 at z = 1) have a negligible impact on the precision with which the specific growth rate β can be measured. Larger redshift errors introduce a positive systematic error, which can be alleviated by adopting a Gaussian distribution function of pairwise velocities. This is, in any case, smaller than the systematic error of up to 10 per cent due to the limitations of the dispersion model, which is studied in a separate paper. We then show that 50 per cent of the statistical error budget on β depends on the deprojection procedure through which the real-space correlation function, needed for the modelling process, is obtained. Finally, we demonstrate that the degeneracy with geometric distortions can in fact be circumvented. This is obtained through a modified version of the Alcock-Paczynski test in redshift space, which successfully recovers the correct cosmology by searching for the solution that optimizes the description of dynamical redshift distortions. For a flat cosmology, we obtain largely independent, robust constraints on β and on the mass density parameter, ΩM. In a volume of 2.4 (h-1 Gpc)3, the correct ΩM is obtained with ˜12 per

  10. THE GENTLE GROWTH OF GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFTS IN OVERDENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Romano-Díaz, Emilio; Shlosman, Isaac; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Sadoun, Raphael

    2014-08-01

    We have explored prevailing modes of galaxy growth for redshifts z ∼ 6-14, comparing substantially overdense and normal regions of the universe, using high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations. Such rare overdense regions have been projected to host high-z quasars. We demonstrate that galaxies in such environments grow predominantly by a smooth accretion from cosmological filaments which dominates the mass input from major, intermediate, and minor mergers. We find that by z ∼ 6, the accumulated galaxy mass fraction from mergers falls short by a factor of 10 of the cumulative accretion mass for galaxies in the overdense regions, and by a factor of 5 in the normal environments. Moreover, the rate of the stellar mass input from mergers also lies below that of an in situ star formation (SF) rate. The fraction of stellar masses in galaxies contributed by mergers in overdense regions is ∼12%, and ∼33% in the normal regions, at these redshifts. Our median SF rates for ∼few × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} galaxies agrees well with the recently estimated rates for z ∼ 7 galaxies from Spitzer's SURF-UP survey. Finally, we find that the main difference between the normal and overdense regions lies in the amplified growth of massive galaxies in massive dark matter halos. This leads to the formation of ≳ 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} galaxies due to the ∼100 fold increase in mass during the above time period. Such galaxies are basically absent in the normal regions at these redshifts.

  11. The redshift evolution of massive galaxy clusters in the MACSIS simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, David J.; Kay, Scott T.; Henson, Monique A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop; Jenkins, Adrian

    2017-02-01

    We present the MAssive ClusterS and Intercluster Structures (MACSIS) project, a suite of 390 clusters simulated with baryonic physics that yields realistic massive galaxy clusters capable of matching a wide range of observed properties. MACSIS extends the recent BAryons and HAloes of MAssive Systems simulation to higher masses, enabling robust predictions for the redshift evolution of cluster properties and an assessment of the effect of selecting only the hottest systems. We study the observable-mass scaling relations and the X-ray luminosity-temperature relation over the complete observed cluster mass range. As expected, we find that the slope of these scaling relations and the evolution of their normalization with redshift depart significantly from the self-similar predictions. However, for a sample of hot clusters with core-excised temperatures kBT ≥ 5 keV, the normalization and the slope of the observable-mass relations and their evolution are significantly closer to self-similar. The exception is the temperature-mass relation, for which the increased importance of non-thermal pressure support and biased X-ray temperatures leads to a greater departure from self-similarity in the hottest systems. As a consequence, these also affect the slope and evolution of the normalization in the luminosity-temperature relation. The median hot gas profiles show good agreement with observational data at z = 0 and z = 1, with their evolution again departing significantly from the self-similar prediction. However, selecting a hot sample of clusters yields profiles that evolve significantly closer to the self-similar prediction. In conclusion, our results show that understanding the selection function is vital for robust calibration of cluster properties with mass and redshift.

  12. ON THE OCCUPATION FRACTION OF SEED BLACK HOLES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lippai, Zoltan; Frei, Zsolt E-mail: frei@alcyone.elte.hu

    2009-08-10

    It is well known that an initial population of seed black holes (BHs), formed in the nuclei of low-mass galaxies at high redshift, can simultaneously explain, through their subsequent growth by mergers and accretion, both the observed evolution of the quasar luminosity function (LF) and the distribution of remnant supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses measured in local galactic nuclei. Here we consider three very different initial conditions for this scenario: models in which initial seed BHs form in either all, or only a small fraction (f {sub bh} = 0.1 or 0.01) of high-redshift dark matter halos (with M {sub halo} = 5 x 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} at z = 6-10). We show that with a suitable and relatively minor adjustment of two global physical parameters (the radiative efficiency and mass accretion time-scale of quasar episodes), models with f {sub bh} {approx} 0.1 and 1 can accurately reproduce the observed quasar LF at redshifts 0 < z {approx}< 6, as well as the remnant SMBH mass function at z = 0. However, SMBHs remain rare, and the normalization of the high-z quasar LF and the local SMBH mass function are both significantly underpredicted, if f {sub bh} {approx}< 0.01. We also show that the merger history of SMBHs, in the mass range detectable by the future Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) instrument, generically looks different as f {sub bh} is varied; this should allow LISA to deliver useful constraints on otherwise degenerate models.

  13. Selection and Physical Properties of High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, G. W.

    2014-09-01

    Extremely Red Objects (EROs) and BzKs continue to attract considerable interest. It has been suggested that they may be the direct progenitors of present-day massive E/S0 galaxies, and can provide crucial constraints on the current galaxy formation and evolution models. Therefore, the key question is to measure the relative fraction of OGs (old galaxies) and DGs (young, and dusty starburst galaxies) in the sample of EROs. Many groups have been currently investigating the fractions of these two ERO populations using a variety of observational approaches, but the fraction of OGs and DGs from different surveys is different. In the meantime, a number of observations suggest that the epoch of z˜2 also plays an important role in galaxy formation and evolution for various reasons: the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) begins to drop at z˜2 from a flat plateau at higher redshifts; the morphological type mix of field galaxies changes remarkably at z˜2; the number density of QSOs has a peak at z˜2; and about 50% to 70% of the stellar mass assembly of galaxies took place in the redshift range 1

  14. High-Redshift Astrophysics Using Every Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breysse, Patrick; Kovetz, Ely; Rahman, Mubdi; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Large galaxy surveys have dramatically improved our understanding of the complex processes which govern gas dynamics and star formation in the nearby universe. However, we know far less about the most distant galaxies, as existing high-redshift observations can only detect the very brightest sources. Intensity mapping surveys provide a promising tool to access this poorly-studied population. By observing emission lines with low angular resolution, these surveys can make use of every photon in a target line to study faint emitters which are inaccessible using traditional techniques. With upcoming carbon monoxide experiments in mind, I will demonstrate how an intensity map can be used to measure the luminosity function of a galaxy population, and in turn how these measurements will allow us to place robust constraints on the cosmic star formation history. I will then show how cross-correlating CO isotopologue lines will make it possible to study gas dynamics within the earliest galaxies in unprecedented detail.

  15. The redshift evolution of major merger triggering of luminous AGNs: a slight enhancement at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewlett, Timothy; Villforth, Carolin; Wild, Vivienne; Mendez-Abreu, Jairo; Pawlik, Milena; Rowlands, Kate

    2017-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs), particularly the most luminous AGNs, are commonly assumed to be triggered through major mergers; however, observational evidence for this scenario is mixed. To investigate any influence of galaxy mergers on AGN triggering and luminosities through cosmic time, we present a sample of 106 luminous X-ray-selected type 1 AGNs from the COSMOS survey. These AGNs occupy a large redshift range (0.5 < z < 2.2) and two orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity (∼1043-1045 erg s-1). AGN hosts are carefully mass and redshift matched to 486 control galaxies. A novel technique for identifying and quantifying merger features in galaxies is developed, subtracting galfit galaxy models and quantifying the residuals. Comparison to visual classification confirms this measure reliably picks out disturbance features in galaxies. No enhancement of merger features with increasing AGN luminosity is found with this metric, or by visual inspection. We analyse the redshift evolution of AGNs associated with galaxy mergers and find no merger enhancement in lower redshift bins. Contrarily, in the highest redshift bin (z ∼ 2) AGNs are ∼4 times more likely to be in galaxies exhibiting evidence of morphological disturbance compared to control galaxies, at 99 per cent confidence level (∼2.4σ) from visual inspection. Since only ∼15 per cent of these AGNs are found to be in morphologically disturbed galaxies, it is implied that major mergers at high redshift make a noticeable but subdominant contribution to AGN fuelling. At low redshifts, other processes dominate and mergers become a less significant triggering mechanism.

  16. Toward More Precise Photometric Redshifts: Calibration Via CCD Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Robert J.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    1997-06-01

    We present the initial results from a deep, multiband photometric survey of selected high Galactic latitude redshift fields. Previous work using the photographic data of Koo and Kron demonstrated that the distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional flux space U, B, R, and I is nearly planar. The position of a galaxy within this plane is determined by its redshift, luminosity, and spectral type (Connolly et al. 1995). Using recently acquired deep CCD photometry in existing, published redshift fields, we have redetermined the distribution of galaxies in this four-dimensional magnitude space. Furthermore, from our CCD photometry and the published redshifts, we have quantified the photometric-redshift relation within the standard AB magnitude system. This empirical relation has a measured dispersion of σz ~ 0.02 for z < 0.4. With this work we are reaching the asymptotic intrinsic dispersions (σz ~ 0.016 for z < 0.4) that were predicted from simulated distributions of galaxy colors. This result will prove useful in providing estimated redshifts for large photometric surveys, as well as improve the sampling of specific redshift regions for spectroscopic surveys through the use of an estimated redshift selection criteria.

  17. The SPT+ALMA CO Redshift Survey of Dusty Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Joaquin

    2017-06-01

    In a 2500 square degree cosmological survey, the South Pole Telescope has systematically identified a large number (100) of high-redshift strongly gravitationally lensed sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs). We are conducting a unique spectroscopic redshift survey with ALMA, targeting carbon monoxide (CO) line emission in these sources, across the 3mm spectral window. To date, we have obtained spectroscopic redshifts for 54 sources from 1.84 and extends into the epoch of re-ionization. Once we determine the redshift for these sources, we are able to obtain high-resolution CO, [CII], [NII], H_2O, OH, and HCN for these sources with ALMA, making this the largest and most well-studied samples of high-redshift starburst galaxies. We are undertaking a comprehensive and systematic followup campaign to use these ``cosmic magnifying glasses'' to study the physical conditions and chemical evolution of the dust-obscured universe in unprecedented detail. I will describe our team's method for obtaining and confirming spectroscopic redshifts, detail our current knowledge of the redshifts distribution of SMGs, present a method for selecting the highest redshift SMGs, describe our high-resolution imaging of molecular lines, and discuss future directions for obtaining large samples of mm-wave spectra.

  18. Anomaly detection for machine learning redshifts applied to SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Paech, Kerstin; Bonnett, Christopher; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    We present an analysis of anomaly detection for machine learning redshift estimation. Anomaly detection allows the removal of poor training examples, which can adversely influence redshift estimates. Anomalous training examples may be photometric galaxies with incorrect spectroscopic redshifts, or galaxies with one or more poorly measured photometric quantity. We select 2.5 million `clean' SDSS DR12 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts, and 6730 `anomalous' galaxies with spectroscopic redshift measurements which are flagged as unreliable. We contaminate the clean base galaxy sample with galaxies with unreliable redshifts and attempt to recover the contaminating galaxies using the Elliptical Envelope technique. We then train four machine learning architectures for redshift analysis on both the contaminated sample and on the preprocessed `anomaly-removed' sample and measure redshift statistics on a clean validation sample generated without any preprocessing. We find an improvement on all measured statistics of up to 80 per cent when training on the anomaly removed sample as compared with training on the contaminated sample for each of the machine learning routines explored. We further describe a method to estimate the contamination fraction of a base data sample.

  19. Probing the sparse tails of redshift distributions with Voronoi tessellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granett, B. R.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an empirical galaxy photometric redshift algorithm based upon the Voronoi tessellation density estimator in the space of redshift and photometric parameters. Our aim is to use sparse survey datasets to estimate the full shape of the redshift distribution that is defined by the degeneracies in galaxy photometric properties and redshift. We describe the algorithm implementation and provide a proof of concept using the first public data release from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS PDR-1). We validate the method by comparing against the standard empirical redshift distribution code Trees for Photo-Z (TPZ) on both mock and real data. We find that the Voronoi tessellation algorithm accurately recovers the full shape of the redshift distribution quantified by its second moment and inferred redshift confidence intervals. The analysis allows us to properly account for galaxies in the tails of the distributions that would otherwise be classified as catastrophic outliers. The source code is publicly available at http://bitbucket.org/bengranett/tailz.

  20. The formation and evolution of high-redshift dusty galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingzhe; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Ge, Jian; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Prochaska, Jason X.; Spilker, Justin; Strandet, Maria; Ashby, Matthew; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Lundgren, Britt; Zhao, Yinan; Ji, Tuo; Zhang, Shaohua; Caucal, Paul; SPT SMG Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Star formation and chemical evolution are among the biggest questions in galaxy formation and evolution. High-redshift dusty galaxies are the best sites to investigate mass assembly and growth, star formation rates, star formation history, chemical enrichment, and physical conditions. My thesis is based on two populations of high-redshift dusty galaxies, submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) and quasar 2175 Å dust absorbers, which are selected by dust emission and dust absorption, respectively.For the SMG sample, I have worked on the gravitationally lensed dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at 2.8 < z < 5.7, which were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and further confirmed by ALMA. My thesis is focused on the stellar masses and star formation rates of these objects by means of multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) modelling. The data include HST/WFC3, Spitzer/IRAC, Herschel/PACS, Herschel/SPIRE, APEX/Laboca and SPT. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these DSFGs have specific SFRs that lie above the MS, suggesting that we are witnessing ongoing strong starburst events that may be driven by major mergers. SPT0346-52 at z = 5.7, the most extraordinary source in the SPT survey for which we obtained Chandra X-ray and ATCA radio data, was confirmed to have the highest star formation surface density of any known galaxy at high-z.The other half of my thesis is focused on a new population of quasar absorption line systems, 2175 Å dust absorbers, which are excellent probes of gas and dust properties, chemical evolution and physical conditions in the absorbing galaxies. This sample was selected from the SDSS and BOSS surveys and followed up with the Echelle Spectrographs and Imager on the Keck-II telescope, the Red & Blue Channel Spectrograph on the Multiple Mirror Telescope, and the Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph onboard the Very Large Telescope. We found a correlation between the presence of the 2175 Å bump and other

  1. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the same sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per Δz = 0.1 bin at z < 1 when ~10 galaxies arcmin–2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter γ (f = Ωγm), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy σ(γ) ≈ 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M. We also find that the σ(γ) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the s