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Sample records for ldl apo b-100

  1. Impact of myeloperoxidase-LDL interactions on enzyme activity and subsequent posttranslational oxidative modifications of apoB-100

    PubMed Central

    Delporte, Cédric; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Noyon, Caroline; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Nuyens, Vincent; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Madhoun, Philippe; Desmet, Jean-Marc; Raynal, Pierre; Dufour, Damien; Koyani, Chintan N.; Reyé, Florence; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Ducobu, Jean; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Nève, Jean; Vanhamme, Luc; Obinger, Christian; Malle, Ernst; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of LDL by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2O2-chloride system is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The present study aimed at investigating the interaction of MPO with native and modified LDL and at revealing posttranslational modifications on apoB-100 (the unique apolipoprotein of LDL) in vitro and in vivo. Using amperometry, we demonstrate that MPO activity increases up to 90% when it is adsorbed at the surface of LDL. This phenomenon is apparently reflected by local structural changes in MPO observed by circular dichroism. Using MS, we further analyzed in vitro modifications of apoB-100 by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) generated by the MPO-H2O2-chloride system or added as a reagent. A total of 97 peptides containing modified residues could be identified. Furthermore, differences were observed between LDL oxidized by reagent HOCl or HOCl generated by the MPO-H2O2-chloride system. Finally, LDL was isolated from patients with high cardiovascular risk to confirm that our in vitro findings are also relevant in vivo. We show that several HOCl-mediated modifications of apoB-100 identified in vitro were also present on LDL isolated from patients who have increased levels of plasma MPO and MPO-modified LDL. In conclusion, these data emphasize the specificity of MPO to oxidize LDL. PMID:24534704

  2. Apo B100 similarities to viral proteins suggest basis for LDL-DNA binding and transfection capacity.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Juan; Prashad, Nagindra; Ermolinsky, Boris; Gaubatz, John W; Kang, Dongcheul; Schwarzbach, Andrea E; Loose, David S; Guevara, Natalia Valentinova

    2010-07-01

    LDL mediates transfection with plasmid DNA in a variety of cell types in vitro and in several tissues in vivo in the rat. The transfection capacity of LDL is based on apo B100, as arginine/lysine clusters, suggestive of nucleic acid-binding domains and nuclear localization signal sequences, are present throughout the molecule. Apo E may also contribute to this capacity because of its similarity to the Dengue virus capsid proteins and its ability to bind DNA. Synthetic peptides representing two apo B100 regions with prominent Arg/Lys clusters were shown to bind DNA. Region 1 (0014Lys-Ser0160) shares sequence motifs present in DNA binding domains of Interferon Regulatory Factors and Flaviviridae capsid/core proteins. It also contains a close analog of the B/E receptor ligand of apo E. Region 1 peptides, B1-1 (0014Lys-Glu0054) and B1-2 (0055Leu-Ala0096), mediate transfection of HeLa cells but are cytotoxic. Region 2 (3313Asp-Thr3431), containing the known B/E receptor ligand, shares analog motifs with the human herpesvirus 5 immediate-early transcriptional regulator (UL122) and Flaviviridae NS3 helicases. Region 2 peptides, B2-1 (3313Asp-Glu3355), and B2-2 (3356Gly-Thr3431) are ineffective in cell transfection and are noncytotoxic. These results confirm the role of LDL as a natural transfection vector in vivo, a capacity imparted by the apo B100, and suggest a basis for Flaviviridae cell entry.

  3. ApoB100-LDL Acts as a Metabolic Signal from Liver to Peripheral Fat Causing Inhibition of Lipolysis in Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Skogsberg, Josefin; Dicker, Andrea; Rydén, Mikael; Åström, Gaby; Nilsson, Roland; Bhuiyan, Hasanuzzaman; Vitols, Sigurd; Mairal, Aline; Langin, Dominique; Alberts, Peteris; Walum, Erik; Tegnér, Jesper; Hamsten, Anders; Arner, Peter; Björkegren, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Background Free fatty acids released from adipose tissue affect the synthesis of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and glucose metabolism in the liver. Whether there also exists a reciprocal metabolic arm affecting energy metabolism in white adipose tissue is unknown. Methods and Findings We investigated the effects of apoB-containing lipoproteins on catecholamine-induced lipolysis in adipocytes from subcutaneous fat cells of obese but otherwise healthy men, fat pads from mice with plasma lipoproteins containing high or intermediate levels of apoB100 or no apoB100, primary cultured adipocytes, and 3T3-L1 cells. In subcutaneous fat cells, the rate of lipolysis was inversely related to plasma apoB levels. In human primary adipocytes, LDL inhibited lipolysis in a concentration-dependent fashion. In contrast, VLDL had no effect. Lipolysis was increased in fat pads from mice lacking plasma apoB100, reduced in apoB100-only mice, and intermediate in wild-type mice. Mice lacking apoB100 also had higher oxygen consumption and lipid oxidation. In 3T3-L1 cells, apoB100-containing lipoproteins inhibited lipolysis in a dose-dependent fashion, but lipoproteins containing apoB48 had no effect. ApoB100-LDL mediated inhibition of lipolysis was abolished in fat pads of mice deficient in the LDL receptor (Ldlr−/−Apob100/100). Conclusions Our results show that the binding of apoB100-LDL to adipocytes via the LDL receptor inhibits intracellular noradrenaline-induced lipolysis in adipocytes. Thus, apoB100-LDL is a novel signaling molecule from the liver to peripheral fat deposits that may be an important link between atherogenic dyslipidemias and facets of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:19020660

  4. Red wine polyphenolics increase LDL receptor expression and activity and suppress the secretion of ApoB100 from human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Ho, Nerissa; Santos, Carlos; Dubois, Paul; Mamo, John; Croft, Kevin; Allister, Emma

    2003-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that the consumption of red wine may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. The cardioprotective effect of red wine has been attributed to the polyphenols present in red wine, particularly resveratrol (a stilbene, with estrogen-like activity), and the flavonoids, catechin, epicatechin, quercetin and phenolic acids such as gallic acid. At present, very little is known about the mechanisms by which red wine phenolic compounds benefit the cardiovascular system. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate whether red wine polyphenolics reduce lipoprotein production and clearance by the liver. Cultured HepG2 cells were incubated in the presence of dealcoholized red wine, alcohol-containing red wine and atorvastatin for 24 h. The apolipoprotien B100 (apoB100) protein (marker of hepatic lipoproteins) was quantified on Western blots with an anti-apoB100 antibody and the enhanced chemiluminescence detection system. Apolipoprotein B100 levels in the cells and that secreted into the media were significantly reduced by 50% in liver cells incubated with alcohol-stripped red wine compared with control cells. This effect of dealcoholized red wine on apoB100 production in HepG2 cells was similar to the effect of atorvastatin. Apo B100 production was significantly attenuated by 30% in cells incubated with alcoholized red wine, suggesting that the alcohol was masking the effect of red wine polyphenolics. Apo B100 production was significantly attenuated by 45% with the polyphenolic compounds resveratrol and quercertin. In addition, dealcoholized and alcoholized red wine and atorvastatin significantly increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase mRNA and LDL receptor binding activity relative to controls. Dealcoholized red wine also increased LDL receptor gene expression. Collectively, this study suggests that red wine polyphenolics regulate major pathways involved in lipoprotein metabolism.

  5. Echium oil reduces plasma lipids and hepatic lipogenic gene expression in apoB100-only LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Boudyguina, Elena; Wilson, Martha D; Gebre, Abraham K; Parks, John S

    2008-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with echium oil (EO), which is enriched in stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4 n-3), the product of Delta-6 desaturation of 18:3 n-3, will decrease plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations and result in conversion of SDA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in the liver. Mildly hypertriglyceridemic mice (apoB100-only LDLrKO) were fed a basal diet containing 10% calories as palm oil (PO) and 0.2% cholesterol for 4 weeks, after which they were randomly assigned to experimental diets consisting of the basal diet plus supplementation of 10% of calories as PO, EO or fish oil (FO) for 8 weeks. The EO and FO experimental diets decreased plasma TG and VLDL lipid concentration, and hepatic TG content compared to PO, and there was a significant correlation between hepatic TG content and plasma TG concentration among diet groups. EO fed mice had plasma and liver lipid EPA enrichment that was greater than PO-fed mice but less than FO-fed mice. Down-regulation of several genes involved in hepatic TG biosynthesis was similar for mice fed EO and FO and significantly lower compared to those fed PO. In conclusion, EO may provide a botanical alternative to FO for reduction of plasma TG concentrations.

  6. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Lough, Christopher M.; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Smith, Thomas L.; Colvin, Perry L.; Parks, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  7. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-12

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model.

  8. Accumulation of "small dense" low density lipoproteins (LDL) in a homozygous patients with familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 results from heterogenous interaction of LDL subfractions with the LDL receptor.

    PubMed Central

    März, W; Baumstark, M W; Scharnagl, H; Ruzicka, V; Buxbaum, S; Herwig, J; Pohl, T; Russ, A; Schaaf, L; Berg, A

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of LDL and LDL subfractions from a patient homozygous for familial defective apoB-100 (FDB) has been studied. His LDL cholesterol ranged from 2.65 to 3.34 g/liter. In cultured fibroblasts, binding, internalization, and degradation of the patient's LDL was diminished, but not completely abolished. The patient's apolipoprotein E concentration was low, and the amount of apolipoprotein E associated with LDL was not elevated over normal. LDL were separated into six subfractions: LDL-1 (1.019-1.031 kg/liter), LDL-2 (1.031-1.034 kg/liter), LDL-3 (1.034-1.037 kg/liter), LDL-4 (1.037-1.040 kg/liter), LDL-5 (1.040-1.044 kg/liter), and LDL-6 (> 1.044 kg/liter). LDL-5 and LDL-6 selectively accumulated in the patient's plasma. Concentrations of LDL-1 to 3 were normal. The LDL receptor-mediated uptake of LDL-1 and LDL-2 could not be distinguished from normal LDL. LDL-3 and LDL-4 displayed reduced uptake; LDL-5 and LDL-6 were completely defective in binding. When apolipoprotein E-containing particles were removed by immunoabsorption before preparing subfractions, LDL-3 and LDL-4, but not LDL-1 and LDL-2, retained some receptor binding activity. We conclude that in FDB, LDL-1 and LDL-2 contain sufficient apolipoprotein E to warrant normal cellular uptake. In LDL-3 and LDL-4, the defective apoB-100 itself displays some receptor binding; LDL-5 and LDL-6 are inable to interact with LDL receptors and accumulate in plasma. Images PMID:8254047

  9. Proposed mechanisms for binding of apo[a] kringle type 9 to apo B-100 in human lipoprotein[a].

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, J; Spurlino, J; Jan, A Y; Yang, C Y; Tulinsky, A; Prasad, B V; Gaubatz, J W; Morrisett, J D

    1993-01-01

    The protein component of human lipoprotein[a] consists primarily of two apolipoproteins, apo[a] and apo B-100, linked through a cystine disulfide(s). In the amino acid sequence of apo bd, Cys4057 located within a plasminogen kringle 4-like repeat sequence (3991-4068) is believed to form a disulfide bond with a specific cysteine residue in apo B-100. Our fluorescence-labeling experiments and molecular modeling studies have provided evidence for possible interactions between this apo[a] kringle type and apo B-100. The fluorescent probe, fluorescein-5-maleimide, was used in parallel experiments to label free sulfhydryl moieties in lipoprotein[a] and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). In apo B-100 of LDL, Cys3734 was labeled with the probe, but this site was not labeled in autologous lipoprotein[a]. The result strongly implicates Cys3734 of apo B-100 as the residue forming the disulfide linkage with Cys4057 of apo[a]. To explore possible noncovalent interactions between apo B-100 and apo[a], the crystallographic coordinates for plasminogen kringle 4 were used to generate molecular models of the apo[a] kringle-repeat sequence (3991-4068, LPaK9), the only plasminogen kringle 4 type repeat in apo[a] having an extra cysteine residue not involved in an intramolecular disulfide bond. The Cys4057 residue (henceforth designated as Cys67 in the LPaK9 sequence) is believed to form an intermolecular disulfide bond with a cysteine of apo B-100. In computer graphics molecular models of LPaK9, Cys67 is located on the surface of the kringle near the lysine ligand binding site. Selected segments of the LDL apo B-100 sequence that contain free sulfhydryl cysteines were subjected to energy minimization and docking with the ligand binding site and adjacent regions of the LPaK9 model. In the docking experiments, apo B-100 segment 3732-3745 (PSCKLDFREIQIYK) displayed the best fit and the largest number of van der Waals contacts with models of LPaK9. Other apo B-100 peptides with sulfhydryl

  10. Gender-Specific Differences in the Kinetics of Nonfasting TRL, IDL, and LDL Apolipoprotein B-100 in Men and Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Matthan, Nirupa R.; Jalbert, Susan M.; Barrett, P. Hugh R.; Dolnikowski, Gregory G.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate mechanisms underlying gender differences in serum lipoprotein concentrations, the kinetic behavior of apoB-100 was assessed. Methods and Results Twenty subjects (<50 years; 12 men and 8 premenopausal women) were provided a Western diet for 4 to 6 weeks, after which the kinetics of apoB-100 in triglyceride-rich, intermediate-density, and low-density lipoprotein (TRL, IDL, and LDL) were determined in the fed state. Nonfasting plasma TC, LDL-C, and triglyceride concentrations were 23%, 34%, and 57% lower, respectively, in the women compared with men. Plasma TRL and LDL apoB 100 pool sizes were lower by 40% and 30%, respectively. These differences were accounted for by higher TRL and LDL apoB 100 fractional catabolic rates (FCR), rather than differences in production rates (PR). Plasma TRL-C and LDL-C were positively correlated with TRL and LDL apoB 100 concentrations and pool size, and negatively correlated with TRL and LDL apoB 100 FCR (women: r=−0.59, P<0.01 and r=−0.54, P<0.04, and men: r=−0.43, P<0.05 and r=−0.44, P<0.05). No significant associations were observed between plasma TRL-C and LDL-C and PR. Conclusions These data suggest the mechanism for lower TRL-C and LDL-C concentrations in women was determined predominantly by higher TRL and LDL FCR rather than lower PR. This could explain, in part, the lower CVD risk in premenopausal women relative to men. PMID:18658047

  11. Higher reactivity of apolipoprotein B-100 and alpha-tocopherol compared to sialic acid moiety of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in radical reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Nao; Nariyama, Yoko; Hashimoto, Ryoko; Kojo, Shosuke

    2003-09-01

    Radical reaction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key step in atherogenesis and causes both a decrease in the sialic acid moiety and modification of apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Although apoB modification (cross-link and fragmentation) increases in atherosclerosis, the change in apoB-bound sialic acid in atherosclerosis is controversial. To elucidate the physiological implications of desialylation of LDL by radical reaction, the reactivity of sialic acid of LDL was compared with that of apoB, which underwent facile fragmentation in radical reactions. ApoB was determined by immunoblot analysis with anti-apoB antiserum, and the sialic acid moiety was measured by blot analysis with a biotin-bound lectin [biotin-SSA from Japanese elderberry (Sambucus sieboldiana)] specific to sialic acid. When human LDL was oxidized with Cu(2+) at 37 degrees C, apoB and apoB-attached sialic acid decreased simultaneously. Comparison of the staining bands with anti-apoB and with biotin-SSA shows that sialic acid moieties still remain on fragmented apoB proteins, indicating that the decrease in sialic acid is much slower than that of apoB fragmentation. In addition, human plasma was oxidized with 400 microM of Cu(2+) at 37 degrees C. Similar analysis indicates that the decrease in sialic acid attached to apoB also results from the fragmentation of apoB. This study indicates that the fragmentation of apoB proceeds at a much faster rate than the decrease in sialic acid content when a free radical reaction is induced in isolated LDL as well as in plasma LDL exposed to Cu(2+)-induced oxidative stress. On the basis of these results, the modification of apoB is much more sensitive than the decrease in sialic acid as an indicator of oxidative stress.

  12. The intravenous injection of oxidized LDL- or Apolipoprotein B100 – Coupled splenocytes promotes Th1 polarization in wildtype and Apolipoprotein E – Deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmetz, Martin; Ponnuswamy, Padmapriya; Laurans, Ludivine; Esposito, Bruno; Tedgui, Alain; Mallat, Ziad

    2015-08-14

    Background: Th1 responses in atherosclerosis are mainly associated with the aggravation of atherosclerotic plaques, whereas Th2 responses lead to a less pronounced disease in mouse models. The fixation of antigens on cells by means of ethylene carbodiimide (ECDI), and subsequent injection of these antigen-coupled splenocytes (Ag-SP) to induce tolerance against the attached antigens, has been successfully used to treat murine type 1 diabetes or encephalomyelitis in. We analyzed this approach in a mouse model for atherosclerosis. Methods and results: OTII-transgenic mice that were treated with a single dose of 5 × 10{sup 7} OVA-coupled splenocytes (OVA-SP), had decreased splenocyte proliferation, and lower IFNγ production in vitro upon antigen recall. However, in vivo CD4 cell activation was increased. To try lipoprotein-derived, “atherosclerosis-associated” antigens, we first tested human oxidized LDL. In wild type mice, an increase of IFNγ production upon in vitro recall was detected in the oxLDL-SP group. In Apolipoprotein E − deficient (ApoE−/−) mice that received oxLDL-SP every 5 weeks for 20 weeks, we did not find any difference of atherosclerotic plaque burden, but again increased IFNγ production. To overcome xenogenous limitations, we then examined the effects of mouse Apolipoprotein B100 peptides P3 and P6. ApoB100-SP treatment again promoted a more IFNγ pronounced response upon in vitro recall. Flow cytometry analysis of cytokine secreting spleen cells revealed CD4 positive T cells to be mainly the source for IFNγ. In ApoE−/− mice that were administered ApoB100-SP during 20 weeks, the atherosclerotic plaque burden in aortic roots as well as total aorta was unchanged compared to PBS treated controls. Splenocyte proliferation upon antigen recall was not significantly altered in ApoB100-SP treated ApoE−/− mice. Conclusion: Although we did not observe a relevant anti-atherosclerotic benefit, the treatment with antigen

  13. ApoB100/LDLR-/- Hypercholesterolaemic Mice as a Model for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Carlos; Sierra, Saleta; Tercero, Inmaculada; Vázquez, Jose Antonio; Pineda, Antonia; Manrique, Tatiana; Burgos, Javier S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical findings support the notion that the progressive deterioration of cholesterol homeostasis is a central player in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies suggest that high midlife plasma total cholesterol levels are associated with an increased risk of AD. This paper reports the plasma cholesterol concentrations, cognitive performance, locomotor activity and neuropathological signs in a murine model (transgenic mice expressing apoB100 but knockout for the LDL receptor [LDLR]) of human familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). From birth, these animals have markedly elevated LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) levels. These transgenic mice were confirmed to have higher plasma cholesterol concentrations than wild-type mice, an effect potentiated by aging. Further, 3-month-old transgenic mice showed cholesterol (total and fractions) concentrations considerably higher than those of 18-month-old wild-type mice. The hypercholesterolaemia of the transgenic mice was associated with a clear locomotor deficit (as determined by rotarod, grip strength and open field testing) and impairment of the episodic-like memory (determined by the integrated memory test). This decline in locomotor activity and cognitive status was associated with neuritic dystrophy and/or the disorganization of the neuronal microtubule network, plus an increase in astrogliosis and lipid peroxidation in the brain regions associated with AD, such as the motor and lateral entorhinal cortex, the amygdaloid basal nucleus, and the hippocampus. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were positively correlated with age, although potentiated by the transgenic genotype, while cerebral β-amyloidosis was positively correlated with genetic background rather than with age. These findings confirm hypercholesterolaemia as a key biomarker for monitoring mild cognitive impairment, and shows these transgenic mice can be used as a model for cognitive and psycho-motor decline. PMID:21829488

  14. Echium Oil Reduces Atherosclerosis in apoB100-only LDLrKO Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Boudyguina, Elena; Wilson, Martha D.; Parks, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The anti-atherogenic and hypotriglyceridemic properties of fish oil are attributed to its enrichment in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5, n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3). Echium oil contains stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4, n-3), which is metabolized to EPA in humans and mice, resulting in decreased plasma triglycerides. Objective We used apoB100 only, LDLrKO mice to investigate whether echium oil reduces atherosclerosis. Methods Mice were fed palm, echium, or fish oil-containing diets for 16 weeks and plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and atherosclerosis were measured. Results Compared to palm oil, echium oil feeding resulted in significantly less plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and atherosclerosis, comparable to that of fish oil. Conclusion This is the first report that echium oil is anti-atherogenic, suggesting that it may be a botanical alternative to fish oil for atheroprotection. PMID:22100249

  15. Phospholipids in oxidized LDL not adducted to apoB are recognized by the CD36 scavenger receptor.

    PubMed

    Podrez, Eugene A; Hoppe, George; O'Neil, June; Hoff, Henry F

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) results in its recognition by scavenger receptors on macrophages. Whereas blockage of lysyl residues on apoB-100 of oxLDL by lipid peroxidation products appears to be critical for recognition by the scavenger receptor class A (SR-A), modification of the lipid moiety has been suggested to be responsible for recognition by the scavenger class B receptor, CD36. We studied the recognition by scavenger receptors of oxidized LDL in which lysyl residues are blocked prior to oxidation through methylation [ox(m)LDL]. This permits us to minimize any contribution of modified apoB-100 to the recognition of oxLDL, but does not disrupt the native configuration of lipids in the particle. We found that ox(m)LDL was recognized by receptors on mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) almost as well as oxLDL. Ox(m)LDL was recognized by CD36-transfected cells but not by SR-A-transfected cells. Oxidized phospholipids (oxPC) transferred from oxLDL or directly from oxPC to LDL, conveyed recognition by CD36-transfected cells, confirming that CD36 recognized unbound oxidized phospholipids in ox(m)LDL. Collectively, these results suggest that oxPC not adducted to apoB within the intact oxLDL particle are recognized by the macrophage scavenger receptor CD36, that these lipids are not recognized by SR-A, and that they can transfer from oxidized to unoxidized LDL and induce CD36 recognition.

  16. Ubiquitination regulates the assembly of VLDL in HepG2 cells and is the committing step of the apoB-100 ERAD pathway[S

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Eric A.; Khanna, Neeraj A.; McLeod, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) is degraded by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) when lipid availability limits assembly of VLDLs. The ubiquitin ligase gp78 and the AAA-ATPase p97 have been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of apoB-100. To study the relationship between ERAD and VLDL assembly, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to reduce gp78 expression in HepG2 cells. Reduction of gp78 decreased apoB-100 ubiquitination and cytosolic apoB-ubiquitin conjugates. Radiolabeling studies revealed that gp78 knockdown increased secretion of newly synthesized apoB-100 and, unexpectedly, enhanced VLDL assembly, as the shift in apoB-100 density in gp78-reduced cells was accompanied by increased triacylglycerol (TG) secretion. To explore the mechanisms by which gp78 reduction might enhance VLDL assembly, we compared the effects of gp78 knockdown with those of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase1/2 inhibitor that enhances apoB-100 secretion in HepG2 cells. U0126 treatment increased secretion of both apoB100 and TG and decreased the ubiquitination and cellular accumu­lation of apoB-100. Furthermore, p97 knockdown caused apoB-100 to accumulate in the cell, but if gp78 was concomitantly reduced or assembly was enhanced by U0126 treatment, cellular apoB-100 returned toward baseline. This indicates that ubiquitination commits apoB-100 to p97-mediated retrotranslocation during ERAD. Thus, decreasing ubiquitination of apoB-100 enhances VLDL assembly, whereas improving apoB-100 lipidation decreases its ubiquitination, suggesting that ubiquitination has a regulatory role in VLDL assembly. PMID:21421992

  17. T-Cells Specific for a Self-Peptide of ApoB-100 Exacerbate Aortic Atheroma in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Michael K; Tse, Kevin Y; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Welch, Kathryn; Eitzman, Daniel T; Thipparthi, Raghavendar R; Montgomery, Paul C; Thummel, Ryan; Tse, Harley Y

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of mouse I-A(b)-binding motifs, two sequences of the murine apolipoprotein B-100 (mApoB-100), mApoB-1003501-3515 (designated P3) and mApoB-100978-992 (designated P6), were found to be immunogenic. In this report, we show that P6 is also atherogenic. Immunization of Apoe(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) with P6 resulted in enhanced development of aortic atheroma as compared to control mice immunized with an irrelevant peptide MOG35-55 or with complete Freund's adjuvant alone. Adoptive transfer of lymph node cells from P6-immunized donor mice to recipients fed an HFD caused exacerbated aortic atheromas, correlating P6-primed cells with disease development. Finally, P6-specific T cell clones were generated and adoptive transfer of T cell clones into recipients fed an HFD led to significant increase in aortic plaque coverage when compared to control animals receiving a MOG35-55-specific T cell line. Recipient mice not fed an HFD, however, did not exhibit such enhancement, indicating that an inflammatory environment facilitated the atherogenic activity of P6-specific T cells. That P6 is identical to or cross-reacts with a naturally processed peptide of ApoB-100 is evidenced by the ability of P6 to stimulate the proliferation of T cells in the lymph node of mice primed by full-length human ApoB-100. By identifying an atherogenic T cell epitope of ApoB-100 and establishing specific T cell clones, our studies open up new and hitherto unavailable avenues to study the nature of atherogenic T cells and their functions in the atherosclerotic disease process.

  18. T-Cells Specific for a Self-Peptide of ApoB-100 Exacerbate Aortic Atheroma in Murine Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Michael K.; Tse, Kevin Y.; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Welch, Kathryn; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Thipparthi, Raghavendar R.; Montgomery, Paul C.; Thummel, Ryan; Tse, Harley Y.

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of mouse I-Ab-binding motifs, two sequences of the murine apolipoprotein B-100 (mApoB-100), mApoB-1003501–3515 (designated P3) and mApoB-100978–992 (designated P6), were found to be immunogenic. In this report, we show that P6 is also atherogenic. Immunization of Apoe−/− mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) with P6 resulted in enhanced development of aortic atheroma as compared to control mice immunized with an irrelevant peptide MOG35–55 or with complete Freund’s adjuvant alone. Adoptive transfer of lymph node cells from P6-immunized donor mice to recipients fed an HFD caused exacerbated aortic atheromas, correlating P6-primed cells with disease development. Finally, P6-specific T cell clones were generated and adoptive transfer of T cell clones into recipients fed an HFD led to significant increase in aortic plaque coverage when compared to control animals receiving a MOG35–55-specific T cell line. Recipient mice not fed an HFD, however, did not exhibit such enhancement, indicating that an inflammatory environment facilitated the atherogenic activity of P6-specific T cells. That P6 is identical to or cross-reacts with a naturally processed peptide of ApoB-100 is evidenced by the ability of P6 to stimulate the proliferation of T cells in the lymph node of mice primed by full-length human ApoB-100. By identifying an atherogenic T cell epitope of ApoB-100 and establishing specific T cell clones, our studies open up new and hitherto unavailable avenues to study the nature of atherogenic T cells and their functions in the atherosclerotic disease process. PMID:28280493

  19. Nonenzymatic oxidative cleavage of peptide bonds in apoprotein B-100.

    PubMed

    Fong, L G; Parthasarathy, S; Witztum, J L; Steinberg, D

    1987-12-01

    Incubation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) with endothelial cells converts it to a form that is avidly degraded by macrophages via the acetyl LDL receptor. This modification has previously been shown to be accompanied by extensive breakdown of the major LDL protein (apoB-100) to smaller peptides. ApoB-100 is known to undergo partial degradation during isolation and purification which is commonly attributed to proteolytic enzymes derived from plasma or to contaminant bacteria. In the present studies addition of any of ten different inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes failed to inhibit the endothelial cell-induced degradation of LDL apoB-100 or its subsequent enhanced rate of degradation by macrophages (termed biological modification). Conversely, deliberate digestion of LDL with any of five well-characterized proteolytic enzymes degraded apoB-100 extensively but did not cause biological modification. The disappearance of intact apoB-100 during incubation with endothelial cells paralleled the formation of thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substances and the breakdown could be completely prevented by the addition of antioxidants or metal chelators. Finally, the incubation of LDL with a free radical-generating system (dihydroxyfumaric acid and Fe3+-ADP) in the absence of cells resulted in the breakdown of apoB-100. These results suggest that the breakdown of apoB-100 during oxidative modification of LDL, whether cell-induced or catalyzed by transition metals, is not mediated by proteolytic enzymes but rather is linked to oxidative attack on the polypeptide chain, either directly or secondary to peroxidation of closely associated LDL lipids.

  20. Mice That Produce ApoB100 Lipoproteins in the RPE Do Not Develop Drusen yet Are Still a Valuable Experimental System

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Masashi; Cano, Marisol; Handa, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Mice typically produce apolipoprotein B (apoB)-48 and not apoB100. Apolipoprotein B100 accumulates in Bruch's membrane prior to basal deposit and drusen formation during the onset of AMD, raising the possibility that they are a trigger for these Bruch's membrane alterations. The purpose herein, was to determine whether mice that predominantly produce apoB100 develop features of AMD. Methods. The eyes of mice that produce apoB100 were examined for apoB100 synthesis, cholesteryl esterase/filipin labeling for cholesteryl esters, and transmission electron microscopy for lipid particles and phenotype. Results. Apolipoprotein B100 was abundant in the RPE-choroid of apoB100, but not wild-type mice by Western blot analysis. The apolipoprotein B100,35S-radiolabeled and immunoprecipitated from RPE explants, confirmed that apoB100 was synthesized by RPE. Apolipoprotein B100, but not control mice, had cholesteryl esters and lipid particles in Bruch's membrane. Immunoreactivity of ApoB100 was present in the RPE and Bruch's membrane, but not choroidal endothelium of apoB100 mice. Ultrastructural changes were consistent with aging, but not AMD when aged up to 18 months. The induction of advanced glycation end products to alter Bruch's membrane, did not promote basal linear deposit or drusen formation. Conclusions. Mice that produce apoB100 in the RPE and liver secrete lipoproteins into Bruch's membrane, but not to the extent that distinct features of AMD develop, which suggests that either additional lipoprotein accumulation or additional factors are necessary to initiate their formation. PMID:25316721

  1. Oxidized phospholipids on apoB-100-containing lipoproteins: a biomarker predicting cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Taleb, Adam; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known etiologic factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. Oxidation of lipoproteins, and in particular of low density lipoprotein, is a necessary if not obligatory mechanism for the generation of macrophage-derived foam cells, the first major initiating factor in the development of an atherosclerotic plaque. Oxidation of lipoproteins does not result in the generation of a single, defined molecular species, but of a variety of oxidation-specific epitopes, such as oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde-lysine epitopes. Unique monoclonal antibodies have been developed to bind these well-defined epitopes, and have been used in in vitro assays to detect them on circulating lipoproteins present in plasma. This article will summarize the accumulating clinical data of one oxidation-specific biomarker, oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) on apoB-100 lipoproteins. Elevated levels of OxPL/apoB predict the presence and progression of coronary, femoral and carotid artery disease, are increased following acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary intervention, and predict the development of death, myocardial infarction, stroke and need for revascularization in unselected populations. OxPL/apoB levels are independent of traditional risk factors and the metabolic syndrome, and enhance the risk prediction of the Framingham Risk Score. The OxPLs measured in this assay reflect the biological activity of the most atherogenic lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) particles, reflected in patients with high plasma Lp(a) levels with small apo(a) isoforms. The predictive value of OxPL/apoB is amplified by Lp(a) and phospholipases such as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and secretory phospholipase A2, which are targets of therapy in clinical trials. This assay has now been validated in over 10,000 patients and efforts are underway to make it available to the research and clinical communities. PMID:22003918

  2. Relationship between serum levels of fetuin-A with apo-A1, apo-B100, body composition and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shidfar, Farzad; Zarrati, Mitra; Khamseh, Mohamad Ebrahim; Haghighat, Neda; Rostami, Ali; Zolfaghari, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some results exist on fetuin-A as marker for vascular disease in type 2diabetes. We examined the relationship between serum fetuin-A with some factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: From October 2012 to June 2013, a total of 131 T2DM patients were recruited and evaluated for various parameters including HOMA-IR, Apo-A1, Apo-B100, body fat percentage and waist circumference. Serum fetuin-A levels were measured by enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Serum glucose with a Cobas MIRA analyzer by enzymatic method. Apo-B100 and apo-A1 were measured by immunoturbidimetry with a Cobas MIRA analyzer. HOMA-IR was calculated by the following formula: [fasting insulin (uIU/mL) × fasting blood glucose (mmol/L)]/22.5. Results: The mean levels of HOMA-IR were significantly increased progressively across fetuin-A tertiles (p for trend=0.04) in women but not men. Fetuin-A had just a significant positive correlation with Apo- A1(r=0.22, p=0.02). Conclusion: This present study showed that levels of serum fetuin-A are significantly associated with insulin resistance in women with T2DM. PMID:25664301

  3. An apolipoprotein B100 mimotope prevents obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Jong; Choi, Jung Soon; Han, Jemin; Kim, Ji Young; Na, Hyun Kyun; Joung, Hae-Jung; Kim, Young Sik

    2015-01-01

    Although apolipoprotein B100 (ApoB100) plays a key role in peripheral fat deposition, it is not considered a suitable therapeutic target in obesity. In the present study we describe a novel ApoB100 mimotope, peptide pB1, and the use of pB1-based vaccine-like formulations (BVFs) against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. In HFD- compared with chow-fed adolescent mice, BVFs reduced the 3-month body-weight gains attributable to increased dietary fat by 44–65%, and prevented mesenteric fat accumulation and liver steatosis. The body-weight reductions paralleled the titres of pB1-reactive immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, and pB1-reactive antibodies specifically recognized native ApoB100 and a synthetic peptide from the C-terminal half of ApoB100. In cultured 3T3L1 adipocytes, anti-pB1 antibodies increased lipolysis and inhibited low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake. In cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages, the same antibodies enhanced LDL uptake (without causing foam cell formation). These findings make ApoB100 a promising target for an immunization strategy against HFD-induced obesity. PMID:26519425

  4. Transgenic mice expressing high plasma concentrations of human apolipoprotein B100 and lipoprotein(a).

    PubMed Central

    Linton, M F; Farese, R V; Chiesa, G; Grass, D S; Chin, P; Hammer, R E; Hobbs, H H; Young, S G

    1993-01-01

    The B apolipoproteins, apo-B48 and apo-B100, are key structural proteins in those classes of lipoproteins considered to be atherogenic [e.g., chylomicron remnants, beta-VLDL, LDL, oxidized LDL, and Lp(a)]. Here we describe the development of transgenic mice expressing high levels of human apo-B48 and apo-B100. A 79.5-kb human genomic DNA fragment containing the entire human apo-B gene was isolated from a P1 bacteriophage library and microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs. 16 transgenic founders expressing human apo-B were generated, and the animals with the highest expression had plasma apo-B100 levels nearly as high as those of normolipidemic humans (approximately 50 mg/dl). The human apo-B100 in transgenic mouse plasma was present largely in lipoproteins of the LDL class as shown by agarose gel electrophoresis, chromatography on a Superose 6 column, and density gradient ultracentrifugation. When the human apo-B transgenic founders were crossed with transgenic mice expressing human apo(a), the offspring that expressed both transgenes had high plasma levels of human Lp(a). Both the human apo-B and Lp(a) transgenic mice will be valuable resources for studying apo-B metabolism and the role of apo-B and Lp(a) in atherosclerosis. Images PMID:8254057

  5. Mechanisms responsible for hepatic very low density lipoprotein-apoB100 overproduction in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overproduction of hepatic very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)1 particles is a major abnormality of lipoprotein dysregulation in type 2 diabetes (T2D). We sought to examine the mechanisms linking systemic/hepatic inflammation associated with insulin resistance and apolipoprotein (apo) B100-containing...

  6. Neurometabolic Roles of ApoE and Ldl-R in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Wong, G. William; Wolfgang, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms in ApoE are highly correlated with the progression of neurodegenerative disease, in particular Alzheimer’s disease. Little is known, however, about the role of ApoE or cholesterol metabolism on brain neurochemistry in general. To better understand the role of lipoprotein and cholesterol metabolism in the brain, we profiled 6-week and 12-week old Apoe KO and Ldlr KO mouse models via unbiased metabolomics to determine which metabolites were affected at an early age to identify those that may play a role in triggering pathology later in life. Steady-state metabolomics revealed only subtle differences among Apoe KO, Ldlr KO and WT mouse brains. Ldlr KO mice exhibited alterations in metabolites involved in neurotransmitter, amino acid and cholesterol metabolism. In contrast, Apoe KO mice only showed subtle changes in amino acid and neurotransmitter metabolism. These subtle changes in a broad range of metabolites indicate that ApoE and Ldl-R alone may not play a significant role in these mouse models at an early age, but instead require the cumulative effect from different pathways that lead to dysfunction at a much later stage of life. PMID:26686234

  7. ApoD mediates binding of HDL to LDL and to growing T24 carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Braesch-Andersen, Sten; Beckman, Lena; Paulie, Staffan; Kumagai-Braesch, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (Apo) D is an important protein produced in many parts of the body. It is necessary for the development and repair of the brain and protection from oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which apoD interacts with lipoproteins in human plasma. By using detergent-free ELISA, we show that immobilized monoclonal antibodies against apoD very efficiently bind to low density lipoprotein (LDL) from plasma; this binding is as equally efficient as binding to an anti-apoB monoclonal antibody. Adding detergent to the plasma inhibited the binding, suggesting that the binding is dependent on the presence of intact lipoprotein particles. Reversing the system by using immobilized anti-apoB revealed that the affinity of apoD for LDL is rather low, suggesting that multiple bindings are needed for a durable connection. Biosensor experiments using purified lipoproteins also showed that purified apoD and high density lipoprotein 3 (HDL3), a lipoprotein fraction rich in apoD, were both able to bind LDL very efficiently, indicating that the HDL3-LDL interaction may be a physiological consequence of the affinity of apoD for LDL. Furthermore, we found that apoD increases the binding of HDL to actively growing T24 bladder carcinoma cells but not to quiescent, contact-inhibited, confluent T24 cells. This result is especially intriguing given that the T24 supernatant only contained detectable levels of apoD after growth inhibition, raising the possibility that alternating the expression of apoD and a putative apoD-receptor could give direction to the flow of lipids. In the current paper, we conclude that apoD mediates binding of HDL to LDL and to growing T24 carcinomas, thereby highlighting the importance of apoD in lipid metabolism.

  8. In situ delipidation of low-density lipoproteins in capillary electrochromatography yields apolipoprotein B-100-coated surfaces for interaction studies.

    PubMed

    D'Ulivo, Lucia; Chen, Jie; Meinander, Kristoffer; Oörni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2008-12-01

    An electrochromatographic method was developed for the in situ delipidation of intact low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles immobilized on the inner wall of a 50-microm inner diameter silica capillary. In this method, the immobilized LDL particles were delipidated with nonionic surfactant Nonidet P-40 at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C, resulting in an apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100)-coated capillary surface. The mobility of the electroosmotic flow marker dimethyl sulfoxide gave information about the surface charge, and the retention factors of beta-estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone were informative of the surface hydrophobicity. The calculated distribution coefficients of the steroids produced specific information about the affinity interactions of the steroids, with capillary surfaces coated either with intact LDL particles or with apoB-100. Delipidation with Nonidet P-40 resulted in a strong decrease in the hydrophobicity of the LDL coating. Atomic force microscopy images confirmed the loss of lipids from the LDL particles and the presence of apoB-100 protein coating. The in situ delipidation of LDL particles in capillaries represents a novel approach for the isolation of immobilized apoB-100 and for the determination of its pI value. The technique requires extremely low quantities of LDL particles, and it is simple and fast.

  9. Structural changes induced by acidic pH in human apolipoprotein B-100

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Higuero, José A.; Benito-Vicente, Asier; Etxebarria, Aitor; Milicua, José Carlos G.; Ostolaza, Helena; Arrondo, José L. R.; Martín, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Acidification in the endosome causes lipoprotein release by promoting a conformational change in the LDLR allowing its recycling and degradation of LDL. Notwithstanding conformational changes occurring in the LDLR have expanded considerably, structural changes occurring in LDL particles have not been fully explored yet. The objectives of the present work were to study structural changes occurring in apoB100 by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and also LDL size and morphology by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electron microscopy (EM) at both pH 7.4 and 5.0. We determined by IR that pH acidification from 7.4 to 5.0, resembling that occurring within endosomal environment, induces a huge reversible structural rearrangement of apoB100 that is characterized by a reduction of beta-sheet content in favor of alpha-helix structures. Data obtained from DLS and EM showed no appreciable differences in size and morphology of LDL. These structural changes observed in apoB100, which are likely implied in particle release from lipoprotein receptor, also compromise the apoprotein stability what would facilitate LDL degradation. In conclusion, the obtained results reveal a more dynamic picture of the LDL/LDLR dissociation process than previously perceived and provide new structural insights into LDL/LDLR interactions than can occur at endosomal low-pH milieu. PMID:27824107

  10. Targeted Knockdown of Hepatic SOAT2 with Antisense Oligonucleotides Stabilizes Atherosclerotic Plaque in ApoB100-only LDLr−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, John T.; Olson, John D.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Wilson, Martha D.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Link, Kerry M.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the attenuation of CO packaging into apoB-containing lipoproteins will arrest progression of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions. Approach and Results Atherosclerosis was induced in apoB-100 only, LDLr−/− mice by feeding a diet enriched in cis-monounsaturated fatty acids (cis-MUFAs) for 24 weeks. A subset of mice was then sacrificed to quantify the extent of atherosclerosis. The remaining mice were continued on the same diet (controls) or assigned to the following treatments for 16 weeks: (1) a diet enriched in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, (2) the cis-MUFA diet plus bi-weekly injections of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) specific to hepatic SOAT2; or (3) the cis-MUFA diet and bi-weekly injections of a non-targeting hepatic ASO. Extent of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta was monitored morphometrically in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ex vivo histologically and immunochemically. Hepatic knockdown of SOAT2 via ASO treatment arrested lesion growth and stabilized lesions. Conclusions Hepatic knockdown of SOAT2 in apoB100-only, LDLr−/− mice resulted in remodeling of aortic atherosclerotic lesions into a stable phenotype, suggesting SOAT2 is a viable target for treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26229140

  11. A high carbohydrate diet induces the beneficial effect of the CC genotype of hepatic lipase C-514T polymorphism on the apoB100/apoAI ratio only in young Chinese males.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minshan; Li, Zhengke; Fang, Ding Zhi

    2012-11-01

    Both diet and genetic background have profound effects on plasma lipid profiles. It was hypothesized that a high carbohydrate (high-CHO) diet could affect the ratios of serum lipids and apolipoproteins (apo) differently in subjects with different genotypes of the C-514T hepatic lipase rs1800588 polymorphism. Fifty-six healthy university students were given a stabilization diet of 54.1% carbohydrate for 7 days, followed with a high-CHO diet of 70.1% carbohydrate for 6 days. Body composition, serum lipids, apolipoproteins and the hepatic lipase C-514T rs1800588 polymorphism were analyzed. The ratios of serum lipids and apolipoproteins were calculated afterwards. At baseline, females have significantly lower waist circumference (WC) (CC genotype: p = 0.049; T carriers: p = 0.015) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) (CC genotype: p = 0.019; T carriers: p = 0.000) than males. When compared with those before the high-CHO diet, the body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.043) and WC (p = 0.048) were significantly decreased in the male T carriers, the TG/HDL-C ratios were significantly increased in females (CC genotype: p = 0.047; T carriers: p = 0.003). The TC/HDL-C ratios were significantly decreased in males (CC genotype: p = 0.000; T carriers: p = 0.003). And the LDL-C/HDL-C ratios were significantly decreased in all subjects (males with the CC genotype: p = 0.001; male T carriers: p = 0.000; females with the CC genotype: p = 0.018; female T carriers: p = 0.006). However, the apoB100/apoAI ratio was only significantly decreased in male CC genotype after the high-CHO diet (p = 0.005).

  12. Production of a plant-derived immunogenic protein targeting ApoB100 and CETP: toward a plant-based atherosclerosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jorge Alberto; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Romero-Maldonado, Andrea; Monreal-Escalante, Elizabeth; Uresti-Rivera, Edith Elena; Bañuelos-Hernández, Bernardo

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to initiate the development of a plant-based vaccination model against atherosclerosis, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-based chimeric protein was designed to target both ApoB100 and CETP epitopes associated with immunotherapeutic effects in atherosclerosis. Epitopes were fused at the C-terminus of CTB to yield a protein called CTB:p210:CETPe. A synthetic gene coding for CTB:p210:CETPe was successfully transferred to tobacco plants with no phenotypic alterations. Plant-derived CTB:p210:CETPe was expressed and assembled in the pentameric form. This protein retained the target antigenic determinants, as revealed by GM1-ELISA and Western blot analyses. Higher expresser lines reached recombinant protein accumulation levels up to 10 µg/g fresh weight in leaf tissues and these lines carry a single insertion of the transgene as determined by qPCR. Moreover, when subcutaneously administered, the biomass from these CTB:p210:CETPe-producing plants was able to elicit humoral responses in mice against both ApoB100 and CETP epitopes and human serum proteins. These findings evidenced for the first time that atherosclerosis-related epitopes can be expressed in plants retaining immunogenicity, which opens a new path in the molecular farming field for the development of vaccines against atherosclerosis.

  13. The plasma concentration of HDL-associated apoM is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Christina; Benn, Marianne; Christensen, Pernille M; Gordts, Philip L S M; Roebroek, Anton J M; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Dahlbäck, Björn; Nielsen, Lars B

    2012-10-01

    ApoM is mainly associated with HDL. Nevertheless, we have consistently observed positive correlations of apoM with plasma LDL cholesterol in humans. Moreover, LDL receptor deficiency is associated with increased plasma apoM in mice. Here, we tested the idea that plasma apoM concentrations are affected by the rate of LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles. We measured apoM in humans each carrying one of three different LDL receptor mutations (n = 9) or the apoB3500 mutation (n = 12). These carriers had increased plasma apoM (1.34 ± 0.13 µM, P = 0.003, and 1.23 ± 0.10 µM, P = 0.02, respectively) as compared with noncarriers (0.93 ± 0.04 µM). When we injected human apoM-containing HDL into Wt (n = 6) or LDL receptor-deficient mice (n = 6), the removal of HDL-associated human apoM was delayed in the LDL receptor-deficient mice. After 2 h, 54 ± 5% versus 90 ± 8% (P < 0.005) of the initial amounts of human apoM remained in the plasma of Wt and LDL receptor-deficient mice, respectively. Finally, we compared the turnover of radio-iodinated LDL and plasma apoM concentrations in 45 normocholesterolemic humans. There was a negative correlation between plasma apoM and the fractional catabolic rate of LDL (r = -0.38, P = 0.009). These data suggest that the plasma clearance of apoM, despite apoM primarily being associated with HDL, is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles.

  14. LDL-apheresis depletes apoE-HDL and pre-β1-HDL in familial hypercholesterolemia: relevance to atheroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Orsoni, Alexina; Saheb, Samir; Levels, Johannes H. M.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje; Atassi, Marielle; Bittar, Randa; Robillard, Paul; Bruckert, Eric; Kontush, Anatol; Carrié, Alain; Chapman, M. John

    2011-01-01

    Subnormal HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo)AI levels are characteristic of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), reflecting perturbed intravascular metabolism with compositional anomalies in HDL particles, including apoE enrichment. Does LDL-apheresis, which reduces HDL-cholesterol, apoAI, and apoE by adsorption, induce selective changes in HDL subpopulations, with relevance to atheroprotection? Five HDL subpopulations were fractionated from pre- and post-LDL-apheresis plasmas of normotriglyceridemic FH subjects (n = 11) on regular LDL-apheresis (>2 years). Apheresis lowered both plasma apoE (−62%) and apoAI (−16%) levels, with preferential, genotype-independent reduction in apoE. The mass ratio of HDL2:HDL3 was lowered from ∼1:1 to 0.72:1 by apheresis, reflecting selective removal of HDL2 mass (80% of total HDL adsorbed). Pre-LDL-apheresis, HDL2 subpopulations were markedly enriched in apoE, consistent with ∼1 copy of apoE per 4 HDL particles. Large amounts (50-66%) of apoE-HDL were removed by apheresis, preferentially in the HDL2b subfraction (−50%); minor absolute amounts of apoE-HDL were removed from HDL3 subfractions. Furthermore, pre-β1-HDL particle levels were subnormal following removal (−53%) upon apheresis, suggesting that cellular cholesterol efflux may be defective in the immediate postapheresis period. In LDL-receptor (LDL-R) deficiency, LDL-apheresis may enhance flux through the reverse cholesterol transport pathway and equally attenuate potential biglycan-mediated deposition of apoE-HDL in the arterial matrix. PMID:21957200

  15. A randomized trial and novel SPR technique identifies altered lipoprotein-LDL receptor binding as a mechanism underlying elevated LDL-cholesterol in APOE4s.

    PubMed

    Calabuig-Navarro, M V; Jackson, K G; Kemp, C F; Leake, D S; Walden, C M; Lovegrove, J A; Minihane, A M

    2017-03-09

    At a population level APOE4 carriers (~25% Caucasians) are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. The penetrance of genotype is however variable and influenced by dietary fat composition, with the APOE4 allele associated with greater LDL-cholesterol elevation in response to saturated fatty acids (SFA). The etiology of this greater responsiveness is unknown. Here a novel surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR) is developed and used, along with hepatocyte (with the liver being the main organ modulating lipoprotein metabolism and plasma lipid levels) uptake studies to establish the impact of dietary fatty acid composition on, lipoprotein-LDL receptor (LDLR) binding, and hepatocyte uptake, according to APOE genotype status. In men prospectively recruited according to APOE genotype (APOE3/3 common genotype, or APOE3/E4), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) were isolated at fasting and 4-6 h following test meals rich in SFA, unsaturated fat and SFA with fish oil. In APOE4s a greater LDLR binding affinity of postprandial TRL after SFA, and lower LDL binding and hepatocyte internalization, provide mechanisms for the greater LDL-cholesterol raising effect. The SPR technique developed may be used for the future study of the impact of genotype, and physiological and behavioral variables on lipoprotein metabolism. Trial registration number NCT01522482.

  16. A randomized trial and novel SPR technique identifies altered lipoprotein-LDL receptor binding as a mechanism underlying elevated LDL-cholesterol in APOE4s

    PubMed Central

    Calabuig-Navarro, M. V.; Jackson, K. G.; Kemp, C. F.; Leake, D. S.; Walden, C. M.; Lovegrove, J. A.; Minihane, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    At a population level APOE4 carriers (~25% Caucasians) are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. The penetrance of genotype is however variable and influenced by dietary fat composition, with the APOE4 allele associated with greater LDL-cholesterol elevation in response to saturated fatty acids (SFA). The etiology of this greater responsiveness is unknown. Here a novel surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR) is developed and used, along with hepatocyte (with the liver being the main organ modulating lipoprotein metabolism and plasma lipid levels) uptake studies to establish the impact of dietary fatty acid composition on, lipoprotein-LDL receptor (LDLR) binding, and hepatocyte uptake, according to APOE genotype status. In men prospectively recruited according to APOE genotype (APOE3/3 common genotype, or APOE3/E4), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) were isolated at fasting and 4–6 h following test meals rich in SFA, unsaturated fat and SFA with fish oil. In APOE4s a greater LDLR binding affinity of postprandial TRL after SFA, and lower LDL binding and hepatocyte internalization, provide mechanisms for the greater LDL-cholesterol raising effect. The SPR technique developed may be used for the future study of the impact of genotype, and physiological and behavioral variables on lipoprotein metabolism. Trial registration number NCT01522482. PMID:28276521

  17. Lipoprotein lipase, LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins in human fetal membranes at term.

    PubMed

    Huter, O; Wolf, H J; Schnetzer, A; Pfaller, K

    1997-11-01

    Ultrastructurally, all cells of human fetal membranes strongly exhibit a large amount of lipid deposits throughout pregnancy. Their origin and function is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of key components of lipid metabolism in this tissue. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the distribution of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL receptors), and apo-lipoprotein B and E was investigated in 20 human fetal membranes at term. In addition, electron microscopy was used to study the intracellular localization of lipoprotein-sized particles. Amnionic epithelium and trophoblast cells reacted strongly for LPL. LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins were present in amnionic epithelium and fibroblasts of the amnion. In none of the investigated cells were lipoprotein-sized particles identified. Similar results were obtained in all 20 cases. The findings indicate that lipoprotein from the amniotic fluid or from the maternal circulation may serve as substrate for lipids in human fetal membranes.

  18. ApoE deficiency promotes colon inflammation and enhances the inflammatory potential of oxidized-LDL and TNF-α in primary colon epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Bahrawy, Ali H.; Tarhuni, Abdelmetalab; Kim, Hogyoung; Subramaniam, Venkat; Benslimane, Ilyes; Elmajeed, Zakaria Y. Abd; Okpechi, Samuel C.; Ghonim, Mohamed A.; Hemeida, Ramadan A.M.; Abo-yousef, Amira M.; El-Sherbiny, Gamal A.; Abdel-Raheem, Ihab T.; Kim, Jong; Naura, Amarjit S.; Boulares, A. Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Although deficiency in Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is linked to many diseases, its effect on colon homoeostasis remains unknown. ApoE appears to control inflammation by regulating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The present study was designed to examine whether ApoE deficiency affects factors of colon integrity in vivo and given the likelihood that ApoE deficiency increases oxidized lipids and TNF-α, the present study also examined whether such deficiency enhances the inflammatory potential of oxidized-LDL (oxLDL) and TNF-α in colon epithelial cells (CECs), in vitro. Here we show that ApoE deficiency is associated with chronic inflammation systemically and in colonic tissues as assessed by TNF-α levels. Increased colon TNF-α mRNA coincided with a substantial increase in cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. ApoE deficiency enhanced the potential of oxLDL and TNF-α to induce COX-2 expression as well as several other inflammatory factors in primary CECs. Interestingly, oxLDL enhanced TGF-β expression only in ApoE−/−, but not in wild-type, epithelial cells. ApoE deficiency appears to promote COX-2 expression enhancement through a mechanism that involves persistent NF-κB nuclear localization and PI3 and p38 MAP kinases but independently of Src. In mice, ApoE deficiency promoted a moderate increase in crypt length, which was associated with opposing effects of an increase in cell proliferation and apoptosis at the bottom and top of the crypt respectively. Our results support the notion that ApoE plays a central role in colon homoeostasis and that ApoE deficiency may constitute a risk factor for colon pathologies. PMID:27538678

  19. Coincubation of PON1, APO A1, and LCAT increases the time HDL is able to prevent LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hine, David; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Mike

    2012-02-01

    The inhibition of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a major antiatherogenic property of this lipoprotein. This activity is due, in part, to HDL associated proteins. However, whether these proteins interact in the antioxidant activity of HDL is unknown. LDL was incubated with apolipoprotein A1 (apo A1), lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) alone or in combination, in the presence or absence of HDL under oxidizing conditions. LDL lipid peroxide concentrations were determined. Apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 all inhibit LDL oxidation in the absence of HDL and enhance the ability of HDL to inhibit LDL oxidation. Their effect was additive rather than synergistic; the combination of these proteins significantly enhanced the length of time LDL was protected from oxidation. This seemed to be due to the ability of PON1 to prevent the oxidative inactivation of LCAT. Apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 can all contribute to the antioxidant activity of HDL in vitro. The combination of apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 prolongs the time that HDL can prevent LDL oxidation, due, at least in part, to the prevention LCAT inactivation.

  20. LDL receptor/lipoprotein recognition: endosomal weakening of ApoB and ApoE binding to the convex face of the LR5 repeat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrián; Millet, Oscar; Sancho, Javier

    2014-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of lipoprotein binding by the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) is poorly understood, one reason being that structures of lipoprotein-receptor complexes are not available. LDLR uses calcium-binding repeats (LRs) to interact with apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein E (ApoB and ApoE). We have used NMR and SPR to characterize the complexes formed by LR5 and three peptides encompassing the putative binding regions of ApoB (site A and site B) and ApoE. The three peptides bind at the hydrophilic convex face of LR5, forming complexes that are weakened at low [Ca(2+) ] and low pH. Thus, endosomal conditions favour dissociation of LDLR/lipoprotein complexes regardless of whether active displacement of bound lipoproteins by the β-propeller in LDLR takes place. The multiple ApoE copies in β very low density lipoproteins (β-VLDLs), and the presence of two competent binding sites (A and B) in LDLs, suggest that LDLR chelates lipoproteins and enhances complex affinity by using more than one LR.

  1. SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2) regulates de-novo lipogenesis and secretion of apoB100 containing lipoproteins in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Gorgani-Firuzjaee, Sattar; Khatami, Shohreh; Adeli, Khosrow; Meshkani, Reza

    2015-09-04

    Hepatic de-novo lipogenesis and production of triglyceride rich VLDL are regulated via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase cascade, however, the role of a negative regulator of this pathway, the SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2) in this process, remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the molecular link between SHIP2 expression and metabolic dyslipidemia using overexpression or suppression of SHIP2 gene in HepG2 cells. The results showed that overexpression of the wild type SHIP2 gene (SHIP2-WT) led to a higher total lipid content (28%) compared to control, whereas overexpression of the dominant negative SHIP2 gene (SHIP2-DN) reduced total lipid content in oleate treated cells by 40%. Overexpression of SHIP2-WT also led to a significant increase in both secretion of apoB100 containing lipoproteins and de-novo lipogenesis, as demonstrated by an enhancement in secreted apoB100 and MTP expression, increased intra and extracellular triglyceride levels and enhanced expression of lipogenic genes such as SREBP1c, FAS and ACC. On the other hand, overexpression of the SHIP2-DN gene prevented oleate-induced de-novo lipogenesis and secretion of apoB100 containing lipoproteins in HepG2 cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that SHIP2 expression level is a key determinant of hepatic lipogenesis and lipoprotein secretion, and its inhibition could be considered as a potential target for treatment of dyslipidemia.

  2. Inducible Apoe Gene Repair in Hypomorphic ApoE Mice Deficient in the LDL Receptor Promotes Atheroma Stabilization with a Human-like Lipoprotein Profile

    PubMed Central

    Eberlé, Delphine; Luk, Fu Sang; Kim, Roy Y.; Olivas, Victor R.; Kumar, Nikit; Posada, Jessica M.; Li, Kang; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Rapp, Joseph H.; Raffai, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study atherosclerosis regression in mice following plasma lipid reduction to moderately elevated apolipoprotein B (apoB)-lipoprotein levels. Approach and Results Chow-fed hypomorphic Apoe mice deficient in LDL receptor expression (Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice) develop hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. These mice were studied before and after inducible cre-mediated Apoe gene repair. By 1 week, induced mice displayed a 2-fold reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels and a decrease in the non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol ratio from 87%:13% to 60%:40%. This halted atherosclerotic lesion growth and promoted macrophage loss and accumulation of thick collagen fibers for up to 8 weeks. Concomitantly, blood Ly-6Chi monocytes were decreased by 2-fold but lesional macrophage apoptosis was unchanged. The expression of several genes involved in extra-cellular matrix remodeling and cell migration were changed in lesional macrophages 1 week after Apoe gene repair. However, mRNA levels of numerous genes involved in cholesterol efflux and inflammation were not significantly changed at this time point. Conclusions Restoring apoE expression in Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice resulted in lesion stabilization in the context of a human-like ratio of non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol. Our data suggest that macrophage loss derived in part from reduced blood Ly-6Chi monocytes levels and genetic reprogramming of lesional macrophages. PMID:23788760

  3. Inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis improves dyslipidemia in the diet-induced hamster model of insulin resistance: evidence for the role of sphingosine and sphinganine in hepatic VLDL-apoB100 overproduction.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Mark J; Baker, Chris; Naples, Mark; Samsoondar, Josh; Zhang, Rianna; Qiu, Wei; Sacco, Jennifer; Adeli, Khosrow

    2013-05-01

    Sphingolipids have emerged as important bioactive lipid species involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, little is known of the regulatory role of sphingolipids in dyslipidemia of insulin-resistant states. We employed hamster models of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance to investigate the role of sphingolipids in hepatic VLDL overproduction, induction of insulin resistance, and inflammation. Hamsters were fed either a control chow diet, a high fructose diet, or a diet high in fat, fructose and cholesterol (FFC diet). They were then treated for 2 weeks with vehicle or 0.3 mg/kg myriocin, a potent inhibitor of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Both fructose and FFC feeding induced significant increases in hepatic sphinganine, which was normalized to chow-fed levels with myriocin (P < 0.05); myriocin also lowered hepatic ceramide content (P < 0.05). Plasma TG and cholesterol as well as VLDL-TG and -apoB100 were similarly reduced with myriocin treatment in all hamsters, regardless of diet. Myriocin treatment also led to improved insulin sensitivity and reduced hepatic SREBP-1c mRNA, though it did not appear to ameliorate the activation of hepatic inflammatory pathways. Importantly, direct treatment of primary hamster hepatocytes ex vivo with C2 ceramide or sphingosine led to an increased secretion of newly synthesized apoB100. Taken together, these data suggest that a) hepatic VLDL-apoB100 overproduction may be stimulated by ceramides and sphingosine and b) inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis can reduce circulating VLDL in hamsters and improve circulating lipids--an effect that is possibly due to improved insulin signaling and reduced lipogenesis but is independent of changes in inflammation.

  4. Estradiol protective role in atherogenesis through LDL structure modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Brunelli, Roberto; Ciasca, Gabriele; Maiorana, Alessandro; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Valentina; Parasassi, Tiziana; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Relevant physiological functions are exerted by circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as eventual pathological processes triggering atherogenesis. Modulation of these functions can well be founded on modifications of LDL structure. Given its large dimension, multicomponent organization and strong interactions between the protein apoB-100 and lipids, determining LDL 3D structure remains a challenge. We propose a novel quantitative physical approach to this complex biological problem. We introduce a three-component model, fitted to small angle x-ray scattering data on LDL maintained in physiological conditions, able to achieve a consistent 3D structure. Unexpected features include three distinct protein domains protruding out of a sphere, quite rough in its surface, where several core lipid areas are exposed. All LDL components are affected by 17-β-estradiol (E2) binding to apoB-100. Mostly one of the three protruding protein domains, dramatically reducing its presence on the surface and with a consequent increase of core lipids’ exposure. This result suggests a structural basis for some E2 protecting roles and LDL physiological modifications.

  5. ApoC-III inhibits clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins through LDL family receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gordts, Philip L.S.M.; Son, Ni-Huiping; Ramms, Bastian; Lew, Irene; Gonzales, Jon C.; Thacker, Bryan E.; Basu, Debapriya; Lee, Richard G.; Mullick, Adam E.; Graham, Mark J.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Witztum, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and plasma triglycerides (TGs) correlate strongly with plasma apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) for ApoC-III reduce plasma TGs in primates and mice, but the underlying mechanism of action remains controversial. We determined that a murine-specific ApoC-III–targeting ASO reduces fasting TG levels through a mechanism that is dependent on low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) and LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1). ApoC-III ASO treatment lowered plasma TGs in mice lacking lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hepatic heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptors, LDLR, or LRP1 and in animals with combined deletion of the genes encoding HSPG receptors and LDLRs or LRP1. However, the ApoC-III ASO did not lower TG levels in mice lacking both LDLR and LRP1. LDLR and LRP1 were also required for ApoC-III ASO–induced reduction of plasma TGs in mice fed a high-fat diet, in postprandial clearance studies, and when ApoC-III–rich or ApoC-III–depleted lipoproteins were injected into mice. ASO reduction of ApoC-III had no effect on VLDL secretion, heparin-induced TG reduction, or uptake of lipids into heart and skeletal muscle. Our data indicate that ApoC-III inhibits turnover of TG-rich lipoproteins primarily through a hepatic clearance mechanism mediated by the LDLR/LRP1 axis. PMID:27400128

  6. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  7. Immunization with cationized BSA inhibits progression of disease in ApoBec-1/LDL receptor deficient mice with manifest atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kolbus, Daniel; Wigren, Maria; Ljungcrantz, Irena; Söderberg, Ingrid; Alm, Ragnar; Björkbacka, Harry; Nilsson, Jan; Fredrikson, Gunilla N

    2011-06-01

    Immune responses against modified self-antigens generated by hypercholesterolemia play an important role in atherosclerosis identifying the immune system as a possible novel target for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. It has recently been shown that these immune responses can be modulated by subcutaneous injection of adjuvant. In the present study we immunized 25-week old ApoBec-1/LDL receptor deficient mice with manifest atherosclerosis with adjuvant and two different concentrations of the carrier molecule cationized BSA (cBSA). Plasma levels of Th2-induced apolipoprotein B (apoB)/IgG1 immune complexes were increased in the cBSA immunized groups verifying induction of immunity against a self-antigen. Mice were sacrificed at 36 weeks of age and atherosclerosis was monitored by en face Oil red O staining of the aorta. Immunization with 100 μg cBSA inhibited plaque progression, whereas the lower dose (50 μg) did not. In addition, the higher dose induced a more stable plaque phenotype, indicated by a higher content of collagen and less macrophages and T cells in the plaques. Moreover, there was an increased ratio of Foxp3+/Foxp3⁻ T cells in the circulation suggesting activation of a regulatory T cell response. In conclusion, we show that immunization with cBSA induces an immune response against apoB as well as an activation of Treg cells. This was associated with development of a more stable plaque phenotype and reduced atherosclerosis progression.

  8. Olive Oil Polyphenols Decrease LDL Concentrations and LDL Atherogenicity in Men in a Randomized Controlled Trial123

    PubMed Central

    Hernáez, Álvaro; Remaley, Alan T; Farràs, Marta; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Subirana, Isaac; Schröder, Helmut; Fernández-Mampel, Mireia; Muñoz-Aguayo, Daniel; Sampson, Maureen; Solà, Rosa; Farré, Magí; de la Torre, Rafael; López-Sabater, María-Carmen; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Zunft, Hans-Joachim F; Covas, María-Isabel; Fitó, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Olive oil polyphenols have shown protective effects on cardiovascular risk factors. Their consumption decreased oxidative stress biomarkers and improved some features of the lipid profile. However, their effects on LDL concentrations in plasma and LDL atherogenicity have not yet been elucidated. Objective: Our objective was to assess whether the consumption of olive oil polyphenols could decrease LDL concentrations [measured as apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B-100) concentrations and the total number of LDL particles] and atherogenicity (the number of small LDL particles and LDL oxidizability) in humans. Methods: The study was a randomized, cross-over controlled trial in 25 healthy European men, aged 20–59 y, in the context of the EUROLIVE (Effect of Olive Oil Consumption on Oxidative Damage in European Populations) study. Volunteers ingested 25 mL/d raw low-polyphenol-content olive oil (LPCOO; 366 mg/kg) or high-polyphenol-content olive oil (HPCOO; 2.7 mg/kg) for 3 wk. Interventions were preceded by 2-wk washout periods. Effects of olive oil polyphenols on plasma LDL concentrations and atherogenicity were determined in the sample of 25 men. Effects on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene expression were assessed in another sample of 18 men from the EUROLIVE study. Results: Plasma apo B-100 concentrations and the number of total and small LDL particles decreased (mean ± SD: by 5.94% ± 16.6%, 11.9% ± 12.0%, and 15.3% ± 35.1%, respectively) from baseline after the HPCOO intervention. These changes differed significantly from those after the LPCOO intervention, which resulted in significant increases of 6.39% ± 16.6%, 4.73% ± 22.0%, and 13.6% ± 36.4% from baseline (P < 0.03). LDL oxidation lag time increased by 5.0% ± 10.3% from baseline after the HPCOO intervention, which was significantly different only relative to preintervention values (P = 0.038). LPL gene expression tended to increase by 26% from baseline after the HPCOO intervention (P = 0.08) and did

  9. LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate increases proteoglycan binding and promotes atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, John T.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in humans and animals suggest that LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate (CO) is associated with increased atherosclerosis. Diet enrichment with MUFAs enhances LDL CO content. Steroyl O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) is the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of much of the CO found in LDL, and gene deletion of SOAT2 minimizes CO in LDL and protects against atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the increased atherosclerosis associated with LDL core enrichment in CO results from an increased affinity of the LDL particle for arterial proteoglycans. ApoB-100-only Ldlr−/− mice with and without Soat2 gene deletions were fed diets enriched in either cis-MUFA or n-3 PUFA, and LDL particles were isolated. LDL:proteogylcan binding was measured using surface plasmon resonance. Particles with higher CO content consistently bound with higher affinity to human biglycan and the amount of binding was shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerosis of the LDL donor mice. The data strongly support the thesis that atherosclerosis was induced through enhanced proteoglycan binding of LDL resulting from LDL core CO enrichment. PMID:23804810

  10. Evaluation of apolipoprotein B-100 fragmentation and cross-linkage in serum as an index of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryoko; Matsukawa, Nao; Nariyama, Yoko; Ogiri, Yukako; Hamagawa, Eri; Tanaka, Kyoko; Usui, Yasue; Nakano, Satomi; Maruyama, Taro; Kyotani, Singo; Tsushima, Motoo; Kojo, Shosuke

    2002-10-10

    It is well established that radical reaction of low density lipoprotein (LDL) causes fragmentation and cross-linkage of apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Our previous studies demonstrated that fragmented and cross-linked apoB proteins are present in normal human serum and tended to increase with age based on immunoblot analysis. These observations suggest that the fragmentation and cross-linkage pattern of apoB reflects the oxidative stress in an individual and that this pattern is a good atherosclerotic index. In this study, a method was developed to evaluate the fragmentation and conjugation pattern of apoB. A parameter named B-ox was introduced for each serum sample to quantitate the staining bands of the immunoblotting analysis. B-ox represents the relative abundance of radical reaction products (a sum of fragmented and conjugated apoB proteins) based on one control subject. If this value increases, it indicates that radical reaction products have increased, i.e., the oxidative stress has increased in the subject. Based on measurements of subjects in a rural area of Japan, B-ox showed significant positive correlation with intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery, LDL cholesterol, and age, while it showed significant negative correlation with high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and vitamin C. These results suggest that B-ox is a reliable indicator of atherosclerosis.

  11. Quantitative X-Ray Imaging of Intraplaque Hemorrhage in Aortas of ApoE-/-/LDL-/- Double Knockout Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Langheinrich,A.; Michniewicz, A.; Sedding, D.; Lai, B.; Jorgensen, S.; Bohle, R.; Ritman, E.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if hemorrhage into an arterial wall can be detected in CT images by virtue of the iron content. Materials and Methods: Aortas from male apoE-/-/LDL-/- mice (n = 31) were infused in situ with contrast agent, for micro-CT scanning and histology. Roentgen-opacities within the aortic walls were identified by histology and micro-x-ray fluorescence to be iron or calcium. Dual-energy scanning was performed at 2 energy levels using synchrotron-based micro-CT [(2 {mu}m)3 voxels, 16 and 20 keV] and 64-slice CT (0.4 x 0.4 x 0.6 mm voxels, 80 and 120 kVp). Results: Opacities were identified as hemorrhage-related clusters of multiple punctate deposits, containing both Fe (0.48 x 10-12 g/voxel) and Ca (3.18 x 10-2 g/voxel), or as isolated confluent accumulations of exclusively calcium. Subtraction of the dual-energy CT scans discriminated iron from calcium deposits. Conclusion: Detection and quantification of iron deposits in hemorrhaged atherosclerotic lesions is feasible by dual-energy CT imaging.

  12. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-antioxidant lignans from Myristica fragrans seeds.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun Sook; Kim, Min-Jung; Jeong, Hyung Jae; Yang, Min Suk; Park, Ki Hun; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Lee, Woo Song

    2008-01-01

    Six diarylbutane lignans 1-5 and one aryltetralin lignan 6 were isolated from the methanol (95%) extracts of Myristica fragrans seeds and then 7-methyl ether diarylbutane lignan 4 has proven to be new a compound. Their compounds 1-7 were evaluated for LDL-antioxidant activity to identify the most potent LDL-antioxidant 3 with an IC50 value of 2.6 microM in TBARS assay. Due to its potency, compound 3 was tested for complementary in vitro investigations, such as lag time (140 min at 1.0 microM), relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of ox-LDL (inhibition of 80% at 20 microM and 72% at 10 microM), and fragmentation of apoB-100 (inhibition of 93% at 20 microM) on copper-mediated LDL oxidation. In macrophage-mediated LDL oxidation, the TBARS formation was also inhibited by compound 3.

  13. Goal attainments and their discrepancies for low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (apo B) in over 2,000 Chinese patients with known coronary artery disease or type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang-Jun; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is primary treatment target for patients with dislipidemia. The apolipoprotein B (apo B), an emerging biomarker for cardiovascular risk prediction, appears to be superior to the LDL-C. However, little is known about goal attainments and their discrepancies for LDL-C and apo B in Chinese patients with known CAD or DM. Methods A total of 2,172 hospitalized patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) or DM, aged >27 years of old, were enrolled. The success rates for apo B and LDL-C goal attainments were evaluated and compared by categorization and by sex. Results When the success rates for apo B were compared with the ones for LDL-C, the former was higher than the latter across all categorizations, with the statistically significant differences seen in all patients, CAD alone and DM alone (P<0.0001), but not in coexistence of CAD and DM (P=0.190). The trend toward to higher success rates for LDL-C and apo B goal attainments in men than in women were noteworthy across all categorizations although only in all patients and in DM alone patients were the statistically significant differences found (P<0.01). Conclusions The LDL-C lags behind the apo B in goal attainments in Chinese patients. Whether these discrepancies are associated with the occurrence differences for CAD and for stroke between the East Asia and the Western countries warrants further study. PMID:25984449

  14. 14 CFR 1203b.100 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 1203b.100 Section 1203b.100 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.100 Purpose. This regulation implements...

  15. Construction of a biotinylated cameloid-like antibody for lable-free detection of apolipoprotein B-100.

    PubMed

    Li, Henan; Yan, Junrong; Ou, Weijun; Liu, Hong; Liu, Songqin; Wan, Yakun

    2015-02-15

    Nanobodies (Nbs), also known as the variable domain of the heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH), are single-domain antigen-binding fragments derived from heavy-chain antibodies that occur naturally in sera of camelids. Due to their unique properties of small size (15 kD), intrinsic stability, high affinity and specificity, Nbs are suitable for detecting clinical relevant antigens. Apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB-100) is a highly predictive marker for coronary artery disease (CAD), which is frequently detected in clinical diagnosis. Herein, we successfully obtained anti-ApoB-100 Nbs for the first time and further fabricated a label-free and sensitive immunosensor for ApoB-100 based on isolated anti-ApoB-100 nanobody (Nb) using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. We have generated an immunized phage display library against ApoB-100 and isolated four anti-ApoB-100 Nbs with high affinity and stability. The Nb with the highest affinity was biotinylated based on in vivo BirA system. Further, we developed a label-free electrochemical impedance immunosensor for ApoB-100 using this anti-ApoB-100 Nb. The attachment of ApoB-100 onto the anti-ApoB-100 Nb-immobilized sensing layer led to the increased electron-transfer resistance, which was proportional to ApoB-100 concentration in the range from 0.05 to 5 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.03 ng mL(-1). This proposed immunosensor revealed high specificity to detect ApoB-100, acceptable intra-assay precision and good stability, functioning as a feasible technique for CAD diagnosis.

  16. Familial ligand-defective apolipoprotein B. Identification of a new mutation that decreases LDL receptor binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Pullinger, C R; Hennessy, L K; Chatterton, J E; Liu, W; Love, J A; Mendel, C M; Frost, P H; Malloy, M J; Schumaker, V N; Kane, J P

    1995-01-01

    Detection of new ligand-defective mutations of apolipoprotein B (apoB) will enable identification of sequences involved in binding to the LDL receptor. Genomic DNA from patients attending a lipid clinic was screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for novel mutations in the putative LDL receptor-binding domain of apoB-100. A 46-yr-old woman of Celtic and Native American ancestry with primary hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol [TC] 343 mg/dl; LDL cholesterol [LDL-C] 241 mg/dl) and pronounced peripheral vascular disease was found to be heterozygous for a novel Arg3531-->Cys mutation, caused by a C-->T transition at nucleotide 10800. One unrelated 59-yr-old man of Italian ancestry was found with the same mutation after screening 1,560 individuals. He had coronary heart disease, a TC of 310 mg/dl, and an LDL-C of 212 mg/dl. A total of eight individuals were found with the defect in the families of the two patients. They had an age- and sex-adjusted TC of 240 +/- 14 mg/dl and LDL-C of 169 +/- 10 mg/dl. This compares with eight unaffected family members with age- and sex-adjusted TC of 185 +/- 12 mg/dl and LDL-C of 124 +/- 12 mg/dl. In a dual-label fibroblast binding assay, LDL from the eight subjects with the mutation had an affinity for the LDL receptor that was 63% that of control LDL. LDL from eight unaffected family members had an affinity of 91%. By way of comparison, LDL from six patients heterozygous for the Arg3500-->Gln mutation had an affinity of 36%. The percentage mass ratio of the defective Cys3531 LDL to normal LDL was 59:41, as determined using the mAb MB19 and dynamic laser light scattering. Thus, the defective LDL had accumulated in the plasma of these patients. Using this mass ratio, it was calculated that the defective Cys3531 LDL particles bound with 27% of normal affinity. Deduced haplotypes using 10 apoB gene markers showed the Arg3531-->Cys alleles to be different in the two kindreds and indicates that the mutations arose

  17. Complex effects of inhibiting hepatic apolipoprotein B100 synthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Soffer, Gissette; Moon, Byoung; Hernandez-Ono, Antonio; Dionizovik-Dimanovski, Marija; Jimenez, Jhonsua; Obunike, Joseph; Thomas, Tiffany; Ngai, Colleen; Fontanez, Nelson; Donovan, Daniel S.; Karmally, Wahida; Holleran, Stephen; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Mittleman, Robert S.; Ginsberg, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    Mipomersen is a 20mer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that inhibits apolipoprotein B (apoB) synthesis; its low-density lipoprotein (LDL)–lowering effects should therefore result from reduced secretion of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). We enrolled 17 healthy volunteers who received placebo injections weekly for 3 weeks followed by mipomersen weekly for 7 to 9 weeks. Stable isotopes were used after each treatment to determine fractional catabolic rates and production rates of apoB in VLDL, IDL (intermediate-density lipoprotein), and LDL, and of triglycerides in VLDL. Mipomersen significantly reduced apoB in VLDL, IDL, and LDL, which was associated with increases in fractional catabolic rates of VLDL and LDL apoB and reductions in production rates of IDL and LDL apoB. Unexpectedly, the production rates of VLDL apoB and VLDL triglycerides were unaffected. Small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of apoB expression in human liver cells demonstrated preservation of apoB secretion across a range of apoB synthesis. Titrated ASO knockdown of apoB mRNA in chow-fed mice preserved both apoB and triglyceride secretion. In contrast, titrated ASO knockdown of apoB mRNA in high-fat–fed mice resulted in stepwise reductions in both apoB and triglyceride secretion. Mipomersen lowered all apoB lipoproteins without reducing the production rate of either VLDL apoB or triglyceride. Our human data are consistent with longstanding models of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation of apoB secretion and are supported by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Targeting apoB synthesis may lower levels of apoB lipoproteins without necessarily reducing VLDL secretion, thereby lowering the risk of steatosis associated with this therapeutic strategy. PMID:26819195

  18. Naphthalocyanine-reconstituted LDL nanoparticles for in vivo cancer imaging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liping; Li, Hui; Sunar, Ulas; Chen, Juan; Corbin, Ian; Yodh, Arjun G; Zheng, Gang

    2007-01-01

    Low density lipoproteins (LDLs) are naturally occurring nanoparticles that are biocompatible, biodegradable and non-immunogenic. Moreover, the size of LDL particle is precisely controlled (~22 nm) by its apoB-100 component, setting them apart from liposomes and lipid micelles. LDL particles have long been proposed as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery of diagnostics and therapeutics to LDL receptor (LDLR)-positive cancers. Here, we report the design and synthesis of a novel naphthalocyanine (Nc)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent, SiNcBOA, and describe its efficient reconstitution into LDL core (100:1 payload). Possessing a near-infrared (NIR) absorption wavelength (>800 nm) and extremely high extinction coefficient (>105 M–1cm–1), SiNcBOA holds the promise of treating deeply seated tumors. Reconstituted LDL particles (r-Nc-LDL) maintain the size and shape of native LDL as determined by transmission electron microscopy, and also retain their LDLR-mediated uptake by cancer cells as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Its preferential uptake by tumor vs normal tissue was confirmed in vivo by noninvasive optical imaging technique, demonstrating the feasibility of using this nanoparticle for NIR imaging-guided PDT of cancer. PMID:18203443

  19. The effect of oat β-glucan on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB for CVD risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hoang V T; Sievenpiper, John L; Zurbau, Andreea; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Jovanovski, Elena; Au-Yeung, Fei; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Oats are a rich source of β-glucan, a viscous, soluble fibre recognised for its cholesterol-lowering properties, and are associated with reduced risk of CVD. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials (RCT) investigating the cholesterol-lowering potential of oat β-glucan on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB for the risk reduction of CVD. MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched. We included RCT of ≥3 weeks of follow-up, assessing the effect of diets enriched with oat β-glucan compared with controlled diets on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol or apoB. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled using the generic inverse-variance method with random effects models and expressed as mean differences with 95 % CI. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran's Q statistic and quantified by the I 2-statistic. In total, fifty-eight trials (n 3974) were included. A median dose of 3·5 g/d of oat β-glucan significantly lowered LDL-cholesterol (-0·19; 95 % CI -0·23, -0·14 mmol/l, P<0·00001), non-HDL-cholesterol (-0·20; 95 % CI -0·26, -0·15 mmol/l, P<0·00001) and apoB (-0·03; 95 % CI -0·05, -0·02 g/l, P<0·0001) compared with control interventions. There was evidence for considerable unexplained heterogeneity in the analysis of LDL-cholesterol (I 2=79 %) and non-HDL-cholesterol (I 2=99 %). Pooled analyses showed that oat β-glucan has a lowering effect on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB. Inclusion of oat-containing foods may be a strategy for achieving targets in CVD reduction.

  20. Nutritional repletion of children with severe acute malnutrition does not affect VLDL apolipoprotein B-100 synthesis rate.

    PubMed

    Badaloo, Asha V; Forrester, Terrence; Reid, Marvin; Jahoor, Farook

    2012-05-01

    VLDL apo B-100 is essential for the secretion of liver fat. It is thought that synthesis of this lipoprotein is impaired in childhood severe acute malnutrition (SAM), especially in the edematous syndromes, and that this contributes to the common occurrence of hepatic steatosis in this condition. However, to our knowledge, it has not been confirmed that VLDL apo B-100 synthesis is slower in edematous compared with nonedematous SAM and that it is impaired in the malnourished compared with the well-nourished state. Therefore, VLDL apo B-100 kinetics were measured in 2 groups of children with SAM (15 edematous and 7 nonedematous), aged 4-20 mo, at 3 stages during treatment. Measurements were done at 4 ± 1 d postadmission, mid- catch-up growth in weight, and at recovery (normal weight-for-length). VLDL apo B-100 synthesis was determined using stable isotope methodology to measure the rate of incorporation of (2)H(3)-leucine into its apoprotein moiety. The fractional and absolute synthesis of VLDL apo B-100 did not differ between the groups or from the initial malnourished stage to the recovery stage. Concentrations of VLDL apo B-100 were greater in the edematous than in the nonedematous group (P < 0.04) and did not differ from the initial stage to recovery. The data indicate that VLDL apo B-100 synthesis is not reduced when children develop either edematous or nonedematous SAM.

  1. Dihydrotanshinone I Attenuates Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice: Role of NOX4/NF-κB Mediated Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 (LOX-1) of the Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenwen; Li, Chunxia; Gao, Hongwei; Wu, Qin; Shi, Jingshan; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrotanshinone I (DHT) is a natural compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge which has been widely used for treating cardiovascular diseases. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, the effect of DHT on atherosclerosis were investigated using apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and endothelial cells. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DHT (10 nM) decreased lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. Silence NOX4 inhibited LPS-induced LOX-1 expression, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. In ApoE(-/-) mice fed with an atherogenic diet, DHT (10 and 25 mg kg(-1)) significantly attenuated atherosclerotic plaque formation, altered serum lipid profile, decreased oxidative stress and shrunk necrotic core areas. The enhanced expression of LOX-1, NOX4, and NF-κB in aorta was also dramatically inhibited by DHT. In conclusion, these results suggested that DHT showed anti-atherosclerotic activity through inhibition of LOX-1 mediated by NOX4/NF-κB signaling pathways both in vitro and in vivo. This finding suggested that DHT might be used as a potential vascular protective candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  2. Dihydrotanshinone I Attenuates Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice: Role of NOX4/NF-κB Mediated Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 (LOX-1) of the Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenwen; Li, Chunxia; Gao, Hongwei; Wu, Qin; Shi, Jingshan; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrotanshinone I (DHT) is a natural compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge which has been widely used for treating cardiovascular diseases. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, the effect of DHT on atherosclerosis were investigated using apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice and endothelial cells. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DHT (10 nM) decreased lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. Silence NOX4 inhibited LPS-induced LOX-1 expression, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. In ApoE-/- mice fed with an atherogenic diet, DHT (10 and 25 mg kg-1) significantly attenuated atherosclerotic plaque formation, altered serum lipid profile, decreased oxidative stress and shrunk necrotic core areas. The enhanced expression of LOX-1, NOX4, and NF-κB in aorta was also dramatically inhibited by DHT. In conclusion, these results suggested that DHT showed anti-atherosclerotic activity through inhibition of LOX-1 mediated by NOX4/NF-κB signaling pathways both in vitro and in vivo. This finding suggested that DHT might be used as a potential vascular protective candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27891092

  3. Apolipoprotein B100 is required for hepatitis C infectivity and Mipomersen inhibits hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Esperance A K; Meixiong, James; Mark, Christina; Deik, Amy; Motola, Daniel L; Fusco, Dahlene; Yang, Andrew; Brisac, Cynthia; Salloum, Shadi; Lin, Wenyu; Clish, Clary B; Peng, Lee F; Chung, Raymond T

    2016-01-01

    AIM To characterize the role of apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) in hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection. METHODS In this study, we utilize a gene editing tool, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), to generate human hepatoma cells with a stable genetic deletion of APOB to assess of apoB in HCV. Using infectious cell culture-competent HCV, viral pseudoparticles, replicon models, and lipidomic analysis we determined the contribution of apoB to each step of the viral lifecycle. We further studied the effect of mipomersen, an FDA-approved antisense inhibitor of apoB100, on HCV using in vitro cell-culture competent HCV and determined its impact on viral infectivity with the TCID50 method. RESULTS We found that apoB100 is indispensable for HCV infection. Using the JFH-1 fully infectious cell-culture competent virus in Huh 7 hepatoma cells with TALEN-mediated gene deletion of apoB (APOB KO), we found a significant reduction in HCV RNA and protein levels following infection. Pseudoparticle and replicon models demonstrated that apoB did not play a role in HCV entry or replication. However, the virus produced by APOB KO cells had significantly diminished infectivity as measured by the TCID-50 method compared to wild-type virus. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that these virions have a fundamentally altered lipidome, with complete depletion of cholesterol esters. We further demonstrate that inhibition of apoB using mipomersen, an FDA-approved anti-sense oligonucleotide, results in a potent anti-HCV effect and significantly reduces the infectivity of the virus. CONCLUSION ApoB is required for the generation of fully infectious HCV virions, and inhibition of apoB with mipomersen blocks HCV. Targeting lipid metabolic pathways to impair viral infectivity represents a novel host targeted strategy to inhibit HCV. PMID:28018102

  4. Effect of Mediterranean diet with and without weight loss on apolipoprotein B100 metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with and without weight loss (WL) on apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome. The diet of 19 men with metabolic syndrome (age, 24–62 years) was first standardized to a North America...

  5. OxLDL-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo MRI detection of perivascular carotid collar induced atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Song; Liu, Dong-Fang; Liu, Zhen; Harris, Steven; Yao, Yu-Yu; Ding, Qi; Nie, Fang; Lu, Tong; Chen, Hua-Jun; An, Yan-Li; Zang, Feng-Chao; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries, and oxidized LDL (OxLDL) plays a key role in the formation, rupture, and subsequent thrombus formation in atherosclerotic plaques. In the current study, anti-mouse OxLDL polyclonal antibody and nonspecific IgG antibody were conjugated to polyethylene glycol-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles, and a carotid perivascular collar model in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice was imaged at 7.0 Tesla MRI before contrast administration and at 8 h and 24 h after injection of 30 mg Fe/kg. The results showed MRI signal loss in the carotid atherosclerotic lesions after administration of targeted anti-OxLDL-USPIO at 8 h and 24 h, which is consistent with the presence of the nanoparticles in the lesions. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the colocalization of the OxLDL/macrophages and iron oxide nanoparticles. The nonspecific IgG-USPIO, unconjugated USPIO nanoparticles, and competitive inhibition groups had limited signal changes (p < 0.05). This report shows that anti-OxLDL-USPIO nanoparticles can be used to directly detect OxLDL and image atherosclerotic lesions within 24 h of nanoparticle administration and suggests a strategy for the therapeutic evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. PMID:22393161

  6. Genetic and metabolic influences on LDL subclasses

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.; Rotter, J.I.; Lusis, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence LDL particle size and density, and expression of an atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype (ALP) characterized by predominance of small, dense LDL particles. Linkage of ALP the LDL receptor locus has been reported previously. Quantitative sib-pair relative-pair linkage methodologies were used to test for linkage of LDL particle size to candidate loci in 25 large pedigrees with familial coronary artery disease. Linkage to the LDL receptor gene locus was confirmed (p=0.008). Evidence was also obtained for linkage to the genes for apoCIII, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and manganese superoxide dismutase. The results suggest multiple genetic determinants of LDL particle size that may involve different metabolic mechanisms giving rise to small, dense LDL and increased atherosclerosis risk.

  7. The lipid- and lipoprotein- [LDL-Lp(a)] apheresis techniques. Updating.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, C; Morozzi, C; Perrone, G; Di Giacomo, S; Vivenzio, A; D'Alessandri, G

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic plasmapheresis allows the extracorporeal removal of plasmatic lipoproteins (Lipid-apheresis) (LA). It can be non selective (non specific), semi - selective or selective low density lipoprotein-lipoprotein(a) (specific [LDL- Lp(a)] apheresis) (Lipoprotein apheresis, LDLa). The LDL removal rate is a perfect parameter to assess the system efficiency. Plasma-Exchange (PEX) cannot be considered either specific nor, selective. In PEX the whole blood is separated into plasma and its corpuscular components usually through centrifugation or rather filtration. The corpuscular components mixed with albumin solution plus saline (NaCl 0.9%) solution at 20%-25%, are then reinfused to the patient, to substitute the plasma formerly removed. PEX eliminates atherogenic lipoproteins, but also other essential plasma proteins, such as albumin, immunoglobulins, and hemocoagulatory mediators. Cascade filtration (CF) is a method based on plasma separation and removal of plasma proteins through double filtration. During the CF two hollow-fiber filters with pores of different diameter are used to eliminate the plasma components of different weight and molecular diameter. A CF system uses a first polypropylene filter with 0.55 µm diameter pores and a second one of diacetate of cellulose with 0.02 µm pores. The first filter separates the whole blood, and the plasma is then perfused through a second filter which allows the recovery of molecules with a diameter lower than 0.02 µm, and the removal of molecules larger in diameter as apoB100-containing lipoproteins. Since both albumin and immunoglobulins are not removed, or to a negligible extent, plasma-expanders, substitution fluids, and in particular albumin, as occurs in PEX are not needed. CF however, is characterized by lower selectivity since removes also high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles which have an antiatherogenic activity. In the 80's, a variation of Lipid-apheresis has been developed which allows the LDL

  8. LDL Cholesterol Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities LDL Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... LDL; LDL-C Formal name: Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; Lipid Profile ; ...

  9. LDL Particle Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... assessing cardiac risk in people who have a personal or family history of heart disease at a young age, especially if their total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) values are not significantly elevated. LDL subfraction testing is ...

  10. Low density lipoprotein (LDL)-antioxidant flavonoids from roots of Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae-Sook; Ryu, Young Bae; Kim, Hoi Young; Curtis-Long, Marcus John; An, Sojin; An, So Jin; Lee, Jin Hwan; Lee, Woo Song; Park, Ki Hun

    2008-11-01

    Oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is strongly implicated as a key process in the onset of atherosclerosis. In this study, nine alkylated (C10-C5) flavonoids from Sophora flavescens were examined for their inhibitory effects on copper-induced LDL oxidation. Of the flavonoids tested, sophoraflavanone G (1), kurarinone (2), kurarinol (3), norkurarinol (4), and kuraridin (9) inhibited the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) with IC50s of 7.9, 14.5, 22.0, 26.9, and 17.5 microM, respectively. The most potent inhibitor, compound 1, also demonstrated significant activities in complementary in vitro investigations, such as lag time (130 min at 5 microM), relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of ox-LDL (80% inhibition at 20 microM), and fragmentation of apoB-100 (inhibition of 71% at 20 microM). Analysis of the structures of these compounds reveals that a resorcinol moiety in the B-ring is strongly correlated with protection of LDL-oxidation.

  11. Unusually high reactivity of apolipoprotein B-100 among proteins to radical reactions induced in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Narita, S; Yamada, Y; Tanaka, K; Kojo, S

    2000-01-17

    Relative reactivities of proteins to radical reactions caused in human plasma were studied for the first time utilizing an immunoblotting assay. When radical reactions were caused by Cu(2+), apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB) underwent extensive fragmentation concurrently with the decrease in alpha-tocopherol, while human serum albumin (HSA) and transferrin (TF) were not decreased at all. When radical reactions were initiated by Cu(2+) with hydrogen peroxide or 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH), alpha-tocopherol and apoB were also decreased steadily but HSA and TF were not decreased. These observations indicate that apoB is extremely reactive, even comparable to alpha-tocopherol, towards radical reactions. These results also suggest that the radical reaction of apoB is a possible process in vivo and it is involved in atherogenesis along with low density lipoprotein lipid peroxidation, which has been studied extensively.

  12. Metabolism of apolipoproteins B-48 and B-100 of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Stalenhoef, A F; Malloy, M J; Kane, J P; Havel, R J

    1986-01-01

    The metabolism of apolipoproteins B-48 and B-100 (apo B-48 and B-100) in large triglyceride-rich lipoproteins was studied in three adults with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (F. dys.) and compared to that of normolipidemic subjects. One Caucasian F. dys. subject was apparently homozygous for the common form of apo E-2, (Arg158----Cys), whereas the two Black subjects were homozygous for a different apo E-2 mutant (Arg145----Cys), which displays much less defective binding to cells than apo E-2 (Arg158----Cys). The lipoproteins were labeled with 125I and injected intravenously into fasted recipients. The results indicate that the terminal catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins of intestinal and hepatic origin is markedly impaired in apo E2/2 homozygotes with alleles Arg158----Cys and Arg145----Cys; despite long residence times, apo B-48 of chylomicrons and apo B-100 of large very low density lipoproteins are not converted appreciably to intermediate or low density lipoproteins in apo E2/2 homozygotes. Images PMID:3745433

  13. Results of the 2007 B100 Quality Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

    2008-03-01

    In a 2007 analysis of samples from 52% of U.S. biodiesel (B100) producers, 90% met ASTM and other specifications for critical engine performance properties and for elements that harm emission controls.

  14. The LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life.

  15. Nutritional repletion of children with severe acute malnutrition does not affect VLDL apolipoprotein B-100 synthesis rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    VLDL apo B-100 is essential for the secretion of liver fat. It is thought that synthesis of this lipoprotein is impaired in childhood severe acute malnutrition (SAM), especially in the edematous syndromes, and that this contributes to the common occurrence of hepatic steatosis in this condition. How...

  16. 2006 B100 Quality Survey Results: Milestone Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.; Deutch, S.

    2007-05-01

    In 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a nationwide quality survey of pure biodiesel (B100) intended to be used as a blendstock. The study collected random samples throughout the United States and analyzed them for quality against the current and proposed ASTM D6751 fuel quality specifications.

  17. Levels of Apolipoprotein A1, B100 and Lipoprotein (a) in Controlled and Uncontrolled Diabetic Patients and in Non-Diabetic Healthy People

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kinjal Prahaladbhai; Makadia, Mayur Goradhanbhai; Shah, Aashna Darshanbhai; Chaudhari, Kaushik Salubhai; Nilayangode, Haridas Neelakandan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is always a multifactorial metabolic disorder having a wide range of abnormalities in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Dyslipidemia is a natural process of DM causing abnormal variations of different lipoproteins and it is one of the significant risk factors for Cardiovascular Disorder (CVD). There is a need to closely evaluate newer approaches in case of DM because even if dyslipidemia is treated, there is always a risk of CVDs in DM patients because of the hyperglycemia itself. So, lipid abnormalities should be assessed aggressively and treated as part of diabetes care. Apolipoprotein B100 (Apo B100), Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) and Lipoprotein (a) {Lp(a)} are newer markers which are always welcome and necessary as many of the reported cases with normal conventional lipid profile have developed cardiac events. Aim Study the correlation between glycemic control and the levels of Apo A1, Apo B100 and Lp(a). Materials and Methods Total 56 patients of (DM) diagnosed on the basis of American Diabetic Association guidelines were recruited, out of which 28 were identified as uncontrolled-diabetic patients and remaining 28 as controlled-diabetics on the basis of Glycosylated HbA1c (HbA1c). The control group consisted of normal healthy 28 individuals. Apo B100, Apo A1 and Lp(a) along with traditional lipid profile, Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS) and HbA1c were estimated in all the subjects. Results Apo B100/Apo A1 ratio and Lp(a) levels showed highly significant difference (p-value <0.001) between uncontrolled diabetics, controlled diabetics and healthy Controls. Apo B100/Apo A1 ratio and Lp(a) showed significant positive correlations with HbA1c (r= 0.494, p <0.0001) and with each other. Conclusion Apo B100/Apo A1 ratio and Lp(a) show a highly significant positive relationship with glucose tolerance of the patients as reflected in the HbA1c values. If proper glycemic control is maintained, the levels of Apo B100/Apo A1 ratio and Lp

  18. Epitopes of apolipoprotein B-100 and B-48 in both liver and intestine. Expression and evidence for local synthesis in recessive abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Dullaart, R P; Speelberg, B; Schuurman, H J; Milne, R W; Havekes, L M; Marcel, Y L; Geuze, H J; Hulshof, M M; Erkelens, D W

    1986-01-01

    The presence of apolipoprotein (apo) B in liver and intestine from a patient with abetalipoproteinemia was evaluated by immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal and six monoclonal antibodies to different apo B-48 and B-100 epitopes. In normal liver, apo B was present inside and outside hepatocytes. The patients liver exhibited staining in the cytoplasm with the polyclonal and three monoclonal antibodies. By immunoelectron-microscopy, apo B was found to be present in the smooth endoplasmatic reticulum and the Golgi complex. Normal intestinal epithelium was labeled with polyclonal and all monoclonal antibodies, including those specific for apo B-100. The patients epithelium stained with polyclonal and six monoclonals, and apo B was present in the Golgi complex. Thus, normal intestinal mucosa expressed apo B-48 and B-100 epitopes, which indicates apo B-100 synthesis in the gut. The synthesis of the apo B molecule in the patient seems to be retained in both liver and gut, which suggests a posttranslational defect. Images PMID:2429992

  19. Hibiscus anthocyanins-rich extract inhibited LDL oxidation and oxLDL-mediated macrophages apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yun-Ching; Huang, Kai-Xun; Huang, An-Chung; Ho, Yung-Chyuan; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2006-07-01

    The oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Anti-oxidative reagents, which can effectively inhibit LDL oxidation, may prevent atherosclerosis via reducing early atherogenesis, and slowing down the progression to advance stages. As shown in previous studies Hibiscus sabdariffa L. is a natural plant containing a lot of pigments that was found to possess anti-oxidative of activity. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the anti-oxidative activity of Hibiscus anthocyanins (HAs) by measuring their effects on LDL oxidation (in cell-free system) and anti-apoptotic abilities (in RAW264.7 cells). HAs have been tested in vitro examining their relative electrophoretic mobility (REM), Apo B fragmentation, thiobarbituric acid relative substances (TBARS) and radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay. The anti-oxidative activity of HAs was defined by relative electrophoretic mobility of oxLDL (decrease of 50% at 2 mg/ml), fragmentation of Apo B (inhibition of 61% at 1mg/ml), and TBARS assay (IC(50): 0.46 mg/ml) in the Cu(2+)-mediated oxidize LDL. Furthermore, the addition of >0.1 mg/ml of HAs could scavenge over 95% of free DPPH radicals, HAs showed strong potential in inhibiting LDL oxidation induced by copper. In addition, to determine whether oxLDL-induced apoptosis in macrophages is inhibited by HAs, we studied the viability, morphology and caspase-3 expression of RAW 264.7 cells. MTT assay, Leukostate staining analysis and Western blotting reveals that HAs could inhibit oxLDL-induced apoptosis. According to these findings, we suggest that HAs may be used to inhibit LDL oxidation and oxLDL-mediated macrophage apoptosis, serving as a chemopreventive agent. However, further investigations into the specificity and mechanism(s) of HAs are needed.

  20. Reduction in lipoprotein-associated apoC-III levels following volanesorsen therapy: phase 2 randomized trial results.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong; Lee, Sang-Rok; Choi, Yun-Seok; Alexander, Veronica J; Digenio, Andres; Yang, Qingqing; Miller, Yury I; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-04-01

    Elevated apoC-III levels predict increased cardiovascular risk when present on LDL and HDL particles. We developed novel high-throughput chemiluminescent ELISAs that capture apoB, lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], and apoA-I in plasma and then detect apoC-III on these individual lipoproteins as apoCIII-apoB, apoCIII-Lp(a), and apoCIII-apoAI complexes, respectively. We assessed the effects on these complexes of placebo or 100-300 mg volanesorsen, a generation 2.0+ antisense drug that targets apoC3 mRNA in patients with hypertriglyceridemia, including familial chylomicronemia syndrome (n = 3), volanesorsen monotherapy (n = 51), and as add-on to fibrate (n = 26), treated for 85 days and followed for 176 days. Compared with placebo, volanesorsen was associated with an 82.3 ± 11.7%, 81.3 ± 15.7%, and 80.8 ± 13.6% reduction in apoCIII-apoB, apoCIII-Lp(a), and apoCIII-apoA-I, respectively (300 mg dose;P< 0.001 for all), at day 92. Strong correlations in all assay measures were noted with total plasma apoC-III, chylomicron-apoC-III, and VLDL-apoC-III. In conclusion, novel high-throughput ELISAs were developed to detect lipoprotein-associated apoC-III, including for the first time on Lp(a). Volanesorsen uniformly lowers apoC-III on apoB-100, Lp(a), and apoA-I lipoproteins, and may be a potent agent to reduce triglycerides and cardiovascular risk mediated by apoC-III.

  1. oxLDL and eLDL Induced Membrane Microdomains in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stefan; Grandl, Margot; Liebisch, Gerhard; Peer, Markus; Orsó, Evelyn; Sigrüner, Alexander; Sobota, Andrzej; Schmitz, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    ), dodecasaccharide-ceramide (CD65s) and GM1 ganglioside upon oxLDL loading. ApoE in contrast to apoA-I preferentially bound to the ceramide enriched surfaces of oxLDL loaded cells. Confocal microscopy showed a co-localization of acid sphingomyelinase with ceramide rich membrane microdomains. Conclusion eLDL leads to the formation of lipid droplets and preferentially induces cholesterol/sphingomyelin rich membrane microdomains while oxLDL promotes the development of cholesterol/ceramide rich microdomains via activation of the salvage pathway. PMID:27870891

  2. Protective effects of berberine against low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and oxidized LDL-induced cytotoxicity on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Lin, Ta-Wei; Chang, Horng-Rong; Lin, Teseng-His; Chen, Pei-Ni; Chu, Shu-Chen

    2007-12-12

    The oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to have a central role in the pathogenesis of atherogenesis. Berberine, a natural constituent of plants of the genera Coptis and Berberis, has several anti-inflammation and anticancer biological effects. However, its protective effects on LDL oxidation and endothelial injury induced by oxLDL remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the antioxidative activity of berberine and how berberine rescues human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from oxidized LDL (oxLDL)-mediated dysfunction. The antioxidative activity of berberine was defined by the relative electrophoretic mobility of oxLDL, fragmentation of ApoB, and malondialdehyde production via the Cu(2+)-mediated oxidation of LDL. Berberine also inhibited the generation of ROS and the subsequent mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, chromosome condensation, cytochrome C release, and caspase-3 activation induced by oxLDL in HUVECs. Our results suggest that berberine may protect LDL oxidation and prevent oxLDL-induced cellular dysfunction.

  3. Cellular cholesterol efflux and cholesterol loading capacity of serum: effects of LDL-apheresis[S

    PubMed Central

    Adorni, M. P.; Zimetti, F.; Puntoni, M.; Bigazzi, F.; Sbrana, F.; Minichilli, F.; Bernini, F.; Ronda, N.; Favari, E.; Sampietro, T.

    2012-01-01

    High LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) characterizes familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH). LDL-apheresis, used in these patients to reduce LDL-C levels, has been shown to also affect HDL levels and composition. We studied LDL-apheresis effects on six FH and nine FCH subjects’ serum capacity to modulate cellular cholesterol efflux, an index of HDL functionality, and to load macrophages with cholesterol. Serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) and macrophage cholesterol loading capacity (CLC) were measured before, immediately after, and two days after LDL-apheresis. The procedure reduced total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, and apoB plasma levels (−69%, −80% and −74%, respectively), parameters only partially restored two days later. HDL-C and apoA-I plasma levels, reduced after LDL-apheresis (−27% and −16%, respectively), were restored to almost normal levels two days later. LDL-apheresis reduced serum aqueous diffusion (AD) CEC, SR-BI-CEC, and ABCA1-CEC. AD and SR-BI were fully restored whereas ABCA1-CEC remained low two days later. Sera immediately and two days after LDL-apheresis had a lower CLC than pre-LDL-apheresis sera. In conclusion, LDL-apheresis transiently reduces HDL-C levels and serum CEC, but it also reduces also serum capacity to deliver cholesterol to macrophages. Despite a potentially negative effect on HDL levels and composition, LDL-apheresis may counteract foam cells formation. PMID:22414482

  4. [The LDL receptor family].

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Melinda

    2002-12-29

    The members of the LDL receptor family are structurally related endocytic receptors. Our view on these receptors has considerably changed in recent years. Not only have new members of the family been identified, but also several interesting observations have been published concerning the biological function of these molecules. The LDL receptor family members are able to bind and internalize a plethora of ligands; as a consequence, they play important roles in diverse physiological processes. These receptors are key players in the lipoprotein metabolism, vitamin homeostasis, Ca2+ homeostasis, cell migration, and embryonic development. Until recently, LDL receptor family members were thought to be classic endocytic receptors that provide cells with metabolites on one hand, while regulating the concentration of their ligands in the extracellular fluids on the other hand. However, recent findings indicate that in addition to their cargo transport function, LDL receptor family members can act as signal transducers, playing important roles in the development of the central nervous system or the skeleton. Better understanding of physiological and pathophysiological functions of these molecules may open new avenues for the treatment or prevention of many disorders.

  5. Inhibition of radical reaction of apolipoprotein B-100 and alpha-tocopherol in human plasma by green tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Yaita, M; Tanaka, K; Hara, Y; Kojo, S

    2000-12-01

    (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg), (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), and Trolox inhibited the decreases of apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB) and alpha-tocopherol in a radical reaction of human plasma initiated by Cu(2+). The concentrations of EC, EGC, ECg, EGCg, and Trolox for 50% inhibition (IC50) of apoB fragmentation were 39.1, 42.2, 14.6, 21.3, and 36.2 microM, respectively. Similar IC50 values were observed for alpha-tocopherol consumption, indicating the close relationship between apoB fragmentation and alpha-tocopherol consumption. These results demonstrate that tea catechins serve as an effective antioxidant in plasma and that the gallate group has a strong antioxidative activity.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha impairs hepatic insulin signaling and stimulates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms underlying hepatic overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) 100-containing very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in insulin resistance induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a were investigated. In the present study, we examined the potential role of TNF-a in insulin signaling and lipopro...

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha impairs hepatic insulin signaling and stumlates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms underlying hepatic overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) 100-containing very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in insulin resistance induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a were investigated. In the present study, we examined the potential role of TNF-a in insulin signaling and lipopro...

  8. Lysine residues of ABCA1 are required for the interaction with apoA-I.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kohjiro; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2012-03-01

    ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by generating high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), a lipid acceptor for ABCA1, reportedly interacts with ABCA1. However, it has also been proposed that apoA-I interacts with ABCA1-generated special domains on the plasma membrane, but apart from ABCA1, and solubilizes membrane lipids. To determine the importance of the apoA-I-ABCA1 interaction in HDL formation, the electrostatic interaction between apoA-I and ABCA1, which mediates the interaction between apoB100 in low-density lipoprotein particles (LDL) and LDL receptor, was analyzed. The apoA-I binding to ABCA1 and the cross-linking between them were inhibited by the highly charged molecules heparin and poly-L-lysine. Treating cells with membrane impermeable reagents that specifically react with primary amino groups abolished the interaction between apoA-I and ABCA1. However, these reagents did not affect the characteristic tight ATP binding to ABCA1. These results suggest that lysine residues in the extracellular domains of ABCA1 contribute to the interaction with apoA-I. The electrostatic interaction between ABCA1 and apoA-I is predicted to be the first step in HDL formation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in high density lipoprotein formation and metabolism: a tribute to John F. Oram (1945-2010).

  9. No genetic linkage or molecular evidence for involvement of the PCSK9, ARH or CYP7A1 genes in the Familial Hypercholesterolemia phenotype in a sample of Danish families without pathogenic mutations in the LDL receptor and apoB genes.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Dorte; Jensen, Jesper Moeller; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Soerensen, Vibeke Reiche; Jensen, Henrik Kjaerulf; Gregersen, Niels; Jensen, Lillian Gryesten; Faergeman, Ole

    2004-12-01

    A locus on chromosome 1p34.1-p32 has been linked to autosomal dominant Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) and is termed the third FH locus. We tested whether this third FH locus is linked to the FH phenotype in 20 Danish families, with 158 members, without pathogenic mutations in the genes, encoding the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor or apolipoprotein B (apoB). We could exclude the third FH locus as a cause of FH by genetic linkage analysis in the families taken together. Since haplotype analysis of each family nevertheless suggested that the FH phenotype co-segregated in a manner consistent with linkage to the third FH locus in three small pedigrees, we performed sequencing analysis without being able to demonstrate mutations in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene, the main candidate gene in the third FH locus. By the same combination of genetic linkage and molecular analysis we could also exclude mutations in the gene for the LDL receptor adaptor protein and in the gene for cholesterol-7-alpha-hydroxylase as causes of FH in our sample. Although not indicating linkage to any known loci, our data still indicate that another dominant gene may be involved in causing a FH phenotype.

  10. A novel truncated form of apolipoprotein A-I transported by dense LDL is increased in diabetic patients1[S

    PubMed Central

    Cubedo, Judit; Padró, Teresa; García-Arguinzonis, Maisa; Vilahur, Gemma; Miñambres, Inka; Pou, Jose María; Ybarra, Juan; Badimon, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic (DM) patients have exacerbated atherosclerosis and high CVD burden. Changes in lipid metabolism, lipoprotein structure, and dysfunctional HDL are characteristics of diabetes. Our aim was to investigate whether serum ApoA-I, the main protein in HDL, was biochemically modified in DM patients. By using proteomic technologies, we have identified a 26 kDa ApoA-I form in serum. MS analysis revealed this 26 kDa form as a novel truncated variant lacking amino acids 1-38, ApoA-IΔ(1-38). DM patients show a 2-fold increase in ApoA-IΔ(1-38) over nondiabetic individuals. ApoA-IΔ(1-38) is found in LDL, but not in VLDL or HDL, with an increase in LDL3 and LDL4 subfractions. To identify candidate mechanisms of ApoA-I truncation, we investigated potentially involved enzymes by in silico data mining, and tested the most probable molecule in an established animal model of diabetes. We have found increased hepatic cathepsin D activity as one of the potential proteases involved in ApoA-I truncation. Cathepsin D-cleaved ApoA-I exhibited increased LDL binding affinity and decreased antioxidant activity against LDL oxidation. In conclusion, we show for the first time: a) presence of a novel truncated ApoA-I form, ApoA-IΔ(1-38), in human serum; b) ApoA-IΔ(1-38) is transported by LDL; c) ApoA-IΔ(1-38) is increased in dense LDL fractions of DM patients; and d) cathepsin D-ApoA-I truncation may lead to ApoA-IΔ(1-38) binding to LDLs, increasing their susceptibility to oxidation and contributing to the high cardiovascular risk of DM patients. PMID:26168996

  11. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, Trudy M; Nikanjam, Mina

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  12. Inhibition of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression and apolipoprotein B100 secretion by the citrus flavonoid naringenin and by insulin involves activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Allister, Emma M; Borradaile, Nica M; Edwards, Jane Y; Huff, Murray W

    2005-06-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is necessary for hepatocyte assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein (apo)B100-containing lipoproteins. The citrus flavonoid naringenin, like insulin, decreased MTP expression in HepG2 cells, resulting in inhibition of apoB100 secretion; however, the mechanism for naringenin is independent of insulin receptor substrate-1/2. Recently, it was reported that insulin decreased MTP expression in HepG2 cells via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) (MAPK(erk)) pathway. We hypothesized that naringenin acts via a similar mechanism. Inhibition of MAPK kinase (MEK) 1/2 in HepG2 cells significantly attenuated the naringenin- and insulin-induced reduction in MTP expression. Both naringenin and insulin increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which was completely inhibited by MEK1/2 inhibition and enhanced by inhibition of MAPK(p38), a negative regulator of MAPK(erk) activity. Inhibition of MEK1/2 significantly attenuated both the naringenin- and insulin-induced decrease in apoB100 secretion demonstrating a direct link between MAPK(erk) activation and apoB100 secretion. Furthermore, both compounds increased MAPK(p38) activation, and therefore inhibition of MAPK(p38) amplified thenaringenin- and insulin-induced decrease in apoB100 secretion. We conclude that MAPK(erk) signaling in hepatocytes is critical for inhibition of apoB100 secretion by naringenin and insulin. Therefore, naringenin may prove useful for activating insulin-signaling pathways important for regulation of hepatocyte lipid homeostasis.

  13. Selective uptake and efflux of cholesteryl linoleate in LDL by macrophages expressing 12/15-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoshitaka . E-mail: ytaka@fhw.oka-pu.ac.jp; Zhu, Hong; Xu, Wanpeng; Murakami, Takashi; Iwasaki, Tadao; Hattori, Hiroaki; Yoshimoto, Tanihiro

    2005-12-09

    Oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a critical step for airtightness, and the role of the 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-Lox) as well as LDL receptor-related protein (Lp) expressed in macrophages in this process has been suggested. The oxygenation of cholesteryl linoleate in LDL by mouse macrophage-like Joe.1 cells over expressing 12/15-Lox was inhibited by an anti-Lp antibody but not by an anti-LDL receptor antibody. When the cells were incubated with LDL double-labeled by [{sup 3}H]cholesteryl linoleate and [{sup 125}I]apo B, association with the cells of [{sup 3}H]cholesteryl linoleate expressed as LDL protein equivalent exceeded that of [{sup 125}I]apo B, indicating selective uptake of [{sup 3}H]cholesteryl linoleate from LDL to these cells. An anti-Lp antibody inhibited the selective uptake of [{sup 3}H]cholesteryl ester by 62% and 81% with the 12/15-Lox-expressing cells and macrophages, respectively. Furthermore, addition of LDL to the culture medium of the [{sup 3}H]cholesteryl linoleate-labeled 12/15-Lox-expressing cells increased the release of [{sup 3}H]cholesteryl linoleate to the medium in LDL concentration- and time-dependent manners. The transport of [{sup 3}H]cholesteryl linoleate from the cells to LDL was also inhibited by an anti-Lp antibody by 75%. These results strongly suggest that Lp contributes to the LDL oxidation by 12/15-Lox in macrophages by selective uptake and efflux of cholesteryl ester in the LDL particle.

  14. Simvastatin Efficiently Lowers Small LDL-IgG Immune Complex Levels: A Therapeutic Quality beyond the Lipid-Lowering Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ferstl, Ulrika; Ledinski, Gerhard; Binder, Josepha; Cvirn, Gerhard; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Trauner, Michael; Koidl, Christoph; Tafeit, Erwin; Amrein, Karin; Scharnagl, Hubert; Jürgens, Günther; Hallström, Seth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a polyethylene glycol non-precipitable low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction targeted by IgG and the influence of statin therapy on plasma levels of these small LDL-IgG-immune complexes (LDL-IgG-IC). LDL-subfractions were isolated from 6 atherosclerotic subjects and 3 healthy individuals utilizing iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation. Cholesterol, apoB and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined in each fraction by enzymatic testing, dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The levels of LDL-IgG-IC were quantified densitometrically following lipid electrophoresis, particle size distribution was assessed with dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography. The influence of simvastatin (40 mg/day for three months) on small LDL-IgG-IC levels and their distribution among LDL-subfractions (salt gradient separation) were investigated in 11 patients with confirmed coronary artery disease (CAD). We demonstrate that the investigated LDL-IgG-IC are small particles present in atherosclerotic patients and healthy subjects. In vitro assembly of LDL-IgG-IC resulted in particle density shifts indicating a composition of one single molecule of IgG per LDL particle. Normalization on cholesterol levels revealed MDA values twice as high for LDL-subfractions rich in small LDL-IgG-IC if compared to dominant LDL-subfractions. Reactivity of affinity purified small LDL-IgG-IC to monoclonal antibody OB/04 indicates a high degree of modified apoB and oxidative modification. Simvastatin therapy studied in the CAD patients significantly lowered LDL levels and to an even higher extent, small LDL-IgG-IC levels without affecting their distribution. In conclusion simvastatin lowers levels of small LDL-IgG-IC more effectively than LDL-cholesterol and LDL-apoB levels in atherosclerotic patients. This antiatherogenic effect may additionally contribute to the known beneficial

  15. A combined LDL receptor/LDL receptor adaptor protein 1 mutation as the cause for severe familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Soufi, Muhidien; Rust, Stephan; Walter, Michael; Schaefer, Juergen R

    2013-05-25

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) results from impaired catabolism of plasma low density lipoproteins (LDL), thus leading to high cholesterol, atherosclerosis, and a high risk of premature myocardial infarction. FH is commonly caused by defects of the LDL receptor or its main ligand apoB, together mediating cellular uptake and clearance of plasma LDL. In some cases FH is inherited by mutations in the genes of PCSK9 and LDLRAP1 (ARH) in a dominant or recessive trait. The encoded proteins are required for LDL receptor stability and internalization within the LDLR pathway. To detect the underlying genetic defect in a family of Turkish descent showing unregular inheritance of severe FH, we screened the four candidate genes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) mutation analysis. We identified different combinatory mixtures of LDLR- and LDLRAP1-gene defects as the cause for severe familial hypercholesterolemia in this family. We also show for the first time that a heterozygous LDLR mutation combined with a homozygous LDLRAP1 mutation produces a more severe hypercholesterolemia phenotype in the same family than a homozygous LDLR mutation alone.

  16. Charged Amino Acid Residues 997–1000 of Human Apolipoprotein B100 Are Critical for the Initiation of Lipoprotein Assembly and the Formation of a Stable Lipidated Primordial Particle in McA-RH7777 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manchekar, Medha; Richardson, Paul E.; Sun, Zhihuan; Liu, Yanwen; Segrest, Jere P.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2008-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a portion, or perhaps all, of the residues between 931 and 1000 of apolipoprotein (apo) B100 are required for the initiation of apoB-containing particle assembly. Based on our structural model of the first 1000 residues of apoB (designated as apoB:1000), we hypothesized that this domain folds into a three-sided lipovitellin-like “lipid pocket” via a hairpin-bridge mechanism. We proposed that salt bridges are formed between four tandem charged residues 717–720 in the turn of the hairpin bridge and four tandem complementary residues 997–1000 located at the C-terminal end of the model. To identify the specific motif within residues 931 and 1000 that is critical for apoB particle assembly, apoB:956 and apoB:986 were produced. To test the hairpin-bridge hypothesis, the following mutations were made: 1) residues 997–1000 deletion (apoB:996), 2) residues 717–720 deletion (apoB:1000Δ717–720), and 3) substitution of charged residues 997–1000 with alanines (apoB:996 + 4Ala). Characterization of particles secreted by stable transformants of McA-RH7777 cells demonstrated the following. 1) ApoB:956 did not form stable particles and was secreted as large lipid-rich aggregates. 2) ApoB:986 formed both a lipidated particle that was denser than HDL3 and large lipid-rich aggregates. 3) Compared with wild-type apoB:1000, apoB:1000Δ717–720 displayed the following: (i) significantly diminished capacity to form intact lipidated particles and (ii) increased propensity to form large lipid-rich aggregates. 4) In striking contrast to wild-type apoB:1000, (i) apoB:996 and apoB:996 + 4Ala were highly susceptible to intracellular degradation, (ii) only a small proportion of the secreted proteins formed stable HDL3-like lipoproteins, and (iii) a majority of the secreted proteins formed large lipid-rich aggregates. We conclude that the first 1000 amino acid residues of human apoB100 are required for the initiation of nascent apo

  17. Postprandial decrease in LDL-cholesterol in men with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Turczyn, Barbara; Wojakowska, Anna; Kreczyńska, Bogusława; Skoczyńska, Marta; Wojtas, Kamila

    2015-01-01

    Background In some epidemiological studies, blood lipids are determined at non-fasting state, which may impact cardiovascular risk estimation. The aim of this study was to evaluate postprandial LDL-C changes in men with newly diagnosed metabolic syndrome (MetSy). Methods 36 male patients were examined: 12 men with and 24 men without MetSy. The fat tolerance test was performed before and after a three-month hypolipidemic treatment. Serum lipids were measured using routine methods, lipid peroxides (LPO) colorimetrically, apolipoproteins A-I, B, and hsCRP immunoturbidimetrically. Results The postprandial increase in triglycerides was associated with a decrease in LDL-C and a small decrease in apo B. In men with MetSy, the mean change in LDL-C (−19.5 ± 2.3 mg/dl) was greater than in healthy men (−5.7 ± 3.8 mg/dl). All lipid changes (ΔTG, ΔLDL-C and ΔLPO) were linearly dependent on the postprandial non-LDL-cholesterol. After three months of hypolipidemic treatment, in all men with MetSy, the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained the same as before the therapy. Conclusion In men diagnosed with MetSy, postprandial decreases in LDL-cholesterol may cause underestimation of cardiovascular risk. After three months of hypolipidemic treatment, there was only a partial reduction in this risk, as the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained the same.

  18. Intracellular degradation in the regulation of secretion of apolipoprotein B-100 by rabbit hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, I J; Higgins, J A

    1996-03-15

    Isolated rabbit hepatocytes were incubated with [35S]methionine to label intracellular pools of apolipoprotein B (apo-B). The cells were then reincubated with an excess of unlabelled methionine in the presence of oleate or protease inhibitors and the intracellular sites of accumulation of radiolabelled apo-B and the mass of apo-B were determined by isolation and analysis of subcellular fractions. Oleate or inhibitors of metalloproteases (o-phenanthroline), serine proteases (aprotinin), serine/cysteine proteases (leupeptin) or cysteins proteases (calpain inhibitor I; ALLN) but not aspartate proteases (pepstatin) resulted in inhibition of the cellular degradation of apo-B. The effect of o-phenanthroline was reversed by the addition of zinc ions. Oleate, o-phenanthroline and leupeptin also stimulated secretion of radiolabelled apo-B; the effects of the inhibitors and oleate were additive, suggesting that they could act via different mechanisms. o-Phenanthroline caused accumulation of apo-B in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) membranes; leupeptin caused accumulation of apo-B in the SER and cis-Golgi membranes, and ALLN and aprotinin caused accumulation of apo-B in the trans-Golgi membranes. These results suggest that intracellular degradation of apo-B occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and in the trans-Golgi membranes and involves different proteases. Apo-B that accumulates in the ER membrane can be diverted into the lumen for secretion; however, apo-B that accumulates in the trans-Golgi membrane is irretrievably diverted from secretion.

  19. Emerging low-density lipoprotein (LDL) therapies: Management of severely elevated LDL cholesterol--the role of LDL-apheresis.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Mary P

    2013-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apheresis is a Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) or severe heterozygous FH. Based on electrochemical principles, it selectively removes apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins through extracorporeal precipitation with either heparin (Heparin-induced Extracorporeal LDL Precipitation, ie, HELP) or dextran sulfate (Liposorber). LDL-apheresis can lead to an acute decrease in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) of 70%-80%, but there is a rapid rebound to baseline levels within approximately 2 weeks. LDL-apheresis is typically performed once-a-week in patients with homozygous FH and every other week in those with heterozygous FH to produce time-average LDL-C reductions of ≈ 40%. Side effects associated with LDL-apheresis include hypotension (later found to be due to concomitant use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), nausea/vomiting, flushing, angina, and fainting. Posttreatment bleeding can occur secondary to heparin used during the procedure. Challenges associated with LDL-apheresis include vascular access often requiring an arteriovenous fistula (fistulas may clot and require revision over time), the time associated with each treatment session (2-4 hours), the frequency of treatment, and the scarcity of medical centers which perform LDL-apheresis. Given the nature of LDL-apheresis, randomized placebo controlled trials are nearly impossible, and virtually all studies of clinical benefit have been non-randomized investigations of small numbers of subjects. Nonetheless, results from those studies support the benefits of LDL-C reduction for reducing coronary atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events.

  20. LRP6 protein regulates low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-mediated LDL uptake.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhi-jia; Go, Gwang-Woong; Singh, Rajvir; Liu, Wenzhong; Keramati, Ali Reza; Mani, Arya

    2012-01-06

    Genetic variations in LRP6 gene are associated with high serum LDL cholesterol levels. We have previously shown that LDL clearance in peripheral B-lymphocytes of the LRP6(R611C) mutation carriers is significantly impaired. In this study we have examined the role of wild type LRP6 (LRP6(WT)) and LRP6(R611C) in LDL receptor (LDLR)-mediated LDL uptake. LDL binding and uptake were increased when LRP6(WT) was overexpressed and modestly reduced when it was knocked down in LDLR-deficient CHO (ldlA7) cells. These findings implicated LRP6 in LDLR-independent cellular LDL binding and uptake. However, LRP6 knockdown in wild type CHO cells resulted in a much greater decline in LDL binding and uptake compared with CHO-ldlA7 cells, suggesting impaired function of the LDLR. LDLR internalization was severely diminished when LRP6 was knocked down and was restored after LRP6 was reintroduced. Further analysis revealed that LRP6(WT) forms a complex with LDLR, clathrin, and ARH and undergoes a clathrin-mediated internalization after stimulation with LDL. LDLR and LRP6 internalizations as well as LDL uptake were all impaired in CHO-k1 cells expressing LRP6(R611C). These studies identify LRP6 as a critical modulator of receptor-mediated LDL endocytosis and introduce a mechanism by which variation in LRP6 may contribute to high serum LDL levels.

  1. History of Discovery: The LDL Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its co-discoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life. PMID:19299327

  2. A common genetic mechanism determines plasma apolipoprotein B levels and dense LDL subfraction distribution in familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed Central

    Juo, S H; Bredie, S J; Kiemeney, L A; Demacker, P N; Stalenhoef, A F

    1998-01-01

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is a common lipid disorder characterized by elevations of plasma cholesterol and/or triglyceride in first-degree relatives. A predominance of small, dense LDL particles and elevated apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels is commonly found in members of FCH families. Many studies have investigated the genetic mechanisms determining individuals' lipid levels, in FCH families. Previously, we demonstrated a major gene effect on LDL particle size and codominant Mendelian inheritance involved in determination of apoB levels in a sample of 40 well-defined FCH families. An elevation of apoB levels is associated metabolically with a predominance of small, dense LDL particles in FCH. To establish whether a common gene regulates both traits, we conducted a bivariate genetic analysis to test the hypothesis of a common genetic mechanism. In this study, we found that 66% of the total phenotypic correlation is due to shared genetic components. Further bivariate segregation analysis suggested that both traits share a common major gene plus individual polygenic components. This common major gene explains 37% of the variance of adjusted LDL particle size and 23% of the variance of adjusted apoB levels. Our study suggests that a major gene that has pleiotropic effects on LDL particle size and apoB levels may be the gene underlying FCH in the families we studied. PMID:9683593

  3. Development of NUPAC 140B 100 ton rail/barge cask

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The NuPac 140-B 100 Ton Rail/Barge Shipping Cask Preliminary Design Report (PDR) presents a general introduction to, and description of, the NuPac 140-B Cask and its fuel payload. The NuPac 140-B Cask, Model: NuPac 140-B, is being designed by Nuclear Packaging, Inc., to meet or exceed all NRC and Department of Transportation regulations governing the shipment of radioactive material. Specifically the Cask is being developed as a safe means of transporting spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels from existing and proposed reactor facilities to a repository and/or a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The primary transportation mode is by railroad, although the shipping package is designed to be transported by barge and by truck shipment on a special overweight basis for short distances. This feature allows the servicing of reactor sites and other facilities which lack direct railroad access.

  4. LDL-Apheresis: Technical and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bambauer, Rolf; Bambauer, Carolin; Lehmann, Boris; Latza, Reinhard; Schiel, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from severe hyperlipidemia, sometimes combined with elevated lipoprotein (a) levels, and coronary heart disease refractory to diet and lipid-lowering drugs is poor. For such patients, regular treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis is the therapeutic option. Today, there are five different LDL-apheresis systems available: cascade filtration or lipid filtration, immunoadsorption, heparin-induced LDL precipitation, dextran sulfate LDL adsorption, and the LDL hemoperfusion. There is a strong correlation between hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Besides the elimination of other risk factors, in severe hyperlipidemia therapeutic strategies should focus on a drastic reduction of serum lipoproteins. Despite maximum conventional therapy with a combination of different kinds of lipid-lowering drugs, sometimes the goal of therapy cannot be reached. Hence, in such patients, treatment with LDL-apheresis is indicated. Technical and clinical aspects of these five different LDL-apheresis methods are shown here. There were no significant differences with respect to or concerning all cholesterols, or triglycerides observed. With respect to elevated lipoprotein (a) levels, however, the immunoadsorption method seems to be most effective. The different published data clearly demonstrate that treatment with LDL-apheresis in patients suffering from severe hyperlipidemia refractory to maximum conservative therapy is effective and safe in long-term application. PMID:22654591

  5. Dominant expression of type III hyperlipoproteinemia. Pathophysiological insights derived from the structural and kinetic characteristics of ApoE-1 (Lys146-->Glu).

    PubMed Central

    Mann, W A; Lohse, P; Gregg, R E; Ronan, R; Hoeg, J M; Zech, L A; Brewer, H B

    1995-01-01

    Type III hyperlipoproteinemia is characterized by delayed chylomicron and VLDL remnant catabolism and is associated with homozygosity for the apoE-2 allele. We have identified a kindred in which heterozygosity for an apoE mutant, apoE-1 (Lys146-->Glu), is dominantly associated with the expression of type III hyperlipoproteinemia. DNA sequence analysis of the mutant apoE gene revealed a single-point mutation that resulted in the substitution of glutamic acid (GAG) for lysine (AAG) at residue 146 in the proposed receptor-binding domain of apoE. The pathophysiological effect of this mutation was investigated in vivo by kinetic studies in the patient and six normal subjects, and in vitro by binding studies of apoE-1 (Lys146-->Glu) to LDL receptors on human fibroblasts and to heparin. The kinetic studies revealed that apoE-1 (Lys146-->Glu) was catabolized significantly slower than apoE-3 in normals (P < 0.005). In the proband, the plasma residence times of both apoEs were substantially longer and the production rate of total apoE was about two times higher than in the control subjects. ApoE-1 (Lys146-->Glu) was defective in interacting with LDL receptors, and its ability to displace LDL in an in vitro assay was reduced to 7.7% compared with apoE-3. The affinity of apoE-1 (Lys146-->Glu) to heparin was also markedly reduced compared with both apoE-2 (Arg158-->Cys) and apoE-3. These abnormal in vitro binding characteristics and the altered in vivo metabolism of apoE-1 (Lys146-->Glu) are proposed to result in the functional dominance of this mutation in the affected kindred. Images PMID:7635945

  6. Changes in lipoprotein(a), oxidized phospholipids, and LDL subclasses with a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet

    PubMed Central

    Faghihnia, Nastaran; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miller, Elizabeth R.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-fat diets have been shown to increase plasma concentrations of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], a preferential lipoprotein carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) in plasma, as well as small dense LDL particles. We sought to determine whether increases in plasma Lp(a) induced by a low-fat high-carbohydrate (LFHC) diet are related to changes in OxPL and LDL subclasses. We studied 63 healthy subjects after 4 weeks of consuming, in random order, a high-fat low-carbohydrate (HFLC) diet and a LFHC diet. Plasma concentrations of Lp(a) (P < 0.01), OxPL/apolipoprotein (apo)B (P < 0.005), and OxPL-apo(a) (P < 0.05) were significantly higher on the LFHC diet compared with the HFLC diet whereas LDL peak particle size was significantly smaller (P < 0.0001). Diet-induced changes in Lp(a) were strongly correlated with changes in OxPL/apoB (P < 0.0001). The increases in plasma Lp(a) levels after the LFHC diet were also correlated with decreases in medium LDL particles (P < 0.01) and increases in very small LDL particles (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that induction of increased levels of Lp(a) by an LFHC diet is associated with increases in OxPLs and with changes in LDL subclass distribution that may reflect altered metabolism of Lp(a) particles. PMID:20713651

  7. Effect of dietary phenolic compounds on apoptosis of human cultured endothelial cells induced by oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Otilia; Escargueil-Blanc, Isabelle; Meilhac, Olivier; Basile, Jean-Pierre; Laranjinha, Joao; Almeida, Leonor; Salvayre, Robert; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoproteins (LDL) are toxic to cultured endothelial cells. Mildly oxidized LDL, characterized by relatively low levels of TBARS and only minor modifications of apoB, were obtained by using 2 experimental model systems of oxidation, namely oxidation by u.v. radiation or ferrylmyoglobin (a two electron oxidation product from the reaction of metmyoglobin with H2O2). Toxic concentrations of mildly oxidized LDL induce apoptosis (programmed cell death) of cultured endothelial cells, as shown by typical morphological features, by the in situ TUNEL procedure and by DNA fragmentation revealed on gel electrophoresis. This apoptosis is calcium-dependent and subsequent to the intense and sustained cytosolic [Ca2+]i peak elicited by oxidized LDL. Five naturally occurring phenolic compounds present in food and beverages were able to prevent, in a concentration-dependent manner, the apoptosis of endothelial cells induced by oxidized LDL. Among the compounds tested, caffeic acid was the most effective. Under the conditions used, the protective effect of caffeic acid (IC50 8.3±2.1 μmol  l−1) in the prevention of apoptosis induced by oxidized LDL was significantly higher than that of the other compounds tested (IC50s were 12.4±3.2, 14.1±4.1, 20.4±4.4 and 72.6±9.2 μmol  l−1 for ferulic, protocatechuic, ellagic and p-coumaric acids, respectively). The anti-apoptotic effect of caffeic acid results from the addition of two effects, (i) the antioxidant effect which prevents LDL oxidation and subsequent toxicity (‘indirect' protective effect); (ii) a ‘direct' cytoprotective effect, acting at the cellular level. Effective concentrations of caffeic acid acted at the cellular level by blocking the intense and sustained cytosolic [Ca2+]i rise elicited by oxidized LDL. In conclusion, phenolic acids (caffeic and ferulic acids being the most potent of the compounds tested under the conditions used) exhibit a potent cytoprotective effect of

  8. Baicalein protects against oxLDL-caused oxidative stress and inflammation by modulation of AMPK- alpha

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shih-Hung; Shih, Jhih-Yuan; Cheng, Yung-Hsin; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Lin, Huei-Chen; Chu, Pei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered to be a form of chronic inflammation and a disorder of lipid metabolism. Oxidative transformations in the lipid and apolipoprotein B (Apo B) constituent of low density lipoprotein drive the initial step in atherogenesis due to macrophage scavenger receptors identify oxidized LDL (oxLDL) but non-oxidized LDL. The human vascular endothelial cells fact a critical role in vasodilation, provides a nonadhesive surface for circulation, reduces vascular smooth muscle proliferation, inflammation, thrombus formation and platelet aggregation. Assembly of oxLDL contribute to stimulation of endothelial cells with up-regulation of adhesion molecules, increase oxidative stress to the vascular endothelium and inhibition of NO-mediated vasodilation. When adhesion molecules are over-expressed on the surface of endothelial cells under oxLDL stimulation, it will recruit monocytes to the arterial wall. Then adherent monocytes will migrate into the subendothelial space and subsequently differentiate into macrophages. In the subendothelial space, oxLDL will be taken up by macrophages, thereby causing the substantial cholesterol accumulation and the foam cells production. PMID:27776344

  9. S-nitrosylation of ARH is required for LDL uptake by the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenze; Pompey, Shanica; Dong, Hongyun; Weng, Jian; Garuti, Rita; Michaely, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) relies upon endocytic adaptor proteins for internalization of lipoproteins. The results of this study show that the LDLR adaptor autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein (ARH) requires nitric oxide to support LDL uptake. Nitric oxide nitrosylates ARH at C199 and C286, and these posttranslational modifications are necessary for association of ARH with the adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) component of clathrin-coated pits. In the absence of nitrosylation, ARH is unable to target LDL-LDLR complexes to coated pits, resulting in poor LDL uptake. The role of nitric oxide on LDLR function is specific for ARH because inhibition of nitric oxide synthase activity impairs ARH-supported LDL uptake but has no effect on other LDLR-dependent lipoprotein uptake processes, including VLDL remnant uptake and dab2-supported LDL uptake. These findings suggest that cells that depend upon ARH for LDL uptake can control which lipoproteins are internalized by their LDLRs through changes in nitric oxide.

  10. Pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of LDL cholesterol response to statins.

    PubMed

    Postmus, Iris; Trompet, Stella; Deshmukh, Harshal A; Barnes, Michael R; Li, Xiaohui; Warren, Helen R; Chasman, Daniel I; Zhou, Kaixin; Arsenault, Benoit J; Donnelly, Louise A; Wiggins, Kerri L; Avery, Christy L; Griffin, Paula; Feng, QiPing; Taylor, Kent D; Li, Guo; Evans, Daniel S; Smith, Albert V; de Keyser, Catherine E; Johnson, Andrew D; de Craen, Anton J M; Stott, David J; Buckley, Brendan M; Ford, Ian; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Slagboom, P Eline; Sattar, Naveed; Munroe, Patricia B; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; O'Brien, Eoin; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Chen, Y-D Ida; Nickerson, Deborah A; Smith, Joshua D; Dubé, Marie Pierre; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastelein, John J P; McKeigue, Paul M; Betteridge, John; Neil, Andrew; Durrington, Paul N; Doney, Alex; Carr, Fiona; Morris, Andrew; McCarthy, Mark I; Groop, Leif; Ahlqvist, Emma; Bis, Joshua C; Rice, Kenneth; Smith, Nicholas L; Lumley, Thomas; Whitsel, Eric A; Stürmer, Til; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ngwa, Julius S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wei, Wei-Qi; Wilke, Russell A; Liu, Ching-Ti; Sun, Fangui; Guo, Xiuqing; Heckbert, Susan R; Post, Wendy; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Arnold, Alice M; Stafford, Jeanette M; Ding, Jingzhong; Herrington, David M; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Leonore J; Harris, Tamara B; Chu, Audrey Y; Giulianini, Franco; MacFadyen, Jean G; Barratt, Bryan J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Stricker, Bruno H; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Emilsson, Valur; Franco, Oscar H; Ridker, Paul M; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Liu, Yongmei; Denny, Joshua C; Ballantyne, Christie M; Rotter, Jerome I; Adrienne Cupples, L; Psaty, Bruce M; Palmer, Colin N A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Colhoun, Helen M; Hitman, Graham; Krauss, Ronald M; Wouter Jukema, J; Caulfield, Mark J

    2014-10-28

    Statins effectively lower LDL cholesterol levels in large studies and the observed interindividual response variability may be partially explained by genetic variation. Here we perform a pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in studies addressing the LDL cholesterol response to statins, including up to 18,596 statin-treated subjects. We validate the most promising signals in a further 22,318 statin recipients and identify two loci, SORT1/CELSR2/PSRC1 and SLCO1B1, not previously identified in GWAS. Moreover, we confirm the previously described associations with APOE and LPA. Our findings advance the understanding of the pharmacogenetic architecture of statin response.

  11. Low Levels of IgM Antibodies against an Advanced Glycation Endproduct-Modified Apolipoprotein B100 Peptide Predict Cardiovascular Events in Nondiabetic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Engelbertsen, Daniel; Vallejo, Jenifer; Quách, Tâm Dan; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Alm, Ragnar; Hedblad, Bo; Björkbacka, Harry; Rothstein, Thomas L; Nilsson, Jan; Bengtsson, Eva

    2015-10-01

    Increased glucose levels are associated with the generation of advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) modifications. Interaction between AGE-modified plaque components and immune cells is believed to have an important role in the development of vascular complications in diabetes. Methylglyoxal (MGO) is one type of reactive aldehyde that gives rise to AGE modification. The present study analyzed whether autoantibodies against MGO-modified epitopes of the low-density lipoprotein apolipoprotein B (apoB) 100 predict cardiovascular events. A library consisting of 302 peptides comprising the complete apoB100 molecule was screened to identify peptides targeted by MGO-specific autoantibodies. Peptide (p) 220 (apoB amino acids 3286-3305) was identified as a major target. Baseline IgM and IgG against MGO-peptide 220 (p220) were measured in 700 individuals from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort. A total of 139 cardiovascular events were registered during the 15-y follow-up period. Controlling for major cardiovascular risk factors demonstrated that subjects in the lowest tertile of MGO-p220 IgM had an increased risk for cardiovascular events (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.07 [1.22-3.50]; p(trend) = 0.004). Interestingly, the association between MGO-p220 IgM and cardiovascular events remained and even tended to become stronger when subjects with prevalent diabetes were excluded from the analysis (2.51 [1.37-4.61]; p(trend) = 0.002). MGO-p220 IgM was inversely associated with blood glucose, but not with oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Finally, we demonstrate that anti-MGO-p220 IgM is produced by B1 cells. These data show that subjects with low levels of IgM recognizing MGO-modified p220 in apoB have an increased risk to develop cardiovascular events and that this association is present in nondiabetic subjects.

  12. Mildly oxidized LDL induces an increased apolipoprotein J/paraoxonase ratio.

    PubMed Central

    Navab, M; Hama-Levy, S; Van Lenten, B J; Fonarow, G C; Cardinez, C J; Castellani, L W; Brennan, M L; Lusis, A J; Fogelman, A M; La Du, B N

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the effects of mildly oxidized LDL and atherosclerosis on the levels of two proteins associated with HDL; apolipoprotein J (apoJ), and paraoxonase (PON). On an atherogenic diet, PON activity decreased by 52%, and apoJ levels increased 2.8-fold in fatty streak susceptible mice, C57BL/6J (BL/6), but not in fatty streak resistant mice, C3H/HeJ (C3H). Plasma PON activity was also significantly decreased, and apoJ levels were markedly increased in apolipoprotein E knockout mice on the chow diet, resulting in a 9.2-fold increase in the apoJ/PON ratio as compared to controls. Furthermore, a dramatic increase in the apoJ/PON ratio (over 100-fold) was observed in LDL receptor knockout mice when they were fed a 0.15%-cholesterol-enriched diet. Injection of mildly oxidized LDL (but not native LDL) into BL/6 mice (but not in C3H mice) on a chow diet resulted in a 59% decrease in PON activity (P < 0.01) and a 3.6-fold increase in apoJ levels (P < 0.01). When an acute phase reaction was induced in rabbits, or the rabbits were placed on an atherogenic diet, hepatic mRNA for apoJ was increased by 2.7-fold and 2.8-fold, respectively. Treatment of HepG2 cells in culture with mildly oxidized LDL (but not native LDL) resulted in reduced mRNA levels for PON (3.0-fold decrease) and increased mRNA levels for apoJ (2.0-fold increase). In normolipidemic patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease who did not have diabetes and were not on lipid-lowering medication (n = 14), the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio was 3.1+/-0.9 as compared to 2.9+/-0.4 in the controls (n = 19). This difference was not statistically significant. In contrast, the apoJ/PON ratio was 3.0+/-0.4 in the patients compared to 0.72+/-0.2 in the controls (P < 0.009). In a subset of these normolipidemic patients (n = 5), the PON activity was low (48+/-6.6 versus 98+/-17 U/ml for controls; P < 0.009), despite similar normal HDL levels, and the HDL from these patients failed to

  13. Nicotine potentiates proatherogenic effects of oxLDL by stimulating and upregulating macrophage CD36 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Sheng; Chadipiralla, Kiranmai; Mendez, Armando J; Jaimes, Edgar A; Silverstein, Roy L; Webster, Keith; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-08-15

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. CD36 mediates oxidized LDL (oxLDL) uptake and contributes to macrophage foam cell formation. We investigated a role for the CD36 pathway in nicotine-induced activation of macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. Nicotine in the same plasma concentration range found in smokers increased the CD36(+)/CD14(+) cell population in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, increased CD36 expression of human THP1 macrophages, and increased macrophage production of reactive oxygen species, PKCδ phosphorylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Nicotine-induced CD36 expression was suppressed by antioxidants and by specific PKCδ and PPARγ inhibitors, implicating mechanistic roles for these intermediates. Nicotine synergized with oxLDL to increase macrophage expression of CD36 and cytokines TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-6, and CXCL9, all of which were prevented by CD36 small interfering (si)RNA. Incubation with oxLDL (50 μg/ml) for 72 h resulted in lipid deposition in macrophages and foam cell formation. Preincubation with nicotine further increased oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation, which was also prevented by CD36 siRNA. Treatment of apoE-/- mice with nicotine markedly exacerbated inflammatory monocyte levels and atherosclerotic plaque accumulation, effects that were not seen in CD36-/- apoE-/- mice. Our results show that physiological levels of nicotine increase CD36 expression in macrophages, a pathway that may account at least in part for the known proinflammatory and proatherogenic properties of nicotine. These results identify such enhanced CD36 expression as a novel nicotine-mediated pathway that may constitute an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in smokers. The results also suggest that exacerbated atherogenesis by this pathway may be an adverse side effect of extended use

  14. Cranberries inhibit LDL oxidation and induce LDL receptor expression in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Liu, Rui Hai

    2005-08-26

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in most industrialized countries. Cranberries were evaluated for their potential roles in dietary prevention of CVD. Cranberry extracts were found to have potent antioxidant capacity preventing in vitro LDL oxidation with increasing delay and suppression of LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. The antioxidant activity of 100 g cranberries against LDL oxidation was equivalent to 1000 mg vitamin C or 3700 mg vitamin E. Cranberry extracts also significantly induced expression of hepatic LDL receptors and increased intracellular uptake of cholesterol in HepG2 cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests that cranberries could enhance clearance of excessive plasma cholesterol in circulation. We propose that additive or synergistic effects of phytochemicals in cranberries are responsible for the inhibition of LDL oxidation, the induced expression of LDL receptors, and the increased uptake of cholesterol in hepatocytes.

  15. New therapeutic principles in dyslipidaemia: focus on LDL and Lp(a) lowering drugs

    PubMed Central

    Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Catapano, Alberico Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidaemias play a key role in determining cardiovascular risk; the discovery of statins has contributed a very effective approach. However, many patients do not achieve, at the maximal tolerated dose, the recommended goals for low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B (apoB). Available agents combined with statins can provide additional LDL-C reduction, and agents in development will increase therapeutic options impacting also other atherogenic lipoprotein classes. In fact, genetic insights into mechanisms underlying regulation of LDL-C levels has expanded potential targets of drug therapy and led to the development of novel agents. Among them are modulators of apoB containing lipoproteins production and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 inhibitors. Alternative targets such as lipoprotein(a) also require attention; however, until we have a better understanding of these issues, further LDL-C lowering in high and very high-risk patients will represent the most sound clinical approach. PMID:23509227

  16. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing-Hsien; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Wang, Chi-Ping; Lin, Hui-Hsuan

    2013-10-15

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression.

  17. Isoforms of Hsp70-binding human LDL in adult Schistosoma mansoni worms.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Adriana S A; Cavalcanti, Marília G S; Zingali, Russolina B; Lima-Filho, José L; Chaves, Maria E C

    2015-03-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most common parasites infecting humans. They are well adapted to the host, and this parasite's longevity is a consequence of effective escape from the host immune system. In the blood circulation, lipoproteins not only help to conceal the worm from attack by host antibodies but also act as a source of lipids for S. mansoni. Previous SEM studies showed that the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles present on the surface of adult S. mansoni worms decreased in size when the incubation time increased. In this study, immunocytochemical and proteomic analyses were used to locate and identify S. mansoni binding proteins to human plasma LDL. Ultrathin sections of adult worms were cut transversely from the anterior, medial and posterior regions of the parasite. Immunocytochemical experiments revealed particles of gold in the tegument, muscle region and spine in male worms and around vitelline cells in females. Immunoblotting and 2D-electrophoresis using incubations with human serum, anti-LDL antibodies and anti-chicken IgG peroxidase conjugate were performed to identify LDL-binding proteins in S. mansoni. Analysis of the binding proteins using LC-MS identified two isoforms of the Hsp70 chaperone in S. mansoni. Hsp70 is involved in the interaction with apoB in the cytoplasm and its transport to the endoplasmic reticulum. However, further studies are needed to clarify the functional role of Hsp70 in S. mansoni, mainly related to the interaction with human LDL.

  18. [Study of LDL receptors and response to lovastatin therapy in familial homozygotic hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Ausina Gómez, A; Gilsanz Peral, A; Montero Brens, C; Dalmau Serra, J

    1991-11-01

    This study shows the results obtained with lovastatin as a combined therapy with probucol and cholestyramine on the lipid profile of two patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Both have been diagnosed according to the clinical and biochemical criteria (tipe IIa hypercholesterolemia) as well as by the cholesterol or low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) receptor analysis. After the initial probucol and cholestyramine treatment we observed a drop of total cholesterol (T-C) of 41.7% and 46% as well as LDL-C of 51.6% and 49.3% in both patients. Respectively when lovastatin were associated an additional drop of T-C of 23.7%, LDL-C of 23.2%, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) of 22.4% and the apoprotein B (Apo B) of 37% were obtained in one patient (receptor-defective) but no change in the lipid profile were obtained in the other patient (receptor-negative). No adverse effects were observed with this drug. This drug could be of help as a combined therapy in the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, even though the treatment of choice is the LDL-plasma feresis and/or liver transplantation. We expound the difficulties relate to LDL receptor study in homocygous receptor-negative patients.

  19. Pectin isolated from prickly pear (Opuntia SSP) modifies LDL metabolism in cholesterol-fed guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, M.L.; McNamara, D.J. )

    1990-02-26

    The effects of dietary pectin on plasma and hepatic cholesterol (CH) levels, plasma lipoprotein profiles, hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) binding to hepatic membranes were investigated by feeding 1% pectin to guinea pigs on a high CH diet. Animals were fed either chow + 0.25% CH (HC diet) or the CH diet + 1% prickly pear pectin (HC-P diet) for 25 days. Plasma CH levels were decreased 26% by the HC-P with 33% decreases in LDL and KDL. LDL peak density shifted from 1.040 to 1.055 g/ml with pectin. Hepatic total, free and esterified CH levels were reduced 60, 40 and 85% respectively by the HC-P diet. In contrast, HMG-CoA reductase activity was unaffected. {sup 125}I-LDL binding to hepatic membranes was increased by intake of the HC-P diet compared to the HC diet. The affinity of the apo B/E receptor for LDL was not affected by dietary pectin while the receptor number was increased 1.5-fold in animals on the HC-P diet. These data suggest that the parameters of HC metabolism affected by dietary pectin are consistent with an increased demand on the hepatic CH pools which possibly results from increased fecal excretion of bile acids.

  20. Cross-species pharmacokinetic comparison from mouse to man of a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide, ISIS 301012, targeting human apolipoprotein B-100.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rosie Z; Kim, Tae-Won; Hong, An; Watanabe, Tanya A; Gaus, Hans J; Geary, Richard S

    2007-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-modified oligonucleotide, ISIS 301012 [targeting human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100)], was characterized in mouse, rat, monkey, and human. Plasma pharmacokinetics following parental administration was similar across species, exhibiting a rapid distribution phase with t(1/2alpha) of several hours and a prolonged elimination phase with t(1/2beta) of days. The prolonged elimination phase represents equilibrium between tissues and circulating drug due to slow elimination from tissues. Absorption was nearly complete following s.c. injection, with bioavailability ranging from 80 to 100% in monkeys. Plasma clearance scaled well across species as a function of body weight alone, and this correlation was improved when corrected for plasma protein binding. In all of the animal models studied, the highest tissue concentrations of ISIS 301012 were observed in kidney and liver. Urinary excretion was less than 3% in monkeys and human in the first 24 h. ISIS 301012 is highly bound to plasma proteins, probably preventing rapid removal by renal filtration. However, following 25 mg/kg s.c. administration in mouse and 5-mg/kg i.v. bolus administration in rat, plasma concentrations of ISIS 301012 exceeded their respective protein binding capacity. Thus, urinary excretion increased to 16% or greater within the first 24 h. Albeit slow, urinary excretion of ISIS 301012 and its shortened metabolites is the ultimate elimination pathway of this compound, as demonstrated by 32% of dose recovered in total excreta by 14 days in a rat mass balance study. The pharmacokinetics of ISIS 301012 in human is predictable from the pharmacokinetics measured in animals. The pharmacokinetic properties of ISIS 301012 provide guidance for clinical development and support infrequent dose administration.

  1. LDL Particle Number and Risk of Future Cardiovascular Disease in the Framingham Offspring Study – Implications for LDL Management

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, William C.; Otvos, James D.; Keyes, Michelle J.; Pencina, Michael J.; Sullivan, Lisa; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wilson, Peter W.F.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.

    2009-01-01

    Background The cholesterol content of LDL particles is variable, causing frequent discrepancies between concentrations of LDL cholesterol and LDL particle number. In managing patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) to LDL target levels, it is unclear whether LDL cholesterol provides the optimum measure of residual risk and adequacy of LDL lowering treatment. Objective To compare the ability of alternative measures of LDL to provide CVD risk discrimination at relatively low levels consistent with current therapeutic targets. Methods Concentrations of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C) were measured chemically and LDL particle number (LDL-P) and VLDL particle number (VLDL-P) were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in 3066 middle-aged white participants (53% women) without CVD in the Framingham Offspring cohort. The main outcome measure was incidence of first CVD event. Results At baseline, the cholesterol content per LDL particle was negatively associated with triglycerides and positively associated with LDL-C. On follow-up (median 14.8 yrs), 265 men and 266 women experienced a CVD event. In multivariable models adjusting for non-lipid CVD risk factors, LDL-P was related more strongly to future CVD in both sexes than LDL-C or non-HDL-C. Subjects with a low level of LDL-P (<25th percentile) had a lower CVD event rate (59 events per 1000 person-years) than those with an equivalently low level of LDL-C or non-HDL-C (81 and 74 events per 1000 person-years, respectively). Conclusions In a large community-based sample, LDL-P was a more sensitive indicator of low CVD risk than either LDL-C or non-HDL-C, suggesting a potential clinical role for LDL-P as a goal of LDL management. PMID:19657464

  2. Discordance of Non-HDL and Directly Measured LDL Cholesterol: Which Lipid Measure is Preferred When Calculated LDL Is Inaccurate?

    PubMed

    Baruch, Lawrence; Chiong, Valerie J; Agarwal, Sanjay; Gupta, Bhanu

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine if non-HDL cholesterol (N-HDL) and directly measured LDL cholesterol (D-LDL) are clinically equivalent measurements. Patients and Methods. Eighty-one subjects recruited for 2 cholesterol treatment studies had at least 1 complete fasting lipid panel and D-LDL performed simultaneously; 64 had a second assessment after 4 to 6 weeks, resulting in 145 triads of C-LDL, D-LDL, and N-HDL. To directly compare N-HDL to D-LDL and C-LDL, we normalized the N-HDL by subtracting 30 from the N-HDL (N-HDLA). Results. There was significant correlation between N-HDLA, D-LDL, and C-LDL. Correlation was significantly greater between N-HDLA and C-LDL than between N-HDLA and D-LDL. A greater than 20 mg/dL difference between measures was observed more commonly between N-HDLA and D-LDL, 29%, than between C-LDL and N-HDLA, 11% (P < 0.001), and C-LDL and D-LDL, 17% (P = 0.028). Clinical discordance was most common, and concordance was least common between N-HDL and D-LDL. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that N-HDL cholesterol and D-LDL cholesterol are not clinically equivalent and frequently discordant. As N-HDL may be superior to even C-LDL for predicting events in statin-treated patients, utilizing N-HDL to guide therapy would appear to be preferable to D-LDL when C-LDL is inaccurate.

  3. Reducing elevated plasma LDL cholesterol: the central role of the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Vincent, J

    2014-07-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and reduction of elevated LDL-C reduces mortality in patients at risk. This benefit has evolved from the use of statins and knowledge of the LDL receptor (LDLR). The most potent drugs used for dyslipidemias act by mechanisms that involve this receptor. Advances in molecular genetics and understanding of the regulation of this receptor have revealed several pharmacological targets that are being explored to develop more targeted therapies for dyslipidemias.

  4. Plasma HDL reduces nonesterified fatty acid hydroperoxides originating from oxidized LDL: a mechanism for its antioxidant ability.

    PubMed

    Kotosai, Mari; Shimada, Sachiko; Kanda, Mai; Matsuda, Namiko; Sekido, Keiko; Shimizu, Yoshibumi; Tokumura, Akira; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Murota, Kaeko; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji

    2013-06-01

    The antioxidant property of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is thought to be involved in potential anti-atherogenic effects but the exact mechanism is not known. We aimed to reveal the contribution of HDL on the elimination of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) derived from oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Oxidized LDL prepared by copper ion-induced oxidation contained nonesterified fatty acid hydroperoxides (FFA-OOH) and lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPtdCho), in addition to cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides (CE-OOH) and phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides (PtdCho-OOH). A platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) inhibitor suppressed formation of FFA-OOH and lysoPtdCho in oxidized LDL. Among LOOH species, FFA-OOH was preferentially reduced by incubating oxidized LDL with HDL. HDL exhibited selective FFA-OOH reducing ability if it was mixed with a liposomal solution containing FFA-OOH, CE-OOH and PtdCho-OOH. Two-electron reduction of the hydroperoxy group to the hydroxy group was confirmed by the formation of 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid from 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid in HPLC analyses. This reducing effect was also found in apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1). FFA-OOH released from PtdCho-OOH due to PAF-AH activity in oxidized LDL undergo two-electron reduction by the reducing ability of apoA1 in HDL. This preferential reduction of FFA-OOH may participate in the mechanism of the antioxidant property of HDL.

  5. The composition and metabolism of large and small LDL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decreased size and increased density of LDL have been associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Elevated plasma concentrations of small dense LDL (sdLDL) correlate with high plasma triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol levels. This review highlights recent findings about the met...

  6. Oxidized LDL: Diversity, Patterns of Recognition, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Suncica; Subbaiah, Papasani V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative modification of LDL is known to elicit an array of pro-atherogenic responses, but it is generally underappreciated that oxidized LDL (OxLDL) exists in multiple forms, characterized by different degrees of oxidation and different mixtures of bioactive components. The variable effects of OxLDL reported in the literature can be attributed in large part to the heterogeneous nature of the preparations employed. In this review, we first describe the various subclasses and molecular composition of OxLDL, including the variety of minimally modified LDL preparations. We then describe multiple receptors that recognize various species of OxLDL and discuss the mechanisms responsible for the recognition by specific receptors. Furthermore, we discuss the contentious issues such as the nature of OxLDL in vivo and the physiological oxidizing agents, whether oxidation of LDL is a prerequisite for atherogenesis, whether OxLDL is the major source of lipids in foam cells, whether in some cases it actually induces cholesterol depletion, and finally the Janus-like nature of OxLDL in having both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. Lastly, we extend our review to discuss the role of LDL oxidation in diseases other than atherosclerosis, including diabetes mellitus, and several autoimmune diseases, such as lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 39–75. PMID:19888833

  7. Genetically determined hypercholesterolemia in a rhesus monkey family due to a deficiency of the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Scanu, A M; Khalil, A; Neven, L; Tidore, M; Dawson, G; Pfaffinger, D; Jackson, E; Carey, K D; McGill, H C; Fless, G M

    1988-12-01

    A family of rhesus monkeys comprising a sire, a dam, and four male offspring were fed a cholesterol-free Purina Chow diet for several months. The sire, 431-J, and two of the offspring, B-8204 and B-8806, had persistent plasma cholesterol levels in the range of 100-130 mg/dl, whereas the dam, 766-I, and the two other offspring, B-1000 and B-7643, exhibited a marked hypercholesterolemia in the 250-300 mg/dl range associated with an elevation of plasma LDL and apoB. When fed for 12 weeks a diet containing 12.5% lard and 0.25% cholesterol, sire, dam, B-1000 and B-7643 exhibited a marked hypercholesterolemia (500-800 mg/dl range), whereas B-8204 and B-8806 developed only a modest hypercholesterolemia (200-250 mg/dl). All animals were Lp[a]+. Skin fibroblasts from each animal and from control cells were grown in 10% fetal calf serum, transferred to 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 48 hr, and then incubated at 4 degrees C or 37 degrees C with 125I-labeled Lp[a]-free LDL. The fibroblasts from dam and offspring B-1000 and B-7643 bound and internalized 125I-labeled LDL less efficiently than control cells. Mathematical analyses of the 4 degrees C binding data indicated that there were no significant differences in LDL binding affinity between test and control cells suggesting that cells from the animals with a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia had a decreased number of LDL receptors. This conclusion was supported by the results of ligand and immunoblot analyses carried out on cell lysates separated by gradient gel electrophoresis. We conclude that a genetically determined LDL receptor deficiency was responsible, in part, for the spontaneous hypercholesterolemia observed in three out of the six family members and that this deficiency accounted for the hyperresponsiveness to a dietary fat and cholesterol challenge by the dam and the two offspring, B-1000 and B-7643. The hyperresponsiveness noted in the sire that had no evidence for LDL-receptor deficiency illustrates that

  8. Pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of LDL cholesterol response to statins

    PubMed Central

    Postmus, Iris; Trompet, Stella; Deshmukh, Harshal A.; Barnes, Michael R.; Li, Xiaohui; Warren, Helen R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Zhou, Kaixin; Arsenault, Benoit J.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Avery, Christy L.; Griffin, Paula; Feng, QiPing; Taylor, Kent D.; Li, Guo; Evans, Daniel S.; Smith, Albert V.; de Keyser, Catherine E.; Johnson, Andrew D.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Stott, David J.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Ford, Ian; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Sattar, Naveed; Munroe, Patricia B.; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C.; O’Brien, Eoin; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Ida Chen, Y.-D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Smith, Joshua D.; Pierre Dubé, Marie; Matthijs Boekholdt, S.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Kastelein, John J. P.; McKeigue, Paul M.; Betteridge, John; Neil, Andrew; Durrington, Paul N.; Doney, Alex; Carr, Fiona; Morris, Andrew; McCarthy, Mark I.; Groop, Leif; Ahlqvist, Emma; Bis, Joshua C.; Rice, Kenneth; Smith, Nicholas L.; Lumley, Thomas; Whitsel, Eric A.; Stürmer, Til; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ngwa, Julius S.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wei, Wei-Qi; Wilke, Russell A.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Sun, Fangui; Guo, Xiuqing; Heckbert, Susan R; Post, Wendy; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Arnold, Alice M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Ding, Jingzhong; Herrington, David M.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Leonore J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Giulianini, Franco; MacFadyen, Jean G.; Barratt, Bryan J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Stricker, Bruno H.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Emilsson, Valur; Franco, Oscar H.; Ridker, Paul M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Liu, Yongmei; Denny, Joshua C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Colhoun, Helen M.; Hitman, Graham; Krauss, Ronald M.; Wouter Jukema, J; Caulfield, Mark J.; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Donnelly, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Corvin, Aiden; McCarthy, Mark I.; Spencer, Chris C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Statins effectively lower LDL cholesterol levels in large studies and the observed interindividual response variability may be partially explained by genetic variation. Here we perform a pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in studies addressing the LDL cholesterol response to statins, including up to 18,596 statin-treated subjects. We validate the most promising signals in a further 22,318 statin recipients and identify two loci, SORT1/CELSR2/PSRC1 and SLCO1B1, not previously identified in GWAS. Moreover, we confirm the previously described associations with APOE and LPA. Our findings advance the understanding of the pharmacogenetic architecture of statin response. PMID:25350695

  9. NARC-1/PCSK9 and its natural mutants: zymogen cleavage and effects on the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Benjannet, Suzanne; Rhainds, David; Essalmani, Rachid; Mayne, Janice; Wickham, Louise; Jin, Weijun; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Hamelin, Josée; Varret, Mathilde; Allard, Delphine; Trillard, Mélanie; Abifadel, Marianne; Tebon, Angie; Attie, Alan D; Rader, Daniel J; Boileau, Catherine; Brissette, Louise; Chrétien, Michel; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G

    2004-11-19

    The discovery of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemic patients with mutations in the PCSK9 gene, encoding the proprotein convertase NARC-1, resulting in the missense mutations suggested a role in low density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism. We show that the endoplasmic reticulum-localized proNARC-1 to NARC-1 zymogen conversion is Ca2+-independent and that within the zymogen autocatalytic processing site SSVFAQ [downward arrow]SIP Val at P4 and Pro at P3' are critical. The S127R and D374Y mutations result in approximately 50-60% and > or =98% decrease in zymogen processing, respectively. In contrast, the double [D374Y + N157K], F216L, and R218S natural mutants resulted in normal zymogen processing. The cell surface LDL receptor (LDLR) levels are reduced by 35% in lymphoblasts of S127R patients. The LDLR levels are also reduced in stable HepG2 cells overexpressing NARC-1 or its natural mutant S127R, and this reduction is abrogated in the presence of 5 mm ammonium chloride, suggesting that overexpression of NARC-1 increases the turnover rate of the LDLR. Adenoviral expression of wild type human NARC-1 in mice resulted in a maximal approximately 9-fold increase in circulating LDL cholesterol, while in LDLR-/- mice a delayed approximately 2-fold increase in LDL cholesterol was observed. In conclusion, NARC-1 seems to affect both the level of LDLR and that of circulating apoB-containing lipoproteins in an LDLR-dependent and -independent fashion.

  10. Is the Ratio of Antibodies Against Oxidized LDL to Oxidized LDL an Indicator of Cardiovascular Risk in Psoriasis?

    PubMed Central

    Rajappa, Medha; Mohan Thappa, Devinder; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Munisamy, Malathi; Revathy, G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Chronic inflammation results in increased oxidative stress and oxidizes lipoproteins, increasing their atherogenicity. This study sought to estimate the levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and antibodies against oxidized LDL (anti-ox-LDL) and compute the ratio of anti-ox-LDL/ox-LDL as a single composite parameter to assess the oxidative lipoprotein burden as an indicator of cardiovascular risk in patients with psoriasis. Methods This cross-sectional study included 45 patients with psoriasis. All patients were given a psoriasis severity index score and their ox-LDL and anti-ox-LDL estimated using ELISA. Results The results of this study show an elevation in the ratio of anti-ox-LDL to ox-LDL in patients with psoriasis, which initiate and perpetuate the pathogenesis of psoriasis and its comorbidity, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conclusions Our results suggest that an elevated ratio of anti-ox-LDL/ox-LDL can serve as a composite parameter reflecting the total oxidative lipoprotein burden and cardiovascular risk in psoriasis patients. PMID:27602197

  11. Hyperlipidemia-Associated Renal Damage Decreases Klotho Expression in Kidneys from ApoE Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Cristina; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Buendía, Irene; Gómez-Guerrero, Carmen; Blanco, Julia; Mas, Sebastian; Egido, Jesús; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Ortiz, Alberto; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background Klotho is a renal protein with anti-aging properties that is downregulated in conditions related to kidney injury. Hyperlipidemia accelerates the progression of renal damage, but the mechanisms of the deleterious effects of hyperlipidemia remain unclear. Methods We evaluated whether hyperlipidemia modulates Klotho expression in kidneys from C57BL/6 and hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE KO) mice fed with a normal chow diet (ND) or a Western-type high cholesterol-fat diet (HC) for 5 to 10 weeks, respectively. Results In ApoE KO mice, the HC diet increased serum and renal cholesterol levels, kidney injury severity, kidney macrophage infiltration and inflammatory chemokine expression. A significant reduction in Klotho mRNA and protein expression was observed in kidneys from hypercholesteromic ApoE KO mice fed a HC diet as compared with controls, both at 5 and 10 weeks. In order to study the mechanism involved in Klotho down-regulation, murine tubular epithelial cells were treated with ox-LDL. Oxidized-LDL were effectively uptaken by tubular cells and decreased both Klotho mRNA and protein expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in these cells. Finally, NF-κB and ERK inhibitors prevented ox-LDL-induced Klotho downregulation. Conclusion Our results suggest that hyperlipidemia-associated kidney injury decreases renal expression of Klotho. Therefore, Klotho could be a key element explaining the relationship between hyperlipidemia and aging with renal disease. PMID:24386260

  12. Apolipoprotein B100

    MedlinePlus

    ... Date 5/5/2016 Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  13. Analogs of LDL Receptor Ligand Motifs in Dengue Envelope and Capsid Proteins as Potential Codes for Cell Entry.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Juan; Romo, Jamie; McWhorter, Troy; Guevara, Natalia Valentinova

    It is established that cell entry of low density lipoprotein particles (LLPs) containing Apo B100 and Apo E is mediated by receptors and GAGs. Receptor ligand motifs, XBBBXXBX, XBBXBX, and ΨBΨXB, and mono- and bipartite NLS sequences are abundant in Apo E and Apo B100 as well as in envelope and capsid proteins of Dengue viruses 1-4 (DENV1-4). Synthetic, fluorescence-labeled peptides of sequences in DENV2 envelope protein, and DENV3 capsid that include these motifs were used to conduct a qualitative assessment of cell binding and entry capacity using HeLa cells. DENV2 envelope peptide, Dsp2EP, (0564)Gly-Gly(0595), was shown to bind and remain at the cell surface. In contrast, DENV3 capsid protein peptide, Dsp3CP, (0002)Asn-Gln(0028), readily enters HeLa cells and accumulates at discrete loci in the nucleus. FITC-labeled dengue synthetic peptides colocalize with Low Density Lipoprotein-CM-DiI and Apo E-CM-DiI to a degree that suggests that Dengue viruses may utilize cell entry pathways used by LLPs.

  14. Analogs of LDL Receptor Ligand Motifs in Dengue Envelope and Capsid Proteins as Potential Codes for Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Juan; Romo, Jamie; McWhorter, Troy; Guevara, Natalia Valentinova

    2016-01-01

    It is established that cell entry of low density lipoprotein particles (LLPs) containing Apo B100 and Apo E is mediated by receptors and GAGs. Receptor ligand motifs, XBBBXXBX, XBBXBX, and ΨBΨXB, and mono- and bipartite NLS sequences are abundant in Apo E and Apo B100 as well as in envelope and capsid proteins of Dengue viruses 1–4 (DENV1–4). Synthetic, fluorescence-labeled peptides of sequences in DENV2 envelope protein, and DENV3 capsid that include these motifs were used to conduct a qualitative assessment of cell binding and entry capacity using HeLa cells. DENV2 envelope peptide, Dsp2EP, 0564Gly-Gly0595, was shown to bind and remain at the cell surface. In contrast, DENV3 capsid protein peptide, Dsp3CP, 0002Asn-Gln0028, readily enters HeLa cells and accumulates at discrete loci in the nucleus. FITC-labeled dengue synthetic peptides colocalize with Low Density Lipoprotein-CM-DiI and Apo E-CM-DiI to a degree that suggests that Dengue viruses may utilize cell entry pathways used by LLPs. PMID:27123468

  15. Early Transcriptomic Response to LDL and oxLDL in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damián-Zamacona, Salvador; Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; Ibarra-Abundis, Mabel Z.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Macedo-Alcibia, Karla Paola; Delgado–Coello, Blanca; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although nowadays it is well known that the human transcriptome can importantly vary according to external or environmental condition, the reflection of this concept when studying oxidative stress and its direct relationship with gene expression profiling during the process of atherogenesis has not been thoroughly achieved. Objective The ability to analyze genome-wide gene expression through transcriptomics has shown that the genome responds dynamically to diverse stimuli. Here, we describe the transcriptome of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) stimulated by native and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (nLDL and oxLDL respectively), with the aim of assessing the early molecular changes that induce a response in this cell type resulting in a transcriptomic transformation. This expression has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo and in vitro, particularly in the light of the oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Total RNA was isolated with TRIzol reagent (Life Technologies) and quality estimated using an Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer. The transcriptome of hVSMC under different experimental conditions (1,5 and 24 hours for nLDL and oxLDL) was obtained using the GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST (Affymetrix) designed to measure gene expression of 28,869 well-annotated genes. A fixed fold-change cut-off corresponding to ± 2 was used to identify genes exhibiting the most significant variation and statistical significance (P< 0.05), and 8 genes validated by qPCR using Taqman probes. Conclusions 10 molecular processes were significantly affected in hVSMC: Apoptosis and cell cycle, extracellular matrix remodeling, DNA repair, cholesterol efflux, cGMP biosynthesis, endocytic mechanisms, calcium homeostasis, redox balance, membrane trafficking and finally, the immune response to inflammation. The evidence we present supporting the hypothesis for the involvement of oxidative modification of several processes and

  16. [The positional isomers of triglycerides in oils, fats and apoB-100 lipoproteins: palmitic and oleic modes of metabolism of fatty acids-substrates for energy acquiring].

    PubMed

    Kotkina, T I; Titov V N

    2014-01-01

    Even total resemblance of content of fatty acids in triglycerides has both no standing for their functional unity nor even identity of their physical chemical characteristics. The etherification of fatty acids in various positions of three-atomic glycerin separates triglycerides on palmitic and oleic substrates for energy acquiring by cells. The kinetic parameters of biochemical reactions under palmitic mode of metabolism of fatty acids are always low. The myocytes in biological reaction of exotrophy experience deficiency of exogenous fatty acids which in vivo is to permanently supply through activation of biological reaction of endotrophy--enhancement of lipolysis in adipocytes. The biological role of insulin is to prevent formation in vivo of palmitic mode of metabolism of saturated and monoenic fatty acids. Under this condition, the necessity to activate lipolysis and to increase in blood plasma concentration of unesteritied fatty acids forms syndrome of resistance to insulin. The surplus of palmitic fatty acid in food and deficiency of insulin show in vivo unidirectional a physiologic action. The formation of palmitic mode of metabolism of energy substrates--portion of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty infiltration of liver and partiallly essential arterial hypertension.

  17. Enhancement by LDL of transfer of L-4F and oxidized lipids to HDL in C57BL/6J mice and human plasma.

    PubMed

    Meriwether, David; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Grijalva, Victor; Hough, Greg; Vakili, Ladan; Anantharamaiah, G M; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Navab, Mohamad; Fogelman, Alan M; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Shechter, Ishaiahu

    2011-10-01

    The apoA-I mimetic peptide L-4F [(Ac-D-W-F-K-A-F-Y-D-K-V-A-E-K-F-K-E-A-F-NH2) synthesized from all L-amino acids] has shown potential for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Here, we demonstrate that LDL promotes association between L-4F and HDL. A 2- to 3-fold greater association of L-4F with human HDL was observed in the presence of human LDL as compared with HDL by itself. This association further increased when LDL was supplemented with the oxidized lipid 15S-hydroxy-5Z, 8Z, 11Z, 13E-eicosatetraenoic acid (15HETE). Additionally, L-4F significantly (P = 0.02) promoted the transfer of 15HETE from LDL to HDL. The transfer of L-4F from LDL to HDL was demonstrated both in vitro and in C57BL/6J mice. L-4F, injected into C57BL/6J mice, associated rapidly with HDL and was then cleared quickly from the circulation. Similarly, L-4F loaded onto human HDL and injected into C57BL/6J mice was cleared quickly with T(1/2) = 23.6 min. This was accompanied by a decline in human apoA-I with little or no effect on the mouse apoA-I. Based on these results, we propose that i) LDL promotes the association of L-4F with HDL and ii) in the presence of L-4F, oxidized lipids in LDL are rapidly transferred to HDL allowing these oxidized lipids to be acted upon by HDL-associated enzymes and/or cleared from the circulation.

  18. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter J. H.; MacKay, Dylan. S.; Senanayake, Vijitha K.; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J. A.; Connelly, Philip W.; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; West, Sheila G.; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets; 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p=0.0005 and p=0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p=0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p=0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p=0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding. PMID:25528432

  19. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter J H; MacKay, Dylan S; Senanayake, Vijitha K; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J A; Connelly, Philip W; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; West, Sheila G; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A; Hantgan, Roy R; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2015-02-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets: 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p = 0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p = 0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p = 0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding.

  20. LDL and HDL transfer rates across peripheral microvascular endothelium agree with those predicted for passive ultrafiltration in humans.

    PubMed

    Michel, C Charles; Nanjee, M Nazeem; Olszewski, Waldemar L; Miller, Norman E

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which LDLs and HDLs cross the vascular endothelium from plasma into interstitial fluid are not understood, and have never been studied in humans in vivo. We determined whether the plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of LDL and HDL conform with those predicted by passive ultrafiltration through intercellular pores, or if it is necessary to invoke an active process such as receptor-mediated transcytosis. Plasma and afferent peripheral lymph were collected under steady-state conditions from 30 healthy men, and assayed for seven globular proteins of molecular radii 2.89-8.95 nm, complement C3, and apo AI, apo AII, and apo B. Plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of the seven proteins fitted the relation expected for molecules of their size when transported through two populations of pores of radius 4.95 and 20.1 nm. The same model parameters were then found to accurately predict the clearance rates of both HDL and LDL. The apparent clearance of complement C3, previously shown to be secreted by cultured endothelium, exceeded that predicted by the model. We conclude that the transport of HDL and LDL from plasma into interstitial fluid across the peripheral vascular endothelium in healthy humans can be explained by ultrafiltration without invoking an additional active process such as transcytosis.

  1. LDL and HDL transfer rates across peripheral microvascular endothelium agree with those predicted for passive ultrafiltration in humans

    PubMed Central

    Michel, C. Charles; Nanjee, M. Nazeem; Olszewski, Waldemar L.; Miller, Norman E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which LDLs and HDLs cross the vascular endothelium from plasma into interstitial fluid are not understood, and have never been studied in humans in vivo. We determined whether the plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of LDL and HDL conform with those predicted by passive ultrafiltration through intercellular pores, or if it is necessary to invoke an active process such as receptor-mediated transcytosis. Plasma and afferent peripheral lymph were collected under steady-state conditions from 30 healthy men, and assayed for seven globular proteins of molecular radii 2.89–8.95 nm, complement C3, and apo AI, apo AII, and apo B. Plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of the seven proteins fitted the relation expected for molecules of their size when transported through two populations of pores of radius 4.95 and 20.1 nm. The same model parameters were then found to accurately predict the clearance rates of both HDL and LDL. The apparent clearance of complement C3, previously shown to be secreted by cultured endothelium, exceeded that predicted by the model. We conclude that the transport of HDL and LDL from plasma into interstitial fluid across the peripheral vascular endothelium in healthy humans can be explained by ultrafiltration without invoking an additional active process such as transcytosis. PMID:25398615

  2. [PCSK9 Inhibitors - the magic bullet for LDL cholesterol reduction?].

    PubMed

    Richter, Kurt; Barthel, Andreas; Bornstein, Stefan R; El-Armouche, Ali; Wagner, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin / kexin type 9 (PCSK9) plays an important role in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) metabolism. Subjects harboring loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding for PCSK9 display markedly reduced LDL-C plasma levels. PCSK9 is secreted by the liver, binds to the LDL receptor and, following endocytosis, induces lysosomal degradation of the receptor together with the bound LDL-C. Current PCSK9 inhibitors are monoclonal antibodies that specifically absorb PCSK9. Subsequently, instead of being degraded the receptor can dissociate from LDL-C and recycle, consecutively resulting in an increased hepatocyte LDL receptor density and higher LDL-C clearance. In clinical trials, the PCSK9 inhibitors alirocumab and evolocumab induced reductions in LDL-C of up to 70 % in statin-treated as well as statin-naïve patients. So far, serious side effects (requiring cessation of drug treatment) occurred only in rare cases. Since this new class of lipid lowering drugs promises a high potential benefit, they have been approved by the EMA even before completion of the studies addressing clinically relevant endpoints like cardiovascular events and mortality. Therefore, the expected publication of these study results in 2017 may allow a better assessment of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors.

  3. Atheroprotective effects of Alum are associated with capture of oxidized LDL antigens and activation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wigren, Maria; Bengtsson, Daniel; Dunér, Pontus; Olofsson, Katarina; Björkbacka, Harry; Bengtsson, Eva; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Nilsson, Jan

    2009-06-19

    The immune system represents a promising novel target for prevention of atherosclerosis. Several pilot vaccines that reduce atherosclerosis in experimental animals have been developed. The aluminum hydroxide adjuvant Alum has been shown to have antiatherogenic properties in itself, suggesting that it may be a suitable adjuvant in possible future atherosclerosis vaccines. To characterize the immune pathways mediating this protection, we treated wild-type C57BL/6 and Apoe(-)(/)(-) mice with Alum or PBS. Analyses of splenocytes isolated from 12-week-old mice demonstrated that Alum increased the presence of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells and downregulated the expression of T cell activation markers CD28 and ICOS in Apoe(-)(/)(-) mice but not in C57BL/6 wild-type mice. A similar immunosuppressive phenotype was found also in 25-week-old Apoe(-)(/)(-) mice and was associated with reduced atherosclerosis. Alum precipitates recovered from the injection site of Apoe(-)(/)(-) mice contained antigens derived from oxidized LDL. These findings demonstrate that treatment of Apoe(-)(/)(-) mice with Alum results in an increase of regulatory T cells and suggest that these are activated by tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells presenting oxidized LDL antigens. Our findings provide improved mechanistic understanding of the atheroprotective properties of aluminum hydroxide adjuvants but also point to the importance of determining if hypercholesterolemia may compromise the efficacy of Alum-containing vaccines used clinically today.

  4. Decoding of lipoprotein – receptor interactions; Properties of ligand binding modules governing interactions with ApoE

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Miklos; Prieto, J. Helena; Croy, Johnny E.; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Clusters of complement-type ligand binding repeats in the LDL receptor family are thought to mediate the interactions between these receptors and their various ligands. Apolipoprotein E, a key ligand for cholesterol homeostasis, has been shown to interact with LDLR, LRP and VLDLR, through these clusters. LDLR and VLDLR each contain a single ligand-binding repeat cluster, whereas LRP contains three large clusters of ligand binding repeats, each with ligand binding functions. We show that within sLRP3, the three-repeat subcluster CR16-18 recapitulated ligand binding to the isolated receptor binding portion of ApoE (residues 130-149). Binding experiments with LA3-5 of LDLR and CR16-18 showed that a conserved W25/D30 pair appears critical for high affinity binding to ApoE(130-149). The triple repeat LA3-5 showed the expected interaction with ApoE(1-191)•DMPC, but surprisingly CR16-18 did not interact with this form of ApoE. To understand these differences in ApoE binding affinity, we introduced mutations of conserved residues from LA5 into CR18, and produced a CR16-18 variant capable of binding ApoE(1-191)•DMPC. This change cannot fully be accounted for by the interaction with the proposed ApoE receptor binding region, therefore we speculate that LA5 is recognizing a distinct epitope on ApoE that may only exists in the lipid bound form. The combination of avidity effects with this distinct recognition process likely governs the ApoE-LDL receptor interaction. PMID:20030366

  5. Nicotine potentiates proatherogenic effects of oxLDL by stimulating and upregulating macrophage CD36 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chadipiralla, Kiranmai; Mendez, Armando J.; Jaimes, Edgar A.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Webster, Keith; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. CD36 mediates oxidized LDL (oxLDL) uptake and contributes to macrophage foam cell formation. We investigated a role for the CD36 pathway in nicotine-induced activation of macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. Nicotine in the same plasma concentration range found in smokers increased the CD36+/CD14+ cell population in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, increased CD36 expression of human THP1 macrophages, and increased macrophage production of reactive oxygen species, PKCδ phosphorylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Nicotine-induced CD36 expression was suppressed by antioxidants and by specific PKCδ and PPARγ inhibitors, implicating mechanistic roles for these intermediates. Nicotine synergized with oxLDL to increase macrophage expression of CD36 and cytokines TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-6, and CXCL9, all of which were prevented by CD36 small interfering (si)RNA. Incubation with oxLDL (50 μg/ml) for 72 h resulted in lipid deposition in macrophages and foam cell formation. Preincubation with nicotine further increased oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation, which was also prevented by CD36 siRNA. Treatment of apoE−/− mice with nicotine markedly exacerbated inflammatory monocyte levels and atherosclerotic plaque accumulation, effects that were not seen in CD36−/− apoE−/− mice. Our results show that physiological levels of nicotine increase CD36 expression in macrophages, a pathway that may account at least in part for the known proinflammatory and proatherogenic properties of nicotine. These results identify such enhanced CD36 expression as a novel nicotine-mediated pathway that may constitute an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in smokers. The results also suggest that exacerbated atherogenesis by this pathway may be an adverse side effect of

  6. Associations between oxidized LDL to LDL ratio, HDL and vascular calcification in the feet of hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    An, Won Suk; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Bae, Hae-Rahn; Rha, Seo-Hee

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular mortality is associated with vascular calcification (VC) in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The present study was designed to find factors related with medial artery calcification on the plain radiography of feet by comparing C-reactive protein (CRP), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) and lipid profile including oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and to elucidate associations among these factors in HD patients. Forty-eight HD patients were recruited for this study. VC in the feet was detected in 18 patients (37.5%) among total patients and 12 patients (85.7%) among diabetic patients. Diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), pulse pressure, ox-LDL/LDL were higher and high density lipoprotein (HDL) was lower in patients with VC than in patients without VC. Negative associations were found between HDL and CRP, PAI-1. PAI-1 had positive association with ox-LDL/LDL. History of CVD was the only determinant of vascular calcification on the plain radiography of feet. Ox-LDL/LDL, HDL, CRP, and PAI-1 were closely related with one another in HD patients. History of CVD is the most important factor associated with the presence of VC and low HDL and relatively high oxidized LDL/LDL ratio may affect VC formation on the plain radiography in the feet of HD patients.

  7. The inhibitory effect of soy protein isolate on atherosclerosis in mice does not require the presence of LDL receptors or alteration of plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael R; Golden, Deborah L; Anthony, Mary S; Register, Thomas C; Williams, J Koudy

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms by which dietary soy favorably influences lipoprotein metabolism and inhibits atherosclerosis are uncertain. Studies of blood mononuclear cells and cultured hepatocytes have indicated that certain soy peptides (i.e., 7S globulins) stimulate expression of LDL receptors. This pathway represents a hypothetical mechanism by which soy's hypocholesterolemic and antiatherosclerotic effects may be mediated. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis is lacking. To address this, we compared effects of dietary soy protein isolate in two genetically engineered mouse models of atherosclerosis. One mouse [LDL receptor -/- + apolipoprotein (apo) B transgenic] is devoid of LDL receptors and overproduces apolipoprotein B, whereas the other (apoE -/-) has a normal complement of LDL receptors but does not produce apolipoprotein E. Male (n = 10-12/group) and ovariectomized female (n = 10-12/group) mice were studied. There were three treatment groups, which differed principally by the source of the protein component of the diet: 1) casein/lactalbumin (no isoflavones), 2) alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (total isoflavones = 0.04 mg/g), and 3) intact soy protein isolate (total isoflavones = 1.72 mg/g). Atherosclerosis was assessed by quantifying the aortic content of esterified cholesterol. Atherosclerosis was inhibited (relative to the casein/lactalbumin group) by both alcohol-washed (45 and 31%) (P < 0.05) and intact (65 and 41%) (P < 0.05) soy protein isolate in LDL receptor -/- and apoE -/- mice, respectively. There was no sex difference. In a two-way analysis, there were significant effects of type of soy isolate and type of mouse. The antiatherosclerosis effect was enhanced in LDL receptor -/- mice (P < 0.001) and diminished in mice fed alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (P < 0.001). Furthermore, inhibitory effects of soy on atherosclerosis were unrelated to plasma LDL, VLDL or HDL cholesterol concentrations. The results represent direct evidence for the

  8. Observational study of lipid profile and LDL particle size in patients with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype is characterized by an increase in plasma triglycerides, a decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), and the prevalence of small, dense-low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) particles. The aim of this study was to establish the importance of LDL particle size measurement by gender in a group of patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MS) attending at a Cardiovascular Risk Unit in Primary Care and their classification into phenotypes. Subjects and methods One hundred eighty-five patients (93 men and 92 women) from several areas in the South of Spain, for a period of one year in a health centre were studied. Laboratory parameters included plasma lipids, lipoproteins, low-density lipoprotein size and several atherogenic rates were determinated. Results We found differences by gender between anthropometric parameters, blood pressure and glucose measures by MS status. Lipid profile was different in our two study groups, and gender differences in these parameters within each group were also remarkable, in HDLc and Apo A-I values. According to LDL particle size, we found males had smaller size than females, and patients with MS had also smaller than those without MS. We observed inverse relationship between LDL particle size and triglycerides in patients with and without MS, and the same relationship between all atherogenic rates in non-MS patients. When we considered our population in two classes of phenotypes, lipid profile was worse in phenotype B. Conclusion In conclusion, we consider worthy the measurement of LDL particle size due to its relationship with lipid profile and cardiovascular risk. PMID:21936888

  9. A common polymorphism in the LDL receptor gene has multiple effects on LDL receptor function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Ihn, Hansel E; Medina, Marisa W; Krauss, Ronald M

    2013-04-01

    A common synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 12 of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, rs688, has been associated with increased plasma total and LDL cholesterol in several populations. Using immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines from a healthy study population, we confirmed an earlier report that the minor allele of rs688 is associated with increased exon 12 alternative splicing (P < 0.05) and showed that this triggered nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the alternatively spliced LDLR mRNA. However, since synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms may influence structure and function of the encoded proteins by co-translational effects, we sought to test whether rs688 was also functional in the full-length mRNA. In HepG2 cells expressing LDLR cDNA constructs engineered to contain the major or minor allele of rs688, the latter was associated with a smaller amount of LDLR protein at the cell surface (-21.8 ± 0.6%, P = 0.012), a higher amount in the lysosome fraction (+25.7 ± 0.3%, P = 0.037) and reduced uptake of fluorescently labeled LDL (-24.3 ± 0.7%, P < 0.01). Moreover, in the presence of exogenous proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), a protein that reduces cellular LDL uptake by promoting lysosomal degradation of LDLR, the minor allele resulted in reduced capacity of a PCSK9 monoclonal antibody to increase LDL uptake. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that rs688, which is located in the β-propeller region of LDLR, has effects on LDLR activity beyond its role in alternative splicing due to impairment of LDLR endosomal recycling and/or PCSK9 binding, processes in which the β-propeller is critically involved.

  10. Adaptor protein ARH is recruited to the plasma membrane by low density lipoprotein (LDL) binding and modulates endocytosis of the LDL/LDL receptor complex in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sirinian, Maria Isabella; Belleudi, Francesca; Campagna, Filomena; Ceridono, Mara; Garofalo, Tina; Quagliarini, Fabiana; Verna, Roberto; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano; Sorice, Maurizio; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Arca, Marcello

    2005-11-18

    ARH is a newly discovered adaptor protein required for the efficient activity of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in selected tissues. Individuals lacking ARH have severe hypercholesterolemia due to an impaired hepatic clearance of LDL. It has been demonstrated that ARH is required for the efficient internalization of the LDL-LDLR complex and to stabilize the association of the receptor with LDL in Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B lymphocytes. However, little information is available on the role of ARH in liver cells. Here we provide evidence that ARH is codistributed with LDLR on the basolateral area in confluent HepG2-polarized cells. This distribution is not modified by the overexpression of LDLR. Conversely, the activation of the LDLR-mediated endocytosis, but not the binding of LDL to LDLR, promotes a significant colocalization of ARH with LDL-LDLR complex that peaked at 2 min at 37 degrees C. To further assess the role of ARH in LDL-LDLR complex internalization, we depleted ARH protein using the RNA interference technique. Twenty-four hours after transfection with ARH-specific RNA interference, ARH protein was depleted in HepG2 cells by more than 70%. Quantitative immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the depletion of ARH caused about 80% reduction in LDL internalization. Moreover, our findings indicate that ARH is associated with other proteins of the endocytic machinery. We suggest that ARH is an endocytic sorting adaptor that actively participates in the internalization of the LDL-LDLR complex, possibly enhancing the efficiency of its packaging into the endocytic vesicles.

  11. Hepatocyte apoB-containing lipoprotein secretion is decreased by the grapefruit flavonoid, naringenin, via inhibition of MTP-mediated microsomal triglyceride accumulation.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; de Dreu, Linda E; Barrett, P Hugh R; Behrsin, Colleen D; Huff, Murray W

    2003-02-11

    Naringenin, the principal flavonoid in grapefruit, reduces plasma lipids in vivo and inhibits apoB secretion, cholesterol esterification, and MTP activity in HepG2 human hepatoma cells. Although naringenin inhibits ACAT, we recently demonstrated that CE availability in the microsomal lumen does not regulate apoB secretion in HepG2 cells. We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of TG accumulation in the ER lumen, secondary to MTP inhibition, is the primary mechanism whereby naringenin blocks lipidation and subsequent secretion of apoB. Multicompartmental modeling of pulse-chase studies was used to compare cellular apoB kinetics in the presence of either naringenin or the specific MTP inhibitor, BMS-197636. At concentrations that reduced apoB secretion by 50%, both compounds selectively enhanced degradation via a kinetically defined, rapid, proteasomal pathway to the same extent. Subcellular fractionation experiments revealed that naringenin and BMS-197636 reduced accumulation of newly synthesized TG in the microsomal lumen by 48% and 54%, respectively. Newly synthesized CE accumulation in the lumen was reduced by 80% and 33% with naringenin and BMS-197636, respectively, demonstrating for the first time that MTP is involved in CE accumulation in the microsomal lumen. Reduced TG availability at this initial site of lipoprotein assembly was associated with significant reductions in the secretion of apoB-containing lipoproteins. Both naringenin and BMS-197636 were most effective in reducing secretion of IDL and LDL, but also inhibited secretion of apoB-containing HDL-sized particles. Furthermore, in McA-RH7777-derived cell lines, naringenin reduced secretion of hapoB72 and hapoB100, which require significant assembly with lipid to be secreted, but did not reduce secretion of hapoB17, hapoB23, and hapoB48, which require only minimal lipidation. Taken together, our results indicate that naringenin inhibits the lipidation and subsequent secretion of apo

  12. Nox2 Modification of LDL Is Essential for Optimal Apolipoprotein B-mediated Control of agr Type III Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Pamela R.; Elmore, Bradley O.; Spang, Cynthia H.; Alexander, Susan M.; Manifold-Wheeler, Brett C.; Castleman, Moriah J.; Daly, Seth M.; Peterson, M. Michal; Sully, Erin K.; Femling, Jon K.; Otto, Michael; Horswill, Alexander R.; Timmins, Graham S.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contains an autoinducing quorum-sensing system encoded within the agr operon that coordinates expression of virulence genes required for invasive infection. Allelic variation within agr has generated four agr specific groups, agr I–IV, each of which secretes a distinct autoinducing peptide pheromone (AIP1-4) that drives agr signaling. Because agr signaling mediates a phenotypic change in this pathogen from an adherent colonizing phenotype to one associated with considerable tissue injury and invasiveness, we postulated that a significant contribution to host defense against tissue damaging and invasive infections could be provided by innate immune mechanisms that antagonize agr signaling. We determined whether two host defense factors that inhibit AIP1-induced agrI signaling, Nox2 and apolipoprotein B (apoB), also contribute to innate control of AIP3-induced agrIII signaling. We hypothesized that apoB and Nox2 would function differently against AIP3, which differs from AIP1 in amino acid sequence and length. Here we show that unlike AIP1, AIP3 is resistant to direct oxidant inactivation by Nox2 characteristic ROS. Rather, the contribution of Nox2 to defense against agrIII signaling is through oxidation of LDL. ApoB in the context of oxLDL, and not LDL, provides optimal host defense against S. aureus agrIII infection by binding the secreted signaling peptide, AIP3, and preventing expression of the agr-driven virulence factors which mediate invasive infection. ApoB within the context of oxLDL also binds AIP 1-4 and oxLDL antagonizes agr signaling by all four agr alleles. Our results suggest that Nox2-mediated oxidation of LDL facilitates a conformational change in apoB to one sufficient for binding and sequestration of all four AIPs, demonstrating the interdependence of apoB and Nox2 in host defense against agr signaling. These data reveal a novel role for oxLDL in host defense against S. aureus quorum-sensing signaling. PMID:23459693

  13. Parabolic relationship between plasma triacylglycerols and LDL-cholesterol in familial combined hyperlipidaemia: the multiple-type hyperlipidaemia explained?

    PubMed

    Brouwers, Martijn C G J; de Graaf, Jacqueline; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; Georgieva, Anna M; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Ter Avest, Ewoud; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Stalenhoef, Anton F; de Bruin, Tjerk W A

    2008-03-01

    FCHL (familial combined hyperlipidaemia) is a highly prevalent genetic lipid disorder that accounts for a substantial number of premature cardiovascular events. To date, FCHL has been complicated by the different lipid phenotypes that are present within one family and one individual patient over time. In the present study, we hypothesized that a parabolic relationship between plasma triacylglycerols (triglycerides) and LDL (low-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol can explain this so-called 'multiple-type hyperlipidaemia' in FCHL. Our hypothesis was tested in two well-documented FCHL cohorts [Maastricht (n=145) and Nijmegen (n=299)] that were followed over a 5-year interval. Three groups were constructed depending on plasma triacylglycerols: group A (individuals with both measurements below 1.5 mmol/l), group B (one measurement below and one measurement above 1.5 mmol/l) and group C (both measurement above 1.5 mmol/l). In both male, but not female, cohorts, a significant positive relationship between plasma triacylglycerols and LDL-cholesterol was observed in group A (P=0.02 for Maastricht cohort and P=0.001 for the Nijmegen cohort), a significant negative relationship in group C (P=0.01 for Maastricht cohort and P=0.02 for the Nijmegen cohort), and a relationship intermediate to group A and C in group B. In contrast, both apoB (apolipoprotein B) levels and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease were related with plasma triacylglycerols in a more linear fashion. In conclusion, a parabolic relationship between plasma triacylglycerols and LDL-cholesterol explains the 'multiple-type hyperlipidaemia' in FCHL. In addition, the linear relationship between triacylglycerols and both apoB levels and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease substantiate the use of apoB instead of LDL-cholesterol in the diagnosis of FCHL and the prediction of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Plasma Levels of Acylation-Stimulating Protein Are Strongly Predicted by Waist/Hip Ratio and Correlate with Decreased LDL Size in Men

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Jumana; Wahab, Rabab A.; Farhan, Hatem; Al-Amri, Issa; Cianflone, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    The association of abdominal obesity with cardiovascular risk is often linked to altered secretion of adipose-derived factors and an abnormal lipid profile including formation of atherogenic small dense low density lipoprotein particles (sdLDL). Acylation-stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipose-derived hormone that exhibits potent lipogenic effects. Plasma ASP levels increase in obesity; however, the association of ASP levels with body fat distribution is not yet established, and no study to date has investigated the association of ASP with LDL size. In this study, we examined the association of ASP levels with abdominal obesity measures and the lipid profile including LDL size in 83 men with a wide range of abdominal girths. Regression analysis showed that waist/hip ratio was the main predictor of ASP levels (β = 0.52, P < 0.0001), significantly followed by decreased LDL size. BMI and TG levels, although positively correlated with ASP levels, were excluded as significant predictors in regression analysis. No correlation was found with LDL-C or apoB levels. ASP levels were 62.5% higher in abdominally obese compared to nonobese men. Waist/hip ratio presenting as the main predictor of ASP levels, suggests increased ASP production by abdominal fat which, as proposed previously, may result from resistance to ASP function causing delayed TG clearance and subsequent formation of atherogenic sdLDL. PMID:24533222

  15. PAF-degrading acetylhydrolase is preferentially associated with dense LDL and VHDL-1 in human plasma. Catalytic characteristics and relation to the monocyte-derived enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tselepis, A D; Dentan, C; Karabina, S A; Chapman, M J; Ninio, E

    1995-10-01

    In human plasma, platelet activating factor (PAF)-degrading acetylhydrolase (acetylhydrolase) is principally transported in association with LDLs and HDLs; this enzyme hydrolyzes PAF and short-chain forms of oxidized phosphatidylcholine, transforming them into lyso-PAF and lysophosphatidylcholine, respectively. We have examined the distribution, catalytic characteristics, and transfer of acetylhydrolase activity among plasma lipoprotein subspecies separated by isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation; the possibility that the plasma enzyme may be partially derived from adherent monocytes has also been evaluated. In normolipidemic subjects with Lp(a) levels < 0.1 mg/mL, acetylhydrolase was associated preferentially with small, dense LDL particles (LDL-5; d = 1.050 to 1.063 g/mL) and with the very-high-density lipoprotein-1 subfraction (VHDL-1; d = 1.156 to 1.179 g/mL), representing 23.9 +/- 1.7% and 20.6 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of total plasma activity. The apparent Km values for PAF of the enzyme associated with such lipoproteins were 89.7 +/- 23.4 and 34.8 +/- 4.5 mumol/L for LDL-5 and VHDL-1, respectively: indeed, the Km value for LDL-5 was some 10-fold higher than that of the light LDL-1, LDL-2, and LDL-3 subspecies, whereas the Km of VHDL-1 was some twofold greater than those of the HDL-2 and HDL-3 subspecies. Furthermore, when expressed on the basis of unit plasma volume, the Vmax of the acetylhydrolase associated with LDL-5 was some 150-fold greater than that in LDL-1 (d = 1.019 to 1.023 g/mL). No significant differences in the pH dependence of enzyme activity or in sensitivity to protease inactivation, sulfydryl reagents, the serine protease inhibitor Pefabloc, or the PAF antagonist CV 3988 could be detected between apo B-containing and apo A-I-containing lipoprotein particle subspecies. Incubation of LDL-1 (Km = 8.4 +/- 2.6 mumol/L) and LDL-2 (d = 1.023 to 1.029 g/mL; Km = 8.4 +/- 3.3 mumol/L) subspecies with LDL-5, in which acetylhydrolase had been

  16. A Single In-Vial Dual Extraction Strategy for the Simultaneous Lipidomics and Proteomics Analysis of HDL and LDL Fractions.

    PubMed

    Godzien, Joanna; Ciborowski, Michal; Armitage, Emily Grace; Jorge, Inmaculada; Camafeita, Emilio; Burillo, Elena; Martín-Ventura, Jose Luis; Rupérez, Francisco J; Vázquez, Jesús; Barbas, Coral

    2016-06-03

    A single in-vial dual extraction (IVDE) procedure for the subsequent analysis of lipids and proteins in the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions derived from the same biological sample is presented. On the basis of methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) extraction, IVDE leads to the formation of three phases: a protein pellet at the bottom, an aqueous phase with polar compounds, and an ether phase with lipophilic compounds. After sample extraction, performed within a high-performance liquid chromatography vial insert, the ether phase was directly injected for lipid fingerprinting, while the protein pellet, after evaporation of the remaining sample, was used for proteomics analysis. Human HDL and LDL isolates were used to test the suitability of the IVDE methodology for lipid and protein analysis from a single sample in terms of data quality and matching composition to that of HDL and LDL. Subsequently, HDL and LDL fractions isolated from ApoE-KO and wild-type mice were used to validate the capacity of IVDE for revealing changes in lipid and protein abundance. Results indicate that IVDE can be successfully used for the subsequent analysis of lipids and proteins with the advantages of time saving, simplicity, and reduced sample amount.

  17. Argan Oil Exerts an Antiatherogenic Effect by Improving Lipids and Susceptibility of LDL to Oxidation in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ould Mohamedou, M. M.; Zouirech, K.; El Messal, M.; El Kebbaj, M. S.; Chraibi, A.; Adlouni, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of argan oil consumption on serum lipids, apolipoproteins (AI and B), CRP, and LDL susceptibility to oxidation in type 2 diabetic patients which are known to have a high level of cardiovascular risk due to lipid abnormalities and lipid peroxidation. For that, 86 type 2 diabetic patients with dyslipidemia were randomized to one group consuming 25 mL/day of argan oil during 3 weeks and control group consuming 20 g/day of butter in breakfast. After argan oil intervention, serum triglycerides decreased by 11.84%, (P = 0.001), total chol by 9.13%, (P = 0.01), and LDL-chol by 11.81%, (P = 0.02). However, HDL-chol and Apo AI increased (10.51%, P = 0.01 and 9.40%,  P = 0.045, resp.). Susceptibility of LDL to lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced by increasing of 20.95%, (P = 0.038) in lag phase after argan oil consumption. In conclusion, we show for the first time that consumption of argan oil may have an antiatherogenic effect by improving lipids, and the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in type 2 diabetes patients with dyslipidemia, and can therefore be recommended in the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22114593

  18. LDL and HDL subfractions, dysfunctional HDL: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Nikolic, Dragana; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Rizzo, Manfredi; Hoogeveen, Ron C

    2014-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are considered as important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), while highdensity lipoproteins (HDL) are well recognized for their putative role in reverse cholesterol transport and other atheroprotective functions. Both LDL and HDL are heterogeneous in nature, including various subfractions depending on the method of isolation (≥ 7 LDL and 10 HDL subspecies, respectively). While it is established that small, dense LDL (sdLDL) have atherogenic potential, the role of different HDL subfractions is still largely unclear. The majority of clinical studies suggest an atheroprotective role of larger HDL particles, although recent work has highlighted the role of dysfunctional HDL within different subfractions. Several therapeutic approaches are able to primarily target cholesterol concentration in LDL or HDL. Certain drugs, such as niacin, statins and fibrates target multiple lipid traits (i.e. pleiotropic drug effects), while cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors are able to increase plasma HDL cholesterol levels. Statins represent the most used lipid-lowering drugs, but there is a continued interest in the development of novel therapeutic approaches, including those that might affect dysfunctional HDL. Targeting distinct LDL and HDL subfractions may potentially reduce the residual risk seen in clinical endpoint trials.

  19. Differential regulation of acid sphingomyelinase in macrophages stimulated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL immune complexes: role in phagocytosis and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Al Gadban, Mohammed M; Smith, Kent J; Jenkins, Russell W; Mayroo, Nalini; Virella, Gabriel; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Bielawska, Alicja; Hannun, Yusuf A; Hammad, Samar M

    2012-05-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL-containing immune complexes (oxLDL-IC) contribute to the formation of lipid-laden macrophages (foam cells). Fcγ receptors mediate uptake of oxLDL-IC, whereas scavenger receptors internalize oxLDL. We have previously reported that oxLDL-IC, but not free oxLDL, activate macrophages and prolong their survival. Sphingomyelin is a major constituent of cell membranes and lipoprotein particles and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) hydrolyses sphingomyelin to generate the bioactive lipid ceramide. ASMase exists in two forms: lysosomal (L-ASMase) and secretory (S-ASMase). In this study we examined whether oxLDL and oxLDL-IC regulate ASMase differently, and whether ASMase mediates monocyte/macrophage activation and cytokine release. The oxLDL-IC, but not oxLDL, induced early and consistent release of catalytically active S-ASMase. The oxLDL-IC also consistently stimulated L-ASMase activity, whereas oxLDL induced a rapid transient increase in L-ASMase activity before it steadily declined below baseline. Prolonged exposure to oxLDL increased L-ASMase activity; however, activity remained significantly lower than that induced by oxLDL-IC. Further studies were aimed at defining the function of the activated ASMase. In response to oxLDL-IC, heat-shock protein 70B' (HSP70B') was up-regulated and localized with redistributed ASMase in the endosomal compartment outside the lysosome. Treatment with oxLDL-IC induced the formation and release of HSP70-containing and IL-1β-containing exosomes via an ASMase-dependent mechanism. Taken together, the results suggest that oxLDL and oxLDL-IC differentially regulate ASMase activity, and the pro-inflammatory responses to oxLDL-IC are mediated by prolonged activation of ASMase. These findings may contribute to increased understanding of mechanisms mediating macrophage involvement in atherosclerosis.

  20. Mechanisms and genetic determinants regulating sterol absorption, circulating LDL levels, and sterol elimination: implications for classification and disease risk.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Sebastiano; Tarugi, Patrizia; Speedy, Helen E; Dean, Andrew F; Bertolini, Stefano; Shoulders, Carol C

    2011-11-01

    This review integrates historical biochemical and modern genetic findings that underpin our understanding of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) dyslipidemias that bear on human disease. These range from life-threatening conditions of infancy through severe coronary heart disease of young adulthood, to indolent disorders of middle- and old-age. We particularly focus on the biological aspects of those gene mutations and variants that impact on sterol absorption and hepatobiliary excretion via specific membrane transporter systems (NPC1L1, ABCG5/8); the incorporation of dietary sterols (MTP) and of de novo synthesized lipids (HMGCR, TRIB1) into apoB-containing lipoproteins (APOB) and their release into the circulation (ANGPTL3, SARA2, SORT1); and receptor-mediated uptake of LDL and of intestinal and hepatic-derived lipoprotein remnants (LDLR, APOB, APOE, LDLRAP1, PCSK9, IDOL). The insights gained from integrating the wealth of genetic data with biological processes have important implications for the classification of clinical and presymptomatic diagnoses of traditional LDL dyslipidemias, sitosterolemia, and newly emerging phenotypes, as well as their management through both nutritional and pharmaceutical means.

  1. Mechanisms and genetic determinants regulating sterol absorption, circulating LDL levels, and sterol elimination: implications for classification and disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Calandra, Sebastiano; Tarugi, Patrizia; Speedy, Helen E.; Dean, Andrew F.; Bertolini, Stefano; Shoulders, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This review integrates historical biochemical and modern genetic findings that underpin our understanding of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) dyslipidemias that bear on human disease. These range from life-threatening conditions of infancy through severe coronary heart disease of young adulthood, to indolent disorders of middle- and old-age. We particularly focus on the biological aspects of those gene mutations and variants that impact on sterol absorption and hepatobiliary excretion via specific membrane transporter systems (NPC1L1, ABCG5/8); the incorporation of dietary sterols (MTP) and of de novo synthesized lipids (HMGCR, TRIB1) into apoB-containing lipoproteins (APOB) and their release into the circulation (ANGPTL3, SARA2, SORT1); and receptor-mediated uptake of LDL and of intestinal and hepatic-derived lipoprotein remnants (LDLR, APOB, APOE, LDLRAP1, PCSK9, IDOL). The insights gained from integrating the wealth of genetic data with biological processes have important implications for the classification of clinical and presymptomatic diagnoses of traditional LDL dyslipidemias, sitosterolemia, and newly emerging phenotypes, as well as their management through both nutritional and pharmaceutical means. PMID:21862702

  2. Phthalocyanine-labeled LDL for tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Marotta, Diane; Kim, Soungkyoo; Chance, Britton; Glickson, Jerry D.; Busch, Theresa M.; Zheng, Gang

    2005-01-01

    Current limitation of both near-infrared (NIR) tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT) is their lack of sufficient tumor-to-tissue contrast due to the relatively non-specific nature of delivering dye to the tumor, which has led to false negatives for NIR imaging and inadequate therapeutic ratio for PDT. Hence, agents targeting "cancer signatures", i.e. molecules that accumulate selectively in cancer cells, are particular attractive. One of these signatures is low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), which is overexpressed in many tumors. We have developed pyropheophorbide cholesterol oleate reconstituted LDL as a LDLR-targeting photosensitizer (PS) and demonstrated its LDLR-mediated uptake in vitro and in vivo. To improve the labeling efficiency for achieving high probe/protein ratio, tetra-t-butyl silicon phthalocyanine bearing two oleate moieties at its axial positions, (tBu)4SiPcBOA, was designed and synthesized. This compound was designed to 1) prevent the PS aggregation; 2) improve the PS solubility in non-polar solvent; and 3) maximize the PS binding to LDL phospholipid monolayer. Using this novel strategy, (tBu)4SiPcBOA was reconstituted into LDL (r-SiPcBOA-LDL) with a very high payload (500:1 molar ratio). In addition, (tBu)4SiPcBOA reconstituted acetylated LDL (r-SiPcBOA)-AcLDL with similar payload was also prepared. Since Ac-LDL cannot bind to LDLR, (r-SiPcBOA)-AcLDL can serve as the negative control to evaluate LDLR targeting specificity. For biological evaluation of these new agents, confocal microscopy and in vitro PDT protocols were performed using LDLR-overexpressing human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2) tumor model. These studies suggest that LDL serves as a delivery vehicle to bring large amount of the NIR/PDT agents selectively to tumor cells overexpressing LDLR.

  3. Phospholipid chlorohydrin induces leukocyte adhesion to ApoE-/- mouse arteries via upregulation of P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Dever, Gary J; Benson, Robert; Wainwright, Cherry L; Kennedy, Simon; Spickett, Corinne M

    2008-02-01

    HOCl-modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has proinflammatory effects, including induction of inflammatory cytokine production, leukocyte adhesion, and ROS generation, but the components responsible for these effects are not completely understood. HOCl and the myeloperoxidase-H(2)O(2)-halide system can modify both protein and lipid moieties of LDL and react with unsaturated phospholipids to form chlorohydrins. We investigated the proinflammatory effects of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine (SOPC) chlorohydrin on artery segments and spleen-derived leukocytes from ApoE(-/-) and C57 Bl/6 mice. Treatment of ApoE(-/-) artery segments with SOPC chlorohydrin, but not unmodified SOPC, caused increased leukocyte-arterial adhesion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. This could be prevented by pretreatment of the artery with P-selectin or ICAM-1-blocking antibodies, but not anti-VCAM-1 antibody, and immunohistochemistry showed that P-selectin expression was upregulated. However, chlorohydrin treatment of leukocytes did not increase expression of adhesion molecules LFA-1 or PSGL-1, but caused increased release of ROS from PMA-stimulated leukocytes by a CD36-dependent mechanism. The SOPC chlorohydrin-induced adhesion and ROS generation could be abrogated by pretreatment of the ApoE(-/-) mice with pravastatin or a nitrated derivative, NCX 6550. These findings suggest that phospholipid chlorohydrins formed in HOCl-treated LDL could contribute to the proinflammatory effects observed for this modified lipoprotein in vitro.

  4. Oxidized LDL, anti-oxidized LDL and anti-annexin A5 antibodies in primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Becarevic, Mirjana; Singh, Sandra; Majkic-Singh, Nada

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare whether oxidized LDL (oxLDL), anti-oxLDL and anti-annexin (anx) A5 antibodies are associated with clinical features of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), and to compare these to well-defined groups of non-PAPS myocardial infarction survivors (non-PAPS MI) and to non-PAPS patients with pulmonary emboli (non-PAPS PE). All parameters investigated were analyzed by ELISA using commercial reagents. PAPS patients with MI, in comparison to the group of non-PAPS MI survivors, had significantly elevated concentrations of oxLDL (p = 0.003) and anti-oxLDL antibodies (p = 0.024). Anti-anxA5 antibodies of the IgG isotype were associated with recurrent abortions (OR = 4.788, p = 0.036, 95% CI: 1.104 - 20.762). OxLDL and anti-oxLDL antibodies represent additional risk factors which, together with other factors, might lead to complications of arterial thromboses, such as myocardial infarctions in PAPS, while association of IgG anti-anxA5 antibodies with recurrent abortions is a reflection of the small number of patients with this feature involved in the study and should therefore be investigated further.

  5. Description of a large family with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia associated with the APOE p.Leu167del mutation

    PubMed Central

    Marduel, Marie; Ouguerram, Khadija; Serre, Valérie; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Berge, Knut Erik; Devillers, Martine; Luc, Gérald; Lecerf, Jean-Michel; Tosolini, Laurent; Erlich, Danièle; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan; Nitchké, Patrick; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Abifadel, Marianne; Kathiresan, Sekar; Leren, Trond Paul; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Apo E mutants are associated with type III hyperlipoproteinemia characterized by high cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia (ADH), due to mutations in the LDLR, APOB or PCSK9 genes, is characterized by an isolated elevation of cholesterol due to high levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We now report an exceptionally large family including 14 members with ADH. Through genome wide mapping, analysis of regional/functional candidate genes and whole exome sequencing, we identified a mutation in the APOE gene, p.Leu167del previously reported associated with sea-blue histiocytosis and familial combined hyperlipidemia. We confirmed the involvement of the APOE p.Leu167del in ADH, with (1) a predicted destabilization of an alpha-helix in the binding domain; (2) a decreased apo E level in LDL; and (3) a decreased catabolism of LDL. Our results show that mutations in the APOE gene can be associated with bona fide ADH. PMID:22949395

  6. LDL biochemical modifications: a link between atherosclerosis and aging

    PubMed Central

    Alique, Matilde; Luna, Carlos; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an aging disease in which increasing age is a risk factor. Modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a well-known risk marker for cardiovascular disease. High-plasma LDL concentrations and modifications, such as oxidation, glycosylation, carbamylation and glycoxidation, have been shown to be proatherogenic experimentally in vitro and in vivo. Atherosclerosis results from alterations to LDL in the arterial wall by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Evidence suggests that common risk factors for atherosclerosis raise the likelihood that free ROS are produced from endothelial cells and other cells. Furthermore, oxidative stress is an important factor in the induction of endothelial senescence. Thus, endothelial damage and cellular senescence are well-established markers for atherosclerosis. This review examines LDL modifications and discusses the mechanisms of the pathology of atherosclerosis due to aging, including endothelial damage and oxidative stress, and the link between aging and atherosclerosis. PMID:26637360

  7. Oxidized LDL and LOX-1 in Experimental Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Banna, Nadia; Lehmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and the lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) are upregulated in inflammation. Because of the importance of inflammation and capillary leakage in the impairment of the microcirculation, which in turn contributes to the development of sepsis and multiorgan failure, the role of oxidized LDL and LOX-1 as players of intestinal inflammation is of great interest. In fact, the blockade of LOX-1 during experimental endotoxemia was effective in reducing leukocyte activation. There are several mechanisms by which oxLDL can participate in local and systemic inflammation, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, capillary perfusion, leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, and endothelial activation. This review highlights the evidence relating oxLDL and LOX-1 to proinflammatory disease mechanisms. We also indicate situations when oxLDL, because of exposure time, dose, or degree of oxidization, is involved in disease resolution. Modulation of LOX-1 response could be utilized for the treatment of local and systemic inflammation, but the successful use of this target requires further understanding of its broad effects. PMID:24000272

  8. Endothelial Chlamydia pneumoniae infection promotes oxidation of LDL.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Ralf; Dragonas, Charalampos; Mueller, Andreas; Maltaris, Theodoros; Rupp, Jan; Beckmann, Matthias W; Maass, Matthias

    2004-06-25

    The bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae chronically infects atheromatous lesions and is linked to atherosclerosis by modifying inflammation, proliferation, and the lipid metabolism of blood monocytes. As continuous LDL modification in the vascular intima is crucial for atherogenesis we investigated the impact of endothelial infection on LDL oxidation. HUVEC were infected with a vascular C. pneumoniae strain. Supernatants of infected cells but not cell lysates increased lipid peroxidation products (6.44 vs 6.14 nmol/ml, p<0.05) as determined by thiobarbituric acid reacting substances assay. Moreover, supernatants rendered human LDL more susceptible to oxidation as shown in a copper-ion catalysed LDL oxidation assay by a 16% reduction of LDL resistance against pro-oxidative stimuli (p<0.05). Chlamydial infection of vascular endothelial cells releases acellular components that convert LDL to its proatherogenic form and reduce its resistance against oxidation. Foci of chronic endothelial chlamydial infection may thus continuously contribute to the dysregulated lipid metabolism that promotes atherogenesis.

  9. Aggregation of LDL with chondroitin-4-sulfate makes LDL oxidizable in the presence of water-soluble antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Abuja, Peter M

    2002-02-13

    The content of plasma and arterial interstitial fluid in water-soluble antioxidants makes it unlikely for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidize by the oxidation mechanisms most frequently discussed. By aggregation of LDL in the presence of chondroitin-4-sulfate (C-4-S), but not with chondroitin-6-sulfate or sphingomyelinase, a complex arises which can oxidize in the presence of 20 microM ascorbate and 300 microM urate. This oxidation sensitivity even persists after the gel-filtration of an LDL/C-4-S/Cu(2+) complex, indicating entrapment of Cu(2+) within. This corresponds well to the known ability of C-4-S to bind copper ions and is a potential mechanism by which LDL oxidation in the arterial intima is facilitated after prolonged retention by the extracellular matrix.

  10. Genome-wide association study of genetic determinants of LDL-c response to atorvastatin therapy: importance of Lp(a).

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Harshal A; Colhoun, Helen M; Johnson, Toby; McKeigue, Paul M; Betteridge, D John; Durrington, Paul N; Fuller, John H; Livingstone, Shona; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Neil, Andrew; Poulter, Neil; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C; Stanton, Alice V; Chatterjee, Aurobindo; Hyde, Craig; Calle, Roberto A; Demicco, David A; Trompet, Stella; Postmus, Iris; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J Wouter; Caulfield, Mark; Hitman, Graham A

    2012-05-01

    We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of LDL-c response to statin using data from participants in the Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS; n = 1,156), the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT; n = 895), and the observational phase of ASCOT (n = 651), all of whom were prescribed atorvastatin 10 mg. Following genome-wide imputation, we combined data from the three studies in a meta-analysis. We found associations of LDL-c response to atorvastatin that reached genome-wide significance at rs10455872 (P = 6.13 × 10(-9)) within the LPA gene and at two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) within the APOE region (rs445925; P = 2.22 × 10(-16) and rs4420638; P = 1.01 × 10(-11)) that are proxies for the ε2 and ε4 variants, respectively, in APOE. The novel association with the LPA SNP was replicated in the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) trial (P = 0.009). Using CARDS data, we further showed that atorvastatin therapy did not alter lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and that Lp(a) levels accounted for all of the associations of SNPs in the LPA gene and the apparent LDL-c response levels. However, statin therapy had a similar effect in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients in the top quartile for serum Lp(a) levels (HR = 0.60) compared with those in the lower three quartiles (HR = 0.66; P = 0.8 for interaction). The data emphasize that high Lp(a) levels affect the measurement of LDL-c and the clinical estimation of LDL-c response. Therefore, an apparently lower LDL-c response to statin therapy may indicate a need for measurement of Lp(a). However, statin therapy seems beneficial even in those with high Lp(a).

  11. Genome-wide association study of genetic determinants of LDL-c response to atorvastatin therapy: importance of Lp(a) [S

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Harshal A.; Colhoun, Helen M.; Johnson, Toby; McKeigue, Paul M.; Betteridge, D. John; Durrington, Paul N.; Fuller, John H.; Livingstone, Shona; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Neil, Andrew; Poulter, Neil; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Stanton, Alice V.; Chatterjee, Aurobindo; Hyde, Craig; Calle, Roberto A.; DeMicco, David A.; Trompet, Stella; Postmus, Iris; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Caulfield, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.

    2012-01-01

    We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of LDL-c response to statin using data from participants in the Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS; n = 1,156), the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT; n = 895), and the observational phase of ASCOT (n = 651), all of whom were prescribed atorvastatin 10 mg. Following genome-wide imputation, we combined data from the three studies in a meta-analysis. We found associations of LDL-c response to atorvastatin that reached genome-wide significance at rs10455872 (P = 6.13 × 10−9) within the LPA gene and at two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) within the APOE region (rs445925; P = 2.22 × 10−16 and rs4420638; P = 1.01 × 10−11) that are proxies for the ϵ2 and ϵ4 variants, respectively, in APOE. The novel association with the LPA SNP was replicated in the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) trial (P = 0.009). Using CARDS data, we further showed that atorvastatin therapy did not alter lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and that Lp(a) levels accounted for all of the associations of SNPs in the LPA gene and the apparent LDL-c response levels. However, statin therapy had a similar effect in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients in the top quartile for serum Lp(a) levels (HR = 0.60) compared with those in the lower three quartiles (HR = 0.66; P = 0.8 for interaction). The data emphasize that high Lp(a) levels affect the measurement of LDL-c and the clinical estimation of LDL-c response. Therefore, an apparently lower LDL-c response to statin therapy may indicate a need for measurement of Lp(a). However, statin therapy seems beneficial even in those with high Lp(a). PMID:22368281

  12. Salvianolic acid B inhibits macrophage uptake of modified low density lipoprotein (mLDL) in a scavenger receptor CD36-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yi; Wang, Li; Xu, Yanni; Yang, Yuan; Wang, Lifei; Si, Shuyi; Cho, Sunghee; Hong, Bin

    2012-01-01

    CD36, a class B scavenger receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a host of vascular inflammatory diseases. Through a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for CD36 antagonist, we previously identified salvianolic acid B (SAB), a hydrophilic component derived from the herb Danshen, as a potential candidate. Danshen, the dried roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been widely used in China for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis-related disorders. Previous studies showed that SAB acted as an anti-oxidant by preventing lipid peroxidation and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) formation. The present study was to investigate the specificity and efficacy of SAB in the inhibition of CD36-mediated lipid uptake. SAB reduced modified LDL (mLDL) uptake in a dose-dependent manner in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated THP-1 and RAW 264.7 cells. In the CD36 silenced THP-1 cells, SAB had no effect in reducing mLDL uptake, whereas its over-expression in CHO cells reinstates the effect, indicating a specific involvement of SAB in antagonizing the CD36's function. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed a direct binding of SAB to CD36 with a high affinity (KD =3.74 μM), confirming physical interactions of SAB with the receptor. Additionally, SAB reduced oxLDL-induced CD36 gene expression in the cultured cell lines and primary macrophages. In ApoE KO mice fed a high fat diet, SAB reduced CD36 gene expression and lipid uptake in macrophages, showing its ability to antagonize CD36 pathways in vivo. These results demonstrate that SAB is an effective CD36 antagonist and suggest SAB as a potential anti-atherosclerotic agent. PMID:22658257

  13. Genistein, the dietary-derived angiogenesis inhibitor, prevents LDL oxidation and protects endothelial cells from damage by atherogenic LDL.

    PubMed

    Kapiotis, S; Hermann, M; Held, I; Seelos, C; Ehringer, H; Gmeiner, B M

    1997-11-01

    There is now growing evidence that the oxidative modification of LDL plays a potential role in atherosclerosis. In this study, genistein, a compound derived from a soy diet with a flavonoid chemical structure (4',5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone), which was found to inhibit angiogenesis, has been evaluated for its ability to act as an LDL antioxidant and a vascular cell protective agent against oxidized LDL. The results showed that genistein was able to inhibit the oxidation of LDL in the presence of copper ions or superoxide/nitric oxide radicals as measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance formation, alteration in electrophoretic mobility, and lipid hydroperoxides. Bovine aortic endothelial cell- and human endothelial cell-mediated LDL oxidation was also inhibited in the presence of genistein. The 7-O-glucoside of genistein, genistin, was much less effective in inhibiting LDL oxidation in the cell-free and cell-mediated lipoprotein-oxidating systems. Incubating human endothelial cells in the absence or presence of genistein and challenging the cells with already oxidized lipoprotein revealed that in addition to its antioxidative potential during LDL oxidating processes, genistein effectively protected the vascular cells from damage by oxidized lipoproteins. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein was found to block upregulation of two tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of 132 and 69 kDa in endothelial cells induced by oxidized LDL. Parallel experiments with the inactive analogue daidzein, however, showed that the cytoprotective effect of the isoflavones seems not to be dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation. Our findings will support the suggested and documented beneficial action of a soy diet in preventing chronic vascular diseases and early atherogenic events.

  14. [Acquired partial lipodystrophy. Insulin resistance, hepatic lipase activity and small and dense LDL particles].

    PubMed

    Paglione, A M; Ferrari, N; Berg, G; Frechtel, G; Taverna, M; Fasulo, V; Lopez, G I; Gomez, R M; Bruno, O; Ruiz, M; Wikinski, R L

    2001-01-01

    Partial lipodystrophy (PLD) is an infrequent condition characterized by symmetric loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue in the upper or lower part of the body, although occasionally it affects only the extremities. In all cases it appears along with acantosis nigricans (AN), insulin resistance and impairment in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates. The case depicted pertains to a 49 year old female with no family history involving loss of adipose tissue in face and upper body. No fat in lower part of body was observed. The patient showed facial thinning at age 8, AN at 11 and gestational diabetes during her fourth pregnancy at 33. At present, the patient presents severe hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia with a marked insulin resistance. Type IV hyperlipoproteinemia (OMS), declined C-HDL and Apo A1 and low C-LDL but with a high proportion of small and dense LDL particles were present. Non esterified fatty acids were high. Lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase activities are in the lower limit and increased respectively. Fraction C3 of the complement was diminished. No mutations were observed either in codons 170, 809 and 972 of the IRS-1 receptor or in codon 276 of the adrenergic beta 2 gene.

  15. Oxidized LDL induces in vitro lymphocyte activation in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laczik, Renata; Szodoray, Peter; Veres, Katalin; Lakos, Gabriella; Sipka, Sandor; Szegedi, Gyula; Soltész, Pal

    2010-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a key feature of the atheromatosus plaque and plays a critical role in foam cell formation and perpetuation of inflammatory processes. In antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), oxLDL molecules form complexes with beta2GPI and become target antigens for autoantibodies, which are detectable in the sera of these patients. oxLDL takes part in the pathogenesis of APS and in the concomitant accelerated atherosclerosis, yet the exact associated immune mechanisms are not clear in details. The aim of this study was to assess the activation and proliferation response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from patients with APS in the presence of oxLDL. Thirteen patients with APS and nine healthy individuals were enrolled in the study. Separated PBMCs of these patients were cultured in the presence of immunogenic epitope of oxLDL. Lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine secretion (TNF-alpha, IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10) were assessed by ELISA. We found significant PBMC proliferation in APS compared to healthy controls (PI/proliferation index/APS: 1.76 vs. PI control: 0.56; p = 0.032). A significant IL-2 and IFN-gamma secretion were detected upon oxLDL stimulus in patients with APS compared to controls (IL-2 cytokine secretion index (CSI) APS: 278.5, IL-2 CSI controls: 65.1; p = 0.025; IFN-gamma CSI APS: 163.2, IFN-gamma CSI controls: 77.4; p = 0.025). Based on our findings, we assume that oxLDL via Th1-type cytokine production and lymphocyte proliferation may contribute to the perpetuation of immune processes in APS.

  16. Intradomain Confinement of Disulfides in the Folding of Two Consecutive Modules of the LDL Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Fraga, Hugo; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Ventura, Salvador; Sancho, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The LDL receptor internalizes circulating LDL and VLDL particles for degradation. Its extracellular binding domain contains ten (seven LA and three EGF) cysteine-rich modules, each bearing three disulfide bonds. Despite the enormous number of disulfide combinations possible, LDLR oxidative folding leads to a single native species with 30 unique intradomain disulfides. Previous folding studies of the LDLR have shown that non native disulfides are initially formed that lead to compact species. Accordingly, the folding of the LDLR has been described as a "coordinated nonvectorial” reaction, and it has been proposed that early compaction funnels the reaction toward the native structure. Here we analyze the oxidative folding of LA4 and LA5, the modules critical for ApoE binding, isolated and in the LA45 tandem. Compared to LA5, LA4 folding is slow and inefficient, resembling that of LA5 disease-linked mutants. Without Ca++, it leads to a mixture of many two-disulfide scrambled species and, with Ca++, to the native form plus two three-disulfide intermediates. The folding of the LA45 tandem seems to recapitulate that of the individual repeats. Importantly, although the folding of the LA45 tandem takes place through formation of scrambled isomers, no interdomain disulfides are detected, i.e. the two adjacent modules fold independently without the assistance of interdomain covalent interactions. Reduction of incredibly large disulfide combinatorial spaces, such as that in the LDLR, by intradomain confinement of disulfide bond formation might be also essential for the efficient folding of other homologous disulfide-rich receptors. PMID:26168158

  17. Effects of Simulated Heat Waves with Strong Sudden Cooling Weather on ApoE Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyu; Kuang, Zhengzhong; Zhang, Xiakun

    2015-05-26

    This study analyzes the mechanism of influence of heat waves with strong sudden cooling on cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in ApoE-/- mice. The process of heat waves with strong sudden cooling was simulated with a TEM1880 meteorological-environment simulation chamber according to the data obtained at 5 a.m. of 19 June 2006 to 11 p.m. of 22 June 2006. Forty-eight ApoE-/- mice were divided into six blocks based on their weight. Two mice from each block were randomly assigned to control, heat wave, temperature drop, and rewarming temperature groups. The experimental groups were transferred into the climate simulator chamber for exposure to the simulated heat wave process with strong sudden temperature drop. After 55, 59, and 75 h of exposure, the experimental groups were successively removed from the chamber to monitor physiological indicators. Blood samples were collected by decollation, and the hearts were harvested in all groups. The levels of heat stress factors (HSP60, SOD, TNF, sICAM-1, HIF-1α), cold stress factors (NE, EPI), vasoconstrictor factors (ANGII, ET-1, NO), and four items of blood lipid (TC, TG, HDL-C, and LDL-C) were measured in each ApoE-/- mouse. Results showed that the heat waves increased the levels of heat stress factors except SOD decreased, and decreased the levels of vasoconstrictor factors and blood lipid factors except TC increased. The strong sudden temperature drop in the heat wave process increased the levels of cold stress factors, vasoconstrictor factors and four blood lipid items (except the level of HDL-C which decreased) and decreased the levels of heat stress factors (except the level of SOD which increased). The analysis showed that heat waves could enhance atherosclerosis of ApoE-/- mice. The strong sudden temperature drop during the heat wave process increased the plasma concentrations of NE and ANGII, which indicates SNS activation, and resulted in increased blood pressure. NE and ANGII are vasoconstrictors involved in systemic

  18. [Lowering LDL-cholesterol: the lower the better?

    PubMed

    Bots, M L

    2017-01-01

    There is still a debate about the optimal LDL level to achieve with pharmacological treatment. Some support the 'the lower, the better' approach, others support 'a level less than 2.5 mmol/l suffices'. Two recent JAMA papers lend support to both views. So what to believe? The issue is whether those with an achieved low LDL level (< 1.8 mmol/l) carry a lower vascular risk than those with an LDL between 1.8 and 2.5 mmol/l. To study this, both groups need to be identical with respect to all other factors that determine the risk, and therefore only differ in their respective LDL levels. So it is all about adjustment for confounding. One paper (shows no benefit for a LDL level lower than 2.5 mmol/l) is based on individual participant information, allowing for optimal adjustment. The other paper (shows the lower, the better) is based on mean levels of trial groups, and cannot adequately adjust for confounding. These examples demonstrate that study design is very important.

  19. Exogenous L-arginine and HDL can alter LDL and ox-LDL-mediated platelet activation: using platelet P-selectin receptor numbers.

    PubMed

    Sener, Azize; Enc, Elif; Ozsavci, Derya; Vanizor-Kural, Birgul; Yanikkaya-Demirel, Gulderen; Oba, Rabia; Uras, Fikriye; Demir, Muzaffer

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of exogenous L-arginine and HDL on LDL and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL)-mediated platelet activation. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-activated platelets have been incubated with lipoproteins with or without L-arginine. P-selectin receptor numbers per platelet have been measured by flow cytometry. After incubation with only L-arginine (without lipoproteins), platelet nitric oxide (NO) levels and P-selectin receptor numbers significantly increased compared to the controls (P < .05). After incubation with LDL or ox-LDL, receptor numbers of P-selectin significantly increased (P < .001). However, P-selectin receptor numbers in platelets treated with L-arginine + LDL or L-arginine + ox-LDL decreased compared to the levels in platelets treated with only LDL or ox-LDL (P < .01, P < .001, respectively). Addition of HDL to L-arginine + ox-LDL caused significant reduction in P-selectin receptor numbers as in the control values (P < .001).We have concluded that L-arginine causes enhanced platelet NO levels and blocks the effects of LDL or ox-LDL on platelet P-selectin receptor numbers and HDL also strengthens this effect of L-arginine.

  20. OxLDL or TLR2-induced cytokine response is enhanced by oxLDL-independent novel domain on mouse CD35

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OxLDL binding to CD36 is shown to result in macrophage activation and foam cell formation that have been implicated in atherosclerosis. However, CD36 has also been shown to induce inflammatory response to other ligands besides oxLDL. During the course of blocking CD36 oxLDL binding function using an...

  1. Establishment, in silico analysis, and experimental verification of a large-scale metabolic network of the xanthan producing Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris strain B100.

    PubMed

    Schatschneider, Sarah; Persicke, Marcus; Watt, Steven Alexander; Hublik, Gerd; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2013-08-20

    The γ-proteobacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) B100 synthesizes the polysaccharide xanthan, a commercially important viscosifier. Since the complete genome of Xcc B100 is available, systems biology tools were applied to obtain a deeper understanding of the metabolism involved in xanthan biosynthesis. A large-scale metabolic network was reconstructed and manually curated. The reconstructed network included 352 genes, 437 biochemical reactions, 10 transport reactions, and 338 internal metabolites. To use this network for flux balance analysis, the biomass composition of Xcc B100 was determined. The comprehensive model obtained was applied for in silico analyses to predict biomass generation and gene essentiality. Predictions were extensively validated by analyzing batch culture performance and by carbon balancing including xanthan production. Single gene deletion mutants causing deficiencies in the central carbohydrate metabolism were constructed to enforce major flux redistributions. The impact of xanthan production was studied in vivo and in silico, comparing the physiology of a gumD mutant, negative in xanthan production, with the original strain. The results indicate a redistribution of resources from xanthan to biomass, rather than a reduction in carbon uptake. With this high quality metabolic model, both systems biology analyses and synthetic biology reengineering of Xcc gained an important tool.

  2. Different Functional and Structural Characteristics between ApoA-I and ApoA-4 in Lipid-Free and Reconstituted HDL State: ApoA-4 Showed Less Anti-Atherogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Ji Yoon; Lee, Seung-Taek; Ham, Sihyun; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I and A-IV are protein constituents of high-density lipoproteins although their functional difference in lipoprotein metabolism is still unclear. To compare anti-atherogenic properties between apoA-I and apoA-4, we characterized both proteins in lipid-free and lipid-bound state. In lipid-free state, apoA4 showed two distinct bands, around 78 and 67 Å on native gel electrophoresis, while apoA-I showed scattered band pattern less than 71 Å. In reconstituted HDL (rHDL) state, apoA-4 showed three major bands around 101 Å and 113 Å, while apoA-I-rHDL showed almost single band around 98 Å size. Lipid-free apoA-I showed 2.9-fold higher phospholipid binding ability than apoA-4. In lipid-free state, BS3-crosslinking revealed that apoA-4 showed less multimerization tendency upto dimer, while apoA-I showed pentamerization. In rHDL state (95:1), apoA-4 was existed as dimer as like as apoA-I. With higher phospholipid content (255:1), five apoA-I and three apoA-4 were required to the bigger rHDL formation. Regardless of particle size, apoA-I-rHDL showed superior LCAT activation ability than apoA-4-rHDL. Uptake of acetylated LDL was inhibited by apoA-I in both lipid-free and lipid-bound state, while apoA-4 inhibited it only lipid-free state. ApoA-4 showed less anti-atherogenic activity with more sensitivity to glycation. In conclusion, apoA-4 showed inferior physiological functions in lipid-bound state, compared with those of apoA-I, to induce more pro-atherosclerotic properties. PMID:25997739

  3. Replication of LDL GWAs hits in PROSPER/PHASE as validation for future (pharmaco)genetic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The PHArmacogenetic study of Statins in the Elderly at risk (PHASE) is a genome wide association study in the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at risk for vascular disease (PROSPER) that investigates the genetic variation responsible for the individual variation in drug response to pravastatin. Statins lower LDL-cholesterol in general by 30%, however not in all subjects. Moreover, clinical response is highly variable and adverse effects occur in a minority of patients. In this report we first describe the rationale of the PROSPER/PHASE project and second show that the PROSPER/PHASE study can be used to study pharmacogenetics in the elderly. Methods The genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted using the Illumina 660K-Quad beadchips following manufacturer's instructions. After a stringent quality control 557,192 SNPs in 5,244 subjects were available for analysis. To maximize the availability of genetic data and coverage of the genome, imputation up to 2.5 million autosomal CEPH HapMap SNPs was performed with MACH imputation software. The GWAS for LDL-cholesterol is assessed with an additive linear regression model in PROBABEL software, adjusted for age, sex, and country of origin to account for population stratification. Results Forty-two SNPs reached the GWAS significant threshold of p = 5.0e-08 in 5 genomic loci (APOE/APOC1; LDLR; FADS2/FEN1; HMGCR; PSRC1/CELSR5). The top SNP (rs445925, chromosome 19) with a p-value of p = 2.8e-30 is located within the APOC1 gene and near the APOE gene. The second top SNP (rs6511720, chromosome 19) with a p-value of p = 5.22e-15 is located within the LDLR gene. All 5 genomic loci were previously associated with LDL-cholesterol levels, no novel loci were identified. Replication in WOSCOPS and CARE confirmed our results. Conclusion With the GWAS in the PROSPER/PHASE study we confirm the previously found genetic associations with LDL-cholesterol levels. With this proof-of-principle study we show

  4. In vitro evidence for the protective role of Sida rhomboidea. Roxb extract against LDL oxidation and oxidized LDL-induced apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Devkar, Ranjisinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2011-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate protective role of S. rhomboidea. Roxb (SR) leaf extract against in vitro low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) induced macrophage apoptosis. Copper and cell-mediated LDL oxidation, Ox-LDL-induced peroxyl radical generation, mitochondrial activity, and apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs) were assessed in presence of SR extract. Results clearly indicated that SR was capable of reducing LDL oxidation and formation of intermediary oxidation products. Also, SR successfully attenuated peroxyl radical formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, nuclear condensation, and apoptosis in Ox-LDL-exposed HMDMs. This scientific report is the first detailed investigation that establishes anti-atherosclerotic potential of SR extract.

  5. Plasma kinetics of an LDL-like nanoemulsion and lipid transfer to HDL in subjects with glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bertato, Marina P; Oliveira, Carolina P; Wajchenberg, Bernardo L; Lerario, Antonio C; Maranhão, Raul C

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucose intolerance is frequently associated with an altered plasma lipid profile and increased cardiovascular disease risk. Nonetheless, lipid metabolism is scarcely studied in normolipidemic glucose-intolerant patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether important lipid metabolic parameters, such as the kinetics of LDL free and esterified cholesterol and the transfer of lipids to HDL, are altered in glucose-intolerant patients with normal plasma lipids. METHODS: Fourteen glucose-intolerant patients and 15 control patients were studied; none of the patients had cardiovascular disease manifestations, and they were paired for age, sex, race and co-morbidities. A nanoemulsion resembling a LDL lipid composition (LDE) labeled with 14C-cholesteryl ester and 3H-free cholesterol was intravenously injected, and blood samples were collected over a 24-h period to determine the fractional clearance rate of the labels by compartmental analysis. The transfer of free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids from the LDE to HDL was measured by the incubation of the LDE with plasma and radioactivity counting of the supernatant after chemical precipitation of non-HDL fractions. RESULTS: The levels of LDL, non-HDL and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apo A1 and apo B were equal in both groups. The 14C-esterified cholesterol fractional clearance rate was not different between glucose-intolerant and control patients, but the 3H-free- cholesterol fractional clearance rate was greater in glucose-intolerant patients than in control patients. The lipid transfer to HDL was equal in both groups. CONCLUSION: In these glucose-intolerant patients with normal plasma lipids, a faster removal of LDE free cholesterol was the only lipid metabolic alteration detected in our study. This finding suggests that the dissociation of free cholesterol from lipoprotein particles occurs in normolipidemic glucose intolerance and may participate in atherogenic

  6. Lectin-like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor (LOX-1): A Chameleon Receptor for Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Zeya, Bushra; Arjuman, Albina; Chandra, Nimai Chand

    2016-08-16

    LOX-1, one of the main receptors for oxLDL, is found mainly on the surface of endothelial cells. It is a multifacet 52 kDa type II transmembrane protein that structurally belongs to the C-type lectin family. It exists with short intracellular N-terminal and long extracellular C-terminal hydrophilic domains separated by a hydrophobic domain of 26 amino acids. LOX-1 acts like a bifunctional receptor either showing pro-atherogenicity by activating the NFκB-mediated down signaling cascade for gene activation of pro-inflammatory molecules or playing an atheroprotective agent by receptor-mediated uptake of oxLDL in the presence of an anti-inflammatory molecule like IL-10. Mildly, moderately, and highly oxidized LDL show their characteristic features upon LOX-1 activation and its ligand binding indenture. The polymorphic LOX-1 genes are intensively associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial diseases. The splicing variant LOX IN dimerizes with the native form of LOX-1 and protects cells from damage by oxidized LDL. In the developing field of regenerating medicine, LOX-1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Reduction of copper, but not iron, by human low density lipoprotein (LDL). Implications for metal ion-dependent oxidative modification of LDL.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S M; Frei, B

    1995-03-10

    Cell-mediated oxidative modification of human low density lipoprotein (LDL), most likely an important early step in atherosclerosis, requires redox active metal ions such as copper or iron. We have previously shown that iron-dependent, in contrast to copper-dependent, oxidative modification of LDL requires superoxide, a physiological reductant. In the present study, we sought to explain these discrepant results. LDL was incubated at 37 degrees C with Cu2+ (10 microM) and bathocuproine (BC, 360 microM), an indicator molecule which specifically complexes Cu+, but not Cu2+. In a time- and concentration-dependent manner, LDL reduced Cu2+ to Cu+. An LDL concentration as low as 10 micrograms of protein/ml (about 20 nM) reduced about 7 microM Cu2+ within 1 h of incubation. Complexation of the Cu+ formed under these conditions with BC significantly inhibited oxidative modification of LDL, as assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Preincubation of LDL with N-ethylmaleimide had no effect on the rate and extent of Cu2+ reduction nor LDL oxidation, indicating that free sulfhydryl groups associated with apolipoprotein B are not involved. Addition of either superoxide dismutase or catalase or increasing the alpha-tocopherol content of LDL from 11.8 +/- 3.0 to 24.4 +/- 2.8 nmol/mg of protein also had no significant effect on the kinetics of Cu2+ reduction by LDL. In contrast, incubation of LDL with Fe(3+)-citrate (10 microM) and the indicator bathophenanthroline (BP, 360 microM) resulted in no significant Fe2+ formation, even at LDL concentrations as high as 200 micrograms of protein/ml. However, incubation of LDL with Fe(3+)-citrate and an enzymatic source of superoxide led to rapid formation of Fe2+ and consequent oxidative modification of LDL. Addition of BP inhibited iron-mediated LDL oxidation under these conditions. Our results indicate that reduced metal ions are important mediators of LDL oxidation, and that LDL specifically reduces Cu2+, but not Fe3+. These data

  8. LDL hemoperfusion--a new procedure for LDL apheresis: biocompatibility results from a first pilot study in hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bosch, T; Schmidt, B; Kleophas, W; Otto, V; Samtleben, W

    1997-10-01

    Current lipid apheresis techniques can remove atherogenic lipoproteins only from plasma. The initial mandatory separation of plasma and blood cells renders the extracorporeal circuit complex. We recently described the first clinical application of a new lipid adsorber that adsorbs low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and lipoprotein (a) (Lp[a]) directly from whole blood. In continuation of our work, this paper describes the clinical biocompatibility of this new LDL hemoperfusion system. In a 2 center phase II clinical trial, 12 hypercholesterolemic patients suffering from overt coronary or peripheral artery disease were treated once with LDL hemoperfusion. The new LDL adsorber (DALI, Fresenius, St. Wendel, Germany) contained 480 ml of polyacrylate coated polyacrylamide gel. The anticoagulation protocol consisted of an initial heparin bolus followed by an acid citrate dextrose-A (ACD-A) infusion during the treatment. One patient blood volume was treated per session. All sessions were clinically uneventful. No signs of hemolysis or extracorporeal clot formation could be detected, and cell counts remained virtually constant. In a subgroup of patients (n = 4-6), further biocompatibility parameters were studied. Activation of leukocytes (elastase release), thrombocytes (beta-thromboglobulin [beta-TG] extrusion), and monocytes (interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6) were minimal. Complement activation (C3a and C5a generation) was negligible. The chosen anticoagulation protocol was both safe (constant ionized calcium levels) and effective (low thrombin-antithrombin formation). In summary, within the scope of a first pilot study, this new LDL hemoperfusion procedure combined the features of excellent clinical tolerance, good biocompatibility, and ease of handling. Phase III clinical trials will have to show whether these encouraging preliminary results can be corroborated in a larger patient population.

  9. Smallest LDL particles are most strongly related to coronarydisease progression in men

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.; Superko, H. Robert; Haskell, William L.; Alderman, Edwin L.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Holl, Laura Glines; Krauss,Ronald M.

    2002-12-03

    Objective-LDLs include particle subclasses that havedifferent mobilities on polyacrylamide gradient gels: LDL-I (27.2to 28.5nm), LDL-IIa (26.5 to 27.2 nm), LDL-IIb (25.6 to 26.5 nm), LDL-IIIa (24.7to 25.6 nm), LDL-IIIb (24.2 to 24.7nm), LDL-IVa (23.3 to 24.2 nm), andLDL-IVb (22.0 to 23.3 nm in diameter). We hypothesized that theassociationbetween smaller LDL particles and coronary artery disease(CAD) risk might involve specific LDL subclasses.Methods andResults-Average 4-year onstudy lipoprotein measurements were comparedwith annualized rates of stenosischange from baseline to 4 years in 117men with CAD. The percentages of total LDL and HDL occurringwithinindividual subclasses were measured by gradient gelelectrophoresis. Annual rate of stenosis change was relatedconcordantlyto onstudy averages of total cholesterol (P 0.04), triglycerides (P0.05), VLDL mass (P 0.03),total/HDL cholesterol ratio (P 0.04), LDL-IVb(P 0.01), and HDL3a (P 0.02) and inversely to HDL2-mass (P 0.02)and HDL2b(P 0.03). The average annual rate in stenosis change was 6-fold morerapid in the fourth quartile ofLDL-IVb (5.2 percent) than in the firstquartile ( 2.5 percent, P 0.03). Stepwise multiple regression analysisshowed thatLDL-IVb was the single best predictor of stenosischange.Conclusions-LDL-IVb was the single best lipoprotein predictor ofincreased stenosis, an unexpected result, given thatLDL-IVb representsonly a minor fraction of total LDL. (Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol.2003;23:314-321.)

  10. Unique cellular events occurring during the initial interaction of macrophages with matrix-retained or methylated aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL). Prolonged cell-surface contact during which ldl-cholesteryl ester hydrolysis exceeds ldl protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Buton, X; Mamdouh, Z; Ghosh, R; Du, H; Kuriakose, G; Beatini, N; Grabowski, G A; Maxfield, F R; Tabas, I

    1999-11-05

    A critical event in atherogenesis is the interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins. Although most studies have investigated this interaction by incubating cultured macrophages with monomeric lipoproteins dissolved in media, arterial wall macrophages encounter lipoproteins that are mostly bound to subendothelial extracellular matrix, and these lipoproteins are often aggregated or fused. Herein, we utilize a specialized cell-culture system to study the initial interaction of macrophages with aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL) bound to extracellular matrix. The aggregated LDL remains extracellular for a relatively prolonged period of time and becomes lodged in invaginations in the surface of the macrophages. As expected, the degradation of the protein moiety of the LDL was very slow. Remarkably, however, hydrolysis of the cholesteryl ester (CE) moiety of the LDL was 3-7-fold higher than that of the protein moiety, in stark contrast to the situation with receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl-LDL. Similar results were obtained using another experimental system in which the degradation of aggregated LDL protein was delayed by LDL methylation rather than by retention on matrix. Additional experiments indicated the following properties of this interaction: (a) LDL-CE hydrolysis is catalyzed by lysosomal acid lipase; (b) neither scavenger receptors nor the LDL receptor appear necessary for the excess LDL-CE hydrolysis; and (c) LDL-CE hydrolysis in this system is resistant to cellular potassium depletion, which further distinguishes this process from receptor-mediated endocytosis. In summary, experimental systems specifically designed to mimic the in vivo interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins have demonstrated an initial period of prolonged cell-surface contact in which CE hydrolysis exceeds protein degradation.

  11. Regression and stabilization of advanced murine atherosclerotic lesions: a comparison of LDL lowering and HDL raising gene transfer strategies.

    PubMed

    Van Craeyveld, Eline; Gordts, Stephanie C; Nefyodova, Elena; Jacobs, Frank; De Geest, Bart

    2011-06-01

    Both reductions in atherogenic lipoproteins and increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels may affect atherosclerosis regression. Here, the relative potential of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) lowering and HDL raising gene transfer strategies to induce regression of complex murine atherosclerotic lesions was directly compared. Male C57BL/6 LDL receptor (LDLr)(-/-) mice were fed an atherogenic diet (1.25% cholesterol and 10% coconut oil) to induce advanced atherosclerotic lesions. A baseline group was killed after 6 months and remaining mice were randomized into a control progression (Adnull or saline), an apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (AdA-I), an LDLr (AdLDLr), or a combined apo A-I/LDLr (AdA-I/AdLDLr) adenoviral gene transfer group and followed-up for another 12 weeks with continuation of the atherogenic diet. Gene transfer with AdLDLr decreased non-HDL cholesterol levels persistently by 95% (p < 0.001) compared with baseline. This drastic reduction of non-HDL cholesterol levels induced lesion regression by 28% (p < 0.001) in the aortic root and by 25% (p < 0.05) in the brachiocephalic artery at 12 weeks after transfer. Change in lesion size was accompanied by enhanced plaque stability, as evidenced by increased collagen content, reduced lesional macrophage content, a drastic reduction of necrotic core area, and decreased expression of inflammatory genes. Elevated HDL cholesterol following AdA-I transfer increased collagen content in lesions, but did not induce regression. Apo A-I gene transfer on top of AdLDLr transfer resulted in additive effects, particularly on inflammatory gene expression. In conclusion, drastic lipid lowering induced by a powerful gene transfer strategy leads to pronounced regression and stabilization of advanced murine atherosclerosis.

  12. A Multivariate Genome-Wide Association Analysis of 10 LDL Subfractions, and Their Response to Statin Treatment, in 1868 Caucasians

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Heejung; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Joshua D.; Mora, Samia; Ridker, Paul M.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 7 subfractions of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) and 3 subfractions of intermediate density lipoproteins (IDLs) measured by gradient gel electrophoresis, and their response to statin treatment, in 1868 individuals of European ancestry from the Pharmacogenomics and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease study. Our analyses identified four previously-implicated loci (SORT1, APOE, LPA, and CETP) as containing variants that are very strongly associated with lipoprotein subfractions (log10Bayes Factor > 15). Subsequent conditional analyses suggest that three of these (APOE, LPA and CETP) likely harbor multiple independently associated SNPs. Further, while different variants typically showed different characteristic patterns of association with combinations of subfractions, the two SNPs in CETP show strikingly similar patterns - both in our original data and in a replication cohort - consistent with a common underlying molecular mechanism. Notably, the CETP variants are very strongly associated with LDL subfractions, despite showing no association with total LDLs in our study, illustrating the potential value of the more detailed phenotypic measurements. In contrast with these strong subfraction associations, genetic association analysis of subfraction response to statins showed much weaker signals (none exceeding log10Bayes Factor of 6). However, two SNPs (in APOE and LPA) previously-reported to be associated with LDL statin response do show some modest evidence for association in our data, and the subfraction response proles at the LPA SNP are consistent with the LPA association, with response likely being due primarily to resistance of Lp(a) particles to statin therapy. An additional important feature of our analysis is that, unlike most previous analyses of multiple related phenotypes, we analyzed the subfractions jointly, rather than one at a time. Comparisons of our multivariate analyses with standard univariate analyses

  13. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Association of APOE Genetic Variation with Plasma Lipoprotein Traits in U.S. Whites and African Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Zaheda H.; Wang, Xingbin; Waqar, Fahad; Pirim, Dilek; Niemsiri, Vipavee; Hokanson, John E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Bunker, Clareann H.; Barmada, M. Michael; Demirci, F. Yesim; Kamboh, M. Ilyas

    2014-01-01

    Although common APOE genetic variation has a major influence on plasma LDL-cholesterol, its role in affecting HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides is not well established. Recent genome-wide association studies suggest that APOE also affects plasma variation in HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides. It is thus important to resequence the APOE gene to identify both common and uncommon variants that affect plasma lipid profile. Here, we have sequenced the APOE gene in 190 subjects with extreme HDL-cholesterol levels selected from two well-defined epidemiological samples of U.S. non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) and African Blacks followed by genotyping of identified variants in the entire datasets (623 NHWs, 788 African Blacks) and association analyses with major lipid traits. We identified a total of 40 sequence variants, of which 10 are novel. A total of 32 variants, including common tagSNPs (≥5% frequency) and all uncommon variants (<5% frequency) were successfully genotyped and considered for genotype-phenotype associations. Other than the established associations of APOE*2 and APOE*4 with LDL-cholesterol, we have identified additional independent associations with LDL-cholesterol. We have also identified multiple associations of uncommon and common APOE variants with HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides. Our comprehensive sequencing and genotype-phenotype analyses indicate that APOE genetic variation impacts HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides in addition to affecting LDL-cholesterol. PMID:25502880

  14. Outdoor temperature is associated with serum HDL and LDL

    PubMed Central

    Halonen, Jaana I.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background While exposures to high and low air temperatures are associated with cardiovascular mortality, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease include high levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). We investigated whether temperature was associated with changes in circulating lipid levels, and whether this might explain part of the association with increased cardiovascular events. Methods The study cohort consisted of 478 men in the greater Boston area with a mean age of 74.2 years. They visited the clinic every 3–5 years between 1995–2008 for physical examination and to complete questionnaires. We excluded from analyses all men taking statin medication and all days with missing data, resulting in a total of 862 visits. Associations between three temperature variables (ambient, apparent, and dew point temperature) and serum lipid levels (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides) were studied with linear mixed models that included possible confounders such as air pollution and a random intercept for each subject. Results We found that HDL decreased −1.76% (95% CI: −3.17 – −0.32, lag 2 days), and −5.58% (95% CI: −8.87 – −2.16, moving average of 4 weeks) for each 5°C increase in mean ambient temperature. For the same increase in mean ambient temperature, LDL increased by 1.74% (95% CI: 0.07 – 3.44, lag 1 day) and 1.87% (95% CI: 0.14 – 3.63, lag 2 days). These results were also similar for apparent and dew point temperatures. No changes were found in total cholesterol or triglycerides in relation to temperature increase. Conclusions Changes in HDL and LDL levels associated with an increase in ambient temperature may be among the underlying mechanisms of temperature-related cardiovascular mortality. PMID:21172696

  15. Molecular basis for LDL receptor recognition by PCSK9.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Lagace, Thomas A; McNutt, Markey C; Horton, Jay D; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2008-02-12

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) posttranslationally regulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) by binding to LDLRs on the cell surface, leading to their degradation. The binding site of PCSK9 has been localized to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a complex between PCSK9 and the EGF-A domain of the LDLR. The binding site for the LDLR EGF-A domain resides on the surface of PCSK9's subtilisin-like catalytic domain containing Asp-374, a residue for which a gain-of-function mutation (Asp-374-Tyr) increases the affinity of PCSK9 toward LDLR and increases plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in humans. The binding surface on PCSK9 is distant from its catalytic site, and the EGF-A domain makes no contact with either the C-terminal domain or the prodomain. Point mutations in PCSK9 that altered key residues contributing to EGF-A binding (Arg-194 and Phe-379) greatly diminished binding to the LDLR's extracellular domain. The structure of PCSK9 in complex with the LDLR EGF-A domain defines potential therapeutic target sites for blocking agents that could interfere with this interaction in vivo, thereby increasing LDLR function and reducing plasma LDL-C levels.

  16. Enhancement of macrophage survival and DNA synthesis by oxidized-low-density-lipoprotein (LDL)-derived lipids and by aggregates of lightly oxidized LDL.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J A; Jessup, W; Brown, A J; Whitty, G

    2001-01-01

    Human atherosclerotic plaque contains a partially characterized range of normal and oxidized lipids formed mainly from free and esterified cholesterol and phospholipids, some of which can be located in macrophage-derived "foam" cells. Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is often considered as an important event leading to subsequent foam-cell development, which may also include enhanced cell survival and/or proliferation. The active component(s) in oxidized LDL (ox.LDL) causing macrophage proliferation is debated. We report here that the lipid component of ox.LDL can promote macrophage survival and DNA synthesis, the latter response showing a synergistic effect in the presence of low concentrations of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. 7-Ketocholesterol showed some stimulation of macrophage DNA synthesis whereas hypochlorite-oxidized (i.e. apolipoprotein B-oxidized) LDL did not. Plaque-derived lipids could enhance macrophage survival. It has not been proven that LDL in lesions is oxidized sufficiently to be the dominant source of sterols in vivo or to be able to induce macrophage growth in vitro or in vivo; it has been suggested that aggregation of modified LDL in vivo is an important step in the deposition of intracellular lipid. We found that aggregation of lightly oxidized LDL potentiated dramatically its ability to stimulate macrophage DNA synthesis, indicating that extensive oxidation of LDL is not required for this response in vitro and perhaps in vivo. PMID:11256965

  17. Impaired oxidant/antioxidant status and LDL-fatty acid composition are associated with increased susceptibility to peroxidation of LDL in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Merzouk, S; Hichami, A; Sari, A; Madani, S; Merzouk, H; Yahia Berrouiguet, A; Lenoir-Rousseaux, J J; Chabane-Sari, N; Khan, N A

    2004-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine the relationships between oxidant/antioxidant status, in vitro LDL oxidizability and LDL-fatty acid composition in diabetes mellitus. Plasma total antioxidant capacity (oxygen radical absorbance capacity, ORAC) and LDL-cholesteryl ester fatty acids were investigated in type 1 and type 2 diabetic subjects with and without complications. The degree of LDL oxidation was determined by the measurement of hydroperoxide levels before and after in vitro peroxidative stress with CuSO4. ORAC values were decreased in diabetic subjects who showed high basal hydroperoxide levels. Oxidizability of LDL in these subjects was higher than in control subjects and it was unrelated to LDL-fatty acid composition. However, in type 2 diabetic subjects with complications, alterations in LDL-fatty acid composition were associated with their enhanced oxidative susceptibility. LDL-fatty acid alterations might be an additional factor that influences LDL oxidizability especially in type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, diabetes mellitus is associated with enhanced oxidative stress and defective antioxidant/oxidant balance regardless the type of diabetes and presence of complications.

  18. Profound influence of LDL oxidative status and monocyte co-cultures on baboon endothelial activation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Juan; Hondara, Vida; Wang, Xing Li; VandeBerg, John L; Shi, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate how increased LDL levels interact with endothelial cells by using well-defined LDL preparations to limit experimental biases caused by heterogeneity of LDL preparations. Methods We pooled LDL from multiple subjects and prepared several types of LDL from a single source. Then we observed their effects on cultured endothelial cells with and without monocyte co-culture. Results Native and minimally oxidized LDL did not cause significant cell death under most circumstances, and did not up-regulate cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression. Native LDL did result in significant increases of MCP-1 release in five of eight subjects. However, extensively oxidized LDL caused a significant amount of cell death and dramatically decreased MCP-1 secretion. Minimally oxidized LDL elicited a mixed response pattern, with a great deal of variation among subjects. When endothelial cells were co-cultured with monocytes and treated with native LDL, significant up-regulation of CAMs was detected after 24 hours of exposure. Up-regulation was not seen in any treatment group that contained either native LDL or monocytes only, indicating a synergistic effect of LDL and monocytes on endothelial cells. Incubation of cultured monocytes with native LDL also resulted in TNF-α and IL-1β release in a dosage- and time-dependent manner. Neutralization of both TNF-α and IL-1β by 10 μg/mL polyclonal antibodies inhibited the up-regulation of CAMs. Conclusion Our results suggest that varying extents of oxidative modification of LDL lead to fundamentally different cytological effects and that native LDL exhibits greater endothelial activation capacity when it interactively cooperates with monocytes. PMID:22254208

  19. LOX-1 expression and oxidized LDL uptake and toxicity in the HN33 neuronal cell line.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoou; Xie, Lin; Greenberg, David A

    2014-09-19

    Cardiovascular risk factors appear to influence the risk and progression of neurodegenerative disease, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. We investigated the possible involvement of oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) in neurodegeneration by studying the expression of LOX-1 and the effects of Ox-LDL in HN33 cells, a neuronal cell line of central nervous system origin. HN33 cells showed LOX-1 protein expression, hypoxic induction of LOX-1, Ox-LDL uptake and Ox-LDL toxicity. LOX-1/Ox-LDL signaling may contribute to the association between cardiovascular risk factors and neurodegenerative disease.

  20. ApoA-I mimetic administration, but not increased apoA-I-containing HDL, inhibits tumour growth in a mouse model of inherited breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cedó, Lídia; García-León, Annabel; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Santos, David; Grijalva, Victor; Martínez-Cignoni, Melanie Raquel; Carbó, José M.; Metso, Jari; López-Vilaró, Laura; Zorzano, Antonio; Valledor, Annabel F.; Cenarro, Ana; Jauhiainen, Matti; Lerma, Enrique; Fogelman, Alan M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) have been associated with breast cancer risk, but several epidemiologic studies have reported contradictory results with regard to the relationship between apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and breast cancer. We aimed to determine the effects of human apoA-I overexpression and administration of specific apoA-I mimetic peptide (D-4F) on tumour progression by using mammary tumour virus-polyoma middle T-antigen transgenic (PyMT) mice as a model of inherited breast cancer. Expression of human apoA-I in the mice did not affect tumour onset and growth in PyMT transgenic mice, despite an increase in the HDLc level. In contrast, D-4F treatment significantly increased tumour latency and inhibited the development of tumours. The effects of D-4F on tumour development were independent of 27-hydroxycholesterol. However, D-4F treatment reduced the plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) levels in mice and prevented oxLDL-mediated proliferative response in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our study shows that D-4F, but not apoA-I-containing HDL, hinders tumour growth in mice with inherited breast cancer in association with a higher protection against LDL oxidative modification. PMID:27808249

  1. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals ALK1 mediates LDL uptake and transcytosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraehling, Jan R.; Chidlow, John H.; Rajagopal, Chitra; Sugiyama, Michael G.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Lee, Monica Y.; Zhang, Xinbo; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Park, Eon Joo; Tao, Bo; Chen, Keyang; Kuruvilla, Leena; Larriveé, Bruno; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa; Ola, Roxana; Rotllan, Noemi; Zhou, Wenping; Nagle, Michael W.; Herz, Joachim; Williams, Kevin Jon; Eichmann, Anne; Lee, Warren L.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Sessa, William C.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and animals lacking functional LDL receptor (LDLR), LDL from plasma still readily traverses the endothelium. To identify the pathways of LDL uptake, a genome-wide RNAi screen was performed in endothelial cells and cross-referenced with GWAS-data sets. Here we show that the activin-like kinase 1 (ALK1) mediates LDL uptake into endothelial cells. ALK1 binds LDL with lower affinity than LDLR and saturates only at hypercholesterolemic concentrations. ALK1 mediates uptake of LDL into endothelial cells via an unusual endocytic pathway that diverts the ligand from lysosomal degradation and promotes LDL transcytosis. The endothelium-specific genetic ablation of Alk1 in Ldlr-KO animals leads to less LDL uptake into the aortic endothelium, showing its physiological role in endothelial lipoprotein metabolism. In summary, identification of pathways mediating LDLR-independent uptake of LDL may provide unique opportunities to block the initiation of LDL accumulation in the vessel wall or augment hepatic LDLR-dependent clearance of LDL. PMID:27869117

  2. Genome wide transcription start sites analysis of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris B100 with insights into the gum gene cluster directing the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Rabeaa S; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Rückert, Christian; Mentz, Almut; Wibberg, Daniel; Hublik, Gerd; Niehaus, Karsten; Pühler, Alfred

    2016-05-10

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the major producer of the exopolysaccharide xanthan, the commercially most important natural polysaccharide of microbial origin. The current work provides deeper insights into the yet uncharacterized transcriptomic features of the xanthan producing strain Xcc-B100. Towards this goal, RNA sequencing of a library based on the selective enrichment of the 5' ends of native transcripts was performed. This approach resulted in the genome wide identification of 3067 transcription start sites (TSSs) that were further classified based on their genomic positions. Among them, 1545 mapped upstream of an actively transcribed CDS and 1363 were classified as novel TSSs representing antisense, internal, and TSSs belonging to previously unidentified genomic features. Analyzing the transcriptional strength of primary and antisense TSSs revealed that in some instances antisense transcription seemed to be initiated at a higher level than its sense counterpart. Mapping the exact positions of TSSs aided in the identification of promoter consensus motifs, ribosomal binding sites, and enhanced the genome annotation of 159 in silico predicted translational start (TLS) sites. The global view on length distribution of the 5' untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) deduced from the data pointed to the occurrence of leaderless transcripts and transcripts with unusually long 5'-UTRs, in addition to identifying seven putative riboswitch elements for Xcc-B100. Concerning the biosynthesis of xanthan, we focused on the transcriptional organization of the gum gene cluster. Under the conditions tested, we present evidence for a complex transcription pattern of the gum genes with multiple TSSs and an obvious considerable role of antisense transcription. The gene gumB, encoding an outer membrane xanthan exporter, is presented here as an example for genes that possessed a strong antisense TSS.

  3. Pathogenic role of modified LDL antibodies and immune complexes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Virella, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    There is strong evidence supporting a key role of the adaptive immune response in atherosclerosis, given that both activated Th cells producing predominantly interferon-γ and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and the corresponding antibodies have been isolated from atheromatous plaques. Studies carried out using immune complexes (IC) prepared with human LDL and rabbit antibodies have demonstrated proatherogenic and pro-inflammatory properties, mostly dependent on the engagement of Fcγ receptors Ⅰ and Ⅱ in macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines. Following the development of a methodology for isolating modified LDL (mLDL) antibodies from serum and isolated IC, it was confirmed that antibodies reacting with oxLDL and advanced glycation end product-modified LDL are predominantly IgG of subtypes 1 and 3 and that mLDL IC prepared with human reagents possesses pro-inflammatory and proatherogenic properties. In previous studies, LDL separated from isolated IC has been analyzed for its modifications, and the reactivity of antibodies isolated from the same IC with different LDL modifications has been tested. Recently, we obtained strong evidence suggesting that the effects of mLDL IC on phagocytic cells are modulated by the composition of the mLDL. Clinical studies have shown that the level of mLDL in circulating IC is a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and, in diabetic patients, other significant complications, such as nephropathy and retinopathy. In conclusion, there is convincing ex vivo and clinical data supporting the hypothesis that, in humans, the humoral immune response to mLDL is pathogenic rather than protective.

  4. Upregulation of macrophage-specific functions by oxidized LDL: lysosomal degradation-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Radhika, A; Sudhakaran, P R

    2013-01-01

    Formation of foam cells from macrophages, which are formed by the differentiation of blood-borne monocytes, is a critical early event in atherogenesis. To examine how pre-exposure of monocytes to modified proteins, such as oxLDL, influences their differentiation to macrophages, an in vitro model system using isolated PBMC maintained in culture in the presence of oxLDL was used. Pretreatment of monocytes with oxLDL caused a faster rate of expression of macrophage-specific functions and loss of monocyte-specific functions compared to unmodified LDL. The effect of oxidation of lipid component of LDL by CuSO(4) and its protein component by HOCl, on mo-mϕ differentiation was studied by monitoring the upregulation of macrophage-specific functions, particularly MMP-9. Chloroquine, a lysosomal degradation blocker, significantly reversed the effect mediated by CuSO(4) oxLDL, indicating the involvement of lysosomal degradation products, while no such effect was observed in HOCl oxLDL-treated cells, indicating the existence of a pathway independent of its lysosomal degradation products. Reversal of the effect of oxLDL by NAC and Calphostin C, an inhibitor of PKC, suggested the activation of RO-mediated signaling pathways. Use of inhibitors of signaling pathways showed that CuSO(4) oxLDL upregulated mϕ-specific MMP-9 through p38 MAPK and Akt-dependent pathways, while HOCl oxLDL utilized ERK ½ and Akt. Further analysis showed the activation of PPARγ and AP-1 in CuSO(4) oxLDL, while HOCl-oxLDL-mediated effect involved NFκB and AP-1. These results suggest that lipid oxLDL- and protein oxLDL-mediated upregulation of mo-mϕ-specific functions involve lysosomal degradation-dependent and -independent activation of intracellular signaling pathways.

  5. The modular adaptor protein ARH is required for low density lipoprotein (LDL) binding and internalization but not for LDL receptor clustering in coated pits.

    PubMed

    Michaely, Peter; Li, Wei-Ping; Anderson, Richard G W; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H

    2004-08-06

    ARH is an adaptor protein required for efficient endocytosis of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors (LDLRs) in selected tissues. Individuals lacking ARH (ARH-/-) have severe hypercholesterolemia due to impaired hepatic clearance of LDL. Immortalized lymphocytes, but not fibroblasts, from ARH-deficient subjects fail to internalize LDL. To further define the role of ARH in LDLR function, we compared the subcellular distribution of the LDLR in lymphocytes from normal and ARH-/- subjects. In normal lymphocytes LDLRs were predominantly located in intracellular compartments, whereas in ARH-/- cells the receptors were almost exclusively on the plasma membrane. Biochemical assays and quantification of LDLR by electron microscopy indicated that ARH-/- lymphocytes had >20-fold more LDLR on the cell surface and a approximately 27-fold excess of LDLR outside of coated pits. The accumulation of LDLR on the cell surface was not due to failure of receptors to localize in coated pits since the number of LDLRs in coated pits was similar in ARH-/- and normal cells. Despite the dramatic increase in cell surface receptors, LDL binding was only 2-fold higher in the ARH-/- lymphocytes. These findings indicate that ARH is required not only for internalization of the LDL.LDLR complex but also for efficient binding of LDL to the receptor and suggest that ARH stabilizes the associations of the receptor with LDL and with the invaginating portion of the budding pit, thereby increasing the efficiency of LDL internalization.

  6. Leucine supplementation via drinking water reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE null mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dai, Xiao-yan; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Ge-xin; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-jiang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that the essential amino acid leucine may be involved in systemic cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. Methods: ApoE null mice were fed with chow supplemented with leucine (1.5% w/v) in drinking water for 8 week. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were examined using Oil Red O staining. Plasma lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were measured with fast protein liquid chromatography. Hepatic gene expression was detected using real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. Results: Leucine supplementation resulted in 57.6% reduction of aortic atherosclerotic lesion area in apoE null mice, accompanied by 41.2% decrease of serum LDL-C levels and 40.2% increase of serum HDL-C levels. The body weight, food intake and blood glucose level were not affected by leucine supplementation. Furthermore, leucine supplementation increased the expression of Abcg5 and Abcg8 (that were involved in hepatic cholesterol efflux) by 1.28- and 0.86-fold, respectively, and significantly increased their protein levels. Leucine supplementation also increased the expression of Srebf1, Scd1 and Pgc1b (that were involved in hepatic triglyceride metabolism) by 3.73-, 1.35- and 1.71-fold, respectively. Consequently, leucine supplementation resulted in 51.77% reduction of liver cholesterol content and 2.2-fold increase of liver triglyceride content. Additionally, leucine supplementation did not affect the serum levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-12, but markedly decreased the serum level of MCP-1. Conclusion: Leucine supplementation effectively attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE null mice by improving the plasma lipid profile and reducing systemic inflammation. PMID:26687933

  7. Caspase-3 Deletion Promotes Necrosis in Atherosclerotic Plaques of ApoE Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schrijvers, Dorien M.; Hermans, Marthe; Van Hoof, Viviane O.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis of macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in advanced atherosclerotic plaques contributes to plaque progression and instability. Caspase-3, a key executioner protease in the apoptotic pathway, has been identified in human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques but its role in atherogenesis is not fully explored. We therefore investigated the impact of caspase-3 deletion on atherosclerosis by crossbreeding caspase-3 knockout (Casp3−/−) mice with apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/−) mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages and VSMCs isolated from Casp3−/−ApoE−/− mice were resistant to apoptosis but showed increased susceptibility to necrosis. However, caspase-3 deficiency did not sensitize cells to undergo RIP1-dependent necroptosis. To study the effect on atherosclerotic plaque development, Casp3+/+ApoE−/− and Casp3−/−ApoE−/− mice were fed a western-type diet for 16 weeks. Though total plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol levels were not altered, both the plaque size and percentage necrosis were significantly increased in the aortic root of Casp3−/−ApoE−/− mice as compared to Casp3+/+ApoE−/− mice. Macrophage content was significantly decreased in plaques of Casp3−/−ApoE−/− mice as compared to controls, while collagen content and VSMC content were not changed. To conclude, deletion of caspase-3 promotes plaque growth and plaque necrosis in ApoE−/− mice, indicating that this antiapoptotic strategy is unfavorable to improve atherosclerotic plaque stability. PMID:27847551

  8. Effects of lowering LDL cholesterol on progression of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard; Lewis, David; Emberson, Jonathan; Reith, Christina; Agodoa, Lawrence; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan C; de Zeeuw, Dick; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Fellström, Bengt; Levin, Adeera; Wheeler, David C; Walker, Rob; Herrington, William G; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J

    2014-08-01

    Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol/L compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant 3% reduction in the incidence of ESRD (1057 [33.9%] cases with simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus 1084 [34.6%] cases with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.89 to 1.05; P=0.41). Similarly, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had no significant effect on the prespecified tertiary outcomes of ESRD or death (1477 [47.4%] events with treatment versus 1513 [48.3%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.04; P=0.34) or ESRD or doubling of baseline creatinine (1189 [38.2%] events with treatment versus 1257 [40.2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD.

  9. Effects of Lowering LDL Cholesterol on Progression of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Richard; Lewis, David; Emberson, Jonathan; Reith, Christina; Agodoa, Lawrence; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan C.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Fellström, Bengt; Levin, Adeera; Wheeler, David C.; Walker, Rob; Herrington, William G.; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Reith, Christina; Emberson, Jonathan; Wheeler, David C.; Tomson, Charles; Wanner, Christoph; Krane, Vera; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Lixin; Hooi, Lai Seong; Levin, Adeera; Agodoa, Lawrence; Gaziano, Mike; Kasiske, Bertram; Walker, Rob; Massy, Ziad A.; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Krairittichai, Udom; Ophascharoensuk, Vuddidhej; Fellström, Bengt; Holdaas, Hallvard; Tesar, Vladimir; Wiecek, Andrzej; Grobbee, Diederick; de Zeeuw, Dick; Grönhagen-Riska, Carola; Dasgupta, Tanaji; Lewis, David; Herrington, Will; Mafham, Marion; Majoni, William; Wallendszus, Karl; Grimm, Richard; Pedersen, Terje; Tobert, Jonathan; Armitage, Jane; Baxter, Alex; Bray, Christopher; Chen, Yiping; Chen, Zhengming; Hill, Michael; Knott, Carol; Parish, Sarah; Simpson, David; Sleight, Peter; Young, Alan; Collins, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol/L compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant 3% reduction in the incidence of ESRD (1057 [33.9%] cases with simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus 1084 [34.6%] cases with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.89 to 1.05; P=0.41). Similarly, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had no significant effect on the prespecified tertiary outcomes of ESRD or death (1477 [47.4%] events with treatment versus 1513 [48.3%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.04; P=0.34) or ESRD or doubling of baseline creatinine (1189 [38.2%] events with treatment versus 1257 [40.2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD. PMID:24790178

  10. Indium-111-labeled LDL: A potential agent for imaging atherosclerotic disease and lipoprotein biodistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.M.; Butler, S.P.; Meinken, G.E.; Wang, T.S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Srivastava, S.C.; Alderson, P.O.; Ginsberg, H.N. )

    1990-03-01

    Radiolabeling of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and external imaging with a gamma camera would offer a means of taking advantage of the metabolic activity of developing atherosclerotic lesions in order to noninvasively detect and determine the extent of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled LDL was prepared and its purity demonstrated by agarose electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. In vitro studies with cultured human fibroblasts demonstrated significant inhibition of iodine-125-({sup 125}I) LDL binding to LDL receptors by {sup 111}In-LDL, although this was less than the inhibition produced by unlabeled LDL. Adrenal gland uptake of {sup 111}In-LDL by hypercholesterolemic rabbits was reduced by 86% compared to the level of uptake observed in normal rabbits. These results were compatible with downregulation of adrenal LDL receptors in the hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Uptake of {sup 111}In-LDL in the atherosclerotic proximal aorta of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was 2.5 times higher than in normal rabbits. These results suggest that {sup 111}In-LDL has the potential to be a useful agent for external imaging of atherosclerotic lesions and lipoprotein biodistribution.

  11. Cowpea protein reduces LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B concentrations, but does not improve biomarkers of inflammation or endothelial dysfunction in adults with moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Frota, Karoline de Macedo Gonçalves; dos Santos Filho, Raul Dias; Ribeiro, Valdenir Queiroz; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-04-01

    Introducción: Los riesgos de las enfermedades cardiovasculares, la principal causa de muerte en el mundo, pueden ser reducidos con la dieta. Proteína caupí en hámsters redujo el colesterol total, LDL-colesterol, así como la esteatosis hepática de manera significativa. Objetivo: Este estudio de prueba de concepto fue verificar si el consumo de proteína de frijol mejora el perfil de lípidos y actúa sobre los biomarcadores de inflamación y disfunción endotelial en pacientes con hipercolesterolemia moderada. Métodos: En un diseño aleatorio doble ciego cruzado, 38 sujetos con hipercolesterolemia (colesterol-LDL = 182,5 ± 2,7 mg/dL) consumieron 25 g / día de aislado de proteína de frijol o 25 g / día de caseína (grupo control) durante seis semanas cada uno, y un intervalo de lavado de cuatro semanas Se recogieron muestras de sangre en ayunas al comienzo y al final de cada período de dieta. Los lípidos (colesterol total, LDL-colesterol, triglicéridos, HDL-colesterol) se determinaron por métodos enzimáticos, apolipoproteínas (apoA-I y apoB) por inmunoensayos normalizados, biomarcadores de inflamación (proteína C reactiva) por turbidimetría y los biomarcadores de disfunción endotelial (molecule-1 de adhesión intercelular y de molécula-1 de adhesión celular vascular) por técnicas de ensayo de inmunoabsorción ligados a enzimas. Resultados y discusión: El consumo de proteínas caupí redujo significativamente el colesterol total (12%), el colesterol LDL (18,9%), colesterol no HDL (16%), apoB (14%), y aumentó el colesterol HDL (2,7%). No se observaron diferencias significativas relacionadas con el grupo de tratamiento para cualquiera de los biomarcadores inflamatorios y de disfunción endotelial. Conclusión: Los presentes hallazgos demostraron el efecto favorable del consumo de proteína caupí en lípidos séricos pro-aterogénicas y apoB en sujetos con hipercolesterolemia moderada, de manera similar a lo observado en un trabajo previo con

  12. Compared with saturated fatty acids, dietary monounsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates increase atherosclerosis and VLDL cholesterol levels in LDL receptor-deficient, but not apolipoprotein E-deficient, mice.

    PubMed

    Merkel, M; Velez-Carrasco, W; Hudgins, L C; Breslow, J L

    2001-11-06

    Heart-healthy dietary recommendations include decreasing the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). However, the relative benefit of replacing SFA with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), or carbohydrates (CARB) is still being debated. We have used two mouse models of atherosclerosis, low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLRKO) and apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoEKO) mice to measure the effects of four isocaloric diets enriched with either SFA, MUFA, PUFA, or CARB on atherosclerotic lesion area and lipoprotein levels. In LDLRKO mice, compared with the SFA diet, the MUFA and CARB diets significantly increased atherosclerosis in both sexes, but the PUFA diet had no effect. The MUFA and CARB diets also increased very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) in males and VLDL-C levels in females. Analysis of data from LDLRKO mice on all diets showed that atherosclerotic lesion area correlated positively with VLDL-C levels (males: r = 0.47, P < 0.005; females: r = 0.52, P < 0.001). In contrast, in apoEKO mice there were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerosis in either sex. Compared with the SFA diet, the CARB diet significantly decreased VLDL-C in males and the MUFA, PUFA, and CARB diets decreased VLDL-C and the CARB diet decreased LDL-C in females. In summary, in LDLRKO mice the replacement of dietary SFA by either MUFA or CARB causes a proportionate increase in both atherosclerotic lesion area and VLDL-C. There were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerotic lesion area in apoEKO mice. These results are surprising and suggest that, depending on the underlying genotype, dietary MUFA and CARB can actually increase atherosclerosis susceptibility, probably by raising VLDL-C levels through a non-LDL receptor, apoE-dependent pathway.

  13. apo B gene knockout in mice results in embryonic lethality in homozygotes and neural tube defects, male infertility, and reduced HDL cholesterol ester and apo A-I transport rates in heterozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L S; Voyiaziakis, E; Markenson, D F; Sokol, K A; Hayek, T; Breslow, J L

    1995-01-01

    apo B is a structural constituent of several classes of lipoprotein particles, including chylomicrons, VLDL, and LDL. To better understand the role of apo B in the body, we have used gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to create a null apo B allele in the mouse. Homozygous apo B deficiency led to embryonic lethality, with resorption of all embryos by gestational day 9. Heterozygotes showed an increased tendency to intrauterine death with some fetuses having incomplete neural tube closure and some live-born heterozygotes developing hydrocephalus. The majority of male heterozygotes were sterile, although the genitourinary system and sperm were grossly normal. Viable heterozygotes had normal triglycerides, but total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol levels were decreased by 37, 37, and 39%, respectively. Hepatic and intestinal apo B mRNA levels were decreased in heterozygotes, presumably contributing to the decreased LDL levels through decreased synthesis of apo B-containing lipoproteins. Kinetic studies indicated that heterozygotes had decreased transport rates of HDL cholesterol ester and apo A-I. As liver and intestinal apo A-I mRNA levels were unchanged, the mechanism for decreased apo A-I transport must be posttranscriptional. Heterozygotes also had normal cholesterol absorption and a normal response of the plasma lipoprotein pattern to chronic consumption of a high fat, high cholesterol, Western-type diet. In summary, we report a mouse model for apo B deficiency with several phenotypic features that were unexpected based on clinical studies of apo B-deficient humans, such as embryonic lethality in homozygotes and neural tube closure defects, male infertility, and a major defect in HDL production in heterozygotes. This model presents an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes. Images PMID:7593600

  14. A high LDL-C to HDL-C ratio predicts poor prognosis for initially metastatic colorectal cancer patients with elevations in LDL-C.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fangxin; He, Wenzhuo; Jiang, Chang; Yin, Chenxi; Guo, Guifang; Chen, Xuxian; Qiu, Huijuan; Rong, Yuming; Zhang, Bei; Xu, Dazhi; Xia, Liangping

    2015-01-01

    Although lipid disequilibrium has been documented for several types of cancer including colorectal cancer (CRC), it remains unknown whether lipid parameters are associated with the outcome of metastatic CRC (mCRC) patients. Here, we retrospectively examined the lipid profiles of 453 mCRC patients and investigated whether any of the lipid parameters correlated with the outcome of mCRC patients. Pretreatment serum lipids, including triglyceride, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), were collected in 453 initially mCRC patients. The LDL-C to HDL-C ratio (LHR) was calculated and divided into the first, second, and third tertiles. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of lipids on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Nearly two-fifths of the patients (41.3%) exhibited elevations in LDL-C while most patients (88.3%) showed normal HDL-C levels. Decreased HDL-C (P=0.542) and increased LDL-C (P=0.023) were prognostic factors for poor OS, while triglyceride (P=0.542) and cholesterol (P=0.215) were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that LDL-C (P=0.031) was an independent prognostic factor. Triglyceride, cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDL-C did not correlate with PFS. Among patients with elevations in LDL-C levels, patients in the third tertile of the LHR had a markedly shorter median OS compared to those in the first or second tertile (P=0.012). Thus, increased LDL-C level is an independent prognostic factor for poor prognosis in mCRC patients, and a high LHR predicts poor prognosis for initially mCRC patients with elevations in LDL-C.

  15. Cytokeratin 8 in Association with sdLDL and ELISA Development

    PubMed Central

    Ashmaig, Mohmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Cytokeratins (CKs) which may also be expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are generally considered to be markers for the differentiation of epithelial cells. Small, dense, low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) particles, also termed LDL-IV, independently predict risk of CVD. Aims: The aims of this study were to develop an analytical method, apart from ultracentrifugation capable of isolating sdLDL in order to study any associated proteins. Materials and Methods: Using modified gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE), de-identified sdLDL-enriched plasma was used to physically elute and isolate sdLDL particles. To validate the finding, additional plasma from 77 normal and 48 higher risk subjects were used to measure sdLDL particles and CK8. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting method were used to identify the characteristics of proteins associated with sdLDL. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was developed and validated for the measurement of CK8 in plasma. Results: The validation of the CK8 ELISA method showed good analytical performance. The isolated sdLDL particles were verified with nondenaturing GGE with the apolipoprotein B component confirmed by Western immunoblotting. Confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western immunoblotting, CK8 was associated with sdLDL. Two-tailed statistical analysis showed that CK8 and sdLDL particles were significantly higher in the high-risk CVD group compared to control group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). Conclusion: This study reports a novel association between CK8 and sdLDL in individuals with CVD who have a predominance of sdLDL. PMID:26713292

  16. Postpartum weight retention is associated with elevated ratio of oxidized LDL lipids to HDL-cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Puhkala, Jatta; Luoto, Riitta; Ahotupa, Markku; Raitanen, Jani; Vasankari, Tommi

    2013-12-01

    Oxidized LDL lipids (ox-LDL) are associated with lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The present study investigated how postpartum weight retention effects on ox-LDL and serum lipids. The study is a nested comparative research of a cluster-randomized controlled trial, NELLI (lifestyle and counselling during pregnancy). During early pregnancy (8-12 weeks) and 1 year postpartum, 141 women participated in measurements for determining of plasma lipids: total cholesterol (T-C), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), triacylglycerols (TAG) and ox-LDL. Subjects were stratified into tertiles (weight loss, unaltered weight and weight gain groups) based on their weight change from baseline to follow-up. Ox-LDL was determined by baseline level of conjugated dienes in LDL lipids. Among the group of weight gainers, concentration of TAG reduced less (-0.14 vs. -0.33, p = 0.002), HDL-C reduced more (-0.31 vs. -0.16, p = 0.003) and ox-LDL/HDL-C ratio increased (3.0 vs. -0.2, p = 0.003) when compared to group of weight loss. Both T-C and LDL-C elevated more (0.14 vs. -0.21, p = 0.008; 0.31 vs. 0.07, p = 0.015) and TAG and ox-LDL reduced less (-0.33 vs. 0.20, p = 0.033; -3.33 vs. -0.68, p = 0.026) in unaltered weight group compared to weight loss group. The women who gained weight developed higher TAG and ox-LDL/HDL-C ratio as compared to those who lost weight. Postpartum weight retention of 3.4 kg or more is associated with atherogenic lipid profile.

  17. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20-50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL.

  18. Long-Term Treatment of Native LDL Induces Senescence of Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung-Tack; Park, Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Joong

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate whether the treatment of primary cultured human endothelial cells with native low-density lipoprotein (nLDL) could induce their senescence and to uncover some of the putative mechanisms involved. For this purpose, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were subcultured and/or continuously cultured with nLDL (0, 2, 5, and 10 μg protein/mL), for up to 9 days. The results indicated that nLDL inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs by arresting the cell cycle at G1 phase. The G1-arrested cells showed increase in cytosolic senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity, a biomarker of cellular senescence. The causative factor of the cellular senescence was nLDL itself and not oxidized LDL (oxLDL), since blocking LDL receptor (LDLR) with the anti-LDLR antibody opposed the nLDL-induced increase of SA-β-Gal activity and decrease of cellular proliferation. In addition, nLDL-induced cellular senescence by inhibiting the phosphorylation of pRb (G1 arrest) via p53 as well as p16 signal transduction pathways. G1 phase arrest of the senescent cells was not overcome by nLDL removal from the culture medium. Moreover, the nLDL-treated cells produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) dose- and time-dependently. These results suggested, for the first time, that long-term treatment of nLDL could induce the premature senescence of endothelial cells. PMID:28197300

  19. Sex Differences in the Impact of the Mediterranean Diet on LDL Particle Size Distribution and Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Alexandra; Corneau, Louise; Lamarche, Benoît; Dodin, Sylvie; Lemieux, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences have been previously highlighted in the cardioprotective effects of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet). The objective of this study was to investigate whether sex differences also exist with regard to LDL particle size distribution and oxidation. Participants were 37 men and 32 premenopausal women (24–53 years) with slightly elevated LDL-C concentrations (3.4–4.9 mmol/L) or total cholesterol/HDL-C ≥5.0. Variables were measured before and after a four-week isoenergetic MedDiet. Sex differences were found in response to the MedDiet for the proportion of medium LDL (255–260 Å) (p for sex-by-time interaction = 0.01) and small, dense LDL (sdLDL; <255 Å) (trend; p for sex-by-time interaction = 0.06), men experiencing an increase in the proportion of medium LDL with a concomitant reduction in the proportion of sdLDL, while an opposite trend was observed in women. A sex difference was also noted for estimated cholesterol concentrations among sdLDL (p for sex-by-time interaction = 0.03), with only men experiencing a reduction in response to the MedDiet. The MedDiet marginally reduced oxidized LDL (oxLDL) concentrations (p = 0.07), with no sex difference. Results suggest that short-termconsumption of the MedDiet leads to a favorable redistribution of LDL subclasses from smaller to larger LDL only in men. These results highlight the importance of considering sex issues in cardiovascular benefits of the MedDiet. PMID:25988764

  20. Dietary cladode powder from wild type and domesticated Opuntia species reduces atherogenesis in apoE knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Garoby-Salom, Sandra; Guéraud, Françoise; Camaré, Caroline; de la Rosa, Ana-Paulina Barba; Rossignol, Michel; Santos Díaz, María del Socorro; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intake of Opuntia species may prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to characterize the biological antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of Opuntia species and to investigate whether Opuntia cladodes prevent the development of atherosclerosis in vivo, in apoE(-)KO mice. The effects of the two Opuntia species, the wild Opuntia streptacantha and the domesticated Opuntia ficus-indica, were tested on the generation of intra- and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and kinetics of the LDL oxidation by murine CRL2181 endothelial cells and on the subsequent inflammatory signaling leading to the adhesion of monocytes on the activated endothelium and the formation of foam cells. Opuntia species blocked the extracellular ROS (superoxide anion) generation and LDL oxidation by CRL2181, as well as the intracellular ROS rise and signaling evoked by the oxidized LDL, including the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFκB, the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 adhesion molecules, and the adhesion of monocytes to CRL2181. In vivo, Opuntia significantly reduced the formation of atherosclerotic lesions and the accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in the vascular wall of apoE-KO mice, indicating that Opuntia cladodes prevent lipid oxidation in the vascular wall. In conclusion, wild and domesticated Opuntia species exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties which emphasize their nutritional benefit for preventing cardiovascular diseases.

  1. PCSK9-mediated degradation of the LDL receptor generates a 17 kDa C-terminal LDL receptor fragment.

    PubMed

    Tveten, Kristian; Strøm, Thea Bismo; Berge, Knut Erik; Leren, Trond P

    2013-06-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to the LDL receptor (LDLR) at the cell surface and reroutes the internalized LDLR to intracellular degradation. In this study, we have shown that PCSK9-mediated degradation of the full-length 160 kDa LDLR generates a 17 kDa C-terminal LDLR fragment. This fragment was not generated from mutant LDLRs resistant to PCSK9-mediated degradation or when degradation was prevented by chemicals such as ammonium chloride or the cysteine cathepsin inhibitor E64d. The observation that the 17 kDa fragment was only detected when the cells were cultured in the presence of the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT indicates that this 17 kDa fragment undergoes γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. The failure to detect the complementary 143 kDa ectodomain fragment is likely to be due to its rapid degradation in the endosomal lumen. The 17 kDa C-terminal LDLR fragment was also generated from a Class 5 mutant LDLR undergoing intracellular degradation. Thus, one may speculate that an LDLR with bound PCSK9 and a Class 5 LDLR with bound LDL are degraded by a similar mechanism that could involve ectodomain cleavage in the endosome.

  2. Influence of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL) on the viability of osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Brodeur, Mathieu R; Brissette, Louise; Falstrault, Louise; Ouellet, Pascale; Moreau, Robert

    2008-02-15

    Cardiovascular diseases have recently been noted as potential risk factors for osteoporosis development. Although it is poorly understood how these two pathologies are related, it is a known fact that oxidized low-density lipoproteins (OxLDL) constitute potential determinants for both of them. The current study investigated the metabolism of OxLDL by osteoblasts and its effect on osteoblastic viability. The results obtained show that OxLDL are internalized but not degraded by osteoblasts while they can selectively transfer their CE to these cells. It is also demonstrated that OxLDL induce proliferation at low concentrations but cell death at high concentrations. This reduction of osteoblast viability was associated with lysosomal membrane damage caused by OxLDL as demonstrated by acridine orange relocalization. Accordingly, chloroquine, an inhibitor of lysosomal activity, accentuated cell death induced by OxLDL. Finally, we demonstrate that osteoblasts have the capacity to oxidize LDL and thereby potentially increase the local concentration of OxLDL. Overall, the current study confirms the potential role of OxLDL in the development of osteoporosis given its influence on osteoblastic viability.

  3. SIRT1 regulates accumulation of oxidized LDL in HUVEC via the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlin; Sun, Juanjuan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Shi, Luyao; Du, Wenxiu; Hu, Lifang; Liu, Chunfeng; Cao, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in the degradation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a new anti-atherosclerotic factor, can induce autophagy in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, we observed the effect of SIRT1 on the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and elucidated whether its effect is relative with the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. The results showed that treatment with either SIRT1 siRNA or SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM) increased Dil-labelled-ox-LDL (Dil-ox-LDL) accumulation in HUVECs, and the SIRT1 inducer resveratrol (RSV) decreased it. Knockdown of autophagy-related protein 5 or inhibit the lysosomal degradation by chloroquine (CQ) decreased the effect of RSV. In HUVECs with ox-LDL, expression of LC3II and LC3 puncta was decreased by treatment with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM, but increased by RSV treatment; sequestosome 1 p62 expression showed the opposite effects. Moreover, Dil-ox-LDL combined with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM showed a much smaller degree of overlap of Lamp1 or Cathepsin D with Dil-ox-LDL than in cells with Dil-ox-LDL alone, and RSV treatment resulted in a greater degree of overlap. These results suggest that SIRT1 can decrease the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and this effect is related to the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

  4. Oxidized-LDL induce morphological changes and increase stiffness of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chouinard, Julie A.; Grenier, Guillaume; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Vermette, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) play a critical role in endothelial injury contributing to the age-related physio-pathological process of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effects of native LDL and ox-LDL on the mechanical properties of living human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements. The contribution of filamentous actin (F-actin) and vimentin on cytoskeletal network organization were also examined by fluorescence microscopy. Our results revealed that ox-LDL had an impact on the HUVEC shape by interfering with F-actin and vimentin while native LDL showed no effect. AFM colloidal force measurements on living individual HUVEC were successfully used to measure stiffness of cells exposed to native and ox-LDL. AFM results demonstrated that the cell body became significantly stiffer when cells were exposed for 24 h to ox-LDL while cells exposed for 24 h to native LDL displayed similar rigidity to that of the control cells. Young's moduli of LDL-exposed HUVEC were calculated using two models. This study thus provides quantitative evidence on biomechanical mechanisms related to endothelial cell dysfunction and may give new insight on strategies aiming to protect endothelial function in atherosclerosis.

  5. Large eddy simulation of LDL surface concentration in a subject specific human aorta.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-02-02

    The development of atherosclerosis is correlated to the accumulation of lipids in the arterial wall, which, in turn, may be caused by the build-up of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) on the arterial surface. The goal of this study was to model blood flow within a subject specific human aorta, and to study how the LDL surface concentration changed during a cardiac cycle. With measured velocity profiles as boundary conditions, a scale-resolving technique (large eddy simulation, LES) was used to compute the pulsatile blood flow that was in the transitional regime. The relationship between wall shear stress (WSS) and LDL surface concentration was investigated, and it was found that the accumulation of LDL correlated well with WSS. In general, regions of low WSS corresponded to regions of increased LDL concentration and vice versa. The instantaneous LDL values changed significantly during a cardiac cycle; during systole the surface concentration was low due to increased convective fluid transport, while in diastole there was an increased accumulation of LDL on the surface. Therefore, the near-wall velocity was investigated at four representative locations, and it was concluded that in regions with disturbed flow the LDL concentration had significant temporal changes, indicating that LDL accumulation is sensitive to not only the WSS but also near-wall flow.

  6. Regulation of small dense LDL concentration in Korean and Scottish men and women.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong Keun; Shin, Gilja; Ryu, Sung Kee; Jang, Yangsoo; Day, Stephen P; Stewart, Grace; Packard, Chris J; Shepherd, James; Caslake, Muriel J

    2002-09-01

    Small dense LDL is now emerging as an important risk factor for coronary artery disease. The amount of the LDL III has been reported to differ between ethnic groups. To investigate differences in the distribution of LDL subfractions between Korean and Scottish populations, we measured the plasma concentration and percent distribution of three major LDL subfractions in age-and sex-matched, middle aged, healthy 124 Korean and Scottish subjects (32 Korean men vs. 32 Scottish men; 30 Korean women vs. 30 Scottish women). Body mass index and waist circumference did not differ between the two ethnic groups. Total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol concentrations were higher in Scottish men compared with Korean men (P<0.01), while plasma triglyceride concentration was higher in Korean men and women (P<0.01 in men, P<0.05 in women). HDL cholesterol concentrations in both Korean men and women were lower than that of their Scottish counterparts (P<0.05 in men; P<0.001 in women). Korean men had lower concentrations of total LDL (242+/-65 vs. 325+/-122 mg/dl, P<0.01), LDL I (24+/-18 vs. 60+/-36 mg/dl, P<0.001) and LDL II (110+/-56 vs. 196+/-78 mg/dl, P<0.001). In contrast, LDL III concentration was markedly higher in Korean men (108+/-75 vs. 70+/-65 mg/dl, P<0.05). Likewise, the percent of LDL I (10.0+/-7.3 vs. 19.1+/-10.1%, P<0.001) and LDL II (47.2+/-20.7 vs. 60.1+/-10.9%, P<0.01) were lower in Korean men, while that of LDL III was higher (42.8+/-24.9 vs. 20.8+/-15.0%, P<0.001). In the female population, there were no differences in total LDL and LDL I concentrations between Korean and Scottish. LDL II concentration was lower in Korean women (106+/-53 vs. 151+/-57 mg/dl, P<0.01). Korean women showed a higher percent of LDL III (24.8+/-24.7 vs. 14.2+/-5.9%, P<0.05) and a lower LDL II (47.8+/-19.1 vs. 61.0+/-10.0%, P<0.01). Multiple linear regression revealed that plasma triglyceride concentration was the most important determinant of the LDL III subfraction concentration in

  7. Genetic variants of ApoE and ApoER2 differentially modulate endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Victoria; Konaniah, Eddy S; Herz, Joachim; Gerard, Robert D; Jung, Eunjeong; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Ahmed, Mohamed; Hui, David Y; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2014-09-16

    It is poorly understood why there is greater cardiovascular disease risk associated with the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE) allele vs. apoE3, and also greater risk with the LRP8/apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) variant ApoER2-R952Q. Little is known about the function of the apoE-ApoER2 tandem outside of the central nervous system. We now report that in endothelial cells apoE3 binding to ApoER2 stimulates endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and endothelial cell migration, and it also attenuates monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. However, apoE4 does not stimulate eNOS or endothelial cell migration or dampen cell adhesion, and alternatively it selectively antagonizes apoE3/ApoER2 actions. The contrasting endothelial actions of apoE4 vs. apoE3 require the N-terminal to C-terminal interaction in apoE4 that distinguishes it structurally from apoE3. Reconstitution experiments further reveal that ApoER2-R952Q is a loss-of-function variant of the receptor in endothelium. Carotid artery reendothelialization is decreased in ApoER2(-/-) mice, and whereas adenoviral-driven apoE3 expression in wild-type mice has no effect, apoE4 impairs reendothelialization. Moreover, in a model of neointima formation invoked by carotid artery endothelial denudation, ApoER2(-/-) mice display exaggerated neointima development. Thus, the apoE3/ApoER2 tandem promotes endothelial NO production, endothelial repair, and endothelial anti-inflammatory properties, and it prevents neointima formation. In contrast, apoE4 and ApoER2-R952Q display dominant-negative action and loss of function, respectively. Thus, genetic variants of apoE and ApoER2 impact cardiovascular health by differentially modulating endothelial function.

  8. Towards increased selectivity of drug delivery to cancer cells: development of a LDL-based nanodelivery system for hydrophobic photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzova, Diana; Huntosova, Veronika; Kasak, Peter; Petrovajova, Dana; Joniova, Jaroslava; Dzurova, Lenka; Nadova, Zuzana; Sureau, Franck; Midkovsky, Pavol; Jancura, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL), a natural in vivo carrier of cholesterol in the vascular system, play a key role in the delivery of hydrophobic photosensitizers (pts) to tumor cells in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. To make this delivery system even more efficient, we have constructed a nano-delivery system by coating of LDL surface by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran. Fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging were used to characterize redistribution of hypericin (Hyp), a natural potent pts, loaded in LDL/PEG and LDL/dextran complexes to free LDL molecules as well as to monitor cellular uptake of Hyp by U87-MG cells. It was shown than the redistribution process of Hyp between LDL molecules is significantly suppressed by dextran coating of LDL surface. On the other hand, PEG does not significantly influence this process. The modification of LDL molecules by the polymers does not inhibit their recognition by cellular LDL receptors. U-87 MG cellular uptake of Hyp loaded in LDL/PEG and LDL/dextran complexes appears to be similar to that one observed for Hyp transported by unmodified LDL particles. It is proposed that by polymers modified LDL molecules could be used as a basis for construction of a drug transport system for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs to cancer cells expressing high level of LDL receptors.

  9. LOX-1 in macrophage migration in response to ox-LDL and the involvement of calpains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianwei; Ding, Zufeng; Lin, Juntang; Guo, Zhikun; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2015-11-06

    Previous studies have shown that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) inhibits macrophage migration, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. Lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor that is expressed in macrophages and binds ox-LDL. Calpains, a family of calcium-dependent proteases, influence several aspects of cell migration. In this study, we investigated the role of LOX-1 in macrophage migration in response to ox-LDL and the involvement of calpains in this process. Peritoneal macrophages from wild type C57BL/6 mice were exposed to different concentrations of ox-LDL (1-20 μg/mL), and expression of LOX-1 and calpain-1 and -2, cell migration and intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)in) were measured. Our results showed that ox-LDL stimulated LOX-1 and calpain-2 expression, and inhibited calpain-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, ox-LDL inhibited macrophage migration and increased Ca(2+)in concentration in macrophages. To further elucidate the role of LOX-1 in ox-LDL-impaired macrophage migration, we isolated peritoneal macrophages from LOX-1 knockout mice, and treated them with ox-LDL. Interestingly, calpain-1 expression was much higher, and calpain-2 expression was lower in LOX-1 knockout macrophages than in wild-type macrophages following exposure to ox-LDL. LOX-1 deletion significantly improved macrophage migration and decreased Ca(2+)in concentration. These data indicate that LOX-1 is, at least in part, responsible for the inhibitory effect of ox-LDL on macrophage migration and this process involves calpain-1 and -2.

  10. [Association between food behavior and hypercholesterolemia-LDL in university students].

    PubMed

    Salazar Ruiz, Erika Nohemi; Márquez Sandoval, Yolanda Fabiola; Vizmanos Lamotte, Bárbara; Altamirano Martínez, Martha Betzaida; Salgado Bernabé, Aralia Berenice; Salgado Goytia, Lorenzo; Muñoz Valle, José Francisco; Parra Rojas, Isela

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: la hipercolesterolemia-LDL (H-LDL) se asocia a mayor riesgo de enfermedad cardiovascular. La asociacion entre H-LDL y alimentacion se ha centrado en aspectos nutrimentales. El estudio de la asociacion entre el comportamiento alimentario (CA) y la H-LDL en estudiantes universitarios podria brindar elementos de correccion y/o prevencion nutricional en esta poblacion. Objetivo: evaluar la asociacion entre CA e H-LDL en estudiantes universitarios. Métodos: estudio transversal realizado en una muestra de 167 estudiantes de la Universidad Autonoma de Guerrero, Mexico. Se midio el colesterol-LDL serico, considerandose hipercolesterolemia una concentracion ≥100 mg/dL. El CA se evaluo mediante un cuestionario previamente validado. La asociacion entre CA e H-LDL se determino con una regresion logistica bivariada, ajustando por sexo, edad, nivel socioeconomico, tabaquismo, ingesta de energia, actividad fisica, presencia o no de obesidad y antecedentes familiares. Resultados: consumir el almuerzo (colacion matutina) se asocio con un 63% de menos riesgo de H-LDL (OR 0,37; 95% IC 0,15, 0,90). Ingerir alimentos fuera de casa una o dos veces a la semana, se asocio con cuatro veces mas riesgo de H-LDL (R 5,14; 95% IC 1,12, 23,62). Los sujetos que referian consumir alimentos en exceso (1 o 2, y 3 o mas veces/semana) tuvieron mayor riesgo de H-LDL (OR 3,26; 95% IC 1,10, 9,64 y OR 10,52; 95% IC 2,66, 41,60, respectivamente). Conclusiones: algunos CA habituales de los estudiantes universitarios de Guerrero implican mayor riesgo de H-LDL. Por ello, promover acciones correctivas y/o preventivas centradas en estos CA podria mejorar la salud de esta poblacion.

  11. Association of LDL subfractions with clinical cardiovascular outcomes: A systematic review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions have been proposed as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Objective: Systematically review the relationship between LDL subfractions and incidence and progression of CVD. Data Sources: Medline, CAB Abstracts, and Cochrane C...

  12. Platelet Activation by Low Concentrations of Intact Oxidized LDL Particles Involves the PAF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Chen, Xi; Salomon, Robert G.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial depolarization aids platelet activation. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) contains the medium length oxidatively truncated phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl-lysoPAF (HAz-LPAF) that disrupts mitochondrial function in nucleated cells, so oxLDL may augment platelet activation. Methods and Results Flow cytometry showed intact oxLDL particles synergized with sub-threshold amounts of soluble agonists to increase intracellular Ca++, and initiate platelet aggregation and surface expression of activated gpIIb/IIIa and P-selectin. oxLDL also induced aggregation and increased intracellular Ca++ in FURA2-labeled cells by itself at low, although not higher, concentrations. HAz-LPAF, alone and in combination with sub-stimulatory amounts of thrombin, rapidly increased cytoplasmic Ca++ and initiated aggregation. HAz-LPAF depolarized mitochondria in intact platelets, but this required concentrations beyond those that directly activated platelets. An unexpectedly large series of chemically pure truncated phospholipids generated by oxidative fragmentation of arachidonoyl-, docosahexaneoyl-, or linoleoyl alkyl phospholipids were platelet agonists. The PAF receptor, thought to effectively recognize only phospholipids with very short sn-2 residues, was essential for platelet activation because PAF receptor agonists blocked signaling by all these medium length phospholipids and oxLDL. Conclusions Intact oxLDL particles activate platelets through the PAF receptor, and the PAF receptor responds to a far wider range of oxidized phospholipids in oxLDL than anticipated. PMID:19112165

  13. The hydrophobic tunnel present in LOX-1 is essential for oxidized LDL recognition and binding.

    PubMed

    Francone, Omar L; Tu, Meihua; Royer, Lori J; Zhu, Jian; Stevens, Kimberly; Oleynek, Joseph J; Lin, Zhiwu; Shelley, Lorraine; Sand, Thomas; Luo, Yi; Kane, Christopher D

    2009-03-01

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a type-II transmembrane protein that belongs to the C-type lectin family of molecules. LOX-1 acts as a cell surface endocytosis receptor and mediates the recognition and internalization of ox-LDL by vascular endothelial cells. Internalization of ox-LDL by LOX-1 results in a number of pro-atherogenic cellular responses implicated in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In an effort to elucidate the functional domains responsible for the binding of ox-LDL to the receptor, a series of site-directed mutants were designed using computer modeling and X-ray crystallography to study the functional role of the hydrophobic tunnel present in the LOX-1 receptor. The isoleucine residue (I(149)) sitting at the gate of the channel was replaced by phenylalanine, tyrosine, or glutamic acid to occlude the channel opening and restrict the docking of ligands to test its functional role in the binding of ox-LDL. The synthesis, intracellular processing, and cellular distribution of all mutants were identical to those of wild type, whereas there was a marked decrease in the ability of the mutants to bind ox-LDL. These studies suggest that the central hydrophobic tunnel that extends through the entire LOX-1 molecule is a key functional domain of the receptor and is critical for the recognition of modified LDL.

  14. A Comparison Between the Effect of Cuminum Cyminum and Vitamin E on the Level of Leptin, Paraoxonase 1, HbA1c and Oxidized LDL in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Samani Keihan, Ghatreh; Gharib, Mohammad Hossein; Momeni, Ali; Hemati, Zohreh; Sedighin, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common metabolic diseases in the world. Vitamin E reduces protein glycation and improves insulin sensitivity, while cumin is effective in remission of diabetes. Therefore this study was designed to evaluate the effects of vitamin E and cumin essential oil, on the blood level of leptin,glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and also on lipid profile in diabetic patients.In this double blind clinical trial, 95 diabetic patients were selected and randomly dividedinto three groups.The first group received cumin essential oil in capsule form. The second group received Vitamin E, and the third group was used ascontrol receiving oral gelatin capsules as placebo for three months period.Blood glucose, lipid profile, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), leptin, HbA1c, oxidized LDL (oxLDL), and paraoxonase1 activity were measured. The results showed reduction in oxLDL and significant increase in paraoxonase 1 in Vitamin E group by the end of the third month period (P<0.05). Cumin group showed decrease in blood glucose, HbA1C, triglyceride, leptin and ox-LDL. ApoA1 and paraoxonase1 were also increased by cumin treatment (P<0.05).Diabetic complications may have been reduced by intake of Vitamin E and cumin essential oil. Cumin in comparison with vitamin E has broader impact and it is more beneficial in terms of ability to reduce the diabetic index. PMID:28357199

  15. Correlation between pretreatment serum LDL-cholesterol levels and prognosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiu; Hu, Qiao-Ying; Piao, Yong-feng; Hua, Yong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the correlations between long-term survival outcomes in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and pretreatment serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Patients and methods Between January 2008 and December 2011, 935 patients with newly diagnosed NPC who were treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy were included in this retrospective clinical analysis. Patients were divided into two groups based on pretreatment LDL-C levels: normal LDL-C (≤3.64 mmol/L; n=816) and elevated LDL-C (>3.64 mmol/L; n=119). Associations between pretreatment LDL-C levels and treatment outcome were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The overall patient follow-up rate was 95.1%, and 726 patients received more than 5 years of follow-up. Five-year overall survival (OS), local control (LC), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates of the entire patient population were 87.1%, 91.1%, and 87.2%, respectively. Rates of 5-year OS, LC, and DMFS for the elevated versus normal LDL-C groups were 77.0% vs 89.1% (P<0.001), 85.8% vs 91.9% (P=0.041), and 81.1% vs 88.1% (P=0.038), respectively. Compared with normal LDL-C levels, elevated LDL-C levels were identified as an independent prognostic factor of a poorer OS (hazard ratio [HR] =2.171; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.424–3.309), LC rate (HR =1.762; 95% CI =1.021–3.942), and DMFS (HR =1.594; 95% CI =1.003–2.532). Conclusion This study found that elevated pretreatment LDL-C levels are negative prognostic indicators of NPC. Elevated LDL-C levels may be useful indicators of locoregional control and distant metastasis in NPC patients. PMID:27217776

  16. The effect of HDL-bound and free PON1 on copper-induced LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Ahmet; Bayrak, Tülin; Bodur, Ebru; Kılınç, Kamer; Demirpençe, Ediz

    2016-09-25

    Oxidative modification of LDL plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) confers protection against atherosclerosis and the antioxidative properties of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) has been suggested to contribute to this effect of HDL. The PON1 exist in two major polymorphic forms (Q and R), which regulate the concentration and activity of the enzyme and alter its ability to prevent lipid oxidation. However, the association of Q192R polymorphism with PON1's capacity to protect against LDL lipoperoxidation is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the purified PON1 Q192R and the partially purified HDL-bound PON1 Q192R isoenzymes (HDL-PON1 Q192R) on LDL oxidation, with respect to their arylesterase/homocysteine thiolactonase (HTLase) activities. Cupric ion-induced LDL oxidation was reduced up to 48% by purified PON1 Q192, but only 33% by an equivalent activity of PON1 R192. HDL-PON1 Q192 isoenzyme caused a 65% reduction, whereas HDL-PON1 R192 isoenzyme caused only 46% reduction in copper ion-induced LDL oxidation. These findings reflect the fact that PON1 Q and PON1 R allozymes may have different protective characteristics against LDL oxidation. The protection against LDL oxidation provided by HDL-PON1 Q192R isoenzymes is more prominent than the purified soluble enzymes. Inhibition of the Ca(+2)-dependent PON1 Q192R arylesterase/HTLase by the metal chelator EDTA, did not alter PON1's ability to inhibit LDL oxidation. These studies indicate that the active site involvement of the purified enzyme is not similar to the HDL-bound one, in terms of both PON1 arylesterase/HTLase activity and the protection of LDL from copper ion-induced oxidation. Moreover, PON1's ability to protect LDL from oxidation does not seem to require calcium.

  17. Implication of low HDL-c levels in patients with average LDL-c levels: a focus on oxidized LDL, large HDL subpopulation, and adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Sereno, José; Teixeira-Lemos, Edite; Marado, Daniela; Palavra, Filipe; Pinto, Rui; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) on patients with LDL-c average levels, focusing on oxidative, lipidic, and inflammatory profiles. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors (n = 169) and control subjects (n = 73) were divided into 2 subgroups, one of normal HDL-c and the other of low HDL-c levels. The following data was analyzed: BP, BMI, waist circumference and serum glucose Total-c, TGs, LDL-c, oxidized LDL, total HDL-c and subpopulations (small, intermediate, and large), paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, hsCRP, uric acid, TNF- α , adiponectin, VEGF, and iCAM1. In the control subgroup with low HDL-c levels, significantly higher values of BP and TGs and lower values of PON1 activity and adiponectin were found, versus control normal HDL-c subgroup. However, differences in patients' subgroups were clearly more pronounced. Indeed, low HDL-c subgroup presented increased HbA1c, TGs, non-HDL-c, Ox-LDL, hsCRP, VEGF, and small HDL-c and reduced adiponectin and large HDL. In addition, Ox-LDL, large-HDL-c, and adiponectin presented interesting correlations with classical and nonclassical markers, mainly in the normal HDL-c patients' subgroup. In conclusion, despite LDL-c average levels, low HDL-c concentrations seem to be associated with a poor cardiometabolic profile in a population with cardiovascular risk factors, which is better evidenced by traditional and nontraditional CV biomarkers, including Ox-LDL, large HDL-c, and adiponectin.

  18. A PCSK9-binding antibody that structurally mimics the EGF(A) domain of LDL-receptor reduces LDL cholesterol in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan G; Di Marco, Stefania; Condra, Jon H; Peterson, Laurence B; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Fubao; Pandit, Shilpa; Hammond, Holly A; Rosa, Ray; Cummings, Richard T; Wood, Dana D; Liu, Xiaomei; Bottomley, Matthew J; Shen, Xun; Cubbon, Rose M; Wang, Sheng-ping; Johns, Douglas G; Volpari, Cinzia; Hamuro, Lora; Chin, Jayne; Huang, Lingyi; Zhao, Jing Zhang; Vitelli, Salvatore; Haytko, Peter; Wisniewski, Douglas; Mitnaul, Lyndon J; Sparrow, Carl P; Hubbard, Brian; Carfí, Andrea; Sitlani, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin-like/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) regulates LDL cholesterol levels by inhibiting LDL receptor (LDLr)-mediated cellular LDL uptake. We have identified a fragment antigen-binding (Fab) 1D05 which binds PCSK9 with nanomolar affinity. The fully human antibody 1D05-IgG2 completely blocks the inhibitory effects of wild-type PCSK9 and two gain-of-function human PCSK9 mutants, S127R and D374Y. The crystal structure of 1D05-Fab bound to PCSK9 reveals that 1D05-Fab binds to an epitope on the PCSK9 catalytic domain which includes the entire LDLr EGF(A) binding site. Notably, the 1D05-Fab CDR-H3 and CDR-H2 loops structurally mimic the EGF(A) domain of LDLr. In a transgenic mouse model (CETP/LDLr-hemi), in which plasma lipid and PCSK9 profiles are comparable to those of humans, 1D05-IgG2 reduces plasma LDL cholesterol to 40% and raises hepatic LDLr protein levels approximately fivefold. Similarly, in healthy rhesus monkeys, 1D05-IgG2 effectively reduced LDL cholesterol 20%-50% for over 2 weeks, despite its relatively short terminal half-life (t(1/2) = 3.2 days). Importantly, the decrease in circulating LDL cholesterol corresponds closely to the reduction in free PCSK9 levels. Together these results clearly demonstrate that the LDL-lowering effect of the neutralizing anti-PCSK9 1D05-IgG2 antibody is mediated by reducing the amount of PCSK9 that can bind to the LDLr.

  19. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Takahashi, Miyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-κB)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-κB inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-κB. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  20. High plasma phospholipase A2 activity, inflammation markers, and LDL alterations in obesity with or without type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Garces, Fatima; López, Flor; Niño, Cladimar; Fernandez, Anazita; Chacin, Luis; Hurt-Camejo, Eva; Camejo, Germán; Apitz-Castro, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Plasma phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)) hydrolyze phospholipids of circulating lipoproteins or deposited in arteries producing bioactive lipids believed to contribute to the atherosclerotic inflammatory response. PLA(2)(s) are elevated in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) but it is not clear which of these conditions is the cause since they frequently coexist. This study attempts to evaluate if high plasma PLA(2)(s) activities and markers of their effects in lipoproteins are associated with obesity or T2D diabetes, or with both. Total PLA(2) and Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent activities, lipids, lipoproteins, apoAI, and apoB apolipoproteins and affinity of apoB-lipoproteins for arterial proteoglycans were measured, as well as Inflammation markers. These parameters were evaluated in plasma samples of four groups: (i) apparently healthy controls with normal BMI (nBMI), (ii) obese subjects with no T2D, (iii) patients with T2D but with nBMI, and (iv) obese patients with T2D. PLA(2) activities were measured in the presence and absence of Ca(2+) and in the presence of specific inhibitors. Obese subjects, with or without T2D, had high activities of total PLA(2) and of Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent enzymes. The activities were correlated with inflammation markers in obese subjects with and without diabetes and with alterations of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) that increased their affinity for arterial proteoglycans. Ca(2+)-dependent secretory (sPLA(2)) enzymes were the main responsible of the obesity-associated high activity. We speculate that augmented PLA(2)(s) activity that increases affinity of circulating LDL for arterial intima proteoglycans could be another atherogenic component of obesity.

  1. LDL of Taiwanese vegetarians are less oxidizable than those of omnivores.

    PubMed

    Lu, S C; Wu, W H; Lee, C A; Chou, H F; Lee, H R; Huang, P C

    2000-06-01

    The vegetarians in Taiwan consume diets high in polyunsaturated fatty acids. To investigate whether this dietary pattern results in high susceptibility of LDL to oxidation, 109 long-term (8 +/- 5 y) male and female vegans and lactovegetarians (ages 31-45 y) from Taipei and females from Hualien and matched omnivores were recruited to have 24-h-recall dietary assessments and blood lipid analysis. Body mass index and blood pressure were significantly lower in all vegetarian groups than in the matched omnivore groups (P < 0.05). Vegetarians consumed less energy except in the males and less protein, fat and cholesterol (P < 0.05). The mean polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acid (P/S) ratio of 2.4 in vegetarian diet was about two times that in omnivore diet (P < 0. 001). The concentrations of plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) but not HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) were significantly lower (P < 0.001) and resulting HDL-C/LDL-C ratio was 38, 46 and 30% higher (P < 0.01) in Taipei female, male and Hualien female vegetarians, respectively, than in the matched omnivores. Plasma triglyceride concentration was significantly lower only in the Hualien women vegetarians (31%, P < 0.001) than in the matched omnivores. The lag time of conjugated diene formation in LDL oxidized in vitro induced by copper was longer in Taipei female (62%, P < 0.001), male (29%, P < 0.05) and Hualien female (38%, P < 0.01), and the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in LDL after 2-4 h of oxidation was 22-32% less (P < 0.005) in Taipei male and Hualien female vegetarians than the matched omnivores. Lag time of LDL oxidation was negatively related to LDL arachidonic (r = -0.55, P = 0.0003) and eicosapentaenoic (r = -0.47, P = 0.003) acid contents. LDL-TBARS production was negatively related to LDL linoleic acid content (r = -0.36, P = 0.023), but positively related to LDL arachidonic (r = 0.56, P = 0.0002) and eicosapentaenoic (r = 0.45, P = 0.004) acids. No significant

  2. Facile preparation of heparinized polysulfone membrane assisted by polydopamine/polyethyleneimine co-deposition for simultaneous LDL selectivity and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liwei; Fang, Fei; Liu, Yang; Li, Jing; Huang, Xiaojun

    2016-11-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) gains worldwide attention for decades as the key risk factor to atherosclerosis that progressively deteriorating into cardiovascular diseases. Until recent years, LDL-apheresis comes to be extensively used as a direct and efficient LDL removal method, with LDL adsorption materials particularly important. In this paper, a new strategy based on the co-deposition of polydopamine (PDA) with polyethylenimine (PEI) onto polysulfone (PSf) membranes, then subsequent heparinization by amino-carbonyl reactions, to achieve LDL selectivity and simultaneous biocompatibility, is proposed. Surface properties of modified PSf membranes are characterized by ATR-FTIR, XPS, FESEM, Zeta potential and WCA measurements. LDL adsorption ability is investigated by ELISA, while blood biocompatibility is evaluated by platelet adhesion experiments. Results suggest that heparin-modified PSf membranes show high selectivity for LDL removal and fine biocompatibility in contact with plasma, as excellent potential materials for LDL-apheresis.

  3. [Phytosterols: another way to reduce LDL cholesterol levels].

    PubMed

    Bitzur, Rafael; Cohen, Hofit; Kamari, Yehuda; Harats, Dror

    2013-12-01

    Phytosterols are sterols found naturally in various oils from plants. Phytosterols compete with cholesterol for a place in the mixed micelles, needed for cholesterol absorption by the small intestine. As a result, cholesterol absorption, either from food or from bile salts is lowered by about 50%, leading to a towering of about 10% of blood cholesterol level, despite an increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. This reduction is achieved when phytosterols are given both as monotherapy, and in addition to statin therapy. The average Western diet contains about 400-800 mg of phytosterols per day, while the dose needed for lowering the blood cholesterol level is about 2-3 grams per day. Therefore, for the purpose of reducing blood cholesterol, they should be given either as phytosterol-enriched food or as supplements. The reduction in the level of LDL-choLesterol achieved with phytosterols may reduce the risk of coronary disease by about 25%. Hence, the American Heart Association recommended the consumption of phytosterols, as part of a balanced diet, for towering blood cholesterol levels.

  4. Decreased training volume and increased carbohydrate intake increases oxidized LDL levels.

    PubMed

    Välimäki, I A; Vuorimaa, T; Ahotupa, M; Kekkonen, R; Korpela, R; Vasankari, T

    2012-04-01

    We studied effects of probiotics and training volume on oxidized LDL lipids (ox-LDL), serum antioxidant potential (s-TRAP) and serum antioxidants (s-α-tocopherol, s-γ-tocopherol, s-retinol, s-β-carotene and s-ubiquinone-10) in marathon runners during 3-months training period, 6-days preparation period and marathon run. Runners (n=127) were recruited for a randomized, double-blind intervention during which they received either Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG, probiotic group) or placebo drink (placebo group) during whole study. During the preparation period, subjects decreased training and increased carbohydrate intake. Blood samples were taken at baseline, before 6-days preparation, before and immediately after the marathon. Probiotics did not have any effect on ox-LDL, s-TRAP or serum antioxidants levels during the study. Interestingly, ox-LDL increased by 28% and 33% during the preparation period and decreased by 16% and 19% during the marathon run in the placebo and probiotic groups, respectively (in all, P<0.001). No changes were seen in s-TRAP before marathon, but during run s-TRAP raised by 16% in both groups (both, P<0.001). The increase of ox-LDL level during the preparative period after several months' training suggests that aerobic training may reduce the concentration of ox-LDL and that decrease of training together with increased energy intake, mainly carbohydrate, before marathon is capable of increasing the level of ox-LDL.

  5. LDL but not HDL increases adiponectin release of primary human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Krautbauer, Sabrina; Neumeier, Markus; Eisinger, Kristina; Hader, Yvonne; Dada, Ashraf; Schmitz, Gerd; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Buechler, Christa

    2013-12-01

    Adipocytes in obesity have inappropriately low cholesterol while adiponectin release is reduced. Cholesterol shortage may contribute to low adiponectin and 3T3-L1 cells treated with lovastatin have diminished adiponectin in cell supernatants. LDL and HDL deliver cholesterol to adipocytes. LDL but not HDL increases adiponectin in cell supernatants of primary human adipocytes. The effect of LDL is not blocked by receptor associated protein suggesting that members of the LDL-receptor family are not involved. To evaluate whether these in vitro observations translate into changes in systemic adiponectin, adiponectin was measured in serum of three patients before, immediately after and 3d after LDL-apheresis. Whereas circulating lipoproteins are reduced immediately after apheresis adiponectin is not changed. Therefore, acute lowering of lipoproteins does not affect systemic adiponectin also excluding that plenty of adiponectin is bound to lipoprotein particles. Accordingly, levels of adiponectin in purified lipoproteins are quite low. Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) is a rare disorder associated with low plasma LDL. Serum adiponectin is, however, similar compared to healthy controls. Thus, neither LDL nor HDL directly contributes to circulating adiponectin concentrations.

  6. Pinoresinol Diglucoside Alleviates oxLDL-Induced Dysfunction in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhipeng; Wang, Xiangfen; Ji, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Deposition of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is one of the initiators and promoters of atherosclerosis. Eucommia lignans were shown to possess antihypertensive effects. This study aimed to investigate the effects of pinoresinol diglucoside (PD), a Eucommia lignan, on oxLDL-induced endothelial dysfunction. HUVECs were treated with oxLDL and/or PD followed by assessing radical oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, nitrogen oxide (NO), malondialdehyde (MDA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity with specific assays kits, mRNA levels with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and protein levels with western blot. PD abolished oxLDL-induced ROS and MDA production, apoptosis, upregulation of lectin-like oxidized LDL recptor-1 (LOX-1), intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB), and activation of p38MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinases)/NF-κB signaling. Meanwhile, PD alleviated oxLDL-caused inhibition of SOD activity, eNOS expression, and NO production. These data demonstrated that PD was effective in protecting endothelial cells from oxLDL-caused injuries, which guarantees further investigation on the clinical benefits of PD on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28042303

  7. LDL decreases the membrane compliance and cell adhesion of endothelial cells under fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dangheng; Chen, Yongpeng; Tang, Chaojun; Huang, Hua; Liu, Lushan; Wang, Zuo; Li, Ruming; Wang, Guixue

    2013-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of large and medium sized arteriole walls that is precipitated by elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the blood. However, the mechanisms that lead to the initiation of atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, endothelial cells (ECs) were incubated with LDL for 24 h, and then the lipid was detected with Oil Red O staining and cholesterol ester was assayed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). F-actin was examined by fluorescence microscopy and the viscoelasticity of ECs was investigated using the micropipette aspiration technique. Then, a parallel-plate flow chamber device was used to observe the adhesion and retention of ECs under shear stress. The results demonstrated that elevated LDL significantly increased the cellular lipid content and induced the rearrangement of cytoskeletal F-actin. The initial rapid deformability (l/K 1 + l/K 2) was reduced by elevated cellular LDL levels, while membrane viscosity (μ) was increased by LDL accumulation. After treatment with 150 mg L(-1) LDL for 24 h, the adhesion of ECs under fluid shear stress was significantly decreased (p < 0.05). These results suggested that LDL induced cellular lipid accumulation and cytoskeleton reorganization which increased the cellular stiffness and decreased the adhesion of ECs.

  8. Effects of olive leaves extract on LDL oxidation induced-CuSO(4) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahmadvand, Hassan; Bagheri, Shahrokh; Khosrobeigi, Ali; Boshtam, Maryam; Abdolahpour, Foad

    2012-07-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The use of some natural antioxidant and herbal medicine may lead to the inhibition of production of oxidized LDL and may decrease both the development and the progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Olive leaves ethanol extract (OLE) on LDL oxidation induced-CuSO(4) quantitatively in vitro. Low-density lipoprotein was incubated with CuSO(4) and the formation of conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Inhibition of this Cu-induced oxidation was studied in the presence of vitamin E and various concentration of OLE. It was demonstrated that OLE reduced the formation of conjugated dienes and TBARS of LDL against oxidation in vitro (p<0.05). The inhibitory effects of the OLE on LDL oxidation were dose-dependent at concentrations ranging from (2μg/ml) to (200μg/ml). Moreover, we compared effects of OLE on LDL oxidation with vitamin E as positive control. This study showed that OLE is a source of potent antioxidants and prevented the oxidation of LDL in vitro and it may be suitable for use in food and pharmaceutical applications.

  9. Acid Sphingomyelinase Mediates Oxidized-LDL Induced Apoptosis in Macrophage via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Pan, Wei; Shi, Rui-zheng; Bai, Yong-ping; You, Bo-yang; Zhang, Kai; Fu, Qiong-mei; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Macrophage apoptosis is a vital event in advanced atherosclerosis, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is a major contributor to this process. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and ceramide are also involved in the induction of apoptosis, particularly in macrophages. Our current study focuses on ASM and investigates its role in ox-LDL-induced macrophage apoptosis. Methods: Human THP-1 and mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured in vitro and treated with ox-LDL. ASM activity and ceramide levels were quantified using ultra performance liquid chromatography. Protein and mRNA levels were analyzed using Western blot analysis and quantitative realtime PCR, respectively. Cell apoptosis was determined using Hoechst staining and flow cytometry. Results: Ox-LDL-induced macrophage apoptosis was triggered by profound endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, leading to an upregulation of ASM activity and ceramide levels at an early stage. ASM was inhibited by siRNA or desipramine (DES), and/or ceramide was degraded by recombinant acid ceramidase (AC). These events attenuated the effect of ox-LDL on ER stress. In contrast, recombinant ASM upregulated ceramide and ER stress. ASM siRNA, DES, recombinant AC, and ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid were blocked by elevated levels of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP); ox-LDL induced elevated levels of CHOP. These events attenuated macrophage apoptosis. Conclusion: These results indicate that ASM/ceramide signaling pathway is involved in ox-LDL-induced macrophage apoptosis via ER stress pathway. PMID:26923251

  10. LDL acts as an opsonin enhancing the phagocytosis of group A Streptococcus by monocyte and whole human blood.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lulei; Liu, Ling; Yang, Jinli; Li, Yuxin; Bai, Wencheng; Liu, Na; Li, Wenlong; Gao, Yumin; Xu, Liping; Liu, Zhi; Han, Runlin

    2016-04-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) binds to group A Streptococcus (GAS) through Sc11 protein, and scavenger receptor CD36 of monocyte mediates the endocytosis of native or modified LDL. Therefore, we hypothesized that LDL might be an opsonin enhancing the phagocytosis of LDL-bound GAS by monocyte. The results showed that LDL could significantly promote U937 cell to phagocytose M28 (ATCC BAA1064) and M41 (ATCC 12373, AM41)-type GAS, and the phagocytosis rates were significantly increased, compared with LDL-free group. LDL, however, did not enhance the phagocytosis of M41 (CMCC 32198, CM41) or M6 (ATCC BAA946)-type GAS since these two strains did not bind to LDL. CD36 was the major scavenger receptor mediating the uptake of LDL-bound GAS by monocyte U937 cells since anti-CD36 antibody abolished the phagocytosis of LDL-opsonized GAS but anti-CD4 antibody did not. Most of AM41-type GAS cells were killed in human blood, whereas only a few CM41-type cells were phagocytosed. Moreover, recombinant Scl1 (rScl1) derived from M41-type GAS could significantly decrease the opsonophagocytosis of AM41 but not CM41-type GAS because the rScl1 competitively blocked the binding of AM41-type GAS to LDL. Therefore, our findings suggest that LDL may be an opsonin to enhance CD36-dependent opsonic phagocytosis of GAS by monocyte.

  11. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4+ T cells. ldlr−/− syk−/− mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr−/− mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis. PMID:25946330

  12. CD36 binds oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) in a mechanism dependent upon fatty acid binding.

    PubMed

    Jay, Anthony G; Chen, Alexander N; Paz, Miguel A; Hung, Justin P; Hamilton, James A

    2015-02-20

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  13. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  14. Increased uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages from type 2 diabetics is inhibited by polyamines.

    PubMed

    Balderas, Francisco L; Quezada-Larios, Marina; García Latorre, Ethel Awilda; Méndez, José D

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine on human LDL oxidation and to assess the ability of macrophages derived from type 2 diabetic patients to uptake oxLDL. Polyamine effect was compared with α-tocopherol. Four healthy subjects and eight type 2 diabetic patients were included in this study. To characterize type 2 diabetic patients and non-diabetic subjects, laboratory test were carried out. Glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C), triglycerides, low (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL) and serum lipid peroxidation were measured in blood. The study was performed in three stages. For each stage, ten experimental conditions comparing the effect of polyamines with α-tocopherol (10μM solutions) on LDL oxidation and the uptake of oxLDL by macrophages were analyzed. MDA concentration was found to be significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients compared to healthy subjects (5.6±0.58 vs. 2.66±0.31μM MDA, respectively, (P<0.05)). Percent of macrophages containing oxLDL was determined by means of red oil staining. The uptake of oxLDL by macrophages derived from diabetic patients was clear. The uptake of oxLDL was inhibited when the oxidation was prevented by polyamines or α-tocopherol. Spermine showed high antioxidant capacity (96.67±1.53% vs. 25.67±2.30%) compared to α-tocopherol (96.67±1.53% vs. 47.00±7.20%) at the concentration tested. In conclusion, polyamines especially spermine, has a potent antioxidant effect compared to α-tocopherol on human LDL oxidation, followed by spermidine and putrescine. The results have clinical relevance in the diabetic complications and add knowledge on the role of polyamines as natural antioxidants. This research is not a clinical evaluation rather a functional analysis utilizing clinical samples.

  15. Isorhamnetin prevent endothelial cell injuries from oxidized LDL via activation of p38MAPK.

    PubMed

    Bao, Meihua; Lou, Yijia

    2006-10-10

    The present investigation was undertaken to determine the protective effects of isorhamnetin on endothelial cell line EA.hy926 injuries induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and to uncover some of the underlying mechanisms of these effects. Indices such as cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and nitric oxide (NO) release were measured to evaluate the protective effects of isorhamnetin. 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD), superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were also detected to evaluate the antioxidant effects of isorhamnetin. Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) was used to confirm the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 mRNA. Western blotting was used to evaluate the protein expression of this receptor and eNOS, as well as p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) phosphorylation and NF-kappaB p65 translocation. As a result, cell viability decreased significantly (P<0.01) after 24 h treatment with ox-LDL, accompanied with apparent secretion disorders such as NO reduction and LDH increase. Pretreatment with isorhamnetin resulted in remarkable increase of cell viability (P<0.05) and modulation of secretion disorders mediated by ox-LDL in a concentration-dependent manner. Besides, ox-LDL led to upregulation of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1, phosphorylation of p38MAPK, translocation of NF-kappaB, and downregulation of the eNOS expression in endothelial cells. Isorhamnetin pretreatment inhibited the ox-LDL-induced downregulation of eNOS, upregulation of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1, phosphorylation of the p38MAPK and translocation of NF-kappaB. Moreover, isorhamnetin exhibited strong antioxidant activity, which was shown by its inhibition effects on ox-LDL-induced superoxide, ROS overproduction and significant SOD reduction. The data indicated the protective effects of isorhamnetin on

  16. ApoE-/-Fas-/- C57BL/6 mice: a novel murine model simultaneously exhibits lupus nephritis, atherosclerosis, and osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuebing; Li, Hongyun; Rumbin, Alexis A; Wang, Xuping; La Cava, Antonio; Brechtelsbauer, Katherine; Castellani, Lawrence W; Witztum, Joseph L; Lusis, Aldons J; Tsao, Betty P

    2007-04-01

    To establish a mouse model of accelerated atherosclerosis in lupus, we generated apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) and Fas(lpr/lpr) (Fas(-/-)) C57BL/6 mice. On a normal chow diet, 5 month old apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had enlarged glomerular tuft areas, severe proteinuria, increased circulating autoantibody levels, and increased apoptotic cells in renal and vascular lesions compared with either single knockout mice. Also, double knockout mice developed increased atherosclerotic lesions but decreased serum levels of total and non-HDL cholesterol compared with apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) littermates. Moreover, female apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had lower vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) and bone volume density (BV/TV) than age-matched female apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) mice. Compared with apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) and apoE(+/+)Fas(-/-) mice, apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had decreased circulating oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) content on apoB-100 containing lipoprotein particles and increased serum IgG antibodies to OxPL, which were significantly correlated with aortic lesion areas (r = 0.58), glomerular tuft areas (r = 0.87), BMD (r = -0.57), and BV/TV (r = -0.72). These results suggest that the apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mouse model might be used to study atherosclerosis and osteopenia in lupus. Correlations of IgG anti-OxPL with lupus-like disease, atherosclerosis, and bone loss suggested a shared pathway of these disease processes.

  17. Gluten-free vegan diet induces decreased LDL and oxidized LDL levels and raised atheroprotective natural antibodies against phosphorylcholine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Elkan, Ann-Charlotte; Sjöberg, Beatrice; Kolsrud, Björn; Ringertz, Bo; Hafström, Ingiäld; Frostegård, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of vegan diet in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on blood lipids oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and natural atheroprotective antibodies against phosphorylcholine (anti-PCs). Methods Sixty-six patients with active RA were randomly assigned to either a vegan diet free of gluten (38 patients) or a well-balanced non-vegan diet (28 patients) for 1 year. Thirty patients in the vegan group completed more than 3 months on the diet regimen. Blood lipids were analyzed by routine methods, and oxLDL and anti-PCs were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data and serum samples were obtained at baseline and after 3 and 12 months. Results Mean ages were 50.0 years for the vegan group and 50.8 years for controls. Gluten-free vegan diet induced lower body mass index (BMI) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and higher anti-PC IgM than control diet (p < 0.005). In the vegan group, BMI, LDL, and cholesterol decreased after both 3 and 12 months (p < 0.01) and oxLDL after 3 months (p = 0.021) and trendwise after 12 months (p = 0.090). Triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein did not change. IgA anti-PC levels increased after 3 months (p = 0.027) and IgM anti-PC levels increased trendwise after 12 months (p = 0.057). There was no difference in IgG anti-PC levels. In the control diet group, IgM anti-PC levels decreased both after 3 and 12 months (p < 0.01). When separating vegan patients into clinical responders and non-responders at 12 months, the effects on oxLDL and anti-PC IgA were seen only in responders (p < 0.05). Conclusion A gluten-free vegan diet in RA induces changes that are potentially atheroprotective and anti-inflammatory, including decreased LDL and oxLDL levels and raised anti-PC IgM and IgA levels. PMID:18348715

  18. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) impacts on erythrocyte viscoelasticity and its molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Yang, Li; Liu, Yao; Gao, Wei; Peng, Weiyan; Sung, K-L Paul; Sung, Lanping Amy

    2009-10-16

    The oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) plays an important role in atherosclerosis, yet it remains unclear if it damages circulating erythrocytes. In this study, erythrocyte deformability and its membrane proteins after Ox-LDL incubations are investigated by micropipette aspiration, thiol radical measurement, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results show that Ox-LDL incubation reduces the erythrocyte deformability, decreases free thiol radical contents in erythrocytes, and induces the cross-linking among membrane proteins. SDS-PAGE analysis reveals a high molecular weight (HMW) complex as well as new bands between spectrins and band 3 and reduced ratios between band 3 and other major membrane skeletal proteins. Analyses indicate that Ox-LDL makes erythrocytes harder to deform through a molecular mechanism by which the oxidation of free thiol radicals forms disulfide bonds among membrane skeletal proteins.

  19. A nonsense mutation in the LDL receptor gene leads to familial hypercholesterolemia in the Druze sect

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, D.; Meiner, V.; Reshef, A.; Leitersdorf, E. ); Levy, Yishai ); Westhytzen, D.R. van der; Coetzee, G.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the LDL receptor gene. Here the authors characterize and LDL receptor mutation that is associated with a distinct haplotype and causes FH in the Druze, a small Middle Eastern Islamic sect with a high degree of inbreeding. The mutation was found in FH families from two distinct Druze villages from the Golan Heights (northern Israel). It was not found either in another Druze FH family residing in a different geographical area nor in eight Arab and four Jewish FH heterozygote index cases whose hypercholesterolemia cosegregates with an identical LDL receptor gene haplotype. The mutation, a single-base substitution, results in a termination codon in exon 4 of the LDL receptor gene that encodes for the fourth repeat of the binding domain of the mature receptor. It can be diagnosed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of PCR-amplified DNA from FH patients.

  20. Imaging LDL receptor oligomerization during endocytosis using a co-internalization assay

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Peng; Ting, Alice Y.

    2011-01-01

    Methods to probe receptor oligomerization are useful to understand the molecular mechanisms of receptor signaling. Here we report a fluorescence imaging method to determine receptor oligomerization state in living cells during endocytic internalization. The wild-type receptor is co-expressed with an internalization-defective mutant, and the internalization kinetics of each is independently monitored. If the receptor internalizes as an oligomer, then the wild-type and mutant isoforms will mutually influence each others' trafficking properties, causing co-internalization of the mutant, or co-retention of the wild-type at the cell surface. Using this approach, we found that the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor internalizes as an oligomer into cells, both in the presence and absence of LDL ligand. The internalization kinetics of the wild-type receptor is not changed by LDL binding. We also found that the oligomerization domain of the LDL receptor is located in its cytoplasmic tail. PMID:21194239

  1. MCP-1 binds to oxidized LDL and is carried by lipoprotein(a) in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Philipp; Tafelmeier, Maria; Chittka, Dominik; Choi, Soo-Ho; Zhang, Li; Byun, Young Sup; Almazan, Felicidad; Yang, Xiaohong; Iqbal, Navaid; Chowdhury, Punam; Maisel, Alan; Witztum, Joseph L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoprotein oxidation plays an important role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) induces profound inflammatory responses in vascular cells, such as production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2], a key chemokine in the initiation and progression of vascular inflammation. Here we demonstrate that OxLDL also binds MCP-1 and that the OxLDL-bound MCP-1 retains its ability to recruit monocytes. A human MCP-1 mutant in which basic amino acids Arg-18 and Lys-19 were replaced with Ala did not bind to OxLDL. The MCP-1 binding to OxLDL was inhibited by the monoclonal antibody E06, which binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) in OxLDL. Because OxPLs are carried by lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] in human plasma, we tested to determine whether Lp(a) binds MCP-1. Recombinant wild-type but not mutant MCP-1 added to human plasma bound to Lp(a), and its binding was inhibited by E06. Lp(a) captured from human plasma contained MCP-1 and the Lp(a)-associated endogenous MCP-1 induced monocyte migration. These results demonstrate that OxLDL and Lp(a) bind MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo and that OxPLs are major determinants of the MCP-1 binding. The association of MCP-1 with OxLDL and Lp(a) may play a role in modulating monocyte trafficking during atherogenesis. PMID:23667177

  2. Diet rich in high glucoraphanin broccoli reduces plasma LDL cholesterol: Evidence from randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Armah, Charlotte N; Derdemezis, Christos; Traka, Maria H; Dainty, Jack R; Doleman, Joanne F; Saha, Shikha; Leung, Wing; Potter, John F; Lovegrove, Julie A; Mithen, Richard F

    2015-01-01

    Scope Cruciferous-rich diets have been associated with reduction in plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), which may be due to the action of isothiocyanates derived from glucosinolates that accumulate in these vegetables. This study tests the hypothesis that a diet rich in high glucoraphanin (HG) broccoli will reduce plasma LDL-C. Methods and results One hundred and thirty volunteers were recruited to two independent double-blind, randomly allocated parallel dietary intervention studies, and were assigned to consume either 400 g standard broccoli or 400 g HG broccoli per week for 12 weeks. Plasma lipids were quantified before and after the intervention. In study 1 (37 volunteers), the HG broccoli diet reduced plasma LDL-C by 7.1% (95% CI: –1.8%, –12.3%, p = 0.011), whereas standard broccoli reduced LDL-C by 1.8% (95% CI +3.9%, –7.5%, ns). In study 2 (93 volunteers), the HG broccoli diet resulted in a reduction of 5.1% (95% CI: –2.1%, –8.1%, p = 0.001), whereas standard broccoli reduced LDL-C by 2.5% (95% CI: +0.8%, –5.7%, ns). When data from the two studies were combined the reduction in LDL-C by the HG broccoli was significantly greater than standard broccoli (p = 0.031). Conclusion Evidence from two independent human studies indicates that consumption of high glucoraphanin broccoli significantly reduces plasma LDL-C. PMID:25851421

  3. ATVB Council Statement: Non-statin LDL-lowering Therapy and Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Hegele, Robert A.; Gidding, Samuel S.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; McPherson, Ruth; Raal, Frederick J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Welty, Francine K.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol using statin drugs is foundational therapy to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Here we consider the place of non-statin therapies that also reduce LDL cholesterol in prevention of CVD. Among conventional non-statins, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials showed that bile acid sequestrants, niacin and fibrates given as monotherapy each reduce CVD end points. From trials in which patients’ LDL cholesterol was already well-controlled on a statin, adding ezetimibe incrementally reduced CVD end points, while adding a fibrate or niacin showed no incremental benefit. Among emerging non-statins, monoclonal antibodies against proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) added to a statin and given for up to 78 weeks showed preliminary evidence of reductions in CVD outcomes. While these promising early findings contributed to the recent approval of these agents in Europe and the US, much larger and longer duration outcomes studies are ongoing for definitive proof of CVD benefits. Other non-statin agents recently approved in the US include lomitapide and mipomersen, which both act via distinctive LDL-receptor independent mechanisms to substantially reduce LDL cholesterol in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. We also address some unanswered questions, including measuring alternative biochemical variables to LDL cholesterol, evidence for treating children with monitoring of subclinical atherosclerosis, and potential risks of extremely low LDL cholesterol. As evidence for benefit in CVD prevention accumulates, we anticipate that clinical practice will shift towards more assertive LDL-lowering treatment, using both statins and non-statins initiated earlier in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26376908

  4. Native LDL promotes differentiation of human monocytes to macrophages with an inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Al-Sharea, Annas; Lee, Man Kit Sam; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Fang, Lu; Sviridov, Dmitri; Chin-Dusting, Jaye; Andrews, Karen L; Murphy, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Recruitment of monocytes in atherosclerosis is dependent upon increased levels of plasma lipoproteins which accumulate in the blood vessel wall. The extracellular milieu can influence the phenotype of monocyte subsets (classical: CD14++CD16-, intermediate: CD14+CD16+ and non-classical: CD14dimCD16++) and macrophages (M1 or M2) and consequently the initiation, progression and/or regression of atherosclerosis. However, it is not known what effect lipoproteins, in particular native low-density lipoproteins (nLDL), have on the polarisation of monocyte-derived macrophages. Monocytes were differentiated into macrophages in the presence of nLDL. nLDL increased gene expression of the inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 in macrophages polarised towards the M1 phenotype while decreasing the M2 surface markers, CD206 and CD200R and the anti-inflammatory cytokines TGFβ and IL-10. Compared to the classical and intermediate subsets, the non-classical subset-derived macrophages had a reduced ability to respond to M1 stimuli (LPS and IFNγ). nLDL enhanced the TNFα and IL-6 gene expression in macrophages from all monocyte subsets, indicating an inflammatory effect of nLDL. Further, the classical and intermediate subsets both responded to M2 stimuli (IL-4) with upregulation of TGFβ and SR-B1 mRNA; an effect, which was reduced by nLDL. In contrast, the non-classical subset failed to respond to IL-4 or nLDL, suggesting it may be unable to polarise into M2 macrophages. Our data suggests that monocyte interaction with nLDL significantly affects macrophage polarisation and that this interaction appears to be subset dependent.

  5. Oxidized LDL enhances stretch-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation through alterations in nuclear protein import.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Mirna N; Dibrov, Elena; Blackwood, David P; Pierce, Grant N

    2012-12-01

    Mechanical stress contributes to hypertension and atherosclerosis partly through the stimulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is another important atherogenic factor that can increase VSMC proliferation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether oxLDL could further enhance the proliferative action of mechanical stretch on VSMC, and to determine the mechanism responsible for this interaction. Because nuclear protein import is critical in regulating gene expression, transcription, and cell proliferation, its involvement in the mitogenic effects of oxLDL and mechanical stress was studied. OxLDL enhanced the proliferative effects of mechanical stretch on its own in rabbit aortic VSMC, and induced increases in the expression of HSP60 in an additive manner. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of HSP60 induced increases in cell proliferation compared with uninfected VSMC. Mechanical stretch and oxLDL stimulated the rate of nuclear protein import in VSMC and increased the expression of nucleoporins. These effects were sensitive to inhibition of the MAPK pathway. We conclude that oxLDL and mechanical stretch have a synergistic effect on VSMC proliferation. This synergistic effect is induced through a stimulation of nuclear protein import via HSP60 and an activation of the MAPK pathway.

  6. The LDL-HDL Profile Determines the Risk of Atherosclerosis: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the leading death in the United State, is a disease in which a plaque builds up inside the arteries. As the plaque continues to grow, the shear force of the blood flow through the decreasing cross section of the lumen increases. This force may eventually cause rupture of the plaque, resulting in the formation of thrombus, and possibly heart attack. It has long been recognized that the formation of a plaque relates to the cholesterol concentration in the blood. For example, individuals with LDL above 190 mg/dL and HDL below 40 mg/dL are at high risk, while individuals with LDL below 100 mg/dL and HDL above 50 mg/dL are at no risk. In this paper, we developed a mathematical model of the formation of a plaque, which includes the following key variables: LDL and HDL, free radicals and oxidized LDL, MMP and TIMP, cytockines: MCP-1, IFN-γ, IL-12 and PDGF, and cells: macrophages, foam cells, T cells and smooth muscle cells. The model is given by a system of partial differential equations with in evolving plaque. Simulations of the model show how the combination of the concentrations of LDL and HDL in the blood determine whether a plaque will grow or disappear. More precisely, we create a map, showing the risk of plaque development for any pair of values (LDL,HDL). PMID:24621857

  7. The LDL-HDL profile determines the risk of atherosclerosis: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the leading death in the United State, is a disease in which a plaque builds up inside the arteries. As the plaque continues to grow, the shear force of the blood flow through the decreasing cross section of the lumen increases. This force may eventually cause rupture of the plaque, resulting in the formation of thrombus, and possibly heart attack. It has long been recognized that the formation of a plaque relates to the cholesterol concentration in the blood. For example, individuals with LDL above 190 mg/dL and HDL below 40 mg/dL are at high risk, while individuals with LDL below 100 mg/dL and HDL above 50 mg/dL are at no risk. In this paper, we developed a mathematical model of the formation of a plaque, which includes the following key variables: LDL and HDL, free radicals and oxidized LDL, MMP and TIMP, cytockines: MCP-1, IFN-γ, IL-12 and PDGF, and cells: macrophages, foam cells, T cells and smooth muscle cells. The model is given by a system of partial differential equations with in evolving plaque. Simulations of the model show how the combination of the concentrations of LDL and HDL in the blood determine whether a plaque will grow or disappear. More precisely, we create a map, showing the risk of plaque development for any pair of values (LDL,HDL).

  8. The glycosylation-dependent interaction of perlecan core protein with LDL: implications for atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ashline, David; Liu, Li; Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Ravid, Katya; Layne, Matthew D.; Reinhold, Vernon; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2015-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan in the arterial wall. Previous studies have linked it to atherosclerosis. Perlecan contains a core protein and three HS side chains. Its core protein has five domains (DI–DV) with disparate structures and DII is highly homologous to the ligand-binding portion of LDL receptor (LDLR). The functional significance of this domain has been unknown. Here, we show that perlecan DII interacts with LDL. Importantly, the interaction largely relies on O-linked glycans that are only present in the secreted DII. Among the five repeat units of DII, most of the glycosylation sites are from the second unit, which is highly divergent and rich in serine and threonine, but has no cysteine residues. Interestingly, most of the glycans are capped by the negatively charged sialic acids, which are critical for LDL binding. We further demonstrate an additive effect of HS and DII on LDL binding. Unlike LDLR, which directs LDL uptake through endocytosis, this study uncovers a novel feature of the perlecan LDLR-like DII in receptor-mediated lipoprotein retention, which depends on its glycosylation. Thus, perlecan glycosylation may play a role in the early LDL retention during the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25528754

  9. Protein modification elicited by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in endothelial cells: protection by (-)-epicatechin.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Yvonne; Jung, Tobias; Klotz, Lars-Oliver; Schewe, Tankred; Grune, Tilman; Sies, Helmut

    2007-04-01

    The action of oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on vascular endothelial cells has been proposed to be a crucial process leading to endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis. OxLDL was shown here to elicit oxidative stress in bovine aortic endothelial cells or human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as judged by an increase in 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and elevated levels of carbonylated, nitrated, and 2-hydroxynonenal-coupled proteins. These effects were sensitive to apocynin, indicating involvement of NADPH oxidase. A 170-kDa polypeptide carbonylated upon exposure of cells to oxLDL was identified by immunoprecipitation as EGF receptor. Immunocytochemical visualization by confocal microscopy revealed the highest levels of modified proteins in the perinuclear region. Exposure of endothelial cells to oxLDL led to modulation of the expression levels of *NO synthases; the endothelial isoform (eNOS) was down-regulated via proteasomal degradation, whereas the inducible isoform (iNOS) was up-regulated in an enzymatically active state. eNOS protein was found to be both carbonylated and nitrated upon exposure of cells to oxLDL. iNOS contributed to the generation of modified proteins as judged by the effects of the selective inhibitor L-NIO. These oxLDL-elicited changes in vascular endothelial cells described were suppressed by (-)-epicatechin, a dietary polyphenol, which inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in these cells.

  10. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Rare and Low-Frequency Coding Variants Associated with LDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Leslie A.; Hu, Youna; Zhang, He; Xue, Chenyi; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Bizon, Chris; Lange, Ethan M.; Smith, Joshua D.; Turner, Emily H.; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Peloso, Gina; Auer, Paul; Li, Kuo-ping; Flannick, Jason; Zhang, Ji; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle; Lindgren, Cecilia; Locke, Adam; Manning, Alisa; Sim, Xueling; Rivas, Manuel A.; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Gottesman, Omri; Lu, Yingchang; Ruderfer, Douglas; Stahl, Eli A.; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Durda, Peter; Jiao, Shuo; Isaacs, Aaron; Hofman, Albert; Bis, Joshua C.; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E.; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Smith, Albert V.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Crosby, Jacy; Wassel, Christina L.; Do, Ron; Franceschini, Nora; Martin, Lisa W.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Crosslin, David R.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Tsai, Michael; Rieder, Mark J.; Farlow, Deborah N.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Lumley, Thomas; Fox, Ervin R.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Peters, Ulrike; Jackson, Rebecca D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Levy, Daniel; Rotter, Jerome I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Siscovick, David S.; Fornage, Myriam; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Chen, Y. Eugene; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Sætrom, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Boehnke, Michael; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark; Meitinger, Thomas; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar; Lin, Dan-Yu; Jarvik, Gail P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilson, James G.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tracy, Russell P.; Willer, Cristen J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Altshuler, David M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Allayee, Hooman; Cresci, Sharon; Daly, Mark J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; DePristo, Mark A.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Peter; Farlow, Deborah N.; Fennell, Tim; Garimella, Kiran; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hu, Youna; Jordan, Daniel M.; Jun, Goo; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kang, Hyun Min; Kiezun, Adam; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Bingshan; Li, Mingyao; Newton-Cheh, Christopher H.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peloso, Gina; Pulit, Sara; Rader, Daniel J.; Reich, David; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Schwartz, Steve; Scott, Laura; Siscovick, David S.; Spertus, John A.; Stitziel, Nathaniel O.; Stoletzki, Nina; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Willer, Cristen J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Akylbekova, Ermeg; Atwood, Larry D.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Barbalic, Maja; Barr, R. Graham; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bis, Joshua; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bowden, Donald W.; Brody, Jennifer; Budoff, Matthew; Burke, Greg; Buxbaum, Sarah; Carr, Jeff; Chen, Donna T.; Chen, Ida Y.; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Pat; Crosby, Jacy; Cupples, L. Adrienne; D’Agostino, Ralph; DeStefano, Anita L.; Dreisbach, Albert; Dupuis, Josée; Durda, J. Peter; Ellis, Jaclyn; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Caroline S.; Fox, Ervin; Funari, Vincent; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gardin, Julius; Goff, David; Gordon, Ora; Grody, Wayne; Gross, Myron; Guo, Xiuqing; Hall, Ira M.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heintz, Nicholas; Herrington, David M.; Hickson, DeMarc; Huang, Jie; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Jacobs, David R.; Jenny, Nancy S.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Johnson, Craig W.; Kawut, Steven; Kronmal, Richard; Kurz, Raluca; Lange, Ethan M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Larson, Martin G.; Lawson, Mark; Lewis, Cora E.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Dalin; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Chunyu; Liu, Jiankang; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Xiaoming; Liu, Yongmei; Longstreth, William T.; Loria, Cay; Lumley, Thomas; Lunetta, Kathryn; Mackey, Aaron J.; Mackey, Rachel; Manichaikul, Ani; Maxwell, Taylor; McKnight, Barbara; Meigs, James B.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Musani, Solomon K.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; North, Kari; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Leary, Daniel; Ong, Frank; Palmas, Walter; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan D.; Paul, Shom; Perez, Marco; Person, Sharina D.; Polak, Joseph; Post, Wendy S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Rice, Kenneth; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sanders, Jill P.; Schreiner, Pamela; Seshadri, Sudha; Shea, Steve; Sidney, Stephen; Silverstein, Kevin; Smith, Nicholas L.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Srinivasan, Asoke; Taylor, Herman A.; Taylor, Kent; Thomas, Fridtjof; Tracy, Russell P.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Wassel, Chrstina L.; Watson, Karol; Wei, Gina; White, Wendy; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Williams, O. Dale; Wilson, Gregory; Wilson, James G.; Wolf, Phillip; Zakai, Neil A.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael; Singleton, Andrew; Worrall, Brad; Bamshad, Michael J.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Accurso, Frank; Anbar, Ran; Beaty, Terri; Bigham, Abigail; Black, Phillip; Bleecker, Eugene; Buckingham, Kati; Cairns, Anne Marie; Caplan, Daniel; Chatfield, Barbara; Chidekel, Aaron; Cho, Michael; Christiani, David C.; Crapo, James D.; Crouch, Julia; Daley, Denise; Dang, Anthony; Dang, Hong; De Paula, Alicia; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Drumm, Allen DozorMitch; Dyson, Maynard; Emerson, Julia; Emond, Mary J.; Ferkol, Thomas; Fink, Robert; Foster, Cassandra; Froh, Deborah; Gao, Li; Gershan, William; Gibson, Ronald L.; Godwin, Elizabeth; Gondor, Magdalen; Gutierrez, Hector; Hansel, Nadia N.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Hiatt, Peter; Hokanson, John E.; Howenstine, Michelle; Hummer, Laura K.; Kanga, Jamshed; Kim, Yoonhee; Knowles, Michael R.; Konstan, Michael; Lahiri, Thomas; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Lin, Lin; Lin, Xihong; Louie, Tin L.; Lynch, David; Make, Barry; Martin, Thomas R.; Mathai, Steve C.; Mathias, Rasika A.; McNamara, John; McNamara, Sharon; Meyers, Deborah; Millard, Susan; Mogayzel, Peter; Moss, Richard; Murray, Tanda; Nielson, Dennis; Noyes, Blakeslee; O’Neal, Wanda; Orenstein, David; O’Sullivan, Brian; Pace, Rhonda; Pare, Peter; Parker, H. Worth; Passero, Mary Ann; Perkett, Elizabeth; Prestridge, Adrienne; Rafaels, Nicholas M.; Ramsey, Bonnie; Regan, Elizabeth; Ren, Clement; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rock, Michael; Rosen, Antony; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ruczinski, Ingo; Sanford, Andrew; Schaeffer, David; Sell, Cindy; Sheehan, Daniel; Silverman, Edwin K.; Sin, Don; Spencer, Terry; Stonebraker, Jackie; Tabor, Holly K.; Varlotta, Laurie; Vergara, Candelaria I.; Weiss, Robert; Wigley, Fred; Wise, Robert A.; Wright, Fred A.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Zanni, Robert; Zou, Fei; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rieder, Mark J.; Green, Phil; Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Crosslin, David R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Fox, P. Keolu; Fu, Wenqing; Gordon, Adam; Gravel, Simon; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnsen, Jill M.; Kan, Mengyuan; Kenny, Eimear E.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Lara-Garduno, Fremiet; Leal, Suzanne M.; Liu, Dajiang J.; McGee, Sean; O’Connor, Timothy D.; Paeper, Bryan; Robertson, Peggy D.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tennessen, Jacob A.; Turner, Emily H.; Wang, Gao; Yi, Qian; Jackson, Rebecca; Peters, Ulrike; Carlson, Christopher S.; Anderson, Garnet; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Auer, Paul L.; Beresford, Shirley; Bizon, Chris; Black, Henry; Brunner, Robert; Brzyski, Robert; Burwen, Dale; Caan, Bette; Carty, Cara L.; Chlebowski, Rowan; Cummings, Steven; Curb, J. David; Eaton, Charles B.; Ford, Leslie; Franceschini, Nora; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Gass, Margery; Geller, Nancy; Heiss, Gerardo; Howard, Barbara V.; Hsu, Li; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Ioannidis, John; Jiao, Shuo; Johnson, Karen C.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kuller, Lewis; LaCroix, Andrea; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Lane, Dorothy; Lasser, Norman; LeBlanc, Erin; Li, Kuo-Ping; Limacher, Marian; Lin, Dan-Yu; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Ludlam, Shari; Manson, JoAnn E.; Margolis, Karen; Martin, Lisa; McGowan, Joan; Monda, Keri L.; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Nathan, Lauren; Ockene, Judith; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Prentice, Ross L.; Robbins, John; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Sarto, Gloria E.; Shumaker, Sally; Simon, Michael S.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Stein, Evan; Tang, Hua; Taylor, Kira C.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Thornton, Timothy A.; Van Horn, Linda; Vitolins, Mara; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wallace, Robert; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Zeng, Donglin; Applebaum-Bowden, Deborah; Feolo, Michael; Gan, Weiniu; Paltoo, Dina N.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Sturcke, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a treatable, heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 157 variants associated with lipid levels but are not well suited to assess the impact of rare and low-frequency variants. To determine whether rare or low-frequency coding variants are associated with LDL-C, we exome sequenced 2,005 individuals, including 554 individuals selected for extreme LDL-C (>98th or <2nd percentile). Follow-up analyses included sequencing of 1,302 additional individuals and genotype-based analysis of 52,221 individuals. We observed significant evidence of association between LDL-C and the burden of rare or low-frequency variants in PNPLA5, encoding a phospholipase-domain-containing protein, and both known and previously unidentified variants in PCSK9, LDLR and APOB, three known lipid-related genes. The effect sizes for the burden of rare variants for each associated gene were substantially higher than those observed for individual SNPs identified from GWASs. We replicated the PNPLA5 signal in an independent large-scale sequencing study of 2,084 individuals. In conclusion, this large whole-exome-sequencing study for LDL-C identified a gene not known to be implicated in LDL-C and provides unique insight into the design and analysis of similar experiments. PMID:24507775

  11. Minimally Modified LDL Upregulates Endothelin Type A Receptors in Rat Coronary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Cao, Lei; Xu, Cang-Bao; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Minimally modified low-density lipoprotein (mmLDL) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The present study investigated the effects of mmLDL on the expression of endothelin type A (ETA) receptors in coronary arteries. Rat coronary arteries were organ-cultured for 24 h. The contractile responses were recorded using a myographic system. ETA receptor mRNA and protein expressions were determined using real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. The results showed that organ-culturing in the presence of mmLDL enhanced the arterial contractility mediated by the ETA receptor in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. Culturing with mmLDL (10 μg/mL) for 24 h shifted the concentration-contractile curves toward the left significantly with increased Emax of 228% ± 20% from control of 100% ± 10% and significantly increased ETA receptor mRNA and protein levels. Inhibition of the protein kinase C, extracellular signal-related kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), or NF-κB activities significantly attenuated the effects of mmLDL. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor or the p38 pathway inhibitor, however, had no such effects. The results indicate that mmLDL upregulates the ETA receptors in rat coronary arterial smooth muscle cells mainly via activating protein kinase C, ERK1/2, and the downstream transcriptional factor, NF-κB. PMID:23861561

  12. Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare and low-frequency coding variants associated with LDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Lange, Leslie A; Hu, Youna; Zhang, He; Xue, Chenyi; Schmidt, Ellen M; Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Bizon, Chris; Lange, Ethan M; Smith, Joshua D; Turner, Emily H; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Peloso, Gina; Auer, Paul; Li, Kuo-Ping; Flannick, Jason; Zhang, Ji; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle; Lindgren, Cecilia; Locke, Adam; Manning, Alisa; Sim, Xueling; Rivas, Manuel A; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Gottesman, Omri; Lu, Yingchang; Ruderfer, Douglas; Stahl, Eli A; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Durda, Peter; Jiao, Shuo; Isaacs, Aaron; Hofman, Albert; Bis, Joshua C; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Smith, Albert V; Schreiner, Pamela J; Feitosa, Mary F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Crosby, Jacy; Wassel, Christina L; Do, Ron; Franceschini, Nora; Martin, Lisa W; Robinson, Jennifer G; Assimes, Themistocles L; Crosslin, David R; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Tsai, Michael; Rieder, Mark J; Farlow, Deborah N; Folsom, Aaron R; Lumley, Thomas; Fox, Ervin R; Carlson, Christopher S; Peters, Ulrike; Jackson, Rebecca D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, André G; Levy, Daniel; Rotter, Jerome I; Taylor, Herman A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Siscovick, David S; Fornage, Myriam; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Chen, Y Eugene; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Sætrom, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Boehnke, Michael; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark; Meitinger, Thomas; Ballantyne, Christie M; Gabriel, Stacey B; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Post, Wendy S; North, Kari E; Reiner, Alexander P; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar; Lin, Dan-Yu; Jarvik, Gail P; Cupples, L Adrienne; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilson, James G; Nickerson, Deborah A; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Rich, Stephen S; Tracy, Russell P; Willer, Cristen J

    2014-02-06

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a treatable, heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 157 variants associated with lipid levels but are not well suited to assess the impact of rare and low-frequency variants. To determine whether rare or low-frequency coding variants are associated with LDL-C, we exome sequenced 2,005 individuals, including 554 individuals selected for extreme LDL-C (>98(th) or <2(nd) percentile). Follow-up analyses included sequencing of 1,302 additional individuals and genotype-based analysis of 52,221 individuals. We observed significant evidence of association between LDL-C and the burden of rare or low-frequency variants in PNPLA5, encoding a phospholipase-domain-containing protein, and both known and previously unidentified variants in PCSK9, LDLR and APOB, three known lipid-related genes. The effect sizes for the burden of rare variants for each associated gene were substantially higher than those observed for individual SNPs identified from GWASs. We replicated the PNPLA5 signal in an independent large-scale sequencing study of 2,084 individuals. In conclusion, this large whole-exome-sequencing study for LDL-C identified a gene not known to be implicated in LDL-C and provides unique insight into the design and analysis of similar experiments.

  13. Biological activity of some naturally occurring resins, gums and pigments against in vitro LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K; Kaliora, Andriana C; Assimopoulou, Andreana N; Papapeorgiou, Vassilios P

    2003-05-01

    Naturally occurring gums and resins with beneficial pharmaceutical and nutraceutical properties were tested for their possible protective effect against copper-induced LDL oxidation in vitro. Chiosmastic gum (CMG) (Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia resin) was the most effective in protecting human LDL from oxidation. The minimum and maximum doses for the saturation phenomena of inhibition of LDL oxidation were 2.5 mg and 50 mg CMG (75.3% and 99.9%, respectively). The methanol/water extract of CMG was the most effective compared with other solvent combinations. CMG when fractionated in order to determine a structure-activity relationship showed that the total mastic essential oil, collofonium-like residue and acidic fractions of CMG exhibited a high protective activity ranging from 65.0% to 77.8%. The other natural gums and resins (CMG resin 'liquid collection', P. terebinthus var. Chia resin, dammar resin, acacia gum, tragacanth gum, storax gum) also tested as above, showed 27.0%-78.8% of the maximum LDL protection. The other naturally occurring substances, i.e. triterpenes (amyrin, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, lupeol, 18-a-glycyrrhetinic acid) and hydroxynaphthoquinones (naphthazarin, shikonin and alkannin) showed 53.5%-78.8% and 27.0%-64.1% LDL protective activity, respectively. The combination effects (68.7%-76.2% LDL protection) of ursolic-, oleanolic- and ursodeoxycholic- acids were almost equal to the effect (75.3%) of the CMG extract in comparable doses.

  14. Refinement of variant selection for the LDL-C genetic risk score in the diagnosis of the polygenic form of clinical Familial Hypercholesterolemia and replication in samples from six countries

    PubMed Central

    Futema, Marta; Shah, Sonia; Cooper, Jackie A; Li, KaWah; Whittall, Ros A; Sharifi, Mahtab; Goldberg, Olivia; Drogari, Euridiki; Mollaki, Vasiliki; Wiegman, Albert; Defesche, Joep; D’Agostino, Maria N; D’Angelo, Antonietta; Rubba, Paolo; Fortunato, Giuliana; Walus-Miarka, Małgorzata; Hegele, Robert A; Bamimore, Mary Aderayo; Durst, Ronen; Leitersdorf, Eran; Mulder, Monique T; Roeters van Lennep, Janine E; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Whittaker, John C; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E

    2016-01-01

    Background Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in one of three genes. In the 60% of patients who are mutation-negative we have recently shown that the clinical phenotype can be associated with an accumulation of common small-effect LDL-C-raising alleles using a 12-SNP score. The aims of the study were to improve the selection of SNPs, and to replicate the results in additional samples. Methods Receiver-operating characteristic curves were used to determine the optimum number of LDL-C SNPs. For replication analysis, we genotyped patients with a clinical diagnosis of FH from six countries for six LDL-C-associated alleles. We compared the weighted SNP score among patients with no confirmed mutation (FH/M-), those with a mutation (FH/M+), and controls from an UK population sample (WHII). Results Increasing the number of SNPs to 33 did not improve the ability of the score to discriminate between FH/M- and controls, while sequential removal of SNPs with smaller effects/lower frequency showed a weighted score of six SNPs performed as well as the 12-SNP score. Meta-analysis of the weighted 6-SNP score, based on polymorphisms in CELSR2, APOB, ABCG5/8, LDLR and APOE loci, in the independent FH/M- cohorts showed a consistently higher score in comparison to the WHII population (P<2.2×10-16). Modeling in individuals with a 6-SNP score in the top three quarters of the score distribution, indicated a >95% likelihood of a polygenic explanation of their increased LDL-C. Conclusion A 6-SNP LDL-C score consistently distinguishes FH/M- patients from healthy subjects. The hypercholesterolemia in 88% of mutation-negative patients is likely to have a polygenic basis. PMID:25414277

  15. An olive oil-rich diet results in higher concentrations of LDL cholesterol and a higher number of LDL subfraction particles than rapeseed oil and sunflower oil diets.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, A; Baumstark, M W; Marckmann, P; Gylling, H; Sandström, B

    2000-12-01

    We investigated the effect of olive oil, rapeseed oil, and sunflower oil on blood lipids and lipoproteins including number and lipid composition of lipoprotein subclasses. Eighteen young, healthy men participated in a double-blinded randomized cross-over study (3-week intervention period) with 50 g of oil per 10 MJ incorporated into a constant diet. Plasma cholesterol, triacylglycerol, apolipoprotein B, and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations were 10;-20% higher after consumption of the olive oil diet compared with the rapeseed oil and sunflower oil diets [analysis of variance (ANOVA), P < 0.05]. The size of IDL, VLDL, and LDL subfractions did not differ between the diets, whereas a significantly higher number (apolipoprotein B concentration) and lipid content of the larger and medium-sized LDL subfractions were observed after the olive oil diet compared with the rapeseed oil and sunflower oil diets (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Total HDL cholesterol concentration did not differ significantly, but HDL(2a) cholesterol was higher after olive oil and rapeseed oil compared with sunflower oil (ANOVA, P < 0.05).In conclusion, rapeseed oil and sunflower oil had more favorable effects on blood lipids and plasma apolipoproteins as well as on the number and lipid content of LDL subfractions compared with olive oil. Some of the differences may be attributed to differences in the squalene and phytosterol contents of the oils.

  16. Anticoagulant activity of tissue factor pathway inhibitor in human plasma is preferentially associated with dense subspecies of LDL and HDL and with Lp(a).

    PubMed

    Lesnik, P; Vonica, A; Guérin, M; Moreau, M; Chapman, M J

    1993-07-01

    Human plasma contains a multivalent, Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor termed tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), which specifically inhibits the action of the factor VII(a)-tissue factor complex in coagulation. In the present study, we examined the distribution and anticoagulant activity of TFPI among plasma lipoprotein subspecies separated by isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation; this procedure permitted the simultaneous fractionation of the major lipoprotein classes (very-low-density lipoprotein [VLDL], intermediate-density lipoprotein [IDL], low-density lipoprotein [LDL], high-density lipoprotein [HDL] 2 and 3, and very-high-density lipoprotein [VHDL]). Studies of eight normolipidemic subjects revealed two major lipoprotein carriers of TFPI activity: dense LDL subspecies (d = 1.039 to 1.063 g/mL) and both dense HDL particles and VHDL (d = 1.133 to 1.190 g/mL), representing 33.8% and 35.9%, respectively, of the total lipoprotein-associated TFPI activity in plasma. TFPI activity was also associated with lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), whose density distribution (d = 1.044 to 1.100 g/mL) overlapped that of LDL and HDL2; such association was related to Lp(a)'s particle size and phenotype. VLDL, IDL, and LDL1 through LDL3 (d = 1.019 to 1.039 g/mL), HDL2 (d = 1.063 to 1.100 g/mL), and light subfractions of HDL3 (d = 1.100 to 1.167 g/mL) conveyed only 1.8%, 10%, and 18.5%, respectively, of lipoprotein-associated TFPI activity. Such anticoagulant activity was dependent on the presence of TFPI protein. The dense subspecies of HDL3 (d = 1.133 to 1.167 g/mL) with which TFPI was preferentially associated were small, displayed a cholesteryl ester to protein ratio of approximately 0.2, and were deficient in phospholipid (13.6% to 18.3%). HDL subspecies of d = 1.110 to 1.167 g/mL mainly contained the higher relative molecular mass form of TFPI of 41 kD (a form that is known to be covalently associated with apolipoprotein [apo] A-II) and minor bands of the 35- and 52-k

  17. A novel BET bromodomain inhibitor, RVX-208, shows reduction of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jahagirdar, Ravi; Zhang, Haiyan; Azhar, Salman; Tobin, Jennifer; Attwell, Sarah; Yu, Raymond; Wu, Jin; McLure, Kevin G; Hansen, Henrik C; Wagner, Gregory S; Young, Peter R; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Wong, Norman C W; Johansson, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Despite the benefit of statins in reducing cardiovascular risk, a sizable proportion of patients still remain at risk. Since HDL reduces CVD risk through a process that involves formation of pre-beta particles that facilitates the removal of cholesterol from the lipid-laden macrophages in the arteries, inducing pre-beta particles, may reduce the risk of CVD. A novel BET bromodomain antagonist, RVX-208, was reported to raise apoA-I and increase preβ-HDL particles in non-human primates and humans. In the present study, we investigated the effect of RVX-208 on aortic lesion formation in hyperlipidemic apoE(-/-) mice. Oral treatments of apoE(-/-) mice with 150 mg/kg b.i.d RVX-208 for 12 weeks significantly reduced aortic lesion formation, accompanied by 2-fold increases in the levels of circulating HDL-C, and ∼50% decreases in LDL-C, although no significant changes in plasma apoA-I were observed. Circulating adhesion molecules as well as cytokines also showed significant reduction. Haptoglobin, a proinflammatory protein, known to bind with HDL/apoA-I, decreased >2.5-fold in the RVX-208 treated group. With a therapeutic dosing regimen in which mice were fed Western diet for 10 weeks to develop lesions followed by switching to a low fat diet and concurrent treatment with RVX-208 for 14 weeks, RVX-208 similarly reduced lesion formation by 39% in the whole aorta without significant changes in the plasma lipid parameters. RVX-208 significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokines IP-10, MIP1(®) and MDC. These results show that the antiatherogenic activity of BET inhibitor, RVX-208, occurs via a combination of lipid changes and anti-inflammatory activities.

  18. Macrophage apoAI protects against dyslipidemia-induced dermatitis and atherosclerosis without affecting HDL.

    PubMed

    Tavori, Hagai; Su, Yan Ru; Yancey, Patricia G; Giunzioni, Ilaria; Wilhelm, Ashley J; Blakemore, John L; Zabalawi, Manal; Linton, MacRae F; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Fazio, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Tissue cholesterol accumulation, macrophage infiltration, and inflammation are features of atherosclerosis and some forms of dermatitis. HDL and its main protein, apoAI, are acceptors of excess cholesterol from macrophages; this process inhibits tissue inflammation. Recent epidemiologic and clinical trial evidence questions the role of HDL and its manipulation in cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effect of ectopic macrophage apoAI expression on atherosclerosis and dermatitis induced by the combination of hypercholesterolemia and absence of HDL in mice. Hematopoietic progenitor cells were transduced to express human apoAI and transplanted into lethally irradiated LDL receptor(-/-)/apoAI(-/-) mice, which were then placed on a high-fat diet for 16 weeks. Macrophage apoAI expression reduced aortic CD4(+) T-cell levels (-39.8%), lesion size (-25%), and necrotic core area (-31.6%), without affecting serum HDL or aortic macrophage levels. Macrophage apoAI reduced skin cholesterol by 39.8%, restored skin morphology, and reduced skin CD4(+) T-cell levels. Macrophage apoAI also reduced CD4(+) T-cell levels (-32.9%) in skin-draining lymph nodes but had no effect on other T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages compared with control transplanted mice. Thus, macrophage apoAI expression protects against atherosclerosis and dermatitis by reducing cholesterol accumulation and regulating CD4(+) T-cell levels, without affecting serum HDL or tissue macrophage levels.

  19. The Essential Role of Pin1 via NF-κB Signaling in Vascular Inflammation and Atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Yu, Peng; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Xue; Zhao, Ji; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2017-03-16

    Atherosclerosis, as a chronic inflammatory disease, is the major underlying cause of death worldwide. However, the mechanisms that underlie the inflammatory process are not completely understood. Prolyl-isomerase-1 (Pin1), as a unique peptidyl-prolyl isomerase, plays an important role in inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Herein, we investigate whether Pin1 regulates vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis, and clarify its mechanisms in these processes. ApoE(-/-) mice were randomly given either juglone (0.3, 1 mg/kg, two times per week) or vehicle i.p. for 4 weeks. Compared with ApoE(-/-) mice, treatment by juglone resulted not only in markedly attenuated macrophage infiltration and atherosclerotic lesion area in a lipid-independent manner, but also in decreased expression of Pin1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and NF-κB activity in aorta. Then, EA.hy926 cells were pretreated with juglone (6 μmol/L), Pin1 siRNA, NF-κB inhibitor, or vehicle prior to exposure to ox-LDL (50 μg/mL). It was observed that treatment with juglone or Pin1 siRNA suppressed expression of VCAM-1 in oxLDL-incubated EA.hy926 cells and decreased THP-1 cell adhesion to oxLDL-stimulated endothelial cells through the NF-κB signal pathway. Our findings indicate that Pin1 plays a vital role on the development of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  20. Carbamylated Low-Density Lipoprotein (cLDL)-Mediated Induction of Autophagy and Its Role in Endothelial Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chhanda; Shah, Sudhir V.; Karaduta, Oleg K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high risk of cardiovascular complications. Plasma levels of carbamylated proteins produced by urea-derived isocyanate or thiocyanate are elevated in CKD patients and that they are significant predictors of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. Carbamylated LDL (cLDL) has pro-atherogenic properties and is known to affect major biological processes relevant to atherosclerosis including endothelial cell injury. The underlying mechanisms of cLDL-induced endothelial cell injury are not well understood. Although autophagy has been implicated in atherosclerosis, cLDL-mediated induction of autophagy and its role in endothelial cell injury is unknown. Our studies demonstrate that human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) respond to cLDL by specific induction of key autophagy proteins including LC3-I, beclin-1, Atg5, formation of lipid-conjugated LC3-II protein, and formation of punctate dots of autophagosome-associated LC3-II. We demonstrated that autophagy induction is an immediate response to cLDL and occurred in a dose and time-dependent manner. Inhibition of cLDL-induced autophagy by a specific siRNA to LC3 as well as by an autophagy inhibitor provided protection from cLDL-induced cell death and DNA fragmentation. Our studies demonstrate that autophagy plays an important role in cLDL-mediated endothelial cell injury and may provide one of the underlying mechanisms for the pathogenesis of cLDL-induced atherosclerosis in CKD patients. PMID:27973558

  1. Restoration of LDL receptor function in cells from patients with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia by retroviral expression of ARH1.

    PubMed

    Eden, Emily R; Patel, Dilipkumar D; Sun, Xi-Ming; Burden, Jemima J; Themis, Michael; Edwards, Matthew; Lee, Philip; Neuwirth, Clare; Naoumova, Rossitza P; Soutar, Anne K

    2002-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an autosomal dominant disorder with a gene-dosage effect that is usually caused by mutations in the LDL receptor gene that disrupt normal clearance of LDL. In the homozygous form, it results in a distinctive clinical phenotype, characterized by inherited hypercholesterolemia, cholesterol deposition in tendons, and severe premature coronary disease. We described previously two families with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia that is not due to mutations in the LDL receptor gene but is characterized by defective LDL receptor-dependent internalization and degradation of LDL by transformed lymphocytes from the patients. We mapped the defective gene to chromosome 1p36 and now show that the disorder in these and a third English family is due to novel mutations in ARH1, a newly identified gene encoding an adaptor-like protein. Cultured skin fibroblasts from affected individuals exhibit normal LDL receptor activity, but their monocyte-derived macrophages are similar to transformed lymphocytes, being unable to internalize and degrade LDL. Retroviral expression of normal human ARH1 restores LDL receptor internalization in transformed lymphocytes from an affected individual, as demonstrated by uptake and degradation of (125)I-labeled LDL and confocal microscopy of cells labeled with anti-LDL-receptor Ab.

  2. Synthetic low-density lipoprotein (sLDL) selectively delivers paclitaxel to tumor with low systemic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hai-Tao; Li, Xin; Liang, De-Sheng; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL), which is a principal carrier for the delivery of cholesterol, has been used as a great candidate for the delivery of drugs to tumor based on the great requirements for cholesterol of many cancer cells. Mimicking the structure and composition of LDL, we designed a synthetic low-density lipoprotein (sLDL) to encapsulate paclitaxel-alpha linolenic acid (PALA) for tumor therapy. The PALA loaded sLDL (PALA-sLDL) and PALA-loaded microemulsion (PALA-ME, without the binding domain for LDLR) displayed uniform sizes with high drug loading efficiency (> 90%). In vitro studies demonstrated PALA-sLDL exhibited enhanced cellular uptake capacity and better cytotoxicity to LDLR over-expressed U87 MG cells as compared to PALA-ME. The uptake mechanisms of PALA-sLDL were involved in a receptor mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Furthermore, the in vivo biodistribution and tumor growth inhibition studies of PALA-sLDL were investigated in xenograft U87 MG tumor-bearing mice. The results showed that PALA-sLDL exhibited higher tumor accumulation than PALA-ME and superior tumor inhibition efficiency (72.1%) compared to Taxol® (51.2%) and PALA-ME (58.8%) but with lower toxicity. These studies suggested that sLDL is potential to be used as a valuable carrier for the selective delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor with low systemic toxicity. PMID:27409176

  3. Effect of shear stress on water and LDL transport through cultured endothelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Cancel, Limary M; Tarbell, John M

    2014-04-01

    Previous animal experiments have shown that the transport of LDL into arterial walls is shear stress dependent. However, little work has probed shear effects on LDL transport in vitro where conditions are well defined and mechanisms are more easily explored. Therefore, we measured shear induced water and LDL fluxes across cultured bovine aortic endothelial (BAEC) monolayers in vitro and developed a three-pore model to describe the transport dynamics. Cell apoptosis was quantified by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. We also examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in shear induced water and LDL fluxes by incubating BAEC monolayers with an NO synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Our results show that direct exposure of endothelial monolayers to 12 dyn/cm2 shear stress for 3 h elicited a 2.37-fold increase in water flux (Jv), a 3.00-fold increase in LDL permeability (Pe), a 1.32-fold increase in LDL uptake, and a 1.68-fold increase in apoptotic rate. L-NMMA treatment of BAEC monolayers blocked shear induced Jv response, but had no significant effect on shear responses of Pe and cell apoptosis. A long time shear exposure (12 h) of endothelial monolayers reduced Pe and apoptotic rate close to the baseline. These results suggest that an acute change in shear stress from a static baseline state induces increases in water flux that are mediated by an NO dependent mechanism. On the other hand, the permeability of endothelial monolayers to LDL is enhanced by a short term-shear application and reduced nearly to the baseline level by a longer time shear exposure, positively correlated to the leaky junctions forming around apoptotic cells.

  4. Apple Peel Supplemented Diet Reduces Parameters of Metabolic Syndrome and Atherogenic Progression in ApoE-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Sandoval, Nathalie; Reyes, María; Gonzalez, Priscila; Gajardo, Monica; Morales, Erik; Neira, Amalia; Razmilic, Iván; Yuri, José A; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all causes of death worldwide. The development of CVD is related in many cases with the previous existence of metabolic syndrome (MS). It is known that apple consumption has a cardiovascular protecting effect, containing phenolic compounds with antioxidant effect, which are concentrated in the fruit peel. The objective of this study was to test the effect of apple peel consumption in a murine model of MS and apoE-/- mice. Apple supplemented diets reduced the biochemical parameters (glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, ureic nitrogen, triglycerides, insulin, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)) of MS model in CF1 mice significantly. The model apoE-/- mouse was used to evaluate the capacity of the apple peel to revert the progression of the atherogenesis. FD with HAP reverts cholesterol significantly and slows down the progression of the plate diminishing the cholesterol accumulation area. With these results, it can be concluded that the consumption of apple peel reduces several MS parameters and the atherogenic progression in mice.

  5. The Effect of Hypertension on the Transport of LDL Across the Deformable Arterial Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagh, Mahsa; Jalali, Payman

    2010-05-01

    The influences of increased endothelial cell turnover and deformation of the intima on the transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) under hypertension are investigated by applying a multilayered model of aortic wall. The thickness and properties of the endothelium, intima, internal elastic lamina (IEL), and media are affected by the transmural pressure. Navier-Stokes and Brinkman equations are applied for the transport of the transmural flow and the convective-diffusion equation is solved for LDL transport. LDL macromolecules enter the intima through leaky junctions, and then pass through the media layer where they permeate over the surface of smooth muscle cells (SMC). Uptake of LDL by cells is modeled through a uniform reaction evenly distributed in the macroscopically homogeneous media layer. The results show that transmural pressure significantly affects the LDL fluxes across the leaky junction, the intima, fenestral pores in the IEL, and the media layer. Many realistic predictions including the proper magnitudes for the permeability of endothelium and intimal layers, and the hydraulic conductivity of all layers as well as their trends with pressure are predicted by the present model.

  6. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  7. Inhibition of human LDL oxidation by the neuroprotective drug l-deprenyl.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tom; Bhavnani, Bhagu R; Thomas, Prem

    2002-03-01

    L-deprenyl (Selegiline) used in the treatment of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease also enhances longevity. Oxidized low density lipoprotein promotes atherosclerosis and is toxic to both vascular and neural tissue. The reported association between vascular dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases prompted us to investigate the effect of l-deprenyl, a MAO-B inhibitor, on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. LDL was isolated from freshly collected blood and the kinetics of copper induced oxidation of LDL was monitored continuously by spectrophotometry. Oral administration (10 mg) or in vitro (2.8 to 84 microM) addition of l-deprenyl inhibited oxidation of LDL isolated from healthy men and post-menopausal women. This is the first report demonstrating that the antioxidant action of l-deprenyl may be antiatherogenic and cardioprotective. Such an action could contribute to reported extension of life span associated with long-term administration of the drug. In conjunction with inhibition of LDL oxidation, l-deprenyl is unique in that it demonstrates protective effects on both vascular and neuronal tissue. Prophylactic use of low doses of l-deprenyl may accord protection against vascular and neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging.

  8. Oxidative modification and poor protective activity of HDL on LDL oxidation in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Unchern, Supeenun; Laohareungpanya, Narumon; Sanvarinda, Yupin; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Tanratana, Pansakorn; Chantharaksri, Udom; Sibmooh, Nathawut

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been reported in thalassemia, which is a consequence of oxidative stress. However, the levels of oxidized high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in thalassemia have not been evaluated and it is unclear whether HDL oxidation may be linked to LDL oxidation. In this study, the levels of total cholesterol, iron, protein, conjugated diene (CD), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) were determined in HDL from healthy volunteers and patients with beta-thalassemia intermedia with hemoglobin E (beta-thal/Hb E). The protective activity of thalassemic HDL on LDL oxidation was also investigated. The iron content of HDL(2) and HDL(3) from beta-thal/HbE patients was higher while the cholesterol content was lower than those in healthy volunteers. Thalassemic HDL(2) and HDL(3) had increased levels of lipid peroxidation markers i.e., conjugated diene, LOOH, and TBARs. Thalassemic HDL had lower peroxidase activity than control HDL and was unable to protect LDL from oxidation induced by CuSO(4). Our findings highlight the oxidative modification and poor protective activity of thalassemic HDL on LDL oxidation which may contribute to cardiovascular complications in thalassemia.

  9. MiR-590-5p Inhibits Oxidized- LDL Induced Angiogenesis by Targeting LOX-1.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yao; Zhang, Zhigao; Cao, Yongxiang; Mehta, Jawahar L; Li, Jun

    2016-03-02

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is, at least in part, responsible for angiogenesis in atherosclerotic regions. This effect of ox-LDL has been shown to be mediated through a specific receptor LOX-1. Here we describe the effect of miR-590-5p on ox-LDL-mediated angiogenesis in in vitro and in vivo settings. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with miR-590-5p mimic or inhibitor followed by treatment with ox-LDL. In other experiments, Marigel plugs were inserted in the mice subcutaneous space. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that miR-590-5p mimic (100 nM) inhibited the ox-LDL-mediated angiogenesis (capillary tube formation, cell proliferation and migration as well as pro-angiogenic signals- ROS, MAPKs, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion-related proteins). Of note, miR-590-5p inhibitor (200 nM) had the opposite effects. The inhibitory effect of miR-590-5p on angiogenesis was mediated by inhibition of LOX-1 at translational level. The inhibition of LOX-1 by miR-590-5p was confirmed by luciferase assay. In conclusion, we show that MiR-590-5p inhibits angiogenesis by targeting LOX-1 and suppressing redox-sensitive signals.

  10. Effect of phytosterols/stanols on LDL concentration and other surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Bard, J-M; Paillard, F; Lecerf, J-M

    2015-02-01

    Plant sterols and stanols are well-known to reduce LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations. It is generally accepted that supplementation with 2g/day of sterols/stanols leads to a 10% reduction in LDL. However, most of the clinical trials supporting this conclusion were of short-term duration, and the results of longer interventions are scanty. In four studies, interventions lasting>6 months were carried out and the LDL-C-lowering effects were maintained over this longer duration, although some results suggest that a reduced effect may be observed with sterols, while stanols maintain their effect. In any case, the data are too limited to be definitive. In a free-living population as well as in multiparametric interventional studies, however, the LDL-C-lowering effect has been confirmed, although to a lesser extent than in clinical studies. In the absence of data on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, data for surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk could be considered adequate alternatives. Several studies have been conducted on this basis, but their results failed to demonstrate any favourable effects. The present report summarizes the different results obtained in long-term studies, and in those comparing the effects of sterols and stanols on lipids and other surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk.

  11. Resolving Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) on the Human Aortic Surface Using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts

    2011-11-01

    The prediction and understanding of the genesis of vascular diseases is one of the grand challenges in biofluid engineering. The progression of atherosclerosis is correlated to the build- up of LDL on the arterial surface, which is affected by the blood flow. A multi-physics simulation of LDL mass transport in the blood and through the arterial wall of a subject specific human aorta was performed, employing a LES turbulence model to resolve the turbulent flow. Geometry and velocity measurements from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were incorporated to assure physiological relevance of the simulation. Due to the turbulent nature of the flow, consecutive cardiac cycles are not identical, neither in vivo nor in the simulations. A phase average based on a large number of cardiac cycles is therefore computed, which is the proper way to get reliable statistical results from a LES simulation. In total, 50 cardiac cycles were simulated, yielding over 2.5 Billion data points to be post-processed. An inverse relation between LDL and WSS was found; LDL accumulated on locations where WSS was low and vice-versa. Large temporal differences were present, with the concentration level decreasing during systolic acceleration and increasing during the deceleration phase. This method makes it possible to resolve the localization of LDL accumulation in the normal human aorta with its complex transitional flow.

  12. Glycaemic control influences the relationship between plasma PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Laugier-Robiolle, Stéphanie; Vergès, Bruno; Le Bras, Maëlle; Gand, Elise; Bouillet, Benjamin; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Le May, Cédric; Pichelin, Matthieu; Maréchaud, Richard; Petit, Jean-Michel; Hadjadj, Samy; Cariou, Bertrand

    2017-03-01

    Pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a critical regulator of LDL cholesterol metabolism. Little is known, however, about the regulation of PCSK9 in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). In the present study, we aimed to determine the relationship between circulating PCSK9 and metabolic variables in T1D. Plasma PCSK9 levels were measured in 195 people with T1D (mean age 38.8 years, mean diabetes duration 17.2 years, mean glycated haemoglobin [HbA1c] 8.3%), who were free of any lipid-lowering agent. Plasma PCSK9 was positively correlated with LDL cholesterol (P = .0007), triglycerides (P = .004), apolipoprotein B (P = .005), HbA1c (P = .003), systolic (P = .003) and diastolic (P = .001) blood pressure and body mass index (0.02). In multivariate analysis, PCSK9 concentration was independently associated with HbA1c (P = .02) and LDL cholesterol (P = .03). After classifying patients according to HbA1c tertile, the correlation between PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol was only observed in the highest tertile (P = .0006; Rho = 0.43), whereas no correlation was found in the lowest and intermediate tertiles. This study suggests that good glycaemic control abolishes the positive relationship between PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol in patients with T1D; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be established.

  13. MiR-590-5p Inhibits Oxidized- LDL Induced Angiogenesis by Targeting LOX-1

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yao; Zhang, Zhigao; Cao, Yongxiang; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is, at least in part, responsible for angiogenesis in atherosclerotic regions. This effect of ox-LDL has been shown to be mediated through a specific receptor LOX-1. Here we describe the effect of miR-590-5p on ox-LDL-mediated angiogenesis in in vitro and in vivo settings. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with miR-590-5p mimic or inhibitor followed by treatment with ox-LDL. In other experiments, Marigel plugs were inserted in the mice subcutaneous space. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that miR-590-5p mimic (100 nM) inhibited the ox-LDL-mediated angiogenesis (capillary tube formation, cell proliferation and migration as well as pro-angiogenic signals- ROS, MAPKs, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion-related proteins). Of note, miR-590-5p inhibitor (200 nM) had the opposite effects. The inhibitory effect of miR-590-5p on angiogenesis was mediated by inhibition of LOX-1 at translational level. The inhibition of LOX-1 by miR-590-5p was confirmed by luciferase assay. In conclusion, we show that MiR-590-5p inhibits angiogenesis by targeting LOX-1 and suppressing redox-sensitive signals. PMID:26932825

  14. Prediction of LDL concentration at the luminal surface of a vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wada, Shigeo; Karino, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    To find out whether concentration polarization of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) occurs at the surface of a vascular endothelium or not, transport of LDL in flowing blood to an water-permeable endothelium was studied theoretically by means of CFD. Calculations were carried out for an endothelium exposed to a Couette flow by assuming that the surface geometry of the endothelium could be expressed by a cosine function. Two typical cases were considered for the permeability of endothelium to water; one was uniform permeability everywhere in the endothelium, and the other was uneven permeability which was augmented at the intercellular junction. It was found that, in both cases, the surface concentration of LDL increased in going distally from the entrance, taking locally high and low values at the valleys and hills of the endothelium, respectively, and the variation was larger in the case of endothelium with uneven permeability. These results clearly showed that concentration polarization of LDL which might affect the uptake of LDL by the arterial wall certainly occurs at the surface of the endothelium even if the flow is disturbed microscopically by the uneven surface of the endothelium.

  15. LDL-Cholesterol Increases the Transcytosis of Molecules through Endothelial Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Magalhaes, Ana; Matias, Inês; Palmela, Inês; Brito, Maria Alexandra; Dias, Sérgio

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol has been identified as a causative factor in numerous pathologies including atherosclerosis and cancer. One of the frequent effects of elevated cholesterol levels in humans is the compromise of endothelial function due to activation of pro-inflammatory signalling pathways. While the mechanisms involved in endothelial activation by cholesterol during an inflammatory response are well established, less is known about the mechanisms by which cholesterol may affect endothelial barrier function, which were the subject of the present study. Here we show that low density lipoprotein (LDL) increases the permeability of endothelial monolayers to high molecular weight dextrans in an LDL receptor and cholesterol-dependent manner. The increased permeability seen upon LDL treatment was not caused by disruption of cell-to-cell junctions as determined by a normal localization of VE-Cadherin and ZO-1 proteins, and no major alterations in transendothelial electrical resistance or permeability to fluorescein. We show instead that LDL increases the level of high molecular weight transcytosis and that this occurs in an LDL receptor, cholesterol and caveolae-dependent way. Our findings contribute to our understanding of the systemic pathological effects of elevated cholesterol and the transport of cargo through endothelial monolayers. PMID:27695052

  16. Effect of young barley leaf extract and adlay on plasma lipids and LDL oxidation in hyperlipidemic smokers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ya-Mei; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Liu, Chu-Sun; Tsai, Ching-Min

    2004-06-01

    Forty hyperlipidemic patients, smokers and non-smokers, were studied. Subjects received 15 g young barley leaf extract (BL) or 60 g adlay daily for four weeks. Overnight fasting blood samples were drawn immediately prior to and after four weeks of supplementation. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipid profiles and their susceptibility to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. The plasma total and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were reduced following treatment with either BL or adlay; furthermore, the lag phase of LDL oxidation increased after either supplementation. However, it seemed that BL had stronger antioxidative effect on the prevention of LDL oxidation than adlay. Our results also indicated that the antioxidative effect was less pronounced in smokers than in non-smokers. Therefore, supplementation with BL or adlay can decrease plasma lipids and inhibit LDL oxidation in hyperlipidemic smokers and/or non-smokers.

  17. Baicalin and geniposide attenuate atherosclerosis involving lipids regulation and immunoregulation in ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pingping; Liu, Lihua; Wang, Bin; Li, Wei; Fang, Xin; Guan, Siming

    2014-10-05

    Baicalin and geniposide, which are respectively isolated from Scutellariae radix and Gardenia jasminoides, have been known to exhibit a number of pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant. Here, we primarily aimed to observe the protective effects of these two Chinese herbs on inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout mice via lipids regulation and immunoregulation. After the ApoE-/- mice with high-cholesterol diet had received 12-weeks׳ oral administration of either baicalin or geniposide (100 mg/kg), atherosclerotic plaque areas in aorta were measured and exhibited a prominent decrease in the treated mice. We then assayed serum lipids levels, serum Treg-cell-associated cytokines (TGF-β1 and IL-10) and the frequency of splenic Treg cells. We found that geniposide notably decreased serum TC and LDL-c. Both baicalin and geniposide treated mice showed much more splenic Treg cells and the correlated cytokines (TGF-β1 and IL-10). Foxp3, as the marker of Treg cell, was detected in atherosclerotic lesions, and we found that Foxp3 expression at both mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated in addition to increased Foxp3 positive Treg cells detected by immunohistochemistry in baicalin or geniposide treated mice. In conclusion, baicalin and geniposide up-regulated the expression of foxp3, promoted the number and function of Treg cells and ameliorated the atherosclerotic lesions progression partly through lipids regulation and immunoregulation.

  18. Hypolipidemic effect of young persimmon fruit in C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Gato, Nobuki

    2008-10-01

    We investigated the hypolipidemic effects of young persimmon fruit (YP) on apolipoprotein E-deficient C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice. These mice exhibited higher plasma cholesterols, except for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and lower plasma HDL cholesterol than C57BL/6.Cr mice that had the same genetic background as the C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice. Male C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice (n=5) were fed a diet supplemented with dry YP, Hachiya-kaki, at a concentration of 5% (w/w) for 10 weeks. YP treatment significantly lowered plasma chylomicron, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterols, and triglyceride, and this response was accompanied by an elevation of fecal bile acid excretion. In the liver, sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 gene expression was significantly higher in mice fed YP, while the mRNA and protein levels of the LDL receptor did not change. These results indicate that acceleration of fecal bile acid excretion is a major mechanism of the hypolipidemic effect induced by YP in C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice.

  19. Electronegative LDL is linked to high-fat, high-cholesterol diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Ho, Shu-Li; Chen, Hui-Ling; Lu, Shao-Chun

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), like that of atherosclerosis, involves lipid accumulation, inflammation and fibrosis. Recent studies suggest that oxidized LDL (oxLDL) may be a risk factor for NASH, but oxLDL levels were not directly measured in these studies. The aim of this study was to examine whether there was an association between electronegative LDL [LDL(-)], a mildly oxLDL found in the blood, and the development of NASH using two animal models. Golden Syrian hamsters and C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFC) diet for 6 or 12weeks, then liver lipid and histopathology, plasma lipoprotein profile and LDL(-) levels were examined. The HFC-diet-fed hamsters and mice had similar levels of hepatic lipid but different histopathological changes, with microvesicular steatosis, hepatocellular hypertrophy, inflammation and bridging fibrosis in the hamsters, but only in mild steatohepatitis with low inflammatory cell infiltration in the mice. It also resulted in a significant increase in plasma levels of LDL cholesterol and LDL(-) in hamsters, but only a slight increase in mice. Moreover, enlarged Kupffer cells, LDL(-) and accumulation of unesterified cholesterol were detected in the portal area of HFC-diet-fed hamsters, but not HFC-diet-fed mice. An in vitro study showed that LDL(-) from HFC-diet-fed hamsters induced TNF-α secretion in rat Kupffer cell through a LOX-1-dependent pathway. Our results strongly suggest that LDL(-) is one of the underlying causes of hepatic inflammation and plays a critical role in the development of NASH.

  20. [LDL cholesterol control in patients with very high cardiovascular risk. A simplified algorithm for achieving LDL cholesterol goals "in two steps"].

    PubMed

    Guijarro-Herraiz, Carlos; Masana-Marin, Luis; Galve, Enrique; Cordero-Fort, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reducing low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) is the main lipid goal of treatment for patients with very high cardiovascular risk. In these patients the therapeutic goal is to achieve a LDL-c lower than 70 mg/dL, as recommended by the guidelines for cardiovascular prevention commonly used in Spain and Europe. However, the degree of achieving these objectives in this group of patients is very low. This article describes the prevalence of the problem and the causes that motivate it. Recommendations and tools that can facilitate the design of an optimal treatment strategy for achieving the goals are also given. In addition, a new tool with a simple algorithm that can allow these very high risk patients to achieve the goals "in two-steps", i.e., with only two doctor check-ups, is presented.

  1. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... high level of triglycerides in the blood, and atherosclerosis that develops at an early age. APOE genotyping ... and is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis . People with these genotypes could be predisposed to ...

  2. Chlorogenic acid protects against atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice and promotes cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongming; Luan, Hong; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Xiaopo; Sun, Xiaobo; Guo, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant polyphenols in the human diet and is suggested to be a potential antiatherosclerotic agent due to its proposed hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CGA on atherosclerosis development in ApoE(-/-) mice and its potential mechanism. ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a cholesterol-rich diet without (control) or with CGA (200 and 400 mg/kg) or atorvastatin (4 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. During the study plasma lipid and inflammatory parameters were determined. Treatment with CGA (400 mg/kg) reduced atherosclerotic lesion area and vascular dilatation in the aortic root, comparable to atorvastatin. CGA (400 mg/kg) also significantly decreased plasma levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol as well as inflammatory markers. Supplementation with CGA or CGA metabolites-containing serum suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation and stimulated cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 cells. CGA significantly increased the mRNA levels of PPARγ, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 as well as the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. Cholesterol efflux assay showed that three major metabolites, caffeic, ferulic and gallic acids, significantly stimulated cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that CGA potently reduces atherosclerosis development in ApoE(-/-) mice and promotes cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 macrophages. Caffeic, ferulic and gallic acids may be the potential active compounds accounting for the in vivo effect of CGA.

  3. FOS Expression in Blood as a LDL-Independent Marker of Statin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Sung, Ho Joong; Jawed, Sarah I.; Brenneman, Cynthia L.; Rao, Yesoda N.; Sher, Salman; Facio, Flavia M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Sachdev, Vandana; Hwang, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The expression of FOS, a gene critical for monocyte and macrophage function, can be inhibited by statins through the disruption of a cholesterol independent signaling pathway. In this pilot study, we hypothesized that blood FOS mRNA levels will be sensitive to statin treatment independent of LDL cholesterol levels. Methods Three cohorts at increased risk of or with cardiovascular disease (CVD) were studied. Blood FOS mRNA levels were measured before and after statin treatment or in patients under stable treatment. Results Statin treatment for three months significantly reduced blood FOS mRNA and LDL cholesterol levels. However, in subjects with similar LDL levels achieved by different doses of long term statin treatment, there was an inverse relationship between statin dose and FOS expression. Conclusions FOS mRNA levels appear to be a sensitive marker of statin treatment that is dissociated from cholesterol levels. PMID:20619839

  4. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  5. A review of PCSK9 inhibition and its effects beyond LDL receptors.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Dave L; Trankle, Cory; Buckley, Leo; Parod, Eric; Carbone, Salvatore; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) plays an integral role in the degradation of low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDL-R), making it an intriguing target for emerging pharmacotherapy. Two PCSK9 inhibitors, alirocumab and evolocumab, have been approved and are available in the United States and European Union. However, much of the PCSK9 story remains to be told. The pipeline for additional pharmacotherapy options is rich with several compounds under development, using alternative strategies for inhibiting PCSK9. Perhaps, more intriguing is the interaction between PCSK9 and non-LDL-R targets, including mediators of inflammation and immunological processes, which remain under intense investigation. This review will discuss the currently available PCSK9 inhibitors, the development of novel approaches to PCSK9 modulation, and the potential non-LDL-R-mediated effects of PCSK9 inhibition.

  6. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young's modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins.

  7. Inhibitory effect of natto, a kind of fermented soybeans, on LDL oxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Kunihisa; Nakaya, Natsuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Matsue, Hajime

    2002-06-05

    The oxygen radical scavenging activity of natto (fermented soybeans) and its inhibitory effect on the oxidation of rat plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitro were investigated to evaluate the usefulness of the antioxidant properties of natto, which has been shown to have antioxidant activity. Natto was separated into three water-soluble fractions: high-molecular-weight viscous substance (HMWVS; Mw > 100 000), low-molecular-weight viscous substance (LMWVS; Mw < 100 000), and soybean water extract (SWE). LMWVS had the strongest radical scavenging activity for hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals, as assessed by electron spin resonance. The increase of conjugated dienes in LDL oxidized by copper and an azo pigment was depressed by the addition of LMWVS and SWE. These results demonstrate that natto fractions have inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation as a result of their radical scavenging activity.

  8. Aggregated LDL in contact with macrophages induces local increases in free cholesterol levels that regulate local actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Grosheva, Inna; Haka, Abigail S.; Qin, Chunbo; Pierini, Lynda M.; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Interaction of macrophages with aggregated matrix-anchored lipoprotein deposits is an important initial step in atherogenesis. Aggregated lipoproteins require different cellular uptake processes than those used for endocytosis of monomeric lipoproteins. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that engagement of aggregated LDL (agLDL) by macrophages could lead to local increases in free cholesterol levels and that these increases in free cholesterol regulate signals that control cellular actin. Methods and Results AgLDL resides for prolonged periods in surface-connected compartments. While agLDL is still extracellular, we demonstrate that an increase in free cholesterol occurs at sites of contact between agLDL and cells due to hydrolysis of agLDL-derived cholesteryl ester. This increase in free cholesterol causes enhanced actin polymerization around the agLDL. Inhibition of cholesteryl ester hydrolysis results in decreased actin polymerization. Conclusions We describe a novel process that occurs during agLDL-macrophage interactions in which local release of free cholesterol causes local actin polymerization, promoting a pathologic positive feedback loop for increased catabolism of agLDL and eventual foam cell formation. PMID:19556523

  9. A feedback regulatory pathway between LDL and alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in chronic inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Cynthia L; Modarresi, Rozbeh; Babayeva, Mariya A; LaBrunda, Michelle; Mukhtarzad, Roya; Trucy, Maylis; Franklin, Aaron; Reeves, Rudy E R; Long, Allegra; Mullen, Michael P; Cortes, Jose; Winston, Ronald

    2013-11-01

    Dietary lipids are transported via lymph to the liver and transformed to lipoproteins which bind to members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family (LDL-RFMs). Certain LDL-RFMs, e.g., very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), are also bound by inactivated proteinase inhibitors, the most abundant being α1proteinase inhibitor (α1PI, α1antitrypsin). Inflammation/infection, including HIV-1 infection, is accompanied by low levels of CD4+ T cells and active α1PI and high levels of inactivated α1PI. By inducing LDL-RFMs-mediated cellular locomotion, active α1PI regulates the number of CD4+ T cells. We sought to investigate whether CD4+ T cells and α1PI directly impact lipoprotein levels. At the cellular level, we show that active α1PI is required for VLDLR-mediated uptake of receptor-associated cargo, specifically CD4-bound HIV-1. We show that active α1PI levels linearly correlate with LDL levels in HIV-1 infected individuals (P<0.001) and that therapeutic, weekly infusions of active α1PI elevate the number of CD4+ T cells and HDL levels while lowering LDL levels in patients on antiretroviral therapy with controlled HIV-1. Based on the unusual combination of lipodystrophy and low levels of α1PI and CD4+ T cells in HIV-1 disease, we reveal that LDL and α1PI participate in a feedback regulatory pathway. We demonstrate integral roles for sequentially acting active and inactive α1PI in the uptake and recycling of receptors and cargo aggregated with VLDLR including CD4 and chemokine receptors. Evidence supports a role for α1PI as a primary sentinel to deploy the immune system as a consequence of its role in lipoprotein transport.

  10. [Update of planning tables of cholesterol-lowering therapy orientated to achieve LDL therapeutic targets].

    PubMed

    Masana, Luis; Plana, Núria

    2015-01-01

    This is the third update of a planning-table for use in cholesterol-lowering therapy, so as to obtain LDLc objectives. This is an easy to use laptop tool to help choose the best statin or combination therapy (statin plus ezetimibe) depending on the current LDL concentration of the patient, and the LDLc objective to achieve. It is based on a colour code that indicates the drugs that are efficient enough to help patients to achieve their LDL goal. Along with the table, recommendations are given for the best strategy in order to implement the optimal therapy in a maximum of two clinical encounters.

  11. Prosopis farcta beans increase HDL cholesterol and decrease LDL cholesterol in ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Omidi, Arash; Ansari nik, Hossein; Ghazaghi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    Ten blue-neck male ostriches (Struthio camelus) were fed Prosopis farcta beans throughout a 30-day experiment. Blood samples were collected from ostriches on days 0 and 30 to measure levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, total serum protein, albumin, globulin, cholesterol, calcium, inorganic phosphorus, the activity of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT). From days 0 to 30, HDL cholesterol, total protein, and globulins levels increased significantly whereas LDL cholesterol, inorganic phosphorus, and γ-GT activity decreased significantly.

  12. Weight loss associated with reduced intake of carbohydrate reduces the atherogenicity of LDL in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lofgren, Ingrid; Zern, Tosca; Herron, Kristin; West, Kristy; Sharman, Matthew J; Volek, Jeff S; Shachter, Neil S; Koo, Sung I; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2005-09-01

    The effect of a 3-tier intervention including dietary modifications (ie, moderate energy restriction, decreased carbohydrate, increased protein), increased physical activity, and the use of carnitine as a dietary supplement was evaluated on plasma lipids and the atherogenicity of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles in a population of overweight and obese premenopausal (aged 20-45 years) women. Carnitine or a placebo (cellulose) was randomly assigned to the participants using a double-blind design. Carnitine supplementation was postulated to enhance fat oxidation resulting in lower concentrations of plasma triglycerides. Seventy women completed the 10-week protocol, which followed a reduction in their energy intake by 15% and a macronutrient energy distribution of 30% protein, 30% fat, and 40% carbohydrate. In addition, subjects increased the number of steps taken per day by 4500. As no differences were observed between the carnitine and placebo groups in all the measured parameters, all subjects were pooled together for statistical analysis. Participants decreased (P<.01) their caloric intake (between 4132.8 and 7770 kJ) and followed prescribed dietary modifications as assessed by dietary records. The average number of steps increased from 8950+/-3432 to 12764+/-4642 (P<.001). Body weight, plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride were decreased by 4.5%, 8.0%, 12.3%, and 19.2% (P<.0001), respectively, after the intervention. Likewise, apolipoproteins B and E decreased by 4.5% and 15% (P<.05) after 10 weeks. The LDL mean particle size was increased from 26.74 to 26.86 nm (P<.01), and the percent of the smaller LDL subfraction (P<.05) was decreased by 26.5% (P<.05) after 10 weeks. In addition, LDL lag time increased by 9.3% (P<.01), and LDL conjugated diene formation decreased by 23% (P<.01), indicating that the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was decreased after the intervention. This study suggests that moderate weight loss (<5% of body

  13. Dose-dependent LDL-cholesterol lowering effect by plant stanol ester consumption: clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Elevated serum lipids are linked to cardiovascular diseases calling for effective therapeutic means to reduce particularly LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Plant stanols reduce levels of LDL-C by partly blocking cholesterol absorption. Accordingly the consumption of foods with added plant stanols, typically esterified with vegetable oil fatty acids in commercial food products, are recommended for lowering serum cholesterol levels. A daily intake of 1.5 to 2.4 g of plant stanols has been scientifically evaluated to lower LDL-C by 7 to 10% in different populations, ages and with different diseases. Based on earlier studies, a general understanding is that no further reduction may be achieved in intakes in excess of approximately 2.5 g/day. Recent studies however suggest that plant stanols show a continuous dose–response effect in serum LDL-C lowering. This review discusses the evidence for a dose-effect relationship between plant stanol ester consumption and reduction of LDL-C concentrations with daily intakes of plant stanols of 4 g/day or more. We identified five such studies and the overall data demonstrate a linear dose-effect relationship with the most pertinent LDL-Cholesterol lowering outcome, 18%, achieved by a daily intake of 9 to 10 g of plant stanols. Along with reduction in LDL-C, the studies demonstrated a decrease in cholesterol absorption markers, the serum plant sterol to cholesterol ratios, by increasing the dose of plant stanol intake. None of the studies with daily intakes up to 10 g of plant stanols reported adverse clinical or biochemical effects from plant stanols. In a like manner, the magnitude of decrease in serum antioxidant vitamins was not related to the dose of plant stanols consumed and the differences between plant stanol ester consumers and controls were minor and insignificant or nonexisting. Consumption of plant stanols in high doses is feasible as a range of food products are commercially available for consumption including spreads

  14. VNN1 promotes atherosclerosis progression in apoE−/− mice fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan-Wei; Wu, Shao-Guo; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Ma, Xin; Lu, Jing-Bo; Xiu, Jian-cheng; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Chuan; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Sha, Yan-Hua; Gao, Ji-Juan; Wang, Yan-Chao; Li, Shu-Fen; Zhao, Jia-Yi; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence shows that vanin-1 (VNN1) plays a key part in glucose metabolism. We explored the effect of VNN1 on cholesterol metabolism, inflammation, apoptosis in vitro, and progression of atherosclerotic plaques in apoE−/− mice. Oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) significantly induced VNN1 expression through an ERK1/2/cyclooxygenase-2/PPARα signaling pathway. VNN1 significantly increased cellular cholesterol content and decreased apoAI and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C)-mediated efflux by 25.16% and 23.13%, respectively, in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells (P < 0.05). In addition, VNN1 attenuated Ox-LDL-induced apoptosis through upregulation of expression of p53 by 59.15% and downregulation of expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 127.13% in THP-1 macrophage (P < 0.05). In vivo, apoE−/− mice were divided randomly into two groups and transduced with lentivirus (LV)-Mock or LV-VNN1 for 12 weeks. VNN1-treated mice showed increased liver lipid content and plasma levels of TG (124.48%), LDL-cholesterol (119.64%), TNF-α (148.74%), interleukin (IL)-1β (131.81%), and IL-6 (156.51%), whereas plasma levels of HDL-C (25.75%) were decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Consistent with these data, development of atherosclerotic lesions was increased significantly upon infection of apoE−/− mice with LV-VNN1. These observations suggest that VNN1 may be a promising therapeutic candidate against atherosclerosis. PMID:27281478

  15. Genome-wide screen for modulation of hepatic apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) secretion.

    PubMed

    Miles, Rebecca R; Perry, William; Haas, Joseph V; Mosior, Marian K; N'Cho, Mathias; Wang, Jian W J; Yu, Peng; Calley, John; Yue, Yong; Carter, Quincy; Han, Bomie; Foxworthy, Patricia; Kowala, Mark C; Ryan, Timothy P; Solenberg, Patricia J; Michael, Laura F

    2013-03-01

    Control of plasma cholesterol levels is a major therapeutic strategy for management of coronary artery disease (CAD). Although reducing LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) levels decreases morbidity and mortality, this therapeutic intervention only translates into a 25-40% reduction in cardiovascular events. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high LDL-c level is not the only risk factor for CAD; low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c) is an independent risk factor for CAD. Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is the major protein component of HDL-c that mediates reverse cholesterol transport from tissues to the liver for excretion. Therefore, increasing ApoA-I levels is an attractive strategy for HDL-c elevation. Using genome-wide siRNA screening, targets that regulate hepatocyte ApoA-I secretion were identified through transfection of 21,789 siRNAs into hepatocytes whereby cell supernatants were assayed for ApoA-I. Approximately 800 genes were identified and triaged using a convergence of information, including genetic associations with HDL-c levels, tissue-specific gene expression, druggability assessments, and pathway analysis. Fifty-nine genes were selected for reconfirmation; 40 genes were confirmed. Here we describe the siRNA screening strategy, assay implementation and validation, data triaging, and example genes of interest. The genes of interest include known and novel genes encoding secreted enzymes, proteases, G-protein-coupled receptors, metabolic enzymes, ion transporters, and proteins of unknown function. Repression of farnesyltransferase (FNTA) by siRNA and the enzyme inhibitor manumycin A caused elevation of ApoA-I secretion from hepatocytes and from transgenic mice expressing hApoA-I and cholesterol ester transfer protein transgenes. In total, this work underscores the power of functional genetic assessment to identify new therapeutic targets.

  16. Changes in LDL and HDL subclasses in normal pregnancy and associations with birth weight, birth length and head circumference.

    PubMed

    Zeljkovic, Aleksandra; Vekic, Jelena; Spasic, Slavica; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana; Spasojevic-Kalimanovska, Vesna; Gojkovic, Tamara; Ardalic, Daniela; Mandic-Markovic, Vesna; Cerovic, Nikola; Mikovic, Zeljko

    2013-04-01

    Pregnancy is associated with alterations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses, but the exact pattern of these variations remains controversial. This study investigates longitudinal changes of plasma LDL and HDL particles distributions during the course of normal pregnancy, as well as associations of maternal LDL and HDL subclasses distributions before delivery with parameters of newborn size. Blood samples were collected from 41 healthy pregnant women throughout entire pregnancy, before delivery and 7 weeks postpartum. LDL and HDL subclasses were determined by gradient gel electrophoresis, while other biochemical parameters were measured by standard laboratory methods. During gestation LDL size significantly decreased (P < 0.001), due to reduction in relative proportion of LDL I (P < 0.01) and increase of LDL II (P < 0.001) and IIIA (P < 0.05) subclasses. In the same time, HDL size and proportions of HDL 2a particles significantly decreased (P < 0.001), with concomitant increase of HDL 3b and 3c subclasses (P < 0.05). Observed alterations were associated with changes in serum triglyceride levels. Rearrangement in LDL subclasses distribution during gestation was transient, while postpartum HDL subclasses distribution remained shifted toward smaller particles. Higher proportion of LDL IVB in maternal plasma before delivery was an independent predictor of smaller birth weights and lengths, while higher proportions of LDL IVB and HDL 2a subclasses were independent determinants of newborns' smaller head circumferences. Routine gestational and prenatal care in otherwise normal pregnancy could be complemented with evaluation of LDL and HDL particles distribution in order to ensure an adequate size of the newborn.

  17. IL-5 links adaptive and natural immunity specific for epitopes of oxidized LDL and protects from atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Christoph J.; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Chang, Mi-Kyung; Miller, Marina; Broide, David; Palinski, Wulf; Curtiss, Linda K.; Corr, Maripat; Witztum, Joseph L.

    2004-01-01

    During atherogenesis, LDL is oxidized, generating various oxidation-specific neoepitopes, such as malondialdehyde-modified (MDA-modified) LDL (MDA-LDL) or the phosphorylcholine (PC) headgroup of oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs). These epitopes are recognized by both adaptive T cell–dependent (TD) and innate T cell–independent type 2 (TI-2) immune responses. We previously showed that immunization of mice with MDA-LDL induces a TD response and atheroprotection. In addition, a PC-based immunization strategy that leads to a TI-2 expansion of innate B-1 cells and secretion of T15/EO6 clonotype natural IgM antibodies, which bind the PC of OxPLs within oxidized LDL (OxLDL), also reduces atherogenesis. T15/EO6 antibodies inhibit OxLDL uptake by macrophages. We now report that immunization with MDA-LDL, which does not contain OxPL, unexpectedly led to the expansion of T15/EO6 antibodies. MDA-LDL immunization caused a preferential expansion of MDA-LDL–specific Th2 cells that prominently secreted IL-5. In turn, IL-5 provided noncognate stimulation to innate B-1 cells, leading to increased secretion of T15/EO6 IgM. Using a bone marrow transplant model, we also demonstrated that IL-5 deficiency led to decreased titers of T15/EO6 and accelerated atherosclerosis. Thus, IL-5 links adaptive and natural immunity specific to epitopes of OxLDL and protects from atherosclerosis, in part by stimulating the expansion of atheroprotective natural IgM specific for OxLDL. PMID:15286809

  18. APOB — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    APOB, a secreted glycoprotein, is the main apolipoprotein of chylomicrons (apo B-48), LDL (apo B-100) and VLDL (apo B-100). It occurs in plasma as two main isoforms, apoB-48 and apoB-100: the former is synthesized exclusively in the gut and the latter in the liver. Apo B-100 functions as a recognition signal for the cellular binding and internalization of LDL particles by the apoB/E receptor. The intestinal and the hepatic forms of apoB are encoded by a single gene from a single, very long mRNA. The two isoforms share a common N-terminal sequence. The shorter apoB-48 protein is produced after RNA editing of the apoB-100 transcript at residue 2180 (CAA->UAA), resulting in the creation of a stop codon, and early translation termination. Mutations in this gene or its regulatory region cause hypobetalipoproteinemia, normotriglyceridemic hypobetalipoproteinemia, and hypercholesterolemia due to ligand-defective apoB, diseases affecting plasma cholesterol and apoB levels. APOB is up-regulated in response to enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection.

  19. Radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers trace LDL cholesteryl esters but not HDL cholesteryl esters in the rat.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, A H

    1995-01-06

    The intravascular metabolism of cholesteryl [1-14C]oleoyl ester and [1,2-3H(N)]cholesteryl palmityl ether was compared in the rat, an animal species without plasma cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA). The tracers had identical plasma disappearance rates when they were incorporated into human or rat low density lipoproteins (LDL). Fractional catabolic rates (FCR) were 0.081 +/- 0.014 h-1 and 0.080 +/- 0.013 h-1 for human LDL ester and ether and 0.098 +/- 0.007 h-1 and 0.101 +/- 0.007 h-1 for rat LDL ester and ether, respectively. In contrast, the ether had plasma disappearance rates that were 24%-25% lower than the ester when they were incorporated into human or rat high density lipoproteins (HDL). FCR were 0.230 +/- 0.020 and 0.173 +/- 0.030 h-1 for human HDL ester and ether and 0.131 +/- 0.020 h-1 and 0.100 +/- 0.017 h-1 for rat HDL ester and ether respectively. Biological screening of the rat HDL preparations did not affect these differences. The results of these studies indicate that in the absence of plasma CETA, cholesteryl ethers can be used to trace LDL cholesteryl esters but not to trace HDL cholesteryl esters.

  20. Effect of Endomorphins on HUVECs Treated by ox-LDL and Its Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Liming; Huang, Wenhui; Quan, Jinxing; Wang, Jinyang; Xu, Yanjia; Wang, Yunfang; Niu, Ruilan

    2016-01-01

    We found in the present study that treatment with ox-LDL decreased the cell viability and the content of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as eNOS mRNA expression, while increasing the mRNA expression and content of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). However, endomorphins EM1/EM2 increased the cell viability and the content of NO and the activity of NOS as well as eNOS mRNA expression, while decreasing the mRNA expression and content of ET-1 compared with ox-LDL alone. Meanwhile, the expressions of JNK and p-JNK were enhanced by ox-LDL while being suppressed by EM1/EM2. The results suggested that EM1 and EM2 can correct the endothelial cell dysfunction induced by ox-LDL and the protective effect may be achieved by affecting the JNK pathway. PMID:27579327

  1. NDRG1 functions in LDL receptor trafficking by regulating endosomal recycling and degradation.

    PubMed

    Pietiäinen, Vilja; Vassilev, Boris; Blom, Tomas; Wang, Wei; Nelson, Jessica; Bittman, Robert; Bäck, Nils; Zelcer, Noam; Ikonen, Elina

    2013-09-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) mutations cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D). However, the cellular function of NDRG1 and how it causes CMT4D are poorly understood. We report that NDRG1 silencing in epithelial cells results in decreased uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) due to reduced LDL receptor (LDLR) abundance at the plasma membrane. This is accompanied by the accumulation of LDLR in enlarged EEA1-positive endosomes that contain numerous intraluminal vesicles and sequester ceramide. Concomitantly, LDLR ubiquitylation is increased but its degradation is reduced and ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins are downregulated. Co-depletion of IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDLR), which ubiquitylates the LDLR and promotes its degradation, rescues plasma membrane LDLR levels and LDL uptake. In murine oligodendrocytes, Ndrg1 silencing not only results in reduced LDL uptake but also in downregulation of the oligodendrocyte differentiation factor Olig2. Both phenotypes are rescued by co-silencing of Idol, suggesting that ligand uptake through LDLR family members controls oligodendrocyte differentiation. These findings identify NDRG1 as a novel regulator of multivesicular body formation and endosomal LDLR trafficking. The deficiency of functional NDRG1 in CMT4D might impair lipid processing and differentiation of myelinating cells.

  2. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  3. Disruption of LDL but not VLDL clearance in autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher; Garuti, Rita; Michaely, Peter; Li, Wei-Ping; Maeda, Nobuyo; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Herz, Joachim; Hobbs, Helen H.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic defects in LDL clearance result in severe hypercholesterolemia and premature atherosclerosis. Mutations in the LDL receptor (LDLR) cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), the most severe form of genetic hypercholesterolemia. A phenocopy of FH, autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH), is due to mutations in an adaptor protein involved in LDLR internalization. Despite comparable reductions in LDL clearance rates, plasma LDL levels are substantially lower in ARH than in FH. To determine the metabolic basis for this difference, we examined the synthesis and catabolism of VLDL in murine models of FH (Ldlr–/–) and ARH (Arh–/–). The hyperlipidemic response to a high-sucrose diet was greatly attenuated in Arh–/– mice compared with Ldlr–/– mice despite similar rates of VLDL secretion. The rate of VLDL clearance was significantly higher in Arh–/– mice than in Ldlr–/– mice, suggesting that LDLR-dependent uptake of VLDL is maintained in the absence of ARH. Consistent with these findings, hepatocytes from Arh–/– mice (but not Ldlr–/– mice) internalized β-migrating VLDL (β-VLDL). These results demonstrate that ARH is not required for LDLR-dependent uptake of VLDL by the liver. The preservation of VLDL remnant clearance attenuates the phenotype of ARH and likely contributes to greater responsiveness to statins in ARH compared with FH. PMID:17200716

  4. [The long-term therapy of familial hypercholesterolemia with heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation].

    PubMed

    Roth, R; Köster, W; Wanner, C; Andre, M; Orth, M; Wieland, H; Schollmeyer, P

    1992-07-24

    The long-term tolerance to and effectiveness of heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation (HELP) in combination with lipid reducing drugs and diet was tested in six patient (5 males, 1 female; mean age 48 +/- 4 years). Follow-up period was over 50 months, in one patient over 24 months, while one man had a sudden cardiac death 57 weeks after starting treatment. The study was divided into three phases. In phase I (24 months) treatment consisted of HELP and conventional lipid-reducing drugs; in phase II (12 months) of lovastatin (80 mg daily) and cholestyramine (12-24 g daily); and phase III (14 months) of HELP, lovastatin and cholestyramine. In phase I it was possible to lower the pre-treatment level of LDL-cholesterol from 306 +/- 18 mg/dl to 173 +/- 13 mg/dl (43.5%). A similar effect (from 307 +/- 21 mg/dl to 155 +/- 17 mg/dl [-49.5%]) was obtained in phase II. The resumption of HELP reduced the pre-treatment LDL concentration to 136 +/- 9 mg/dl (-55.7%). The various treatment regimens were well tolerated. Biochemical data remained unchanged except for iron loss requiring substitution. Thus combined HELP, lovastatin and ion exchange offer for the first time an effective and reliable means in familial hypercholesterolaemia of clearly reducing long-term the mean LDL cholesterol level below the atherosclerosis threshold of 120 mg/dl.

  5. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 inhibits the monocyte transmigration induced by mildly oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, K; Navab, M; Leitinger, N; Fogelman, A M; Lusis, A J

    1997-09-01

    Heme catabolic processes produce the antioxidants biliverdin and bilirubin, as well as the potent prooxidant free iron. Since these products have opposing effects on oxidative stress, it is not clear whether heme catabolism promotes or inhibits inflammatory processes, including atherosclerotic lesion formation. Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of heme catabolism. We used cocultures of human aortic endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells to examine the possible role of HO in early atherosclerosis. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the inducible isoform of HO, was highly induced by mildly oxidized LDL, and augmented induction was observed with hemin pretreatment. This augmented HO-1 induction resulted in the reduction of monocyte chemotaxis in response to LDL oxidation. Conversely, inhibition of HO by a specific inhibitor, Sn-protoporphyrin IX, enhanced chemotaxis. Furthermore, pretreatment with biliverdin or bilirubin, the products of HO, reduced chemotaxis. Oxidized phospholipids in the mildly oxidized LDL appear to be responsible for HO-1 induction, since oxidized but not native arachidonic acid-containing phospholipids also induced HO-1. These results suggest that HO-1 induced by mildly oxidized LDL may protect against the induction of inflammatory responses in artery wall cells through the production of the antioxidants biliverdin and bilirubin.

  6. Effect of Endomorphins on HUVECs Treated by ox-LDL and Its Related Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jing; Tian, Liming; Huang, Wenhui; Quan, Jinxing; Wang, Jinyang; Xu, Yanjia; Wang, Yunfang; Niu, Ruilan

    2016-01-01

    We found in the present study that treatment with ox-LDL decreased the cell viability and the content of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as eNOS mRNA expression, while increasing the mRNA expression and content of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). However, endomorphins EM1/EM2 increased the cell viability and the content of NO and the activity of NOS as well as eNOS mRNA expression, while decreasing the mRNA expression and content of ET-1 compared with ox-LDL alone. Meanwhile, the expressions of JNK and p-JNK were enhanced by ox-LDL while being suppressed by EM1/EM2. The results suggested that EM1 and EM2 can correct the endothelial cell dysfunction induced by ox-LDL and the protective effect may be achieved by affecting the JNK pathway.

  7. Age- and Gender-Related Differences in LDL-Cholesterol Management in Outpatients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giuseppina; Pintaudi, Basilio; Giorda, Carlo; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Nicolucci, Antonio; Cristofaro, Maria Rosaria; Suraci, Concetta; Mulas, Maria Franca; Napoli, Angela; Rossi, Maria Chiara; Manicardi, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Dyslipidemia contribute to the excess of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk observed in women with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) is the major target for CHD prevention, and T2DM women seem to reach LDL-C targets less frequently than men. Aim. To explore age- and gender-related differences in LDL-C management in a large sample of outpatients with T2DM. Results. Overall, 415.294 patients (45.3% women) from 236 diabetes centers in Italy were included. Women were older and more obese, with longer diabetes duration, higher total-cholesterol, LDL-C, and HDL-C serum levels compared to men (P < 0.0001). Lipid profile was monitored in ~75% of subjects, women being monitored less frequently than men, irrespective of age. More women did not reach the LDL-C target as compared to men, particularly in the subgroup treated with lipid-lowering medications. The between-genders gap in reaching LDL-C targets increased with age and diabetes duration, favouring men in all groups. Conclusions. LDL-C management is worst in women with T2DM, who are monitored and reach targets less frequently than T2DM men. Similarly to men, they do not receive medications despite high LDL-C. These gender discrepancies increase with age and diabetes duration, exposing older women to higher CHD risk. PMID:25873960

  8. Prevention by alpha-tocopherol and rutin of glutathione and ATP depletion induced by oxidized LDL in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, A.; Salvayre, R.; Delchambre, J.; Nègre-Salvayre, A.

    1995-01-01

    1. Oxidized low density lipoproteins (LDL) are thought to play an important role in atherogenesis. Mildly oxidized LDL are cytotoxic to cultured endothelial cells. Toxic doses of oxidized LDL promote the peroxidation of cellular lipids (beginning at 6 h and being maximal after 12 h of pulse with oxidized LDL) and glutathione and ATP depletion (beginning after 15 h of pulse and evolving concurrently with the cytotoxicity). 2. Antioxidants from 3 different classes (rutin, ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol) were compared as to their ability to inhibit the cytotoxic effect of oxidized LDL to endothelial cells. 3. Effective concentrations of alpha-tocopherol inhibited cellular lipid peroxidation, glutathione and ATP depletion and the cytotoxic effect. 4. Ascorbic acid was less effective than alpha-tocopherol and rutin, and exhibited a dose-dependent biphasic effect in the presence of oxidized LDL. 5. Effective concentrations of rutin inhibited glutathione and ATP depletion as well as cytotoxicity, but did not block cellular lipid peroxidation. This suggests that the glutathione and ATP depletion is directly correlated to the cytotoxicity of oxidized LDL, whereas cellular lipid peroxidation is probably not directly the cause of cellular damage leading to cell death. 6. The association of antioxidants of 3 different classes allowed the suppression of the biphasic effect of ascorbic acid and increased the efficacy of the protective effect. The potential consequences for prevention of the pathogenic role of oxidized LDL in endothelial injury are discussed. PMID:8640336

  9. Association between LDL-cholesterol lowering genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lotta, Luca A.; Sharp, Stephen. J; Burgess, Stephen; Perry, John R. B.; Stewart, Isobel. D; Willems, Sara M.; Luan, Jian’an; Ardanaz, Eva; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Boeing, Heiner; Deloukas, Panos; Forouhi, Nita G; Franks, Paul W; Grioni, Sara; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Navarro, Carmen; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, Jose-Ramón; Riboli, Elio; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salamanca, Elena C; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke MW; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Inês; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Savage, David. B; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Importance Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1 or HMGCR, encoding the respective molecular targets of ezetimibe and statins, have previously been used as proxies to study the efficacy of these lipid-lowering drugs. Alleles near HMGCR are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, mimicking the increased incidence of new-onset diabetes associated with statin treatment in randomized clinical trials. It is unknown whether alleles near NPC1L1 are also associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective To investigate whether LDL-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1 and other genes encoding current or prospective molecular targets of lipid-lowering therapy (i.e. HMGCR, PCSK9, ABCG5/G8, LDLR) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Design, Setting and Participants The associations with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease of LDL-lowering genetic variants were investigated in meta-analyses of genetic association studies. Meta-analyses included 50,775 individuals with type 2 diabetes and 270,269 controls including three studies and 60,801 individuals with coronary artery disease and 123,504 controls from a published meta-analysis. Data collection took place in Europe and the United States between 1991 and 2016. Exposure LDL-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1, HMGCR, PCSK9, ABCG5/G8, LDLR. Main Outcomes and Measures Odds ratio of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Results LDL-lowering genetic variants at NPC1L1 were inversely associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio for a genetically-predicted reduction of 1 mmol/L in LDL cholesterol, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.88; p=0.008) and directly associated with type 2 diabetes (2.42, 1.70-3.43; p<0.001). The odds ratio of type 2 diabetes for PCSK9 genetic variants was 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.38, p=0.03). For a given reduction in LDL cholesterol, genetic variants were associated with a similar reduction in coronary artery

  10. The uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate acts as a pro- or antioxidant on LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Praschberger, M; Hermann, M; Wanner, J; Jirovetz, L; Exner, M; Kapiotis, S; Gmeiner, B M K; Laggner, H

    2014-06-01

    Uremic toxins have been shown to play a role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated oxidative stress. Oxidative stress and inflammation have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in uraemia. The oxidative modification of LDL may play a role in early atherogenesis. Enhanced LDL oxidation has been found in uremic patients which may account for accelerated atherosclerosis observed in CKD. The uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate (IS) has been reported to exert oxidative and antioxidative activity. Thus, in the present study we have investigated the influence of IS on the atherogenic modifications of LDL exposed in vitro to different oxidising systems. The transition metal ion (Cu(2+)) and hemin/H2O2 induced lipid oxidation reactions monitored by conjugated diene formation, were inhibited by the presence of IS, which points to possible antioxidant effects by this uremic toxin. A protective effect of IS on LDL apoprotein modification by the exposure to the product of the myeloperoxidase/H2O2/Cl(-) system HOCl, was also observed as estimated by protein carbonyl formation. In contrast, a marked increase in conjugated dienes and lipid hydroperoxides was observed when lipid oxidation was initiated by the free radical generator AAPH in presence of IS. The GC-MS analysis revealed the formation of indole-2,3-dione and 6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxo-indolo[2,1-b]quinazoline (tryptanthrin) in IS/AAPH reaction. A scheme for the generation of tryptanthrin from IS via indoxyl radicals is proposed, which may facilitate LDL lipid oxidation. Our observations add further insight in the Janus-faced properties of this important uremic toxin.

  11. Characterization of a family of gamma-ray-induced CHO mutants demonstrates that the ldlA locus is diploid and encodes the low-density lipoprotein receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sege, R.D.; Kozarsky, K.F.; Krieger, M.

    1986-09-01

    The ldlA locus is one of four Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell loci which are known to be required for the synthesis of functional low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors. Previous studies have suggested that the ldlA locus is diploid and encodes the LDL receptor. To confirm this assignment, we have isolated a partial genomic clone of the Chinese hamster LDL receptor gene and used this and other nucleic acid and antibody probes to study a family of ldlA mutants isolated after gamma-irradiation. Our analysis suggests that there are two LDL receptor alleles in wild-type CHO cells. Each of the three mutants isolated after gamma-irradiation had detectable deletions affecting one of the two LDL receptor alleles. One of the mutants also had a disruption of the remaining allele, resulting in the synthesis of an abnormal receptor precursor which was not subject to Golgi-associated posttranslational glycoprotein processing. The correlation of changes in the expression, structure, and function of LDL receptors with deletions in the LDL receptor genes in these mutants directly demonstrated that the ldlA locus in CHO cells is diploid and encodes the LDL receptor. In addition, our analysis suggests that CHO cells in culture may contain a partial LDL receptor pseudogene.

  12. Characterization of a family of gamma-ray-induced CHO mutants demonstrates that the ldlA locus is diploid and encodes the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Sege, R D; Kozarsky, K F; Krieger, M

    1986-09-01

    The ldlA locus is one of four Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell loci which are known to be required for the synthesis of functional low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors. Previous studies have suggested that the ldlA locus is diploid and encodes the LDL receptor. To confirm this assignment, we have isolated a partial genomic clone of the Chinese hamster LDL receptor gene and used this and other nucleic acid and antibody probes to study a family of ldlA mutants isolated after gamma-irradiation. Our analysis suggests that there are two LDL receptor alleles in wild-type CHO cells. Each of the three mutants isolated after gamma-irradiation had detectable deletions affecting one of the two LDL receptor alleles. One of the mutants also had a disruption of the remaining allele, resulting in the synthesis of an abnormal receptor precursor which was not subject to Golgi-associated posttranslational glycoprotein processing. The correlation of changes in the expression, structure, and function of LDL receptors with deletions in the LDL receptor genes in these mutants directly demonstrated that the ldlA locus in CHO cells is diploid and encodes the LDL receptor. In addition, our analysis suggests that CHO cells in culture may contain a partial LDL receptor pseudogene.

  13. Resveratrol Enhances Autophagic Flux and Promotes Ox-LDL Degradation in HUVECs via Upregulation of SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanlin; Cao, Xueqin; Zhu, Wawa; Liu, Zhihua; Liu, Huihui; Zhou, Yande; Cao, Yongjun; Liu, Chunfeng; Xie, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein- (Ox-LDL-) induced autophagy dysfunction in human vascular endothelial cells contributes to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). Resveratrol (RSV) protects against Ox-LDL-induced endothelium injury. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms underlying Ox-LDL-induced autophagy dysfunction and RSV-mediated protection in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results showed that Ox-LDL suppressed the expression of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and increased LC3-II and sequestosome 1 (p62) protein levels without altering p62 mRNA levels in HUVECs. Pretreatment with bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) to inhibit lysosomal degradation abrogated the Ox-LDL-induced increase in LC3-II protein level. Ox-LDL increased colocalization of GFP and RFP puncta in mRFP-GFP-tandem fluorescent LC3- (tf-LC3-) transfected cells. Moreover, Ox-LDL decreased the expression of mature cathepsin D and attenuated cathepsin D activity. Pretreatment with RSV increased the expression of SIRT1 and LC3-II and increased p62 protein degradation. RSV induced RFP-LC3 aggregation more than GFP-LC3 aggregation. RSV restored lysosomal function and promoted Ox-LDL degradation in HUVECs. All the protective effects of RSV were blocked after SIRT1 was knocked down. These findings demonstrated that RSV upregulated the expression of SIRT1, restored lysosomal function, enhanced Ox-LDL-induced impaired autophagic flux, and promoted Ox-LDL degradation through the autophagy-lysosome degradation pathway in HUVECs. PMID:27069532

  14. Cloning and expression of an anti-LDL(-) single-chain variable fragment, and its inhibitory effect on experimental atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kazuma, Soraya M; Cavalcante, Marcela F; Telles, Andréia E R; Maranhão, Andrea Queiroz; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are important for the formation of foam cells and as mediators of the immuno-inflammatory process involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. Electronegative LDL, LDL(-), is a LDL subfraction with pro-inflammatory properties that is present in human blood. To investigate possible atheroprotective effects, an anti-LDL(-) single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris and its activity was evaluated in vitro against macrophages and in experimental atherosclerosis in Ldlr(-/-) mice. The recombinant 2C7 scFv was produced in a yield of 9.5 mg of protein/L. The specificity and affinity of purified 2C7 scFv against LDL(-) was confirmed by ELISA. To assess the activity of 2C7 scFv on foam cell formation, RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to LDL(-) in the presence or absence of 2C7 scFv. The 2C7 scFv inhibited the uptake of LDL(-) by macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, and internalization of LDL(-) by these cells was found to be mediated by the CD36 and CD14 receptor. In addition, compared with untreated cells, lipid accumulation in macrophages was decreased, and the expression of Cd36, Tlr-4 and Cox-2 was downregulated in macrophages treated with 2C7 scFv. Importantly, compared with untreated mice, the treatment of Ldlr(-/-) mice with 2C7 scFv decreased the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus. In conclusion, our data show that 2C7 scFv inhibits foam cell formation and atherosclerotic plaque development by modulating the expression of genes relevant to atherogenesis. These results encourage further use of this antibody fragment in the development of new therapeutic strategies that neutralize the pro-atherogenic effects of LDL(-).

  15. Oxidized LDL-induced angiogenesis involves sphingosine 1-phosphate: prevention by anti-S1P antibody

    PubMed Central

    Camaré, Caroline; Trayssac, Magali; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Mucher, Elodie; Sabbadini, Roger; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Neovascularization occurring in atherosclerotic lesions may promote plaque expansion, intraplaque haemorrhage and rupture. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) are atherogenic, but their angiogenic effect is controversial; both angiogenic and anti-angiogenic effects have been reported. The angiogenic mechanism of oxLDL is partly understood, but the role of the angiogenic sphingolipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), in this process is not known. Thus, we investigated whether S1P is involved in the oxLDL-induced angiogenesis and whether an anti-S1P monoclonal antibody can prevent this effect. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Angiogenesis was assessed by capillary tube formation by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) cultured on Matrigel and in vivo by the Matrigel plug assay in C57BL/6 mice. KEY RESULTS Human oxLDL exhibited a biphasic angiogenic effect on HMEC-1; low concentrations were angiogenic, higher concentrations were cytotoxic. The angiogenic response to oxLDL was blocked by the sphingosine kinase (SPHK) inhibitor, dimethylsphingosine, by SPHK1-siRNA and by an anti-S1P monoclonal antibody. Moreover, inhibition of oxLDL uptake and subsequent redox signalling by anti-CD36 and anti-LOX-1 receptor antibodies and by N-acetylcysteine, respectively, blocked SPHK1 activation and tube formation. In vivo, in the Matrigel plug assay, low concentrations of human oxLDL or murine oxVLDL also triggered angiogenesis, which was prevented by i.p. injection of the anti-S1P antibody. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These data highlight the role of S1P in angiogenesis induced by oxLDL both in HMEC-1 cultured on Matrigel and in vivo in the Matrigel plug model in mice, and demonstrate that the anti-S1P antibody effectively blocks the angiogenic effect of oxLDL. PMID:25176316

  16. Associations of Circulating Oxidized LDL and Conventional Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of the Navajo Population.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Molly E; Campen, Matthew J; Miller, Curtis; Shuey, Chris; Cajero, Miranda; Lucas, Selita; Pacheco, Bernadette; Erdei, Esther; Ramone, Sandy; Nez, Teddy; Lewis, Johnnye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalences of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have increased among the Navajo Native American community in recent decades. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a novel CVD biomarker that has never been assessed in the Navajo population. We examined the relationship of oxLDL to conventional CVD and T2D risk factors and biomarkers in a cross-sectional population of Navajo participants. This cross-sectional study included 252 participants from 20 Navajo communities from the Diné Network for Environmental Health Project. Plasma samples were tested for oxLDL levels by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the relationship of oxLDL and oxidized- to non-oxidized lipoprotein ratios to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6) and demographic and health variables. Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and obesity are very prevalent in this Navajo population. HbA1c, CRP, body mass index (BMI), high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides were at levels that may increase risk for CVD and T2D. Median oxLDL level was 47 (36.8-57) U/L. Correlational analysis showed that although oxLDL alone was not associated with HbA1c, oxLDL/HDL, oxLDL/LDL and CRP were significantly associated with HbA1c and glucose. OxLDL, oxLDL/HDL and oxLDL/LDL were significantly associated with CRP. Multivariate analysis showed that triglycerides were a common and strong predictor of oxLDL, oxLDL/HDL and oxLDL/LDL. OxLDL was trended with HbA1c and glucose but did not reach significance, however, HbA1c was an independent predictor of OxLDL/HDL. CRP trended with oxLDL/HDL and was a weak predictor of oxLDL/LDL. This Navajo subset appears to have oxLDL levels comparable to subjects without evidence of CVD reported in other studies. The high prevalence of T2D, hypertension and obesity along with abnormal levels of other biomarkers including HbA1c indicate that the Navajo population has

  17. ApoE and Quality of Life in Nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Lapid, Maria I.; Rummans, Teresa A.; Cha, Ruth H.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Pankratz, Vernon (Shane) S.; Tangalos, Eric G.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives ApoE ε4 is associated with adverse health conditions that negatively impact the quality of life (QOL). The relationship between ApoE ε4 and QOL has not been explored in the oldest old. Our study aimed to examine ApoE in the oldest old, and explore its association with QOL. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Setting A medium sized community in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA. Participants 90–99 year old individuals living independently or in long term care environments. Measurements We collected demographic information and measured cognitive function (Short Test of Mental Status [STMS], Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE], Mattis Dementia Rating Scale [DRS]), QOL (Linear Analogue Self Assessment [LASA]) and ApoE distribution. Subjects were classified as cognitively normal, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia (DEM), or dementia with stroke and/or parkinsonism (DEMSP). Regression model was used to assess the predictors of QOL. Results 121 subjects (45 cognitively normal, 13 MCI, 34 DEM, 29 DEMSP) aged 90–99,106 (87.6 %) females, were included. Frequency of ApoE ε3 allele was highest [194 (80.2%): ε2/3 18, ε3/3 77, ε3/4 22] followed by ApoE ε4 [25 (10.3%): ε2/4 3, ε3/4 22] and ApoE ε2 [23 (9.5%; ε2/2 1, ε2/3 18, ε2/4 3]. None of the subjects carried ApoE ε4/4 genotype. QOL was similar between ApoE ε4 carrier and non-carriers. Physical well-being, emotional well-being, intellectual well-being, social connectedness and coping ability were positively associated with QOL, whereas male gender, DEMSP, pain frequency and pain severity were negatively associated. Conclusions The most common ApoE in the oldest old was ε3/3 genotype and ε3 allele. No association was found between ApoE ε4 and QOL. However, those with high physical, emotional and intellectual well being, social connectedness and coping ability had the highest overall QOL. PMID:22863665

  18. Xanthine-based KMUP-1 improves HDL via PPARγ/SR-B1, LDL via LDLRs, and HSL via PKA/PKG for hepatic fat loss.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Wu, Bin-Nan; Liu, Chung-Pin; Yang, Tzu-Yang; Kao, Li-Pin; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Lai, Wen-Ter; Chen, Ing-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI)/eNOS enhancer KMUP-1, targeting G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), improves dyslipidemia. We compared its lipid-lowering effects with simvastatin and explored hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) translocation in hepatic fat loss. KMUP-1 HCl (1, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg/day) and simvastatin (5 mg/kg/day) were administered in C57BL/6J male mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) by gavage for 8 weeks. KMUP-1 inhibited HFD-induced plasma/liver TG, total cholesterol, and LDL; increased HDL/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR)/Rho kinase II (ROCK II)/PPARγ/ABCA1; and decreased liver and body weight. KMUP-1 HCl in drinking water (2.5 mg/200 ml tap water) for 1-14 or 8-14 weeks decreased HFD-induced liver and body weight and scavenger receptor class B type I expression and increased protein kinase A (PKA)/PKG/LDLRs/HSL expression and immunoreactivity. In HepG2 cells incubated with serum or exogenous mevalonate, KMUP-1 (10(-7)∼10(-5) M) reversed HMGR expression by feedback regulation, colocalized expression of ABCA1/apolipoprotein A-I/LXRα/PPARγ, and reduced exogenous geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate/farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP)-induced RhoA/ROCK II expression. A guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) antagonist reversed KMUP-1-induced ROCK II reduction, indicating cGMP/eNOS involvement. KMUP-1 inceased PKG and LDLRs surrounded by LDL and restored oxidized LDL-induced PKA expresion. Unlike simvastatin, KMUP-1 could not inhibit (14)C mevalonate formation. KMUP-1 could, but simvastatin could not, decrease ROCK II expression by exogenous FPP/CGPP. KMUP-1 improves HDL via PPARγ/LXRα/ABCA1/Apo-I expression and increases LDLRs/PKA/PKG/HSL expression and immunoreactivity, leading to TG hydrolysis to lower hepatic fat and body weight.

  19. Xanthine-based KMUP-1 improves HDL via PPARγ/SR-B1, LDL via LDLRs, and HSL via PKA/PKG for hepatic fat loss[S

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Wu, Bin-Nan; Liu, Chung-Pin; Yang, Tzu-Yang; Kao, Li-Pin; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Lai, Wen-Ter; Chen, Ing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI)/eNOS enhancer KMUP-1, targeting G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), improves dyslipidemia. We compared its lipid-lowering effects with simvastatin and explored hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) translocation in hepatic fat loss. KMUP-1 HCl (1, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg/day) and simvastatin (5 mg/kg/day) were administered in C57BL/6J male mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) by gavage for 8 weeks. KMUP-1 inhibited HFD-induced plasma/liver TG, total cholesterol, and LDL; increased HDL/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR)/Rho kinase II (ROCK II)/PPARγ/ABCA1; and decreased liver and body weight. KMUP-1 HCl in drinking water (2.5 mg/200 ml tap water) for 1–14 or 8–14 weeks decreased HFD-induced liver and body weight and scavenger receptor class B type I expression and increased protein kinase A (PKA)/PKG/LDLRs/HSL expression and immunoreactivity. In HepG2 cells incubated with serum or exogenous mevalonate, KMUP-1 (10−7∼10−5 M) reversed HMGR expression by feedback regulation, colocalized expression of ABCA1/apolipoprotein A-I/LXRα/PPARγ, and reduced exogenous geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate/farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP)-induced RhoA/ROCK II expression. A guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) antagonist reversed KMUP-1-induced ROCK II reduction, indicating cGMP/eNOS involvement. KMUP-1 inceased PKG and LDLRs surrounded by LDL and restored oxidized LDL-induced PKA expresion. Unlike simvastatin, KMUP-1 could not inhibit 14C mevalonate formation. KMUP-1 could, but simvastatin could not, decrease ROCK II expression by exogenous FPP/CGPP. KMUP-1 improves HDL via PPARγ/LXRα/ABCA1/Apo-I expression and increases LDLRs/PKA/PKG/HSL expression and immunoreactivity, leading to TG hydrolysis to lower hepatic fat and body weight. PMID:26351364

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment. PMID:27636901

  1. Differential effects of the changes of LDL cholesterol and systolic blood pressure on the risk of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effects of baseline and changes in blood pressure and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol on the carotid intima media thickness (IMT) have not been well documented. Methods A total of 2572 adults (mean age 53.8 years, 54.6% women) in a Taiwanese community undertook three blood pressure and LDL cholesterol examinations over 6 years. Latent growth curve modeling was used to investigate the effects of baseline and change in blood pressure and LDL cholesterol on IMT. Results Greater baseline LDL and blood pressure were associated with an increase in IMT (0.005 ± 0.002 mm per 1 mg/dL [p = 0.006] and 0.041 ± 0.004 mm mmHg [p <0.0001], respectively. Change in blood pressure was associated with a significant increase in IMT (0.047±0.016, P = 0.004), whilst the association between change in LDL and change in IMT was not statistically significant (0.008±0.006, P = 0.20). Conclusions Carotid IMT was associated with baseline blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, yet only changes of blood pressure, not LDL cholesterol, were related to carotid IMT during the 6-year observation. PMID:22900906

  2. Low LDL cholesterol and increased risk of Parkinson's disease: prospective results from Honolulu-Asia Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuemei; Abbott, Robert D; Petrovitch, Helen; Mailman, Richard B; Ross, G Webster

    2008-05-15

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are suggested to be associated inversely with Parkinson's disease (PD). To test the hypothesis that LDL-C levels may increase PD risk, we studied a prospective cohort of 3,233 men (Honolulu-Asia Aging Study) for whom the LDL-C from fasting lipid profiles was obtained during 1991 to 1993. The cohort was followed longitudinally until 2001 for incident Parkinson's cases. During follow-up, 41 men developed PD (18.4/10,000 person-years). Although the incidence of PD increased with decreasing LDL-C in a dose-dependent manner, the association was only significant for men aged 71 to 75 years. In the latter group, risk of PD declined from 38.5/10,000 person-years in men with LDL-C levels <80 mg/dl to less than 9/10,000 person-years for concentrations that were > or =140 mg/dl. After adjustment for age, smoking, coffee intake, and other factors, the relative odds of PD for men at the 80th versus the 20th percentile of LDL-C (135 vs. 85 mg/dl) was 0.4 (95% confidence interval: 0.2, 0.9). This prospective study supports the hypothesis that low LDL-C is associated with an increased risk of PD. Although confirmation is required, the underlying mechanisms may be useful in understanding key aspects of PD.

  3. Oxidized LDL binding to LOX-1 upregulates VEGF expression in cultured bovine chondrocytes through activation of PPAR-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kanata, Sohya; Akagi, Masao . E-mail: makagi@med.kindai.ac.jp; Nishimura, Shunji; Hayakawa, Sumio; Yoshida, Kohji; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Munakata, Hiroshi; Hamanishi, Chiaki

    2006-09-29

    It has been reported that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors play an important role in the destruction of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis through increased production of matrix metalloproteinases. We investigated whether the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) binding to lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) upregulates VEGF expression in cultured bovine articular chondrocytes (BACs). Ox-LDL markedly increased VEGF mRNA expression and protein release in time- and dose-dependent manners, which was significantly suppressed by anti-LOX-1 antibody pretreatment. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma} was evident in BACs with ox-LDL addition and was attenuated by anti-LOX-1 antibody. The specific PPAR-{gamma} inhibitor GW9662 suppressed ox-LDL-induced VEGF expression. These results suggest that the ox-LDL/LOX-1 system upregulates VEGF expression in articular cartilage, at least in part, through activation of PPAR-{gamma} and supports the hypothesis that ox-LDL is involved in cartilage degradation via LOX-1.

  4. Biochemical and ultrastructural analysis of. beta. -VLDL and AC-LDL metabolism by pigeon monocyte-derived macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    It is proposed that monocyte-derived foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions of White Carneau pigeons become lipid-filled through the uptake of lipoproteins including ..beta..-migrating very low density lipoproteins (..beta..-VLDL) and acetylated low density lipoproteins (Ac-LDL). Using iodinated forms of the above lipoproteins, specific and saturable receptors for both ..beta..-VLDL and Ac-LDL were detected on the surface of White Carneau pigeon monocyte-derived macrophages in culture. Competition studies demonstrated the high degree of binding specificity for /sup 125/I-Ac-LDL. Likewise, binding of /sup 125/I-..beta..-VLDL to its receptor was significantly inhibited by excess ..beta..-VLDL, however LDL from both hyper- and normocholesterolemic pigeons were also recognized by the receptor. Upon binding of ..beta..-VLDL and Ac-LDL to their respective receptors, the lipoproteins were rapidly internalized and delivered to intracellular sites of degradation. As measured by the amount of /sup 14/C-oleate incorporated into cholesteryl /sup 14/C-oleate, the cholesterole liberated from the degradation of both ..beta..-VLDL and Ac-LDL stimulated cholesteryl ester synthesis in the pigeon cells. Using lipoproteins conjugated to colloidal gold of visualization with transmission electron microscopy, a major difference in the binding and uptake properties of ..beta..-VLDL-Gold and Ac-LDL-Gold was documented.

  5. Neuroprotective Sirtuin ratio reversed by ApoE4.

    PubMed

    Theendakara, Veena; Patent, Alexander; Peters Libeu, Clare A; Philpot, Brittany; Flores, Sonia; Descamps, Olivier; Poksay, Karen S; Zhang, Qiang; Cailing, Gabriellee; Hart, Matthew; John, Varghese; Rao, Rammohan V; Bredesen, Dale E

    2013-11-05

    The canonical pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease links the expression of apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (ApoE) to amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and Aβ peptide accumulation by a set of mechanisms that is incompletely defined. The development of a simple system that focuses not on a single variable but on multiple factors and pathways would be valuable both for dissecting the underlying mechanisms and for identifying candidate therapeutics. Here we show that, although both ApoE3 and ApoE4 associate with APP with nanomolar affinities, only ApoE4 significantly (i) reduces the ratio of soluble amyloid precursor protein alpha (sAPPα) to Aβ; (ii) reduces Sirtuin T1 (SirT1) expression, resulting in markedly differing ratios of neuroprotective SirT1 to neurotoxic SirT2; (iii) triggers Tau phosphorylation and APP phosphorylation; and (iv) induces programmed cell death. We describe a subset of drug candidates that interferes with the APP-ApoE interaction and returns the parameters noted above to normal. Our data support the hypothesis that neuronal connectivity, as reflected in the ratios of critical mediators such as sAPPα:Aβ, SirT1:SirT2, APP:phosphorylated (p)-APP, and Tau:p-Tau, is programmatically altered by ApoE4 and offer a simple system for the identification of program mediators and therapeutic candidates.

  6. A Prospective Observational Survey on the Long-Term Effect of LDL Apheresis on Drug-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muso, Eri; Mune, Masatoshi; Hirano, Tsutomu; Hattori, Motoshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shunya; Wada, Takashi; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takemura, Tsukasa; Yuzawa, Yukio; Ogahara, Satoru; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Iino, Yasuhiko; Sakai, Soichi; Ogura, Yousuke; Yukawa, Susumu; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Yorioka, Noriaki; Imai, Enyu; Matsuo, Seiichi; Saito, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims LDL apheresis (LDL-A) is used for drug-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS) as an alternative therapy to induce remission by improvement of hyperlipidemia. Several clinical studies have suggested the efficacy of LDL-A for refractory NS, but the level of evidence remains insufficient. A multicenter prospective study, POLARIS (Prospective Observational Survey on the Long-Term Effects of LDL Apheresis on Drug-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome), was conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy with high-level evidence. Methods Patients with NS who showed resistance to primary medication for at least 4 weeks were prospectively recruited to the study and treated with LDL-A. The long-term outcome was evaluated based on the rate of remission of NS 2 years after treatment. Factors affecting the outcome were also examined. Results A total of 58 refractory NS patients from 40 facilities were recruited and enrolled as subjects of the POLARIS study. Of the 44 subjects followed for 2 years, 21 (47.7%) showed remission of NS based on a urinary protein (UP) level <1.0 g/day. The UP level immediately after LDL-A and the rates of improvement of UP, serum albumin, serum creatinine, eGFR, and total and LDL cholesterol after the treatment session significantly affected the outcome. Conclusions Almost half of the cases of drug-resistant NS showed remission 2 years after LDL-A. Improvement of nephrotic parameters at termination of the LDL-A treatment was a predictor of a favorable outcome. PMID:26557843

  7. Effects of magnetic field and Hall current to the blood velocity and LDL transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, I.; Naser, N.; Talib, A. H.; Mahali, S.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic field and Hall current effects have been considered on blood velocity and concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). It is important to observe those effects to the flowing blood in a stenosed artery. The analysis from the obtained results may be useful to some clinical procedures, such as MRI, where the radiologists may have more information in the investigations before cardiac operations could be done. In this study, the uniform magnetic field and Hall current are applied to the Newtonian blood flow through an artery having a cosine-shaped stenosis. The governing equations are coupled with mass transfer and solved employing a finite difference Marker and Cell (MAC) method with an appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The graphical results of velocity profiles and LDL concentration are presented in this paper and the results show that the velocity increases and concentration decreases as Hall parameter increased.

  8. Investigation of singlet oxygen generation in Vit C-Cu2+ -LDL system by chemiluminescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Xing, Da; Tan, Shici; Tang, Yonghong; He, Yonghong

    2002-04-01

    In this study, by chemiluminescence method using a Cypridina luciferin analog, 2-methyl-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)-3,7- dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-one (MCLA), as a selective and sensitive chemiluminescence probe, singlet oxygen (1O2) formation was observed in the vit C- LDL-Cu2+ reaction system. Another experimental evidence for the generation of 1O2 was the quenching effect of sodium azide (NaN3) on vit C-induced chemiluminescence in the reaction mixture of LDL- Cu2+-MCLA. Analysis based on the experimental results indicated the plausible reaction mechanism is that vit C converts Cu2+ to its reduced state and vit C becomes vit C radical itself, thereby stimulating the formation of peroxyl radicals, and bimolecular reaction of peroxyl radicals results in 1O2 production in the above systems.

  9. Effects of a very high saturated fat diet on LDL particles in adults with atherogenic dyslipidemia: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Sally; Williams, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that increases in LDL-cholesterol resulting from substitution of dietary saturated fat for carbohydrate or unsaturated fat are due primarily to increases in large cholesterol-enriched LDL, with minimal changes in small, dense LDL particles and apolipoprotein B. However, individuals can differ by their LDL particle distribution, and it is possible that this may influence LDL subclass response. Objective The objective of this study was to test whether the reported effects of saturated fat apply to individuals with atherogenic dyslipidemia as characterized by a preponderance of small LDL particles (LDL phenotype B). Methods Fifty-three phenotype B men and postmenopausal women consumed a baseline diet (55%E carbohydrate, 15%E protein, 30%E fat, 8%E saturated fat) for 3 weeks, after which they were randomized to either a moderate carbohydrate, very high saturated fat diet (HSF; 39%E carbohydrate, 25%E protein, 36%E fat, 18%E saturated fat) or low saturated fat diet (LSF; 37%E carbohydrate, 25%E protein, 37%E fat, 9%E saturated fat) for 3 weeks. Results Compared to the LSF diet, consumption of the HSF diet resulted in significantly greater increases from baseline (% change; 95% CI) in plasma concentrations of apolipoprotein B (HSF vs. LSF: 9.5; 3.6 to 15.7 vs. -6.8; -11.7 to -1.76; p = 0.0003) and medium (8.8; -1.3 to 20.0 vs. -7.3; -15.7 to 2.0; p = 0.03), small (6.1; -10.3 to 25.6 vs. -20.8; -32.8 to -6.7; p = 0.02), and total LDL (3.6; -3.2 to 11.0 vs. -7.9; -13.9 to -1.5; p = 0.03) particles, with no differences in change of large and very small LDL concentrations. As expected, total-cholesterol (11.0; 6.5 to 15.7 vs. -5.7; -9.4 to -1.8; p<0.0001) and LDL-cholesterol (16.7; 7.9 to 26.2 vs. -8.7; -15.4 to -1.4; p = 0.0001) also increased with increased saturated fat intake. Conclusions Because medium and small LDL particles are more highly associated with cardiovascular disease than are larger LDL, the present results suggest

  10. Practical aspects of direct adsorption of lipoproteins from whole blood by DALI LDL-apheresis.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Thomas

    2004-10-01

    Direct adsorption of lipoproteins (DALI) from whole blood is the first LDL-hemoperfusion procedure. The present paper addresses practical questions of DALI apheresis in order to optimise DALI therapy in sometimes critically ill coronary patients. The reduction of LDL and Lp(a) by DALI can be optimised by increasing the treated blood volume and the DALI adsorber volume. Hypotension (1.2% of sessions) may be minimised by fluid intake before the session, isovolemic connection of the patient to the ECC, reduced blood flow and low ACD-A ratio. Hypocalcemia may be avoided by low citrate anticoagulation (1:40) and reduced blood flow. Bradykinin release peaks at ca. 1000 ml of treated blood volume and may cause Quincke edema (tight throat), hypotension and flush. Reduction of the blood flow rate and decrease of citrate admixture as well as administration of iv. calcium may be helpful. While ACE inhibitors are contraindicated in DALI patients, sartans may be used without problems. Some "intrinsic" PTT increase is caused by adsorption of coagulation factors; undue PTT prolongations after DALI may be avoided by reduction of the heparin dosage during priming and treatment. In patients prone to alkalosis and hypokalemia, a reduction of the ACD-A ratio is recommended. Rises of adsorber inlet pressure may be due to insufficient anticoagulation and adsorber clotting or malfunctioning of the venous access. Rinsing of the adsorber with saline, administration of a heparin bolus and increase of the citrate admixture as well as a rinse and/or repositioning of the venous access are helpful measures. If these basic rules are followed, DALI LDL-apheresis is a safe, efficient, rapid and user-friendly LDL-apheresis procedure as evidenced by more than 80,000 DALI sessions successfully performed to date.

  11. Antioxidant activity of various teas against free radicals and LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Reiko; Iwamoto, Tamami; Tago, Motomi; Takeo, Tadakazu; Unno, Tomonori; Itakura, Hiroshige; Kondo, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    Tea is a widely consumed beverage throughout the world. We assessed the antioxidant activity of six teas, including the aqueous extracts of green tea and oolong tea (Camellia sinensis), tochu (Eucommia ulmoides), Gymnema sylvestre, Japanese mugwort (Artemisia princeps), and barley (Hordeum vulgare), against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and LDL oxidation, and examined the association of LDL oxidizability with the plasma catechin levels in 10 healthy volunteers with a single dose of 5 g green tea powder. In vitro, the inhibitory effects of DPPH radicals and LDL oxidation were found to be strongest in the extract of green tea and weakest in that of barley. After the ingestion of green tea powder, the lag time increased from basal 52.2 +/- 4.1 to 60.3 +/- 4.2 min at 1 h and 59.5 +/- 4.1 min at 2 h, and then returned to the baseline lag time (51.9 +/- 1.4 at 4 h and 52.1 +/- 4.7 min at 6 h). Regarding the plasma catechin levels, epigallocatechingallate and epicatechingallate significantly increased from basal 3.7 +/- 1.3 and 0.8 +/- 0.8 ng/mL to 65.7 +/- 11.6 and 54.6 +/- 12.6 ng/mL at 1 h, and 74.4 +/- 18.6 and 49.4 +/- 7.1 ng/mL at 2 h, respectively. Green tea therefore showed the strongest antioxidant activity among the six different teas, and the inhibitory effects of green tea on LDL oxidation depended on the plasma catechin levels.

  12. HMGCR rs17671591 SNP Determines Lower Plasma LDL-C after Atorvastatin Therapy in Chilean Individuals.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Alejandro; Fernández, César; Ferrada, Luis; Zambrano, Tomás; Rosales, Alexy; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A

    2016-04-01

    Lipid-lowering response to statin therapy shows large interindividual variability. At a genome-wide significance level, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PCSK9 and HMGCR have been implicated in this differential response. However, the influence of these variants is uncertain in the Chilean population. Hence, we aimed to evaluate the contribution of PCSK9 rs7552841 and HMGCR rs17671591 SNPs as genetic determinants of atorvastatin response in Chilean hypercholesterolaemic individuals. One hundred and one hypercholesterolaemic patients received atorvastatin 10 mg/day for 4 weeks. Plasma lipid profile (TC, HDL-C, LDL-C and TG) was determined before and after statin treatment, and SNPs were identified by allelic discrimination using TaqMan(®) SNP Genotyping Assays. Adjusted univariate and multivariate analyses' models were used for statistical analyses, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. From baseline (week 0) to the study end-point (week 4), significant reductions were observed in plasma TC, LDL-C and TG (p < 0.001), while HDL-C levels were increased (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed no association between lipid levels and atorvastatin therapy for the PCSK9 variant. However, the HMGCR rs17671591 T allele contributed to basal HDL-C concentration variability along with a higher increase in this lipid fraction after statin medication. In addition, this allele determined greater plasma LDL-C reductions after therapy with atorvastatin. Our data suggest that the HMGCR rs17671591 polymorphism can constitute a genetic marker of lower plasma LDL-C and enhanced HDL-C concentration after atorvastatin therapy in the Chilean population.

  13. SDF-1 promotes ox-LDL induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Xing; Zhang, Xian-Feng; Bai, Xue; Tong, Qian

    2013-09-01

    The mechanism of the regulatory roles of stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXCR4) on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via the protein kinase C (PKC) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathways have been investigated. Rat aortic VSMCs were treated with control or an oxidised low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) atherosclerosis (AS) model. Cells exposed to the AS model were treated with SDF-1 plus inhibitors specific for PKC (Ro31-8220), CXCR4 (12G5) or NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, PDTC). Cell proliferation was measured with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and apoptosis by flow cytometry. NF-κB protein expression was analysed using Western blotting. The proliferation rate in the AS model group was significantly higher than the control group, but lower than the SDF-1 group (P < 0.05). Apoptosis in the AS model group (ox-LDL) was significantly higher than the normal control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the apoptosis rate in the SDF-1 group was significantly lower than the normal control group (P < 0.05); however, there was no difference from the Ro31-8220 group. NF-κB protein expression in the SDF-1 group was significantly higher than the AS model (ox-LDL) group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, SDF-1 can promote the proliferation of VSMCs induced by ox-LDL and inhibit cell apoptosis, via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  14. Changes in Lipids and Lipoproteins after Selective LDL Apheresis (7-Year Experience)

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Hatzigeorgiou, Georgios; Mihas, Constantinos; Gontoras, Nikos; Litras, Panagiotis; Devekousos, Dimitris; Kontodima, Panagiota; Sorontila, Constantina; Bilianou, Helen; Mavrogeni, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in plasma lipids and lipoproteins and the cardiovascular events after selective LDL apheresis. Methods and Results. Two pediatric patients with familial hypercholesterolemia aged 11 and 13 years and 19 dyslipidemic adults aged 41 ± 14 years underwent direct adsorption of lipoproteins (DALI) sessions. The mean follow-up period was 47 ± 23 months. The total cholesterol (TC) values before and after treatment were 8.2 ± 2.2 and 3.1 ± 1.6 mmol/l (318 ± 86 and 122 ± 62 mg/dL), respectively. The interval mean of TC was 6.9 ± 1.9 mmol/l (268 ± 75 mg/dL). The LDL cholesterol concentrations before and after treatment were 6.6 ± 2.1 and 1.7 ± 1.1 mmol/l, (256 ± 82 mg/dL and 65 ± 41 mg/dL), respectively. The percentage of acute LDL cholesterol reduction was 75 ± 11%. Cardiovascular events were observed in seven patients. The average annual event rate was 5.51%. Conclusion. LDL apheresis is a very important therapeutic tool in managing patients at high risk for premature CAD or with aggressive CAD, despite adequate medical treatment. PMID:22315677

  15. Insoluble carob fiber rich in polyphenols lowers total and LDL cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic sujects.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Roso, Baltasar; Quintela, José C; de la Fuente, Ester; Haya, Javier; Pérez-Olleros, Lourdes

    2010-03-01

    Recently, polyphenols have been found to affect blood lipids in animals in a similar manner as soluble dietary fibre. The aim was to assess whether an insoluble dietary fiber very rich in polyphenols has a beneficial effect on serum lipids in humans. In a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical study with parallel arms, 88 volunteers with hypercholesterolemia were randomly assigned to consume daily either, fiber with insoluble 84% polyphenols 4 g twice a day (n = 43) or placebo (n = 45). Serum total, LDL and HDL cholesterol and triglycerides were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks. The insoluble polyphenols consumption reduced the total cholesterol by 17.8 +/- 6.1% (p < 0.05), LDL cholesterol by 22.5 +/- 8.9% (p < 0.001), LDL: HDL cholesterol ratio by 26.2 +/- 14.3% (p < 0.001) and triglycerides by 16.3 +/- 23.4% (p < 0.05) at the end of the study compared with baseline. No significant differences were found during the study time in the placebo group for the lipid profile. The consumption of fiber very rich in insoluble polyphenols shows beneficial effects on human blood lipid profile and may be effective in prevention and treatment of hyperlipemia.

  16. Inhibition of LDL oxidation by flavonoids in relation to their structure and calculated enthalpy.

    PubMed

    Vaya, Jacob; Mahmood, Saeed; Goldblum, Amiram; Aviram, Michael; Volkova, Nina; Shaalan, Amin; Musa, Ramadan; Tamir, Snait

    2003-01-01

    Twenty flavonoid compounds of five different subclasses were selected, and the relationship of their structure to the inhibition of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in vitro was investigated. The most effective inhibitors, by either copper ion or 2,2'-azobis (2-amidino-propane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) induction, were flavonols and/or flavonoids with two adjacent hydroxyl groups at ring B. In the presence of the later catechol group, the contribution of the double bond and the carbonyl group at ring C was negligible. Isoflavonoids were more effective inhibitors than other flavonoid subclasses with similar structure. Substituting ring B with hydroxyl group(s) at 2' position resulted in a significantly higher inhibitory effect than by substituting ring A or ring B at other positions. The type of LDL inducer had no effect in flavonoids with catechol structure. Calculated heat of formation data (deltadeltaH(f)) revealed that the donation of a hydrogen atom from position 3 was the most likely result, followed by that of a hydroxyl from ring B. Position 3 was favored only in the presence of conjugated double bonds between ring A to ring B. This study makes it possible to assign the contribution of different functional groups among the flavonoid subclasses to in vitro inhibition of LDL oxidation.

  17. Near Infrared Fluorescence (NIRF) Molecular Imaging of Oxidized LDL with an Autoantibody in Experimental Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Ramzi Y; Woollard, Kevin J.; Hyde, Gareth D.; Boyle, Joseph J; Bicknell, Colin; Chang, Shang-Hung; Malik, Talat H; Hara, Tetsuya; Mauskapf, Adam; Granger, David W; Johnson, Jason L.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Matthews, Paul M; Jaffer, Farouc A; Haskard, Dorian O

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to develop a quantitative antibody-based near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) approach for the imaging of oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis. LO1, a well- characterized monoclonal autoantibody that reacts with malondialdehyde-conjugated LDL, was labeled with a NIRF dye to yield LO1-750. LO1-750 specifically identified necrotic core in ex vivo human coronary lesions. Injection of LO1-750 into high fat (HF) fed atherosclerotic Ldlr−/− mice led to specific focal localization within the aortic arch and its branches, as detected by fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) combined with micro-computed tomography (CT). Ex vivo confocal microscopy confirmed LO1-750 subendothelial localization of LO1-750 at sites of atherosclerosis, in the vicinity of macrophages. When compared with a NIRF reporter of MMP activity (MMPSense-645-FAST), both probes produced statistically significant increases in NIRF signal in the Ldlr−/− model in relation to duration of HF diet. Upon withdrawing the HF diet, the reduction in oxLDL accumulation, as demonstrated with LO1-750, was less marked than the effect seen on MMP activity. In the rabbit, in vivo injected LO1-750 localization was successfully imaged ex vivo in aortic lesions with a customised intra-arterial NIRF detection catheter. A partially humanized chimeric LO1-Fab-Cys localized similarly to the parent antibody in murine atheroma showing promise for future translation. PMID:26911995

  18. Quercetin Inhibits LPS-Induced Inflammation and ox-LDL-Induced Lipid Deposition.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Nie, Xiaobo; Shi, Jianping; Liu, Qingxue; Wang, Ziwei; Li, Xiting; Zhou, Jinqiu; Su, Jia; Xue, Mingming; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of inflammation and excess accumulation of lipids play crucial role in the occurrence and progression of atherosclerosis (AS). Quercetin (QCT) has been tested effectively to cure AS. It is widely distributed in plant foods and has been proved to have potential antioxidative and anticancer activities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of OCT in AS are not completely understood. In the present study, we stimulated murine RAW264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) to mimic the development of AS. The data show that QCT treatment leads to an obvious decrease of multiple inflammatory cytokines in transcript level, including interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by LPS. Moreover, expressions of other factors that contribute to the AS development, such as matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) induced by LPS are also downregulated by QCT. Furthermore, we found that QCT suppressed LPS-induced the phosphorylation of STAT3. Meanwhile, QCT could ameliorate lipid deposition and overproduction of reactive oxygen species induced by ox-LDL, and block the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages. Taken together, our data reveal that QCT has obvious anti-inflammatory and antioxidant virtues and could be a therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of AS.

  19. Induction of DKK1 by ox-LDL negatively regulates intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ge, Cheng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Xinxin; Chen, Yifei; Li, Mengmeng; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-02

    Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway antagonist, is closely associated with cardiovascular disease and adipogenesis. We performed an in vitro study to determine whether oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) increased the expression of DKK1 in macrophages and whether β-catenin and liver X receptor α (LXRα) were involved in this regulation. Induction of DKK1 expression by ox-LDL decreased the level of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) via a Wnt/β-catenin pathway and increased ATP-binding cassette transporter A/G1 (ABCA/G1) levels via a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. Lower LOX-1 and higher ABCA/G1 levels inhibited cholesterol loading in macrophages. In conclusion, ox-LDL may induce DKK1 expression in macrophages to inhibit the accumulation of lipids through a mechanism that involves downregulation of LOX-1-mediated lipid uptake and upregulation of ABCA/G1-dependent cholesterol efflux.

  20. Quercetin Inhibits LPS-Induced Inflammation and ox-LDL-Induced Lipid Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Feng; Nie, Xiaobo; Shi, Jianping; Liu, Qingxue; Wang, Ziwei; Li, Xiting; Zhou, Jinqiu; Su, Jia; Xue, Mingming; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of inflammation and excess accumulation of lipids play crucial role in the occurrence and progression of atherosclerosis (AS). Quercetin (QCT) has been tested effectively to cure AS. It is widely distributed in plant foods and has been proved to have potential antioxidative and anticancer activities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of OCT in AS are not completely understood. In the present study, we stimulated murine RAW264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) to mimic the development of AS. The data show that QCT treatment leads to an obvious decrease of multiple inflammatory cytokines in transcript level, including interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by LPS. Moreover, expressions of other factors that contribute to the AS development, such as matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) induced by LPS are also downregulated by QCT. Furthermore, we found that QCT suppressed LPS-induced the phosphorylation of STAT3. Meanwhile, QCT could ameliorate lipid deposition and overproduction of reactive oxygen species induced by ox-LDL, and block the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages. Taken together, our data reveal that QCT has obvious anti-inflammatory and antioxidant virtues and could be a therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of AS. PMID:28217098

  1. Lipid fluidity at different regions in LDL and HDL of {beta}-thalassemia/Hb E patients

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Noppawan Phumala . E-mail: scnpm@mahidol.ac.th; Charlermchoung, Chalermkhwan; Luechapudiporn, Rataya; Yamanont, Paveena; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chantharaksri, Udom

    2006-11-24

    Atherosclerosis-related vascular complications in {beta}-thalassemia/hemoglobin E ({beta}-thal/Hb E) patients may result from iron induced oxidation of lipoproteins. To identify the specific site of oxidative damage, changes in lipid fluidity at different regions in LDL and HDL particle were investigated using two fluorescence probes and two ESR spin probes. The magnitude of increased lipid fluidity in thalassemic lipoproteins was dependent on the location of the probes. In hydrophobic region, the rotational correlation times for 16-doxyl stearic acid and DPH anisotropy were markedly changed in LDL and HDL of the patients. In the surface region, there was only a slight change in the order parameter (S) for 5-doxyl stearic acid and TMA-DPH anisotropy. Lipid fluidity at the core of LDL and HDL showed good correlation with oxidative stress markers, the ratio of CL/CO, and the level of {alpha}-tocopherol, suggesting that hydrophobic region of thalassemic lipoprotein was a target site for oxidative damage.

  2. Rapamycin down-regulates LDL-receptor expression independently of SREBP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Laura J.; Brown, Andrew J.

    2008-09-05

    As a key regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, sterol-regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) up-regulates expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (e.g., 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) Reductase) and uptake (the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor). Previously, we showed that Akt, a critical kinase in cell growth and proliferation, contributes to SREBP-2 activation. However, the specific Akt target involved is unknown. A potential candidate is the mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR. Rapamycin can cause hyperlipidaemia clinically, and we hypothesised that this may be mediated via an effect of mTOR on SREBP-2. Herein, we found that SREBP-2 activation and HMG-CoA Reductase gene expression were unaffected by rapamycin treatment. However, LDL-receptor gene expression was decreased by rapamycin, suggesting that this may contribute to the hyperlipidaemia observed in rapamycin-treated patients. Rapamycin did not affect mRNA stability, so the decrease in LDL-receptor gene expression is likely to be occurring at the transcriptional level, although independently of SREBP-2.

  3. Longitudinal Study of Low Serum LDL and Depressive Symptom Onset in Postmenopause

    PubMed Central

    Persons, Jane E.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Coryell, William H.; Payne, Martha E.; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and subsequent depressive symptoms onset in postmenopausal women. We secondarily assessed serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL-c), total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Methods This population-based prospective cohort study utilizes data from 24,216 50-79 year old participants of the Women’s Health Initiative, which originally ran from 1993-2005 and has since incorporated two extension studies, with the most recent culminating in 2015. Fasting lipids were measured for all participants at baseline, and for a subset through six years of follow-up. Depressive symptoms were characterized using the Burnam eight-item scale for depressive disorders (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression/Diagnostic Interview Schedule short form) at baseline and over follow-up, using a cutpoint of 0.06 to indicate presence of depressive symptoms. Results The lowest quintile of LDL-c was associated with an increased risk of subsequent depressive symptoms (HR=1.25, CI 1.05-1.49, p=0.01) and follow-up analyses demonstrated that the elevated risk appeared to be confined to the lowest decile (LDL-c <100 mg/dL). Further, this elevated risk was moderated by lipid-lowering drug treatment. Elevated risk was demonstrated among those who reported no lipid-lowering medication use (HR=1.23, CI 1.03-1.47, p=0.02), but not among those reporting use (HR=0.65, CI 0.18-2.29, p=0.50). Conclusion Among postmenopausal women, untreated serum LDL-c below 100 mg/dL was associated with an increased risk of developing depressive symptoms. No excess risk was observed in those attaining LDL-c <100 mg/dl with lipid-lowering therapy. These findings have important implications for risk assessment, treatment considerations, and mechanistic insight. PMID:26930520

  4. Extracellular Proteolysis of Apolipoprotein E (apoE) by Secreted Serine Neuronal Protease

    PubMed Central

    Tamboli, Irfan Y.; Heo, Dongeun; Rebeck, G. William

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, brain apolipoprotein E (apoE) is secreted and lipidated by astrocytes, then taken up by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis. Free apoE is either degraded in intraneuronal lysosomal compartments or released. Here we identified a novel way by which apoE undergoes proteolysis in the extracellular space via a secreted neuronal protease. We show that apoE is cleaved in neuronal conditioned media by a secreted serine protease. This apoE cleavage was inhibited by PMSF and α1-antichymotrypsin, but not neuroserpin-1 or inhibitors of thrombin and cathepsin G, supporting its identity as a chymotrypsin like protease. In addition, apoE incubation with purified chymotrypsin produced a similar pattern of apoE fragments. Analysis of apoE fragments by mass spectrometry showed cleavages occuring at the C-terminal side of apoE tryptophan residues, further supporting our identification of cleavage by chymotrypsin like protease. Hippocampal neurons were more efficient in mediating this apoE cleavage than cortical neurons. Proteolysis of apoE4 generated higher levels of low molecular weight fragments compared to apoE3. Primary glial cultures released an inhibitor of this proteolytic activity. Together, these studies reveal novel mechanism by which apoE can be regulated and therefore could be useful in designing apoE directed AD therapeutic approaches. PMID:24675880

  5. Novel phage group infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, as revealed by genomic and proteomic analysis of bacteriophage Ldl1.

    PubMed

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; Neve, Horst; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-02-01

    Ldl1 is a virulent phage infecting the dairy starter Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis LdlS. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that this phage exhibits a large head and a long tail and bears little resemblance to other characterized phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii. In vitro propagation of this phage revealed a latent period of 30 to 40 min and a burst size of 59.9 +/- 1.9 phage particles. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses showed remarkable similarity between the genome of Ldl1 and that of Lactobacillus plantarum phage ATCC 8014-B2. The genomic and proteomic characteristics of Ldl1 demonstrate that this phage does not belong to any of the four previously recognized L. delbrueckii phage groups, necessitating the creation of a new group, called group e, thus adding to the knowledge on the diversity of phages targeting strains of this industrially important lactic acid bacterial species.

  6. Lipid Profiles and APOE4 Allele Impact Midlife Cognitive Decline in HIV-Infected Men on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Locascio, Joseph J.; Misra, Vikas; Lorenz, David R.; Holman, Alex; Dutta, Anupriya; Penugonda, Sudhir; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dyslipidemia and apolipoprotein E4 (APOE ϵ4) allele are risk factors for age-related cognitive decline, but how these risks are modified by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is unclear. Methods. In a longitudinal nested study from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, 273 HIV type 1–infected (HIV+) men aged 50–65 years with baseline HIV RNA <400 copies/mL and on continuous antiretroviral therapy (ART) in ≥95% of follow-up visits were matched by sociodemographic variables to 516 HIV-uninfected (HIV–) controls. The association between lipid markers (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], and triglycerides), APOE genotype, and cognitive decline in HIV infection was examined using mixed-effects models. Results. The median baseline age of participants was 51, 81% were white, and 89% had education >12 years. HIV+ men had similar baseline total cholesterol and LDL-C, but lower HDL-C and higher triglycerides than controls (P < .001). Higher total cholesterol and LDL-C were associated with faster rates of cognitive decline (P < .01), whereas higher HDL-C attenuated decline (P = .02) in HIV+ men. In HIV+ men with elevated cholesterol, statin use was associated with a slower estimated rate of decline (P = .02). APOE ϵ4 genotype accelerated cognitive decline in HIV+ but not HIV– men (P = .01), with trajectories diverging from HIV– ε4 carriers after age 50. Total cholesterol levels did not modify the association of ϵ4 genotype with decline (P = .9). Conclusions. Elevated cholesterol and APOE ϵ4 genotype are independent risk factors for cognitive decline in ART-adherent HIV+ men aged >50 years. Treatment of dyslipidemia may be an effective strategy to reduce cognitive decline in older HIV+ individuals. PMID:27448678

  7. Exendin-4 ameliorates oxidized-LDL-induced inhibition of macrophage migration in vitro via the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ge-fei; Chen, Song; Yin, Lei; Gao, Xiang-dong; Yao, Wen-bing

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced inhibition of macrophage migration and the mechanisms underlying the effects of exendin-4. Methods: Primary peritoneal macrophages were extracted from the peritoneal cavity of mice treated with 3% thioglycollate (2 mL, ip). Migration of the macrophages was examined using a cell migration assay. Macrophage migration-related factors including leptin-like ox-LDL receptor (LOX-1), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-1 (IL-1)β, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of MIF and ICAM-1 proteins was examined with ELISA. Gelatin zymography was used to evaluate the activity of MMP-9. Activation of the NF-κB pathway was determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results: Treatment of the macrophages with ox-LDL (50 μg/mL) markedly suppressed the macrophage migration. Furthermore, ox-LDL treatment substantially increased the expression of the macrophage migration-related factors, the activity of MMP-9 and the translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. These effects of ox-LDL were significantly ameliorated by pretreatment with the specific NF-κB inhibitor ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (100 μmol/L). These effects of ox-LDL were also significantly ameliorated by pretreatment with exendin-4 (25 and 50 nmol/L). Conclusion: Exendin-4 ameliorates the inhibition of ox-LDL on macrophage migration in vitro, via suppressing ox-LDL-induced expression of ICAM-1 and MIF, which is probably mediated by the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24335838

  8. Dysregulation of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE)/hydrogen sulfide pathway contributes to ox-LDL-induced inflammation in macrophage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Fen; You, Shou-Jiang; Cao, Yong-Jun; Cao, Li-Dan; Han, Qiao; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), mainly produced by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) in vascular system, emerges as a novel gasotransmitter exerting anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Alterations of CSE/H2S pathway may thus be involved in atherosclerosis pathogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study showed that the levels of CSE mRNA and protein expression, as well as H2S production were decreased in ox-LDL-treated macrophage. CSE overexpression reduced the ox-LDL-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) generation in Raw264.7 and primary macrophage while CSE knockdown enhanced it. Exogenous supplementation of H2S with NaHS and Na2S also decreased the production of TNF-α and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in ox-LDL-stimulated macrophage, and alleviated the adhesion of macrophage to endothelial monolayer. Cysteine, a CSE preferential substrate for H2S biosynthesis, produced similar effects on the pro-inflammatory cytokine generation, which were reversed by CSE inhibitors PAG and BCA, respectively. Moreover, NaHS and Na2S attenuated the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and p65 nuclear translocation, as well as JNK activation caused by ox-LDL. The JNK inhibitor suppressed the NF-κB transcription activity in ox-LDL-treated cells. Furthermore, inhibitors of NF-κB (PDTC), ERK (U0126 and PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) partially blocked the suppression by ox-LDL on the CSE mRNA levels. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that ox-LDL may down-regulate the CSE/H2S pathway, which plays an anti-inflammatory role in ox-LDL-stimulated macrophage by suppressing JNK/NF-κB signaling. The study reveals new therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis, based on modulating CSE/H2S pathway.

  9. Inhibition of LDL oxidation by a new estradiol receptor modulator compound LY-139478, comparative effect with other steroids.

    PubMed

    Rattan, A K; Arad, Y

    1998-02-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is postulated to be essential for the development of atherosclerosis. LY-139478 is a new non-steroidal potent estrogen analog, but its effects on in vitro LDL oxidation have not been completely elucidated. We investigated the ability of LY-139478 to inhibit in vitro copper sulfate-mediated LDL oxidation using several methods, including conjugated diene (CD) accumulation, relative electrophoretic mobility on agarose gel, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay, and superoxide anions scavenging activity. The antioxidative potential of LY-139478 was compared to testosterone (T), 17-alpha-estradiol (17alphaE), 17-beta-estradiol (17betaE), dehydroepiandrosterone (D), and dehydroepiandrosterone-3-sulfate (DS). LY-139478 was superior to 17alphaE and 17betaE in prolonging the lag phase and decreasing the slope and peak concentration of the conjugated diene accumulation, decreasing the rate of migration of LDL on agarose gel electrophoresis, and inhibiting the production of melonyldialdehyde (MDA) in the TBARS assay. T, D and DS were ineffective in all three assays. It was previously shown that when native LDL is oxidized by previously oxidized LDL (secondary oxidation) the lag phase is lost (Schnitzer et al. Free Rad Res 1995;23:137). LY-139478 was at least 15-fold more effective than 17alphaE, and 17betaE in slowing the propagation phase and reducing CD accumulation in this secondary oxidation, with 50% inhibition at 10 microM and 98% inhibition at 100 microM. However, none restored the lag phase. T, D and DS were ineffective. Superoxide anion generation was inhibited only by DS at high doses (500 microM). These results demonstrate that LY-139478 is an effective inhibitor of LDL oxidation and is superior to natural steroidal hormones, including 17betaE, in protecting against primary and secondary LDL oxidation.

  10. Atherosclerosis development in SLE patients is not determined by monocytes ability to bind/endocytose Ox-LDL.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Lina M; Londoño, Julián; Montoya, Guillermo; De Sanctis, Juan B; Rojas, Mauricio; Ramírez, Luis A; García, Luis F; Vásquez, Gloria

    2011-05-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease; however, the mechanisms involved in the early onset of atherosclerosis in these patients are not clear. Scavenger receptors, CD36 and CD163 are expressed by mononuclear phagocytes and participate in the binding and uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (Ox-LDL), contributing to foam-cells formation and atherosclerosis development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate CD36(+) and CD163(+) expression and Ox-LDL removal by monocytes from SLE and atherosclerotic patients, compared to similar age-range healthy controls. Healthy controls, SLE, and atherosclerotic patients were evaluated for carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), lipid profile, and native LDL (N-LDL) and Ox-LDL binding/endocytosis. SLE patients presented decreased high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and increased Triglyceride levels, and half of the SLE patients had increased CIMT, compared to their healthy controls (HC(SLE)). The number of CD14(+)CD163(+) cells was increased in atherosclerosis healthy controls (HC(Atheros)) compared to HC(SLE), but there were no differences between SLE or atherosclerotic patients and their respective healthy controls. Clearance assays revealed a similar capacity to bind/endocytose Ox-LDL by monocytes from SLE patients and HC(SLE), and an increased binding and endocytosis of Ox-LDL by monocytes from atherosclerotic patients, compared to HC(Atheros). The decreased CD36 and CD163 expression observed in atherosclerotic and SLE patients, respectively, suggest that these inflammatory conditions modulate these receptors differentially. The increased CIMT observed in SLE patients cannot be explained by Ox-LDL binding/endocytosis, which was comparable to their controls.

  11. The N342S MYLIP polymorphism is associated with high total cholesterol and increased LDL receptor degradation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Calkin, Anna C.; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Zelcer, Noam; Riba, Laura; Tino, Ana Maria Vargas; Ordoñez-Sánchez, Maria Luisa; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Tontonoz, Peter; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) affects more than 1 in 3 American adults. Hypercholesterolemia is a major treatable risk factor for ASCVD, yet many individuals fail to reach target levels of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) through the use of statins and lifestyle changes. The E3 ubiquitin ligase myosin regulatory light chain–interacting protein (MYLIP; also known as IDOL) is a recently identified regulator of the LDL receptor (LDLR) pathway. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in populations of mixed European descent have identified noncoding variants in the MYLIP region as being associated with LDL-C levels, but no underlying functional variants were pinpointed. In order to fine-map actual susceptibility variants, we studied a population demographically distinct from the discovery population to ensure a different pattern of linkage disequilibrium. Our analysis revealed that in a Mexican population, the nonsynonymous SNP rs9370867, which encodes the N342S amino acid substitution, is an underlying functional variant that was associated with high total cholesterol and accounted for one of the previous significant GWAS signals. Functional characterization showed that the Asn-encoding allele was associated with more potent LDLR degradation and decreased LDL uptake. Mutagenesis of residue 342 failed to affect intrinsic MYLIP E3 ligase activity, but it was critical for LDLR targeting. Our findings suggest that modulation of MYLIP activity can affect LDL-C levels and that pharmacologic inhibition of MYLIP activity might be a useful strategy in the treatment of dyslipidemia and ASCVD. PMID:21765216

  12. Having excess levels of PCSK9 is not sufficient to induce complex formation between PCSK9 and the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Catherine J; Adcock, Audrey F; Agina-Obu, DaTonye I; Lopez, Dayami

    2014-03-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-9 (PCSK9) acts mainly by forming complexes with the LDL receptor at the cell surface, which are then degraded in the lysosome. Studies were performed to determine whether excess levels of PCSK9 was sufficient to induce PCSK9/LDL receptor complex formation in human hepatocyte-like C3A cells. It was demonstrated using ELISA that instead of considering the overall levels of PCSK9 protein that is produced in response to certain treatment, what is critical is how much PCSK9 is actually capable of forming complexes. Despite the high levels, most of the PCSK9 produced as a result of incubating cells with a medium supplemented with BD™ MITO+ serum extender (MITO+ medium) appeared to be inhibited by a secreted factor. Having lower levels of PCSK9/LDL receptor complexes did not prevent an increase in the degradation rate of LDL receptors in MITO+ medium as compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing medium (Regular medium), an effect that did not correlate with an increase in protein levels of the inducible degrader of LDL receptors (IDOL), as demonstrated using Western blotting analysis. Additional studies are required to determine the exact mechanism(s) for the degradation of the LDL receptor and/or to identify the secreted inhibitor of PCSK9.

  13. Liver-specific ATP-citrate lyase inhibition by bempedoic acid decreases LDL-C and attenuates atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Newton, Roger S.; Day, Emily A.; Ford, Rebecca J.; Lhotak, Sarka; Austin, Richard C.; Birch, Carolyn M.; Smith, Brennan K.; Filippov, Sergey; Groot, Pieter H.E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Lalwani, Narendra D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread use of statins to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and associated atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk, many patients do not achieve sufficient LDL-C lowering due to muscle-related side effects, indicating novel treatment strategies are required. Bempedoic acid (ETC-1002) is a small molecule intended to lower LDL-C in hypercholesterolemic patients, and has been previously shown to modulate both ATP-citrate lyase (ACL) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in rodents. However, its mechanism for LDL-C lowering, efficacy in models of atherosclerosis and relevance in humans are unknown. Here we show that ETC-1002 is a prodrug that requires activation by very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase-1 (ACSVL1) to modulate both targets, and that inhibition of ACL leads to LDL receptor upregulation, decreased LDL-C and attenuation of atherosclerosis, independently of AMPK. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the absence of ACSVL1 in skeletal muscle provides a mechanistic basis for ETC-1002 to potentially avoid the myotoxicity associated with statin therapy. PMID:27892461

  14. Localization of genes for V+LDL plasma cholesterol levels on two diets in the opossum Monodelphis domestica[S

    PubMed Central

    Kammerer, Candace M.; Rainwater, David L.; Gouin, Nicolas; Jasti, Madhuri; Douglas, Kory C.; Dressen, Amy S.; Ganta, Prasanth; VandeBerg, John L.; Samollow, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol levels among individuals vary considerably in response to diet. However, the genes that influence this response are largely unknown. Non-HDL (V+LDL) cholesterol levels vary dramatically among gray, short-tailed opossums fed an atherogenic diet, and we previously reported that two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) influenced V+LDL cholesterol on two diets. We used hypothesis-free, genome-wide linkage analyses on data from 325 pedigreed opossums and located one QTL for V+LDL cholesterol on the basal diet on opossum chromosome 1q [logarithm of the odds (LOD) = 3.11, genomic P = 0.019] and another QTL for V+LDL on the atherogenic diet (i.e., high levels of cholesterol and fat) on chromosome 8 (LOD = 9.88, genomic P = 5 × 10−9). We then employed a novel strategy involving combined analyses of genomic resources, expression analysis, sequencing, and genotyping to identify candidate genes for the chromosome 8 QTL. A polymorphism in ABCB4 was strongly associated (P = 9 × 10−14) with the plasma V+LDL cholesterol concentrations on the high-cholesterol, high-fat diet. The results of this study indicate that genetic variation in ABCB4, or closely linked genes, is responsible for the dramatic differences among opossums in their V+LDL cholesterol response to an atherogenic diet. PMID:20650928

  15. Localization of genes for V+LDL plasma cholesterol levels on two diets in the opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Kammerer, Candace M; Rainwater, David L; Gouin, Nicolas; Jasti, Madhuri; Douglas, Kory C; Dressen, Amy S; Ganta, Prasanth; Vandeberg, John L; Samollow, Paul B

    2010-10-01

    Plasma cholesterol levels among individuals vary considerably in response to diet. However, the genes that influence this response are largely unknown. Non-HDL (V+LDL) cholesterol levels vary dramatically among gray, short-tailed opossums fed an atherogenic diet, and we previously reported that two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) influenced V+LDL cholesterol on two diets. We used hypothesis-free, genome-wide linkage analyses on data from 325 pedigreed opossums and located one QTL for V+LDL cholesterol on the basal diet on opossum chromosome 1q [logarithm of the odds (LOD) = 3.11, genomic P = 0.019] and another QTL for V+LDL on the atherogenic diet (i.e., high levels of cholesterol and fat) on chromosome 8 (LOD = 9.88, genomic P = 5 x 10(-9)). We then employed a novel strategy involving combined analyses of genomic resources, expression analysis, sequencing, and genotyping to identify candidate genes for the chromosome 8 QTL. A polymorphism in ABCB4 was strongly associated (P = 9 x 10(-14)) with the plasma V+LDL cholesterol concentrations on the high-cholesterol, high-fat diet. The results of this study indicate that genetic variation in ABCB4, or closely linked genes, is responsible for the dramatic differences among opossums in their V+LDL cholesterol response to an atherogenic diet.

  16. Image-based computational simulation of sub-endothelial LDL accumulation in a human right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohammad; Jalali, Farhang; Karimi, Gholamreza; Zarrabi, Khalil

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of low density lipoproteins (LDL) in the vessel wall is suggested as the initiator of atherosclerosis and coronary stenosis. This process is associated with the performance of endothelium layer that regulates entering of macromolecules to the vessel wall. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate sub-endothelial accumulation of LDL molecules in a coronary tree and predict atherosclerosis prone sites. Non-Newtonian blood flow is simulated for normal and hypertensive conditions through the lumen of a right coronary artery reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images. A three-pore model is implemented as the endothelium boundary condition and hence, plasma flow and LDL transport are simulated within the arterial wall. Based on the pore model, endothelium pathways divide into normal junctions, vesicles and leaky junctions. Most of LDL molecules pass through the leaky junctions that arise at locations with low wall shear stress (WSS). Results indicate that increase in the number of leaky junctions at branch points with low WSS can lead to both elevated levels of sub-endothelial LDL accumulation and atherosclerosis risk. Findings reveal that at the branch points with disturbed flow, sub-endothelial concentration of LDL for the hypertensive condition is higher than the normal condition, however for the rest of regions with uniform geometry and unidirectional flow, this is reversed. Comparisons of non-Newtonian and Newtonian flows show mean increases of 34% and 13% in the sub-endothelial concentrations of Newtonian flows during the normal and hypertensive conditions, respectively.

  17. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein-β2-Glycoprotein I Complex But Not Free Oxidized LDL Is Associated With the Presence and Severity of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Bliden, Kevin P; Chaudhary, Rahul; Lopez, Luis R; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Guyer, Kirk; Gesheff, Martin G; Franzese, Christopher J; Kaza, Himabindu; Tantry, Udaya S; Gurbel, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) have been identified in human atherosclerotic lesions and when complexed have been implicated as a pro-atherothrombotic antigen. We examined the association of free oxLDL and oxLDL-β2GPI complex in patients with coronary artery disease who underwent elective cardiac catheterization. Serum was collected from patients with suspected coronary artery disease immediately before elective cardiac catheterization who were either treated (n = 385) or not treated (n = 150) with statins and from healthy volunteers (n = 134). OxLDL and oxLDL-β2GPI complex levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Disease severity was defined angiographically as none-minimal (<20%), moderate (20% to 75%), and severe (>75%) luminal diameter obstruction of any major coronary vessel. Both oxLDL and oxLDL-β2GPI complex were lower in patients on statins (p <0.001). In statin-naive patients, oxLDL-β2GPI complex, but not free oxLDL, was associated with severe coronary artery disease (p = 0.036). However, no association was observed in patients on statins. LDL4 and triglycerides increased with oxLDL-β2GPI complex quartiles (p = 0.001). OxLDL-β2GPI complex (>0.32 U/ml) was predictive of severe atherosclerosis by receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis in statin-naive patients (area under the curve 0.66, p = 0.002). In conclusion, oxLDL-β2GPI appears more predictive of coronary artery disease severity than oxLDL alone in statin-naive patients.

  18. Serum Oxidized LDL Decreases in Response to Statin Therapy and Relates Independently to Reductions in Coronary Plaque in Patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    NOU, Eric; LU, Michael T.; LOOBY, Sara E.; FITCH, Kathleen V.; KIM, Elli A.; LEE, Hang; HOFFMANN, Udo; GRINSPOON, Steven K.; LO, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating oxidized LDL (oxLDL) levels are elevated in HIV-infected patients and have been associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Statins have been shown to reduce plaque on coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) in HIV-infected individuals. Thus, we investigated the effect of statins on serum oxLDL levels and the relationship between changes in oxLDL and coronary atherosclerosis on cCTA in patients with HIV. Design We previously conducted a 12-month randomized, placebo-controlled trial with atorvastatin in forty HIV-infected subjects on stable anti-retroviral therapy with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and LDL-cholesterol < 130 mg/dL. Methods In the current analysis, subjects underwent cCTA and measurements of serum oxLDL, sCD14, sCD163, lipoprotein phospholipase A2, and fasting lipids including direct LDL at baseline and end of the study. Results Nineteen subjects were randomized to atorvastatin and twenty-one subjects to placebo. Serum oxLDL decreased −22.7% [95% CI −28.7 to −16.7] in the atorvastatin group and increased 7.5% [95% CI −3.3 to 18.4] in the placebo group (p < 0.0001). Change in oxLDL significantly correlated with changes in non-calcified plaque volume, total plaque volume, positively remodeled plaque, and low attenuation plaque. The association between changes in oxLDL and non-calcified plaque volume was independent of the baseline 10-year Framingham risk, direct LDL, CD4 count, and viral load. Conclusions Statins lower oxLDL levels in HIV-infected patients, and reductions in oxLDL are related to improvements in coronary atherosclerosis, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Reductions in oxLDL may be one mechanism through which statins exert beneficial effects on reducing atherosclerosis in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26558731

  19. ApoE and Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease: accidental encounters or partners?

    PubMed Central

    Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Xu, Huaxi; Bu, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Among the three human apolipoprotein E (apoE) isoforms, apoE4 increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While transporting cholesterol is a primary function, apoE also regulates amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolism, aggregation and deposition. Although earlier work suggests that different affinities of apoE isoforms to Aβ might account for their effects on Aβ clearance, recent studies indicate that apoE also competes with Aβ for cellular uptake through apoE receptors. Thus, several factors likely determine the variable effects apoE has on Aβ. In this review, we examine biochemical, structural, and functional studies and propose testable models that address the complex mechanisms underlying apoE-Aβ interaction and how apoE4 may increase AD risk and also serve as a target pathway for therapy. PMID:24559670

  20. Bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages have different inflammatory response to oxLDL and M1/M2 marker expression – implications for atherosclerosis research

    PubMed Central

    Bisgaard, Line S.; Mogensen, Christina K.; Rosendahl, Alexander; Cucak, Helena; Nielsen, Lars Bo; Rasmussen, Salka E.; Pedersen, Tanja X.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and can polarize into specific subsets, e.g. pro-inflammatory M1-like and re-modelling M2-like macrophages. To determine if peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) or bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) resembled aortic macrophages from ApoE−/− mice, their M1/M2 phenotype, inflammatory status, and lipid metabolism signatures were compared. oxLDL accumulation was similar in PEMs and BMDMs. On protein expression level, BMDMs showed an M2-like CD206highCD11clow profile, while cholesterol loading led to enhanced CD11c expression and reduced MCP-1 secretion. In contrast, PEMs expressed low levels of CD206 and CD11c, and responded to cholesterol loading by increasing CD11c expression and MCP-1 secretion. mRNA expression of M1/M2 markers was higher in PEMS than BMDMs, while lipid metabolism genes were similarly expressed. Whole aorta flow cytometry showed an accumulation of M2-like CD206highCD11clow macrophages in advanced versus early atherosclerotic disease in ApoE−/− mice. In isolated lesions, mRNA levels of the M2 markers Socs2, CD206, Retnla, and IL4 were downregulated with increasing disease severity. Likewise, mRNA expression of lipid metabolism genes (SREBP2, ACSL1, SRB1, DGAT1, and cpt1a) was decreased in advanced versus early lesions. In conclusion, PEMs and BMDMs are phenotypically distinct and differ from macrophages in lesions with respect to expression of M1/M2 markers and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27734926

  1. Emergent biomarkers of residual cardiovascular risk in patients with low HDL-c and/or high triglycerides and average LDL-c concentrations: focus on HDL subpopulations, Oxidized LDL, adiponectin, and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Palavra, Filipe; Marado, Daniela; Sereno, José; Teixeira-Lemos, Edite; Freitas, Isabel; Isabel-Mendonça, Maria; Pinto, Rui; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to determine the impact of HDL-c and/or TGs levels on patients with average LDL-c concentration, focusing on lipidic, oxidative, inflammatory, and angiogenic profiles. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors (n = 169) were divided into 4 subgroups, combining normal and low HDL-c with normal and high TGs patients. The following data was analyzed: BP, BMI, waist circumference and serum glucose, Total-c, TGs, LDL-c, oxidized-LDL, total HDL-c and HDL subpopulations, paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, hsCRP, uric acid, TNF- α , adiponectin, VEGF, and iCAM1. The two populations with increased TGs levels, regardless of the normal or low HDL-c, presented obesity and higher waist circumference, Total-c, LDL-c, Ox-LDL, and uric acid. Adiponectin concentration was significantly lower and VEGF was higher in the population with cumulative low values of HDL-c and high values of TGs, while HDL quality was reduced in the populations with impaired values of HDL-c and/or TGs, viewed by reduced large and increased small HDL subfractions. In conclusion, in a population with cardiovascular risk factors, low HDL-c and/or high TGs concentrations seem to be associated with a poor cardiometabolic profile, despite average LDL-c levels. This condition, often called residual risk, is better evidenced by using both traditional and nontraditional CV biomarkers, including large and small HDL subfractions, Ox-LDL, adiponectin, VEGF, and uric acid.

  2. Endothelial cytoprotection from oxidized LDL by some crude Melanesian plant extracts is not related to their antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Owen, Patrick L; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Sirois, Martin; Johns, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Habitual consumption of some Melanesian medicinal and food plants may influence atherosclerosis development via their antioxidant capacity at the endothelial level. Areca nut (AN; Areca catechu), piper inflorescence (PBI; Piper betle), betel quid (BQ), guava buds (GB; Psidium guajava), the leaves (NL), juice (NJ), fruit (NF), and root (NR) of noni (Morinda citrifolia), the propagules of raw (MBR), and cooked (MBC) mangrove (Bruguiera gymnorrhiza) were evaluated for their ability to scavenge the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyle (DPPH) radical, to protect human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from Cu2+-catalyzed oxidation and to protect cultured bovine aortal endothelial cells (BAEC) from oxidized LDL (oxLDL)-induced cytotoxicity. Polyphenol-rich extracts AN, PBI, and BQ were potent DPPH scavengers, having similar activity to quercetin and able to protect LDL from oxidation in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations higher than 10 microg/mL, but were pro-oxidants at lower concentrations. These extracts were cytotoxic to BAEC at concentrations above 10 microg/mL and were unable to prevent oxLDL endotheliopathy. GB and NR at 10 mug/mL displayed both the ability to delay LDL oxidation and prevent oxLDL cytotoxicity, although the latter lacked the ability to scavenge the DPPH radical. At higher concentrations, however, both were cytotoxic in themselves. The remaining noni extracts NF, NJ, NL, and both mangrove extracts MBC and MBR were unable to protect LDL from oxidation at all tested concentrations, but were effective cytoprotective agents at 50 microg/mL. All extracts were able to prevent an oxLDL-mediated increase in intracellular aldehyde generation but had little effect on extracellular peroxidation as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). On the basis of this model system, we conclude that the antioxidant benefits of AN, PBI, and BQ may be offset by their enhancement of their cytotoxic effects of oxLDL toward BAEC, whereas GB and low

  3. MicroRNAs expression in ox-LDL treated HUVECs: MiR-365 modulates apoptosis and Bcl-2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Bing; Xiao, Bo; Liang, Desheng; Xia, Jian; Li, Ye; Yang, Huan

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} We evaluated the role of miRNAs in ox-LDL induced apoptosis in ECs. {yields} We found 4 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated miRNAs in apoptotic ECs. {yields} Target genes of the dysregulated miRNAs regulate ECs apoptosis and atherosclerosis. {yields} MiR-365 promotes ECs apoptosis via suppressing Bcl-2 expression. {yields} MiR-365 inhibitor alleviates ECs apoptosis induced by ox-LDL. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells (ECs) apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is thought to play a critical role in atherosclerosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse cell functions, including differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. However, whether miRNAs are associated with ox-LDL induced apoptosis and their effect on ECs is still unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated potential miRNAs and their involvement in ECs apoptosis in response to ox-LDL stimulation. Microarray and qRT-PCR analysis performed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to ox-LDL identified 15 differentially expressed (4 up- and 11 down-regulated) miRNAs. Web-based query tools were utilized to predict the target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs, and the potential target genes were classified into different function categories with the gene ontology (GO) term and KEGG pathway annotation. In particular, bioinformatics analysis suggested that anti-apoptotic protein B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) is a target gene of miR-365, an apoptomir up-regulated by ox-LDL stimulation in HUVECs. We further showed that transfection of miR-365 inhibitor partly restored Bcl-2 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, leading to a reduction of ox-LDL-mediated apoptosis in HUVECs. Taken together, our findings indicate that miRNAs participate in ox-LDL-mediated apoptosis in HUVECs. MiR-365 potentiates ox-LDL-induced ECs apoptosis by regulating the

  4. Chronic depletion of glutathione (GSH) and minimal modification of LDL in vivo: its prevention by glutathione mono ester (GME) therapy.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Namakkal Soorappan; Sathyanarayanan, Srinivasan; Devaraj, Niranjali S; Devaraj, Halagowder

    2005-06-30

    A decline in reduced glutathione (GSH) level is associated with aging and free radical mediated diseases. The objective of this study was to determine whether the chronic depletion of extra cellular GSH causes oxidative damage to the circulating macromolecules such as lipoproteins. Decreased concentrations of plasma glutathione, vitamin E and ascorbic acid were recorded in the rats treated with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a selective GSH inhibitor. In LDL isolated from BSO-treated animals, the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes were significantly increased (P<0.01), whereas the levels of vitamin E were decreased (P<0.01). The analysis of total and LDL cholesterol revealed significant changes between the control and experimental groups. Of interest, altered concentrations of lyso-phosphatidyl choline (Lyso-PC) and phosphatidyl choline (PC) were recorded from the BSO mediated minimally modified LDL. A negative correlation between LDL-BDC/MDA and its antioxidant capacity was noted. Upon in vitro oxidation with CuSO(4), the electrophoretic behavior of purified LDL-apoprotein-B on agarose gel showed an increased mobility in BSO-treated rats, indicative of in vivo modification of LDL to become susceptible for in vitro oxidation. The increased mobility of LDL (after in vitro oxidation) isolated from the BSO-treated animals correlates with a decrease in its amino groups, as determined by the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) reactants. However, the mobility of LDL molecule was not altered due to BSO treatment in vivo. Interestingly, the minimal modification on LDL does not lead to any vascular damage in the dorsal aorta of the rats injected with BSO. The administration of glutathione monoester (GME), at a dose of 5 mmol/kg body weight, twice a day, for 30 days, to animals treated with l-buthionine-SR-sulfoximine (BSO, 4 mmol/kg body weight, twice a day, for 30 days) normalized the antioxidant status and prevented the minimal modifications on

  5. Beneficial Effects of Berberine on Oxidized LDL-Induced Cytotoxicity to Human Retinal Müller Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dongxu; Yu, Jeremy Y.; Connell, Anna R.; Yang, Shihe; Hookham, Michelle B.; McLeese, Rebecca; Lyons, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Limited mechanistic understanding of diabetic retinopathy (DR) has hindered therapeutic advances. Berberine, an isoquinolone alkaloid, has shown favorable effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in animal and human studies, but effects on DR are unknown. We previously demonstrated intraretinal extravasation and modification of LDL in human diabetes, and toxicity of modified LDL to human retinal Müller cells. We now explore pathogenic effects of modified LDL on Müller cells, and the efficacy of berberine in mitigating this cytotoxicity. Methods Confluent human Müller cells were exposed to in vitro–modified ‘highly oxidized, glycated (HOG-) LDL versus native-LDL (N-LDL; 200 mg protein/L) for 6 or 24 hours, with/without pretreatment with berberine (5 μM, 1 hour) and/or the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, Compound C (5 μM, 1 hour). Using techniques including Western blots, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection assay, and quantitative real-time PCR, the following outcomes were assessed: cell viability (CCK-8 assay), autophagy (LC3, Beclin-1, ATG-5), apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3, cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase), oxidative stress (ROS, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, glutathione peroxidase 1, NADPH oxidase 4), angiogenesis (VEGF, pigment epithelium-derived factor), inflammation (inducible nitric oxide synthase, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α), and glial cell activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein). Results Native-LDL had no effect on cultured human Müller cells, but HOG-LDL exhibited marked toxicity, significantly decreasing viability and inducing autophagy, apoptosis, oxidative stress, expression of angiogenic factors, inflammation, and glial cell activation. Berberine attenuated all the effects of HOG-LDL (all P < 0.05), and its effects were mitigated by AMPK inhibition (P < 0.05). Conclusions Berberine inhibits modified LDL-induced Müller cell injury by activating

  6. An Anti-apoE4 Specific Monoclonal Antibody Counteracts the Pathological Effects of apoE4 In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Luz, Ishai; Liraz, Ori; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2016-06-02

    ApolipoproteinE4 (apoE4) is the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and as such is a promising therapeutic target. This study examined the extent to which the pathological effects of apoE4 can be counteracted in vivo utilizing an immunological approach in which anti-apoE4 antibodies are applied peripherally by i.p. injections into apoE4-targeted replacement mice. Prerequisites for the successful pursuit of this objective are the availability of antibodies that specifically bind brain apoE4 and not apoE3, and demonstrating that direct application of these antibodies into the brain can counteract the effects of apoE4. Accordingly, it was shown that the antiapoE4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 9D11 binds specifically to brain apoE4 and not apoE3. Direct i.c.v. application of mAb 9D11 prevented the apoE4-driven accumulation of Aβ in hippocampal neurons following activation of the amyloid cascade by inhibiting the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin. These findings provide a proof-of-concept that anti-apoE4 mAb 9D11, when introduced into the brain, can counteract the apoE4 effects in vivo. Subsequent experiments, utilizing repeated i.p. injections of mAb 9D11, resulted in the formation of apoE/IgG complexes specifically in apoE4 mice. This was associated with reversal of the cognitive impairments of apoE4 in the Morris water maze and the novel object recognition test as well as with reversal of key apoE4-driven pathologies including the hyperphosphorylated tau and the reduced levels of the apoER2 receptor. These results indicate that anti-apoE4 immunotherapy counteracts the cognitive and brain pathological effects of apoE4, and suggest that such an approach could also benefit human apoE4 carriers.

  7. Uptake and catabolism of modified LDL in scavenger-receptor class A type I/II knock-out mice.

    PubMed Central

    Van Berkel, T J; Van Velzen, A; Kruijt, J K; Suzuki, H; Kodama, T

    1998-01-01

    The liver is the major organ responsible for the uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from the blood circulation, with endothelial and Kupffer cells as major cellular uptake sites. Scavenger-receptors, which include various classes, are held responsible for this uptake. Mice deficient in scavenger-receptor class A types I and II were created and the fate of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL) in vivo and its interaction with liver endothelial, Kupffer and peritoneal macrophages was characterized. Surprisingly, the decay in vivo (t12 < 2 min), tissue distribution and liver uptake (at 5 min it was 77.4 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose) of Ac-LDL in the knock-out mice were not significantly different from control mice (t12 < 2 min and liver uptake 79.1 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose). A separation of mice liver cells into parenchymal, endothelial and Kupffer cells 10 min after injection of Ac-LDL indicated that in both control and knock-out mice the liver endothelial cells were responsible for more than 70% of the liver uptake. Both in control and knock-out mice, preinjection of polyinosinic acid (poly I, 200 microg) completely blocked the liver uptake, indicating that both in control and knock-out mice the scavenger-receptors are sensitive to poly I. Preinjection of suboptimal poly I concentrations (20 and 50 microg) provided evidence that the serum decay and liver uptake of Ac-LDL is more readily inhibited in the knock-out mice as compared with the control mice, indicating less efficient removal of Ac-LDL in vivo in the knock-out mice under these conditions. Studies in vitro with isolated liver endothelial and Kupffer cells from knock-out mice indicate that the cell association of Ac-LDL during 2 h at 37 degrees C is 50 and 53% of the control, respectively, whereas the degradation reaches values of 58 and 63%. For peritoneal macrophages from knock-out mice the cell association of Ac-LDL was identical to the control mice whereas the Ac-LDL degradation in cells from the

  8. Atorvastatin treatment and LDL cholesterol target attainment in patients at very high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Ulrich; Karmann, Barbara; Pittrow, David

    2016-09-01

    The use of atorvastatin is rapidly increasing among statins since the introduction of generics. However, only limited data are available on its current use and the effectiveness outside of randomised trials. The aim of the study was to assess low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels in ambulatory patients at very high cardiovascular risk on atorvastatin therapy in physician's offices. A total of 2625 high-risk patients on atorvastatin were included into this cross-sectional study by 539 office-based physicians between June and December 2014. 47.0 % of the patients had documented coronary heart disease (CHD), 25.1 % type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and 27.9 % CHD plus concomitant DM. The mean age was 66.1 ± 10.8 years, 62.1 % were male. Atorvastatin at the dose of 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg/day was administered in 15.6, 45.7, 33.9, and 4.8 % of the patients, respectively. The treatment duration was 92.6 ± 109.6 weeks. The mean atorvastatin dose at therapy start was 24.8 ± 15.2 mg/day and at time of documentation 27.9 ± 15.8 mg/day. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) <70 mg/dL was achieved by 10.5 % of the total cohort (7.5 % in DM, 9.3 % in CHD, and 15.2 % in CHD + DM). In contrast, according to physicians' subjective assessment, 62.7 % of patients (with small differences between groups) had reached their individual LDL-C target. In summary, higher doses of atorvastatin are not frequently used in clinical practice. The LDL-C target level <70 mg/dL as recommended by current guidelines is achieved only in a minority of atorvastatin treated patients at very high cardiovascular risk.

  9. Lipid and apolipoprotein distribution as a function of density in equine plasma lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, D; Pastier, D; Hannan, Y; Petit, E; Ayrault-Jarrier, M; Nouvelot, A

    1989-01-01

    1. Equine lipoproteins were isolated from plasma by density gradient ultracentrifugation and apolipoprotein composition determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. 2. VLDL and IDL were present at low concentration (0.2 mg/ml). Two apoB components of Mr corresponding to human apoB-100 and one apoB-48-like component were represented in VLDL fraction. 3. LDL-1 and LDL-2 subfractions have displayed an almost equal concentration (0.4 mg/ml). Two apoB-100-like components were the major apolipoproteins in each fraction. Small amounts of apoB-48-like component were detectable in LDL-1 and LDL-2. 4. HDL-2 represented a major class of equine lipoproteins (1.8 mg/ml). ApoA-1-like component was the dominant protein in HDL-1, HDL-2 and HDL-3. Dimeric apoA-II-like components were slightly represented in HDL subfractions. 5. HDL-3 displayed the same apolipoprotein pattern as HDL-1 and HDL-2, but two further minor proteins of Mr 20,000 and 14,000 were detected. 6. VHDL represented a minor class of lipoprotein (0.2 mg/ml). ApoA-I-like component was the major apolipoprotein of VHDL. Small amounts of apoA-IV-like, apoE-like, and Mr 55,000 protein were detectable. 7. ApoC-like of Mr lower than 10,000 was represented in all equine lipoprotein classes.

  10. L5-LDL from ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients induces IL-1β production via LOX-1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Lu, Shao-Chun

    2017-02-01

    L5-LDL, the most electronegative LDL associated with major cardiovascular risks, significantly rises in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The inflammatory nature of atherosclerotic vascular diseases has prompted us to investigate whether L5-LDL induces the production of inflammatory cytokines, especially vascular ischemia-related interleukin (IL)-1β, in the pathogenesis of STEMI. Clinical data showed that plasma levels of L5-LDL and IL-1β were higher in the STEMI patients than in the controls (P < 0.05). In THP-1-derived human macrophages, L5-LDL significantly increased the levels of both IL-1β and cleaved caspase-1, indicating the activation of NOD-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes by L5-LDL. Knockdown of NLRP3 and its adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) resulted in decreased L5-LDL-induced IL-1β. Furthermore, knock down of the lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1) in THP-1 cells attenuated L5-LDL-induced activation of NF-κB and caspase-1, leading to subsequent inhibition of IL-1β in macrophages. Furthermore, blockade LOX-1 with neutralizing antibody also inhibited L5-LDL-induced IL-1β in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived macrophages. In conclusion, L5-LDL induces IL-1β production in macrophages by activation of NF-κB and caspase-1 through the LOX-1-dependent pathway. This study represents the evidence linking L5-LDL and the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in STEMI, and identifies L5-LDL as a novel therapeutic target in acute myocardial infarction.

  11. Taurine protects HK-2 cells from oxidized LDL-induced cytotoxicity via the ROS-mediated mitochondrial and p53-related apoptotic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chun-Yu; Shen, Chao-Yu; Kang, Chao-Kai; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.; Chang, Chia-Che; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2014-09-15

    Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) induces a pro-oxidative environment and promotes apoptosis, causing the progression of renal diseases in humans. Taurine is a semi-essential amino acid in mammals and has been shown to be a potent endogenous antioxidant. The kidney plays a pivotal role in maintaining the balance of taurine. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of taurine against oxLDL-induced injury in renal epithelial cells have not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of taurine on human proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells exposed to oxLDL and explored the related mechanisms. We observed that oxLDL increased the contents of ROS and of malondialdehyde (MDA), which is a lipid peroxidation by-product that acts as an indicator of the cellular oxidation status. In addition, oxLDL induced cell death and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. Pretreatment with taurine at 100 μM significantly attenuated the oxLDL-induced cytotoxicity. We determined that oxLDL triggered the phosphorylation of ERK and, in turn, the activation of p53 and other apoptosis-related events, including calcium accumulation, destabilization of the mitochondrial permeability and disruption of the balance between pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The malfunctions induced by oxLDL were effectively blocked by taurine. Thus, our results suggested that taurine exhibits potential therapeutic activity by preventing oxLDL-induced nephrotoxicity. The inhibition of oxLDL-induced epithelial apoptosis by taurine was at least partially due to its anti-oxidant activity and its ability to modulate the ERK and p53 apoptotic pathways. - Highlights: • Oxidized LDL induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. • Pretreatment with taurine attenuated oxLDL-induced nephrotoxicity. • Taurine protected against renal damages through inhibition of ROS generation. • Taurine prevented apoptosis through modulation of the p53 phosphorylation.

  12. Dietary palmitic acid influences LDL-mediated lymphocyte proliferation differently to other mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in rats.

    PubMed

    Tinahones, F J; Gómez-Zumaquero, J M; Monzón, A; Rojo-Martínez, G; Pareja, A; Morcillo, S; Cardona, F; Olveira, G; Soriguer, F

    2004-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that the biological effects of saturated fatty acids depend on the length of their chain. We compared the effect of diets containing different fatty acids on plasma lipids and lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of lovastatin and with increasing amounts of LDL. Lymphocytes from rats fed with a diet rich in palmitic acid had a greater lymphocyte proliferation capacity than those from rats fed with diets rich in oleic acid, linoleic acid, or fish oil. This effect was maintained when small amounts of polyunsaturatwed fatty acids (PUFA; sunflower oil) were added to the palmitic acid diet. LDL receptor activity, measured by the capacity of lovastatin to revert the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation with increasing amounts of LDL in the medium, was greater in the rats fed with palmitic acid, and was similar to the other groups when small amounts of PUFA were added. All the groups had similar levels of plasma cholesterol, but the LDL levels were significantly lower in the group fed with palmitic acid plus PUFA. The highest HDL-cholesterol (HDLc) levels were found in the palmitic acid group and the lowest LDL-cholesterol (LDLc)/HDLc ratio in the palmitic acid plus PUFA group. These results suggest that diets rich in palmitic acid do not raise total cholesterol, but reduce LDLc or keep it normal, and raise HDLc levels. This effect may be partly due to an increase in LDL receptor activity. The inclusion of small amounts of PUFA in the diet rich in palmitic acid substantially modified the LDL receptor response in the lymphocytes, suggesting that the proportion of different families of dietary fatty acids may be more important than the individual amount of each in absolute terms to explain their effects on plasma lipids and lipoproteins.

  13. Deleuze&apos;s Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey-Moody, Anna Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Children, the image of the child, and the gendered figures of the girl and the boy are thematics that run through the work of Deleuze and feature prominently in his joint writing with Guattari. However, there are many different children in Deleuze&apos;s writings. Various child figures do distinct things in Deleuze&apos;s work. In this article, I…

  14. Genetic manipulation of the ApoF/Stat2 locus supports an important role for type I interferon signaling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lagor, William R; Fields, David W; Bauer, Robert C; Crawford, Alison; Abt, Michael C; Artis, David; Wherry, E John; Rader, Daniel J

    2014-03-01

    Apolipoprotein F (ApoF) is a sialoglycoprotein that is a component of the HDL and LDL fractions of human serum. We sought to test the hypothesis that ApoF plays an important role in atherosclerosis in mice by modulating lipoprotein function. Atherosclerosis was assessed in male low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr KO) and ApoF/Ldlr double knockout (DKO) mice fed a Western diet for 16 weeks. ApoF/Ldlr DKO mice showed a 39% reduction in lesional area by en face analysis of aortas (p < 0.05), despite no significant differences in plasma lipid parameters. ApoF KO mice had reduced expression of Interferon alpha (IFNα) responsive genes in liver and spleen, as well as impaired macrophage activation. Interferon alpha induced gene 27 like 2a (Ifi27l2a), Oligoadenylate synthetases 2 and 3 (Oas2 and Oas3) were significantly reduced in the ApoF KO mice relative to wild type controls. These effects were attributable to hypomorphic expression of Stat2 in the ApoF KO mice, a critical gene in the Type I IFN pathway that is situated just 425 base pairs downstream of ApoF. These studies implicate STAT2 as a potentially important player in atherosclerosis, and support the growing evidence that the Type I IFN pathway may contribute to this complex disease.

  15. Genetic manipulation of the ApoF/Stat2 locus supports an important role for Type I Interferon signaling in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lagor, William R.; Fields, David W.; Bauer, Robert C.; Crawford, Alison; Abt, Michael C.; Artis, David; Wherry, E. John; Rader, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein F (ApoF) is a sialoglycoprotein that is a component of the HDL and LDL fractions of human serum. We sought to test the hypothesis that ApoF plays an important role in atherosclerosis in mice by modulating lipoprotein function. Atherosclerosis was assessed in male low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR KO) and ApoF/LDLR double knockout (DKO) mice fed a Western diet for 16 weeks. ApoF/LDLR DKO mice showed a 39% reduction in lesional area by en face analysis of aortas (p<0.05), despite no significant differences in plasma lipid parameters. ApoF KO mice had reduced expression of Interferon alpha (IFNα) responsive genes in liver and spleen, as well as impaired macrophage activation. Interferon alpha induced gene 27 like 2a (Ifi27l2a), Oligoadenylate synthetases 2 and 3 (Oas2 and Oas3) were significantly reduced in the ApoF KO mice relative to wild type controls. These effects were attributable to hypomorphic expression of Stat2 in the ApoF KO mice, a critical gene in the Type I IFN pathway that is situated just 425 base pairs downstream of ApoF. These studies implicate STAT2 as a potentially important player in atherosclerosis, and support the growing evidence that the Type I IFN pathway may contribute to this complex disease. PMID:24529150

  16. LDL cholesterol-lowering effects of grape extract used as a dietary supplement on healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Noemí; Sanz-Buenhombre, Marisa; Guadarrama, Alberto; Villanueva, Sonia; Carrión, Juan M; Larrarte, Eider; Moro, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Eminol®, the polyphenol-rich grape extract supplement (700 mg), on cardiovascular risk and oxidant stress indicators in a sample of volunteers. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed over 56 days and included 60 volunteers. Thirty volunteers took 700 mg of the grape extract, Eminol® (E), and 30 took the placebo (P). On comparison of the results, a decrease in total cholesterol (E: 213.77 ± 4.1 mg/dl and P: 245.57 ± 4.1 mg/dl; p = 0.01) and LDL cholesterol (E: 142.17 ± 3.1 mg/dl and P: 165.13 ± 3.1 mg/dl; p = 0.02) levels as well as an increase in antioxidant capacity (E: 65.63 ± 5.8 μmol TE/mg and P: 57.80 ± 7.7 μmol TE/mg; p < 0.01) and vitamin E (E: 11.46 ± 0.5 μg/ml and P: 9.06 ± 0.5 μg/ml; p = 0.018) was observed. This result indicates that the grape extract Eminol® modulated the lipid profile in terms of cardiovascular risk indicators, lowering total blood cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels.

  17. A novel posttranscriptional mechanism for dietary cholesterol-mediated suppression of liver LDL receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Shende, Vikram; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-07-01

    It is well-established that over-accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the liver inhibits sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-mediated LDL receptor (LDLR) gene transcription leading to a reduced hepatic LDLR mRNA level in hypercholesterolemic animals. However, it is unknown whether elevated cholesterol levels can elicit a cellular response to increase LDLR mRNA turnover to further repress LDLR expression in liver tissue. In the current study, we examined the effect of a high cholesterol diet on the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA binding proteins in three different animal models and in cultured hepatic cells. Our results demonstrate that high cholesterol feeding specifically elevates the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA decay promoting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP)D without affecting expressions of other LDLR mRNA binding proteins in vivo and in vitro. Employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we further show that depletion of HNRNPD in the liver results in a marked reduction of serum LDL-cholesterol and a substantial increase in liver LDLR expression in hyperlipidemic mice. Additional studies of gene knockdown in albumin-luciferase-untranslated region (UTR) transgenic mice provide strong evidence supporting the essential role of 3'UTR in HNRNPD-mediated LDLR mRNA degradation in liver tissue. Altogether, this work identifies a novel posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism by which dietary cholesterol inhibits liver LDLR expression via inducing HNRNPD to accelerate LDLR mRNA degradation.

  18. LDL Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) Regulates Cholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Muratoglu, Selen Catania; Au, Dianaly T.; Migliorini, Mary; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Fried, Susan K.; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    Within the circulation, cholesterol is transported by lipoprotein particles and is taken up by cells when these particles associate with cellular receptors. In macrophages, excessive lipoprotein particle uptake leads to foam cell formation, which is an early event in the development of atherosclerosis. Currently, mechanisms responsible for foam cell formation are incompletely understood. To date, several macrophage receptors have been identified that contribute to the uptake of modified forms of lipoproteins leading to foam cell formation, but the contribution of the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to this process is not known. To investigate the role of LRP1 in cholesterol accumulation in macrophages, we generated mice with a selective deletion of LRP1 in macrophages on an LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient background (macLRP1-/-). After feeding mice a high fat diet for 11 weeks, peritoneal macrophages isolated from Lrp+/+ mice contained significantly higher levels of total cholesterol than those from macLRP1-/- mice. Further analysis revealed that this was due to increased levels of cholesterol esters. Interestingly, macLRP1-/- mice displayed elevated plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels resulting from accumulation of large, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in the circulation. This increase did not result from an increase in hepatic VLDL biosynthesis, but rather results from a defect in catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in macLRP1-/- mice. These studies reveal an important in vivo contribution of macrophage LRP1 to cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26061292

  19. Versatility in ligand recognition by LDL receptor family proteins: advances and frontiers.

    PubMed

    Blacklow, Stephen C

    2007-08-01

    Proteins of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family transport cholesterol-carrying particles into cells, clear protease-inhibitor complexes from the circulation, participate in biological signaling cascades, and even serve as viral receptors. These receptors utilize clusters of cysteine-rich LDL receptor type-A (LA) modules to bind many of their ligands. Recent structures show that these modules typically exhibit a characteristic binding mode to recognize their partners, relying primarily on electrostatic complementarity and avidity effects. The dominant contribution of electrostatic interactions with small interface areas in these complexes allows binding to be regulated by changes in pH via at least two distinct mechanisms. The structure of the subtilisin/kexin family protease PCSK9, a newly identified molecular partner of the LDLR also implicated in LDL-cholesterol homeostasis, also raises the possibility that the LDLR and its related family members may employ other strategies for pH-sensitive binding that have yet to be uncovered.

  20. Macrophage-specific overexpression of interleukin-5 attenuates atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W; Lei, T; Li, H; Sun, D; Mo, X; Wang, Z; Zhang, K; Ou, H

    2015-08-01

    Interleukin-5 (IL-5) increases the secretion of natural T15/EO6 IgM antibodies that inhibit the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by macrophages. This study aimed to determine whether macrophage-specific expression of IL-5 in LDL receptor-deficient mice (Ldlr(-/-)) could improve cholesterol metabolism and reduce atherosclerosis. To induce macrophage-specific IL-5 expression, the pLVCD68-IL5 lentivirus was delivered into Ldlr(-/-) mice via bone marrow transplantation. The recipient mice were fed a Western-type diet for 12 weeks to induce lesion formation. We found that IL-5 was efficiently and specifically overexpressed in macrophages in recipients of pLVCD68-IL5-transduced bone marrow cells (BMC). Plasma titers of T15/EO6 IgM antibodies were significantly elevated by 58% compared with control mice transplanted with pLVCD68 lacking the IL-5 coding sequence. Plaque areas of aortas in IL-5-overexpressing mice were reduced by 43% and associated with a 2.4-fold decrease in lesion size at the aortic roots when compared with mice receiving pLVCD68-transduced BMCs. The study showed that macrophage-specific overexpression of IL-5 inhibited the progression of atherosclerotic lesions. These findings suggest that modulation of IL-5 cytokine expression represents a potential strategy for intervention of familial hypercholesterolemia and other cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Macadamia nut consumption lowers plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic men.

    PubMed

    Garg, Manohar L; Blake, Robert J; Wills, Ron B H

    2003-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the cholesterol-lowering potential of macadamia nuts. Seventeen hypercholesterolemic men (mean age 54 y) were given macadamia nuts (40-90 g/d), equivalent to 15% energy intake, for 4 wk. Plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and homocysteine concentrations and the fatty acid composition of plasma lipids were determined before and after treatment. Plasma MUFA 16:1(n-7), 18:1(n-7) and 20:1(n-9) were elevated after intervention with macadamia nuts. Plasma (n-6) and (n-3) PUFA concentrations were unaffected by macadamia nut consumption. Plasma total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol concentrations decreased by 3.0 and 5.3%, respectively, and HDL cholesterol levels increased by 7.9% in hypercholesterolemic men after macadamia nut consumption. Plasma triglyceride and homocysteine concentrations were not affected by treatment. Macadamia nut consumption was associated with a significant increase in the relative intake of MUFA and a reduced relative intake of saturated fatty acids and PUFA. This study demonstrates that macadamia nut consumption as part of a healthy diet favorably modifies the plasma lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic men despite their diet being high in fat.

  2. Inhibitory effect of oolong tea on the oxidative state of low density lipoprotein (LDL).

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hiroshi; Fukami, Harukazu; Toyoda, Yoshiko; Kageyama, Norihiko; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Shibata, Hiroshi; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Takaharu

    2003-05-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-oxidant activity of oolong tea in an oxidation model using human low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Oolong tea suppressed the oxidation of LDL induced by 2-2'-azobis 4-methoxy-2,4-dimethyvaleronitrile (V70) in a dose-dependent manner, that is, it prolonged the lag time to 114.3%, 138% and 199.9% as compared with the control group at 0.5 microg/ml, 1.0 microg/ml, and 2.5 microg/ml, respectively. We also determined the scavenging effect of oolong tea on active oxygen radicals using the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trapping agent. The intensity of the ESR signals for the DMPO-OOH adduct formed by the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase reaction system with DMPO decreased in the presence of oolong tea. The IC(50) of oolong tea was 19.9 microg/ml. These findings suggested that oolong tea has beneficial effects on health related to its anti-oxidative action.

  3. Electronegative LDL-mediated cardiac electrical remodeling in a rat model of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, An-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chung, Ching-Hu; Peng, Hsien-Yu; Chang, Chia-Ming; Su, Ming-Jai; Chen, Chu-Huang; Chang, Kuan-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying chronic kidney disease (CKD)–associated higher risks for life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias remain poorly understood. In rats subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx), we examined cardiac electrophysiological remodeling and relevant mechanisms predisposing to ventricular arrhythmias. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent UNx (n = 6) or sham (n = 6) operations. Eight weeks later, the UNx group had higher serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and a longer electrocardiographic QTc interval than did the sham group. Patch-clamp studies revealed epicardial (EPI)-predominant prolongation of the action potential duration (APD) at 50% and 90% repolarization in UNx EPI cardiomyocytes compared to sham EPI cardiomyocytes. A significant reduction of the transient outward potassium current (Ito) in EPI but not in endocardial (ENDO) cardiomyocytes of UNx rats led to a decreased transmural gradient of Ito. The reduction of Ito currents in UNx EPI cardiomyocytes was secondary to downregulation of KChIP2 but not Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and Kv1.4 protein expression. Incubation of plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from UNx rats with normal EPI and ENDO cardiomyocytes recapitulated the electrophysiological phenotype of UNx rats. In conclusion, CKD disrupts the physiological transmural gradient of Ito via downregulation of KChIP2 proteins in the EPI region, which may promote susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Electronegative LDL may underlie downregulation of KChIP2 in CKD. PMID:28094801

  4. Circulating CD36 and oxLDL levels are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in young subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) results from a combination of abnormalities in lipoprotein metabolism, oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and susceptibility to thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is the major cause of CVD. CD36 has been shown to play a critical role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions by its capacity to bind and promote endocytosis of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and is implicated in the formation of foam cells. The purpose of this research was to evaluate whether there is an association of sCD36 and oxLDL levels with cardiovascular risk factors in young subjects. Methods A total of 188 subjects, 18 to 25 years old, 133 normal-weight and 55 obese subjects from the state of Guerrero, Mexico were recruited in the study. The lipid profile and glucose levels were measured by enzymatic colorimetric assays. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISA) for oxLDL and sCD36 were performed. Statistical analyses of data were performed with Wilcoxon- Mann Whitney and chi-square tests as well as with multinomial regression. Results TC, LDL-C, TG, oxLDL and sCD36 levels were higher in obese subjects than in normal-weight controls, as well as, monocyte and platelet counts (P < 0.05). Obese subjects had 5.8 times higher risk of sCD36 in the third tertil (>97.8 ng/mL) than normal-weight controls (P = 0.014), and 7.4 times higher risk of oxLDL levels in third tertile (>48 U/L) than control group. The subjects with hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, fasting impaired LDL-C had a higher risk of oxLDL levels in the third tertile (>48 U/L) than the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions Circulating CD36 and oxLDL levels are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in young subjects and may be potential early markers for cardiovascular disease (CVD). PMID:24766787

  5. A genetic variant in the LDLR promoter is responsible for part of the LDL-cholesterol variability in primary hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background GWAS have consistently revealed that LDLR locus variability influences LDL-cholesterol in general population. Severe LDLR mutations are responsible for familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). However, most primary hypercholesterolemias are polygenic diseases. Although Cis-regulatory regions might be the cause of LDL-cholesterol variability; an extensive analysis of the LDLR distal promoter has not yet been performed. We hypothesized that genetic variants in this region are responsible for the LDLR association with LDL-cholesterol found in GWAS. Methods Four-hundred seventy-seven unrelated subjects with polygenic hypercholesterolemia (PH) and without causative FH-mutations and 525 normolipemic subjects were selected. A 3103 pb from LDLR (-625 to +2468) was sequenced in 125 subjects with PH. All subjects were genotyped for 4 SNPs (rs17242346, rs17242739, rs17248720 and rs17249120) predicted to be potentially involved in transcription regulation by in silico analysis. EMSA and luciferase assays were carried out for the rs17248720 variant. Multivariable linear regression analysis using LDL-cholesterol levels as the dependent variable were done in order to find out the variables that were independently associated with LDL-cholesterol. Results The sequencing of the 125 PH subjects did not show variants with minor allele frequency ≥ 10%. The T-allele from g.3131C > T (rs17248720) had frequencies of 9% (PH) and 16.4% (normolipemic), p < 0.00001. Studies of this variant with EMSA and luciferase assays showed a higher affinity for transcription factors and an increase of 2.5 times in LDLR transcriptional activity (T-allele vs C-allele). At multivariate analysis, this polymorphism with the lipoprotein(a) and age explained ≈ 10% of LDL-cholesterol variability. Conclusion Our results suggest that the T-allele at the g.3131 T > C SNP is associated with LDL-cholesterol levels, and explains part of the LDL-cholesterol variability. As a plausible

  6. Extra virgin olive oil use is associated with improved post-prandial blood glucose and LDL cholesterol in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Violi, F; Loffredo, L; Pignatelli, P; Angelico, F; Bartimoccia, S; Nocella, C; Cangemi, R; Petruccioli, A; Monticolo, R; Pastori, D; Carnevale, R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is a key component of the Mediterranean diet and seems to account for the protective effect against cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanism is still elusive. Design: We tested the effect of EVOO, added to Mediterranean-type meal, on post-prandial glycemic and lipid profile. Subjects: Post-prandial glycemic and lipid profile were investigated in 25 healthy subjects who were randomly allocated in a cross-over design to a Mediterranean-type meal added with or without 10 g EVOO (first study), or Mediterranean-type meal with EVOO (10 g) or corn oil (10 g; second study). Glycemic profile, which included glucose, insulin, dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) protein and activity, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and lipid profile, which included, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (LDL-C), oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C), were analyzed before and 2 h after the meal. Results: In the first study, 2 h after meal, subjects who assumed a meal with EVOO had significantly lower blood glucose (P<0.001), DPP-4 protein (P<0.001) and activity (P<0.001), LDL-C (P<0.001) and ox-LDL (P<0.001) and higher insulin (P<0.05), GLP-1 (P<0.001) and GIP (P<0.05) compared with those without EVOO. The second study showed that compared with corn oil, EVOO improved both glycemic and lipid profile. Thus, a significantly smaller increase of glucose (P<0.05), DPP4 protein (P<0.001) and activity (P<0.05) and higher increase of insulin (P<0.001) and GLP-1 (P<0.001) were observed. Furthermore, compared with corn oil, EVOO showed a significantly less increase of LDL-C (P<0.05) and ox-LDL (P<0.001). Conclusions: We report for the first time that EVOO improves post-prandial glucose and LDL-C, an effect that may account for the antiatherosclerotic effect of the Mediterranean diet. PMID:26192450

  7. Direct observation of apolipoprotein B refolding at single molecule level by ultra sensitive fluorescence microscopy and solution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Lee, Hsing-Yuan; Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Chen, Gong-Shen; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2013-03-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) B is the only protein of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The huge size and extreme hydrophobicity of apoB make examination of its lipidation process an experimental challenge. In this study, we showed that apoB lipidation and its intermediates could be observed at single molecule level by an on-path folding process. When carboxyl-terminal-truncated mutants apoB-29 and apoB-48, representing the amino-terminal 29% and 48%, respectively, of the full-length apoB (apoB-100), were used for comparison, we observed that the refolded apoB-100 resembled both native LDL and VLDL precursors. Thus the process of lipidation recapitulates that of pre-VLDL assembly, in vitro. These results suggest that the assembly of mature VLDL requires involvement of factors in addition to apoB-100 and lipids. Using solution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we were able to detect incorporation of hydrophobic super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into apoB-100 particles at the initial, but not final, stage of refolding. The current study thus demonstrates that VLDL assembly can be monitored at single molecule level, too.

  8. Effect of Cyp27A1 gene dosage on atherosclerosis development in ApoE-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zurkinden, Line; Solcà, Curzio; Vögeli, Isabelle A; Vogt, Bruno; Ackermann, Daniel; Erickson, Sandra K; Frey, Felix J; Sviridov, Dmitri; Escher, Geneviève

    2014-03-01

    In humans, sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) deficiency leads to cholesterol deposition in tendons and vasculature. Thus, in addition to its role in bile acid synthesis, where it converts cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC), CYP27A1 may also be atheroprotective. Cyp27A1-deficient (Cyp27A1(-/-)) mice were crossed with apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice. Cyp27A1(+/+)/apoE(-/-) [ApoE-knockout (KO)], Cyp27A1(+/-)/apoE(-/-) heterozygous (het), and Cyp27A1(-/-)/apoE(-/-) [double-knockout (DKO)] mice were challenged with a Western diet (WD) for 3 and 6 mo. ApoE-KO mice fed a chow diet or a WD were used as the control. The severity of atherosclerosis in DKO mice was reduced 10-fold. Compared with the control, the DKO mice had no 27-OHC, total plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein and very low density lipoprotein (LDL/VLDL) concentrations were reduced 2-fold, and HDL was elevated 2-fold. Expression of hepatic CYP7A1, CYP3A, and CYP8B1 were 5- to 10-fold higher. 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity increased 4-fold. Fecal cholesterol was increased. In contrast, het mice fed a WD developed accelerated atherosclerosis and severe skin lesions, possibly because of reduced reverse cholesterol transport due to diminished 27-OHC production. CYP27A1 activity is involved in the control of cholesterol homeostasis and development of atherosclerosis with a distinct gene dose-dependent effect.

  9. Detection and characterization of cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides in oxidized LDL and oxidized HDL by use of an Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hui, Shu-Ping; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Ohkawa, Futaba; Furumaki, Hiroaki; Jin, Shigeki; Fuda, Hirotoshi; Takeda, Seiji; Kurosawa, Takao; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2012-07-01

    Oxidation of cholesteryl esters in lipoproteins by reactive oxygen species yields cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides (CEOOH). In this study, we developed a novel method for identification and characterization of CEOOH molecules in human lipoproteins by use of reversed-phase liquid chromatography with an hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (LC-LTQ Orbitrap). Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric analysis was performed in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes. Identification of CEOOH molecules was completed by use of high-mass-accuracy (MA) mass spectrometric data obtained by using the spectrometer in Fourier-transform (FT) mode. Native low-density lipoproteins (nLDL) and native high-density lipoproteins (nHDL) from a healthy donor were oxidized by CuSO(4), furnishing oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and oxidized HDL (oxHDL). No CEOOH molecules were detected in the nLDL and the nHDL, whereas six CEOOH molecules were detected in the oxLDL and the oxHDL. In positive-ion mode, CEOOH was detected as [M + NH(4)](+) and [M + Na](+) ions. In negative-ion mode, CEOOH was detected as [M + CH(3)COO](-) ions. CEOOH were more easily ionized in positive-ion mode than in negative-ion mode. The LC-LTQ Orbitrap method was applied to human plasma and six species of CEOOH were detected. The limit of detection was 0.1 pmol (S/N = 5:1) for synthesized CEOOH.

  10. A lipidomics study reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunxiu; Xie, Bingxian; Du, Yinan; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Qiaoli; Shen, Bin; Hu, Bian; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhu, Haibo; Huang, Xingxu; Xu, Guowang; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) plays a critical role in the liver for the clearance of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Its deficiency causes hypercholesterolemia in many models. To facilitate the usage of rats as animal models for the discovery of cholesterol-lowering drugs, we took a genetic approach to delete the LDLR in rats aiming to increase plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). An LDLR knockout rat was generated via zinc-finger nuclease technology, which harbors a 19-basepair deletion in the seventh exon of the ldlr gene. As expected, deletion of the LDLR elevated total cholesterol and total triglyceride in the plasma, and caused a tenfold increase of plasma LDL-C and a fourfold increase of plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C). A lipidomics analysis revealed that deletion of the LDLR affected hepatic lipid metabolism, particularly lysophosphatidylcholines, free fatty acids and sphingolipids in the liver. Cholesterol ester (CE) 20:4 also displayed a significant increase in the LDLR knockout rats. Taken together, the LDLR knockout rat offers a new model of hypercholesterolemia, and the lipidomics analysis reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor. PMID:27378433

  11. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Galvano, Fabio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Masella, Roberta; Giovannini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power. PMID:26180584

  12. A Mechanistic Systems Pharmacology Model for Prediction of LDL Cholesterol Lowering by PCSK9 Antagonism in Human Dyslipidemic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gadkar, K; Budha, N; Baruch, A; Davis, J D; Fielder, P; Ramanujan, S

    2014-01-01

    PCSK9 is a promising target for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease. A Quantitative Systems Pharmacology model of the mechanisms of action of statin and anti-PCSK9 therapies was developed to predict low density lipoprotein (LDL) changes in response to anti-PCSK9 mAb for different treatment protocols and patient subpopulations. Mechanistic interactions and cross-regulation of LDL, LDL receptor, and PCSK9 were modeled, and numerous virtual subjects were developed and validated against clinical data. Simulations predict a slightly greater maximum percent reduction in LDL cholesterol (LDLc) when anti-PCSK9 is administered on statin background therapy compared to as a monotherapy. The difference results primarily from higher PCSK9 levels in patients on statin background. However, higher PCSK9 levels are also predicted to increase clearance of anti-PCSK9, resulting in a faster rebound of LDLc. Simulations of subjects with impaired LDL receptor (LDLR) function predict compromised anti-PCSK9 responses in patients such as homozygous familial hypercholesterolemics, whose functional LDLR is below 10% of normal. PMID:25426564

  13. Age-Dependent Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) Activity and LDL Oxidation in Wistar Rats during Their Entire Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dileep

    2014-01-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an HDL bound enzyme which plays a key role in the protection of LDL and HDL from oxidation by hydrolyzing activated phospholipids and lipid peroxide products. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis by oxidation of LDL. This study was conducted to determine age-dependent changes in plasma PON1 arylesterase activity and LDL oxidation in rats during their entire lifespan. 48 Wistar strain rats were grouped in six different age groups (1, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 months). We observe a significant (P < 0.001) age-dependent decrease in plasma PON1 arylesterase activity correlating with increase in susceptibility of LDL oxidation and increase in plasma MDA level concomitantly with a significant (P < 0.001) decrease in plasma radical scavenging activity after 8 months. The reduction of PON1 and free radical scavenging activity with age could have a considerable impact on the increased incidence of atherosclerosis with age. Our observation of a significant decline in PON1 activity which correlates with increased LDL oxidation after 8 months of age is an interesting observation and needs further investigation. PMID:24971380

  14. Traffic, polarity, and detergent solubility of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein after LDL-deprivation of MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, GPI-proteins, are selectively delivered to the apical surfaces of many types of morphologically polarized epithelial cells. It has been proposed that the unit for targeting GPI-proteins to the apical surface is a membrane lipid domain. This sorting domain or molecular cluster has been equated to detergent (Triton X-100)-insoluble membrane fractions that are enriched in enriched in GPI-proteins, glycosphingolipids, and cholesterol. To determine the role of cholesterol in the formation of sorting domains and to examine its importance in the intracellular traffic and membrane polarity of GPI-proteins, we studied the behavior of a model GPI-protein, gD1-DAF, in MDCK cells cultured for 3 or 14 d without their principal source of cholesterol, serum LDL. LDL deprivation affects the intracellular traffic of gD1-DAF. Surface expression of gD1-DAF is reduced in LDL-deprived cells; this reduction is most marked after 3 d of LDL deprivation. We also find a great reduction in the fraction of gD1-DAF that is detergent-insoluble in these cells and a change in its membrane milieu defined by susceptibility to cleavage with PI-specific phospholipase C. Despite these changes, the surface polarity of gD1-DAF is no different in LDL- deprived cells than in control cells. PMID:8682