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Sample records for ldl-scavenger receptor sites

  1. Nicotine Recruits Glutamate Receptors to Postsynaptic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jing-jing; Lozada, Adrian F.; Gou, Chen-yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K.

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors. PMID:26365992

  2. Nicotine recruits glutamate receptors to postsynaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing-Jing; Lozada, Adrian F; Gou, Chen-Yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K

    2015-09-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input that the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors.

  3. Receptor-binding sites: bioinformatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Flower, Darren R

    2006-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that both transient and long-lasting interactions between biomacromolecules and their molecular partners are the most fundamental of all biological mechanisms and lie at the conceptual heart of protein function. In particular, the protein-binding site is the most fascinating and important mechanistic arbiter of protein function. In this review, I examine the nature of protein-binding sites found in both ligand-binding receptors and substrate-binding enzymes. I highlight two important concepts underlying the identification and analysis of binding sites. The first is based on knowledge: when one knows the location of a binding site in one protein, one can "inherit" the site from one protein to another. The second approach involves the a priori prediction of a binding site from a sequence or a structure. The full and complete analysis of binding sites will necessarily involve the full range of informatic techniques ranging from sequence-based bioinformatic analysis through structural bioinformatics to computational chemistry and molecular physics. Integration of both diverse experimental and diverse theoretical approaches is thus a mandatory requirement in the evaluation of binding sites and the binding events that occur within them. PMID:16671408

  4. [Sites of synthesis of acetylcholine receptors in denervated muscles].

    PubMed

    Giacobini Robecchi, M G; Garelli, M; Filogamo, G

    1980-09-01

    Muscle fibres binding with 125I alpha-bungarotoxine from Bungarus Multicinctus, after treatment with saponine, shows (in electron microscope autoradiography) intracellular binding sites identifying sites of acetylcholine receptor synthesis. In innervated muscle, the acetylcholine receptor is located only at the neuromuscular junction. In denervated muscle the receptor is distributed along the whole sarcolemma; in this situation the acetylcholine receptor is synthesized "ex novo" in the membrane system over the whole length of the muscle fibre. PMID:7214035

  5. Conserved site for neurosteroid modulation of GABA A receptors.

    PubMed

    Hosie, Alastair M; Clarke, Laura; da Silva, Helena; Smart, Trevor G

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses whether the potentiation site for neurosteroids on GABA(A) receptors is conserved amongst different GABA(A) receptor isoforms. The neurosteroid potentiation site was previously identified in the alpha1beta2gamma2S receptor by mutation of Q241 to methionine or leucine, which reduced the potentiation of GABA currents by the naturally occurring neurosteroids, allopregnanolone or tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC). By using heterologous expression of GABA(A) receptors in HEK cells, in combination with whole-cell patch clamp recording methods, a relatively consistent potentiation by allopregnanolone of GABA-activated currents was evident for receptors composed of one alpha subunit isoform (alpha2-5) assembled with beta3 and gamma2S subunits. Using mutant alphabetagamma receptors, the neurosteroid potentiation was universally dependent on the conserved glutamine residue in M1 of the respective alpha subunit. Studying wild-type and mutant receptors composed of alpha4beta3delta subunits revealed that the delta subunit is unlikely to contribute to the neurosteroid potentiation binding site and probably affects the efficacy of potentiation. Thus, in keeping with the ability of neurosteroids to potentiate GABA currents via a broad variety of GABA(A) receptor isoforms in neurons, the potentiation site is structurally highly conserved on this important neurotransmitter receptor family.

  6. Mu opioid receptor binding sites in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pilapil, C.; Welner, S.; Magnan, J.; Zamir, N.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our experiments focused on the examination of the distribution of mu opioid receptor binding sites in normal human brain using the highly selective ligand (/sup 3/H)DAGO, in both membrane binding assay and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Mu opioid binding sites are very discretely distributed in human brain with high densities of sites found in the posterior amygdala, caudate, putamen, hypothalamus and certain cortical areas. Moreover the autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding sites clearly reveals the discrete lamination (layers I and III-IV) of mu sites in cortical areas.

  7. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  8. Extra-helical binding site of a glucagon receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Ali; Doré, Andrew S; Lamb, Daniel; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Southall, Stacey M; Baig, Asma H; Bortolato, Andrea; Koglin, Markus; Robertson, Nathan J; Errey, James C; Andrews, Stephen P; Teobald, Iryna; Brown, Alastair J H; Cooke, Robert M; Weir, Malcolm; Marshall, Fiona H

    2016-05-12

    Glucagon is a 29-amino-acid peptide released from the α-cells of the islet of Langerhans, which has a key role in glucose homeostasis. Glucagon action is transduced by the class B G-protein-coupled glucagon receptor (GCGR), which is located on liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart and pancreas cells, and this receptor has been considered an important drug target in the treatment of diabetes. Administration of recently identified small-molecule GCGR antagonists in patients with type 2 diabetes results in a substantial reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations. Although an X-ray structure of the transmembrane domain of the GCGR has previously been solved, the ligand (NNC0640) was not resolved. Here we report the 2.5 Å structure of human GCGR in complex with the antagonist MK-0893 (ref. 4), which is found to bind to an allosteric site outside the seven transmembrane (7TM) helical bundle in a position between TM6 and TM7 extending into the lipid bilayer. Mutagenesis of key residues identified in the X-ray structure confirms their role in the binding of MK-0893 to the receptor. The unexpected position of the binding site for MK-0893, which is structurally similar to other GCGR antagonists, suggests that glucagon activation of the receptor is prevented by restriction of the outward helical movement of TM6 required for G-protein coupling. Structural knowledge of class B receptors is limited, with only one other ligand-binding site defined--for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRF1R)--which was located deep within the 7TM bundle. We describe a completely novel allosteric binding site for class B receptors, providing an opportunity for structure-based drug design for this receptor class and furthering our understanding of the mechanisms of activation of these receptors. PMID:27111510

  9. Evidence for a second receptor binding site on human prolactin.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Struman, I; Mainfroid, V; Kinet, S; Martial, J A

    1994-12-23

    The existence of a second receptor binding site on human prolactin (hPRL) was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. First, 12 residues of helices 1 and 3 were mutated to alanine. Since none of the resulting mutants exhibit reduced bioactivity in the Nb2 cell proliferation bioassay, the mutated residues do not appear to be functionally necessary. Next, small residues surrounding the helix 1-helix 3 interface were replaced with Arg and/or Trp, the aim being to sterically hinder the second binding site. Several of these mutants exhibit only weak agonistic properties, supporting our hypothesis that the channel between helices 1 and 3 is involved in a second receptor binding site. We then analyzed the antagonistic and self-antagonistic properties of native hPRL and of several hPRLs analogs altered at binding site 1 or 2. Even at high concentrations (approximately 10 microM), no self-inhibition was observed with native hPRL; site 2 hPRL mutants self-antagonized while site 1 mutants did not. From these data, we propose a model of hPRL-PRL receptor interaction which slightly differs from that proposed earlier for the homologous human growth hormone (hGH) (Fuh, G., Cunningham, B. C., Fukunaga, R., Nagata, S., and Goeddel, D. V., and Well, J. A. (1992) Science 256, 1677-1680). Like hGH, hPRL would bind sequentially to two receptor molecules, first through site 1, then through site 2, but we would expect the two sites of hPRL to display, unlike the two binding sites of hGH, about the same binding affinity, thus preventing self-antagonism at high concentrations. PMID:7798264

  10. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general.

  11. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general. PMID:27310579

  12. Visualization of growth factor receptor sites in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Araujo, D.; Nair, N.P.; Chabot, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    It is now known that various growth factors may also act in the central nervous system. Among them, it has recently been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) may possess trophic effects in the mammalian brain. We report here on the respective autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 125/I)EGF and (/sup 125/I)IGF-I receptor binding sites in the rat brain, both during ontogeny and in adulthood. It appears that (/sup 125/I)EGF sites are mostly found in the rat forebrain during brain development. On the other hand, (/sup 125/I)IGF-I sites are more widely distributed both during ontogeny and in adulthood. These results reveal the plasticity of the expression of EGF and IGF-I receptor sites in the mammalian brain. This could be relevant for the respective role of these two growth factors in the development and maintenance of neuronal function.

  13. A Procedure for Preparing Models of Receptor Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, D. Eric; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses ways that chemists have traditionally used models to represent chemical structures. Suggests new ways to construct three-dimensional models of receptor sites using thermoplastics or heavy aluminum foil. Provides sketches and photographs of several models. Points out the advantages of using such models over traditional two-dimensional…

  14. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Regulating sst3 Somatostatin Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Günther, Thomas; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The human somatostatin receptor 3 (sst3) is expressed in about 50% of all neuroendocrine tumors and hence a promising target for multireceptor somatostatin analogs. The sst3 receptor is unique among ssts in that it exhibits a very long intracellular C-terminal tail containing a huge number of potential phosphate acceptor sites. Consequently, our knowledge about the functional role of the C-terminal tail in sst3 receptor regulation is very limited. Here, we have generated a series of phosphorylation-deficient mutants that enabled us to determine crucial sites for its agonist-induced β-arrestin mobilization, internalization, and down-regulation. Based on this information, we generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for C-terminal Ser(337)/Thr(341), Thr(348), and Ser(361) that enabled us to investigate the temporal patterns of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We found that the endogenous ligand somatostatin induced a rapid and robust phosphorylation that was completely blocked by the sst3 antagonist NVP-ACQ090. The stable somatostatin analogs pasireotide and octreotide promoted clearly less phosphorylation compared with somatostatin. We also show that sst3 phosphorylation occurred within seconds to minutes, whereas dephosphorylation of the sst3 receptor occurred at a considerable slower rate. In addition, we also identified G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 and protein phosphatase 1α and 1β as key regulators of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Thus, we here define the C-terminal phosphorylation motif of the human sst3 receptor that regulates its agonist-promoted phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and internalization of this clinically relevant receptor.

  15. Functional differences between neurotransmitter binding sites of muscle acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Bruhova, Iva; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Gupta, Shaweta; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    A muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has two neurotransmitter binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αε (adult) or αγ (fetal) subunit interfaces. We used single-channel electrophysiology to measure the effects of mutations of five conserved aromatic residues at each site with regard to their contribution to the difference in free energy of agonist binding to active versus resting receptors (ΔGB1). The two binding sites behave independently in both adult and fetal AChRs. For four different agonists, including ACh and choline, ΔGB1 is ∼-2 kcal/mol more favorable at αγ compared with at αε and αδ. Only three of the aromatics contribute significantly to ΔGB1 at the adult sites (αY190, αY198, and αW149), but all five do so at αγ (as well as αY93 and γW55). γW55 makes a particularly large contribution only at αγ that is coupled energetically to those contributions of some of the α-subunit aromatics. The hydroxyl and benzene groups of loop C residues αY190 and αY198 behave similarly with regard to ΔGB1 at all three kinds of site. ACh binding energies estimated from molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with experimental values from electrophysiology and suggest that the αγ site is more compact, better organized, and less dynamic than αε and αδ. We speculate that the different sensitivities of the fetal αγ site versus the adult αε and αδ sites to choline and ACh are important for the proper maturation and function of the neuromuscular synapse. PMID:25422413

  16. Application of phosphorylation site-specific antibodies to measure nuclear receptor signaling: characterization of novel phosphoantibodies for estrogen receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dhaheri, Mariam H.; Rowan, Brian G.

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of posttranslational events in nuclear receptor signaling is crucial for drug design and clinical therapeutic strategies. Phosphorylation is a well-characterized posttranslational modification that regulates subcellular localization and function of nuclear receptors and coregulators. Although the role of single phosphorylation sites in nuclear receptor function has been described, the contribution of combinations of multiple phosphorylation sites to receptor function remains unclear. The development of phosphoantibodies to each phosphorylation site in a nuclear receptor is a powerful tool to address the role of phosphorylation in multiply phosphorylated receptors. However, phosphoantibodies must be rigorously validated prior to use. This review describes the general methodology for design, characterization and validation of phosphoantibodies using the example of eight phosphoantibodies raised against phosphorylation sites in estrogen receptor α (ERα). PMID:16741565

  17. Binding of type II nuclear receptors and estrogen receptor to full and half-site estrogen response elements in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, C M; Bodenner, D L; Desai, D; Niles, R M; Traish, A M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism by which retinoids, thyroid hormone (T3) and estrogens modulate the growth of breast cancer cells is unclear. Since nuclear type II nuclear receptors, including retinoic acid receptor (RAR), retinoid X receptor (RXR) and thyroid hormone receptor (TR), bind direct repeats (DR) of the estrogen response elements (ERE) half-site (5'-AGGTCA-3'), we examined the ability of estrogen receptor (ER) versus type II nuclear receptors, i.e. RARalpha, beta and gamma, RXRbeta, TRalpha and TRbeta, to bind various EREs in vitro . ER bound a consensus ERE, containing a perfectly palindromic 17 bp inverted repeat (IR), as a homodimer. In contrast, ER did not bind to a single ERE half-site. Likewise, ER did not bind two tandem (38 bp apart) half-sites, but low ER binding was detected to three tandem copies of the same half-site. RARalpha,beta or gamma bound both ERE and half-site constructs as a homodimer. RXRbeta did not bind full or half-site EREs, nor did RXRbeta enhance RARalpha binding to a full ERE. However, RARalpha and RXRbeta bound a half-site ERE cooperatively forming a dimeric complex. The RARalpha-RXRbeta heterodimer bound the Xenopus vitellogenin B1 estrogen responsive unit, with two non-consensus EREs, with higher affinity than one or two copies of the full or half-site ERE. Both TRalpha and TRbeta bound the full and the half-site ERE as monomers and homodimers and cooperatively as heterodimers with RXRbeta. We suggest that the cellular concentrations of nuclear receptors and their ligands, and the nature of the ERE or half-site sequence and those of its flanking sequences determine the occupation of EREs in estrogen-regulated genes in vivo . PMID:9115356

  18. Substance P receptor binding sites are expressed by glia in vivo after neuronal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyh, P.W.; Johnson, D.J.; Boehmer, C.G.; Catton, M.D.; Vinters, H.V.; Maggio, J.E.; Too, Hengphon; Vigna, S.R. )

    1989-07-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, the authors examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were examined. Specific receptor binding sites for each of these neurotransmitters were identified in the rabbit forebrain but were not detected in the normal optic nerve or tract. In the transected optic nerve and tract, only receptor binding sites for substance P were expressed at detectable levels. The density of substance P receptor binding sites observed in this glial scar is among the highest observed in the rabbit forebrain. Ligand displacement and saturation experiments indicate that the substance P receptor binding site expressed by the glial scar has pharmacological characteristics similar to those of substance P receptors in the rabbit striatum, rat brain, and rat and canine gut. The present study demonstrates that glial cells in vivo express high concentrations of substance P receptor binding sites after transection of retinal ganglion cell axons. Because substance P has been shown to regulate inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues, substance P may also, by analogy, be involved in regulating the glial response to injury in the central nervous system.

  19. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 reporter mice reveal receptor activation sites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Mari; Tucker, Ana E.; Tran, Jennifer; Bergner, Jennifer B.; Turner, Ewa M.; Proia, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the GPCR sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates key physiological processes. S1P1 activation also has been implicated in pathologic processes, including autoimmunity and inflammation; however, the in vivo sites of S1P1 activation under normal and disease conditions are unclear. Here, we describe the development of a mouse model that allows in vivo evaluation of S1P1 activation. These mice, known as S1P1 GFP signaling mice, produce a S1P1 fusion protein containing a transcription factor linked by a protease cleavage site at the C terminus as well as a β-arrestin/protease fusion protein. Activated S1P1 recruits the β-arrestin/protease, resulting in the release of the transcription factor, which stimulates the expression of a GFP reporter gene. Under normal conditions, S1P1 was activated in endothelial cells of lymphoid tissues and in cells in the marginal zone of the spleen, while administration of an S1P1 agonist promoted S1P1 activation in endothelial cells and hepatocytes. In S1P1 GFP signaling mice, LPS-mediated systemic inflammation activated S1P1 in endothelial cells and hepatocytes via hematopoietically derived S1P. These data demonstrate that S1P1 GFP signaling mice can be used to evaluate S1P1 activation and S1P1-active compounds in vivo. Furthermore, this strategy could be potentially applied to any GPCR to identify sites of receptor activation during normal physiology and disease. PMID:24667638

  20. Phosphorylation Site Dynamics of Early T-cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T. G.; Hu, Bin; Hlavacek, William S.; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2014-01-01

    In adaptive immune responses, T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling impacts multiple cellular processes and results in T-cell differentiation, proliferation, and cytokine production. Although individual protein–protein interactions and phosphorylation events have been studied extensively, we lack a systems-level understanding of how these components cooperate to control signaling dynamics, especially during the crucial first seconds of stimulation. Here, we used quantitative proteomics to characterize reshaping of the T-cell phosphoproteome in response to TCR/CD28 co-stimulation, and found that diverse dynamic patterns emerge within seconds. We detected phosphorylation dynamics as early as 5 s and observed widespread regulation of key TCR signaling proteins by 30 s. Development of a computational model pointed to the presence of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling phosphorylation of sites with central roles in TCR signaling. The model was used to generate predictions suggesting unexpected roles for the phosphatase PTPN6 (SHP-1) and shortcut recruitment of the actin regulator WAS. Predictions were validated experimentally. This integration of proteomics and modeling illustrates a novel, generalizable framework for solidifying quantitative understanding of a signaling network and for elucidating missing links. PMID:25147952

  1. Elimination of a ligand gating site generates a supersensitive olfactory receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kanika; Ahuja, Gaurav; Hussain, Ashiq; Balfanz, Sabine; Baumann, Arnd; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2016-01-01

    Olfaction poses one of the most complex ligand-receptor matching problems in biology due to the unparalleled multitude of odor molecules facing a large number of cognate olfactory receptors. We have recently deorphanized an olfactory receptor, TAAR13c, as a specific receptor for the death-associated odor cadaverine. Here we have modeled the cadaverine/TAAR13c interaction, exchanged predicted binding residues by site-directed mutagenesis, and measured the activity of the mutant receptors. Unexpectedly we observed a binding site for cadaverine at the external surface of the receptor, in addition to an internal binding site, whose mutation resulted in complete loss of activity. In stark contrast, elimination of the external binding site generated supersensitive receptors. Modeling suggests this site to act as a gate, limiting access of the ligand to the internal binding site and thereby downregulating the affinity of the native receptor. This constitutes a novel mechanism to fine-tune physiological sensitivity to socially relevant odors. PMID:27323929

  2. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes. PMID:17168764

  3. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes.

  4. Virtual Screening of Receptor Sites for Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ferdia; Cela-Pérez, María Concepción; Karim, Kal; Piletsky, Sergey; López-Vilariño, José Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) are highly advantageous in the field of analytical chemistry. However, interference from secondary molecules can also impede capture of a target by a MIP receptor. This greatly complicates the design process and often requires extensive laboratory screening which is time consuming, costly, and creates substantial waste products. Herein, is presented a new technique for screening of "virtually imprinted receptors" for rebinding of the molecular template as well as secondary structures, correlating the virtual predictions with experimentally acquired data in three case studies. This novel technique is particularly applicable to the evaluation and prediction of MIP receptor specificity and efficiency in complex aqueous systems. PMID:27076379

  5. Structural Studies of GABAA Receptor Binding Sites: Which Experimental Structure Tells us What?

    PubMed Central

    Puthenkalam, Roshan; Hieckel, Marcel; Simeone, Xenia; Suwattanasophon, Chonticha; Feldbauer, Roman V.; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Ernst, Margot

    2016-01-01

    Atomic resolution structures of cys-loop receptors, including one of a γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA receptor) subtype, allow amazing insights into the structural features and conformational changes that these pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) display. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of more than 30 cys-loop receptor structures of homologous proteins that revealed several allosteric binding sites not previously described in GABAA receptors. These novel binding sites were examined in GABAA receptor homology models and assessed as putative candidate sites for allosteric ligands. Four so far undescribed putative ligand binding sites were proposed for follow up studies based on their presence in the GABAA receptor homology models. A comprehensive analysis of conserved structural features in GABAA and glycine receptors (GlyRs), the glutamate gated ion channel, the bacterial homologs Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) and Gloeobacter violaceus GLIC, and the serotonin type 3 (5-HT3) receptor was performed. The conserved features were integrated into a master alignment that led to improved homology models. The large fragment of the intracellular domain that is present in the structure of the 5-HT3 receptor was utilized to generate GABAA receptor models with a corresponding intracellular domain fragment. Results of mutational and photoaffinity ligand studies in GABAA receptors were analyzed in the light of the model structures. This led to an assignment of candidate ligands to two proposed novel pockets, candidate binding sites for furosemide and neurosteroids in the trans-membrane domain were identified. The homology models can serve as hypotheses generators, and some previously controversial structural interpretations of biochemical data can be resolved in the light of the presented multi-template approach to comparative modeling. Crystal and cryo-EM microscopic structures of the closest homologs that were solved in different conformational

  6. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  7. Defining the functional binding sites of interleukin 12 receptor β1 and interleukin 23 receptor to Janus kinases.

    PubMed

    Floss, Doreen M; Klöcker, Tobias; Schröder, Jutta; Lamertz, Larissa; Mrotzek, Simone; Strobl, Birgit; Hermanns, Heike; Scheller, Jürgen

    2016-07-15

    The interleukin (IL)-12-type cytokines IL-12 and IL-23 are involved in T-helper (Th) 1 and Th17 immunity, respectively. They share the IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) as one component of their receptor signaling complexes, with IL-12Rβ2 as second receptor for IL-12 and IL-23R for IL-23 signal transduction. Stimulation with IL-12 and IL-23 results in activation of receptor-associated Janus kinases (Jak) and phosphorylation of STAT proteins in target cells. The Janus kinase tyrosine kinase (Tyk) 2 associates with IL-12Rβ1, whereas Jak2 binds to IL-23R and also to IL-12Rβ2. Receptor association of Jak2 is mediated by Box1 and Box2 motifs located within the intracellular domain of the receptor chains. Here we define the Box1 and Box2 motifs in IL-12Rβ1 and an unusual Jak2-binding site in IL-23R by the use of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis. Our data show that nonfunctional box motifs abolish IL-12- and IL-23-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and cytokine-dependent proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation of Tyk2 by IL-12Rβ1 and Jak2 by IL‑23R supported these findings. In addition, our data demonstrate that association of Jak2 with IL-23R is mandatory for IL-12 and/or IL-23 signaling, whereas Tyk2 seems to be dispensable.

  8. Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Binding Sites in the Brain: Regulation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Rochelle D.; Kellar, Kenneth J.

    1983-04-01

    Tritiated acetylcholine was used to measure binding sites with characteristics of nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Regulation of the binding sites in vivo was examined by administering two drugs that stimulate nicotinic receptors directly or indirectly. After 10 days of exposure to the cholinesterase inhibitor diisopropyl fluorophosphate, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cerebral cortex was decreased. However, after repeated administration of nicotine for 10 days, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cortex was increased. Saturation analysis of tritiated acetylcholine binding in the cortices of rats treated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate or nicotine indicated that the number of binding sites decreased and increased, respectively, while the affinity of the sites was unaltered.

  9. Novel Electrophilic and Photoaffinity Covalent Probes for Mapping the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable side effects associated with orthosteric agonists/antagonists of cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), a tractable target for treating several pathologies affecting humans, have greatly limited their translational potential. Recent discovery of CB1R negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has renewed interest in CB1R by offering a potentially safer therapeutic avenue. To elucidate the CB1R allosteric binding motif and thereby facilitate rational drug discovery, we report the synthesis and biochemical characterization of first covalent ligands designed to bind irreversibly to the CB1R allosteric site. Either an electrophilic or a photoactivatable group was introduced at key positions of two classical CB1R NAMs: Org27569 (1) and PSNCBAM-1 (2). Among these, 20 (GAT100) emerged as the most potent NAM in functional assays, did not exhibit inverse agonism, and behaved as a robust positive allosteric modulator of binding of orthosteric agonist CP55,940. This novel covalent probe can serve as a useful tool for characterizing CB1R allosteric ligand-binding motifs. PMID:26529344

  10. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-05-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, (/sup 3/H) dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for (/sup 3/H) (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin and (3H)ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites.

  11. Identification of a gp130 cytokine receptor critical site involved in oncostatin M response.

    PubMed

    Olivier, C; Auguste, P; Chabbert, M; Lelièvre, E; Chevalier, S; Gascan, H

    2000-02-25

    Gp130 cytokine receptor is involved in the formation of multimeric functional receptors for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-11, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM), ciliary neurotrophic factor, and cardiotrophin-1. Cloning of the epitope recognized by an OSM-neutralizing anti-gp130 monoclonal antibody identified a portion of gp130 receptor localized in the EF loop of the cytokine binding domain. Site-directed mutagenesis of the corresponding region was carried out by alanine substitution of residues 186-198. To generate type 1 or type 2 OSM receptors, gp130 mutants were expressed together with either LIF receptor beta or OSM receptor beta. When positions Val-189/Tyr-190 and Phe-191/Val-192 were alanine-substituted, Scatchard analyses indicated a complete abrogation of OSM binding to both type receptors. Interestingly, binding of LIF to type 1 receptor was not affected, corroborating the notion that in this case gp130 mostly behaves as a converter protein rather than a binding receptor. The present study demonstrates that positions 189-192 of gp130 cytokine binding domain are essential for OSM binding to both gp130/LIF receptor beta and gp130/OSM receptor beta heterocomplexes. PMID:10681548

  12. Identification and Functional Characterization of the Phosphorylation Sites of the Neuropeptide FF2 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Lauriane; Froment, Carine; Pardo, Pierre; Candotto, Cédric; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine; Moulédous, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide FF2 (NPFF2) receptor belongs to the rhodopsin family of G protein-coupled receptors and mediates the effects of several related RFamide neuropeptides. One of the main pharmacological interests of this system resides in its ability to regulate endogenous opioid systems, making it a potential target to reduce the negative effects of chronic opioid use. Phosphorylation of intracellular residues is the most extensively studied post-translational modification regulating G protein-coupled receptor activity. However, until now, no information concerning NPFF2 receptor phosphorylation is available. In this study, we combined mass spectrometric analysis and site-directed mutagenesis to analyze for the first time the phosphorylation pattern of the NPFF2 receptor and the role of the various phosphorylation sites in receptor signaling, desensitization, and trafficking in a SH-SY5Y model cell line. We identified the major, likely GRK-dependent, phosphorylation cluster responsible for acute desensitization, 412TNST415 at the end of the C terminus of the receptor, and additional sites involved in desensitization (372TS373) and internalization (Ser395). We thus demonstrate the key role played by phosphorylation in the regulation of NPFF2 receptor activity and trafficking. Our data also provide additional evidence supporting the concept that desensitization and internalization are partially independent processes relying on distinct phosphorylation patterns. PMID:25326382

  13. Metal binding sites of the estradiol receptor from calf uterus and their possible role in the regulation of receptor function

    SciTech Connect

    Medici, N.; Minucci, S.; Nigro, V.; Abbondanza, C.; Armetta, I.; Molinari, A.M.; Puca, G.A. )

    1989-01-10

    The existence of putative metal binding sites on the estradiol receptor (ER) molecule from calf uterus was evaluated by immobilizing various divalent metals to iminodiacetate-Sepharose. ER from both crude and highly purified preparations binds to metal-containing adsorbents complexed with Zn(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Cu(II), but not to those complexed with Fe(II) and Cd(II). Analysis of affinity-labeled ER by ({sup 3}H)tamoxifen aziridine after elution from a column of Zn(II)-charged iminodiacetate-Sepharose showed that ER fragments obtained by extensive trypsinization were also bound. Zn(II) and the same other metals able to bind ER, when immobilized on resins, inhibit the binding of estradiol to the receptor at micromolar concentration. This inhibition is noncompetitive and can be reversed by EDTA. The inhibition of the hormone binding was still present after trypsin treatment of the cytosol, and it was abolished by preincubation with the hormone. Micromolar concentrations of these metals were able to block those chemical-physical changes occurring during the process of ER transformation in vitro. The presence of metal binding sites that modulate the ER activity in the hormone binding domain of ER is speculated. Since progesterone receptor showed the same pattern of binding and elution from metal-containing adsorbents, the presence of metal binding regulatory sites could be a property of all steroid receptors.

  14. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  15. Quantitative nanoscopy of inhibitory synapses: counting gephyrin molecules and receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Specht, Christian G; Izeddin, Ignacio; Rodriguez, Pamela C; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Rostaing, Philippe; Darzacq, Xavier; Dahan, Maxime; Triller, Antoine

    2013-07-24

    The strength of synaptic transmission is controlled by the number and activity of neurotransmitter receptors. However, little is known about absolute numbers and densities of receptor and scaffold proteins and the stoichiometry of molecular interactions at synapses. Here, we conducted three-dimensional and quantitative nanoscopic imaging based on single-molecule detections to characterize the ultrastructure of inhibitory synapses and to count scaffold proteins and receptor binding sites. We observed a close correspondence between the spatial organization of gephyrin scaffolds and glycine receptors at spinal cord synapses. Endogenous gephyrin was clustered at densities of 5,000-10,000 molecules/μm(2). The stoichiometry between gephyrin molecules and receptor binding sites was approximately 1:1, consistent with a two-dimensional scaffold in which all gephyrin molecules can contribute to receptor binding. The competition of glycine and GABAA receptor complexes for synaptic binding sites highlights the potential of single-molecule imaging to quantify synaptic plasticity on the nanoscopic scale.

  16. Biochemical study of multiple drug recognition sites on central benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Trifiletti, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor complex of mammalian brain possesses recognition sites which mediate (at least in part) the pharmacologic actions of the 1,4-benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Evidence is provided suggesting the existence of least seven distinct drug recognition sites on this complex. Interactions between the various recognition sites have been explored using radioligand binding techniques. This information is utilized to provide a comprehensive scheme for characterizing receptor-active drugs on an anxiolytic-anticonvulsant/proconvulsant continuum using radioligand binding techniques, as well as a comprehensive program for identifying potential endogenous receptor-active substances. Further evidence is provided here supporting the notion of benzodiazepine recognition site heterogeneity. Classical 1,4-benzodiazepines do not appear to differentiate two populations of benzodiazepine receptors in an equilibrium sense, but appear to do so in a kinetic sense. An apparent physical separation of the two receptor subtypes can be achieved by differential solubilization. The benzodiazepine binding subunit can be identified by photoaffinity labeling with the benzodiazepine agonist (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepan. Conditions for reproducible partial proteolytic mapping of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled receptors are established. From these maps, it is concluded that there are probably no major differences in the primary sequence of the benzodiazepine binding subunit in various regions of the rat central nervous system.

  17. New paradigms in chemokine receptor signal transduction: Moving beyond the two-site model.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Andrew B; Getschman, Anthony E; Ziarek, Joshua J; Nevins, Amanda M; Gauthier, Pierre-Arnaud; Chevigné, Andy; Szpakowska, Martyna; Volkman, Brian F

    2016-08-15

    Chemokine receptor (CKR) signaling forms the basis of essential immune cellular functions, and dysregulated CKR signaling underpins numerous disease processes of the immune system and beyond. CKRs, which belong to the seven transmembrane domain receptor (7TMR) superfamily, initiate signaling upon binding of endogenous, secreted chemokine ligands. Chemokine-CKR interactions are traditionally described by a two-step/two-site mechanism, in which the CKR N-terminus recognizes the chemokine globular core (i.e. site 1 interaction), followed by activation when the unstructured chemokine N-terminus is inserted into the receptor TM bundle (i.e. site 2 interaction). Several recent studies challenge the structural independence of sites 1 and 2 by demonstrating physical and allosteric links between these supposedly separate sites. Others contest the functional independence of these sites, identifying nuanced roles for site 1 and other interactions in CKR activation. These developments emerge within a rapidly changing landscape in which CKR signaling is influenced by receptor PTMs, chemokine and CKR dimerization, and endogenous non-chemokine ligands. Simultaneous advances in the structural and functional characterization of 7TMR biased signaling have altered how we understand promiscuous chemokine-CKR interactions. In this review, we explore new paradigms in CKR signal transduction by considering studies that depict a more intricate architecture governing the consequences of chemokine-CKR interactions. PMID:27106080

  18. New paradigms in chemokine receptor signal transduction: Moving beyond the two-site model.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Andrew B; Getschman, Anthony E; Ziarek, Joshua J; Nevins, Amanda M; Gauthier, Pierre-Arnaud; Chevigné, Andy; Szpakowska, Martyna; Volkman, Brian F

    2016-08-15

    Chemokine receptor (CKR) signaling forms the basis of essential immune cellular functions, and dysregulated CKR signaling underpins numerous disease processes of the immune system and beyond. CKRs, which belong to the seven transmembrane domain receptor (7TMR) superfamily, initiate signaling upon binding of endogenous, secreted chemokine ligands. Chemokine-CKR interactions are traditionally described by a two-step/two-site mechanism, in which the CKR N-terminus recognizes the chemokine globular core (i.e. site 1 interaction), followed by activation when the unstructured chemokine N-terminus is inserted into the receptor TM bundle (i.e. site 2 interaction). Several recent studies challenge the structural independence of sites 1 and 2 by demonstrating physical and allosteric links between these supposedly separate sites. Others contest the functional independence of these sites, identifying nuanced roles for site 1 and other interactions in CKR activation. These developments emerge within a rapidly changing landscape in which CKR signaling is influenced by receptor PTMs, chemokine and CKR dimerization, and endogenous non-chemokine ligands. Simultaneous advances in the structural and functional characterization of 7TMR biased signaling have altered how we understand promiscuous chemokine-CKR interactions. In this review, we explore new paradigms in CKR signal transduction by considering studies that depict a more intricate architecture governing the consequences of chemokine-CKR interactions.

  19. Defining the functional binding sites of interleukin 12 receptor β1 and interleukin 23 receptor to Janus kinases

    PubMed Central

    Floss, Doreen M.; Klöcker, Tobias; Schröder, Jutta; Lamertz, Larissa; Mrotzek, Simone; Strobl, Birgit; Hermanns, Heike; Scheller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-12–type cytokines IL-12 and IL-23 are involved in T-helper (Th) 1 and Th17 immunity, respectively. They share the IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) as one component of their receptor signaling complexes, with IL-12Rβ2 as second receptor for IL-12 and IL-23R for IL-23 signal transduction. Stimulation with IL-12 and IL-23 results in activation of receptor-associated Janus kinases (Jak) and phosphorylation of STAT proteins in target cells. The Janus kinase tyrosine kinase (Tyk) 2 associates with IL-12Rβ1, whereas Jak2 binds to IL-23R and also to IL-12Rβ2. Receptor association of Jak2 is mediated by Box1 and Box2 motifs located within the intracellular domain of the receptor chains. Here we define the Box1 and Box2 motifs in IL-12Rβ1 and an unusual Jak2-binding site in IL-23R by the use of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis. Our data show that nonfunctional box motifs abolish IL-12– and IL-23–induced STAT3 phosphorylation and cytokine-dependent proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation of Tyk2 by IL-12Rβ1 and Jak2 by IL‑23R supported these findings. In addition, our data demonstrate that association of Jak2 with IL-23R is mandatory for IL-12 and/or IL-23 signaling, whereas Tyk2 seems to be dispensable. PMID:27193299

  20. Identification of a new hormone-binding site on the surface of thyroid hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Souza, P C T; Puhl, A C; Martínez, L; Aparício, R; Nascimento, A S; Figueira, A C M; Nguyen, P; Webb, P; Skaf, M S; Polikarpov, I

    2014-04-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors involved in cell differentiation, growth, and homeostasis. Although X-ray structures of many nuclear receptor ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal that the ligand binds within the hydrophobic core of the ligand-binding pocket, a few studies suggest the possibility of ligands binding to other sites. Here, we report a new x-ray crystallographic structure of TR-LBD that shows a second binding site for T3 and T4 located between H9, H10, and H11 of the TRα LBD surface. Statistical multiple sequence analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and cell transactivation assays indicate that residues of the second binding site could be important for the TR function. We also conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate ligand mobility and ligand-protein interaction for T3 and T4 bound to this new TR surface-binding site. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations designed to compute ligand-protein dissociation constant indicate that the binding affinities to this surface site are of the order of the plasma and intracellular concentrations of the thyroid hormones, suggesting that ligands may bind to this new binding site under physiological conditions. Therefore, the second binding site could be useful as a new target site for drug design and could modulate selectively TR functions.

  1. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response.

  2. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  3. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.whittaker@case.edu

    2006-08-18

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the {alpha} subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K {sub d} of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site.

  4. Multiple binding sites in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: An opportunity for polypharmacolgy.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bermudez, Isabel; Varas, Rodrigo; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    For decades, the development of selective compounds has been the main goal for chemists and biologists involved in drug discovery. However, diverse lines of evidence indicate that polypharmacological agents, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, might show better profiles than selective ligands, regarding both efficacy and side effects. On the other hand, the availability of the crystal structure of different receptors allows a detailed analysis of the main interactions between drugs and receptors in a specific binding site. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute a large and diverse family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that, as a product of its modulation, regulate neurotransmitter release, which in turns produce a global neuromodulation of the central nervous system. nAChRs are pentameric protein complexes in such a way that expression of compatible subunits can lead to various receptor assemblies or subtypes. The agonist binding site, located at the extracellular region, exhibits different properties depending on the subunits that conform the receptor. In the last years, it has been recognized that nAChRs could also contain one or more allosteric sites which could bind non-classical nicotinic ligands including several therapeutically useful drugs. The presence of multiple binding sites in nAChRs offers an interesting possibility for the development of novel polypharmacological agents with a wide spectrum of actions. PMID:26318763

  5. Binding-site analysis of opioid receptors using monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Structural relatedness between the variable region of anti-ligand antibodies and opioid binding sites allowed the generation of anti-idiotypic antibodies which recognized opioid receptors. The IgG{sub 3}k antibodies which bound to opioid receptors were obtained when an anti-morphine antiserum was the idiotype. Both antibodies bound to opioid receptors, but only one of these blocked the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone. The antibody which did not inhibit the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone was itself displaced from the receptor by opioid ligands. The unique binding properties displayed by this antibody indicated that anti-idiotypic antibodies are not always a perfect image of the original ligand, and therefore may be more useful than typical ligands as probes for the receptor. An auto-anti-idiotypic technique was successfully used to obtain anti-opioid receptor antibodies. Another IgG{sub 3}k antibody that blocked the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone to rat brain opioid receptors was obtained when a mouse was immunized with naloxone conjugated to bovine serum albumin. These data confirmed that an idiotype-anti-idiotype network which can generate an anti-receptor antibody normally functions when an opioid ligand is introduced into an animal in an immunogenic form.

  6. Import pathways of precursor proteins into mitochondria: multiple receptor sites are followed by a common membrane insertion site

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The precursor of porin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, competes for the import of precursors destined for the three other mitochondrial compartments, including the Fe/S protein of the bc1- complex (intermembrane space), the ADP/ATP carrier (inner membrane), subunit 9 of the F0-ATPase (inner membrane), and subunit beta of the F1- ATPase (matrix). Competition occurs at the level of a common site at which precursors are inserted into the outer membrane. Protease- sensitive binding sites, which act before the common insertion site, appear to be responsible for the specificity and selectivity of mitochondrial protein uptake. We suggest that distinct receptor proteins on the mitochondrial surface specifically recognize precursor proteins and transfer them to a general insertion protein component (GIP) in the outer membrane. Beyond GIP, the import pathways diverge, either to the outer membrane or to translocation contact-sites, and then subsequently to the other mitochondrial compartments. PMID:2974457

  7. Receptor modelling of secondary particulate matter at UK sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charron, A.; Degrendele, C.; Laongsri, B.; Harrison, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    Complementary approaches have been taken to better understand the sources and their spatial distribution for secondary inorganic (nitrate and sulphate) and secondary organic aerosol sampled at a rural site (Harwell) in the southern United Kingdom. A concentration field map method was applied to 1581 daily samples of chloride, nitrate and sulphate from 2006 to 2010, and 982 samples for organic carbon and elemental carbon from 2007 to 2010. This revealed a rather similar pattern of sources for nitrate, sulphate and secondary organic carbon within western/central Europe, which in the case of nitrate and sulphate, correlated significantly with EMEP emissions maps of NOx and SO2. A slightly more southerly source emphasis for secondary organic carbon may reflect the contribution of biogenic sources. Trajectory clusters confirm this pattern of behaviour with a major contribution from mainland European sources. Similar behaviours of, on the one hand, sulphate and organic carbon and, on the other hand, EC and nitrate showed that the former are more subject to regional influence than the latter in agreement with the slower atmospheric formation of sulphate and secondary organic aerosol than for nitrate, and the local/mesoscale influences upon primary EC. In a separate study, measurements of sulphate, nitrate, elemental and organic carbon were made in 100 simultaneously collected samples at Harwell and at a suburban site in Birmingham (UK). This showed a significant correlation in concentrations between the two sites for all of the secondary constituents, further indicating secondary organic aerosol to be a regional pollutant behaving similarly to sulphate and nitrate.

  8. Identification of drugs competing with d-tubocurarine for an allosteric site on cardiac muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M

    1994-10-01

    d-Tubocurarine behaved as a weak allosteric inhibitor of N-[3H] methylscopolamine binding to cardiac M2 muscarinic receptors. In a low ionic strength buffer devoid of bivalent ions, d-tubocurarine recognized cardiac M2 receptors in the micromolar concentration range and decreased their affinity for N-[3H]methylscopolamine by at most 4-fold. To identify the compounds that preferentially recognize this accessory site (as opposed to the classical muscarinic binding site), we measured the inhibition by different drugs of N-[3H]methylscopolamine binding, in the absence or presence of d-tubocurarine. The effect of gallamine was competitively inhibited by d-tubocurarine; both drugs compete for the same accessory site on muscarinic receptors. The effects of dexetimide, levetimide, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-ethylpiperidine ethobromide, AF-DX 116, and telenzepine on N-[3H]methylscopolamine binding were not affected or were barely affected by d-tubocurarine; these compounds preferentially recognize another binding site (probably the muscarinic binding site). The dose-effect curves for pentamethylene-bis(4-diphenylacetoxymethylpiperidine) bromide and methoctramine were shifted, but at most 10-fold, by d-tubocurarine. It is likely that (in this low ionic strength incubation buffer) methoctramine and pentamethylene-bis(4-diphenylacetoxymethylpiperidine)bromide had comparable affinities for the muscarinic site and the accessory site. d-Tubocurarine competitively inhibited their binding to the accessory site and allosterically inhibited their binding to the muscarinic site. This resulted in a large decrease (40-60-fold) of their overall affinity for muscarinic receptors. PMID:7969047

  9. Distinct ETA Receptor Binding Mode of Macitentan As Determined by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ETA receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ETA receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ETA receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ETA receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ETA receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ETA receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that – in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan - macitentan-ETA receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable antagonism. PMID

  10. Distinct ETA receptor binding mode of macitentan as determined by site directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ET(A) receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ET(A) receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ET(A) receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ET(A) receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ET(A) receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ET(A) receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that--in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan--macitentan-ET(A) receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable

  11. The first intron of the human growth hormone gene contains a binding site for glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, D D; Marks, A R; Buckley, D I; Kapler, G; Payvar, F; Goodman, H M

    1985-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) protein stimulates transcription from a variety of cellular genes. We show here that GCR partially purified from rat liver binds specifically to a site within the first intron of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene, approximately 100 base pairs downstream from the start of hGH transcription. GCR binding is selectively inhibited by methylation of two short, symmetrically arranged clusters of guanine residues within this site. A cloned synthetic 24-base-pair deoxyoligonucleotide containing the predicted GCR binding sequence interacts specifically with GCR. The hGH binding site shares sequence homology with a GCR binding site upstream from the human metallothionein II gene and a subset of GCR binding sites from mouse mammary tumor virus. All of these binding sites for this eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory protein show remarkable similarity in overall geometry to the binding sites for several prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory proteins. Images PMID:2983311

  12. The interaction site for tamoxifen aziridine with the bovine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ratajczak, T.; Wilkinson, S.P.; Brockway, M.J.; Haehnel, R.M.; Moritz, R.L.; Begg, G.S.; Simpson, R.J.

    1989-08-15

    Calf uterine estrogen receptor was covalently labeled with ({sup 3}H)tamoxifen aziridine during affinity chromatography purification. After carboxymethylation, affinity labeled receptor was digested with trypsin under limit conditions and the labeled peptides were fractionated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography into one major and two minor components. Sequence analysis of the dominant labeled fragment indicated the facile cleavage of label during Edman degradation but identified two peptides, both derived from the extreme carboxyl terminus of the steroid-binding domain. The 17 residues of one peptide were fully conserved in all estrogen receptors. This fragment contained five nucleophilic amino acids and was considered as the more favored interaction site for tamoxifen aziridine. A corresponding region of the glucocorticoid receptor has recently been identified as one of three major contact sites for glucocorticoids. A comparison of amino acid physical characteristics in the hormone-binding domains of human estrogen and glucocorticoid receptors demonstrated an excellent structural correlation between the two regions and delineated elements in the estrogen receptor which may be directly involved in estradiol binding.

  13. Two Affinity Sites of the Cannabinoid Subtype 2 Receptor Identified by a Novel Homogeneous Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Rabal, Obdulia; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Zamarbide, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Sánchez-Arias, Juan A; de Miguel, Irene; Lanciego, José L; Oyarzabal, Julen; Franco, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Endocannabinoids act on G protein-coupled receptors that are considered potential targets for a variety of diseases. There are two different cannabinoid receptor types: ligands for cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2Rs) show more promise than those for cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) because they lack psychotropic actions. However, the complex pharmacology of these receptors, coupled with the lipophilic nature of ligands, is delaying the translational success of medications targeting the endocannabinoid system. We here report the discovery and synthesis of a fluorophore-conjugated CB2R-selective compound, CM-157 (3-[[4-[2-tert-butyl-1-(tetrahydropyran-4-ylmethyl)benzimidazol-5-yl]sulfonyl-2-pyridyl]oxy]propan-1-amine), which was useful for pharmacological characterization of CB2R by using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. This methodology does not require radiolabeled compounds and may be undertaken in homogeneous conditions and in living cells (i.e., without the need to isolate receptor-containing membranes). The affinity of the labeled compound was similar to that of the unlabeled molecule. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays disclosed a previously unreported second affinity site and showed conformational changes in CB2R forming receptor heteromers with G protein-coupled receptor GPR55, a receptor for l-α-lysophosphatidylinositol. The populations displaying subnanomolar and nanomolar affinities were undisclosed in competitive assays using a well known cannabinoid receptor ligand, AM630 (1-[2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethyl]-2-methyl-3-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-6-iodoindole), and TH-chrysenediol, not previously tested on binding to cannabinoid receptors. Variations in binding parameters upon formation of dimers with GPR55 may reflect decreases in binding sites or alterations of the quaternary structure of the macromolecular G protein-coupled receptor complexes. In summary, the homogeneous binding assay described here may

  14. Receptor Binding Sites and Antigenic Epitopes on the Fiber Knob of Human Adenovirus Serotype 3

    PubMed Central

    Liebermann, Herbert; Mentel, Renate; Bauer, Ulrike; Pring-Åkerblom, Patricia; Dölling, Rudolf; Modrow, Susanne; Seidel, Werner

    1998-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber knob causes the first step in the interaction of adenovirus with cell membrane receptors. To obtain information on the receptor binding site(s), the interaction of labeled cell membrane proteins to synthetic peptides covering the adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) fiber knob was studied. Peptide P6 (amino acids [aa] 187 to 200), to a lesser extent P14 (aa 281 to 294), and probably P11 (aa 244 to 256) interacted specifically with cell membrane proteins, indicating that these peptides present cell receptor binding sites. Peptides P6, P11, and P14 span the D, G, and I β-strands of the R-sheet, respectively. The other reactive peptides, P2 (aa 142 to 156), P3 (aa 153 to 167), and P16 (aa 300 to 319), probably do not present real receptor binding sites. The binding to these six peptides was inhibited by Ad3 virion and was independent of divalent cations. We have also screened the antigenic epitopes on the knob with recombinant Ad3 fiber, recombinant Ad3 fiber knob, and Ad3 virion-specific antisera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The main antigenic epitopes were presented by P3, P6, P12 (aa 254 to 269), P14, and especially the C-terminal P16. Peptides P14 and P16 of the Ad3 fiber knob were able to inhibit Ad3 infection of cells. PMID:9765458

  15. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR REGULATION IN THE RAT EMBRYO: A POTENTIAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat embryo: a potential site for developmental toxicity?

    Ghosh B, Wood CR, Held GA, Abbott BD, Lau C.

    National Research Council, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

  16. Characterization of a Ligand Binding Site in the Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Pore

    PubMed Central

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule. PMID:23442958

  17. Characterization of a ligand binding site in the human transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 pore.

    PubMed

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-02-19

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule.

  18. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution. PMID:26561004

  19. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution.

  20. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. )

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  1. Non-canonical interleukin 23 receptor complex assembly: p40 protein recruits interleukin 12 receptor β1 via site II and induces p19/interleukin 23 receptor interaction via site III.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Jutta; Moll, Jens M; Baran, Paul; Grötzinger, Joachim; Scheller, Jürgen; Floss, Doreen M

    2015-01-01

    IL-23, composed of the cytokine subunit p19 and the soluble α receptor subunit p40, binds to a receptor complex consisting of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) and the IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1). Complex formation was hypothesized to follow the "site I-II-III" architectural paradigm, with site I of p19 being required for binding to p40, whereas sites II and III of p19 mediate binding to IL-12Rβ1 and IL-23R, respectively. Here we show that the binding mode of p19 to p40 and of p19 to IL-23R follow the canonical site I and III paradigm but that interaction of IL-23 to IL-12Rβ1 is independent of site II in p19. Instead, binding of IL-23 to the cytokine binding module of IL-12Rβ1 is mediated by domains 1 and 2 of p40 via corresponding site II amino acids of IL-12Rβ1. Moreover, domains 2 and 3 of p40 were sufficient for complex formation with p19 and to induce binding of p19 to IL-23R. The Fc-tagged fusion protein of p40_D2D3/p19 did, however, not act as a competitive IL-23 antagonist but, at higher concentrations, induced proliferation via IL-23R but independent of IL-12Rβ1. On the basis of our experimental validation, we propose a non-canonical topology of the IL-23·IL-23R·IL-12Rβ1 complex. Furthermore, our data help to explain why p40 is an antagonist of IL-23 and IL-12 signaling and show that site II of p19 is dispensable for IL-23 signaling.

  2. Mapping the Putative G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Docking Site on GPCR Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Beautrait, Alexandre; Michalski, Kevin R.; Lopez, Thomas S.; Mannix, Katelynn M.; McDonald, Devin J.; Cutter, Amber R.; Medina, Christopher B.; Hebert, Aaron M.; Francis, Charnelle J.; Bouvier, Michel; Tesmer, John J. G.; Sterne-Marr, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate agonist-occupied receptors initiating the processes of desensitization and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Interaction of GRKs with activated receptors serves to stimulate their kinase activity. The extreme N-terminal helix (αN), the kinase small lobe, and the active site tether (AST) of the AGC kinase domain have previously been implicated in mediating the allosteric activation. Expanded mutagenesis of the αN and AST allowed us to further assess the role of these two regions in kinase activation and receptor phosphorylation in vitro and in intact cells. We also developed a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay to monitor the recruitment of GRK2 to activated α2A-adrenergic receptors (α2AARs) in living cells. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer signal exhibited a biphasic response to norepinephrine concentration, suggesting that GRK2 is recruited to Gβγ and α2AAR with EC50 values of 15 nm and 8 μm, respectively. We show that mutations in αN (L4A, V7E, L8E, V11A, S12A, Y13A, and M17A) and AST (G475I, V477D, and I485A) regions impair or potentiate receptor phosphorylation and/or recruitment. We suggest that a surface of GRK2, including Leu4, Val7, Leu8, Val11, and Ser12, directly interacts with receptors, whereas residues such as Asp10, Tyr13, Ala16, Met17, Gly475, Val477, and Ile485 are more important for kinase domain closure and activation. Taken together with data on GRK1 and GRK6, our data suggest that all three GRK subfamilies make conserved interactions with G protein-coupled receptors, but there may be unique interactions that influence selectivity. PMID:25049229

  3. The Sigma-2 Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 are Different Binding Sites Derived From Independent Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Uyen B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Chu, Ming-Liang; Yang, Huan; Schulman, Amanda; Mesangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Guo, Lian-Wang; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor (S2R) is a potential therapeutic target for cancer and neuronal diseases. However, the identity of the S2R has remained a matter of debate. Historically, the S2R has been defined as (1) a binding site with high affinity to 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and haloperidol but not to the selective sigma-1 receptor ligand (+)-pentazocine, and (2) a protein of 18–21 kDa, as shown by specific photolabeling with [3H]-Azido-DTG and [125I]-iodoazido-fenpropimorph ([125I]-IAF). Recently, the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), a 25 kDa protein, was reported to be the S2R (Nature Communications, 2011, 2:380). To confirm this identification, we created PGRMC1 knockout NSC34 cell lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We found that in NSC34 cells devoid of or overexpressing PGRMC1, the maximum [3H]-DTG binding to the S2R (Bmax) as well as the DTG-protectable [125I]-IAF photolabeling of the S2R were similar to those of wild-type control cells. Furthermore, the affinities of DTG and haloperidol for PGRMC1 (KI = 472 μM and 350 μM, respectively), as determined in competition with [3H]-progesterone, were more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for the S2R (20–80 nM). These results clarify that PGRMC1 and the S2R are distinct binding sites expressed by different genes. PMID:26870805

  4. Progesterone receptor induces bcl-x expression through intragenic binding sites favoring RNA polymerase II elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, Paola Y.; Nacht, A. Silvina; Alló, Mariano; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Ballaré, Cecilia; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Zaurin, Roser; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Pecci, Adali

    2013-01-01

    Steroid receptors were classically described for regulating transcription by binding to target gene promoters. However, genome-wide studies reveal that steroid receptors-binding sites are mainly located at intragenic regions. To determine the role of these sites, we examined the effect of progestins on the transcription of the bcl-x gene, where only intragenic progesterone receptor-binding sites (PRbs) were identified. We found that in response to hormone treatment, the PR is recruited to these sites along with two histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein (CBP) and GCN5, leading to an increase in histone H3 and H4 acetylation and to the binding of the SWI/SNF complex. Concomitant, a more relaxed chromatin was detected along bcl-x gene mainly in the regions surrounding the intragenic PRbs. PR also mediated the recruitment of the positive elongation factor pTEFb, favoring RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation activity. Together these events promoted the re-distribution of the active Pol II toward the 3′-end of the gene and a decrease in the ratio between proximal and distal transcription. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which PR regulates gene expression by facilitating the proper passage of the polymerase along hormone-dependent genes. PMID:23640331

  5. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor. PMID:27498819

  6. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  7. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor. PMID:27498819

  8. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-08

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  9. Counting Bungarotoxin Binding Sites of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Mammalian Cells with High Signal/Noise Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Paul D.; DeBerg, Hannah A.; Ge, Pinghua; Alexander, John K.; Jeyifous, Okunola; Green, William N.; Selvin, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are some of the most studied synaptic proteins; however, many questions remain that can only be answered using single molecule approaches. Here we report our results from single α7 and neuromuscular junction type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in mammalian cell membranes. By labeling the receptors with fluorophore-labeled bungarotoxin, we can image individual receptors and count the number of bungarotoxin-binding sites in receptors expressed in HEK 293 cells. Our results indicate that there are two bungarotoxin-binding sites in neuromuscular junction receptors, as expected, and five in α7 receptors, clarifying previous uncertainty. This demonstrates a valuable technique for counting subunits in membrane-bound proteins at the single molecule level, with nonspecialized optics and with higher signal/noise ratios than previous fluorescent protein-based techniques. PMID:21081055

  10. Site-specific basicities regulate molecular recognition in receptor binding: in silico docking of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gergő; Baska, Ferenc; Schretner, András; Rácz, Akos; Noszál, Béla

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between thyroid hormone α and β receptors and the eight protonation microspecies of each of the main thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine, and reverse liothyronine) were investigated and quantitated by molecular modeling. Flexible docking of the various protonation forms of thyroid hormones and high-affinity thyromimetics to the two thyroid receptors was carried out. In this method the role of the ionization state of each basic site could be studied in the composite process of molecular recognition. Our results quantitate at the molecular level how the ionization state and the charge distribution influence the protein binding. The anionic form of the carboxyl group (i.e., carboxylate site) is essential for protein binding, whereas the protonated form of amino group worsens the binding. The protonation state of the phenolate plays a less important role in the receptor affinity; its protonation, however, alters the electron density and the concomitant stacking propensity of the aromatic rings, resulting in a different binding score. The combined results of docking and microspeciation studies show that microspecies with the highest concentration at the pH of blood are not the strongest binding ones. The calculated binding free energy values can be well interpreted in terms of the interactions between the actual sites of the microspecies and the receptor amino acids. Our docking results were validated and compared with biological data from the literature. Since the thyroid hormone receptors influence several physiologic functions, such as metabolic rate, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and heart frequency, our binding results provide a molecular basis for drug design and development in related therapeutic indications. PMID:23907234

  11. Identification of an Inhibitory Alcohol Binding Site in GABAA ρ1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Borghese, Cecilia M; Ruiz, Carlos I; Lee, Ui S; Cullins, Madeline A; Bertaccini, Edward J; Trudell, James R; Harris, R Adron

    2016-01-20

    Alcohols inhibit γ-aminobutyric acid type A ρ1 receptor function. After introducing mutations in several positions of the second transmembrane helix in ρ1, we studied the effects of ethanol and hexanol on GABA responses using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The 6' mutations produced the following effects on ethanol and hexanol responses: small increase or no change (T6'M), increased inhibition (T6'V), and small potentiation (T6'Y and T6'F). The 5' mutations produced mainly increases in hexanol inhibition. Other mutations produced small (3' and 9') or no changes (2' and L277 in the first transmembrane domain) in alcohol effects. These results suggest an inhibitory alcohol binding site near the 6' position. Homology models of ρ1 receptors based on the X-ray structure of GluCl showed that the 2', 5', 6', and 9' residues were easily accessible from the ion pore, with 5' and 6' residues from neighboring subunits facing each other; L3' and L277 also faced the neighboring subunit. We tested ethanol through octanol on single and double mutated ρ1 receptors [ρ1(I15'S), ρ1(T6'Y), and ρ1(T6'Y,I15'S)] to further characterize the inhibitory alcohol pocket in the wild-type ρ1 receptor. The pocket can only bind relatively short-chain alcohols and is eliminated by introducing Y in the 6' position. Replacing the bulky 15' residue with a smaller side chain introduced a potentiating binding site, more sensitive to long-chain than to short-chain alcohols. In conclusion, the net alcohol effect on the ρ1 receptor is determined by the sum of its actions on inhibitory and potentiating sites.

  12. Two renal. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor sites revealed by of-aminoclonidine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sripanidkulchai, B.; Dawson, R.; Oparil, S.; Wyss, J.M.

    1987-02-01

    (/sup 3/H)p-aminoclonidine (/sup 3/H)PAC, a specific ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist, was used to characterize ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor binding in rat renal membranes. Rosenthal plots demonstrated two binding sites with K/sub dS/ of approx. 1.7 and 14.2 nM and B/sub max/S (maximum binding) of 47.3 and 218.8 fmol/mg protein for the high- and low-affinity sites, respectively. These characteristics were confirmed by estimate of K/sub d/ parameters based on association and dissociation experiments. Pseudo-Hill coefficients generated from drug inhibition experiments were all less than unity, suggesting differential binding at two ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor binding sites. Specific ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonists exhibited greater binding affinity to both sites than did nonspecific drugs, and all drugs displayed greater affinity for the high- than the low-affinity binding site. Both guanyl nucleotides and sodium chloride inhibited (/sup 3/H)PAC binding more at the high-affinity than at the low-affinity site. Renal denervation resulted in significant upregulation of receptor density only at the high-affinity sites with no change in receptor affinity at either site, suggesting that a majority of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors in the kidney are postsynaptic. Thus all lines of evidence in this study indicate that two ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor binding sites exist in the rat kidney.

  13. Structure, oligosaccharide structures, and posttranslationally modified sites of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, L; Earnest, J P; Stroud, R M; Burlingame, A L

    1989-01-01

    Using mass spectrometry, we have examined the transmembrane topography of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, a five-subunit glycosylated protein complex that forms a gated ion channel in the neuromuscular junction. The primary sequences of the four polypeptide chains making up the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica contain many possible sites for glycosylation or phosphorylation. We have used liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify posttranslationally modified residues and to determine the intact oligosaccharide structures of the carbohydrate present on the acetylcholine receptor. Asparagine-143 of the alpha subunit (in consensus numbering) is shown to be glycosylated with high-mannose oligosaccharide. Asparagine-453 of the gamma subunit is not glycosylated, a fact that bears on the question of the orientations of putative transmembranous helices M3, MA, and M4. The structures of the six major acetylcholine receptor oligosaccharides are determined: the major components (70%) are of the high-mannose type, with bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary complex oligosaccharides making up approximately equal to 22 mol% of the total carbohydrate. This application of a multichannel array detector mass spectrometer provided a breakthrough in sensitivity that allowed us to identify the site of attachment of, and the sequence of, oligosaccharides on a 300-kDa membrane protein from only 5 pmol of the isolated oligosaccharide. Images PMID:2771948

  14. In vivo receptor binding of opioid drugs at the mu site

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, J.S.; Holford, N.H.; Sadee, W.

    1985-06-01

    The in vivo receptor binding of a series of opioid drugs was investigated in intact rats after s.c. administration of (/sup 3/H)etorphine tracer, which selectively binds to mu sites in vivo. Receptor binding was determined by a membrane filtration assay immediately after sacrifice of the animals and brain homogenization. Coadministration of unlabeled opioid drugs together with tracer led to a dose-dependent decrease of in vivo tracer binding. Estimates of the doses required to occupy 50% of the mu sites in vivo established the following potency rank order: diprenorphine, naloxone, buprenorphine, etorphine, levallorphan, cyclazocine, sufentanil, nalorphine, ethylketocyclazocine, ketocyclazocine, pentazocine, morphine. In vivo-in vitro differences among the relative receptor binding potencies were only partially accounted for by differences in their access to the brain and the regulatory effects of Na+ and GTP, which are expected to reduce agonist affinities in vivo. The relationship among mu receptor occupancy in vivo and pharmacological effects of the opioid drugs is described.

  15. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-05-29

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets.

  16. Structures of Receptor Complexes of a North American H7N2 Influenza Hemagglutinin with a Loop Deletion in the Receptor Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Carney, Paul J.; Donis, Ruben O.; Stevens, James

    2012-02-21

    Human infections with subtype H7 avian influenza viruses have been reported as early as 1979. In 1996, a genetically stable 24-nucleotide deletion emerged in North American H7 influenza virus hemagglutinins, resulting in an eight amino acid deletion in the receptor-binding site. The continuous circulation of these viruses in live bird markets, as well as its documented ability to infect humans, raises the question of how these viruses achieve structural stability and functionality. Here we report a detailed molecular analysis of the receptor binding site of the North American lineage subtype H7N2 virus A/New York/107/2003 (NY107), including complexes with an avian receptor analog (3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 3'SLN) and two human receptor analogs (6'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 6'SLN; sialyllacto-N-tetraose b, LSTb). Structural results suggest a novel mechanism by which residues Arg220 and Arg229 (H3 numbering) are used to compensate for the deletion of the 220-loop and form interactions with the receptor analogs. Glycan microarray results reveal that NY107 maintains an avian-type ({alpha}2-3) receptor binding profile, with only moderate binding to human-type ({alpha}2-6) receptor. Thus despite its dramatically altered receptor binding site, this HA maintains functionality and confirms a need for continued influenza virus surveillance of avian and other animal reservoirs to define their zoonotic potential.

  17. Cleavage Site Localization Differentially Controls Interleukin-6 Receptor Proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Riethmueller, Steffen; Ehlers, Johanna C.; Lokau, Juliane; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Knittler, Katharina; Dombrowsky, Gregor; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rabe, Björn; Rose-John, Stefan; Garbers, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) leads to the release of the IL-6R ectodomain. Binding of the cytokine IL-6 to the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) results in an agonistic IL-6/sIL-6R complex, which activates cells via gp130 irrespective of whether the cells express the IL-6R itself. This signaling pathway has been termed trans-signaling and is thought to mainly account for the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6. A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17 are the major proteases that cleave the IL-6R. We have previously shown that deletion of a ten amino acid long stretch within the stalk region including the cleavage site prevents ADAM17-mediated cleavage, whereas the receptor retained its full biological activity. In the present study, we show that deletion of a triple serine (3S) motif (Ser-359 to Ser-361) adjacent to the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent IL-6R cleavage by ADAM17, but not ADAM10. We find that the impaired shedding is caused by the reduced distance between the cleavage site and the plasma membrane. Positioning of the cleavage site in greater distance towards the plasma membrane abrogates ADAM17-mediated shedding and reveals a novel cleavage site of ADAM10. Our findings underline functional differences in IL-6R proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:27151651

  18. Two disparate ligand binding sites in the human P2Y1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dandan; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Zhang, Kaihua; Kiselev, Evgeny; Crane, Steven; Wang, Jiang; Paoletta, Silvia; Yi, Cuiying; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Wenru; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Hong; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-01-01

    In response to adenosine 5′-diphosphate, the P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R) facilitates platelet aggregation, and thus serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Here we report the crystal structures of the human P2Y1R in complex with a nucleotide antagonist MRS2500 at 2.7Å resolution, and with a non-nucleotide antagonist BPTU at 2.2Å resolution. The structures reveal two distinct ligand binding sites, providing atomic details of P2Y1R’s unique ligand binding modes. MRS2500 recognizes a binding site within the seven transmembrane bundle of P2Y1R, which, however, is different in shape and location from the nucleotide binding site in previously determined P2Y12R structure. BPTU binds to an allosteric pocket on the external receptor interface with the lipid bilayer, making it the first structurally characterized selective G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand located entirely outside of the helical bundle. These high-resolution insights into P2Y1R should enable discovery of new orthosteric and allosteric antithrombotic drugs with reduced adverse effects. PMID:25822790

  19. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor

    PubMed Central

    Winnig, Marcel; Bufe, Bernd; Kratochwil, Nicole A; Slack, Jay P; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Background Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Results By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. Conclusion From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor activation by neohesperidin

  20. Mapping functional group free energy patterns at protein occluded sites: nuclear receptors and G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Yu, Wenbo; Raman, E Prabhu; Hershfeld, Alena V; Fang, Lei; Deshpande, Deepak A; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-03-23

    Occluded ligand-binding pockets (LBP) such as those found in nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a significant opportunity and challenge for computer-aided drug design. To determine free energies maps of functional groups of these LBPs, a Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo/Molecular Dynamics (GCMC/MD) strategy is combined with the Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) methodology. SILCS-GCMC/MD is shown to map functional group affinity patterns that recapitulate locations of functional groups across diverse classes of ligands in the LBPs of the androgen (AR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated-γ (PPARγ) NRs and the metabotropic glutamate (mGluR) and β2-adreneric (β2AR) GPCRs. Inclusion of protein flexibility identifies regions of the binding pockets not accessible in crystal conformations and allows for better quantitative estimates of relative ligand binding affinities in all the proteins tested. Differences in functional group requirements of the active and inactive states of the β2AR LBP were used in virtual screening to identify high efficacy agonists targeting β2AR in Airway Smooth Muscle (ASM) cells. Seven of the 15 selected ligands were found to effect ASM relaxation representing a 46% hit rate. Hence, the method will be of use for the rational design of ligands in the context of chemical biology and the development of therapeutic agents.

  1. HIV-1 Env gp120 Structural Determinants for Peptide Triazole Dual Receptor Site Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Tuzer, Ferit; Madani, Navid; Kamanna, Kantharaju; Zentner, Isaac; LaLonde, Judith; Holmes, Andrew; Upton, Elizabeth; Rajagopal, Srivats; McFadden, Karyn; Contarino, Mark; Sodroski, Joseph; Chaiken, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in HIV therapy, viral resistance and side-effects with current drug regimens require targeting new components of the virus. Dual antagonist peptide triazoles (PT) are a novel class of HIV-1 inhibitors that specifically target the gp120 component of the viral spike and inhibit its interaction with both of its cell surface protein ligands, namely the initial receptor CD4 and the co-receptor (CCR5/CXCR4), thus preventing viral entry. Following an initial survey of 19 gp120 alanine mutants by ELISA, we screened 11 mutants for their importance in binding to, and inhibition by the PT KR21 using surface plasmon resonance. Key mutants were purified and tested for their effects on the peptide’s affinity and its ability to inhibit binding of CD4 and the co-receptor surrogate mAb 17b. Effects of the mutations on KR21 viral neutralization were measured by single-round cell infection assays. Two mutations, D474A and T257A, caused large-scale loss of KR21 binding, as well as losses in both CD4/17b and viral inhibition by KR21. A set of other Ala mutants revealed more moderate losses in direct binding affinity and inhibition sensitivity to KR21. The cluster of sensitive residues defines a PT functional epitope. This site is in a conserved region of gp120 that overlaps the CD4 binding site and is distant from the co-receptor/17b binding site, suggesting an allosteric mode of inhibition for the latter. The arrangement and sequence conservation of the residues in the functional epitope explain the breadth of antiviral activity, and improve the potential for rational inhibitor development. PMID:23011758

  2. Interaction of a monoclonal antibody against hEGF with a receptor site for EGF.

    PubMed

    Valente, S; Souto, B; Balter, H; Welling, M M; Román, E; Robles, A; Pauwels, E K

    1999-11-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in different body fluids such as serum, amniotic fluid, and urine. Human tumor tissues with EGF receptors (EGF-Rc) may be saturated with EGF, which may be of prognostic value. An RIA was envisaged to measure human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) levels using EGF-Rc as capture agent and a monoclonal antibody anti-hEGF (MAb anti-hEGF) labeled with 125Iodine as a marker for this binding. The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of MAb anti-hEGF to detect the receptor binding sites and to investigate the interaction between MAb anti-hEGF and the EGF-Rc. Various binding experiments were performed to study possible interference and interactions in the complex MAb anti-hEGF and the receptor. Affinity constants were determined by means of Scatchard plot analysis to interpret the complex stability challenged with other compounds for a better understanding of the interaction process. Binding constants were of the same order for all the ligands tested separately involving the EGF-Rc, but were significantly higher (t = 15.7, p < 0.05) for hEGF in its binding to MAb anti-hEGF. It was possible with equilibrium studies and competition experiments to evaluate the interaction of EGF and MAb anti-hEGF with the EGF receptor. This observation makes the MAb anti-hEGF a potential tracer for the quantitation of receptors in vitro, and possibly for the detection of membrane receptors on tumor cells in vivo.

  3. Rpn1 provides adjacent receptor sites for substrate binding and deubiquitination by the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuan; Chen, Xiang; Elsasser, Suzanne; Stocks, Bradley B.; Tian, Geng; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Naixia; de Poot, Stefanie A. H.; Tuebing, Fabian; Sun, Shuangwu; Vannoy, Jacob; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Engen, John R.; Finley, Daniel; Walters, Kylie J.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract INTRODUCTION The ubiquitin-proteasome system comprises hundreds of distinct pathways of degradation, which converge at the step of ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. Five proteasomal ubiquitin receptors have been identified, two that are intrinsic to the proteasome (Rpn10 and Rpn13) and three reversibly associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors (Rad23, Dsk2, and Ddi1). RATIONALE We found that the five known proteasomal ubiquitin receptors of yeast are collectively nonessential for ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. We therefore screened for additional ubiquitin receptors in the proteasome and identified subunit Rpn1 as a candidate. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the structure of the binding site within Rpn1, which we term the T1 site. Mutational analysis of this site showed its functional importance within the context of intact proteasomes. T1 binds both ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (UBL) proteins, in particular the substrate-delivering shuttle factor Rad23. A second site within the Rpn1 toroid, T2, recognizes the UBL domain of deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6, as determined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis and validated by amino acid substitution and functional assays. The Rpn1 toroid thus serves a critical scaffolding role within the proteasome, helping to assemble multiple proteasome cofactors as well as substrates. RESULTS Our results indicate that proteasome subunit Rpn1 can recognize both ubiquitin and UBL domains of substrate shuttling factors that themselves bind ubiquitin and function as reversibly-associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors. Recognition is mediated by the T1 site within the Rpn1 toroid, which supports proteasome function in vivo. We found that the capacity of T1 to recognize both ubiquitin and UBL proteins was shared with Rpn10 and Rpn13. The surprising multiplicity of ubiquitin-recognition domains within the proteasome may promote enhanced

  4. Synthetic receptors as models for alkali metal cation- binding sites in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wall, Stephen L.; Meadows, Eric S.; Barbour, Leonard J.; Gokel, George W.

    2000-06-01

    The alkali metal cations Na+ and K+ have several important physiological roles, including modulating enzyme activity. Recent work has suggested that alkali metal cations may be coordinated by systems, such as the aromatic amino acid side chains. The ability of K+ to interact with an aromatic ring has been assessed by preparing a family of synthetic receptors that incorporate the aromatic side chains of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. Thesereceptors are constructed around a diaza-18-crown-6 scaffold, which serves as the primary binding site for an alkali metal cation. The ability of the aromatic rings to coordinate a cation was determined by crystallizing each of the receptors in the presence of K+ and by solving the solid state structures. In all cases, complexation of K+ by the pi system was observed. When possible, the structures of the unbound receptors also were determined for comparison. Further proof that the aromatic ring makes an energetically favorable interaction with the cation was obtained by preparing a receptor in which the arene was perfluorinated. Fluorination of the arene reverses the electrostatics, but the aromaticity is maintained. The fluorinated arene rings do not coordinate the cation in the solid state structure of the K+ complex. Thus, the results of the predicted electrostatic reversal were confirmed. Finally, the biological implications of the alkali metal cation-pi interaction are addressed.

  5. Characterization of the Binding Site of Aspartame in the Human Sweet Taste Receptor.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Mezei, Mihaly; Hecht, Elizabeth; Quijada, Jeniffer; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman; Max, Marianna

    2015-10-01

    The sweet taste receptor, a heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptor comprised of T1R2 and T1R3, binds sugars, small molecule sweeteners, and sweet proteins to multiple binding sites. The dipeptide sweetener, aspartame binds in the Venus Flytrap Module (VFTM) of T1R2. We developed homology models of the open and closed forms of human T1R2 and human T1R3 VFTMs and their dimers and then docked aspartame into the closed form of T1R2's VFTM. To test and refine the predictions of our model, we mutated various T1R2 VFTM residues, assayed activity of the mutants and identified 11 critical residues (S40, Y103, D142, S144, S165, S168, Y215, D278, E302, D307, and R383) in and proximal to the binding pocket of the sweet taste receptor that are important for ligand recognition and activity of aspartame. Furthermore, we propose that binding is dependent on 2 water molecules situated in the ligand pocket that bridge 2 carbonyl groups of aspartame to residues D142 and L279. These results shed light on the activation mechanism and how signal transmission arising from the extracellular domain of the T1R2 monomer of the sweet receptor leads to the perception of sweet taste. PMID:26377607

  6. PICK1 mediates synaptic recruitment of AMPA receptors at neurexin-induced postsynaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junyu; Kam, Chuen; Luo, Jian-Hong; Xia, Jun

    2014-11-12

    In the CNS, synapse formation and maturation play crucial roles in the construction and consolidation of neuronal circuits. Neurexin and neuroligin localize on the opposite sides of synaptic membrane and interact with each other to promote the assembly and specialization of synapses. However, the excitatory synapses induced by the neurexin-neuroligin complex are initially immature synapses that lack AMPA receptors. Previously, PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) was shown to cluster and regulate the synaptic localization of AMPA receptors. Here, we report that during synaptogenesis induced by neurexin in cultured neurons from rat hippocampus, PICK1 recruited AMPA receptors to immature postsynaptic sites. This synaptic recruitment of AMPA receptors depended on the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1, and on the lipid-binding ability of PICK1, but not the interaction between PICK1 and neuroligin. Last, our results demonstrated that the recruitment of GluA2 to synapses could be prevented by ICA69 (islet cell autoantigen 69 kDa), a key binding partner of PICK1. Our study showed that PICK1, being negatively regulated by ICA69, could facilitate synapse maturation.

  7. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  8. Characterization of the Binding Site of Aspartame in the Human Sweet Taste Receptor.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Mezei, Mihaly; Hecht, Elizabeth; Quijada, Jeniffer; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman; Max, Marianna

    2015-10-01

    The sweet taste receptor, a heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptor comprised of T1R2 and T1R3, binds sugars, small molecule sweeteners, and sweet proteins to multiple binding sites. The dipeptide sweetener, aspartame binds in the Venus Flytrap Module (VFTM) of T1R2. We developed homology models of the open and closed forms of human T1R2 and human T1R3 VFTMs and their dimers and then docked aspartame into the closed form of T1R2's VFTM. To test and refine the predictions of our model, we mutated various T1R2 VFTM residues, assayed activity of the mutants and identified 11 critical residues (S40, Y103, D142, S144, S165, S168, Y215, D278, E302, D307, and R383) in and proximal to the binding pocket of the sweet taste receptor that are important for ligand recognition and activity of aspartame. Furthermore, we propose that binding is dependent on 2 water molecules situated in the ligand pocket that bridge 2 carbonyl groups of aspartame to residues D142 and L279. These results shed light on the activation mechanism and how signal transmission arising from the extracellular domain of the T1R2 monomer of the sweet receptor leads to the perception of sweet taste.

  9. Conversion of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist into an agonist by site-specific mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ju, G; Labriola-Tompkins, E; Campen, C A; Benjamin, W R; Karas, J; Plocinski, J; Biondi, D; Kaffka, K L; Kilian, P L; Eisenberg, S P

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) is a naturally occurring protein that binds to the IL-1 receptor present on T cells, fibroblasts, and other cell types and acts to block IL-1-induced responses. IL-1ra is a pure antagonist and has no agonist activity in in vitro or in vivo systems. By site-specific mutagenesis, an analog of IL-1ra was created that contained a substitution of a single amino acid, Lys-145----Asp. This analog, IL-1ra K145D, exhibited partial agonist activity in the D10.G4.1 cell proliferation assay. The newly acquired agonist activity could not be neutralized by antisera to IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta, but it could be blocked by a monoclonal antibody to the T-cell IL-1 receptor. The analog also showed agonist activity as assayed by increased prostaglandin E2 synthesis from CHO cells expressing recombinant mouse IL-1 receptor. These results with IL-1ra K145D demonstrate the importance of the region surrounding the corresponding Asp-145 residue in IL-1 beta for triggering the biological response to IL-1. Images PMID:1826365

  10. Characterization of the Binding Site of Aspartame in the Human Sweet Taste Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Emeline L.; Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Mezei, Mihaly; Hecht, Elizabeth; Quijada, Jeniffer; Osman, Roman; Max, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor, a heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptor comprised of T1R2 and T1R3, binds sugars, small molecule sweeteners, and sweet proteins to multiple binding sites. The dipeptide sweetener, aspartame binds in the Venus Flytrap Module (VFTM) of T1R2. We developed homology models of the open and closed forms of human T1R2 and human T1R3 VFTMs and their dimers and then docked aspartame into the closed form of T1R2’s VFTM. To test and refine the predictions of our model, we mutated various T1R2 VFTM residues, assayed activity of the mutants and identified 11 critical residues (S40, Y103, D142, S144, S165, S168, Y215, D278, E302, D307, and R383) in and proximal to the binding pocket of the sweet taste receptor that are important for ligand recognition and activity of aspartame. Furthermore, we propose that binding is dependent on 2 water molecules situated in the ligand pocket that bridge 2 carbonyl groups of aspartame to residues D142 and L279. These results shed light on the activation mechanism and how signal transmission arising from the extracellular domain of the T1R2 monomer of the sweet receptor leads to the perception of sweet taste. PMID:26377607

  11. Pairwise detection of site-specific receptor phosphorylations using single-molecule blotting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Lock; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Seongsil; Kim, Su-Jeong; Noh, Jung Eun; Kim, Joung-Hun; Chae, Young Chan; Lee, Jong-Bong; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) at the plasma membrane (PM) determine the signal transduction efficacy alone and in combination. However, current approaches to identify PTMs provide ensemble results, inherently overlooking combinatorial PTMs in a single polypeptide molecule. Here, we describe a single-molecule blotting (SiMBlot) assay that combines biotinylation of cell surface receptors with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. This method enables quantitative measurement of the phosphorylation status of individual membrane receptor molecules and colocalization analysis of multiple immunofluorescence signals to directly visualize pairwise site-specific phosphorylation patterns at the single-molecule level. Strikingly, application of SiMBlot to study ligand-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, which is widely thought to be multi-phosphorylated, reveals that EGFR on cell membranes is hardly multi-phosphorylated, unlike in vitro autophosphorylated EGFR. Therefore, we expect SiMBlot to aid understanding of vast combinatorial PTM patterns, which are concealed in ensemble methods, and to broaden knowledge of RTK signaling. PMID:27009355

  12. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Archundia, Marlet; Cordomi, Arnau; Garriga, Pere; Perez, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS). Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand. PMID:22500107

  13. Overlapping binding sites drive allosteric agonism and positive cooperativity in type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Xavier; Malhaire, Fanny; Scholler, Pauline; Rodrigo, Jordi; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Patricia; Llebaria, Amadeu; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Giraldo, Jesús; Goudet, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors are emerging targets for the treatment of various disorders. Accordingly, numerous mGlu4-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been identified, some of which also display agonist activity. To identify the structural bases for their allosteric action, we explored the relationship between the binding pockets of mGlu4 PAMs with different chemical scaffolds and their functional properties. By use of innovative mGlu4 biosensors and second-messenger assays, we show that all PAMs enhance agonist action on the receptor through different degrees of allosteric agonism and positive cooperativity. For example, whereas VU0155041 and VU0415374 display equivalent efficacies [log(τ(B)) = 1.15 ± 0.38 and 1.25 ± 0.44, respectively], they increase the ability of L-AP4 to stabilize the active conformation of the receptor by 4 and 39 times, respectively. Modeling and docking studies identify 2 overlapping binding pockets as follows: a first site homologous to the pocket of natural agonists of class A GPCRs linked to allosteric agonism and a second one pointing toward a site topographically homologous to the Na(+) binding pocket of class A GPCRs, occupied by PAMs exhibiting the strongest cooperativity. These results reveal that intrinsic efficacy and cooperativity of mGlu4 PAMs are correlated with their binding mode, and vice versa, integrating structural and functional knowledge from different GPCR classes. PMID:25342125

  14. Activation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Stuart J; Sathyaprakash, Chaitra; Doward, Anne; Millar, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    In common with other members of the Cys-loop family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are activated by the binding of a neurotransmitter to an extracellular orthosteric site, located at the interface of two adjacent receptor subunits. In addition, a variety of compounds have been identified that modulate agonist-evoked responses of 5-HT3Rs, and other Cys-loop receptors, by binding to distinct allosteric sites. In this study, we examined the pharmacological effects of a group of monoterpene compounds on recombinant 5-HT3Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Two phenolic monoterpenes (carvacrol and thymol) display allosteric agonist activity on human homomeric 5-HT3ARs (64 ± 7% and 80 ± 4% of the maximum response evoked by the endogenous orthosteric agonist 5-HT, respectively). In addition, at lower concentrations, where agonist effects are less apparent, carvacrol and thymol act as potentiators of responses evoked by submaximal concentrations of 5-HT. By contrast, carvacrol and thymol have no agonist or potentiating activity on the closely related mouse 5-HT3ARs. Using subunit chimeras containing regions of the human and mouse 5-HT3A subunits, and by use of site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified transmembrane amino acids that either abolish the agonist activity of carvacrol and thymol on human 5-HT3ARs or are able to confer this property on mouse 5-HT3ARs. By contrast, these mutations have no significant effect on orthosteric activation of 5-HT3ARs by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT3ARs can be activated by the binding of ligands to an allosteric transmembrane site, a conclusion that is supported by computer docking studies. PMID:25338672

  15. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2016-09-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes.

  16. Proximity effect of magnetic permalloy nanoelements used to induce AMR changes in magnetic biosensor nanowires at specific receptor sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Iain; Ding, An; Xu, Yongbing

    2015-08-01

    We present simulated, substrate bound, permalloy nanowires with receptor sites for magnetic, aqueously suspended nanoelements that are able to induce an anisotropic magnetoresistive effect in nanowire circuits. The permalloy nanoelements were also simulated to determine the remanent spin configuration and were designed to be bound by antibody mediated interactions with biological ligands at the receptor sites in order to act as a biosensor. All results were simulated using micromagnetic simulations by the Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework (OOMMF). The simulations revealed that anisotropic magnetoresistive changes were induced at the bridging sections between adjacent nanowires, next to the receptor sites, which connect the two adjacent nanowires. The electrical resistance across the nanowires reduced after the inclusion of the nanoelements at the receptor sites. We therefore conclude that this nanowire configuration is useful for an inexpensive diagnostic biosensor.

  17. Positive modulation of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors by an antagonist of the high affinity benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Middendorp, Simon J; Maldifassi, Maria C; Baur, Roland; Sigel, Erwin

    2015-08-01

    GABAA receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are the target for many clinically important drugs such as the benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines act at the high-affinity binding site at the α+/γ- subunit interface. Previously, an additional low affinity binding site for diazepam located in the transmembrane (TM) domain has been described. The compound SJM-3 was recently identified in a prospective screening of ligands for the benzodiazepine binding site and investigated for its site of action. We determined the binding properties of SJM-3 at GABAA receptors recombinantly expressed in HEK-cells using radioactive ligand binding assays. Impact on function was assessed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with electrophysiological experiments using the two-electrode voltage clamp method. SJM-3 was shown to act as an antagonist at the α+/γ- site. At the same time it strongly potentiated GABA currents via the binding site for diazepam in the transmembrane domain. Mutation of a residue in M2 of the α subunit strongly reduced receptor modulation by SJM-3 and a homologous mutation in the β subunit abolished potentiation. SJM-3 acts as a more efficient modulator than diazepam at the site in the trans-membrane domain. In contrast to low concentrations of benzodiazepines, SJM-3 modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. A detailed exploration of the membrane site may provide the basis for the design and identification of subtype-selective modulatory drugs.

  18. Heterosubtypic antibody recognition of the influenza virus hemagglutinin receptor binding site enhanced by avidity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter S.; Yoshida, Reiko; Ekiert, Damian C.; Sakai, Naoki; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Takada, Ayato; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Continual and rapid mutation of seasonal influenza viruses by antigenic drift necessitates the almost annual reformulation of flu vaccines, which may offer little protection if the match to the dominant circulating strain is poor. S139/1 is a cross-reactive antibody that neutralizes multiple HA strains and subtypes, including those from H1N1 and H3N2 viruses that currently infect humans. The crystal structure of the S139/1 Fab in complex with the HA from the A/Victoria/3/1975 (H3N2) virus reveals that the antibody targets highly conserved residues in the receptor binding site and contacts antigenic sites A, B, and D. Binding and plaque reduction assays show that the monovalent Fab alone can protect against H3 strains, but the enhanced avidity from binding of bivalent IgG increases the breadth of neutralization to additional strains from the H1, H2, H13, and H16 subtypes. Thus, antibodies making relatively low affinity Fab interactions with the receptor binding site can have significant antiviral activity when enhanced by avidity through bivalent interactions of the IgG, thereby extending the breadth of binding and neutralization to highly divergent influenza virus strains and subtypes. PMID:23027945

  19. Site-Specific Chemoenzymatic Labeling of Aerolysin Enables the Identification of New Aerolysin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Annet E. M.; Theile, Christopher S.; Li, Zeyang; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Guimaraes, Carla P.

    2014-01-01

    Aerolysin is a secreted bacterial toxin that perforates the plasma membrane of a target cell with lethal consequences. Previously explored native and epitope-tagged forms of the toxin do not allow site-specific modification of the mature toxin with a probe of choice. We explore sortase-mediated transpeptidation reactions (sortagging) to install fluorophores and biotin at three distinct sites in aerolysin, without impairing binding of the toxin to the cell membrane and with minimal impact on toxicity. Using a version of aerolysin labeled with different fluorophores at two distinct sites we followed the fate of the C-terminal peptide independently from the N-terminal part of the toxin, and show its loss in the course of intoxication. Making use of the biotinylated version of aerolysin, we identify mesothelin, urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor (uPAR, CD87), glypican-1, and CD59 glycoprotein as aerolysin receptors, all predicted or known to be modified with a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. The sortase-mediated reactions reported here can be readily extended to other pore forming proteins. PMID:25275512

  20. Site-specific circadian expression of leptin and its receptor in human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Abellán, P. Gómez; Santos, C. Gómez; Madrid, J. A.; Milagro, F. I.; Campion, J.; Martínez, J. A.; Luján, J. A.; Ordovás, J. M.; Garaulet, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Circadian variability of circulating leptin levels has been well established over the last decade. However, the circadian behavior of leptin in human adipose tissue remains unknown. This also applies to the soluble leptin receptor. Objective We investigated the ex vivo circadian behavior of leptin and its receptor expression in human adipose tissue (AT). Subjects and methods Visceral and subcutaneous abdominal AT biopsies (n = 6) were obtained from morbid obese women (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2). Anthropometric variables and fasting plasma glucose, leptin, lipids and lipoprotein concentrations were determined. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of leptin and its receptor, AT explants were cultured during 24-h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 08:00, 14:00, 20:00, 02:00 h, using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Leptin expression showed an oscillatory pattern that was consistent with circadian rhythm in cultured AT. Similar patterns were noted for the leptin receptor. Leptin showed its achrophase (maximum expression) during the night, which might be associated to a lower degree of fat accumulation and higher mobilization. When comparing both fat depots, visceral AT anticipated its expression towards afternoon and evening hours. Interestingly, leptin plasma values were associated with decreased amplitude of LEP rhythm. This association was lost when adjusting for waist circumference. Conclusion Circadian rhythmicity has been demonstrated in leptin and its receptor in human AT cultures in a site-specific manner. This new knowledge paves the way for a better understanding of the autocrine/paracrine role of leptin in human AT. PMID:22411388

  1. High Throughput Techniques for Discovering New Glycine Receptor Modulators and their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Daniel F.; Islam, Robiul; Lynagh, Timothy; Lynch, Joseph W.; Webb, Timothy I.

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the Cys-loop receptor family that mediates inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These receptors are emerging as potential drug targets for inflammatory pain, immunomodulation, spasticity and epilepsy. Antagonists that specifically inhibit particular GlyR isoforms are also required as pharmacological probes for elucidating the roles of particular GlyR isoforms in health and disease. Although a substantial number of both positive and negative GlyR modulators have been identified, very few of these are specific for the GlyR over other receptor types. Thus, the potential of known compounds as either therapeutic leads or pharmacological probes is limited. It is therefore surprising that there have been few published studies describing attempts to discover novel GlyR isoform-specific modulators. The first aim of this review is to consider various methods for efficiently screening compounds against these receptors. We conclude that an anion sensitive yellow fluorescent protein is optimal for primary screening and that automated electrophysiology of cells stably expressing GlyRs is useful for confirming hits and quantitating the actions of identified compounds. The second aim of this review is to demonstrate how these techniques are used in our laboratory for the purpose of both discovering novel GlyR-active compounds and characterizing their binding sites. We also describe a reliable, cost effective method for transfecting HEK293 cells in single wells of a 384-well plate using nanogram quantities of plasmid DNA. PMID:19949449

  2. Immunoglobulins from Graves' disease patients interact with different sites on TSH receptor/LH-CG receptor chimeras than either TSH or immunoglobulins from idiopathic myxedema patients.

    PubMed

    Tahara, K; Ban, T; Minegishi, T; Kohn, L D

    1991-08-30

    To examine the identity of binding sites for thyrotropin (TSH) and thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) associated with Graves' disease, we constructed eight human TSH receptor/rat LH-CG receptor chimeras. Substitution of amino acid residues 8-165 of the TSH receptor with the corresponding LH-CG receptor segment (Mc1 + 2) results in a chimera which retains high affinity TSH binding and the cAMP response to TSH but loses both the cAMP response to Graves' IgG and Graves' IgG inhibition of TSH binding. Two of three IgGs from idiopathic myxedema patients which contain thyroid stimulation blocking antibodies (TSBAbs) still, however, react with this chimera. Chimeras which substitute residues 90-165 (Mc2) and 261-370 (Mc4) retain the ability to interact with TSH, Graves' IgG, and idiopathic myxedema IgG. The data thus suggest that residues 8-165 contain an epitope specific for TSAbs and that TSH receptor determinants important for the activities of TSAbs and TSH are not identical. Further, binding sites for TSBAbs in idiopathic myxedema may be different from receptor binding sites for both Graves' IgG TSAb as well as TSH and may be different in individual patients.

  3. Amiloride and GMQ Allosteric Modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 Receptor: Influences of the Intersubunit Site.

    PubMed

    Snell, Heather D; Gonzales, Eric B

    2015-06-01

    Amiloride, a diuretic used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure, and 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) are guanidine compounds that modulate acid-sensing ion channels. Both compounds have demonstrated affinity for a variety of membrane proteins, including members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels, such as the heteromeric GABA-A αβγ receptors. The actions of these guanidine compounds on the homomeric GABA-A ρ1 receptor remains unclear, especially in light of how many GABA-A αβγ receptor modulators have different effects in the GABA-A ρ1 receptors. We sought to characterize the influence of amiloride and GMQ on the human GABA-A ρ1 receptors using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. The diuretic amiloride potentiated the human GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current, whereas GMQ antagonized the receptor. Furthermore, a GABA-A second transmembrane domain site, the intersubunit site, responsible for allosteric modulation in the heteromeric GABA-A receptors mediated amiloride's positive allosteric actions. In contrast, the mutation did not remove GMQ antagonism but only changed the guanidine compound's potency within the human GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Through modeling and introduction of point mutations, we propose that the GABA-A ρ1 intersubunit site plays a role in mediating the allosteric effects of amiloride and GMQ.

  4. Amiloride and GMQ Allosteric Modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 Receptor: Influences of the Intersubunit Site

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride, a diuretic used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure, and 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) are guanidine compounds that modulate acid-sensing ion channels. Both compounds have demonstrated affinity for a variety of membrane proteins, including members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels, such as the heteromeric GABA-A αβγ receptors. The actions of these guanidine compounds on the homomeric GABA-A ρ1 receptor remains unclear, especially in light of how many GABA-A αβγ receptor modulators have different effects in the GABA-A ρ1 receptors. We sought to characterize the influence of amiloride and GMQ on the human GABA-A ρ1 receptors using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. The diuretic amiloride potentiated the human GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current, whereas GMQ antagonized the receptor. Furthermore, a GABA-A second transmembrane domain site, the intersubunit site, responsible for allosteric modulation in the heteromeric GABA-A receptors mediated amiloride’s positive allosteric actions. In contrast, the mutation did not remove GMQ antagonism but only changed the guanidine compound’s potency within the human GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Through modeling and introduction of point mutations, we propose that the GABA-A ρ1 intersubunit site plays a role in mediating the allosteric effects of amiloride and GMQ. PMID:25829529

  5. Identification of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmi, S.M.; Mishra, R.K.

    1989-02-15

    The existence of specific alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites has been shown in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SH5Y) cells using direct radioligand binding. (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, exhibited high affinity, saturable binding to both Y-79 and SH-SY5Y cell membranes. The binding of alpha 1 specific antagonist, (/sup 3/H)Prazocine, was not detectable in either cell type. Competition studies with antagonists yielded pharmacological characteristics typical of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors: rauwolscine greater than yohimbine greater than phentolamine greater than prazocine. Based on the affinity constants of prazocine and oxymetazoline, it appears that Y-79 cells contain alpha 2A receptor, whereas SH-SY5Y cells probably represent a mixture of alpha 2A and alpha 2B receptors. alpha 2-agonists clonidine and (-)epinephrine inhibition curves yielded high and low affinity states of the receptor in SH-SY5Y cells. Gpp(NH)p and sodium ions reduced the proportion of high affinity sites of alpha 2 receptors. These two neuronal cell lines of human origin would prove useful in elucidating the action and regulation of human alpha 2-adrenergic receptors and their interaction with other receptor systems.

  6. Nonequivalence of alpha-bungarotoxin binding sites in the native nicotinic receptor molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Tang, F.; Walgrave, S.; Gallagher, W. )

    1990-01-30

    In the native, membrane-bound form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AcChR) the two sites for the cholinergic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT) have different binding properties. One site has high affinity, and the M-AcChR/alpha-BGT complexes thus formed dissociate very slowly, similar to the complexes formed with detergent-solubilized AcChR (S-AcChR). The second site has much lower affinity (KD approximately 59 +/- 35 nM) and forms quickly reversible complexes. The nondenaturing detergent Triton X-100 is known to solubilize the AcChR in a form unable, upon binding of cholinergic ligands, to open the ion channel and to become desensitized. Solubilization of the AcChR in Triton X-100 affects the binding properties of this second site and converts it to a high-affinity, slowly reversible site. Prolonged incubation of M-AcChR at 4 degrees C converts the low-affinity site to a high-affinity site similar to those observed in the presence of Triton X-100. Although the two sites have similar properties when the AcChR is solubilized in Triton X-100, their nonequivalence can be demonstrated by the effect on alpha-BGT binding of concanavalin A, which strongly reduces the association rate of one site only. The Bmax of alpha-BGT to either Triton-solubilized AcChR or M-AcChR is not affected by the presence of concanavalin A. Occupancy of the high-affinity, slowly reversible site in M-AcChR inhibits the Triton X-100 induced conversion to irreversibility of the second site. At difference with alpha-BGT, the long alpha-neurotoxin from Naja naja siamensis venom (alpha-NTX) binds with high affinity and in a very slowly reversible fashion to two sites in the M-AcChR. We confirm here that Triton-solubilized AcChR or M-AcChR binds in a very slowly reversible fashion the same amount of alpha-NTX.

  7. Thyroid hormone receptor binds to a site in the rat growth hormone promoter required for induction by thyroid hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, R J; Brent, G A; Warne, R L; Larsen, P R; Moore, D D

    1987-01-01

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. We have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. We show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor. Images PMID:3475698

  8. Specificity of the antibody receptor site to D-lysergamide: model of a physiological receptor for lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Van Vunakis, H; Farrow, J T; Gjika, H B; Levine, L

    1971-07-01

    Antibodies to D-lysergic acid have been produced in rabbits and guinea pigs and a radioimmunoassay for the hapten was developed. The specificity of this lysergamide-antilysergamide reaction was determined by competitive binding with unlabeled lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psychotomimetic drugs, neurotransmitters, and other compounds with diverse structures. LSD and several related ergot alkaloids were potent competitors, three to seven times more potent than lysergic acid itself. The N,N-dimethyl derivatives of several compounds, including tryptamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 4-hydroxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptamine, tyramine, and mescaline, were only about ten times less effective than lysergic acid, even though these compounds lack some of the ring systems of lysergic acid. The pattern of inhibition by related compounds with various substituents suggests that the antibody receptor site recognizes structural features resembling the LSD molecule. In particular, the aromatic nucleus and the dimethylated ethylamine side chain in phenylethylamine and tryptamine derivatives may assume in solution a conformation resembling ring A and the methylated nitrogen in ring C of LSD. Among the tryptamine derivatives, a large percentage of the most potent competitors are also psychotomimetic compounds.

  9. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  10. The thrombin receptor extracellular domain contains sites crucial for peptide ligand-induced activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bahou, W F; Coller, B S; Potter, C L; Norton, K J; Kutok, J L; Goligorsky, M S

    1993-01-01

    A thrombin receptor (TR) demonstrating a unique activation mechanism has recently been isolated from a megakaryocytic (Dami) cell line. To further study determinants of peptide ligand-mediated activation phenomenon, we have isolated, cloned, and stably expressed the identical receptor from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) library. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a functional TR (CHO-TR), platelets, and HUVECs were then used to specifically characterize alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced activation responses using two different antibodies: anti-TR34-52 directed against a 20-amino acid peptide spanning the thrombin cleavage site, and anti-TR1-160 generated against the NH2-terminal 160 amino acids of the TR expressed as a chimeric protein in Escherichia coli. Activation-dependent responses to both alpha-thrombin (10 nM) and peptide ligand (20 microM) were studied using fura 2-loaded cells and microspectrofluorimetry. Whereas preincubation of CHO-TR with anti-TR34-52 abolished only alpha-thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i transients, preincubation with anti-TR1-160 abrogated both alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced responses. This latter inhibitory effect was dose dependent and similar for both agonists, with an EC50 of approximately 90 micrograms/ml. Anti-TR1-160 similarly abolished peptide ligand-induced [Ca2+]i transients in platelets and HUVECs, whereas qualitatively different responses characterized by delayed but sustained elevations in [Ca2+]i transients were evident using alpha-thrombin. Platelet aggregation to low concentrations of both ligands was nearly abolished by anti-TR1-160, although some shape change remained; anti-TR34-52 only inhibited alpha-thrombin-induced aggregation. These data establish that a critical recognition sequence for peptide ligand-mediated receptor activation is contained on the NH2-terminal portion of the receptor, upstream from the first transmembrane domain. Furthermore, alpha

  11. Acid potentiation of the capsaicin receptor determined by a key extracellular site.

    PubMed

    Jordt, S E; Tominaga, M; Julius, D

    2000-07-01

    The capsaicin (vanilloid) receptor, VR1, is a sensory neuron-specific ion channel that serves as a polymodal detector of pain-producing chemical and physical stimuli. The response of VR1 to capsaicin or noxious heat is dynamically potentiated by extracellular protons within a pH range encountered during tissue acidosis, such as that associated with arthritis, infarction, tumor growth, and other forms of injury. A molecular determinant for this important physiological activity was localized to an extracellular Glu residue (E600) in the region linking the fifth transmembrane domain with the putative pore-forming region of the channel. We suggest that this residue serves as a key regulatory site of the receptor by setting sensitivity to other noxious stimuli in response to changes in extracellular proton concentration. We also demonstrate that protons, vanilloids, and heat promote channel opening through distinct pathways, because mutations at a second site (E648) selectively abrogate proton-evoked channel activation without diminishing responses to other noxious stimuli. Our findings provide molecular evidence for stimulus-specific steps in VR1 activation and offer strategies for the development of novel analgesic agents. PMID:10859346

  12. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  13. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  14. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues.

  15. Coarse-grained molecular simulation of epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase multi-site self-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Koland, John G

    2014-01-01

    Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in either of the two C-terminal (CT) domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in molecules such as EGFR

  16. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  17. Procaine rapidly inactivates acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo and competes with agonist for inhibition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Miller, K.W. )

    1989-02-21

    The relationship between the high-affinity procaine channel inhibition site and the agonist self-inhibition site on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from Torpedo electroplaque was investigated by using rapid {sup 86}Rb{sup +} quenched-flux assays at 4 {degree}C in native AChR-rich vesicles on which 50-60% of ACh activation sites were blocked with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX). In the presence of channel-activating acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations alone, AChR undergoes one phase of inactivation in under a second. Addition of procaine produces two-phase inactivation similar to that seen with self-inhibiting ACh concentrations rapid inactivation complete in 30-75 ms is followed by fast desensitization at the same k{sub d} observed without procaine. The dependence of k{sub r} on (procaine) is consistent with a bimolecular association between procaine and its AChR site. Inhibition of AChR function by mixtures of procaine plus self-inhibiting concentrations of ACh or suberyldicholine was studied by reducing the level of {alpha}-BTX block in vesicles. The data support a mechanism where procaine binds preferentially to the open-channel AChR state, since no procaine-induced inactivation is observed without agonist and k{sub r}'s dependence on (ACh) in channel-activating range closely parallels that of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux response to ACh.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each of the two toxin-binding sites of Torpedo acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, A.J.; Hall, Z.W.

    1987-10-06

    The authors have isolated and characterized 12 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that block the binding of ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin (..cap alpha..-BuTx) to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of Torpedo californica. Two of the mAbs block ..cap alpha..-BuTx binding completely; the other 10 inhibit only about 50% of the binding. The mAbs that partially inhibit ..cap alpha..-BuTx binding can be divided into two groups by examination of the additive effect of pairs of mAbs on toxin binding, and by analysis of competition between mAbs for binding to the AChR. These two groups of mAbs, which we have termed A and B, appear to recognize different toxin-binding sites on the same receptor. A and B mAbs were used to determine the kinetic and pharmacological properties of the two sites. The site recognized by A mAbs binds ..cap alpha..-BuTx with a forward rate constant of 0.98 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, d-tubocurarine (dTC) with a K/sub D/ of (6.8 +/- 0.3) x 10/sup -8/ M, and pancuronium with a K/sub D/ of (1.9 +/- 1.0) x 10/sup -9/ M. The site recognized by B mAbs binds ..cap alpha..-BuTx with a forward rate constant of 9.3 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, dTC with a K/sub D/ of (4.6 +/- 0.3) x 10/sup -6/ M, and pancurionium with a K/sub D/ of (9.3 +/- 0.8) x 10/sup -6/ M. Binding of A and B mAbs to the AChR was variably inhibited by nicotinic cholinergic agonists and antagonists, and by ..cap alpha..-conotoxin. The observed pattern of inhibition is consistent with the relative affinity of the two sites for antagonists as given above but also indicates that the mAbs recognize a diversity of epitopes within each site.

  19. Characterization of Genomic Vitamin D Receptor Binding Sites through Chromatin Looping and Opening

    PubMed Central

    Seuter, Sabine; Neme, Antonio; Carlberg, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a transcription factor that mediates the genomic effects of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Genome-wide there are several thousand binding sites and hundreds of primary 1,25(OH)2D3 target genes, but their functional relation is largely elusive. In this study, we used ChIA-PET data of the transcription factor CTCF in combination with VDR ChIP-seq data, in order to map chromatin domains containing VDR binding sites. In total, we found 1,599 such VDR containing chromatin domains and studied in THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells four representatives of them. Our combined ChIP-seq and FAIRE-seq time course data showed that each of these four domains contained a master VDR binding site, where an increase of VDR binding pairs with 1,25(OH)2D3-promoted chromatin opening and the presence of a highly significant DR3-type sequence below the peak summit. These sites differed in their relative VDR binding but not in their kinetics, while other loci either had a weaker and delayed VDR association or could not be confirmed at all. All studied chromatin domains contained at least one primary 1,25(OH)2D3 target gene demonstrating a characteristic slope of mRNA increase, while neighboring genes responded delayed, if at all. In conclusion, the observation of ligand-inducible VDR binding and chromatin opening combined with a DR3-type sequence highlighted genome-wide 160 VDR loci that have within their chromatin domain a more than 4-fold increased likelihood to identify a primary 1,25(OH)2D3 target gene than in the vicinity of other genomic VDR binding sites. PMID:24763502

  20. Novel Benzodiazepine Photoaffinity Probe Stereoselectively Labels a Site Deep Within the Membrane-spanning Domain of the Cholecystokinin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hadac, Elizabeth M.; Dawson, Eric S.; Darrow, James W.; Sugg, Elizabeth E.; Lybrand, Terry P.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of the molecular basis of drug action provides opportunities for refinement of drug properties and for development of more potent and selective molecules that act at the same biological target. In this work, we have identified the active enantiomers in racemic mixtures of structurally related benzophenone derivatives of 1,5-benzodiazepines, representing both antagonist and agonist ligands of the type A cholecystokinin receptor. The parent compounds of the 1,5-benzodiazepine CCK receptor photoaffinity ligands were originally prepared in an effort to develop orally active drugs. The enantiomeric compounds reported in this study selectively photoaffinity-labeled the CCK receptor, resulting in the identification of a site of attachment for the photolabile moiety of the antagonist probe deep within the receptor’s membrane-spanning region at Leu88, a residue within transmembrane segment two. In contrast, the agonist probe labeled a region including extracellular loop one and a portion of transmembrane segment three. The antagonist covalent attachment site to the receptor served as a guide in the construction of theoretical three-dimensional molecular models for the antagonist-receptor complex. These models provided a means for visualization of physically plausible ligand-receptor interactions in the context of all currently available biological data that address small molecule interactions with the CCK receptor. Our approach, featuring the use of novel photolabile compounds targeting the membrane-spanning receptor domain to probe the binding site region, introduces powerful tools and a strategy for direct and selective investigation of non-peptidyl ligand binding to peptide receptors. PMID:16451051

  1. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition.

  2. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes. PMID:27581526

  3. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition. PMID:12813023

  4. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes. PMID:27581526

  5. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  6. The pharmacological stimulation of NMDA receptors via co-agonist site: an fMRI study in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Panizzutti, Rogério; Rausch, Martin; Zurbrügg, Stefan; Baumann, Diana; Beckmann, Nicolau; Rudin, Markus

    d-Serine has been proposed as an endogenous modulator at the co-agonist glycine-binding site of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. There is still some debate as to whether this site is saturated in vivo, but it seems likely that this depends on regional differences in local glycine or d-serine concentrations. In order to identify areas where the co-agonist site was not fully activated in vivo, we studied the effect of intraperitoneal d-serine administration in the rat brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Using contrast agent injection, the variations in the relative cerebral blood volume (CBVrel) in several regions of interest were evaluated. d-Serine (50 mg/kg) elicited a significant statistical increase in the CBVrel in the hippocampus. This effect was inhibited by the specific full antagonist of the co-agonist glycine site L-701,324 indicating that the hippocampal activation occurred through the binding of the agonist d-serine to the glycine-binding site of NMDA receptors. This result demonstrates that in the hippocampus, the co-agonist sites of NMDA receptors are not endogenously saturated under our experimental conditions, suggesting an important role of d-serine in the modulation of receptor function in the hippocampus.

  7. A 7-phenyl substituted triazolopyridazine has inverse agonist activity at the benzodiazepine receptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Biziere, K.; Bourguignon, J. J.; Chambon, J. P.; Heaulme, M.; Perio, A.; Tebib, S.; Wermuth, C. G.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate further the structural requirements for benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor ligands, we synthesized SR 95195, [7-phenyl-3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolo-(4,3-b) pyridazine], a positional isomer of the 6-phenyl-triazolo-pyridazines, which were the first non-BZD derivatives to exhibit high affinity for the BZD receptor and BZD-like activity in vivo. In vitro, SR 95195 displaced specifically bound [3H]-flunitrazepam from rat cerebellar and hippocampal membranes with respective IC50 values of 4 and 8 microM. In vivo, SR 95195 lacked BZD-like activity. At high doses SR 95195 induced clonic seizures in mice (threshold convulsant dose: 150 mg kg-1; CD50: 160 mg kg-1 i.p.) which were antagonized by Ro 15-1788. At non-convulsant doses (25 mg kg-1 i.p. and 100 mg kg-1 i.p.) SR 95195 significantly decreased punished responding in an operant conflict procedure in the rat, suggesting SR 95195 has intrinsic anxiogenic activity. SR 95195, in mice, reversed the anticonvulsant and myorelaxant actions of diazepam 3 mg kg-1, orally (respective ED50 values: 45 mg kg-1 i.p. and 44 mg kg-1 i.p.). In an operant-conflict test in rats, SR 95195 at non-anxiogenic doses, antagonized the disinhibitory action of diazepam 4 mg kg-1, i.p. (ED50: 8.6 mg kg-1, i.p.), but not that of pentobarbitone 15 mg kg-1, i.p. It is concluded that SR 95195 has the pharmacological profile of an inverse BZD agonist and that displacing the phenyl from the 6- to the 7-position in the triazolopyridazine series causes a shift from agonist to inverse agonist type activity at the BZD receptor site. PMID:3028557

  8. Structure-activity relationships for the irreversible blockade of nicotinic receptor agonist sites by lophotoxin and congeneric diterpene lactones

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, P.; Burch, M.; Potenza, C.; Wasserman, L.; Fenical, W.; Taylor, P.

    1985-11-01

    Lophotoxin, a diterpene lactone paralytic toxin from gorgonian corals of the genus Lophogorgia, inhibits ( SVI)-alpha-toxin binding to surface nicotinic receptors of BC3H-1 cells by irreversible occupation of the primary agonist sites. In contrast, receptor-bearing membrane fragments or detergent-solubilized receptors prepared from BC3H-1 cells are not susceptible to lophotoxin block. Thus, lophotoxin inhibition requires intact cells. However, when intact cells were incubated with lophotoxin, subsequent membrane-fragment preparation or detergent solubilization of the receptors did not diminish lophotoxin occupation of ( SVI)-alpha-toxin-binding sites, indicating that lophotoxin binds very tightly to nicotinic receptors. These studies further demonstrate that both surface and nonsurface nicotinic receptors of BC3H-1 cells are susceptible to irreversible occupation by lophotoxin, indicating that the lipophilic toxin freely permeates intact cells. The authors also examined several structural analogs of lophotoxin, one of which was equipotent with lophotoxin for inhibition of ( SVI)-alpha-toxin binding to intact cells and, notably, also blocked alpha-toxin binding to detergent-extracted receptor.

  9. Antagonism of ligand-gated ion channel receptors: two domains of the glycine receptor alpha subunit form the strychnine-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, R J; French, C R; Barry, P H; Shine, J; Schofield, P R

    1992-01-01

    The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel receptor superfamily. Glycine activation of the receptor is antagonized by the convulsant alkaloid strychnine. Using in vitro mutagenesis and functional analysis of the cDNA encoding the alpha 1 subunit of the human GlyR, we have identified several amino acid residues that form the strychnine-binding site. These residues were identified by transient expression of mutated cDNAs in mammalian (293) cells and examination of resultant [3H]strychnine binding, glycine displacement of [3H]strychnine, and electrophysiological responses to the application of glycine and strychnine. This mutational analysis revealed that residues from two separate domains within the alpha 1 subunit form the binding site for the antagonist strychnine. The first domain includes the amino acid residues Gly-160 and Tyr-161, and the second domain includes the residues Lys-200 and Tyr-202. These results, combined with analyses of other ligand-gated ion channel receptors, suggest a conserved tertiary structure and a common mechanism for antagonism in this receptor superfamily. PMID:1311851

  10. Rational Design of an Epstein-Barr Virus Vaccine Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kanekiyo, Masaru; Bu, Wei; Joyce, M Gordon; Meng, Geng; Whittle, James R R; Baxa, Ulrich; Yamamoto, Takuya; Narpala, Sandeep; Todd, John-Paul; Rao, Srinivas S; McDermott, Adrian B; Koup, Richard A; Rossmann, Michael G; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-08-27

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) represents a major global health problem. Though it is associated with infectious mononucleosis and ∼200,000 cancers annually worldwide, a vaccine is not available. The major target of immunity is EBV glycoprotein 350/220 (gp350) that mediates attachment to B cells through complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21). Here, we created self-assembling nanoparticles that displayed different domains of gp350 in a symmetric array. By focusing presentation of the CR2-binding domain on nanoparticles, potent neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice and non-human primates. The structurally designed nanoparticle vaccine increased neutralization 10- to 100-fold compared to soluble gp350 by targeting a functionally conserved site of vulnerability, improving vaccine-induced protection in a mouse model. This rational approach to EBV vaccine design elicited potent neutralizing antibody responses by arrayed presentation of a conserved viral entry domain, a strategy that can be applied to other viruses.

  11. Identification of four novel phosphorylation sites in estrogen receptor α: impact on receptor-dependent gene expression and phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα) phosphorylation is important for estrogen-dependent transcription of ER-dependent genes, ligand-independent receptor activation and endocrine therapy response in breast cancer. However ERα phosphorylation at the previously identified sites does not fully account for these receptor functions. To determine if additional ERα phosphorylation sites exist, COS-1 cells expressing human ERα were labeled with [32P]H3PO4 in vivo and ERα tryptic phosphopeptides were isolated to identify phosphorylation sites. Results Previously uncharacterized phosphorylation sites at serines 46/47, 282, 294, and 559 were identified by manual Edman degradation and phosphoamino acid analysis and confirmed by mutagenesis and phospho-specific antibodies. Antibodies detected phosphorylation of endogenous ERα in MCF-7, MCF-7-LCC2, and Ishikawa cancer cell lines by immunoblot. Mutation of Ser-282 and Ser-559 to alanine (S282A, S559A) resulted in ligand independent activation of ERα as determined by both ERE-driven reporter gene assays and endogenous pS2 gene expression in transiently transfected HeLa cells. Mutation of Ser-46/47 or Ser-294 to alanine markedly reduced estradiol dependent reporter activation. Additionally protein kinase CK2 was identified as a kinase that phosphorylated ERα at S282 and S559 using motif analysis, in vitro kinase assays, and incubation of cells with CK2 kinase inhibitor. Conclusion These novel ERα phosphorylation sites represent new means for modulation of ERα activity. S559 represents the first phosphorylation site identified in the extreme C-terminus (F domain) of a steroid receptor. PMID:20043841

  12. Catch-and-Hold Activation of Muscle Acetylcholine Receptors Having Transmitter Binding Site Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Prasad; Bruhova, Iva; Gupta, Shaweta; Auerbach, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Agonists turn on receptors because their target sites have a higher affinity in the active versus resting conformation of the protein. We used single-channel electrophysiology to measure the lower-affinity (LA) and higher-affinity (HA) equilibrium dissociation constants for acetylcholine in adult-type muscle mouse nicotinic receptors (AChRs) having mutations of agonist binding site amino acids. For a series of agonists and for all mutations of αY93, αG147, αW149, αY190, αY198, εW55, and δW57, the change in LA binding energy was approximately half that in HA binding energy. The results were analyzed as a linear free energy relationship between LA and HA agonist binding, the slope of which (κ) gives the fraction of the overall binding chemical potential where the LA complex is established. The linear correlation between LA and HA binding energies suggests that the overall binding process is by an integrated mechanism (catch-and-hold). For the agonist and the above mutations, κ ∼ 0.5, but side-chain substitutions of two residues had a slope that was significantly higher (0.90; αG153) or lower (0.25; εP121). The results suggest that backbone rearrangements in loop B, loop C, and the non-α surface participate in both LA binding and the LA ↔ HA affinity switch. It appears that all of the intermediate steps in AChR activation comprise a single, energetically coupled process. PMID:24988344

  13. Identification of thyroid hormone receptor binding sites in developing mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones play an essential role in early vertebrate development as well as other key processes. One of its modes of action is to bind to the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) which, in turn, binds to thyroid response elements (TREs) in promoter regions of target genes. The sequence motif for TREs remains largely undefined as does the precise chromosomal location of the TR binding sites. A chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarray (ChIP-chip) experiment was conducted using mouse cerebellum post natal day (PND) 4 and PND15 for the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta 1 to map its binding sites on over 5000 gene promoter regions. We have performed a detailed computational analysis of these data. Results By analysing a recent spike-in study, the optimal normalization and peak identification approaches were determined for our dataset. Application of these techniques led to the identification of 211 ChIP-chip peaks enriched for TR binding in cerebellum samples. ChIP-PCR validation of 25 peaks led to the identification of 16 true positive TREs. Following a detailed literature review to identify all known mouse TREs, a position weight matrix (PWM) was created representing the classic TRE sequence motif. Various classes of promoter regions were investigated for the presence of this PWM, including permuted sequences, randomly selected promoter sequences, and genes known to be regulated by TH. We found that while the occurrence of the TRE motif is strongly correlated with gene regulation by TH for some genes, other TH-regulated genes do not exhibit an increased density of TRE half-site motifs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that an increase in the rate of occurrence of the half-site motifs does not always indicate the specific location of the TRE within the promoter region. To account for the fact that TR often operates as a dimer, we introduce a novel dual-threshold PWM scanning approach for identifying TREs with a true positive rate of 0.73 and a false positive

  14. Functional sites involved in modulation of the GABAA receptor channel by the intravenous anesthetics propofol, etomidate and pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Maldifassi, Maria C; Baur, Roland; Sigel, Erwin

    2016-06-01

    GABAA receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are the target for many clinically important drugs. Among the many modulatory compounds are also the intravenous anesthetics propofol and etomidate, and barbiturates. The mechanism of receptor modulation by these compounds is of mayor relevance. The site of action of these compounds has been located to subunit interfaces in the intra-membrane region of the receptor. In α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors there are five such interfaces, two β+/α- and one each of α+/β-, α+/γ- and γ+/β- subunit interfaces. We have used reporter mutations located in the second trans-membrane region in different subunits to probe the effects of changes at these subunit interfaces on modulation by propofol, etomidate and pentobarbital. We provide evidence for the fact that each of these compounds either modulates through a different set of subunit interfaces or through the same set of subunit interfaces to a different degree. As a GABAA receptor pentamer harbors two β+/α- subunit interfaces, we used concatenated receptors to dissect the contribution of individual interfaces and show that only one of these interfaces is important for receptor modulation by etomidate. PMID:26767954

  15. Investigating the Role of Loop C Hydrophilic Residue ‘T244’ in the Binding Site of ρ1 GABAC Receptors via Site Mutation and Partial Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Moawiah M.; Absalom, Nathan; Solomon, V. Raja; Chebib, Mary; Hibbs, David E.; Hanrahan, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The loop C hydrophilic residue, threonine 244 lines the orthosteric binding site of ρ1 GABAC receptors was studied by point mutation into serine, alanine and cysteine, and tested with GABA, some representative partial agonists and antagonists. Thr244 has a hydroxyl group essential for GABA activity that is constrained by the threonine methyl group, orienting it toward the binding site. Significant decreases in activation effects of the studied ligands at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors, suggests a critical role for this residue. Results of aliphatic and heteroaromatic partial agonists demonstrate different pharmacological effects at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors when co-applied with GABA EC50 responses. ρ1 T244A and ρ1 T244C mutant receptors have minimal sensitivity to GABA at high mM concentrations, whereas, the ρ1 WT partial agonists, β-alanine and MTSEA demonstrate more efficacy and potency, respectively, than GABA at these mutant receptors. This study explores the role of Thr244 in the binding of agonists as an initial step during channel gating by moving loop C towards the ligand. PMID:27244450

  16. Identification of interaction sites for dimerization and adapter recruitment in Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain of Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Bovijn, Celia; Ulrichts, Peter; De Smet, Anne-Sophie; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Beyaert, Rudi; Tavernier, Jan; Peelman, Frank

    2012-02-01

    Toll-like receptor signaling requires interactions of the Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains of the receptor and adapter proteins. Using the mammalian protein-protein interaction trap strategy, homology modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis, we identify the interaction surfaces in the TLR4 TIR domain for the TLR4-TLR4, TLR4-MyD88 adapter-like (MAL), and TLR4-TRIF-related adapter molecule (TRAM) interaction. Two binding sites are equally important for TLR4 dimerization and adapter recruitment. In a model based on the crystal structure of the dimeric TLR10 TIR domain, the first binding site mediates TLR4-TLR4 TIR-TIR interaction. Upon dimerization, two identical second binding sites of the TLR4 TIR domain are juxtaposed and form an extended binding platform for both MAL and TRAM. In our mammalian protein-protein interaction trap assay, MAL and TRAM compete for binding to this platform. Our data suggest that adapter binding can stabilize the TLR4 TIR dimerization. PMID:22139835

  17. Identification of Interaction Sites for Dimerization and Adapter Recruitment in Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor (TIR) Domain of Toll-like Receptor 4*

    PubMed Central

    Bovijn, Celia; Ulrichts, Peter; De Smet, Anne-Sophie; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Beyaert, Rudi; Tavernier, Jan; Peelman, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor signaling requires interactions of the Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains of the receptor and adapter proteins. Using the mammalian protein-protein interaction trap strategy, homology modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis, we identify the interaction surfaces in the TLR4 TIR domain for the TLR4-TLR4, TLR4-MyD88 adapter-like (MAL), and TLR4-TRIF-related adapter molecule (TRAM) interaction. Two binding sites are equally important for TLR4 dimerization and adapter recruitment. In a model based on the crystal structure of the dimeric TLR10 TIR domain, the first binding site mediates TLR4-TLR4 TIR-TIR interaction. Upon dimerization, two identical second binding sites of the TLR4 TIR domain are juxtaposed and form an extended binding platform for both MAL and TRAM. In our mammalian protein-protein interaction trap assay, MAL and TRAM compete for binding to this platform. Our data suggest that adapter binding can stabilize the TLR4 TIR dimerization. PMID:22139835

  18. Transient elevation of amygdala alpha 2 adrenergic receptor binding sites during the early stages of amygdala kindling.

    PubMed

    Chen, M J; Vigil, A; Savage, D D; Weiss, G K

    1990-03-01

    Enhanced noradrenergic neurotransmission retards but does not prevent the development of kindling. We previously reported that locus coeruleus (LC) alpha 2 adrenergic receptor binding sites are transiently elevated during the early stages of kindling development. Since the firing activity of LC noradrenergic neurons is partially regulated via an alpha 2 receptor-mediated recurrent inhibition, the transient elevation in LC alpha 2 receptors could decrease LC activity and consequently facilitate the development of kindling. Transient elevation of alpha 2 receptor binding sites during early stages of kindling may also occur on noradrenergic axon terminals projecting to forebrain sites. Using in vitro neurotransmitter autoradiography techniques, we investigated this hypothesis by measuring specific [3H]idazoxan binding in 5 different areas of rat forebrain at 2 different stages of kindling development. After 2 class 1 kindled seizures, specific [3H]idazoxan binding was elevated significantly in the amygdala, but not in other forebrain regions. No differences in specific [3H]idazoxan binding were observed in any of the 5 brain regions in rats kindled to a single class 5 kindled motor seizure. Saturation of binding experiments indicated that the increase in amygdala [3H]idazoxan binding, following 2 class 1 kindled motor seizures, was due to an increase in the total number of alpha 2 receptor binding sites without a change in the affinity of the binding sites for [3H]idazoxan. Thus, the transient increase in alpha 2 receptors that occurs in the LC in the early stages of kindling also occurs in the forebrain region in which the kindled seizure originates.

  19. Power availability at terrestrial receptor sites for laser-power transmission from the satellite power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1982-01-01

    A statistical model was developed for relating the temporal transmission parameters of a laser beam from a solar power satellite to observable meteorological data to determine the influence of weather on power reception at the earth-based receiver. Sites within 100 miles of existing high voltage transmission lines were examined and the model was developed for clear-sky and clouded conditions. The cases of total transmission through clouds at certain wavelengths, no transmission, and partial transmission were calculated for the cloud portion of the model. The study covered cirriform, stratiform, cumiliform, and mixed type clouds and the possibility of boring holes through the clouds with the beam. Utilization of weapons-quality beams for hole boring, was found to yield power availability increases of 9-33%, although no beneficial effects could be predicted in regions of persistent cloud cover. An efficiency of 80% was determined as possible if several receptor sites were available within 200-300 miles of each other, thereby allowing changes of reception point in cases of unacceptable meteorological conditions.

  20. Automated Site Preparation in Physics-Based Rescoring of Receptor Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Chaya S.; Schonbrun, Cheryl; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Huang, Niu

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen atoms are not typically observable in xray crystal structures but inferring their locations is often important in structure-based drug design. In addition, protonation states of the protein can change in response to ligand binding, as can the orientations of OH groups, a subtle form of “induced fit”. We implement and evaluate an automated procedure for optimizing polar hydrogens in protein binding sites in complex with ligands. Specifically, we apply the previously described ICDA algorithm (Proteins 66: 824–837), which assigns the ionization states of titratable residues, the amide orientations of Asn/Gln side chains, the imidazole ring orientation in His, and the orientations of OH/SH groups, in a unified algorithm. We test the utility of this method for identifying native-like ligand poses using 247 protein-ligand complexes from an established database of docked decoys. Pose selection is performed with a physics-based scoring function based on a molecular mechanics energy function and a Generalized Born implicit solvent model. The use of the ICDA receptor preparation protocol, implemented with no knowledge of the native ligand pose, increases the accuracy of pose selection significantly, with the average RMSD over all complexes decreasing from 2.7 to 1.5 Å when applying ICDA. Large improvements are seen for specific classes of binding sites with titratable groups, such as aspartyl proteases. PMID:19382204

  1. Automated site preparation in physics-based rescoring of receptor ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Chaya S; Schonbrun, Cheryl; Jacobson, Matthew P; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Huang, Niu

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogen atoms are not typically observable in X-ray crystal structures, but inferring their locations is often important in structure-based drug design. In addition, protonation states of the protein can change in response to ligand binding, as can the orientations of OH groups, a subtle form of "induced fit." We implement and evaluate an automated procedure for optimizing polar hydrogens in protein-binding sites in complex with ligands. Specifically, we apply the previously described Independent Cluster Decomposition Algorithm (ICDA) algorithm (Li et al., Proteins 2007;66:824-837), which assigns the ionization states of titratable residues, the amide orientations of Asn/Gln side chains, the imidazole ring orientation in His, and the orientations of OH/SH groups, in a unified algorithm. We test the utility of this method for identifying nativelike ligand poses using 247 protein-ligand complexes from an established database of docked decoys. Pose selection is performed with a physics-based scoring function based on a molecular mechanics energy function and a Generalized Born implicit solvent model. The use of the ICDA receptor preparation protocol, implemented with no knowledge of the native ligand pose, increases the accuracy of pose selection significantly, with the average RMSD over all complexes decreasing from 2.7 to 1.5 A when applying ICDA. Large improvements are seen for specific classes of binding sites with titratable groups, such as aspartyl proteases.

  2. Multiplex Detection of Functional G Protein-Coupled Receptors Harboring Site-Specifically Modified Unnatural Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We developed a strategy for identifying positions in G protein-coupled receptors that are amenable to bioorthogonal modification with a peptide epitope tag under cell culturing conditions. We introduced the unnatural amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine (azF) into human CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) at site-specific amber codon mutations. We then used strain-promoted azide–alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition to label the azF-CCR5 variants with a FLAG peptide epitope-conjugated aza-dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) reagent. A microtiter plate-based sandwich fluorophore-linked immunosorbent assay was used to probe simultaneously the FLAG epitope and the receptor using infrared dye-conjugated antibodies so that the extent of DBCO incorporation, corresponding nominally to labeling efficiency, could be quantified ratiometrically. The extent of incorporation of DBCO at the various sites was evaluated in the context of a recent crystal structure of maraviroc-bound CCR5. We observed that labeling efficiency varied dramatically depending on the topological location of the azF in CCR5. Interestingly, position 109 in transmembrane helix 3, located in a hydrophobic cavity on the extracellular side of the receptor, was labeled most efficiently. Because the bioorthogonal labeling and detection strategy described might be used to introduce a variety of different peptide epitopes or fluorophores into engineered expressed receptors, it might prove to be useful for a wide range of applications, including single-molecule detection studies of receptor trafficking and signaling mechanism. PMID:25524496

  3. Evidence for a Transient Additional Ligand Binding Site in the TAS2R46 Bitter Taste Receptor.

    PubMed

    Sandal, Massimo; Behrens, Maik; Brockhoff, Anne; Musiani, Francesco; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Carloni, Paolo; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Most human G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are activated by small molecules binding to their 7-transmembrane (7-TM) helix bundle. They belong to basally diverging branches: the 25 bitter taste 2 receptors and most members of the very large rhodopsin-like/class A GPCRs subfamily. Some members of the class A branch have been suggested to feature not only an orthosteric agonist-binding site but also a more extracellular or "vestibular" site, involved in the binding process. Here we use a hybrid molecular mechanics/coarse-grained (MM/CG) molecular dynamics approach on a widely studied bitter taste receptor (TAS2R46) receptor in complex with its agonist strychnine. Three ∼1 μs molecular simulation trajectories find two sites hosting the agonist, which together elucidate experimental data measured previously and in this work. This mechanism shares similarities with the one suggested for the evolutionarily distant class A GPCRs. It might be instrumental for the remarkably broad but specific spectrum of agonists of these chemosensory receptors.

  4. Meta-diamide insecticides acting on distinct sites of RDL GABA receptor from those for conventional noncompetitive antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinich; Nomura, Michikazu; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-04-01

    The RDL GABA receptor is an attractive target of insecticides. Here we demonstrate that meta-diamides [3-benzamido-N-(4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)phenyl)benzamides] are a distinct class of RDL GABA receptor antagonists showing high insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura. We also suggest that the mode of action of the meta-diamides is distinct from that of conventional noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs), such as fipronil, picrotoxin, lindane, dieldrin, and α-endosulfan. Using a membrane potential assay, we examined the effects of the meta-diamide 3-benzamido-N-(2-bromo-4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (meta-diamide 7) and NCAs on mutant Drosophila RDL GABA receptors expressed in Drosophila Mel-2 cells. NCAs had little or no inhibitory activity against at least one of the three mutant receptors (A2'S, A2'G, and A2'N), which were reported to confer resistance to NCAs. In contrast, meta-diamide 7 inhibited all three A2' mutant receptors, at levels comparable to its activity with the wild-type receptor. Furthermore, the A2'S·T6'V mutation almost abolished the inhibitory effects of all NCAs. However, meta-diamide 7 inhibited the A2'S・T6'S mutant receptor at the same level as its activity with the wild-type receptor. In contrast, a G336M mutation in the third transmembrane domain of the RDL GABA receptor abolished the inhibitory activities of meta-diamide 7, although the G336M mutation had little effect on the inhibitory activities of conventional NCAs. Molecular modeling studies also suggested that the binding site of meta-diamides was different from those of NCAs. Meta-diamide insecticides are expected to be prominent insecticides effective against A2' mutant RDL GABA receptors with a different mode of action.

  5. Removal of either N-glycan site from the envelope receptor binding domain of Moloney and Friend but not AKV mouse ecotropic gammaretroviruses alters receptor usage

    SciTech Connect

    Knoper, Ryan C.; Ferrarone, John; Yan Yuhe; Lafont, Bernard A.P.; Kozak, Christine A.

    2009-09-01

    Three N-linked glycosylation sites were removed from the envelope glycoproteins of Friend, Moloney, and AKV mouse ecotropic gammaretroviruses: gs1 and gs2, in the receptor binding domain; and gs8, in a region implicated in post-binding cell fusion. Mutants were tested for their ability to infect rodent cells expressing 4 CAT-1 receptor variants. Three mutants (Mo-gs1, Mo-gs2, and Fr-gs1) infect NIH 3T3 and rat XC cells, but are severely restricted in Mus dunni cells and Lec8, a Chinese hamster cell line susceptible to ecotropic virus. This restriction is reproduced in ferret cells expressing M. dunni dCAT-1, but not in cells expressing NIH 3T3 mCAT-1. Virus binding assays, pseudotype assays, and the use of glycosylation inhibitors further suggest that restriction is primarily due to receptor polymorphism and, in M. dunni cells, to glycosylation of cellular proteins. Virus envelope glycan size or type does not affect infectivity. Thus, host range variation due to N-glycan deletion is receptor variant-specific, cell-specific, virus type-specific, and glycan site-specific.

  6. Removal of either N-glycan site from the envelope receptor binding domain of Moloney and Friend but not AKV mouse ecotropic gammaretroviruses alters receptor usage

    PubMed Central

    Knoper, Ryan C.; Ferrarone, John; Yan, Yuhe; Lafont, Bernard A. P.; Kozak, Christine A.

    2009-01-01

    Three N-linked glycosylation sites were removed from the envelope glycoproteins of Friend, Moloney, and AKV mouse ecotropic gammaretroviruses: gs1 and gs2, in the receptor binding domain; and gs8, in a region implicated in post-binding cell fusion. Mutants were tested for their ability to infect rodent cells expressing 4 CAT-1 receptor variants. Three mutants (Mo-gs1, Mo-gs2, Fr-gs1) infect NIH 3T3 and rat XC cells, but are severely restricted in M. dunni cells and Lec8, a Chinese hamster cell line susceptible to ecotropic virus. This restriction is reproduced in ferret cells expressing M. dunni dCAT-1, but not in cells expressing NIH 3T3 mCAT-1. Virus binding assays, pseudotype assays, and use of glycosylation inhibitors further suggest that restriction is primarily due to receptor polymorphism and, in M. dunni cells, to glycosylation of cellular proteins. Virus envelope glycan size or type does not affect infectivity. Thus, host range variation due to N-glycan deletion is receptor variant-specific, cell specific, virus type-specific, and glycan site-specific. PMID:19584017

  7. Functional analysis of the BRI1 receptor kinase by Thr-for-Ser substitution in a regulatory autophosphorylation site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BRI1 becomes highly phosphorylated in vivo upon perception of the ligand, brassinolide, as a result of autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by its co-receptor kinase, BAK1. Important autophosphorylation sites include those involved in activation of kinase activity and those that are inhibito...

  8. Antibody Recognition of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Minsun; Lee, Peter S.; Hoffman, Ryan M. B.; Zhu, Xueyong; Krause, Jens C.; Laursen, Nick S.; Yoon, Sung-il; Song, Langzhou; Tussey, Lynda; Crowe, James E.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. This potential threat was realized in 2009 when an H1N1 virus emerged that resembled the 1918 virus in antigenicity but fortunately was not nearly as deadly. 5J8 is a human antibody that potently neutralizes a broad spectrum of H1N1 viruses, including the 1918 and 2009 pandemic viruses. Here, we present the crystal structure of 5J8 Fab in complex with a bacterially expressed and refolded globular head domain from the hemagglutinin (HA) of the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pandemic virus. 5J8 recognizes a conserved epitope in and around the receptor binding site (RBS), and its HCDR3 closely mimics interactions of the sialic acid receptor. Electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions of 5J8 Fab in complex with an HA trimer from a 1986 H1 strain and with an engineered stabilized HA trimer from the 2009 H1 pandemic virus showed a similar mode of binding. As for other characterized RBS-targeted antibodies, 5J8 uses avidity to extend its breadth and affinity against divergent H1 strains. 5J8 selectively interacts with HA insertion residue 133a, which is conserved in pandemic H1 strains and has precluded binding of other RBS-targeted antibodies. Thus, the RBS of divergent HAs is targeted by 5J8 and adds to the growing arsenal of common recognition motifs for design of therapeutics and vaccines. Moreover, consistent with previous studies, the bacterially expressed H1 HA properly refolds, retaining its antigenic structure, and presents a low-cost and rapid alternative for engineering and manufacturing candidate flu vaccines. PMID:24027321

  9. Antibody recognition of the pandemic H1N1 Influenza virus hemagglutinin receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minsun; Lee, Peter S; Hoffman, Ryan M B; Zhu, Xueyong; Krause, Jens C; Laursen, Nick S; Yoon, Sung-Il; Song, Langzhou; Tussey, Lynda; Crowe, James E; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-11-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. This potential threat was realized in 2009 when an H1N1 virus emerged that resembled the 1918 virus in antigenicity but fortunately was not nearly as deadly. 5J8 is a human antibody that potently neutralizes a broad spectrum of H1N1 viruses, including the 1918 and 2009 pandemic viruses. Here, we present the crystal structure of 5J8 Fab in complex with a bacterially expressed and refolded globular head domain from the hemagglutinin (HA) of the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pandemic virus. 5J8 recognizes a conserved epitope in and around the receptor binding site (RBS), and its HCDR3 closely mimics interactions of the sialic acid receptor. Electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions of 5J8 Fab in complex with an HA trimer from a 1986 H1 strain and with an engineered stabilized HA trimer from the 2009 H1 pandemic virus showed a similar mode of binding. As for other characterized RBS-targeted antibodies, 5J8 uses avidity to extend its breadth and affinity against divergent H1 strains. 5J8 selectively interacts with HA insertion residue 133a, which is conserved in pandemic H1 strains and has precluded binding of other RBS-targeted antibodies. Thus, the RBS of divergent HAs is targeted by 5J8 and adds to the growing arsenal of common recognition motifs for design of therapeutics and vaccines. Moreover, consistent with previous studies, the bacterially expressed H1 HA properly refolds, retaining its antigenic structure, and presents a low-cost and rapid alternative for engineering and manufacturing candidate flu vaccines.

  10. Identification of Host Insulin Binding Sites on Schistosoma japonicum Insulin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Rachel J.; Toth, Istvan; Liang, Jiening; Mangat, Amanjot; McManus, Donald P.; You, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum insulin receptors (SjIRs) have been identified as encouraging vaccine candidates. Interrupting or blocking the binding between host insulin and the schistosome insulin receptors (IRs) may result in reduced glucose uptake leading to starvation and stunting of worms with a reduction in egg output. To further understand how schistosomes are able to exploit host insulin for development and growth, and whether these parasites and their mammalian hosts compete for the same insulin source, we identified insulin binding sites on the SjIRs. Based on sequence analysis and the predicted antigenic structure of the primary sequences of the SjIRs, we designed nine and eleven peptide analogues from SjIR-1 and SjIR-2, respectively. Using the Octet RED system, we identified analogues derived from SjIR-1 (10) and SjIR-2 (20, 21 and 22) with insulin-binding sequences specific for S. japonicum. Nevertheless, the human insulin receptor (HIR) may compete with the SjIRs in binding human insulin in other positions which are important for HIR binding to insulin. However, no binding occurred between insulin and parasite analogues derived from SjIR-1 (2, 7 and 8) and SjIR-2 (14, 16 and 18) at the same locations as HIR sequences which have been shown to have strong insulin binding affinities. Importantly, we found two analogues (1 and 3), derived from SjIR-1, and two analogues (13 and 15) derived from SjIR-2, were responsible for the major insulin binding affinity in S. japonicum. These peptide analogues were shown to have more than 10 times (in KD value) stronger binding capacity for human insulin compared with peptides derived from the HIR in the same sequence positions. Paradoxically, analogues 1, 3, 13 and 15 do not appear to contain major antigenic determinants which resulted in poor antibody responses to native S. japonicum protein. This argues against their future development as peptide-vaccine candidates. PMID:27441998

  11. The effect of interferon on the receptor sites to rabies virus on mouse neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of rabies virus to mouse neuroblastoma cells (MNA) primed with alpha interferon (IFN-{alpha}), beta interferon (IFN-{beta}), or alpha bungarotoxin (BTX) was examined. A saturable number of receptor sites to rabies virus was calculated by increasing the amount of {sup 3}H-CVS added to a constant number of untreated MNA cells. MNA cells were then exposed to 20 I.U. of IFN-{alpha}, IFN-{beta}, or 1 {mu}g of BTX and assayed to determine if these treatments had an effect on the number of receptor sites to rabies virus. Total amount of {sup 3}H-CVS bound to MNA cells was determined during a three hour incubation period. Cold competition assays using 1,000 fold excess unlabeled CVS were used to determine non-specific binding for each treatment. Specific binding was then calculated by subtracting non-specific binding from the total amount of CVS bound to MNA cells. A similar amount of total viral protein bound to untreated and IFN-{beta}, and BTX treated cells after 180 minutes of incubation. The bound protein varied by only 0.07 {mu}g. However, the amount of specific and non-specific binding varied a great deal between treatments. BTX caused an increase in non-specific and a decrease in specific binding of rabies virus. IFN-{beta} produced variable results in non-specific and specific binding while IFN-{alpha} caused mainly specific binding to occur. The most significant change brought about by IFN-{alpha} was an increase in the rate of viral attachment. At 30 minutes post-infection, IFN-{alpha} treated cells had bound 90% of the total amount of virus bound to untreated cells after 180 minutes. The increased binding rate did not cause a productive infection of rabies virus. No viral production was evident after an incubation period of 48 hours in either IFN-{alpha} or IFN-{beta} treated cells.

  12. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE, IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro, toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, indicating that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity. NMDA-glutamate receptors are widely present in the visual system and contribute to pattern-elicited visual evoked potent...

  13. Stereoselective L-(3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate-binding sites in nervous tissue of Aplysia californica: evidence for muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, T.F.; Mpitsos, G.J.; Siebenaller, J.F.; Barker, D.L.

    1985-12-01

    The muscarinic antagonist L-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (L-(/sup 3/H)QNB) binds with a high affinity (Kd = 0.77 nM) to a single population of specific sites (Bmax = 47 fmol/mg of protein) in nervous tissue of the gastropod mollusc, Aplysia. The specific L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding is displaced stereoselectively by the enantiomers of benzetimide, dexetimide, and levetimide. The pharmacologically active enantiomer, dexetimide, is more potent than levetimide as an inhibitor of L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding. Moreover, the muscarinic cholinergic ligands, scopolamine, atropine, oxotremorine, and pilocarpine are effective inhibitors of the specific L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding, whereas nicotinic receptor antagonists, decamethonium and d-tubocurarine, are considerably less effective. These pharmacological characteristics of the L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site provide evidence for classical muscarinic receptors in Aplysia nervous tissue. The physiological relevance of the dexetimide-displaceable L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site was supported by the demonstration of the sensitivity of the specific binding to thermal denaturation. Specific binding of L-(/sup 3/H)QNB was also detected in nervous tissue of another marine gastropod, Pleurobranchaea californica. The characteristics of the Aplysia L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site are in accordance with studies of numerous vertebrate and invertebrate tissues indicating that the muscarinic cholinergic receptor site has been highly conserved through evolution.

  14. Stereoselective L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate-binding sites in nervous tissue of Aplysia californica: evidence for muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Murray, T F; Mpitsos, G J; Siebenaller, J F; Barker, D L

    1985-12-01

    The muscarinic antagonist L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (L-[3H]QNB) binds with a high affinity (Kd = 0.77 nM) to a single population of specific sites (Bmax = 47 fmol/mg of protein) in nervous tissue of the gastropod mollusc, Aplysia. The specific L-[3H]QNB binding is displaced stereoselectively by the enantiomers of benzetimide, dexetimide, and levetimide. The pharmacologically active enantiomer, dexetimide, is more potent than levetimide as an inhibitor of L-[3H]QNB binding. Moreover, the muscarinic cholinergic ligands, scopolamine, atropine, oxotremorine, and pilocarpine are effective inhibitors of the specific L-[3H]QNB binding, whereas nicotinic receptor antagonists, decamethonium and d-tubocurarine, are considerably less effective. These pharmacological characteristics of the L-[3H]QNB-binding site provide evidence for classical muscarinic receptors in Aplysia nervous tissue. The physiological relevance of the dexetimide-displaceable L-[3H]QNB-binding site was supported by the demonstration of the sensitivity of the specific binding to thermal denaturation. Specific binding of L-[3H]QNB was also detected in nervous tissue of another marine gastropod, Pleurobranchaea californica. The characteristics of the Aplysia L-[3H]QNB-binding site are in accordance with studies of numerous vertebrate and invertebrate tissues indicating that the muscarinic cholinergic receptor site has been highly conserved through evolution. PMID:4078624

  15. Identification and mutagenesis of the TACE and γ-secretase cleavage sites in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Arrash; Glenn, Gary; van der Geer, Peter

    2014-07-18

    Stimulation of macrophages with phorbolesters, bacterial DNA, or lipopolysaccharides causes regulated intramembrane proteolysis or RIPping of the CSF-1 receptor. This process involves TACE-mediated cleavage in the extracellular domain, followed by γ-secretase-mediated cleavage within the transmembrane region. In the current study, we have identified the TACE cleavage site, which is present twelve residues from the carboxy-terminal end of the extracellular domain. Replacement of fourteen residues at the end of the extracellular domain blocked TACE cleavage. In addition, we identified the γ-secretase cleavage site, which is present four residues from the carboxy-terminal end of the transmembrane region. Replacement of six residues surrounding this site strongly reduced intramembrane cleavage. Our results provide new insights into the molecular physiology of the CSF-1 receptor and contribute to our understanding of substrate selection by TACE and γ-secretase.

  16. Neutralization of influenza A viruses by insertion of a single antibody loop into the receptor binding site

    PubMed Central

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Kashyap, Arun K.; Steel, John; Rubrum, Adam; Bhabha, Gira; Khayat, Reza; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Dillon, Michael A.; O’Neil, Ryann E.; Faynboym, Aleksandr M.; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B.; Palese, Peter; Webby, Richard; Lerner, Richard A.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Immune recognition of protein antigens relies upon the combined interaction of multiple antibody loops, which provides a fairly large footprint and constrains the size and shape of protein surfaces that can be targeted. Single protein loops can mediate extremely high affinity binding, but it is unclear whether such a mechanism is available to antibodies. Here we report the isolation and characterization of antibody C05 that neutralizes strains from multiple subtypes of influenza A viruses, including H1, H2, and H3. Crystal and EM structures show that C5 recognizes conserved elements of the receptor binding site on the hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein. Recognition of the HA receptor binding site is dominated by a single HCDR3 loop, with minor contacts from HCDR1, and is sufficient to achieve nanomolar binding with a minimal footprint. Thus, binding predominantly with a single loop can allow antibodies to target small, conserved, functional sites on otherwise hypervariable antigens. PMID:22982990

  17. Site-specific incorporation of keto amino acids into functional G protein-coupled receptors using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shixin; Köhrer, Caroline; Huber, Thomas; Kazmi, Manija; Sachdev, Pallavi; Yan, Elsa C Y; Bhagat, Aditi; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2008-01-18

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous heptahelical transmembrane proteins involved in a wide variety of signaling pathways. The work described here on application of unnatural amino acid mutagenesis to two GPCRs, the chemokine receptor CCR5 (a major co-receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus) and rhodopsin (the visual photoreceptor), adds a new dimension to studies of GPCRs. We incorporated the unnatural amino acids p-acetyl-L-phenylalanine (Acp) and p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (Bzp) into CCR5 at high efficiency in mammalian cells to produce functional receptors harboring reactive keto groups at three specific positions. We obtained functional mutant CCR5, at levels up to approximately 50% of wild type as judged by immunoblotting, cell surface expression, and ligand-dependent calcium flux. Rhodopsin containing Acp at three different sites was also purified in high yield (0.5-2 microg/10(7) cells) and reacted with fluorescein hydrazide in vitro to produce fluorescently labeled rhodopsin. The incorporation of reactive keto groups such as Acp or Bzp into GPCRs allows their reaction with different reagents to introduce a variety of spectroscopic and other probes. Bzp also provides the possibility of photo-cross-linking to identify precise sites of protein-protein interactions, including GPCR binding to G proteins and arrestins, and for understanding the molecular basis of ligand recognition by chemokine receptors. PMID:17993461

  18. Activation of two sites by adenosine receptor agonists to cause relaxation in rat isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, D J; Payne, S L; Hourani, S M O

    1997-01-01

    /[A] curves for adenosine, CPA or R-PIA. However, in the presence of NBTI (1 μM), 8-SPT (100 μM) gave significant rightward shifts of E/[A] curves to adenosine.ZM 241385 (0.1–1 μM) produced significant rightward shifts of the high potency phase of NECA E/[A] curves (pA2=7.65±0.25 in the presence and 7.20±0.12 in the absence of endothelium), while curves to R-PIA were not significantly shifted by 1 μM ZM 241385. In the presence of NBTI E/[A] curves to adenosine were significantly rightward shifted by ZM 241385 (0.1 μM, pA2=7.50±0.16).In conclusion, the results suggest activation of A2B receptors located primarily on the smooth muscle by low concentrations of NECA and by adenosine under conditions of uptake blockade, and of another, as yet undefined site which may be intracellular, by higher concentrations of NECA, by CPA, R-PIA and adenosine under conditions where uptake is operational. PMID:9421303

  19. A mutational analysis of the acetylcholine receptor channel transmitter binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Akk, G; Zhou, M; Auerbach, A

    1999-01-01

    Mutagenesis and single-channel kinetic analysis were used to investigate the roles of four acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR) residues that are candidates for interacting directly with the agonist. The EC50 of the ACh dose-response curve was increased following alpha-subunit mutations Y93F and Y198F and epsilon-subunit mutations D175N and E184Q. Single-channel kinetic modeling indicates that the increase was caused mainly by a reduced gating equilibrium constant (Theta) in alphaY198F and epsilonD175N, by an increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant for ACh (KD) and a reduction in Theta in alphaY93F, and only by a reduction in KD in epsilonE184Q. This mutation altered the affinity of only one of the two binding sites and was the only mutation that reduced competition by extracellular K+. Additional mutations of epsilonE184 showed that K+ competition was unaltered in epsilonE184D and was virtually eliminated in epsilonE184K, but that neither of these mutations altered the intrinsic affinity for ACh. Thus there is an apparent electrostatic interaction between the epsilonE184 side chain and K+ ( approximately 1.7kBT), but not ACh+. The results are discussed in terms of multisite and induced-fit models of ligand binding to the AChR. PMID:9876135

  20. Rational Design of an Epstein-Barr Virus Vaccine Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kanekiyo, Masaru; Bu, Wei; Joyce, M Gordon; Meng, Geng; Whittle, James R R; Baxa, Ulrich; Yamamoto, Takuya; Narpala, Sandeep; Todd, John-Paul; Rao, Srinivas S; McDermott, Adrian B; Koup, Richard A; Rossmann, Michael G; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-08-27

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) represents a major global health problem. Though it is associated with infectious mononucleosis and ∼200,000 cancers annually worldwide, a vaccine is not available. The major target of immunity is EBV glycoprotein 350/220 (gp350) that mediates attachment to B cells through complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21). Here, we created self-assembling nanoparticles that displayed different domains of gp350 in a symmetric array. By focusing presentation of the CR2-binding domain on nanoparticles, potent neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice and non-human primates. The structurally designed nanoparticle vaccine increased neutralization 10- to 100-fold compared to soluble gp350 by targeting a functionally conserved site of vulnerability, improving vaccine-induced protection in a mouse model. This rational approach to EBV vaccine design elicited potent neutralizing antibody responses by arrayed presentation of a conserved viral entry domain, a strategy that can be applied to other viruses. PMID:26279189

  1. Role of the Syk autophosphorylation site and SH2 domains in B cell antigen receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    To explore the mechanism(s) by which the Syk protein tyrosine kinase participates in B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling, we have studied the function of various Syk mutants in B cells made Syk deficient by homologous recombination knockout. Both Syk SH2 domains were required for BCR-mediated Syk and phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma 2 phosphorylation, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate release, and Ca2+ mobilization. A possible explanation for this requirement was provided by findings that recruitment of Syk to tyrosine-phosphorylated immunoglobulin (Ig) alpha and Ig beta requires both Syk SH2 domains. A Syk mutant in which the putative autophosphorylation site (Y518/Y519) of Syk was changed to phenylalanine was also defective in signal transduction; however, this mutation did not affect recruitment to the phosphorylated immunoreceptor family tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). These findings not only confirm that both SH2 domains are necessary for Syk binding to tyrosine-phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta but indicate that this binding is necessary for Syk (Y518/519) phosphorylation after BCR ligation. This sequence of events is apparently required for coupling the BCR to most cellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation, to the phosphorylation and activation of PLC- gamma 2, and to Ca2+ mobilization. PMID:7500027

  2. Mutations in the GM1 Binding Site of Simian Virus 40 VP1 Alter Receptor Usage and Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Buch, Michael H. C.; Murata, Haruhiko; Erickson, Kimberly D.; Neu, Ursula; Garcea, Robert L.; Peden, Keith; Stehle, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are nonenveloped viruses with capsids composed primarily of 72 pentamers of the viral VP1 protein, which forms the outer shell of the capsid and binds to cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Highly conserved VP1 proteins from closely related polyomaviruses recognize different oligosaccharides. To determine whether amino acid changes restricted to the oligosaccharide binding site are sufficient to determine receptor specificity and how changes in receptor usage affect tropism, we studied the primate polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40), which uses the ganglioside GM1 as a receptor that mediates cell binding and entry. Here, we used two sequential genetic screens to isolate and characterize viable SV40 mutants with mutations in the VP1 GM1 binding site. Two of these mutants were completely resistant to GM1 neutralization, were no longer stimulated by incorporation of GM1 into cell membranes, and were unable to bind to GM1 on the cell surface. In addition, these mutant viruses displayed an infection defect in monkey cells with high levels of cell surface GM1. Interestingly, one mutant infected cells with low cell surface GM1 more efficiently than wild-type virus, apparently by utilizing a different ganglioside receptor. Our results indicate that a small number of mutations in the GM1 binding site are sufficient to alter ganglioside usage and change tropism, and they suggest that VP1 divergence is driven primarily by a requirement to accommodate specific receptors. In addition, our results suggest that GM1 binding is required for vacuole formation in permissive monkey CV-1 cells. Further study of these mutants will provide new insight into polyomavirus entry, pathogenesis, and evolution. PMID:22514351

  3. Key Sites for P2X Receptor Function and Multimerization: Overview of Mutagenesis Studies on a Structural Basis

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann, Ralf; Kless, Achim; Schmalzing, Günther

    2015-01-01

    P2X receptors constitute a seven-member family (P2X1-7) of extracellular ATP-gated cation channels of widespread expression. Because P2X receptors have been implicated in neurological, inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases, they constitute promising drug targets. Since the first P2X cDNA sequences became available in 1994, numerous site-directed mutagenesis studies have been conducted to disclose key sites of P2X receptor function and oligomerization. The publication of the 3-Å crystal structures of the zebrafish P2X4 (zfP2X4) receptor in the homotrimeric apo-closed and ATP-bound open states in 2009 and 2012, respectively, has ushered a new era by allowing for the interpretation of the wealth of molecular data in terms of specific three-dimensional models and by paving the way for designing more-decisive experiments. Thanks to these structures, the last five years have provided invaluable insight into our understanding of the structure and function of the P2X receptor class of ligandgated ion channels. In this review, we provide an overview of mutagenesis studies of the pre- and post-crystal structure eras that identified amino acid residues of key importance for ligand binding, channel gating, ion flow, formation of the pore and the channel gate, and desensitization. In addition, the sites that are involved in the trimerization of P2X receptors are reviewed based on mutagenesis studies and interface contacts that were predicted by the zfP2X4 crystal structures. PMID:25439586

  4. Menthol shares general anesthetic activity and sites of action on the GABA(A) receptor with the intravenous agent, propofol.

    PubMed

    Watt, Erin E; Betts, Brooke A; Kotey, Francesca O; Humbert, Danielle J; Griffith, Theanne N; Kelly, Elizabeth W; Veneskey, Kelley C; Gill, Nikhila; Rowan, Kathleen C; Jenkins, Andrew; Hall, Adam C

    2008-08-20

    Menthol and related compounds were investigated for modulation of recombinant human gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A), alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2s)) receptor currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Sub-maximal (EC(20)) GABA currents were typically enhanced by co-applications of 3-300 microM (+)-menthol (e.g. by approximately 2-fold at 50 microM) > isopulegol > isomenthol> alpha-terpineol > cyclohexanol. We studied menthol's actions on GABA(A) receptors compared to sedatives (benzodiazepines) and intravenous anesthetics (barbiturates, steroids, etomidate and propofol). Flumazenil (a benzodiazepine antagonist) did not inhibit menthol enhancements while currents directly activated by 50 microM propofol were significantly inhibited (by 26+/-3%) by 50 microM (+)-menthol. GABA(A) receptors containing beta(2) subunits with either a point mutation in a methionine residue to a tryptophan at the 286 position (in transmembrane domain 3, TM-3) or a tyrosine to a tryptophan at the 444 position (TM-4) are insensitive to modulation by propofol. Enhancements of GABA EC(20) currents by menthol were equally abolished in GABA(A) alpha(1)beta(2)(M286W)gamma(2s) and alpha(1)beta(2)(Y444W)gamma(2s) receptors while positive modulations by benzodiazepines, barbiturates and steroids were unaffected. Menthol may therefore exert its actions on GABA(A) receptors via sites distinct from benzodiazepines, steroids and barbiturates, and via sites important for modulation by propofol. Finally, using an in vivo tadpole assay, addition of (+)-menthol resulted in a loss of righting reflex with an EC(50) of 23.5+/-4.7 microM (approximately10-fold less potent anesthesia than propofol). Thus, menthol and analogs share general anesthetic action with propofol, possibly via action at similar sites on the GABA(A) receptor. PMID:18593637

  5. Matricryptic sites control tissue injury responses in the cardiovascular system: relationships to pattern recognition receptor regulated events.

    PubMed

    Davis, George E

    2010-03-01

    This review addresses new concepts related to the importance of how cells within the cardiovascular system respond to matricryptic sites generated from the extracellular matrix (ECM) following tissue injury. A model is presented whereby matricryptic sites exposed from the ECM result in activation of multiple cell surface receptors including integrins, scavenger receptors, and toll-like receptors which together are hypothesized to coactivate downstream signaling pathways which alter cell behaviors following tissue injury. Of great interest are the relationships between matricryptic fragments of ECM called matricryptins and other stimuli that activate cells during injury states such as released components from cells (DNA, RNA, cytoskeletal components such as actin) or products from infectious agents in innate immunity responses. These types of cell activating molecules, which are composed of repeating molecular elements, are known to interact with pattern recognition receptors that (i) are expressed from cell surfaces, (ii) are released from cells following tissue injury, or (iii) circulate as components of plasma. Thus, cell recognition of matricryptic sites from the ECM appears to be an important component of a broad cell and tissue sensory system to detect and respond to environmental cues generated following varied types of tissue injury.

  6. Receptor binding sites for substance P in surgical specimens obtained from patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyh, C.R.; Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Kruger, L.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-05-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that tachykinin neuropeptides (substance P (SP), substance K (SK), and neuromedin K (NK)) play a role in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses. To test this hypothesis in a human inflammatory disease, quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to examine possible abnormalities in tachykinin binding sites in surgical specimens from patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In all cases, specimens were processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography by using /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton-Hunter conjugates of NK, SK, and SP. In colon tissue obtained from ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease patients, very high concentrations of SP receptor binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules located in the submucosa, muscalairs mucosa, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and serosa, in contrast to control patients. These results demonstrate that receptor binding sites for SP, but not SK or NK, are ectopically expressed in high concentrations by cells involved in mediating inflammatory and immune responses. These data suggest that SP may be involved in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease and might provide some insight into the interaction between the nervous system and the regulation of inflammation and the immune response in human inflammatory disease.

  7. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-10-01

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms.

  8. Efficacy of anti-insulin-like growth factor I receptor monoclonal antibody cixutumumab in mesothelioma is highly correlated with insulin growth factor-I receptor sites/cell.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Neetu; Zhang, Jingli; Yu, Yunkai; Ho, Mitchell; Merino, Maria; Cao, Liang; Hassan, Raffit

    2012-11-01

    Insulin growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is expressed in mesothelioma and therefore an attractive target for therapy. The antitumor activity of cixutumumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to IGF-IR, in mesothelioma and relationship to IGF-IR expression was investigated using eight early passage tumor cells obtained from patients, nine established cell lines and an in vivo human mesothelioma tumor xenograft model. Although IGF-IR expression at the mRNA and protein level was present in all mesothelioma cells, using a quantitative ELISA immunoassay, there was considerable variability of IGF-IR expression ranging from 1 to 14 ng/mg of lysate. Using flow cytometry, the number of IGF-IR surface receptors varied from ≈ 2,000 to 50,000 sites/cell. Cells expressing >10,000 sites/cell had greater than 10% growth inhibition when treated with cixutumumab (100 μg/ml). Cixutumumab also induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated toxicity (>10% specific lysis) in cell lines, which had >20,000 IGF-IR sites/cell. Treatment with cixutumumab decreased phosphorylation of IGF-IR, Akt and Erk in cell lines, H226 and H28 having 24,000 and 51,000 IGF-IR sites/cell, respectively, but not in the cell line H2052 with 3,000 IGF-IR sites/cell. In vivo, cixutumumab treatment delayed growth of H226 mesothelioma tumor xenografts in mice and improved the overall survival of these mice compared to mice treated with saline (p < 0.004). Our results demonstrate that the antitumor efficacy of cixutumumab including inhibition of IGF-IR downstream signaling is highly correlated with IGF-IR sites/cell. A phase II clinical trial of cixutumumab is currently ongoing for the treatment of patients with mesothelioma.

  9. Measles Virus Infects both Polarized Epithelial and Immune Cells by Using Distinctive Receptor-Binding Sites on Its Hemagglutinin▿

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Maino; Takeda, Makoto; Shirogane, Yuta; Hashiguchi, Takao; Ohno, Shinji; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2008-01-01

    Measles is one of the most contagious human infectious diseases and remains a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), also called CD150, is a cellular receptor for measles virus (MV), presumably accounting for its tropism for immune cells and its immunosuppressive properties. On the other hand, pathological studies have shown that MV also infects epithelial cells at a later stage of infection, although its mechanism has so far been unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type MV can infect and produce syncytia in human polarized epithelial cell lines independently of SLAM and CD46 (a receptor for the vaccine strains of MV). Progeny viral particles are released exclusively from the apical surface of these polarized epithelial cell lines. We have also identified amino acid residues on the MV attachment protein that are likely to interact with a putative receptor on epithelial cells. All of these residues have aromatic side chains and may form a receptor-binding pocket located in a different position from the putative SLAM- and CD46-binding sites on the MV attachment protein. Thus, our results indicate that MV has an intrinsic ability to infect both polarized epithelial and immune cells by using distinctive receptor-binding sites on the attachment protein corresponding to each of their respective receptors. The ability of MV to infect polarized epithelial cells and its exclusive release from the apical surface may facilitate its efficient transmission via aerosol droplets, resulting in its highly contagious nature. PMID:18287234

  10. Inter- and Intra-Subunit Butanol/Isoflurane Sites of Action in the Human Glycine Receptor.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Mandy L; Gorini, Giorgio; McCracken, Lindsay M; Mayfield, R Dayne; Harris, R Adron; Trudell, James R

    2016-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission and are targets for alcohols and anesthetics in brain. GlyR transmembrane (TM) domains contain critical residues for alcohol/anesthetic action: amino acid A288 in TM3 forms crosslinks with TM1 (I229) in the adjacent subunit as well as TM2 (S267) and TM4 (Y406, W407, I409, Y410) in the same subunit. We hypothesized that these residues may participate in intra-subunit and inter-subunit sites of alcohol/anesthetic action. The following double and triple mutants of GLRA1 cDNA (encoding human glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit) were injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes: I229C/A288C, I229C/A288C/C290S, A288C/Y406C, A288C/W407C, A288C/I409C, and A288C/Y410C along with the corresponding single mutants and wild-type GLRA1. Butanol (22 mM) or isoflurane (0.6 mM) potentiation of GlyR-mediated currents before and after application of the cysteine crosslinking agent HgCl2 (10 μM) was measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Crosslinking nearly abolished butanol and isoflurane potentiation in the I229C/A288C and I229C/A288C/C290S mutants but had no effect in single mutants or wild-type. Crosslinking also inhibited butanol and isoflurane potentiation in the TM3-4 mutants (A288C/Y406C, A288C/W407C, A288C/I409C, A288C/Y410C) with no effect in single mutants or wild-type. We extracted proteins from oocytes expressing I229C/288C, A288C/Y410C, or wild-type GlyRs, used mass spectrometry to verify their expression and possible inter-subunit dimerization, plus immunoblotting to investigate the biochemical features of proposed crosslinks. Wild-type GlyR subunits measured about 50 kDa; after crosslinking, the dimeric/monomeric 100:50 kDa band ratio was significantly increased in I229C/288C but not A288C/Y410C mutants or wild-type, providing support for TM1-3 inter-subunit and TM3-4 intra-subunit crosslinking. A GlyR homology model based on the GluCl template provides further evidence for a multi-site model

  11. Inter- and Intra-Subunit Butanol/Isoflurane Sites of Action in the Human Glycine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Mandy L.; Gorini, Giorgio; McCracken, Lindsay M.; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Harris, R. Adron; Trudell, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission and are targets for alcohols and anesthetics in brain. GlyR transmembrane (TM) domains contain critical residues for alcohol/anesthetic action: amino acid A288 in TM3 forms crosslinks with TM1 (I229) in the adjacent subunit as well as TM2 (S267) and TM4 (Y406, W407, I409, Y410) in the same subunit. We hypothesized that these residues may participate in intra-subunit and inter-subunit sites of alcohol/anesthetic action. The following double and triple mutants of GLRA1 cDNA (encoding human glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit) were injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes: I229C/A288C, I229C/A288C/C290S, A288C/Y406C, A288C/W407C, A288C/I409C, and A288C/Y410C along with the corresponding single mutants and wild-type GLRA1. Butanol (22 mM) or isoflurane (0.6 mM) potentiation of GlyR-mediated currents before and after application of the cysteine crosslinking agent HgCl2 (10 μM) was measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Crosslinking nearly abolished butanol and isoflurane potentiation in the I229C/A288C and I229C/A288C/C290S mutants but had no effect in single mutants or wild-type. Crosslinking also inhibited butanol and isoflurane potentiation in the TM3-4 mutants (A288C/Y406C, A288C/W407C, A288C/I409C, A288C/Y410C) with no effect in single mutants or wild-type. We extracted proteins from oocytes expressing I229C/288C, A288C/Y410C, or wild-type GlyRs, used mass spectrometry to verify their expression and possible inter-subunit dimerization, plus immunoblotting to investigate the biochemical features of proposed crosslinks. Wild-type GlyR subunits measured about 50 kDa; after crosslinking, the dimeric/monomeric 100:50 kDa band ratio was significantly increased in I229C/288C but not A288C/Y410C mutants or wild-type, providing support for TM1-3 inter-subunit and TM3-4 intra-subunit crosslinking. A GlyR homology model based on the GluCl template provides further evidence for a multi-site model

  12. Bisphenol A binds to the local anesthetic receptor site to block the human cardiac sodium channel.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Andrias O; Eberhardt, Esther; Weidner, Christian; Alzheimer, Christian; Wallace, B A; Lampert, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has attracted considerable public attention as it leaches from plastic used in food containers, is detectable in human fluids and recent epidemiologic studies link BPA exposure with diseases including cardiovascular disorders. As heart-toxicity may derive from modified cardiac electrophysiology, we investigated the interaction between BPA and hNav1.5, the predominant voltage-gated sodium channel subtype expressed in the human heart. Electrophysiology studies of heterologously-expressed hNav1.5 determined that BPA blocks the channel with a K(d) of 25.4±1.3 µM. By comparing the effects of BPA and the local anesthetic mexiletine on wild type hNav1.5 and the F1760A mutant, we demonstrate that both compounds share an overlapping binding site. With a key binding determinant thus identified, an homology model of hNav1.5 was generated based on the recently-reported crystal structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb. Docking predictions position both ligands in a cavity delimited by F1760 and contiguous with the DIII-IV pore fenestration. Steered molecular dynamics simulations used to assess routes of ligand ingress indicate that the DIII-IV pore fenestration is a viable access pathway. Therefore BPA block of the human heart sodium channel involves the local anesthetic receptor and both BPA and mexiletine may enter the closed-state pore via membrane-located side fenestrations. PMID:22848561

  13. Lung cancer risk assessment at receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant.

    PubMed

    Scungio, Mauro; Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Ficco, Giorgio

    2016-10-01

    The toxicity of particulate matter emitted from waste-to-energy plants, is associated to the compounds attached to the particles, several of which have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in the Group 1 carcinogens. In this paper a modified risk-assessment model, deriving from an existing one, was applied to estimate the lung cancer risk related to both ultrafine and coarse particles emitted from an incinerator whose people living nearby are exposed to. To this end, the measured values of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni) and PCDD/Fs (Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans) emitted from an incinerator placed in Italy were used to calculate the Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk (ELCR) at the stack of the plant. The estimated ELCR was then used as input data in a numerical CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model that solves the mass, momentum, turbulence and species transport equations to study the influence of wind speed and chimney height on the ELCR at receptor sites. Furthermore, combining meteorological data (wind speed and direction), and hypothesizing different exposure scenarios on the basis of time-activity patterns of people living nearby the plant, specific risk maps were obtained by evaluating ELCR around the incinerator. Results show that with the increasing of wind speed, the ELCR value downwind at the plant decreases and its point of maximum risk becomes closer to the stack. On the other hand, increasing the stack height decreases the ELCR, moving away from the stack the point of maximum risk. Finally, the risk maps for people living or working nearby the plant have highlighted that the excess risk of lung cancer due to the presence of the incinerator is below the WHO target (1×10(-5)). PMID:27462027

  14. Lung cancer risk assessment at receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant.

    PubMed

    Scungio, Mauro; Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Ficco, Giorgio

    2016-10-01

    The toxicity of particulate matter emitted from waste-to-energy plants, is associated to the compounds attached to the particles, several of which have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in the Group 1 carcinogens. In this paper a modified risk-assessment model, deriving from an existing one, was applied to estimate the lung cancer risk related to both ultrafine and coarse particles emitted from an incinerator whose people living nearby are exposed to. To this end, the measured values of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni) and PCDD/Fs (Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans) emitted from an incinerator placed in Italy were used to calculate the Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk (ELCR) at the stack of the plant. The estimated ELCR was then used as input data in a numerical CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model that solves the mass, momentum, turbulence and species transport equations to study the influence of wind speed and chimney height on the ELCR at receptor sites. Furthermore, combining meteorological data (wind speed and direction), and hypothesizing different exposure scenarios on the basis of time-activity patterns of people living nearby the plant, specific risk maps were obtained by evaluating ELCR around the incinerator. Results show that with the increasing of wind speed, the ELCR value downwind at the plant decreases and its point of maximum risk becomes closer to the stack. On the other hand, increasing the stack height decreases the ELCR, moving away from the stack the point of maximum risk. Finally, the risk maps for people living or working nearby the plant have highlighted that the excess risk of lung cancer due to the presence of the incinerator is below the WHO target (1×10(-5)).

  15. Functional characterization of ivermectin binding sites in α1β2γ2L GABA(A) receptors

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mondragon, Argel; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are therapeutic targets for many indications including sedation, anesthesia and anxiolysis. There is, however, considerable scope for the development of new therapeutics with improved beneficial effects and reduced side-effect profiles. The anthelminthic drug, ivermectin, activates the GABAAR although its binding site is not known. The molecular site of action of ivermectin has, however, been defined by crystallography in the homologous glutamate-gated chloride channel. Resolving the molecular mechanisms of ivermectin binding to α1β2γ2L GABAARs may provide insights into the design of improved therapeutics. Given that ivermectin binds to subunit interfaces, we sought to define (1) which subunit interface sites it binds to, (2) whether these sites are equivalent in terms of ivermectin sensitivity or efficacy, and (3) how many must be occupied for maximal efficacy. Our approach involved precluding ivermectin from binding to particular interfaces by introducing bulky M3 domain 36′F sidechains to the “+” side of those interfaces. We thereby demonstrated that ivermectin produces irreversible channel activation only when it binds to the single γ2L-β2 interface site. When it binds to α1-β2 sites it elicits potentiation of GABA-gated currents but has no irreversible activating effect. Ivermectin cannot bind to the β2-α1 interface site due to its endogenous bulky 36′ methionine. Replacing this with an alanine creates a functional site at this interface, but surprisingly it is inhibitory. Molecular docking simulations reveal that the γ2L-β2 interface forms more contacts with ivermectin than the other interfaces, possibly explaining why ivermectin appears to bind irreversibly at this interface. This study demonstrates unexpectedly stark pharmacological differences among GABAAR ivermectin binding sites. PMID:26441518

  16. Regulation of MMP-9 by a WIN-Binding Site in the Monocyte-Macrophage System Independent from Cannabinoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Wolf, Susanne; Synwoldt, Peggy; Pahl, Andreas; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Ullrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The cannabinoid system is known to be involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Therefore, drugs targeting cannabinoid receptors are considered as candidates for anti-inflammatory and tissue protective therapy. We demonstrated that the prototypical cannabinoid agonist R(+)WIN55,212-2 (WIN) reduced the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in a murine model of cigarette-smoke induced lung inflammation. In experiments using primary cells and cell lines of the monocyte-macrophage-system we found that binding of the cannabinoid-receptor agonist WIN to a stereo-selective, specific binding site in cells of the monocyte-macrophage-system induced a significant down-regulation of MMP-9 secretion and disturbance of intracellular processing, which subsequently down-regulated MMP-9 mRNA expression via a ERK1/2-phosphorylation-dependent pathway. Surprisingly, the anti-inflammatory effect was independent from classical cannabinoid receptors. Our experiments supposed an involvement of TRPV1, but other yet unidentified sites are also possible. We conclude that cannabinoid-induced control of MMP-9 in the monocyte-macrophage system via a cannabinoid-receptor independent pathway represents a general option for tissue protection during inflammation, such as during lung inflammation and other diseases associated with inflammatory tissue damage. PMID:23139770

  17. Structural characteristics of the recognition site for cholinergic ligands in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from squid optical ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Plyashkevich, Yu.G.; Demushkin, V.P.

    1986-01-20

    The influence of chemical modification on the parameters of the binding of cholinergic ligands by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of squid optical ganglia was investigated. The presence of two subpopulations of recognition sites, differing in the composition of the groups contained in them, was detected. It was established with high probability that subpopulation I contains arginine and tyrosine residues and a carboxyl group while subpopulation II contains an amino group, a thyrosine residue, and a carboxyl group. Moreover, in both subpopulations there is an amino group important only for the binding of tubocurarin. On the basis of the results obtained, a model of the recognition sites for cholinergic ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of squid optical ganglia is proposed.

  18. Identification and functional analysis of tomato BRI1 and BAK1 receptor kinase phosphorylation sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential plant hormones that are perceived at the cell surface by a membrane bound receptor kinase, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1). BRI1 interacts with BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (BAK1) to initiate a signal transduction pathway in which autophosphorylation an...

  19. Elucidation of the Molecular Basis of Cholecystokinin Peptide Docking to Its Receptor Using Site-Specific Intrinsic Photoaffinity Labeling and Molecular Modeling†

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pino, Delia I.; Abagyan, Ruben; Miller, Laurence J.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors represent the largest family of receptors and the major target of current drug development efforts. Understanding of the mechanisms of ligand binding and activation of these receptors remains limited, despite recent advances in structural determination of family members. This work focuses on the use of photoaffinity labeling and molecular modeling to elucidate the structural basis of binding a natural peptide ligand to a family A G protein-coupled receptor, the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Two photolabile cholecystokinin analogues were developed and characterized as representing high-affinity, fully biologically active probes with sites of covalent attachment at positions 28 and 31. The sites of receptor labeling were identified by purification, proteolytic peptide mapping, and radiochemical sequencing of labeled wild-type and mutant cholecystokinin receptors. The position 28 probe labeled second extracellular loop residue Leu199, while the position 31 probe labeled first extracellular loop residue Phe107. Along with five additional spatial approximation constraints coming from previous photoaffinity labeling studies and 12 distance restraints from fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies, these were built into two homology models of the cholecystokinin receptor, based on the recent crystal structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor and A2a-adenosine receptor. The resultant agonist ligand-occupied receptor models fully accommodate all existing experimental data and represent the best refined models of a peptide hormone receptor in this important family. PMID:19441839

  20. Endothelin-B receptor activation triggers an endogenous analgesic cascade at sites of peripheral injury.

    PubMed

    Khodorova, Alla; Navarro, Betsy; Jouaville, Laurence Sophie; Murphy, Jo-Ellen; Rice, Frank L; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Long-Woodward, Denise; Stoffel, Markus; Strichartz, Gary R; Yukhananov, Rus; Davar, Gudarz

    2003-08-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a newly described pain mediator that is involved in the pathogenesis of pain states ranging from trauma to cancer. ET-1 is synthesized by keratinocytes in normal skin and is locally released after cutaneous injury. While it is able to trigger pain through its actions on endothelin-A (ET(A)) receptors of local nociceptors, it can coincidentally produce analgesia through endothelin-B (ET(B)) receptors. Here we map a new endogenous analgesic circuit, in which ET(B) receptor activation induces the release of beta-endorphin from keratinocytes and the activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs, also named Kir-3) linked to opioid receptors on nociceptors. These results indicate the existence of an intrinsic feedback mechanism to control peripheral pain in skin, and establish keratinocytes as an ET(B) receptor-operated opioid pool.

  1. Identification of a site critical for kinase regulation on the central processing unit (CPU) helix of the aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Trammell, M A; Falke, J J

    1999-01-01

    Ligand binding to the homodimeric aspartate receptor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium generates a transmembrane signal that regulates the activity of a cytoplasmic histidine kinase, thereby controlling cellular chemotaxis. This receptor also senses intracellular pH and ambient temperature and is covalently modified by an adaptation system. A specific helix in the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, helix alpha6, has been previously implicated in the processing of these multiple input signals. While the solvent-exposed face of helix alpha6 possesses adaptive methylation sites known to play a role in kinase regulation, the functional significance of its buried face is less clear. This buried region lies at the subunit interface where helix alpha6 packs against its symmetric partner, helix alpha6'. To test the role of the helix alpha6-helix alpha6' interface in kinase regulation, the present study introduces a series of 13 side-chain substitutions at the Gly 278 position on the buried face of helix alpha6. The substitutions are observed to dramatically alter receptor function in vivo and in vitro, yielding effects ranging from kinase superactivation (11 examples) to complete kinase inhibition (one example). Moreover, four hydrophobic, branched side chains (Val, Ile, Phe, and Trp) lock the kinase in the superactivated state regardless of whether the receptor is occupied by ligand. The observation that most side-chain substitutions at position 278 yield kinase superactivation, combined with evidence that such facile superactivation is rare at other receptor positions, identifies the buried Gly 278 residue as a regulatory hotspot where helix packing is tightly coupled to kinase regulation. Together, helix alpha6 and its packing interactions function as a simple central processing unit (CPU) that senses multiple input signals, integrates these signals, and transmits the output to the signaling subdomain where the histidine kinase is bound. Analogous CPU

  2. Interaction of alpha-L-aspartyl-D-phenylalanine methyl ester with the receptor site of the bitter taste.

    PubMed

    Lelj, F; Tancredi, T; Temussi, P A; Toniolo, C

    1980-12-01

    The analysis of the structure-activity relationship previously performed on the sweet L,L isomer of Asp-Phe-OMe was extended to the bitter L,D diastereoisomer. A combination of NMR measurements and of an original method of PEM calculations gives a description of the conformational state of the L,D isomer that can be effectively used to study the interaction with a previously proposed model of the bitter taste receptor site. PMID:7202705

  3. Interaction of alpha-L-aspartyl-D-phenylalanine methyl ester with the receptor site of the bitter taste.

    PubMed

    Lelj, F; Tancredi, T; Temussi, P A; Toniolo, C

    1980-12-01

    The analysis of the structure-activity relationship previously performed on the sweet L,L isomer of Asp-Phe-OMe was extended to the bitter L,D diastereoisomer. A combination of NMR measurements and of an original method of PEM calculations gives a description of the conformational state of the L,D isomer that can be effectively used to study the interaction with a previously proposed model of the bitter taste receptor site.

  4. Characterization of binding sites for [3H]-DTG, a selective sigma receptor ligand, in the sheep pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Abreu, P; Sugden, D

    1990-09-14

    Specific binding sites for [3H]-1,3 di-ortho-tolylguanidine ([3H]-DTG), a selective radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand, were detected and characterized in sheep pineal gland membranes. The binding of [3H]-DTG to sheep pineal membranes was rapid and reversible with a rate constant for association (K+1) at 25 degrees C of 0.0052 nM-1.min-1 and rate constant for dissociation (K-1) 0.0515 min-1, giving a Kd (K-1/K+1) of 9.9 nM. Saturation studies demonstrated that [3H]-DTG binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 27 +/- 3.4 nM, and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 1.39 +/- 0.03 pmol/mg protein. Competition experiments showed that the relative order of potency of compounds for inhibition of [3H]-DTG binding to sheep pineal membranes was as follows: trifluoperazine = DTG greater than haloperidol greater than pentazocine greater than (+)-3-PPP greater than (+/-)SKF 10,047. Some steroids (testosterone, progesterone, deoxycorticosterone) previously reported to bind to the sigma site in brain membranes were very weak inhibitors of [3H]-DTG binding in the present study. The results indicate that [3H]-DTG binding sites having the characteristics of sigma receptors are present in sheep pineal gland. The physiological importance of these sites in regulating the synthesis of the pineal hormone melatonin awaits further study. PMID:2169739

  5. Identification of an l-Phenylalanine Binding Site Enhancing the Cooperative Responses of the Calcium-sensing Receptor to Calcium*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Huang, Yun; Jiang, Yusheng; Mulpuri, Nagaraju; Wei, Ling; Hamelberg, Donald; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Functional positive cooperative activation of the extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o)-sensing receptor (CaSR), a member of the family C G protein-coupled receptors, by [Ca2+]o or amino acids elicits intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) oscillations. Here, we report the central role of predicted Ca2+-binding site 1 within the hinge region of the extracellular domain (ECD) of CaSR and its interaction with other Ca2+-binding sites within the ECD in tuning functional positive homotropic cooperativity caused by changes in [Ca2+]o. Next, we identify an adjacent l-Phe-binding pocket that is responsible for positive heterotropic cooperativity between [Ca2+]o and l-Phe in eliciting CaSR-mediated [Ca2+]i oscillations. The heterocommunication between Ca2+ and an amino acid globally enhances functional positive homotropic cooperative activation of CaSR in response to [Ca2+]o signaling by positively impacting multiple [Ca2+]o-binding sites within the ECD. Elucidation of the underlying mechanism provides important insights into the longstanding question of how the receptor transduces signals initiated by [Ca2+]o and amino acids into intracellular signaling events. PMID:24394414

  6. The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor glycine site and D-serine metabolism: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptor requires two distinct agonists to operate. Glycine is assumed to be the endogenous ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine site, but this notion has been challenged by the discovery of high levels of endogenous d-serine in the mammalian forebrain. I have outlined an evolutionary framework for the appearance of a glycine site in animals and the metabolic events leading to high levels of D-serine in brain. Sequence alignments of the glycine-binding regions, along with the scant experimental data available, suggest that the properties of invertebrate NMDA receptor glycine sites are probably different from those in vertebrates. The synthesis of D-serine in brain is due to a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (B(6))-requiring serine racemase in glia. Although it remains unknown when serine racemase first evolved, data concerning the evolution of B(6) enzymes, along with the known occurrences of serine racemases in animals, point to D-serine synthesis arising around the divergence time of arthropods. D-Serine catabolism occurs via the ancient peroxisomal enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAO), whose ontogenetic expression in the hindbrain of mammals is delayed until the postnatal period and absent from the forebrain. The phylogeny of D-serine metabolism has relevance to our understanding of brain ontogeny, schizophrenia and neurotransmitter dynamics. PMID:15306409

  7. Systematic Mapping of Posttranslational Modifications in Human Estrogen Receptor-α with Emphasis on Novel Phosphorylation Sites*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Atsriku, Christian; Britton, David J.; Held, Jason M.; Schilling, Birgit; Scott, Gary K.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Benz, Christopher C.; Baldwin, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic study of posttranslational modifications of the estrogen receptor isolated from the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line is reported. Proteolysis with multiple enzymes, mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry achieved very high sequence coverage for the full-length 66-kDa endogenous protein from estradiol-treated cell cultures. Nine phosphorylated serine residues were identified, three of which were previously unreported and none of which were previously observed by mass spectrometry by any other laboratory. Two additional modified serine residues were identified in recombinant protein, one previously reported but not observed here in endogenous protein and the other previously unknown. Although major emphasis was placed on identifying new phosphorylation sites, N-terminal loss of methionine accompanied by amino acetylation and a lysine side chain acetylation (or possibly trimethylation) were also detected. The use of both HPLC-ESI and MALDI interfaced to different mass analyzers gave higher sequence coverage and identified more sites than could be achieved by either method alone. The estrogen receptor is critical in the development and progression of breast cancer. One previously unreported phosphorylation site identified here was shown to be strongly dependent on estradiol, confirming its potential significance to breast cancer. Greater knowledge of this array of posttranslational modifications of estrogen receptor, particularly phosphorylation, will increase our understanding of the processes that lead to estradiol-induced activation of this protein and may aid the development of therapeutic strategies for management of hormone-dependent breast cancer. PMID:18984578

  8. Rapid agonist-induced loss of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin opioid receptor sites in NG108-15, but not SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, R.I.; Lameh, J.; Sadee, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites on intact SK-N-SH and NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells, respectively, in culture. Use of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin ({beta}E) as a tracer, together with {beta}E(6-31) to block high-affinity non-opioid binding in both cell lines, permitted the measurement of cell surface {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites. Labeling was at {delta} sites in NG108-15 cells and predominantly at {mu} sites in SK-N-SH cells. Pretreatment with the {mu} and {delta} agonist, DADLE, caused a rapid loss of cell surface {delta} receptor sites in NG108-15 cells, but failed to reduce significantly {mu} receptor density in SK-N-SH cells.

  9. Activation of erythropoietin receptor in the absence of hormone by a peptide that binds to a domain different from the hormone binding site

    PubMed Central

    Naranda, Tatjana; Wong, Kenneth; Kaufman, R. Ilene; Goldstein, Avram; Olsson, Lennart

    1999-01-01

    Applying a homology search method previously described, we identified a sequence in the extracellular dimerization site of the erythropoietin receptor, distant from the hormone binding site. A peptide identical to that sequence was synthesized. Remarkably, it activated receptor signaling in the absence of erythropoietin. Neither the peptide nor the hormone altered the affinity of the other for the receptor; thus, the peptide does not bind to the hormone binding site. The combined activation of signal transduction by hormone and peptide was strongly synergistic. In mice, the peptide acted like the hormone, protecting against the decrease in hematocrit caused by carboplatin. PMID:10377456

  10. Synthesis of GABAA Receptor Agonists and Evaluation of their α-Subunit Selectivity and Orientation in the GABA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Michaela; Rabe, Holger; Strehle, Axelle; Dieler, Sandra; Debus, Fabian; Dannhardt, Gerd; Akabas, Myles H.; Lüddens, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Drugs used to treat various disorders target GABAA receptors. To develop α subunit selective compounds, we synthesized 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL) derivatives. The 3-isoxazolol moiety was substituted by 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-one, 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-thione, and substituted 1,2,4-triazol-3-ol heterocycles with modifications to the basic piperidine substituent as well as substituents without basic nitrogen. Compounds were screened by [3H]muscimol binding and in patch-clamp experiments with heterologously expressed GABAA αiβ3γ2 receptors (i = 1–6). The effects of 5-aminomethyl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5d were comparable to GABA for all α subunit isoforms. 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5a and 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H- [1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-thione 6a were weak agonists at α3–, α3–, and α5–containing receptors. When coapplied with GABA they were antagonistic inα2–, α4–, and α6–containing receptors and potentiated α3-containing receptors. 6a protected GABA binding site cysteine-substitution mutants α1F64C and α1S68C from reacting with methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate. 6a specifically covalently modified the α1R66C thiol, in the GABA binding site, through its oxadiazolethione sulfur. These results demonstrate the feasibility of synthesizing α subtype selective GABA mimetic drugs. PMID:18651727

  11. Gating allosterism at a single class of etomidate sites on alpha1beta2gamma2L GABA A receptors accounts for both direct activation and agonist modulation.

    PubMed

    Rüsch, Dirk; Zhong, Huijun; Forman, Stuart A

    2004-05-14

    At clinical concentrations, the potent intravenous general anesthetic etomidate enhances gamma-aminobutyric acid, type A (GABA(A)) receptor activity elicited with low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations, whereas much higher etomidate concentrations activate receptors in the absence of GABA. Therefore, GABA(A) receptors may possess two types of etomidate sites: high affinity GABA-modulating sites and low affinity channel-activating sites. However, GABA modulation and direct activation share stereoselectivity for the (R)(+)-etomidate isomer and display parallel dependence on GABA(A) beta subunit isoforms, suggesting that these two actions may be mediated by a single class of etomidate site(s) that exert one or more molecular effects. In this study, we assessed GABA modulation by etomidate using leftward shifts of electrophysiological GABA concentration responses in cells expressing human alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors. Etomidate at up to 100 microm reduced GABA EC(50) values by over 100-fold but without apparent saturation, indicating the absence of high affinity etomidate sites. In experiments using a partial agonist, P4S, etomidate both reduced EC(50) and increased maximal efficacy, demonstrating that etomidate shifts the GABA(A) receptor gating equilibrium toward open states. Results were quantitatively analyzed using equilibrium receptor gating models, wherein a postulated class of equivalent etomidate sites both directly activates receptors and enhances agonist gating. A Monod-Wyman-Changeux co-agonist mechanism with two equivalent etomidate sites that allosterically enhance GABA(A) receptor gating independently of agonist binding most simply accounts for direct activation and agonist modulation. This model also correctly predicts the actions of etomidate on GABA(A) receptors containing a point mutation that increases constitutive gating activity.

  12. Structural model for gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor noncompetitive antagonist binding: widely diverse structures fit the same site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ligong; Durkin, Kathleen A; Casida, John E

    2006-03-28

    Several major insecticides, including alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil, and the botanical picrotoxinin are noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs) for the GABA receptor. We showed earlier that human beta(3) homopentameric GABA(A) receptor recognizes all of the important GABAergic insecticides and reproduces the high insecticide sensitivity and structure-activity relationships of the native insect receptor. Despite large structural diversity, the NCAs are proposed to fit a single binding site in the chloride channel lumen lined by five transmembrane 2 segments. This hypothesis is examined with the beta(3) homopentamer by mutagenesis, pore structure studies, NCA binding, and molecular modeling. The 15 amino acids in the cytoplasmic half of the pore were mutated to cysteine, serine, or other residue for 22 mutants overall. Localization of A-1'C, A2'C, T6'C, and L9'C (index numbers for the transmembrane 2 region) in the channel lumen was established by disulfide cross-linking. Binding of two NCA radioligands [(3)H]1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-n-propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and [(3)H] 3,3-bis-trifluoromethyl-bicyclo[2,2,1]heptane-2,2-dicarbonitrile was dramatically reduced with 8 of the 15 mutated positions, focusing attention on A2', T6', and L9' as proposed binding sites, consistent with earlier mutagenesis studies. The cytoplasmic half of the beta3 homopentamer pore was modeled as an alpha-helix. The six NCAs listed above plus t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate fit the 2' to 9' pore region forming hydrogen bonds with the T6' hydroxyl and hydrophobic interactions with A2', T6', and L9' alkyl substituents, thereby blocking the channel. Thus, widely diverse NCA structures fit the same GABA receptor beta subunit site with important implications for insecticide cross-resistance and selective toxicity between insects and mammals.

  13. A Specific Cholesterol Binding Site Is Established by the 2.8 Å Structure of the Human [beta][subscript 2]-Adrenergic Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Michael A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Griffith, Mark T.; Roth, Christopher B.; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Kuhn, Peter; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2008-07-08

    The role of cholesterol in eukaryotic membrane protein function has been attributed primarily to an influence on membrane fluidity and curvature. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a thermally stabilized human {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor bound to cholesterol and the partial inverse agonist timolol. The receptors pack as monomers in an antiparallel association with two distinct cholesterol molecules bound per receptor, but not in the packing interface, thereby indicating a structurally relevant cholesterol-binding site between helices I, II, III, and IV. Thermal stability analysis using isothermal denaturation confirms that a cholesterol analog significantly enhances the stability of the receptor. A consensus motif is defined that predicts cholesterol binding for 44% of human class A receptors, suggesting that specific sterol binding is important to the structure and stability of other G protein-coupled receptors, and that this site may provide a target for therapeutic discovery.

  14. α1F64 Residue at GABA(A) receptor binding site is involved in gating by influencing the receptor flipping transitions.

    PubMed

    Szczot, Marcin; Kisiel, Magdalena; Czyzewska, Marta M; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2014-02-26

    GABA receptors (GABAARs) mediate inhibition in the adult brain. These channels are heteropentamers and their ligand binding sites are localized at the β+ / α- interfaces. As expected, mutations of binding-site residues affect binding kinetics but accumulating evidence indicates that gating is also altered, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We investigated the impact of the hydrophobic box residue localized at α1(-), F64 (α1F64), on the binding and gating of rat recombinant α1β1γ2 receptors. The analysis of current responses to rapid agonist applications confirmed a marked effect of α1F64 mutations on agonist binding and revealed surprisingly strong effects on gating, including the disappearance of rapid desensitization, the slowing of current onset, and accelerated deactivation. Moreover, nonstationary variance analysis revealed that the α1F64C mutation dramatically reduced the maximum open probability without altering channel conductance. Interestingly, for wild-type receptors, responses to saturating concentration of a partial agonist, P4S, showed no rapid desensitization, similar to GABA-evoked responses mediated by α1F64C mutants. For the α1F64L mutation, the application of the high-affinity agonist muscimol partially rescued rapid desensitization compared with responses evoked by GABA. These findings suggest that α1F64 mutations do not disrupt desensitization mechanisms but rather affect other gating features that obscure it. Model simulations indicated that all of our observations related to α1F64 mutations could be properly reproduced by altering the flipped state transitions that occurred after agonist binding but preceded opening. In conclusion, we propose that the α1F64 residue may participate in linking binding and gating by influencing flipping kinetics.

  15. Genetically encoded photo-cross-linkers map the binding site of an allosteric drug on a G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Grunbeck, Amy; Huber, Thomas; Abrol, Ravinder; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Goddard, William A; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2012-06-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are dynamic membrane proteins that bind extracellular molecules to transduce signals. Although GPCRs represent the largest class of therapeutic targets, only a small percentage of their ligand-binding sites are precisely defined. Here we describe the novel application of targeted photo-cross-linking using unnatural amino acids to obtain structural information about the allosteric binding site of a small molecule drug, the CCR5-targeted HIV-1 co-receptor blocker maraviroc. PMID:22455376

  16. Free Energy Landscape of Lipid Interactions with Regulatory Binding Sites on the Transmembrane Domain of the EGF Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hedger, George; Shorthouse, David; Koldsø, Heidi; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-08-25

    Lipid molecules can bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins, modulating their structure and function. We have undertaken coarse-grained simulations to calculate free energy profiles for glycolipids and phospholipids interacting with modulatory sites on the transmembrane helix dimer of the EGF receptor within a lipid bilayer environment. We identify lipid interaction sites at each end of the transmembrane domain and compute interaction free energy profiles for lipids with these sites. Interaction free energies ranged from ca. -40 to -4 kJ/mol for different lipid species. Those lipids (glycolipid GM3 and phosphoinositide PIP2) known to modulate EGFR function exhibit the strongest binding to interaction sites on the EGFR, and we are able to reproduce the preference for interaction with GM3 over other glycolipids suggested by experiment. Mutation of amino acid residues essential for EGFR function reduce the binding free energy of these key lipid species. The residues interacting with the lipids in the simulations are in agreement with those suggested by experimental (mutational) studies. This approach provides a generalizable tool for characterizing the interactions of lipids that bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins.

  17. Free Energy Landscape of Lipid Interactions with Regulatory Binding Sites on the Transmembrane Domain of the EGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid molecules can bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins, modulating their structure and function. We have undertaken coarse-grained simulations to calculate free energy profiles for glycolipids and phospholipids interacting with modulatory sites on the transmembrane helix dimer of the EGF receptor within a lipid bilayer environment. We identify lipid interaction sites at each end of the transmembrane domain and compute interaction free energy profiles for lipids with these sites. Interaction free energies ranged from ca. −40 to −4 kJ/mol for different lipid species. Those lipids (glycolipid GM3 and phosphoinositide PIP2) known to modulate EGFR function exhibit the strongest binding to interaction sites on the EGFR, and we are able to reproduce the preference for interaction with GM3 over other glycolipids suggested by experiment. Mutation of amino acid residues essential for EGFR function reduce the binding free energy of these key lipid species. The residues interacting with the lipids in the simulations are in agreement with those suggested by experimental (mutational) studies. This approach provides a generalizable tool for characterizing the interactions of lipids that bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins. PMID:27109430

  18. Computational Characterization and Prediction of Estrogen Receptor Coactivator Binding Site Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, B J; Kulp, K S; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F C

    2005-08-26

    Many carcinogens have been shown to cause tissue specific tumors in animal models. The mechanism for this specificity has not been fully elucidated and is usually attributed to differences in organ metabolism. For heterocyclic amines, potent carcinogens that are formed in well-done meat, the ability to either bind to the estrogen receptor and activate or inhibit an estrogenic response will have a major impact on carcinogenicity. Here we describe our work with the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and the mutagenic/carcinogenic heterocyclic amines PhIP, MeIQx, IFP, and the hydroxylated metabolite of PhIP, N2-hydroxy-PhIP. We found that PhIP, in contrast to the other heterocyclic amines, increased cell-proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and activated the hERa receptor. We show mechanistic data supporting this activation both computationally by homology modeling and docking, and by NMR confirmation that PhIP binds with the ligand binding domain (LBD). This binding competes with estradiol (E2) in the native E2 binding cavity of the receptor. We also find that other heterocyclic amines and N2-hydroxy-PhIP inhibit ER activation presumably by binding into another cavity on the LBD. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations of inhibitory heterocyclic amines reveal a disruption of the surface of the receptor protein involved with protein-protein signaling. We therefore propose that the mechanism for the tissue specific carcinogenicity seen in the rat breast tumors and the presumptive human breast cancer associated with the consumption of well-done meat maybe mediated by this receptor activation.

  19. GABA(A) receptors implicated in REM sleep control express a benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2013-08-21

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consistent with GABAA receptor antagonists disinhibiting acetylcholine release in the PnO to result in an acetylcholine-mediated REM sleep induction. Direct evidence has been lacking for localization in the PnO of the specific GABAA receptor-subtypes mediating the REM sleep effects. Here, we demonstrated a dose-related, long-lasting increase in REM sleep following injection (60 nl) in the PnO of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline (DMCM, 10(-2)M). REM sleep increases were greater and more consistently produced than with the non-selective antagonist gabazine, and both were blocked by atropine. Fluorescence immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, colocalized in PnO vesicular acetylcholine transporter, a presynaptic marker of cholinergic boutons, with the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor. These data provide support for the direct action of GABA on mechanisms of acetylcholine release in the PnO. The presence of the γ2 subunit at this locus and the REM sleep induction by DMCM are consistent with binding of benzodiazepines by a GABAA receptor-subtype in control of REM sleep.

  20. Computer modeling of the neurotoxin binding site of acetylcholine receptor spanning residues 185 through 196

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garduno-Juarez, R.; Shibata, M.; Zielinski, T. J.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the complex between the acetylcholine receptor and the snake neurotoxin, cobratoxin, was built by molecular model building and energy optimization techniques. The experimentally identified functionally important residues of cobratoxin and the dodecapeptide corresponding to the residues 185-196 of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were used to build the model. Both cis and trans conformers of cyclic L-cystine portion of the dodecapeptide were examined. Binding residues independently identified on cobratoxin are shown to interact with the dodecapeptide AChR model.

  1. ( sup 3 H)opipramol labels a novel binding site and sigma receptors in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, C.D.; Hirsch, D.J.; Brooks, B.P.; Snowman, A.M.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Opipramol (OP), a clinically effective antidepressant with a tricyclic structure, is inactive as an inhibitor of biogenic amine uptake. ({sup 3}H)Opipramol binds saturably to rat brain membranes (apparent KD = 4 nM, Bmax = 3 pmol/mg of protein). ({sup 3}H)Opipramol binding can be differentiated into haloperidol-sensitive and -resistant components, with Ki values for haloperidol of 1 nM (Bmax = 1 pmol/mg of protein) and 350 nM (Bmax = 1.9 pmol/mg of protein), respectively. The drug specificity of the haloperidol-sensitive component is the same as that of sigma receptors labeled with (+)-({sup 3}H)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperdine. The haloperidol-resistant component does not correspond to any known neurotransmitter receptor or uptake recognition site. It displays high affinity for phenothiazines and related structures such as perphenazine, clopenthixol, and flupenthixol, whose potencies are comparable to that of opipramol. Because certain of these drugs are more potent at the haloperidol-resistant opipramol site than in exerting any other action, it is possible that this opipramol-selective site may mediate their therapeutic effects.

  2. AMPA receptor potentiation by acetylcholinesterase is age-dependently upregulated at synaptogenesis sites of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Silvia; Henley, Jeremy M.; Rodriguez-Ithurralde, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have used radioligand binding to synaptic membranes from distinct rat brain regions and quantitative autoradiography to investigate the postnatal evolution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-evoked up-regulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in CNS areas undergoing synaptogenesis. Incubation of synaptosomal membranes or brain sections with purified AChE caused a developmentally modulated enhancement in the binding of [3H]-(S)–AMPA and the specific AMPA receptor ligand [3H]-(S)-5–fluorowillardiine, but did not modify binding to kainate neither N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. In all postnatal ages investigated (4, 7, 14, 20, 27, 40 days-old and adult rats), AChE effect on binding was concentration-dependent and blocked by propidium, BW 284c51, diisopropylfluorophosphonate and eserine, therefore requiring indemnity of both peripheral and active sites of the enzyme. AChE-mediated enhancement of [3H]-fluorowillardiine binding was measurable in all major CNS areas, but displayed remarkable anatomical selectivity and developmental regulation. Autoradiograph densitometry exhibited distinct temporal profiles and peaks of treated/control binding ratios for different cortices, cortical layers, and nuclei. Within the parietal, occipital and temporal neocortices, hippocampal CA1 field and cerebellum, AChE-potentiated binding ratios peaked in chronological correspondence with synaptogenesis periods of the respective AMPA-receptor containing targets. This modulation of AMPA receptors by AChE is a molecular mechanism able to transduce localized neural activity into durable modifications of synaptic molecular structure and function. It might also contribute to AChE-mediated neurotoxicity, as postulated in Alzheimer’s disease and other CNS disorders. PMID:12565696

  3. Nematode cys-loop GABA receptors: biological function, pharmacology and sites of action for anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Michael V; Beech, Robin N; Forrester, Sean G

    2012-06-01

    Parasitic nematode infection of humans and livestock is a major problem globally. Attempts to control nematode populations have led to the development of several classes of anthelmintic, which target cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. Unlike the vertebrate nervous system, the nematode nervous system possesses a large and diversified array of ligand-gated chloride channels that comprise key components of the inhibitory neurotransmission system. In particular, cys-loop GABA receptors have evolved to play many fundamental roles in nematode behaviour such as locomotion. Analysis of the genomes of several free-living and parasitic nematodes suggests that there are several groups of cys-loop GABA receptor subunits that, for the most part, are conserved among nematodes. Despite many similarities with vertebrate cys-loop GABA receptors, those in nematodes are quite distinct in sequence similarity, subunit composition and biological function. With rising anthelmintic resistance in many nematode populations worldwide, GABA receptors should become an area of increased scientific investigation in the development of the next generation of anthelmintics. PMID:22430311

  4. Nematode cys-loop GABA receptors: biological function, pharmacology and sites of action for anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Michael V; Beech, Robin N; Forrester, Sean G

    2012-06-01

    Parasitic nematode infection of humans and livestock is a major problem globally. Attempts to control nematode populations have led to the development of several classes of anthelmintic, which target cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. Unlike the vertebrate nervous system, the nematode nervous system possesses a large and diversified array of ligand-gated chloride channels that comprise key components of the inhibitory neurotransmission system. In particular, cys-loop GABA receptors have evolved to play many fundamental roles in nematode behaviour such as locomotion. Analysis of the genomes of several free-living and parasitic nematodes suggests that there are several groups of cys-loop GABA receptor subunits that, for the most part, are conserved among nematodes. Despite many similarities with vertebrate cys-loop GABA receptors, those in nematodes are quite distinct in sequence similarity, subunit composition and biological function. With rising anthelmintic resistance in many nematode populations worldwide, GABA receptors should become an area of increased scientific investigation in the development of the next generation of anthelmintics.

  5. GLYX-13, an NMDA receptor glycine site functional partial agonist enhances cognition and produces antidepressant effects without the psychotomimetic side effects of NMDA receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Moskal, Joseph R; Burch, Ronald; Burgdorf, Jeffrey S; Kroes, Roger A; Stanton, Patric K; Disterhoft, John F; Leander, J David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-ionophore complex plays a key role in learning and memory and has efficacy in animals and humans with affective disorders. GLYX-13 is an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glycine-site functional partial agonist and cognitive enhancer that also shows rapid antidepressant activity without psychotomimetic side effects. Areas covered The authors review the mechanism of action of GLYX-13 that was investigated in preclinical studies and evaluated in clinical studies. Specifically, the authors review its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and drug safety that were demonstrated in clinical studies. Expert opinion NMDAR full antagonists can produce rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant subjects; however, they are often accompanied by psychotomimetic effects that make chronic use outside of a clinical trial inpatient setting problematic. GLYX-13 appears to exert its antidepressant effects in the frontal cortex via NMDAR-triggered synaptic plasticity. Understanding the mechanistic underpinning of GLYX-13’s antidepressant action should provide both novel insights into the role of the glutamatergic system in depression and identify new targets for therapeutic development. PMID:24251380

  6. Intracytoplasmic phosphorylation sites of Tac antigen (p55) are not essential for the conformation, function, and regulation of the human interleukin 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, M; Minamoto, S; Taniguchi, T

    1986-01-01

    Tac antigen, the receptor for human interleukin 2 (IL-2), contains in its intracytoplasmic region a serine residue (Ser-247) that is seemingly the predominant site of protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation. A number of studies on growth factor receptors have suggested the importance of phosphorylation in receptor structure, function, and regulation. In this study, we generated site-directed mutations in the Tac antigen cDNA to generate mutant receptors in which Ser-247 or Thr-250, a probable site of minor phosphorylation, was replaced with another amino acid that is not accessible to phosphorylation. Study of the expression of these mutant genes in a T-lymphoid cell line has provided no evidence as to the essential role of the above-mentioned residues in determining the degree of receptor affinity, its ability for signal transduction, and phorbol ester-mediated regulation of the receptor. Our results strongly suggest the existence of an IL-2 receptor "complex" in which the Tac antigen is associated with another molecule(s) that is involved in receptor structure, function, and regulation. PMID:3099287

  7. Zolpidem is a potent stoichiometry-selective modulator of α1β3 GABAA receptors: evidence of a novel benzodiazepine site in the α1-α1 interface

    PubMed Central

    Che Has, Ahmad Tarmizi; Absalom, Nathan; van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S.; Clarkson, Andrew N.; Ahring, Philip K.; Chebib, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Zolpidem is not a typical GABAA receptor hypnotic. Unlike benzodiazepines, zolpidem modulates tonic GABA currents in the rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, exhibits residual effects in mice lacking the benzodiazepine binding site, and improves speech, cognitive and motor function in human patients with severe brain injury. The receptor by which zolpidem mediates these effects is not known. In this study we evaluated binary α1β3 GABAA receptors in either the 3α1:2β3 or 2α1:3β3 subunit stoichiometry, which differ by the existence of either an α1-α1 interface, or a β3-β3 interface, respectively. Both receptor stoichiometries are readily expressed in Xenopus oocytes, distinguished from each other by using GABA, zolpidem, diazepam and Zn2+. At the 3α1:2β3 receptor, clinically relevant concentrations of zolpidem enhanced GABA in a flumazenil-sensitive manner. The efficacy of diazepam was significantly lower compared to zolpidem. No modulation by either zolpidem or diazepam was detected at the 2α1:3β3 receptor, indicating that the binding site for zolpidem is at the α1-α1 interface, a site mimicking the classical α1-γ2 benzodiazepine site. Activating α1β3 (3α1:2β3) receptors may, in part, mediate the physiological effects of zolpidem observed under distinct physiological and clinical conditions, constituting a potentially attractive drug target. PMID:27346730

  8. Differential Effects of D-Cycloserine and ACBC at NMDA Receptors in the Rat Entorhinal Cortex Are Related to Efficacy at the Co-Agonist Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Lench, Alex M; Robson, Emma; Jones, Roland S G

    2015-01-01

    Partial agonists at the NMDA receptor co-agonist binding site may have potential therapeutic efficacy in a number of cognitive and neurological conditions. The entorhinal cortex is a key brain area in spatial memory and cognitive processing. At synapses in the entorhinal cortex, NMDA receptors not only mediate postsynaptic excitation but are expressed in presynaptic terminals where they tonically facilitate glutamate release. In a previous study we showed that the co-agonist binding site of the presynaptic NMDA receptor is endogenously and tonically activated by D-serine released from astrocytes. In this study we determined the effects of two co-agonist site partial agonists on both presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDA receptors in layer II of the entorhinal cortex. The high efficacy partial agonist, D-cycloserine, decreased the decay time of postsynaptic NMDA receptor mediated currents evoked by electrical stimulation, but had no effect on amplitude or other kinetic parameters. In contrast, a lower efficacy partial agonist, 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid, decreased decay time to a greater extent than D-cycloserine, and also reduced the peak amplitude of the evoked NMDA receptor mediated postsynaptic responses. Presynaptic NMDA receptors, (monitored indirectly by effects on the frequency of AMPA receptor mediated spontaneous excitatory currents) were unaffected by D-cycloserine, but were reduced in effectiveness by 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid. We discuss these results in the context of the effect of endogenous regulation of the NMDA receptor co-agonist site on receptor gating and the potential therapeutic implications for cognitive disorders.

  9. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  10. Molecular Architecture of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-binding Site of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lu; Cho, Sangwoo; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Kerzic, Melissa C.; Dam, Julie; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the detection and destruction of virally infected and tumor cells during innate immune responses. The highly polymorphic Ly49 family of NK receptors regulates NK cell function by sensing major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on target cells. Despite the determination of two Ly49-MHC-I complex structures, the molecular features of Ly49 receptors that confer specificity for particular MHC-I alleles have not been identified. To understand the functional architecture of Ly49-binding sites, we determined the crystal structures of Ly49C and Ly49G and completed refinement of the Ly49C-H-2Kb complex. This information, combined with mutational analysis of Ly49A, permitted a structure-based classification of Ly49s that we used to dissect the binding site into three distinct regions, each having different roles in MHC recognition. One region, located at the center of the binding site, has a similar structure across the Ly49 family and mediates conserved interactions with MHC-I that contribute most to binding. However, the preference of individual Ly49s for particular MHC-I molecules is governed by two regions that flank the central region and are structurally more variable. One of the flanking regions divides Ly49s into those that recognize both H-2D and H-2K versus only H-2D ligands, whereas the other discriminates among H-2D or H-2K alleles. The modular design of Ly49-binding sites provides a framework for predicting the MHC-binding specificity of Ly49s that have not been characterized experimentally. PMID:18426793

  11. Molecular Architecture of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Binding Site of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,L.; Cho, S.; Malchiodi, E.; Kerzic, M.; Dam, J.; Mariuzza, R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the detection and destruction of virally infected and tumor cells during innate immune responses. The highly polymorphic Ly49 family of NK receptors regulates NK cell function by sensing major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on target cells. Despite the determination of two Ly49-MHC-I complex structures, the molecular features of Ly49 receptors that confer specificity for particular MHC-I alleles have not been identified. To understand the functional architecture of Ly49-binding sites, we determined the crystal structures of Ly49C and Ly49G and completed refinement of the Ly49C-H-2Kb complex. This information, combined with mutational analysis of Ly49A, permitted a structure-based classification of Ly49s that we used to dissect the binding site into three distinct regions, each having different roles in MHC recognition. One region, located at the center of the binding site, has a similar structure across the Ly49 family and mediates conserved interactions with MHC-I that contribute most to binding. However, the preference of individual Ly49s for particular MHC-I molecules is governed by two regions that flank the central region and are structurally more variable. One of the flanking regions divides Ly49s into those that recognize both H-2D and H-2K versus only H-2D ligands, whereas the other discriminates among H-2D or H-2K alleles. The modular design of Ly49-binding sites provides a framework for predicting the MHC-binding specificity of Ly49s that have not been characterized experimentally.

  12. Identification of a GABAA receptor anesthetic binding site at subunit interfaces by photolabeling with an etomidate analog.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Dong; Chiara, David C; Sawyer, Gregory W; Husain, S Shaukat; Olsen, Richard W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2006-11-01

    General anesthetics, including etomidate, act by binding to and enhancing the function of GABA type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Here, we used a radiolabeled, photoreactive etomidate analog ([(3)H]azietomidate), which retains anesthetic potency in vivo and enhances GABA(A)R function in vitro, to identify directly, for the first time, amino acids that contribute to a GABA(A)R anesthetic binding site. For GABA(A)Rs purified by affinity chromatography from detergent extracts of bovine cortex, [(3)H]azietomidate photoincorporation was increased by GABA and inhibited by etomidate in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) = 30 microm). Protein microsequencing of fragments isolated from proteolytic digests established photolabeling of two residues: one within the alphaM1 transmembrane helix at alpha1Met-236 (and/or the homologous methionines in alpha2,3,5), not previously implicated in etomidate function, and one within the betaM3 transmembrane helix at beta3Met-286 (and/or the homologous methionines in beta1,2), an etomidate sensitivity determinant. The pharmacological specificity of labeling indicates that these methionines contribute to a single binding pocket for etomidate located in the transmembrane domain at the interface between beta and alpha subunits, in what is predicted by structural models based on homology with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to be a water-filled pocket approximately 50 A below the GABA binding site. The localization of the etomidate binding site to an intersubunit, not an intrasubunit, binding pocket is a novel conclusion that suggests more generally that the localization of drug binding sites to subunit interfaces may be a feature not only for GABA and benzodiazepines but also for etomidate and other intravenous and volatile anesthetics. PMID:17093081

  13. Site-specific DOTA/europium-labeling of recombinant human relaxin-3 for receptor-ligand interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jie; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Ya-Li; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2012-08-01

    Relaxin-3 (also known as INSL7) is a recently identified neuropeptide belonging to the insulin/relaxin superfamily. It has putative roles in the regulation of stress responses, food intake, and reproduction by activation of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptor RXFP3. It also binds and activates the relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP4 in vitro. To obtain a europium-labeled relaxin-3 as tracer for studying the interaction of these receptors with various ligands, in the present work we propose a novel site-specific labeling strategy for the recombinant human relaxin-3 that has been previously prepared in our laboratory. First, the N-terminal 6 × His-tag of the single-chain relaxin-3 precursor was removed by Aeromonas aminopeptidase and all of the primary amines of the resultant peptide were reversibly blocked by citroconic anhydride. Second, the A-chain N-terminus of the blocked peptide was released by endoproteinase Asp-N cleavage that removed the linker peptide between the B- and A-chains. Third, an alkyne moiety was introduced to the newly released A-chain N-terminus by reaction with the highly active primary amine-specific N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Fourth, after removal of the reversible blockage under mild acidic condition, europium-loaded DOTA with an azide moiety was introduced to the two-chain relaxin-3 carrying the alkyne moiety through click chemistry. Using this site-specific labeling strategy, homogeneous monoeuropium-labeled human relaxin-3 could be obtained with good overall yield. In contrast, conventional random labeling resulted in a complex mixture that was poorly resolved because human relaxin-3 has four primary amine moieties that all react with the modification reagent. Both saturation and competition binding assays demonstrated that the DOTA/Eu(3+)-labeled relaxin-3 retained high binding affinity for human RXFP3, RXFP4, and RXFP1 and was therefore a suitable non-radioactive and stable tracer to study the interaction of various

  14. Insecticidal 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides specifically bind with high affinity to a novel allosteric site in housefly GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Nakao, Toshifumi; Sato, Kazuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs) are an important target for existing insecticides such as fiproles. These insecticides act as noncompetitive antagonists (channel blockers) for insect GABARs by binding to a site within the intrinsic channel of the GABAR. Recently, a novel class of insecticides, 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides (BPBs), was shown to inhibit GABARs by binding to a site distinct from the site for fiproles. We examined the binding site of BPBs in the adult housefly by means of radioligand-binding and electrophysiological experiments. 3-Benzamido-N-(2,6-dimethyl-4-perfluoroisopropylphenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (BPB 1) (the N-demethyl BPB) was a partial, but potent, inhibitor of [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (GABA channel blocker) binding to housefly head membranes, whereas the 3-(N-methyl)benzamido congener (the N-methyl BPB) had low or little activity. A total of 15 BPB analogs were tested for their abilities to inhibit [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to the head membranes. The N-demethyl analogs, known to be highly effective insecticides, potently inhibited the [(3)H]BPB 1 binding, but the N-methyl analogs did not even though they, too, are considered highly effective. [(3)H]BPB 1 equally bound to the head membranes from wild-type and dieldrin-resistant (rdl mutant) houseflies. GABA allosterically inhibited [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. By contrast, channel blocker-type antagonists enhanced [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to housefly head membranes by increasing the affinity of BPB 1. Antiparasitic macrolides, such as ivermectin B1a, were potent inhibitors of [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. BPB 1 inhibited GABA-induced currents in housefly GABARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it failed to inhibit l-glutamate-induced currents in inhibitory l-glutamate receptors. Overall, these findings indicate that BPBs act at a novel allosteric site that is different from the site for channel blocker-type antagonists and that is probably overlapped with the site for macrolides

  15. Fluorescence histochemical study of the localisation and distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites in the spinal cord and cerebellum of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Bondok, A A; Botros, K G; el-Mohandes, E A

    1988-10-01

    The distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites has been studied in chicken spinal cord and cerebellum using a fluorescent analogue of propranolol, 9-amino-acridin-propranolol (9-AAP). In the cervical and lumbar regions of the spinal cord, beta-adrenoceptor sites were concentrated on cell bodies of alpha-motor neurons of the dorsolateral and ventrolateral nuclear groups of the ventral horn. In the thoracic region, they were present on cell bodies of the preganglionic sympathetic nucleus (dorsal commissural nucleus). In the dorsal horn, the receptor sites were present mainly on cell bodies of columna dorsalis magnocellularis. Sparse distribution of fluorescence was present in other regions of the gray matter. In the cerebellum, a dense distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites was observed on Purkinje cell bodies and their apical dendrites. Sparse distribution of receptor sites was present on fine ramifications of Purkinje cell dendrites in the molecular layer. Receptor sites were absent in the granule cell layer and the white matter. These observations indicate that alpha-motor neurons, preganglionic sympathetic neurons, neurons of columna dorsalis magnocellularis, and Purkinje cells are adrenoceptive, while granule cells are non-adrenoceptive.

  16. Regulation of the nongenomic actions of retinoid X receptor-α by targeting the coregulator-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-kun; Su, Ying; Chen, Liqun; Chen, Fan; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα), a unique member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, represents an intriguing and unusual target for pharmacologic interventions and therapeutic applications in cancer, metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite the fact that the RXR-based drug Targretin (bexarotene) is currently used for treating human cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and the fact that RXRα ligands (rexinoids) show beneficial effects in the treatment of cancer and diseases, the therapeutic potential of RXRα remains unexplored. In addition to its conventional transcription regulation activity in the nucleus, RXRα can act in the cytoplasm to modulate important biological processes, such as mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, inflammation, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT-mediated cell survival. Recently, new small-molecule-binding sites on the surface of RXRα have been identified, which mediate the regulation of the nongenomic actions of RXRα by a class of small molecules derived from the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) Sulindac. This review discusses the emerging roles of the nongenomic actions of RXRα in the RXRα signaling network, and their possible implications in cancer, metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders, as well as our current understanding of RXRα regulation by targeting alternate binding sites on its surface. PMID:25434990

  17. An intracellular allosteric site for a specific class of antagonists of the CC chemokine G protein-coupled receptors CCR4 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Glen; Jones, Carolyn; Wreggett, Keith A

    2008-03-01

    A novel mechanism for antagonism of the human chemokine receptors CCR4 and CCR5 has been discovered with a series of small-molecule compounds that seems to interact with an allosteric, intracellular site on the receptor. The existence of this site is supported by a series of observations: 1) intracellular access of these antagonists is required for their activity; 2) specific, saturable binding of a radiolabeled antagonist requires the presence of CCR4; and 3) through engineering receptor chimeras by reciprocal transfer of C-terminal domains between CCR4 and CCR5, compound binding and the selective structure-activity relationships for antagonism of these receptors seem to be associated with the integrity of that intracellular region. Published antagonists from other chemical series do not seem to bind to the novel site, and their interaction with either CCR4 or CCR5 is not affected by alteration of the C-terminal domain. The precise location of the proposed binding site remains to be determined, but the known close association of the C-terminal domain, including helix 8, as a proposed intracellular region that interacts with transduction proteins (e.g., G proteins and beta-arrestin) suggests that this could be a generic allosteric site for chemokine receptors and perhaps more broadly for class A G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of such a site that can be targeted for drug discovery has implications for screening assays for receptor antagonists, which would need, therefore, to consider compound properties for access to this intracellular site.

  18. Elucidation of strain-specific interaction of a GII-4 norovirus with HBGA receptors by site-directed mutagenesis study

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Ming |; Xia Ming; Cao Sheng; Huang Pengwei; Farkas, Tibor |; Meller, Jarek |; Hegde, Rashmi S. |; Li Xuemei; Rao Zihe; Jiang Xi |

    2008-09-30

    Noroviruses interact with histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) receptors in a strain-specific manner probably detecting subtle structural differences in the carbohydrate receptors. The specific recognition of types A and B antigens by various norovirus strains is a typical example. The only difference between the types A and B antigens is the acetamide linked to the terminal galactose of the A but not to the B antigen. The crystal structure of the P dimer of a GII-4 norovirus (VA387) bound to types A and B trisaccharides has elucidated the A/B binding site on the capsid but did not explain the binding specificity of the two antigens. In this study, using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified three residues on the VA387 capsid that are sterically close to the acetamide and are required for binding to A but not B antigens, indicating that the acetamide determines the binding specificity between the A and B antigens. Further mutational analysis showed that a nearby open cavity may also be involved in binding specificity to HBGAs. In addition, a systematic mutational analysis of residues in and around the binding interface has identified a group of amino acids that are required for binding but do not have direct contact with the carbohydrate antigens, implying that these residues may be involved in the structural integrity of the receptor binding interface. Taken together, our study provides new insights into the carbohydrate/capsid interactions which are a valuable complement to the atomic structures in understanding the virus/host interaction and in the future design of antiviral agents.

  19. Opioid receptors in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: evidence for distinct morphine (. mu. ) and enkephalin (delta) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmi, S.M.I.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-06-13

    Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exhibited a heterogeneous population of ..mu.. and delta types of opioid binding sites. These specific binding sites displayed the characteristic saturability, stereospecificity and reversibility, expected of a receptor. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin (DADLE) in the presence of 10/sup -5/M D-Pro/sup 4/-morphiceptin (to block the ..mu.. receptors) and the competitive displacement by various highly selective ligands yielded the binding parameters of delta sites which closely resemble those of the delta receptors in brain and mouse neuroblastoma clones. Similarly, the high affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine, together with the higher potency of morphine analogues to displace (/sup 3/H)-naloxone binding established the presence of ..mu.. sites. Guanine nucleotides and NaCl significantly inhibited the association and increased the dissociation of (/sup 3/H)-DADLE binding.

  20. Agonist interactions with 5-HT3 receptor recognition sites in the rat entorhinal cortex labelled by structurally diverse radioligands.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. M.; Barnes, N. M.; Costall, B.; Jagger, S. M.; Naylor, R. J.; Robertson, D. W.; Roe, S. Y.

    1992-01-01

    1. The pharmacological properties of 5-HT3 receptor recognition sites labelled with [3H]-(S)-zacopride, [3H]-LY278,584, [3H]-granisetron and [3H]-GR67330 in membranes prepared from the rat entorhinal cortex were investigated to assess the presence of cooperativity within the 5-HT3 receptor complex. 2. In rat entorhinal cortex homogenates, [3H]-(S)-zacopride, [3H]-LY278,584, [3H]-granisetron and [3H]-GR67330 labelled homogeneous densities of recognition sites (defined by granisetron, 10 microM) with high affinity (Bmax = 75 +/- 5, 53 +/- 5, 92 +/- 6 and 79 +/- 6 fmol mg-1 protein, respectively; pKd = 9.41 +/- 0.04, 8.69 +/- 0.14, 8.81 +/- 0.06 and 10.14 +/- 0.04 for [3H]-(S)-zacopride, [3H]-LY278,584, [3H]-granisetron and [3H]-GR67330, respectively, n = 3-8). 3. Quipazine and granisetron competed for the binding of each of the radioligands in the rat entorhinal cortex preparation at low nanomolar concentrations (pIC50; quipazine 9.38-8.51, granisetron 8.62-8.03), whilst the agonists, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), phenylbiguanide (PBG) and 2-methyl-5-HT competed at sub-micromolar concentrations (pIC50; 5-HT 7.16-6.42, PBG 7.52-6.40, 2-methyl-5-HT 7.38-6.09). 4. Competition curves generated with increasing concentrations of quipazine, PBG, 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT displayed Hill coefficients greater than unity when the 5-HT3 receptor recognition sites in the entorhinal cortex preparation were labelled with [3H]-LY278,584, [3H]-granisetron and [3H]-GR67330. These competing compounds displayed Hill coefficients of around unity when the sites were labelled with [3H]-(S)-zacopride. Competition for the binding of [3H]-(S)-zacopride, [3H]-LY278,584, [3H]-granisetron and [3H]-GR67330 by granisetron generated Hill coefficients around unity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1559139

  1. Molecular blueprint of allosteric binding sites in a homologue of the agonist-binding domain of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Spurny, Radovan; Debaveye, Sarah; Farinha, Ana; Veys, Ken; Vos, Ann M.; Gossas, Thomas; Atack, John; Bertrand, Sonia; Bertrand, Daniel; Danielson, U. Helena; Tresadern, Gary; Ulens, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) belongs to the family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and is involved in fast synaptic signaling. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified chimera of the extracellular domain of the native α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholine binding protein, termed α7-AChBP. This chimeric receptor was used to conduct an innovative fragment-library screening in combination with X-ray crystallography to identify allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site is surface-exposed and is located near the N-terminal α-helix of the extracellular domain. Ligand binding at this site causes a conformational change of the α-helix as the fragment wedges between the α-helix and a loop homologous to the main immunogenic region of the muscle α1 subunit. A second site is located in the vestibule of the receptor, in a preexisting intrasubunit pocket opposite the agonist binding site and corresponds to a previously identified site involved in positive allosteric modulation of the bacterial homolog ELIC. A third site is located at a pocket right below the agonist binding site. Using electrophysiological recordings on the human α7 nAChR we demonstrate that the identified fragments, which bind at these sites, can modulate receptor activation. This work presents a structural framework for different allosteric binding sites in the α7 nAChR and paves the way for future development of novel allosteric modulators with therapeutic potential. PMID:25918415

  2. Molecular blueprint of allosteric binding sites in a homologue of the agonist-binding domain of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Spurny, Radovan; Debaveye, Sarah; Farinha, Ana; Veys, Ken; Vos, Ann M; Gossas, Thomas; Atack, John; Bertrand, Sonia; Bertrand, Daniel; Danielson, U Helena; Tresadern, Gary; Ulens, Chris

    2015-05-12

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) belongs to the family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and is involved in fast synaptic signaling. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified chimera of the extracellular domain of the native α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholine binding protein, termed α7-AChBP. This chimeric receptor was used to conduct an innovative fragment-library screening in combination with X-ray crystallography to identify allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site is surface-exposed and is located near the N-terminal α-helix of the extracellular domain. Ligand binding at this site causes a conformational change of the α-helix as the fragment wedges between the α-helix and a loop homologous to the main immunogenic region of the muscle α1 subunit. A second site is located in the vestibule of the receptor, in a preexisting intrasubunit pocket opposite the agonist binding site and corresponds to a previously identified site involved in positive allosteric modulation of the bacterial homolog ELIC. A third site is located at a pocket right below the agonist binding site. Using electrophysiological recordings on the human α7 nAChR we demonstrate that the identified fragments, which bind at these sites, can modulate receptor activation. This work presents a structural framework for different allosteric binding sites in the α7 nAChR and paves the way for future development of novel allosteric modulators with therapeutic potential. PMID:25918415

  3. Docking of 1,4-Benzodiazepines in the α1/γ2 GABAA Receptor Modulator SiteS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Berezhnoy, D.; Gibbs, T. T.; Farb, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulation of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) via the benzodiazepine recognition site is the mechanism whereby diverse chemical classes of therapeutic agents act to reduce anxiety, induce and maintain sleep, reduce seizures, and induce conscious sedation. The binding of such therapeutic agents to this allosteric modulatory site increases the affinity of GABA for the agonist recognition site. A major unanswered question, however, relates to how positive allosteric modulators dock in the 1,4-benzodiazepine (BZD) recognition site. In the present study, the X-ray structure of an acetylcholine binding protein from the snail Lymnea stagnalis and the results from site-directed affinity-labeling studies were used as the basis for modeling of the BZD binding pocket at the α1/γ2 subunit interface. A tethered BZD was introduced into the binding pocket, and molecular simulations were carried out to yield a set of candidate orientations of the BZD ligand in the binding pocket. Candidate orientations were refined based on known structure-activity and stereospecificity characteristics of BZDs and the impact of the α1H101R mutation. Results favor a model in which the BZD molecule is oriented such that the C5-phenyl substituent extends approximately parallel to the plane of the membrane rather than parallel to the ion channel. Application of this computational modeling strategy, which integrates site-directed affinity labeling with structure-activity knowledge to create a molecular model of the docking of active ligands in the binding pocket, may provide a basis for the design of more selective GABAAR modulators with enhanced therapeutic potential. PMID:19483108

  4. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases. PMID:26577786

  5. Spatial modeling of receptor species for ecological risk assessment activities on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, Karen Frances

    To assist risk assessors on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS), a Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed to provide relevant information about specific receptor species that can be used for ecological risk assessment (ERA). Although this GIS is a useful tool, it is limited in that it can only provide information about a species if it was studied in that particular area and does not describe the site-wide spatial distribution or life history of a receptor species, which may be crucial when developing an ecological impact assessment. The GIS was expanded by modeling wildlife species on the SRS to provide information regarding their over-all distribution (probability of being in an area) and habitat utilization. Each model is a stand-alone tool consisting of algorithms that are applied within a GIS and therefore dynamic enough to respond to stochastic events such as natural and anthropogenic habitat disturbances and/or long-term changes such as natural succession. Spatial analyses suggest toxicant exposure and accumulation risk in relation to the species probability of occurrence in the area. This modeling effort provides the tools that are crucial for the Department of Energy to conduct ERA activities for specific contaminants on the SRS. Further, it serves as a template for DOE managed lands and other large government facilities to establish a framework for site-specific ecological impact assessments that use wildlife species as endpoints. Predictive distribution models for the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and wild hog (Sus scrofa ) are used to demonstrate the construction and utilization of these models to: (1) estimate wildlife toxicant exposure, (2) identify possible contaminant vectors, and (3) construct human-based risk assessments from consuming wild game.

  6. Site differences of Toll-like receptor expression in the mucous epithelium of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Mantani, Y; Kamezaki, A; Udayanga, K G S; Takahara, E-i; Qi, W M; Kawano, J; Yokoyama, T; Hoshi, N; Kitagawa, H

    2011-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and might function as receptors to detect microbes. In this study, the distribution of TLR-2, -4 and -9 were immunohistochemically investigated in the rat small intestine. As a result, TLR-2 was detected in the striated borders of villous columnar epithelial cells throughout the small intestine, except for the apices of a small number of intestinal villi. TLR-4 and -9 were detected in the striated borders of the villous columnar epithelial cells only in the duodenum. TLR-4-immunopositive minute granules were found in the apical cytoplasms of epithelial cells, subepithelial spaces and blood capillary lumina. TLR-2 and -4 were detected in the striated borders of undifferentiated epithelial cells and in the luminal substances of the intestinal crypts throughout the small intestine, but TLR-9 was not detected in the crypts throughout the small intestine. Only TLR-4 was detected in the secretory granules of Paneth cells in both the jejunal and ileal intestinal crypts. These findings suggest that duodenal TLRs might monitor indigenous bacteria proliferation in the upper alimentary tract, that TLR-2 might also monitor the proliferation of colonized indigenous bacteria throughout the small intestine, that the lack of TLR-2 at the villous apices might contribute to the settlement of indigenous bacteria, and that TLR-2 and -4 are secreted from intestinal crypts.

  7. Lactate receptor sites link neurotransmission, neurovascular coupling, and brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Morland, Cecilie; Puchades, Maja; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Hagelin, Else Marie; Lauritzen, Fredrik; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Gjedde, Albert; Bergersen, Linda H

    2014-10-01

    The G-protein-coupled lactate receptor, GPR81 (HCA1), is known to promote lipid storage in adipocytes by downregulating cAMP levels. Here, we show that GPR81 is also present in the mammalian brain, including regions of the cerebral neocortex and hippocampus, where it can be activated by physiological concentrations of lactate and by the specific GPR81 agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate to reduce cAMP. Cerebral GPR81 is concentrated on the synaptic membranes of excitatory synapses, with a postsynaptic predominance. GPR81 is also enriched at the blood-brain-barrier: the GPR81 densities at endothelial cell membranes are about twice the GPR81 density at membranes of perivascular astrocytic processes, but about one-seventh of that on synaptic membranes. There is only a slight signal in perisynaptic processes of astrocytes. In synaptic spines, as well as in adipocytes, GPR81 immunoreactivity is located on subplasmalemmal vesicular organelles, suggesting trafficking of the protein to and from the plasma membrane. The results indicate roles of lactate in brain signaling, including a neuronal glucose and glycogen saving response to the supply of lactate. We propose that lactate, through activation of GPR81 receptors, can act as a volume transmitter that links neuronal activity, cerebral energy metabolism and energy substrate availability.

  8. The conformation of acetylcholine at its target site in the membrane-embedded nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, P. T. F.; Verhoeven, A.; Miller, K. W.; Meier, B. H.; Watts, A.

    2007-01-01

    The conformation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine bound to the fully functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor embedded in its native membrane environment has been characterized by using frequency-selective recoupling solid-state NMR. Six dipolar couplings among five resolved 13C-labeled atoms of acetylcholine were measured. Bound acetylcholine adopts a bent conformation characterized with a quaternary ammonium-to-carbonyl distance of 5.1 Å. In this conformation, and with its orientation constrained to that previously determined by us, the acetylcholine could be docked satisfactorily in the agonist pocket of the agonist-bound, but not the agonist-free, crystal structure of a soluble acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnali. The quaternary ammonium group of the acetylcholine was determined to be within 3.9 Å of five aromatic residues and its acetyl group close to residues C187/188 of the principle and residue L112 of the complementary subunit. The observed >CO chemical shift is consistent with H bonding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor residues γY116 and δT119 that are homologous to L112 in the soluble acetylcholine-binding protein. PMID:17989232

  9. Use of antibodies specific to defined regions of scorpion. cap alpha. -toxin to study its interaction with its receptor site on the sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ayeb, M.E.; Bahraoui, E.M.; Granier, C.; Rochat, H.

    1986-10-21

    Five antibody populations selected by immunoaffinity chromatography for the specificity toward various regions of toxin II of the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector were used to probe the interaction of this protein with its receptor site on the sodium channel. These studies indicate that two antigenic sites, one located around the disulfide bridge 12-63 and one encompassing residues 50-59, are involved in the molecular mechanisms of toxicity neutralization. Fab fragments specific to the region around disulfide bridge 12-63 inhibit binding of the /sup 125/I-labeled toxin to its receptor site. Also, these two antigenic regions are inaccessible to the antibodies when the toxin is bound to its receptor site. In contrast, the two other antigenic sites encompassing the only ..cap alpha..-helix region (residues 23-32) and a ..beta..-turn structure (residues 32-35) are accessible to the respective antibodies when the toxin is bound to its receptor. Together, these data support the recent proposal that a region made of residues that are conserved in the scorpion toxin family is involved in the binding of the toxin to the receptor.

  10. Analysis of Epstein-Barr virus-binding sites on complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) using human-mouse chimeras and peptides. At least two distinct sites are necessary for ligand-receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Molina, H; Brenner, C; Jacobi, S; Gorka, J; Carel, J C; Kinoshita, T; Holers, V M

    1991-07-01

    The predicted amino acid sequence of human complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21, C3d,g/Epstein-Barr virus receptor) and its genetic murine homologue are approximately 70% identical. The sequence of each consists of a linear array of 60-70 amino acid repeats designated short consensus repeats (SCRs). Although they share significant sequence identity, a major difference in the activities of these two proteins has been believed to be the ability of human, but not mouse, CR2 to mediate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of B lymphocytes. In order to formally address this question and to directly compare the activities of the CR2 protein of each species, we have expressed recombinant mouse CR2 (rMCR2) in a human K562 erythroleukemia cell line background. We have found that rMCR2 reacts with two previously described rat anti-MCR2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 7G6 and 7E9, but not mAb 8C12, which recognizes only mouse complement receptor 1. rMCR2 rosettes with erythrocytes bearing mouse and human C3d,g and binds glutaraldehyde cross-linked human C3d,g with a similar Kd as human CR2 (HCR2). rMCR2 does not bind EBV. By using this observation and constructing chimeras bearing portions of MCR2 on a HCR2 background, we have been able to define unique sequences in HCR2 SCRs 1 and 2 important in the interaction with both mAb OKB7, which blocks EBV binding and infection, and with EBV. In addition, by using blocking peptides derived from HCR2 sequence, we have identified a second distinct region in SCR2 important in EBV binding. Therefore, within the first two SCRs of HCR2 are multiple distinct sites of interaction with EBV and with mAb OKB7.

  11. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  12. Interaction of Fibrin with the VLDL Receptor: Further Characterization and Localization of the Fibrin-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergiy; Medved, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Our recent study revealed that fibrin interacts with the VLDL receptor (VLDLR) on endothelial cells through its βN-domains and this interaction promotes transendothelial migration of leukocytes and thereby inflammation. The major aims of the present study were to further characterize this interaction and localize fibrin-binding site in the VLDL receptor. To localize the fibrin-binding site, we expressed a soluble extracellular portion of this receptor, sVLDLRHT, its N- and C-terminal regions, VLDLR(1–8)HT and des(1–8)VLDLRHT, respectively, and a number of VLDLR fragments containing various combinations of CR-domains, and confirmed their proper folding by fluorescence spectroscopy. Interaction of these fragments with the (β15–66)2 fragment corresponding to a pair of VLDLR-binding βN-domains of fibrin was tested by different methods. Our experiments performed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance revealed that the VLDLR(1–8)HT fragment containing eight CR-domain of VLDLR and its sub-fragments, VLDLR(1–4)HT and VLDLR(2–4)HT, interact with (β15–66)2 with practically the same affinity as sVLDLRHT while the affinity of VLDLR(2–3)HT was about 2-fold lower. In contrast, des(1–8)VLDLRHT exhibited no binding. Complex formation in solution between the fibrin-binding fragments of VLDLR and (β15–66)2 was detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, formation of a complex between VLDLR(2–4)HT and (β15–66)2 in solution was confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography. Thus, the results obtained indicate that minimal fibrin-binding structures are located within the second and third CR-domains of the VLDL receptor and the presence of the fourth CR-domain is required for the high affinity binding. They also indicate that tryptophan residues of CR-domains are involved in this binding. PMID:26153297

  13. GABA-induced uncoupling of GABA/benzodiazepine site interactions is mediated by increased GABAA receptor internalization and associated with a change in subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M L; Ferreri, M C; Gravielle, M C

    2014-01-17

    Persistent activation of GABAA receptors triggers compensatory changes in receptor function that are relevant to physiological, pathological and pharmacological conditions. Chronic treatment of cultured neurons with GABA for 48h has been shown to produce a down-regulation of receptor number and an uncoupling of GABA/benzodiazepine site interactions with a half-time of 24-25h. Down-regulation is the result of a transcriptional repression of GABAA receptor subunit genes and depends on activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels. The mechanism of this uncoupling is currently unknown. We have previously demonstrated that a single brief exposure of rat primary neocortical cultures to GABA for 5-10min (t½=3min) initiates a process that results in uncoupling hours later (t½=12h) without a change in receptor number. Uncoupling is contingent upon GABAA receptor activation and independent of voltage-gated calcium influx. This process is accompanied by a selective decrease in subunit mRNA levels. Here, we report that the brief GABA exposure induces a decrease in the percentage of α3-containing receptors, a receptor subtype that exhibits a high degree of coupling between GABA and benzodiazepine binding sites. Initiation of GABA-induced uncoupling is prevented by co-incubation of GABA with high concentrations of sucrose suggesting that it is dependent on a receptor internalization step. Moreover, results from immunocytochemical and biochemical experiments indicate that GABA exposure causes an increase in GABAA receptor endocytosis. Together, these data suggest that the uncoupling mechanism involves an initial increase in receptor internalization followed by activation of a signaling cascade that leads to selective changes in receptor subunit levels. These changes might result in the assembly of receptors with altered subunit compositions that display a lower degree of coupling between GABA and benzodiazepine sites. Uncoupling might represent a homeostatic mechanism

  14. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in fluorescent Pseudomonas: characterization of the pyoverdine-receptor binding site of three cross-reacting pyoverdines.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jean-Marie; Geoffroy, Valérie A; Baysse, Christine; Cornelis, Pierre; Barelmann, Insa; Taraz, Kambiz; Budzikiewicz, Herbert

    2002-01-15

    Two Pseudomonas fluorescens and one Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, although producing structurally different pyoverdines, demonstrated highly efficient cross-reactions when tested for pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake. A ferripyoverdine receptor-deficient mutant of the P. aeruginosa strain was unable to use any of the three pyoverdines. Moreover, the three strains presented each a specific outer membrane siderophore-receptor pattern. Thus, the capacity of using heterologous pyoverdines was related not to the presence of supplementary specific ferripyoverdine receptors but to the existence within the respective pyoverdine-peptide chains of a common dipeptide motif which should act as the receptor-binding site for the three pyoverdines. Other pyoverdines sharing the same motif but at another position within the peptide chain were not efficient in iron transport, demonstrating the importance of the spatial position of the binding site. PMID:11795869

  15. An inter-comparison of PM10 source apportionment using PCA and PMF receptor models in three European sites.

    PubMed

    Cesari, Daniela; Amato, F; Pandolfi, M; Alastuey, A; Querol, X; Contini, D

    2016-08-01

    Source apportionment of aerosol is an important approach to investigate aerosol formation and transformation processes as well as to assess appropriate mitigation strategies and to investigate causes of non-compliance with air quality standards (Directive 2008/50/CE). Receptor models (RMs) based on chemical composition of aerosol measured at specific sites are a useful, and widely used, tool to perform source apportionment. However, an analysis of available studies in the scientific literature reveals heterogeneities in the approaches used, in terms of "working variables" such as the number of samples in the dataset and the number of chemical species used as well as in the modeling tools used. In this work, an inter-comparison of PM10 source apportionment results obtained at three European measurement sites is presented, using two receptor models: principal component analysis coupled with multi-linear regression analysis (PCA-MLRA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). The inter-comparison focuses on source identification, quantification of source contribution to PM10, robustness of the results, and how these are influenced by the number of chemical species available in the datasets. Results show very similar component/factor profiles identified by PCA and PMF, with some discrepancies in the number of factors. The PMF model appears to be more suitable to separate secondary sulfate and secondary nitrate with respect to PCA at least in the datasets analyzed. Further, some difficulties have been observed with PCA in separating industrial and heavy oil combustion contributions. Commonly at all sites, the crustal contributions found with PCA were larger than those found with PMF, and the secondary inorganic aerosol contributions found by PCA were lower than those found by PMF. Site-dependent differences were also observed for traffic and marine contributions. The inter-comparison of source apportionment performed on complete datasets (using the full range of

  16. An inter-comparison of PM10 source apportionment using PCA and PMF receptor models in three European sites.

    PubMed

    Cesari, Daniela; Amato, F; Pandolfi, M; Alastuey, A; Querol, X; Contini, D

    2016-08-01

    Source apportionment of aerosol is an important approach to investigate aerosol formation and transformation processes as well as to assess appropriate mitigation strategies and to investigate causes of non-compliance with air quality standards (Directive 2008/50/CE). Receptor models (RMs) based on chemical composition of aerosol measured at specific sites are a useful, and widely used, tool to perform source apportionment. However, an analysis of available studies in the scientific literature reveals heterogeneities in the approaches used, in terms of "working variables" such as the number of samples in the dataset and the number of chemical species used as well as in the modeling tools used. In this work, an inter-comparison of PM10 source apportionment results obtained at three European measurement sites is presented, using two receptor models: principal component analysis coupled with multi-linear regression analysis (PCA-MLRA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). The inter-comparison focuses on source identification, quantification of source contribution to PM10, robustness of the results, and how these are influenced by the number of chemical species available in the datasets. Results show very similar component/factor profiles identified by PCA and PMF, with some discrepancies in the number of factors. The PMF model appears to be more suitable to separate secondary sulfate and secondary nitrate with respect to PCA at least in the datasets analyzed. Further, some difficulties have been observed with PCA in separating industrial and heavy oil combustion contributions. Commonly at all sites, the crustal contributions found with PCA were larger than those found with PMF, and the secondary inorganic aerosol contributions found by PCA were lower than those found by PMF. Site-dependent differences were also observed for traffic and marine contributions. The inter-comparison of source apportionment performed on complete datasets (using the full range of

  17. Novel nootropic drug sunifiram enhances hippocampal synaptic efficacy via glycine-binding site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Tomoya; Narahashi, Toshio; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-10-01

    Sunifiram is a novel pyrrolidone nootropic drug structurally related to piracetam, which was developed for neurodegenerative disorder like Alzheimer's disease. Sunifiram is known to enhance cognitive function in some behavioral experiments such as Morris water maze task. To address question whether sunifiram affects N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic function in the hippocampal CA1 region, we assessed the effects of sunifiram on NMDAR-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) by electrophysiology and on phosphorylation of synaptic proteins by immunoblotting analysis. In mouse hippocampal slices, sunifiram at 10-100 nM significantly enhanced LTP in a bell-shaped dose-response relationship which peaked at 10 nM. The enhancement of LTP by sunifiram treatment was inhibited by 7-chloro-kynurenic acid (7-ClKN), an antagonist for glycine-binding site of NMDAR, but not by ifenprodil, an inhibitor for polyamine site of NMDAR. The enhancement of LTP by sunifilam was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisozazole-4-propionate receptor (AMPAR) through activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and an increase in phosphorylation of NMDAR through activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Sunifiram treatments at 1-1000 nM increased the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a dose-dependent manner. The enhancement was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of AMPAR receptor through activation of CaMKII. Interestingly, under the basal condition, sunifiram treatments increased PKCα (Ser-657) and Src family (Tyr-416) activities with the same bell-shaped dose-response curve as that of LTP peaking at 10 nM. The increase in phosphorylation of PKCα (Ser-657) and Src (Tyr-416) induced by sunifiram was inhibited by 7-ClKN treatment. The LTP enhancement by sunifiram was significantly inhibited by PP2, a Src family inhibitor. Finally, when pretreated with a high

  18. Response Element Composition Governs Correlations between Binding Site Affinity and Transcription in Glucocorticoid Receptor Feed-forward Loops.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Zuo, Zheng; Kadiyala, Vineela; Zhang, Liyang; Pufall, Miles A; Jain, Mukesh K; Phang, Tzu L; Stormo, Gary D; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-08-01

    Combinatorial gene regulation through feed-forward loops (FFLs) can bestow specificity and temporal control to client gene expression; however, characteristics of binding sites that mediate these effects are not established. We previously showed that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and KLF15 form coherent FFLs that cooperatively induce targets such as the amino acid-metabolizing enzymes AASS and PRODH and incoherent FFLs exemplified by repression of MT2A by KLF15. Here, we demonstrate that GR and KLF15 physically interact and identify low affinity GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for PRODH and AASS that contribute to combinatorial regulation with KLF15. We used deep sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to derive in vitro GR binding affinities across sequence space. We applied these data to show that AASS GRE activity correlated (r(2) = 0.73) with predicted GR binding affinities across a 50-fold affinity range in transfection assays; however, the slope of the linear relationship more than doubled when KLF15 was expressed. Whereas activity of the MT2A GRE was even more strongly (r(2) = 0.89) correlated with GR binding site affinity, the slope of the linear relationship was sharply reduced by KLF15, consistent with incoherent FFL logic. Thus, GRE architecture and co-regulator expression together determine the functional parameters that relate GR binding site affinity to hormone-induced transcriptional responses. Utilization of specific affinity response functions and GR binding sites by FFLs may contribute to the diversity of gene expression patterns within GR-regulated transcriptomes. PMID:26088140

  19. Identification of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binding Sites and Target Genes Using ChIP-on-Chip in Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongyan; Yauk, Carole L.; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; You, Seo-Hee; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Lambert, Iain; Wade, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical to normal brain development, but the mechanisms operating in this process are poorly understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to enrich regions of DNA bound to thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) of mouse cerebellum sampled on post natal day 15. Enriched target was hybridized to promoter microarrays (ChIP-on-chip) spanning −8 kb to +2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS) of 5000 genes. We identified 91 genes with TR binding sites. Roughly half of the sites were located in introns, while 30% were located within 1 kb upstream (5′) of the TSS. Of these genes, 83 with known function included genes involved in apoptosis, neurodevelopment, metabolism and signal transduction. Two genes, MBP and CD44, are known to contain TREs, providing validation of the system. This is the first report of TR binding for 81 of these genes. ChIP-on-chip results were confirmed for 10 of the 13 binding fragments using ChIP-PCR. The expression of 4 novel TH target genes was found to be correlated with TH levels in hyper/hypothyroid animals providing further support for TR binding. A TRβ binding site upstream of the coding region of myelin associated glycoprotein was demonstrated to be TH-responsive using a luciferase expression system. Motif searches did not identify any classic binding elements, indicating that not all TR binding sites conform to variations of the classic form. These findings provide mechanistic insight into impaired neurodevelopment resulting from TH deficiency and a rich bioinformatics resource for developing a better understanding of TR binding. PMID:19240802

  20. Characterization of Naphthaleneacetic Acid Binding to Receptor Sites on Cellular Membranes of Maize Coleoptile Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Characteristics of and optimum conditions for saturable (“specific”) binding of [14C]naphthaleneacetic acid to sites located on membranous particles from maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles are described. Most, if not all, of the specific binding appears to be due to a single kinetic class of binding sites having a KD of 5 to 7 × 10−7m for naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA). Binding of NAA is insensitive to high monovalent salt concentrations, indicating that binding is not primarily ionic. However, specific binding is inhibited by Mg2+ or Ca2+ above 5 mm. Specific binding is improved by organic acids, especially citrate. Binding is heat-labile and is sensitive to agents that act either on proteins or on lipids. Specific binding is reversibly inactivated by reducing agents such as dithioerythritol; a reducible group, possibly a disulfide group, may be located at the binding site and required for its function. The affinity of the specific binding sites for auxins is modified by an unidentified dialyzable, heat-stable, apparently amphoteric, organic factor (“supernatant factor”) found in maize tissue. PMID:16659851

  1. An autophosphorylation site database for leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a family-wide study to identify and characterize sites of autophosphorylation in 73 representative LRR RLKs of the 223 member LRR RLK family in Arabidopsis thaliana. His-tagged constructs of intact cytoplasmic domains (CDs) for 73 of 223 A. thaliana LRR RLKs were cloned into E. coli BL-...

  2. Multi-organ Site Metastatic Reactivation Mediated by Non-canonical Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Zhang, Zhanguo; Akalay, Intissar; Gadiya, Mayur; Gao, Yaquan; Sinha, Surajit; Hu, Jian; Jiang, Cizhong; Akram, Muzaffar; Brogi, Edi; Leitinger, Birgit; Giancotti, Filippo G

    2016-06-30

    Genetic screening identifies the atypical tetraspanin TM4SF1 as a strong mediator of metastatic reactivation of breast cancer. Intriguingly, TM4SF1 couples the collagen receptor tyrosine kinase DDR1 to the cortical adaptor syntenin 2 and, hence, to PKCα. The latter kinase phosphorylates and activates JAK2, leading to the activation of STAT3. This non-canonical mechanism of signaling induces the expression of SOX2 and NANOG; sustains the manifestation of cancer stem cell traits; and drives metastatic reactivation in the lung, bone, and brain. Bioinformatic analyses and pathological studies corroborate the clinical relevance of these findings. We conclude that non-canonical DDR1 signaling enables breast cancer cells to exploit the ubiquitous interstitial matrix component collagen I to undergo metastatic reactivation in multiple target organs.

  3. Maxi-circles, glycosomes, gene transposition, expression sites, transsplicing, transferrin receptors and base J.

    PubMed

    Borst, Piet

    2016-01-01

    This is a personal story of the author of his research on trypanosomatids, covering a period of 1970-2015. Some of the highlights include the discovery of new aspects of kDNA, the mini-circle heterogeneity and the maxi-circle; the glycosome; the discovery of gene transposition as a major mechanism for antigenic variation; trans-splicing as an essential step in the synthesis of all trypanosome mRNAs; Pulsed Field Gradient gels to size-fractionate chromosome-sized DNA molecules of protozoa; the sequence of trypanosome telomeres and their growth and contraction; the first ABC-transporter of trypanosomatids, LtpgpA; the variable transferrin receptor of T. brucei and its role in Fe uptake; and base J, its structure, biosynthesis and function.

  4. Synthesis and radioiodination of ergoline derivatives: potential in-vivo dopamine receptor site mapping radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The need of a dopamine-receptor based radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging is apparent. If such an agent is made available to physicians, it could provide means for detecting brain tumors, and diagnose such mental disorders as parkinsonism, schizophrenia and psychosis. Currently, such agents are yet to be discovered. Procedures were developed to synthesize and label four ergoline derivatives which could potentially exhibit affinity to dopamine receptors. Labelling with /sup 125/I was accomplished in some cases by displacing a suitably positioned leaving group with /sup 125/I-anion, while in other cases iodine exchange procedures were utilized. Formulations of the labeled derivatives were achieved via the formation of their water soluble tartarate salts. Biodistribution studies in mature Sprague-Dawley rats showed that of the four radioactive compounds injected, the highest uptake in the brain and adrenals was achieved with 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline. In addition, high target/nontarget ratios were obtained with the above mentioned compound. On the other hand, the least brain and adrenal uptake as well as the lowest target/nontarget ratios were exhibited by 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-(p-iodobenzenesulfonyl)-lysergol presumably due to its in-vivo instability. A comparative biodistribution study for ergoline derivatives and N-isopropyl-(I-123)-p-iodoamphetamine was conducted. The biodistribution studies showed that the brain to blood ratio for the ergoline derivative 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline to be very close to that for /sup 125/I-IMP at 1 minute after dose administration. However after 15 minutes the brain/blood ratio of compound XLVI was half the value of /sup 123/I-IMP. Different mechanisms of brain influx and efflux are known to occur with the amphetamine and ergoline derivatives.

  5. Escape variants of the XPR1 gammaretrovirus receptor are rare due to reliance on a splice donor site and a short hypervariable loop

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyu; Martin, Carrie; Bouchard, Christelle; Kozak, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Entry determinants in the XPR1 receptor for the xenotropic/polytropic mouse leukemia viruses (XP-MLVs) lie in its third and fourth putative extracellular loops (ECLs). The critical ECL3 receptor determinant overlies a splice donor and is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrate XPR1 genes; 2 of the 3 rare replacement mutations at this site destroy this receptor determinant. The 13 residue ECL4 is hypervariable, and replacement mutations carrying an intact ECL3 site alter but do not abolish receptor activity, including replacement of the entire loop with that of a jellyfish (Cnidaria) XPR1. Because ECL4 deletions are found in all X-MLV-infected Mus subspecies, we deleted each ECL4 residue to determine if deletion-associated restriction is residue-specific or is effected by loop size. All deletions influence receptor function, although different deletions affect different XP-MLVs. Thus, receptor usage of a constrained splice site and a loop that tolerates mutations severely limits the likelihood of host escape mutations. PMID:25151060

  6. Identification of a new component of the agonist binding site of the nicotinic alpha 7 homooligomeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Corringer, P J; Galzi, J L; Eiselé, J L; Bertrand, S; Changeux, J P; Bertrand, D

    1995-05-19

    Tryptophan 54 of the alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic homooligomeric receptor is homologous to gamma-Trp-55 and delta-Trp-57 of non-alpha subunits of Torpedo receptor labeled by d-tubocurarine. This residue was mutated on the alpha 7-V201-5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)3 homooligomeric chimera, which displays alpha 7 nicotinic pharmacology, and for which both equilibrium binding studies and electrophysiological recordings could be carried out in parallel. Replacement of Trp-54 by a Phe, Ala, or His causes a progressive decrease both in binding affinity and in responses (EC50 or IC50) for acetylcholine, nicotine, and dihydro-beta-erythroidine, without significant modification in alpha-Bgtx binding. Except for Gln-56, comparatively small effects are observed when the other residues of the 52-58 region are mutated into alanine. These data support the participation of Trp-54 to ligand binding, and provide evidence for a new "complementary component" of the alpha 7 nicotinic binding site, distinct from its three-loop "principal component," and homologous to the "non-alpha component" present on gamma and delta subunits.

  7. Evidence that phospholipid turnover is the signal transducing system coupled to serotonin-S2 receptor sites

    SciTech Connect

    de Chaffoy de Courcelles, D.; Leysen, J.E.; De Clerck, F.; Van Belle, H.; Janssen, P.A.

    1985-06-25

    Upon stimulation with serotonin of washed human platelets prelabeled with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, the authors found an approximately 250% increase in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidic acid (PA) formation, a small decrease in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and a concomitant increase in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Using (/sup 3/H)arachidonate for prelabeling, (/sup 3/H)diacylglycerol accumulated transiently at 10 s after addition of the agonist, (/sup 3/H)PA increased but to a lower extent compared to /sup 32/P-labeled lipid, and the formation of both (/sup 3/H)polyphosphoinositides increased. The serotonin-induced dose-dependent changes in (/sup 32/P)PA correlate with its effect on the changes in slope of aggregation of platelets. The potency of 13 drugs to antagonize the serotonin-induced PA formation closely corresponds to both their potency to inhibit platelet aggregation and their binding affinity for serotonin-S2 receptor sites. It is suggested that at least part of the signal transducing system following activation of the serotonin-S2 receptors involves phospholipase C catalyzed inositol lipid breakdown yielding diacylglycerol which is subsequently phosphorylated to PA.

  8. Action of nicotine and analogs on acetylcholine receptors having mutations of transmitter-binding site residue αG153.

    PubMed

    Jadey, Snehal; Purohit, Prasad; Auerbach, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    A primary target for nicotine is the acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR). Some of the ability of nicotine to activate differentially AChR subtypes has been traced to a transmitter-binding site amino acid that is glycine in lower affinity and lysine in higher affinity AChRs. We studied the effects of mutations of this residue (αG153) in neuromuscular AChRs activated by nicotine and eight other agonists including nornicotine and anabasine. All of the mutations increased the unliganded gating equilibrium constant. The affinity of the resting receptor (K(d)) and the net binding energy from the agonist for gating (ΔG(B)) were estimated by cross-concentration fitting of single-channel currents. In all but one of the agonist/mutant combinations there was a moderate decrease in K(d) and essentially no change in ΔG(B). The exceptional case was nicotine plus lysine, which showed a large, >8,000-fold decrease in K(d) but no change in ΔG(B). The extraordinary specificity of this combination leads us to speculate that AChRs with a lysine at position αG153 may be exposed to a nicotine-like compound in vivo.

  9. A study of the source-receptor relationships influencing the acidity of precipitation collected at a rural site in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charron, Aurélie; Plaisance, Hervé; Sauvage, Stéphane; Coddeville, Patrice; Galloo, Jean-Claude; Guillermo, René

    In order to examine the qualitative and quantitative source-receptor relationships responsible for acid rains at a background site in France, a receptor-oriented model was applied to the precipitation data collected from 1992 to 1995. Origins of acidic and alkaline species in precipitations have been investigated. The methodology combines precipitation chemical data with air parcel backward trajectories to establish concentration field maps of likely contributing sources. Highest acidities and concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in precipitation were associated with transport from the high emission areas of central Europe. Alkaline events were associated with air masses originating from Mediterranean basin or northern Africa. The quantitative relationships between the maps of potential sources and the European emissions of SO 2 and NO x were examined performing a correlation analysis. Good correlations were found between computed concentrations of acidic species and emissions of SO 2 and NO x. Substantial seasonal variations of acidic species were revealed. The highest concentrations occurred during the warm season. These seasonal variations are the effect of change of meteorological conditions and of the strength atmospheric processes according to the season.

  10. Characterization of the ligand binding site of the bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R).

    PubMed

    Morton, H Craig; Pleass, Richard J; Woof, Jenny M; Brandtzaeg, Per

    2004-12-24

    Recently, we identified a bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R), which shows high homology to the human myeloid Fc alpha R, CD89. IgA binding has previously been shown to depend on several specific residues located in the B-C and F-G loops of the membrane-distal extracellular domain 1 of CD89. To compare the ligand binding properties of these two Fc alpha Rs, we have mapped the IgA binding site of bFc alpha R. We show that, in common with CD89, Tyr-35 in the B-C loop is essential for IgA binding. However, in contrast to earlier observations on CD89, mutation of residues in the F-G loop did not significantly inhibit IgA binding.

  11. Mapping the Interaction Sites between AMPA Receptors and TARPs Reveals a Role for the Receptor N-Terminal Domain in Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Cais, Ondrej; Herguedas, Beatriz; Krol, Karolina; Cull-Candy, Stuart G.; Farrant, Mark; Greger, Ingo H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast neurotransmission at excitatory synapses. The extent and fidelity of postsynaptic depolarization triggered by AMPAR activation are shaped by AMPAR auxiliary subunits, including the transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). TARPs profoundly influence gating, an effect thought to be mediated by an interaction with the AMPAR ion channel and ligand binding domain (LBD). Here, we show that the distal N-terminal domain (NTD) contributes to TARP modulation. Alterations in the NTD-LBD linker result in TARP-dependent and TARP-selective changes in AMPAR gating. Using peptide arrays, we identify a TARP interaction region on the NTD and define the path of TARP contacts along the LBD surface. Moreover, we map key binding sites on the TARP itself and show that mutation of these residues mediates gating modulation. Our data reveal a TARP-dependent allosteric role for the AMPAR NTD and suggest that TARP binding triggers a drastic reorganization of the AMPAR complex. PMID:25373908

  12. Receptor modelling of secondary and carbonaceous particulate matter at a southern UK site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charron, A.; Degrendele, C.; Laongsri, B.; Harrison, R. M.

    2013-02-01

    Complementary approaches have been taken to better understand the sources and their spatial distribution for secondary inorganic (nitrate and sulphate) and secondary organic aerosol sampled at a rural site (Harwell) in the southern United Kingdom. A concentration field map method was applied to 1581 daily samples of chloride, nitrate and sulphate from 2006 to 2010, and 982 samples for organic carbon and elemental carbon from 2007 to 2010. This revealed a rather similar pattern of sources for nitrate, sulphate and secondary organic carbon within western/central Europe, which in the case of nitrate, sulphate, organic carbon and secondary organic carbon, correlated significantly with EMEP emissions maps of NOx, SO2, and VOC respectively. A slightly more southerly source emphasis for secondary organic carbon may reflect the contribution of biogenic sources. Trajectory clusters confirm this pattern of behaviour with a major contribution from mainland European sources. Similar behaviours of, on the one hand, sulphate and organic carbon and, on the other hand, EC and nitrate showed that the former are more subject to regional influence than the latter in agreement with the slower atmospheric formation of sulphate and secondary organic aerosol than for nitrate, and the local/mesoscale influences upon primary EC. However, careful analysis of back trajectories and Concentration Field Maps indicates a strong contribution of mainland European sites to EC concentrations at Harwell. In a separate study, measurements of sulphate, nitrate, elemental and organic carbon were made in 100 simultaneously collected samples at Harwell and at a suburban site in Birmingham (UK). This showed a significant correlation in concentrations between the two sites for all of the secondary constituents, further indicating secondary organic aerosol to be a regional pollutant behaving similarly to sulphate and nitrate.

  13. Honokiol promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep via the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei-Min; Yue, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Yu; Fan, Kun; Chen, Chang-Rui; Hou, Yi-Ping; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Decoctions of the Chinese herb houpu contain honokiol and are used to treat a variety of mental disorders, including depression. Depression commonly presents alongside sleep disorders and sleep disturbances, which appear to be a major risk factor for depression. Here, we have evaluated the somnogenic effect of honokiol and the mechanisms involved. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Honokiol was administered i.p. at 20:00 h in mice. Flumazenil, an antagonist at the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor, was administered i.p. 15 min before honokiol. The effects of honokiol were measured by EEG and electromyogram (EMG), c-Fos expression and in vitro electrophysiology. KEY RESULTS Honokiol (10 and 20 mg·kg−1) significantly shortened the sleep latency to non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep and increased the amount of NREM sleep. Honokiol increased the number of state transitions from wakefulness to NREM sleep and, subsequently, from NREM sleep to wakefulness. However, honokiol had no effect on either the amount of REM sleep or EEG power density of both NREM and REM sleep. Honokiol increased c-Fos expression in ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) neurons, as examined by immunostaining, and excited sleep-promoting neurons in the VLPO by whole-cell patch clamping in the brain slice. Pretreatment with flumazenil abolished the somnogenic effects and activation of the VLPO neurons by honokiol. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Honokiol promoted NREM sleep by modulating the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor, suggesting potential applications in the treatment of insomnia, especially for patients who experience difficulty in falling and staying asleep. PMID:22537192

  14. Homology modeling, agonist binding site identification, and docking in octopamine receptor of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Akinori; Huang, Hongwei

    2008-06-01

    AY333178 (from Periplaneta americana, 628 AAs) was selected as a target octopamine receptor (OAR) class OAR2 for this study using Discovery Studio (DS Modeling1.1/1.2, Accelrys Inc.). Blast similarity search was performed and identified that AY333178 contains N-terminal domain of GPCR. Based upon Blast and Pfam results, Rhodopsin 1U19 (protein data bank) was considered as an ideal homologue and used as a template for homology modeling due to its higher X-ray resolution at 2.2A. Sequence alignment between AY333178 and 1U19 was done using Align123 followed by a manual modification. The final alignment was carefully evaluated and evidenced to be matching the conserved residue data for class A GPCR fairly well. The 3D model of AY333178 was generated with MODELER, and further refined using CHARMm. Superimposition of the model was done over the template 1U19. Two fairly consistent profiles were observed demonstrating AY333178 model was reasonable and could be employed for the further docking study. Agonist docking into OAR2 model was done using LigandFit. The superimposition of two top poses of representative agonists was performed with a soft surface generated. Those models are considered to be used in designing new leads for hopefully more active compounds. Further research on the comparison of models for the agonists may elucidate the mechanisms of OAR2-ligand interactions.

  15. Shisa6 traps AMPA receptors at postsynaptic sites and prevents their desensitization during synaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Remco V; Stroeder, Jasper; Coussen, Françoise; Hafner, Anne-Sophie; Petersen, Jennifer D; Renancio, Cedric; Schmitz, Leanne J M; Normand, Elisabeth; Lodder, Johannes C; Rotaru, Diana C; Rao-Ruiz, Priyanka; Spijker, Sabine; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Choquet, Daniel; Smit, August B

    2016-03-02

    Trafficking and biophysical properties of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the brain depend on interactions with associated proteins. We identify Shisa6, a single transmembrane protein, as a stable and directly interacting bona fide AMPAR auxiliary subunit. Shisa6 is enriched at hippocampal postsynaptic membranes and co-localizes with AMPARs. The Shisa6 C-terminus harbours a PDZ domain ligand that binds to PSD-95, constraining mobility of AMPARs in the plasma membrane and confining them to postsynaptic densities. Shisa6 expressed in HEK293 cells alters GluA1- and GluA2-mediated currents by prolonging decay times and decreasing the extent of AMPAR desensitization, while slowing the rate of recovery from desensitization. Using gene deletion, we show that Shisa6 increases rise and decay times of hippocampal CA1 miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Shisa6-containing AMPARs show prominent sustained currents, indicating protection from full desensitization. Accordingly, Shisa6 prevents synaptically trapped AMPARs from depression at high-frequency synaptic transmission.

  16. Shisa6 traps AMPA receptors at postsynaptic sites and prevents their desensitization during synaptic activity

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, Remco V.; Stroeder, Jasper; Coussen, Françoise; Hafner, Anne-Sophie; Petersen, Jennifer D.; Renancio, Cedric; Schmitz, Leanne J. M.; Normand, Elisabeth; Lodder, Johannes C.; Rotaru, Diana C.; Rao-Ruiz, Priyanka; Spijker, Sabine; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Choquet, Daniel; Smit, August B.

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking and biophysical properties of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the brain depend on interactions with associated proteins. We identify Shisa6, a single transmembrane protein, as a stable and directly interacting bona fide AMPAR auxiliary subunit. Shisa6 is enriched at hippocampal postsynaptic membranes and co-localizes with AMPARs. The Shisa6 C-terminus harbours a PDZ domain ligand that binds to PSD-95, constraining mobility of AMPARs in the plasma membrane and confining them to postsynaptic densities. Shisa6 expressed in HEK293 cells alters GluA1- and GluA2-mediated currents by prolonging decay times and decreasing the extent of AMPAR desensitization, while slowing the rate of recovery from desensitization. Using gene deletion, we show that Shisa6 increases rise and decay times of hippocampal CA1 miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Shisa6-containing AMPARs show prominent sustained currents, indicating protection from full desensitization. Accordingly, Shisa6 prevents synaptically trapped AMPARs from depression at high-frequency synaptic transmission. PMID:26931375

  17. Reconstitution of a Functional Toll-like Receptor 5 Binding Site in Campylobacter jejuni Flagellin*

    PubMed Central

    de Zoete, Marcel R.; Keestra, A. Marijke; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin is important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Flagellins from most species activate Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). The principal bacterial food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni escapes TLR5 recognition, probably due to an alternate flagellin subunit structure. We investigated the molecular basis of TLR5 evasion by aiming to reconstitute TLR5 stimulating activity in live C. jejuni. Both native glycosylated C. jejuni flagellins (FlaA and FlaB) and recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli failed to activate NF-κB in HEK293 cells expressing TLR5. Introduction of multiple defined regions from Salmonella flagellin into C. jejuni FlaA via a recombinatorial approach revealed three regions critical for the activation of human and mouse TLR5, including a β-hairpin structure not previously implicated in TLR5 recognition. Surprisingly, this domain was not required for the activation of chicken TLR5, indicating a selective requirement for the β-hairpin in the recognition of mammalian TLR5. Expression of the active chimeric protein in C. jejuni resulted in secreted glycosylated flagellin that induced a potent TLR5 response. Overall, our results reveal a novel structural requirement for TLR5 recognition of bacterial flagellin and exclude flagellin glycosylation as an additional mechanism of bacterial evasion of the TLR5 response. PMID:20164175

  18. Reconstitution of a functional Toll-like receptor 5 binding site in Campylobacter jejuni flagellin.

    PubMed

    de Zoete, Marcel R; Keestra, A Marijke; Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Putten, Jos P M

    2010-04-16

    Bacterial flagellin is important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Flagellins from most species activate Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). The principal bacterial food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni escapes TLR5 recognition, probably due to an alternate flagellin subunit structure. We investigated the molecular basis of TLR5 evasion by aiming to reconstitute TLR5 stimulating activity in live C. jejuni. Both native glycosylated C. jejuni flagellins (FlaA and FlaB) and recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli failed to activate NF-kappaB in HEK293 cells expressing TLR5. Introduction of multiple defined regions from Salmonella flagellin into C. jejuni FlaA via a recombinatorial approach revealed three regions critical for the activation of human and mouse TLR5, including a beta-hairpin structure not previously implicated in TLR5 recognition. Surprisingly, this domain was not required for the activation of chicken TLR5, indicating a selective requirement for the beta-hairpin in the recognition of mammalian TLR5. Expression of the active chimeric protein in C. jejuni resulted in secreted glycosylated flagellin that induced a potent TLR5 response. Overall, our results reveal a novel structural requirement for TLR5 recognition of bacterial flagellin and exclude flagellin glycosylation as an additional mechanism of bacterial evasion of the TLR5 response. PMID:20164175

  19. Shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization of protease-activated receptor 1 can be separated by mutation of putative phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Hammes, S R; Shapiro, M J; Coughlin, S R

    1999-07-20

    The thrombin receptor PAR1 becomes rapidly phosphorylated upon activation by either thrombin or exogenous SFLLRN agonist peptide. Substitution of alanine for all serine and threonine residues in the receptor's cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail ablated phosphorylation and yielded a receptor defective in both shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization. These observations suggested that activation-dependent phosphorylation of PAR1's cytoplasmic tail is required for both shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization. To identify the phosphorylation site(s) that are necessary for these functions, we generated three mutant receptors in which alanine was substituted for serine and threonine residues in the amino-terminal, middle, and carboxyl-terminal thirds of PAR1's cytoplasmic tail. When stably expressed in fibroblasts, all three mutated receptors were rapidly phosphorylated in response to agonist, while a mutant in which all serines and threonines in the cytoplasmic tail were converted to alanines was not. This result suggests that phosphorylation can occur at multiple sites in PAR1's cytoplasmic tail. Alanine substitutions in the N-terminal and C-terminal portions of the tail had no effect on either receptor shutoff or agonist-triggered internalization. By contrast, alanine substitutions in the "middle" serine cluster between Ser(391) and Ser(406) yielded a receptor with considerably slower shutoff of signaling after thrombin activation than the wild type. Surprisingly, this same mutant was indistinguishable from the wild type in agonist-triggered internalization and degradation. Overexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and GRK3 "suppressed" the shutoff defect of the S --> A (391-406) mutant, consistent with this defect being due to altered receptor phosphorylation. These results suggest that specific phosphorylation sites are required for rapid receptor shutoff, but phosphorylation at multiple alternative sites is sufficient for agonist

  20. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  1. Receptor modelling of airborne particulate matter in the vicinity of a major steelworks site.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, A M; Beddows, D C S; Calzolai, G; Harrison, Roy M; Lucarelli, F; Nava, S; Shi, Z; Valli, G; Vecchi, R

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the Multilinear Engine (ME-2) receptor model was applied to speciated particulate matter concentration data collected with two different measuring instruments upwind and downwind of a steelworks complex in Port Talbot, South Wales, United Kingdom. Hourly and daily PM samples were collected with Streaker and Partisol samplers, respectively, during a one month sampling campaign between April 18 and May 16, 2012. Daily samples (PM10, PM2.5, PM2.5-10) were analysed for trace metals and water-soluble ions using standard procedures. Hourly samples (PM2.5 and PM2.5-10) were assayed for 22 elements by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). PM10 data analysis using ME-2 resolved 6 factors from both datasets identifying different steel processing units including emissions from the blast furnaces (BF), the basic oxygen furnace steelmaking plant (BOS), the coke-making plant, and the sinter plant. Steelworks emissions were the main contributors to PM10 accounting for 45% of the mass when including also secondary aerosol. The blast furnaces were the largest emitter of primary PM10 in the study area, explaining about one-fifth of the mass. Other source contributions to PM10 were from marine aerosol (28%), traffic (16%), and background aerosol (11%). ME-2 analysis was also performed on daily PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 data resolving 7 and 6 factors, respectively. The largest contributions to PM2.5-10 were from marine aerosol (30%) and blast furnace emissions (28%). Secondary components explained one-half of PM2.5 mass. The influence of steelworks sources on ambient particulate matter at Port Talbot was distinguishable for several separate processing sections within the steelworks in all PM fractions. PMID:24875261

  2. Receptor modelling of airborne particulate matter in the vicinity of a major steelworks site.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, A M; Beddows, D C S; Calzolai, G; Harrison, Roy M; Lucarelli, F; Nava, S; Shi, Z; Valli, G; Vecchi, R

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the Multilinear Engine (ME-2) receptor model was applied to speciated particulate matter concentration data collected with two different measuring instruments upwind and downwind of a steelworks complex in Port Talbot, South Wales, United Kingdom. Hourly and daily PM samples were collected with Streaker and Partisol samplers, respectively, during a one month sampling campaign between April 18 and May 16, 2012. Daily samples (PM10, PM2.5, PM2.5-10) were analysed for trace metals and water-soluble ions using standard procedures. Hourly samples (PM2.5 and PM2.5-10) were assayed for 22 elements by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). PM10 data analysis using ME-2 resolved 6 factors from both datasets identifying different steel processing units including emissions from the blast furnaces (BF), the basic oxygen furnace steelmaking plant (BOS), the coke-making plant, and the sinter plant. Steelworks emissions were the main contributors to PM10 accounting for 45% of the mass when including also secondary aerosol. The blast furnaces were the largest emitter of primary PM10 in the study area, explaining about one-fifth of the mass. Other source contributions to PM10 were from marine aerosol (28%), traffic (16%), and background aerosol (11%). ME-2 analysis was also performed on daily PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 data resolving 7 and 6 factors, respectively. The largest contributions to PM2.5-10 were from marine aerosol (30%) and blast furnace emissions (28%). Secondary components explained one-half of PM2.5 mass. The influence of steelworks sources on ambient particulate matter at Port Talbot was distinguishable for several separate processing sections within the steelworks in all PM fractions.

  3. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    PubMed

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  4. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  5. Delineation of the complement receptor type 2-C3d complex by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Craig D; Storek, Michael J; Young, Kendra A; Kovacs, James M; Thurman, Joshua M; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2010-12-10

    The interactions between the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) and the C3 complement fragments C3d, C3dg, and iC3b are essential for the initiation of a normal immune response. A crystal-derived structure of the two N-terminal short consensus repeat (SCR1-2) domains of CR2 in complex with C3d has previously been elucidated. However, a number of biochemical and biophysical studies targeting both CR2 and C3d appear to be in conflict with these structural data. Previous mutagenesis and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy studies directed toward the C3d-binding site on CR2 have indicated that the CR2-C3d cocrystal structure may represent an encounter/intermediate or nonphysiological complex. With regard to the CR2-binding site on C3d, mutagenesis studies by Isenman and coworkers [Isenman, D. E., Leung, E., Mackay, J. D., Bagby, S. & van den Elsen, J. M. H. (2010). Mutational analyses reveal that the staphylococcal immune evasion molecule Sbi and complement receptor 2 (CR2) share overlapping contact residues on C3d: Implications for the controversy regarding the CR2/C3d cocrystal structure. J. Immunol. 184, 1946-1955] have implicated an electronegative "concave" surface on C3d in the binding process. This surface is discrete from the CR2-C3d interface identified in the crystal structure. We generated a total of 18 mutations targeting the two (X-ray crystallographic- and mutagenesis-based) proposed CR2 SCR1-2 binding sites on C3d. Using ELISA analyses, we were able to assess binding of mutant forms of C3d to CR2. Mutations directed toward the concave surface of C3d result in substantially compromised CR2 binding. By contrast, targeting the CR2-C3d interface identified in the cocrystal structure and the surrounding area results in significantly lower levels of disruption in binding. Molecular modeling approaches used to investigate disparities between the biochemical data and the X-ray structure of the CR2-C3d cocrystal result in highest-scoring solutions in which CR2 SCR1-2 is

  6. Delineation of the complement receptor type 2-C3d complex by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Craig D; Storek, Michael J; Young, Kendra A; Kovacs, James M; Thurman, Joshua M; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2010-12-10

    The interactions between the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) and the C3 complement fragments C3d, C3dg, and iC3b are essential for the initiation of a normal immune response. A crystal-derived structure of the two N-terminal short consensus repeat (SCR1-2) domains of CR2 in complex with C3d has previously been elucidated. However, a number of biochemical and biophysical studies targeting both CR2 and C3d appear to be in conflict with these structural data. Previous mutagenesis and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy studies directed toward the C3d-binding site on CR2 have indicated that the CR2-C3d cocrystal structure may represent an encounter/intermediate or nonphysiological complex. With regard to the CR2-binding site on C3d, mutagenesis studies by Isenman and coworkers [Isenman, D. E., Leung, E., Mackay, J. D., Bagby, S. & van den Elsen, J. M. H. (2010). Mutational analyses reveal that the staphylococcal immune evasion molecule Sbi and complement receptor 2 (CR2) share overlapping contact residues on C3d: Implications for the controversy regarding the CR2/C3d cocrystal structure. J. Immunol. 184, 1946-1955] have implicated an electronegative "concave" surface on C3d in the binding process. This surface is discrete from the CR2-C3d interface identified in the crystal structure. We generated a total of 18 mutations targeting the two (X-ray crystallographic- and mutagenesis-based) proposed CR2 SCR1-2 binding sites on C3d. Using ELISA analyses, we were able to assess binding of mutant forms of C3d to CR2. Mutations directed toward the concave surface of C3d result in substantially compromised CR2 binding. By contrast, targeting the CR2-C3d interface identified in the cocrystal structure and the surrounding area results in significantly lower levels of disruption in binding. Molecular modeling approaches used to investigate disparities between the biochemical data and the X-ray structure of the CR2-C3d cocrystal result in highest-scoring solutions in which CR2 SCR1-2 is

  7. Intracellular signaling of the Ufo/Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is mediated mainly by a multi-substrate docking-site.

    PubMed

    Braunger, J; Schleithoff, L; Schulz, A S; Kessler, H; Lammers, R; Ullrich, A; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1997-06-01

    Ufo/Axl belongs to a new family of receptor tyrosine kinases with an extracellular structure similar to that of neural cell adhesion molecules. In order to elucidate intracellular signaling, the cytoplasmic moiety of Ufo/Axl was used to screen an expression library according to the CORT (cloning of receptor targets) method. Three putative Ufo substrates were identified: phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma), as well as p85alpha and p85beta subunits of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-kinase). Subsequently, chimeric EGFR/Ufo receptors consisting of the extracellular domains of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the transmembrane and intracellular moiety of Ufo were engineered. Using different far-Western blot analyses and coimmunoprecipitation assays, receptor binding of PLCgamma and p85 proteins as well as GRB2, c-src and lck was examined in vitro and in vivo. Competitive inhibition of substrate binding and mutagenesis experiments with EGFR/Ufo constructs revealed C-terminal tyrosine 821 (EILpYVNMDEG) as a docking site for multiple effectors, namely PLCgamma, p85 proteins, GRB2, c-src and lck. Tyrosine 779 (DGLpYALMSRC) demonstrated an additional, but lower binding affinity for the p85 proteins in vitro. In addition, binding of PLCgamma occurred through tyrosine 866 (AGRpYVLCPST). Moreover, our in vivo data indicate that further direct or indirect binding sites for PLCgamma, GRB2, c-src and lck on the human Ufo receptor may exist.

  8. 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A serotonin receptors in the primate cerebral cortex: possible site of action of hallucinogenic and antipsychotic drugs in pyramidal cell apical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Jakab, R L; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1998-01-20

    To identify the cortical sites where 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) serotonin receptors respond to the action of hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs, we have examined the cellular and subcellular distribution of these receptors in the cerebral cortex of macaque monkeys (with a focus on prefrontal areas) by using light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques. 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity was detected in all cortical layers, among which layers II and III and layers V and VI were intensely stained, and layer IV was weakly labeled. The majority of the receptor-labeled cells were pyramidal neurons and the most intense immunolabeling was consistently confined to their parallelly aligned proximal apical dendrites that formed two intensely stained bands above and below layer IV. In double-label experiments, 5-HT2A label was found in calbindin D28k-positive, nonphosphorylated-neurofilament-positive, and immuno-negative pyramidal cells, suggesting that probably all pyramidal cells express 5-HT2A receptors. 5-HT2A label was also found in large- and medium-size interneurons, some of which were immuno-positive for calbindin. 5-HT2A receptor label was also associated with axon terminals. These findings reconcile the data on the receptor's cortical physiology and localization by (i) establishing that 5-HT2A receptors are located postsynaptically and presynaptically, (ii) demonstrating that pyramidal neurons constitute the major 5-HT2A-receptor-expressing cells in the cortex, and (iii) supporting the view that the apical dendritic field proximal to the pyramidal cell soma is the "hot spot" for 5-HT2A-receptor-mediated physiological actions relevant to normal and "psychotic" functional states of the cerebral cortex.

  9. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activity of atmospheric particulate matter from an urban and a rural site in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Daniela; Gerecke, Andreas C.; Heeb, Norbert V.; Hueglin, Christoph; Seiler, Cornelia; Haag, Regula; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Zenobi, Renato

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is an air-suspended mixture of solid and liquid particles that vary in size, shape, and chemical composition. Long-term exposure to elevated concentrations of fine atmospheric particles is considered to pose a health threat to humans and animals. In this context, it has been hypothesized that toxic chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) play an important role. Some PAHs are known to be carcinogenic and it has been shown that carcinogenic effects of PAHs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In this study, PM1 was collected at a rural and an urban traffic site during an intense winter smog period, in which concentration of PM1 often exceeded 50 μg m -3. We applied an in vitro reporter gene assay (DR-CALUX) to detect and quantify PM1-associated chemicals that induce AhR-mediated gene expression. This activity was expressed as CALUX equivalents of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (PM-TCDD-CEQs). In addition, concentrations of PAHs in the PM1 extracts were determined using gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry. Concentrations of PM-TCDD-CEQs ranged from 10 to 85 pg m -3 and from 19 to 87 pg m -3 at the urban and rural site, respectively. By the use of known relative potency factors, the measured concentration of a PAH was converted into a PAH-TCDD-CEQ concentration. ΣPAH-TCDD-CEQ and PM-TCDD-CEQ were highly correlated at both sites ( r2 = 0.90 and 0.69). The calculated ΣPAH-TCDD-CEQs explain between 2% and 20% of the measured PM-TCDD-CEQs. Benzo[ k]fluoranthene was the most important PAH causing approximately 60% of the total ΣPAH-TCDD-CEQ activity. In contrast to NO, CO, PM10, and PM1, the concentration of PM-TCDD-CEQs showed no significant difference between the two sites. No indications were found that road traffic emissions caused elevated concentrations of PM-TCDD-CEQs at the urban traffic site.

  10. Multifunctional receptor model for dioxin and related compound toxic action: possible thyroid hormone-responsive effector-linked site.

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, J D

    1989-01-01

    Molecular/theoretical modeling studies have revealed that thyroid hormones and toxic chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons of environmental significance (for which dioxin or TCDD is the prototype) have similar structural properties that could be important in molecular recognition in biochemical systems. These molecular properties include a somewhat rigid, sterically accessible and polarizable aromatic ring and size-limited, hydrophobic lateral substituents, usually contained in opposite adjoining rings of a diphenyl compound. These molecular properties define the primary binding groups thought to be important in molecular recognition of both types of structures in biochemical systems. Similar molecular reactivities are supported by the demonstration of effective specific binding of thyroid hormones and chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons with four different proteins, enzymes, or receptor preparations that are known or suspected to be involved in the expression of thyroid hormone activity. These binding interactions represent both aromatic-aromatic (stacking) and molecular cleft-type recognition processes. A multiple protein or multifunctional receptor-ligand binding mechanism model is proposed as a way of visualizing the details and possible role of both the stacking and cleft type molecular recognition factors in the expression of biological activity. The model suggests a means by which hormone-responsive effector-linked sites (possible protein-protein-DNA complexes) can maintain highly structurally specific control of hormone action. Finally, the model also provides a theoretical basis for the design and conduct of further biological experimentation on the molecular mechanism(s) of action of toxic chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons and thyroid hormones. Images FIGURE 3. A FIGURE 3. B FIGURE 3. C FIGURE 3. D PMID:2551666

  11. Mutagenesis and computational docking studies support the existence of a histamine binding site at the extracellular β3+β3- interface of homooligomeric β3 GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Hoerbelt, Paul; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Ernst, Margot; Sieghart, Werner; Thomson, Jeffrey L; Hough, Lindsay B; Fleck, Mark W

    2016-09-01

    Histamine is an important neurotransmitter that exerts its physiological actions through H1-4 metabotropic receptors in mammals. It also directly activates ionotropic GABAA receptor (GABAAR) β3 homooligomers and potentiates GABA responses in αβ heterooligomers in vitro, but the respective histamine binding sites in GABAARs are unknown. We hypothesized that histamine binds at the extracellular β+β- interface at a position homologous to the GABA binding site of heterooligomeric GABAARs. To test this, we individually mutated several residues at the putative ligand binding minus side of a rat GABAAR β3 wild type subunit and of a β3 subunit that was made insensitive to trace Zn(2+) inhibition [β3(H267A); called (Z)β3]. (Z)β3, (Z)β3(Y62L), (Z)β3(Q64A), (Z)β3(Q64E), α1(Z)β3, or α1(Z)β3(Y62L) receptors were studied in HEK293T cells using whole cell voltage clamp recording. β3, β3(Y62C), β3(Q64C), β3(N41C), β3(D43C), β3(A45C) or β3(M115C) receptors were examined in Xenopus oocytes using two-electrode voltage clamp. Histamine directly activated (Z)β3 and β3 homooligomers and potentiated GABA actions in α1(Z)β3 heterooligomers. Receptors containing (Z)β3(Y62L), β3(Y62C) and β3(D43C) showed markedly reduced histamine potency, but homo- and heterooligomers with (Z)β3(Q64E) exhibited increased potency. The GABAAR αβ(γ) competitive antagonist bicuculline elicited sub-maximal agonist currents through (Z)β3 homooligomers, the potency of which was strongly decreased by (Z)β3(Y62L). Mutations β3(N41C), β3(A45C) and β3(M115C) disturbed receptor expression or assembly. Computational docking into the crystal structure of homooligomeric β3 receptors resulted in a histamine pose highly consistent with the experimental findings, suggesting that histamine activates β3 receptors via a site homologous to the GABA site in αβγ receptors. PMID:27140694

  12. Receptor modelling of both particle composition and size distribution from a background site in London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Green, D. C.; Fuller, G. W.

    2015-09-01

    Positive matrix factorisation (PMF) analysis was applied to PM10 chemical composition and particle number size distribution (NSD) data measured at an urban background site (North Kensington) in London, UK, for the whole of 2011 and 2012. The PMF analyses for these 2 years revealed six and four factors respectively which described seven sources or aerosol types. These included nucleation, traffic, urban background, secondary, fuel oil, marine and non-exhaust/crustal sources. Urban background, secondary and traffic sources were identified by both the chemical composition and particle NSD analysis, but a nucleation source was identified only from the particle NSD data set. Analysis of the PM10 chemical composition data set revealed fuel oil, marine, non-exhaust traffic/crustal sources which were not identified from the NSD data. The two methods appear to be complementary, as the analysis of the PM10 chemical composition data is able to distinguish components contributing largely to particle mass, whereas the number particle size distribution data set - although limited to detecting sources of particles below the diameter upper limit of the SMPS (604 nm) - is more effective for identifying components making an appreciable contribution to particle number. Analysis was also conducted on the combined chemical composition and NSD data set, revealing five factors representing urban background, nucleation, secondary, aged marine and traffic sources. However, the combined analysis appears not to offer any additional power to discriminate sources above that of the aggregate of the two separate PMF analyses. Day-of-the-week and month-of-the-year associations of the factors proved consistent with their assignment to source categories, and bivariate polar plots which examined the wind directional and wind speed association of the different factors also proved highly consistent with their inferred sources. Source attribution according to the air mass back trajectory showed, as

  13. Desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) and [3H]dFBr-Labeled Binding Sites in a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Wang, Ze-Jun; Stewart, Deirdre S; Jain, Atul D; Glennon, Richard A; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2015-07-01

    Desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) is a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of α4β2 and α2β2 nAChRs that, at concentrations >1 µM, also inhibits these receptors and α7 nAChRs. However, its interactions with muscle-type nAChRs have not been characterized, and the locations of its binding site(s) in any nAChR are not known. We report here that dFBr inhibits human muscle (αβεδ) and Torpedo (αβγδ) nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes with IC50 values of ∼ 1 μM. dFBr also inhibited the equilibrium binding of ion channel blockers to Torpedo nAChRs with higher affinity in the nAChR desensitized state ([(3)H]phencyclidine; IC50 = 4 μM) than in the resting state ([(3)H]tetracaine; IC50 = 60 μM), whereas it bound with only very low affinity to the ACh binding sites ([(3)H]ACh, IC50 = 1 mM). Upon irradiation at 312 nm, [(3)H]dFBr photoincorporated into amino acids within the Torpedo nAChR ion channel with the efficiency of photoincorporation enhanced in the presence of agonist and the agonist-enhanced photolabeling inhibitable by phencyclidine. In the presence of agonist, [(3)H]dFBr also photolabeled amino acids in the nAChR extracellular domain within binding pockets identified previously for the nonselective nAChR PAMs galantamine and physostigmine at the canonical α-γ interface containing the transmitter binding sites and at the noncanonical δ-β subunit interface. These results establish that dFBr inhibits muscle-type nAChR by binding in the ion channel and that [(3)H]dFBr is a photoaffinity probe with broad amino acid side chain reactivity. PMID:25870334

  14. PM over summertime India: Sources and trends investigated using long term measurements and multi-receptor site back trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Sarkar, Chinmoy; Sachan, Himanshu; Kumar, Devender; Sinha, Baerbel

    2013-04-01

    We apply multi-receptor site residence-time weighted concentration back trajectory analysis to a ten year data set (1991-2003) of PM10 and TSP measurement data from four Indian megacities Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata and Chennai. The dataset was sourced from the published and peer reviewed work of Gupta and Kumar (2006). Sources and trends of PM10 and TSP during the pre-monsoon season (March-June) were investigated. Residence-time weighted concentration maps were derived using 72 hour HYSPLIT back trajectory ensemble calculations. Trajectory runs were started 100 m AGL and the observed PM monthly averages were attributed to all trajectory runs in a month and each trajectory of the ensemble runs with equal probability. For investigating trends the dataset was further subdivided into two groups of four year durations each (1992-1995 and 2000-2003). We found a linear correlation with a slope of 1.0 (R2=0.9) between estimated seasonal average TSP (2000-2003) using our approach and the measured seasonal averages (2006-2007) for Kanpur, Ahmedabad, Pune and Bangalore. A linear fit between predicted and measured PM10 concentration for 19 sites with PM10 observations of at least one seasonal average between 1999-2009 shows a slope of 1.4 (R2=0.4). For the observation period 2000-2003, the Thar Desert and Taklimakan Desert emerged as largest sources for both PM10 (>180 μg/m3 and >200 μg/m3 respectively) and TSP (>650 μg/m3 and >725 μg/m3 respectively). In-situ observation at Bikaner (central Thar Desert) and in Jhunjhunu (semi-arid site at the border of the Thar Desert) indicate that both TSP and PM10 inside the desert source region are underpredicted by a factor of 10 compared to in-situ observations while for the semi arid area bordering the desert PM10 and TSP are underpredicted by a factor of 5 and 3 respectively. This indicates that strong sources are underpredicted by a receptor site centred approach. The entire North-Western Indo-Gangetic Basin (NW-IGB), where crop

  15. Teratogenesis of polychlorocycloalkane insecticides in chicken embryos resulting from their interactions at the convulsant recognition sites of the GABA (pro)receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, J. )

    1989-05-01

    There is an increasing concern for the effects of toxicants expressed during embryonic development. This paper considers the teratogenicity of polychlorocycloalkane insecticides. They are neurotoxicants which act at the convulsant recognition site(s) of the GABA receptor-chloride ionophore and antagonize GABA-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. This study uses the chicken embryo as a model organism. It focuses on malformations related to interactions of polychlorocycloalkane insecticides with the convulsant recognition sites in the brain. Information provided by this study is important for investigations on the teratogenicity of insecticidal GABA antagonists in mammals.

  16. Temporal variability of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a receptor site of Puebla -Tlaxcala Valley.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla Barrera, Zuhelen; Torres Jardón, Ricardo; Gerardo Ruiz, Luis; Castro, Telma

    2015-04-01

    surface area was 81.9 mm2/m3and the maximum of 176.8 mm2/m3. Peak concentrations occurred at dawn and in the early hours of the morning then decreasing in the morning and evening. Particularly notable was the drop in the concentration of both PAHs and DC between 8 and 10 am , this period is when the vehicular activity peaks as the use of fuels for heating homes is intense. Additionally, this period is when the boundary layer is fully established favoring the accumulation of newly issued pollutants and remnants of the night. The breaking of the layer precisely between 8 am and 9am resulting in a rapid decrease in the concentrations of all pollutants favored the vertical mixing them with cleaner air masses previously located above the boundary layer. Once broken the boundary layer , the new layer grows and pollutants are mixed with air masses that are being transported to other sites which establishes the dominant concentrations and in the day. By 7 pm there is an increase in vehicular traffic and even dominates the regional wind ventilation, a slight increase was observed in the concentrations of CO , NOx and DC.

  17. Dimensional and chemical characterization of particles at a downwind receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, G.; Stabile, L.; Avino, P.; Vanoli, R.

    2010-07-15

    In the last years numerous epidemiological studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of particulate matter on human health. In industrialized areas, anthropogenic activities highly contribute to the fine and ultrafine particle concentrations. Then, it is important to characterize the evolution of particle size distribution and chemical composition near these emission points. Waste incineration represents a favorable technique for reducing the waste volume. However, in the past, municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) had a bad reputation due to the emission of toxic combustion byproducts. Consequently, the risk perception of the people living near MWIs is very high even if in Western countries waste incineration has nowadays to be considered a relatively clean process from a technical point of view. The study here presented has an exemplary meaning for developing appropriate management and control strategies for air quality in the surrounding of MWIs and to perform exposure assessment for populations involved. Environment particles were continuously measured through a SMPS/APS system over 12 months. The monitoring site represents a downwind receptor of a typical MWI. Furthermore, elements and organic fractions were measured by means of the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and using dichotomous and high volume samplers. Annual mean values of 8.6 x 10{sup 3} +- 3.7 x 10{sup 2} part. cm{sup -3} and 31.1 +- 9.0 mug m{sup -3} were found for number and mass concentration, typical of a rural site. Most of the elements can be attributed to long-range transport from other natural and/or anthropogenic sources. Finally, the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons present low concentrations with a mean value of 24.6 ng m{sup -3}.

  18. Dimensional and chemical characterization of particles at a downwind receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, G; Stabile, L; Avino, P; Vanoli, R

    2010-07-01

    In the last years numerous epidemiological studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of particulate matter on human health. In industrialized areas, anthropogenic activities highly contribute to the fine and ultrafine particle concentrations. Then, it is important to characterize the evolution of particle size distribution and chemical composition near these emission points. Waste incineration represents a favorable technique for reducing the waste volume. However, in the past, municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) had a bad reputation due to the emission of toxic combustion byproducts. Consequently, the risk perception of the people living near MWIs is very high even if in Western countries waste incineration has nowadays to be considered a relatively clean process from a technical point of view. The study here presented has an exemplary meaning for developing appropriate management and control strategies for air quality in the surrounding of MWIs and to perform exposure assessment for populations involved. Environment particles were continuously measured through a SMPS/APS system over 12 months. The monitoring site represents a downwind receptor of a typical MWI. Furthermore, elements and organic fractions were measured by means of the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and using dichotomous and high volume samplers. Annual mean values of 8.6 x 10(3)+/-3.7 x 10(2)part.cm(-3) and 31.1+/-9.0 microg m(-3) were found for number and mass concentration, typical of a rural site. Most of the elements can be attributed to long-range transport from other natural and/or anthropogenic sources. Finally, the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons present low concentrations with a mean value of 24.6 ng m(-3).

  19. Dimensional and chemical characterization of particles at a downwind receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, G; Stabile, L; Avino, P; Vanoli, R

    2010-07-01

    In the last years numerous epidemiological studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of particulate matter on human health. In industrialized areas, anthropogenic activities highly contribute to the fine and ultrafine particle concentrations. Then, it is important to characterize the evolution of particle size distribution and chemical composition near these emission points. Waste incineration represents a favorable technique for reducing the waste volume. However, in the past, municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) had a bad reputation due to the emission of toxic combustion byproducts. Consequently, the risk perception of the people living near MWIs is very high even if in Western countries waste incineration has nowadays to be considered a relatively clean process from a technical point of view. The study here presented has an exemplary meaning for developing appropriate management and control strategies for air quality in the surrounding of MWIs and to perform exposure assessment for populations involved. Environment particles were continuously measured through a SMPS/APS system over 12 months. The monitoring site represents a downwind receptor of a typical MWI. Furthermore, elements and organic fractions were measured by means of the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and using dichotomous and high volume samplers. Annual mean values of 8.6 x 10(3)+/-3.7 x 10(2)part.cm(-3) and 31.1+/-9.0 microg m(-3) were found for number and mass concentration, typical of a rural site. Most of the elements can be attributed to long-range transport from other natural and/or anthropogenic sources. Finally, the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons present low concentrations with a mean value of 24.6 ng m(-3). PMID:20100651

  20. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Mehmet; Liu, Yuanbo; Zhang, Zhentao; De Silva, Dinuka; Parker, Joel S; Earp, H Shelton; Whang, Young E

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  1. Allosteric binding site in a Cys-loop receptor ligand-binding domain unveiled in the crystal structure of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Farinha, Ana; Yoluk, Özge; Andersson, Magnus; Brams, Marijke; Spurny, Radovan; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Lindahl, Erik; Ulens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels or Cys-loop receptors are responsible for fast inhibitory or excitatory synaptic transmission. The antipsychotic compound chlorpromazine is a widely used tool to probe the ion channel pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which is a prototypical Cys-loop receptor. In this study, we determine the molecular determinants of chlorpromazine binding in the Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC). We report the X-ray crystal structures of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine or its brominated derivative bromopromazine. Unexpectedly, we do not find a chlorpromazine molecule in the channel pore of ELIC, but behind the β8–β9 loop in the extracellular ligand-binding domain. The β8–β9 loop is localized downstream from the neurotransmitter binding site and plays an important role in coupling of ligand binding to channel opening. In combination with electrophysiological recordings from ELIC cysteine mutants and a thiol-reactive derivative of chlorpromazine, we demonstrate that chlorpromazine binding at the β8–β9 loop is responsible for receptor inhibition. We further use molecular-dynamics simulations to support the X-ray data and mutagenesis experiments. Together, these data unveil an allosteric binding site in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of ELIC. Our results extend on previous observations and further substantiate our understanding of a multisite model for allosteric modulation of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:27791038

  2. A semi-empirical, receptor-oriented Lagrangian model for simulating fine particulate carbon at rural sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schichtel, B. A.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Barna, M. G.; Gebhart, K. A.; Pitchford, M. L.; Malm, W. C.

    2012-12-01

    Total fine particulate carbon (TC) is an important contributor to fine particulate matter and is measured in routine national monitoring programs. TC contributes to adverse health effects, regional haze, and climate effects. To resolve these adverse effects, there is a need for tools capable of routine and climatological assessments and exploration of the sources contributing to the measured TC. To address this need, a receptor-oriented, Lagrangian particle dispersion model was developed to simulate TC in rural areas, using readily available meteorological and emission inputs. This model was based on the CAPITA (Center for Air Pollution Impact and Trend Analysis) Monte Carlo model (CMC) and simulated the contributions from eight source categories, including biomass burning and secondary organic carbon (SOC) from vegetation. TC removal and formation mechanisms are simulated using a simplified parameterization of atmospheric processes based on pseudo-first-order rate equations. The rate coefficients are empirical functions of meteorological parameters derived from measured, modeled, and literature data. These functions were optimized such that the simulated TC concentrations reproduce the average spatial and seasonal patterns in measured 2008 U.S. TC concentrations, as well as measured SOC fractions at two eastern U.S. sites. The optimized model was used to simulate 2006-2008 rural TC that was evaluated against measured TC. In addition, the model output was compared to TC from a 2006 Eulerian Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) simulation. It is shown that the CMC model has similar performance metrics as the CMAQ model.

  3. Site-specific influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on atherosclerosis in immune incompetent LDL receptor deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Catherine A; Blachowicz, Lydia; Gupta, Gaorav; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Getz, Godfrey S

    2006-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are thought to influence plasma lipid levels, atherosclerosis, and the immune system. In this study, we fed male LDL receptor deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice and immune incompetent LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-) mice diets containing predominantly saturated fats (milk fat) or PUFA (safflower oil) to determine if the response to diet was influenced by immune status. Relative to milk fat diet, plasma lipid and VLDL levels in both the LDLR(-/-) and LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-) mice fed safflower oil diet were lower, suggesting that the primary effect of PUFA on plasma lipids was not due to its inhibition of the immune system. Neither diet nor immune status influenced hepatic triglyceride production and post-heparin lipase activity, suggesting that the differences in triglyceride levels are due to differences in rates of catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. While both diets promoted atherogenesis, both aortic root and innominate artery atherosclerosis in LDLR(-/-) mice was less in safflower oil fed animals. In contrast, a site-specific effect of PUFA was observed in the immune incompetent LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-). In these mice, aortic root atherosclerosis, but not innominate artery atherosclerosis, was less in PUFA fed animal. These results suggest that PUFA and the immune system may influence innominate artery atherosclerosis by some overlapping mechanisms.

  4. Antibody Treatment of Ebola and Sudan Virus Infection via a Uniquely Exposed Epitope within the Glycoprotein Receptor-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Howell, Katie A; Qiu, Xiangguo; Brannan, Jennifer M; Bryan, Christopher; Davidson, Edgar; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Wec, Anna Z; Shulenin, Sergey; Biggins, Julia E; Douglas, Robin; Enterlein, Sven G; Turner, Hannah L; Pallesen, Jesper; Murin, Charles D; He, Shihua; Kroeker, Andrea; Vu, Hong; Herbert, Andrew S; Fusco, Marnie L; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Lai, Jonathan R; Keck, Zhen-Yong; Foung, Steven K H; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Zeitlin, Larry; Ward, Andrew B; Chandran, Kartik; Doranz, Benjamin J; Kobinger, Gary P; Dye, John M; Aman, M Javad

    2016-05-17

    Previous efforts to identify cross-neutralizing antibodies to the receptor-binding site (RBS) of ebolavirus glycoproteins have been unsuccessful, largely because the RBS is occluded on the viral surface. We report a monoclonal antibody (FVM04) that targets a uniquely exposed epitope within the RBS; cross-neutralizes Ebola (EBOV), Sudan (SUDV), and, to a lesser extent, Bundibugyo viruses; and shows protection against EBOV and SUDV in mice and guinea pigs. The antibody cocktail ZMapp™ is remarkably effective against EBOV (Zaire) but does not cross-neutralize other ebolaviruses. By replacing one of the ZMapp™ components with FVM04, we retained the anti-EBOV efficacy while extending the breadth of protection to SUDV, thereby generating a cross-protective antibody cocktail. In addition, we report several mutations at the base of the ebolavirus glycoprotein that enhance the binding of FVM04 and other cross-reactive antibodies. These findings have important implications for pan-ebolavirus vaccine development and defining broadly protective antibody cocktails.

  5. Pre- and neonatal exposure of the Dahl rat to NaCl: development and regional distribution of myocardial alpha 1-adrenergic and cholinergic receptor sites.

    PubMed

    McCaughran, J A; Juno, C J; Friedman, R

    1986-06-01

    The prenatal and/or postweaning effects of a hypertensinogenic high NaCl-containing diet (8.0% NaCl, w/w) on (1) the regional distribution of alpha 1-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptor sites in the heart and (2) the predisposition/resistance to hypertension (HT) were assessed in the inbred Dahl HT-sensitive (S/JR) and HT-resistant (R/JR) rat. The density of alpha 1-adrenoceptors was reduced in the left ventricle but not consistently affected in the ventricular septum, right ventricle, or atria of S/JR offspring with NaCl-induced HT. Both normotensive and hypertensive S/JR rats also displayed a significantly greater density of cholinergic receptor sites in the atria but few consistent alterations in other regions of the heart, compared to R/JR rats. Maternal diet had no effect on the predisposition/resistance to salt-induced HT and little effect on the regional development of alpha 1-adrenoceptors and cholinergic receptor sites. The results of this study suggest that the reduced density of ventricular alpha 1-adrenoceptors in the S/JR strain is a consequence of HT while the elevated density of cholinergic receptors in the atria may be related to the genetic predisposition/resistance to HT.

  6. Activity-Dependent Shedding of the NMDA Receptor Glycine Binding Site by Matrix Metalloproteinase 3: A PUTATIVE Mechanism of Postsynaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Pietrowski, Eweline; Neugebauer, Rainer; Schlicksupp, Andrea; Kirsch, Joachim; Kuhse, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Functional and structural alterations of clustered postsynaptic ligand gated ion channels in neuronal cells are thought to contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory formation in the human brain. Here, we describe a novel molecular mechanism for structural alterations of NR1 subunits of the NMDA receptor. In cultured rat spinal cord neurons, chronic NMDA receptor stimulation induces disappearance of extracellular epitopes of NMDA receptor NR1 subunits, which was prevented by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Immunoblotting revealed the digestion of solubilized NR1 subunits by MMP-3 and identified a fragment of about 60 kDa as MMPs-activity-dependent cleavage product of the NR1 subunit in cultured neurons. The expression of MMP-3 in the spinal cord culture was shown by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Recombinant NR1 glycine binding protein was used to identify MMP-3 cleavage sites within the extracellular S1 and S2-domains. N-terminal sequencing and site-directed mutagenesis revealed S542 and L790 as two putative major MMP-3 cleavage sites of the NR1 subunit. In conclusion, our data indicate that MMPs, and in particular MMP-3, are involved in the activity dependent alteration of NMDA receptor structure at postsynaptic membrane specializations in the CNS. PMID:18629001

  7. Lys-63-linked Ubiquitination of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA), Type B1, at Multiple Sites by the E3 Ligase Mind Bomb-2 Targets GABAB Receptors to Lysosomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Zemoura, Khaled; Trümpler, Claudia; Benke, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors, which control neuronal excitability by mediating prolonged inhibition. The magnitude of GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition essentially depends on the amount of receptors in the plasma membrane. However, the factors regulating cell surface expression of GABAB receptors are poorly characterized. Cell surface GABAB receptors are constitutively internalized and either recycled to the plasma membrane or degraded in lysosomes. The signal that sorts GABAB receptors to lysosomes is currently unknown. Here we show that Mind bomb-2 (MIB2)-mediated Lys-63-linked ubiquitination of the GABAB1 subunit at multiple sites is the lysosomal sorting signal for GABAB receptors. We found that inhibition of lysosomal activity in cultured rat cortical neurons increased the fraction of Lys-63-linked ubiquitinated GABAB receptors and enhanced the expression of total as well as cell surface GABAB receptors. Mutational inactivation of four putative ubiquitination sites in the GABAB1 subunit significantly diminished Lys-63-linked ubiquitination of GABAB receptors and prevented their lysosomal degradation. We identified MIB2 as the E3 ligase triggering Lys-63-linked ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of GABAB receptors. Finally, we show that sustained activation of glutamate receptors, a condition occurring in brain ischemia that down-regulates GABAB receptors, considerably increased the expression of MIB2 and Lys-63-linked ubiquitination of GABAB receptors. Interfering with Lys-63-linked ubiquitination by overexpressing ubiquitin mutants or GABAB1 mutants deficient in Lys-63-linked ubiquitination prevented glutamate-induced down-regulation of the receptors. These findings indicate that Lys-63-linked ubiquitination of GABAB1 at multiple sites by MIB2 controls sorting of GABAB receptors to lysosomes for degradation under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27573246

  8. Combined stimulation of the glycine and polyamine sites of the NMDA receptor attenuates NMDA blockade-induced learning deficits of rats in a 14-unit T-maze.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R C; Knox, J; Purwin, D A; Spangler, E L; Ingram, D K

    1998-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of multi-site activation of the glycine and polyamine sites of the NMDA receptor on memory formation in rats learning a 14-unit T-maze task. The competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, (+/-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 9 mg/kg), was used to impair learning. The objectives were two-fold: (1) to investigate the effects of independent stimulation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site or the polyamine site; (2) to investigate the effects of simultaneous activation of these two sites. Male, Fischer-344 rats were pretrained to a criterion of 13 out of 15 shock avoidances in a straight runway, and 24 h later were trained in a 14-unit T-maze that also required shock avoidance. Prior to maze training, rats received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of saline, saline plus CPP, CPP plus the glycine agonist, D-cycloserine (DCS, 30 or 40 mg/kg), CPP plus the polyamine agonist, spermine (SPM, 2.5 or 5 mg/kg), or CPP plus a combination of DCS (7.5 mg/kg) and SPM (0.625 mg/kg). Individual administration of either DCS or SPM attenuated the CPP-induced maze learning impairment in a dose-dependent manner. However, the combined treatment with both DCS and SPM completely reversed the learning deficit at doses five-fold less than either drug given alone. These findings provide additional evidence that the glycine and polyamine modulatory sites of the NMDA receptor are involved in memory formation. Furthermore, the potent synergistic effect resulting from combined activation of the glycine and polyamine sites would suggest a stronger interaction between these two sites than previously considered, and might provide new therapeutic approaches for enhancing glutamatergic function. PMID:9498733

  9. Dynamics of histamine H(3) receptor antagonists on brain histamine metabolism: do all histamine H(3) receptor antagonists act at a single site?

    PubMed

    Barnes, W; Boyd, D; Hough, L

    2001-11-16

    Thioperamide, the prototypical histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, acts at the brain histamine H(3) autoreceptor to promote the release and metabolism of neuronal histamine, resulting in higher brain levels of the metabolite tele-methylhistamine. However, unlike thioperamide, several new histamine H(3) receptor antagonists enter the central nervous system (CNS), block brain histamine H(3) receptors and increase histamine release without increasing brain tele-methylhistamine levels. Experiments were performed presently in an attempt to understand these results. Consistent with previous findings, thioperamide significantly increased the content and synthesis rate of tele-methylhistamine in mouse and rat brain. In contrast, the histamine H(3) receptor antagonists GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and clobenpropit did not affect tele-methylhistamine synthesis rate in mouse whole brain. The histamine H(3) receptor ligand GT-2016 (5-cyclohexyl-1-(4-imidazol-4-ylpiperidyl)pentan-1-one) had no effect on tele-methylhistamine levels in any rat brain region and decreased tele-methylhistamine synthesis rates in the mouse whole brain. To examine the possibility that these histamine H(3) receptor antagonists might prevent the methylation of newly released histamine, they were co-administered with thioperamide to determine their effects on the thioperamide-induced stimulation of tele-methylhistamine synthesis. GT-2016 significantly reduced the thioperamide-induced activation of tele-methylhistamine synthesis in mouse whole brain and in several regions of rat brain. Although further clarification is needed, these results suggest that some histamine H(3) receptor antagonists may promote the release of neuronal histamine, but also act to reduce histamine methylation in vivo by an unknown mechanism.

  10. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of the S-Locus Receptor Kinase and Its Role in the Self-Incompatibility Response of the Brassicaceae[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Tantikanjana, Titima; Nishio, Takeshi; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Nasrallah, June B.

    2014-01-01

    The S-locus receptor kinase SRK is a highly polymorphic transmembrane kinase of the stigma epidermis. Through allele-specific interaction with its pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich protein SCR, SRK is responsible for recognition and inhibition of self pollen in the self-incompatibility response of the Brassicaceae. The SRK extracellular ligand binding domain contains several potential N-glycosylation sites that exhibit varying degrees of conservation among SRK variants. However, the glycosylation status and functional importance of these sites are currently unclear. We investigated this issue in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana stigmas that express the Arabidopsis lyrata SRKb variant and exhibit an incompatible response toward SCRb-expressing pollen. Analysis of single- and multiple-glycosylation site mutations of SRKb demonstrated that, although five of six potential N-glycosylation sites in SRKb are glycosylated in stigmas, N-glycosylation is not important for SCRb-dependent activation of SRKb. Rather, N-glycosylation functions primarily to ensure the proper and efficient subcellular trafficking of SRK to the plasma membrane. The study provides insight into the function of a receptor that regulates a critical phase of the plant life cycle and represents a valuable addition to the limited information available on the contribution of N-glycosylation to the subcellular trafficking and function of plant receptor kinases. PMID:25480368

  11. Similarities between the Binding Sites of SB-206553 at Serotonin Type 2 and Alpha7 Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptors: Rationale for Its Polypharmacological Profile

    PubMed Central

    Möller-Acuña, Patricia; Contreras-Riquelme, J. Sebastián; Rojas-Fuentes, Cecilia; Nuñez-Vivanco, Gabriel; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Arias, Hugo R.; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from systems biology indicates that promiscuous drugs, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, are clinically better in terms of efficacy, than those that act in a more selective fashion. This has generated a new trend in drug development called polypharmacology. However, the rational design of promiscuous compounds is a difficult task, particularly when the drugs are aimed to act at receptors with diverse structure, function and endogenous ligand. In the present work, using docking and molecular dynamics methodologies, we established the most probable binding sites of SB-206553, a drug originally described as a competitive antagonist of serotonin type 2B/2C metabotropic receptors (5-HT2B/2CRs) and more recently as a positive allosteric modulator of the ionotropic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). To this end, we employed the crystal structures of the 5-HT2BR and acetylcholine binding protein as templates to build homology models of the 5-HT2CR and α7 nAChR, respectively. Then, using a statistical algorithm, the similarity between these binding sites was determined. Our analysis showed that the most plausible binding sites for SB-206553 at 5-HT2Rs and α7 nAChR are remarkably similar, both in size and chemical nature of the amino acid residues lining these pockets, thus providing a rationale to explain its affinity towards both receptor types. Finally, using a computational tool for multiple binding site alignment, we determined a consensus binding site, which should be useful for the rational design of novel compounds acting simultaneously at these two types of highly different protein targets. PMID:26244344

  12. Similarities between the Binding Sites of SB-206553 at Serotonin Type 2 and Alpha7 Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptors: Rationale for Its Polypharmacological Profile.

    PubMed

    Möller-Acuña, Patricia; Contreras-Riquelme, J Sebastián; Rojas-Fuentes, Cecilia; Nuñez-Vivanco, Gabriel; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Arias, Hugo R; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from systems biology indicates that promiscuous drugs, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, are clinically better in terms of efficacy, than those that act in a more selective fashion. This has generated a new trend in drug development called polypharmacology. However, the rational design of promiscuous compounds is a difficult task, particularly when the drugs are aimed to act at receptors with diverse structure, function and endogenous ligand. In the present work, using docking and molecular dynamics methodologies, we established the most probable binding sites of SB-206553, a drug originally described as a competitive antagonist of serotonin type 2B/2C metabotropic receptors (5-HT2B/2CRs) and more recently as a positive allosteric modulator of the ionotropic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). To this end, we employed the crystal structures of the 5-HT2BR and acetylcholine binding protein as templates to build homology models of the 5-HT2CR and α7 nAChR, respectively. Then, using a statistical algorithm, the similarity between these binding sites was determined. Our analysis showed that the most plausible binding sites for SB-206553 at 5-HT2Rs and α7 nAChR are remarkably similar, both in size and chemical nature of the amino acid residues lining these pockets, thus providing a rationale to explain its affinity towards both receptor types. Finally, using a computational tool for multiple binding site alignment, we determined a consensus binding site, which should be useful for the rational design of novel compounds acting simultaneously at these two types of highly different protein targets. PMID:26244344

  13. Interaction of pyracetam with specific /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites and GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex of brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhanets, V.V.; Chakhbra, K.K.; Danchev, N.D.; Malin, K.M.; Rusakov, D.Yu.; Val'dman, A.V.

    1986-06-01

    This paper studies the effect of pyracetam on parameters of specific binding of tritium-imipramine and GABA-activated binding of tritium-flunitrazepam with rat brain membranes. The experimental method is described and it is shown that pyracetam and mebicar in experiments in vivo on normal animals can exert their anxiolytic action without the participation of bensodiazepine receptors. Either the interaction of pyracetam and mebicar with benzodiazeprine receptors has a different interpretation than competition of these compounds with specific binding sites of tritium-flunitrazepam, or in experiments on normal animals in vivo GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex does not accept pyracetam and mebicar, for it contains endogenous inhibitors of GABA-modulating action.

  14. Rab GTPases bind at a common site within the angiotensin II type I receptor carboxyl-terminal tail: evidence that Rab4 regulates receptor phosphorylation, desensitization, and resensitization.

    PubMed

    Esseltine, Jessica L; Dale, Lianne B; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2011-01-01

    The human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT₁R) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily and represents an important target for cardiovascular therapeutic intervention. Agonist-activation of the AT₁R induces β-arrestin-dependent endocytosis to early endosomes in which the receptor resides as a protein complex with the Rab GTPase Rab5. In the present study, we examined whether other Rab GTPases that regulate receptor trafficking through endosomal compartments also bind to the AT₁R. We find that Rab4, Rab7, and Rab11 all bind to the last 10 amino acid residues of the AT₁R carboxyl-terminal tail. Rab11 binds AT₁R more effectively than Rab5, whereas Rab4 binds less effectively than Rab5. Alanine scanning mutagenesis reveals that proline 354 and cysteine 355 contribute to Rab protein binding, and mutation of these residues does not affect G protein coupling. We find that the Rab GTPases each compete with one another for receptor binding and that although Rab4 interacts poorly with the AT₁R, it effectively displaces Rab11 from the receptor. In contrast, Rab11 overexpression does not prevent Rab4 binding to the AT₁R. Overexpression of wild-type Rab4, but not Rab11, facilitates AT₁R dephosphorylation, and a constitutively active Rab4-Q67L mutant reduces AT₁R desensitization and promotes AT₁R resensitization. Taken together, our data indicate that multiple Rab GTPases bind to a motif localized to the distal end of the AT₁R tail and that increased Rab4 activity may contribute to the regulation AT₁R desensitization and dephosphorylation.

  15. Nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and imetit: affinities for H3 binding sites and potencies in a functional H3 receptor model.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E; Detzner, M; Timmerman, H

    1993-11-01

    We determined the affinities of nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and imetit for H3 binding sites (labelled by 3H-N alpha-methylhistamine) in rat brain cortex homogenates and their potencies at presynaptic H3A receptors on noradrenergic nerve endings in mouse brain cortex slices. 3H-N alpha-Methylhistamine bound saturably to rat brain cortex homogenates with a Kd of 0.70 nmol/l and a Bmax of 98 fmol/mg protein. Binding of 3H-N alpha-methylhistamine was displaced monophasically by dimaprit (pKi 6.55), nordimaprit (5.94), homodimaprit (6.44), clobenpropit (9.16), imetit (9.83), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (8.87) and histamine (8.20), and biphasically by burimamide (pKi high 7.73, pKi low 5.97). In superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline, the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow was inhibited by imetit (pIC35 8.93), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (7.87) and histamine (7.03). The effect of histamine was attenuated by nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and N-ethoxycarbonyl-2- ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ); EEDQ (but not nordimaprit, homodimaprit and clobenpropit) attenuated the effect of histamine also in slices pre-exposed to the drug 60-30 min prior to superfusion. The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by homodimaprit and clobenpropit; Schild plots yielded straight lines with a slope of unity for both drugs (pA2 5.94 and 9.55, respectively). Nordimaprit depressed the maximum effect of histamine (pD'2 5.55) and also slightly increased the concentration of histamine producing the half-maximum effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mutation conferring target-site resistance to imidacloprid in Nilaparvata lugens (brown planthopper).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zewen; Williamson, Martin S; Lansdell, Stuart J; Denholm, Ian; Han, Zhaojun; Millar, Neil S

    2005-06-14

    Neonicotinoids, such as imidacloprid, are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists with potent insecticidal activity. Since its introduction in the early 1990s, imidacloprid has become one of the most extensively used insecticides for both crop protection and animal health applications. As with other classes of insecticides, resistance to neonicotinoids is a significant threat and has been identified in several pest species, including the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, a major rice pest in many parts of Asia. In this study, radioligand binding experiments have been conducted with whole-body membranes prepared from imidacloprid-susceptible and imidacloprid-resistant strains of N. lugens. The results reveal a much higher level of [3H]imidacloprid-specific binding to the susceptible strain than to the resistant strain (16.7 +/- 1.0 and 0.34 +/- 0.21 fmol/mg of protein, respectively). With the aim of understanding the molecular basis of imidacloprid resistance, five nAChR subunits (Nlalpha1-Nlalpha4 and Nlbeta1) have been cloned from N. lugens.A comparison of nAChR subunit genes from imidacloprid-sensitive and imidacloprid-resistant populations has identified a single point mutation at a conserved position (Y151S) in two nAChR subunits, Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3. A strong correlation between the frequency of the Y151S point mutation and the level of resistance to imidacloprid has been demonstrated by allele-specific PCR. By expression of hybrid nAChRs containing N. lugens alpha and rat beta2 subunits, evidence was obtained that demonstrates that mutation Y151S is responsible for a substantial reduction in specific [3H]imidacloprid binding. This study provides direct evidence for the occurrence of target-site resistance to a neonicotinoid insecticide. PMID:15937112

  17. Crystal structure of acetylcholine-binding protein from Bulinus truncatus reveals the conserved structural scaffold and sites of variation in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Celie, Patrick H N; Klaassen, Remco V; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sarah E; van Elk, René; van Nierop, Pim; Smit, August B; Sixma, Titia K

    2005-07-15

    The crystal structure of acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) from the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis is the established model for the ligand binding domains of the ligand-gated ion channel family, which includes nicotinic acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), types A and C, and glycine receptors. Here we present the crystal structure of a remote homolog, AChBP from Bulinus truncatus, which reveals both the conserved structural scaffold and the sites of variation in this receptor family. These include rigid body movements of loops that are close to the transmembrane interface in the receptors and changes in the intermonomer contacts, which alter the pentamer stability drastically. Structural, pharmacological and mutational analysis of both AChBPs shows how 3 amino acid changes in the binding site contribute to a 5-10-fold difference in affinity for nicotinic ligands. Comparison of these structures will be valuable for improving structure-function studies of ligand-gated ion channel receptors, including signal transduction, homology modeling, and drug design. PMID:15899893

  18. Discovery of anxiolytic 2-ferrocenyl-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones exerting GABAA receptor interaction via the benzodiazepine-binding site.

    PubMed

    Pejović, Anka; Denić, Marija S; Stevanović, Dragana; Damljanović, Ivan; Vukićević, Mirjana; Kostova, Kalina; Tavlinova-Kirilova, Maya; Randjelović, Pavle; Stojanović, Nikola M; Bogdanović, Goran A; Blagojević, Polina; D'hooghe, Matthias; Radulović, Niko S; Vukićević, Rastko D

    2014-08-18

    Herein, we report on the synthesis, spectral, crystallographic and electrochemical properties of a small library of N-substituted 2-ferrocenyl-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones, designed as novel GABAA benzodiazepine-binding site ligands. The anxiolytic properties of the title compounds were evaluated in several different in vivo models, whereas the involvement of the GABAA receptor complex in the activity of the most potent compound, 2-ferrocenyl-3-(4-methoxyphenylethyl)-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one, was inferred from experiments with known GABAA-targeting agents. Ligand docking experiments revealed that the high, dose-dependent, anxiolytic activity of the new compounds might be due to their favorable interactions with the benzodiazepine-binding site of the GABAA receptor complex. The incorporation of the ferrocene core and fine tuning of the distance between the thiazolidinone core and an additional aromatic ring were judged to be crucial structural requirements for the observed anxiolytic effect. PMID:24950490

  19. Structure of the Fab fragment of the anti-murine EGFR antibody 7A7 and exploration of its receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Ariel; Mackenzie, Jenny; Garrido, Greta; Friemann, Rosmarie; López-Requena, Alejandro; Moreno, Ernesto; Krengel, Ute

    2011-07-01

    The EGF receptor is an important target of cancer immunotherapies. The 7A7 monoclonal antibody has been raised against the murine EGFR, but it cross-reacts with the human receptor. The results from experiments using immune-competent mice can therefore, in principle, be extrapolated to the corresponding scenario in humans. In this work we report the crystal structure of the 7A7 Fab at an effective resolution of 1.4Å. The antibody binding site comprises a deep pocket, located at the interface between the light and heavy chains, with major contributions from CDR loops H1, H2, H3 and L1. Binding experiments show that 7A7 recognizes a site on the EGFR extracellular domain that is not accessible in its most stable conformations, but that becomes exposed upon treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This suggests a recognition mechanism similar to that proposed for mAb 806. PMID:21592580

  20. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE USING PATTERN ELICITED VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, as well as other channels. This has led to the hypothesis that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity, CNS depression, and altered visual evoked ...

  1. Characterization of the β-d-Glucopyranoside Binding Site of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor hTAS2R16*

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takanobu; Misaka, Takumi; Ishiguro, Masaji; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Sugawara, Taishi; Ito, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takuya; Matsuo, Shinji; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Asakura, Tomiko; Abe, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors mediate the senses of taste, smell, and vision in mammals. Humans recognize thousands of compounds as bitter, and this response is mediated by the hTAS2R family, which is one of the G-protein-coupled receptors composed of only 25 receptors. However, structural information on these receptors is limited. To address the molecular basis of bitter tastant discrimination by the hTAS2Rs, we performed ligand docking simulation and functional analysis using a series of point mutants of hTAS2R16 to identify its binding sites. The docking simulation predicted two candidate binding structures for a salicin-hTAS2R16 complex, and at least seven amino acid residues in transmembrane 3 (TM3), TM5, and TM6 were shown to be involved in ligand recognition. We also identified the probable salicin-hTAS2R16 binding mode using a mutated receptor experiment. This study characterizes the molecular interaction between hTAS2R16 and β-d-glucopyranoside and will also facilitate rational design of bitter blockers. PMID:20605788

  2. Cannabinoid-induced mesenteric vasodilation through an endothelial site distinct from CB1 or CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Járai, Z; Wagner, J A; Varga, K; Lake, K D; Compton, D R; Martin, B R; Zimmer, A M; Bonner, T I; Buckley, N E; Mezey, E; Razdan, R K; Zimmer, A; Kunos, G

    1999-11-23

    Cannabinoids, including the endogenous ligand arachidonyl ethanolamide (anandamide), elicit not only neurobehavioral but also cardiovascular effects. Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, have been cloned, and studies with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A have implicated peripherally located CB1 receptors in the hypotensive action of cannabinoids. In rat mesenteric arteries, anandamide-induced vasodilation is inhibited by SR141716A, but other potent CB1 receptor agonists, such as HU-210, do not cause vasodilation, which implicates an as-yet-unidentified receptor in this effect. Here we show that "abnormal cannabidiol" (Abn-cbd) is a neurobehaviorally inactive cannabinoid that does not bind to CB1 receptors, yet causes SR141716A-sensitive hypotension and mesenteric vasodilation in wild-type mice and in mice lacking CB1 receptors or both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Hypotension by Abn-cbd is also inhibited by cannabidiol (20 microgram/g), which does not influence anandamide- or HU-210-induced hypotension. In the rat mesenteric arterial bed, Abn-cbd-induced vasodilation is unaffected by blockade of endothelial NO synthase, cyclooxygenase, or capsaicin receptors, but it is abolished by endothelial denudation. Mesenteric vasodilation by Abn-cbd, but not by acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, or capsaicine, is blocked by SR141716A (1 microM) or by cannabidiol (10 microM). Abn-cbd-induced vasodilation is also blocked in the presence of charybdotoxin (100 nM) plus apamin (100 nM), a combination of K(+)-channel toxins reported to block the release of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These findings suggest that Abn-cbd and cannabidiol are a selective agonist and antagonist, respectively, of an as-yet-unidentified endothelial receptor for anandamide, activation of which elicits NO-independent mesenteric vasodilation, possibly by means of the release of EDHF.

  3. Differential and irreversible CNS ontogenic reduction in maximal MK-801 binding site number in the NMDA receptor after acute hypoxic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Vacotto, M; Rodríguez Gil, D J; Mitridate de Novara, A; Fiszer de Plazas, S

    2003-06-27

    CNS exposure to hypoxia impairs excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Our aim was to determine variations induced by normobaric acute hypoxic hypoxia (8% O(2) for 60 min) on the NMDA receptor complex, as well as their potential reversibility after normoxic recovery. To this end, [3H]MK-801 binding assays to a synaptic membrane fraction isolated from chick optic lobes were performed. Previous studies throughout development had disclosed a characteristic age-dependent pattern. Results at embryonic day (ED) 12 and 18 indicated two distinct MK-801 binding sites. Hypoxic treatment failed to alter either the high affinity site dissociation constant (K(d)) or its maximal binding capacity (B(max)), whereas the low affinity site B(max) was significantly decreased (50% and 30% at ED12 and 18, respectively), without alteration in its K(d) values. Hypoxic embryos restored for 48 h at ED12 to normoxic conditions displayed unchanged MK-801 binding reduction, unlike those treated likewise at ED18 whose values fully recovered control levels. To conclude, hypoxic treatment reduces low affinity MK-801 B(max) in the NMDA receptor which proves irreversible up to ED12. Such early neuronal vulnerability may be due to post-transcriptional changes, to endocytosis followed by receptor degradation, or alternatively to cell death.

  4. Binding sites for. alpha. -bungarotoxin and the noncompetitive inhibitor phencyclidine on a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the. alpha. -subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly-Roberts, D.L.; Lentz, T.L. )

    1991-07-30

    The binding of the competitive antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-Btx) and the noncompetitive inhibitor phencyclidine (PCP) to a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the {alpha}-subunit of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor has been characterized. {sup 125}I-{alpha}-Btx bound to the 172-227 peptide in a solid-phase assay and was competed by {alpha}-Btx d-tubocurarine and NaCl. In the presence of 0.02% sodium dodecyl sulfate, {sup 125}I-{alpha}-Btx bound to the 56-residue peptide with a K{sub D} of 3.5 nM, as determined by equilibrium saturation binding studies. Because {alpha}Btx binds to a peptide comprising residues 173-204 with the same affinity and does not bind to a peptide comprising residues 205-227, the competitive antagonist and hence agonist binding site lies between residues 173 and 204. After photoaffinity labeling, ({sup 3}H)PCP was bound to the 172-227 peptide. ({sup 3}H)PCP binding was inhibited by chlorpromazine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. It is concluded that a high-affinity binding site for PCP is located between residues 205 and 227, which includes the first 18 residues of transmembrane segment M1, and that a low-affinity site is located in the competitive antagonist binding site between residues 173 and 204. These results show that a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the {alpha} subunit contains three binding sites, one for {alpha}-Btx and two for PCP. Previous studies on the intact receptor indicate high-affinity PCP binding occurs in the receptor channel.

  5. Novel computational methodologies for structural modeling of spacious ligand binding sites of G-protein-coupled receptors: development and application to human leukotriene B4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Yoko; Harada, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the picosecond or nanosecond time scale, and then evolutionary computation including receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix of a GPCR protein as a movement on a longer time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the proposed method was able to derive the appropriate 3D structure of the active-state GPCR which docks with its agonists.

  6. Identification of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in human prostate: expression site of the estrogen receptor in the benign and neoplastic gland.

    PubMed

    Rago, V; Romeo, F; Giordano, F; Ferraro, A; Carpino, A

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are involved in growth, differentiation and pathogenesis of human prostate through the mediation of the classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a 'novel' mediator of estrogen signaling which has been recently recognized in some human reproductive tissues, but its expression in the prostate gland is still unknown. Here, we investigated GPER in benign (from 5 patients) and neoplastic prostatic tissues (from 50 patients) by immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting. Normal areas of benign prostates revealed a strong GPER immunoreactivity in the basal epithelial cells while luminal epithelial cells were unreactive and stromal cells were weakly immunostained. GPER was also immunolocalized in adenocarcinoma samples but the immunoreactivity of tumoral areas decreased from Gleason pattern 2 to Gleason pattern 4. Furthermore, a strong GPER immunostaining was also revealed in cells of pre-neoplastic lesions (high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia). Western blot analysis of benign and tumor protein extracts showed the presence of a ~42 kDa band, consistent with the GPER molecular weight. An increase in both pAkt and p cAMP-response-binding protein (pCREB) levels was also observed in poorly differentiated PCa samples. Finally, this work identified GPER in the epithelial basal cells of benign human prostate, with a different localization with respect to the classical estrogen receptors. Furthermore, the expression of GPER in prostatic adenocarcinoma cells was also observed but with a modulation of the immunoreactivity according to tumor cell arrangements.

  7. Another mechanism for creating diversity in gamma-aminobutyrate type A receptors: RNA splicing directs expression of two forms of gamma 2 phosphorylation site.

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, P; McKernan, R M; Iversen, L L

    1990-01-01

    Diversity of gamma-aminobutyrate type A (GABAA) receptors has recently been proposed to be achieved by assembly of receptor subtypes from a multitude of subunits (alpha 1-6, beta 1-3, gamma 1-2, and delta) encoded by different genes. Here we report a further mechanism for creating GABAA receptor diversity: alternative RNA splicing. Two forms of bovine gamma 2 subunit cDNA were isolated (gamma 2S and gamma 2L) that differed by the presence or absence of a 24-base-pair (8-amino acid) insertion in the cytoplasmic domain between the third and fourth putative membrane-spanning regions. Polymerase chain reaction from RNA demonstrated that the two forms of gamma 2 subunit are expressed in bovine, human, and rat brain. Sequencing of genomic DNA clones encoding the gamma 2 subunit demonstrated that the 24-base-pair insert is organized as a separate exon. Analysis of the sequence of the 8-amino acid insert revealed that it contains a protein kinase C consensus phosphorylation site. Expression of the large cytoplasmic loop domains of gamma 2S and gamma 2L in Escherichia coli, followed by phosphorylation of the recombinant proteins by protein kinase C, demonstrated that gamma 2L, but not gamma 2S, could be phosphorylated. Thus the two forms of gamma 2 subunit differ by the presence or absence of a protein kinase C phosphorylation site. This mechanism for creating GABAA receptor diversity may allow differential regulation of the function of receptor subtypes. Images PMID:1702226

  8. Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In March 2004, ORD's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) received a request from the Ecological Risk Assessment Forum (ERAF) relating to the evaluation of ecological risk to vertebrate and benthic invertebrate receptors from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds...

  9. Receptor editing in a transgenic mouse model: site, efficiency, and role in B cell tolerance and antibody diversification.

    PubMed

    Pelanda, R; Schwers, S; Sonoda, E; Torres, R M; Nemazee, D; Rajewsky, K

    1997-12-01

    Mice carrying transgenic rearranged V region genes in their IgH and Igkappa loci to encode an autoreactive specificity direct the emerging autoreactive progenitors into a pre-B cell compartment, in which their receptors are edited by secondary Vkappa-Jkappa rearrangements and RS recombination. Editing is an efficient process, because the mutant mice generate normal numbers of B cells. In a similar nonautoreactive transgenic strain, neither a pre-B cell compartment nor receptor editing was seen. Thus, the pre-B cell compartment may have evolved to edit the receptors of autoreactive cells and later been generally exploited for efficient antibody diversification through the invention of the pre-B cell receptor, mimicking an autoreactive antibody to direct the bulk of the progenitors into that compartment.

  10. Mu-opioid receptor densities are depleted in regions implicated in agonistic and sexual behavior in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) defending nest sites and courting females

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Cynthia A.; Forbes-Lorman, Robin M.; Auger, Catherine J.; Riters, Lauren V.

    2010-01-01

    Social status and resource availability can strongly influence individual behavioral responses to conspecifics. In European starlings, males that acquire nest sites sing in response to females and dominate other males. Males without nest sites sing, but not to females, and they do not interact agonistically with other males. Little is known about the neural regulation of status- or resource-appropriate behavioral responses to conspecifics. Opioid neuropeptides are implicated in birdsong and agonistic behavior, suggesting that opioids may underlie differences in the production of these behaviors in males with and without nest sites. Here, we examined densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in groups of male starlings. Males that defended nest boxes dominated other males and sang at higher rates when presented with a female than males without nest boxes, independent of testosterone concentrations. Multiple regression analyses showed nest box ownership (not agonistic behavior or singing) predicted the optical density of receptor labeling in the medial bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, ventral tegmental area and the medial preoptic nucleus. Compared to males without nest boxes, males with nest boxes had lower densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in these regions. Singing additionally predicted the area covered by labeling in the ventral tegmental area. The results suggest that elevated opioid activity in these regions suppresses courtship and agonistic behavioral responses to conspecifics in males without nest boxes. The findings are consistent with a dynamic role for opioid receptors in adjusting social behavior so that it is appropriate given the resources available to an individual. PMID:21147175

  11. Mu-opioid receptor densities are depleted in regions implicated in agonistic and sexual behavior in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) defending nest sites and courting females.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Cynthia A; Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Auger, Catherine J; Riters, Lauren V

    2011-05-16

    Social status and resource availability can strongly influence individual behavioral responses to conspecifics. In European starlings, males that acquire nest sites sing in response to females and dominate other males. Males without nest sites sing, but not to females, and they do not interact agonistically with other males. Little is known about the neural regulation of status- or resource-appropriate behavioral responses to conspecifics. Opioid neuropeptides are implicated in birdsong and agonistic behavior, suggesting that opioids may underlie differences in the production of these behaviors in males with and without nest sites. Here, we examined densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in groups of male starlings. Males that defended nest boxes dominated other males and sang at higher rates when presented with a female than males without nest boxes, independent of testosterone concentrations. Multiple regression analyses showed nest box ownership (not agonistic behavior or singing) predicted the optical density of receptor labeling in the medial bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, ventral tegmental area and the medial preoptic nucleus. Compared to males without nest boxes, males with nest boxes had lower densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in these regions. Singing additionally predicted the area covered by labeling in the ventral tegmental area. The results suggest that elevated opioid activity in these regions suppresses courtship and agonistic behavioral responses to conspecifics in males without nest boxes. The findings are consistent with a dynamic role for opioid receptors in adjusting social behavior so that it is appropriate given the resources available to an individual. PMID:21147175

  12. Autoradiographic localization of sigma receptor binding sites in guinea pig and rat central nervous system with (+)3H-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, A.L.; Largent, B.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-06-01

    (+)3H-3-PPP ((+)3H-3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)-piperidine) binds with high affinity to brain membranes with a pharmacological profile consistent with that of sigma receptors. The distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites in brain and spinal cord of both guinea pig and rat has been determined by in vitro autoradiography with binding densities quantitated by computer-assisted densitometry. (+)3H-3-PPP binding to slide-mounted brain sections is saturable and displays high affinity and a pharmacological specificity very similar to sites labeled in homogenates. (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites are heterogeneously distributed. Highest concentrations of binding sites occur in spinal cord, particularly the ventral horn and dorsal root ganglia; the pons-medulla, associated with the cranial nerve and pontine nuclei and throughout the brain stem reticular formation; the cerebellum, over the Purkinje cell layer; the midbrain, particularly the central gray and red nucleus; and hippocampus, over the pyramidal cell layer. Lowest levels are seen in the basal ganglia and parts of the thalamus, while all other areas, including hypothalamus and cerebral cortex, exhibit moderate grain densities. Quinolinic acid-induced lesions of the hippocampus indicate that (+)3H-3-PPP labels hippocampal pyramidal cells and granule cells in the dentate gyrus. Intrastriatal injection of ibotenic acid dramatically reduces (+)3H-3-PPP binding in this area, while injection of 6-hydroxydopamine produces a relatively slight decrease. The distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites does not correlate with the receptor distribution of any recognized neurotransmitter or neuropeptide, including dopamine. However, there is a notable similarity between the distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP sites and high-affinity binding sites for psychotomimetic opioids, such as the benzomorphan (+)SKF 10,047.

  13. Identification of ah receptor agonists in soil of E-waste recycling sites from Taizhou area in China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chaofeng; Huang, Shengbiao; Wang, Zijian; Qiao, Min; Tang, Xianjin; Yu, Chunna; Shi, Dezhi; Zhu, Youfeng; Shi, Jiyan; Chen, Xincai; Setty, Karen; Chen, Yingxu

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, increasing concern has surrounded the consequences of improper electric and electronic waste (e-waste) disposal. In order to mitigate or remediate the potentially severe toxic effects of e-waste recycling on the environment, organisms, and humans, many contaminated sites must first be well-characterized. In this study, soil samples were taken from Taizhou city, one of the largest e-waste disposal centers in China, which was involved in recycling for nearly 30 years. The extracts of the samples were assayed for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) induction in the rat hepatoma cell line H4IIE. Some of the target AhR agonists, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were instrumentally analyzed as well. The cause-effect relationship and dose-response relationship between the chemical concentrations of AhR agonists and observed EROD activity were examined. The results showed that soil extracts could induce AhR activity significantly, and the chemically derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalents (TEQcal) were perfectly correlated to bioassay-derived TCDD equivalents (TEQbio; R = 0.96, P < 0.001), which indicated that the known AhR agonists could account for the observed responses. Among different contributors, PCBs accounted for 87.2-98.2% and PCDD/Fs contributed 1.7-11.6% of TEQcal, while the contribution of PAHs could almost be neglected. Under these conditions, a quantitative dose-effect relationship between TEQ(PCB) and EROD activity could be evaluated, suggesting that the observed AhR effect was mainly caused by PCBs. Further source identification by congener profiles analysis showed that the crude dismantling of electric power devices and open burning of electric wires and printed circuit boards may be the main sources of these dioxin-like compounds. This study suggests that

  14. Binding site structure of one LRP-RAP complex: implications for a common ligand-receptor binding motif.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Gitte A; Andersen, Olav M; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Bjerrum-Bohr, Ida; Etzerodt, Michael; Thøgersen, Hans C; O'Shea, Charlotte; Poulsen, Flemming M; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2006-09-29

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) interacts with more than 30 ligands of different sizes and structures that can all be replaced by the receptor-associated protein (RAP). The double module of complement type repeats, CR56, of LRP binds many ligands including all three domains of RAP and alpha2-macroglobulin, which promotes the catabolism of the Abeta-peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. To understand the receptor-ligand cross-talk, the NMR structure of CR56 has been solved and ligand binding experiments with RAP domain 1 (RAPd1) have been performed. From chemical shift perturbations of both binding partners upon complex formation, a HADDOCK model of the complex between CR56 and RAPd1 has been obtained. The binding residues are similar to a common binding motif suggested from alpha2-macroglobulin binding studies and provide evidence for an understanding of their mutual cross-competition pattern. The present structural results convey a simultaneous description of both binding partners of an LRP-ligand complex and open a route to a broader understanding of the binding specificity of the LRP receptor, which may involve a general four-residue receptor-ligand recognition motif common to all LRP ligands. The present result may be beneficial in the design of antagonists of ligand binding to the LDL receptor family, and especially of drugs for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. A branched peptide mimotope of the nicotinic receptor binding site is a potent synthetic antidote against the snake neurotoxin alpha-bungarotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bracci, Luisa; Lozzi, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro; Lelli, Barbara; Falciani, Chiara; Niccolai, Neri; Bernini, Andrea; Spreafico, Adriano; Soldani, Patrizia; Neri, Paolo

    2002-08-13

    We previously produced synthetic peptides mimicking the snake neurotoxin binding site of the nicotinic receptor. These peptide mimotopes bind the snake neurotoxin alpha-bungarotoxin with higher affinity than peptides reproducing native receptor sequences and inhibit toxin binding to nicotinic receptors in vitro; yet their efficiency in vivo is low. Here we synthesized one of the peptide mimotopes in a tetrabranched MAP form. The MAP peptide binds alpha-bungarotoxin in solution and inhibits its binding to the receptor with a K(A) and an IC(50) similar to the monomeric peptide. Nonetheless, it is at least 100 times more active in vivo. The MAP completely neutralizes toxin lethality when injected in mice at a dose compatible with its use as a synthetic antidote in humans. The in vivo efficacy of the tetrameric peptide cannot be ascribed to a kinetic and thermodynamic effect and is probably related to different pharmacokinetic behavior of the tetrameric molecule, with respect to the monomer. Our findings bring new perspectives to the therapeutic use of multimeric peptides.

  16. Structure-function relationships of the major neurotoxin from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus with a new sodium channel receptor site

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    We have determined that ShN I, a 48-residue type 2 sea anemone toxin, delays the inactivation of the Na channel in lobster olfactory somas. The receptor for ShN I was identified in vesicle preparations of neuronal tissues from both crustaceans and mammals; however, the K{sub D} values for the former is more than 1,000 fold lower for the later. The binding of ({sup 125}I)-ShN I to this receptor was determined to be unaffected by Anemonia sulcata II, depolarization of the membrane, or veratridine. ShN I was unable to displace ({sup 125}I)-Androctonus austrialis Hector II, whereas unlabeled AaH II and As II displaced the labeled scorpion toxin from rat brain synaptosomes. This is the first characterization of a new Na channel receptor site which specifically binds type 2 anemone toxins. To study the interactions that specific amino acid residues of ShN I have with this receptor, we developed a strategy using solid phase peptide synthesis. Prior to the synthesis of analogs to ShN I, we assembled the native ShN I sequence and reoxidized the three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Chemical, physical, and pharmacological characterization of the purified synthetic ShN I showed it to be indistinguishable from the natural toxin.

  17. Amino acids of the Torpedo marmorata acetylcholine receptor. cap alpha. subunit labeled by a photoaffinity ligand for the acetylcholine binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, M.; Giraudat, J.; Kotzyba-Hibert, F.; Goeldner, M.; Hirth, C.; Chang, J.Y.; Lazure, C.; Chretien, M.; Changeux, J.P.

    1988-04-05

    The acetylcholine-binding sites on the native, membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata were covalently labeled with the photoaffinity reagent (/sup 3/H)-p-(dimethylamino)-benzenediazonium fluoroborate (DDF) in the presence of phencyclidine by employing an energy-transfer photolysis procedure. The ..cap alpha..-chains isolated from receptor-rich membranes photolabeled in the absence or presence of carbamoylcholine were cleaved with CNBr and the radiolabeled fragments purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Amino acid and/or sequence analysis demonstrated that the ..cap alpha..-chain residues Trp-149, Tyr-190, Cys-192, and Cys-193 and an unidentified residue(s) in the segment ..cap alpha.. 31-105 were all labeled by the photoaffinity reagent in an agonist-protectable manner. The labeled amino acids are located within three distinct regions of the large amino-terminal hydrophilic domain of the ..cap alpha..-subunit primary structure and plausibly lie in proximity to one another at the level of the acetylcholine-binding sites in the native receptor. These findings are in accord with models proposed for the transmembrane topology of the ..cap alpha..-chain that assign the amino-terminal segment ..cap alpha.. 1-210 to the synaptic cleft. Furthermore, the results suggest that the four identified (/sup 3/H)DDF-labeled resides, which are conserved in muscle and neuronal ..cap alpha..-chains but not in the other subunits, may be directly involved in agonist binding.

  18. Pre-treatment with the NMDA receptor glycine-binding site antagonist L-701,324 improves pharmacosensitivity in a mouse kindling model.

    PubMed

    Zellinger, Christina; Salvamoser, Josephine D; Soerensen, Jonna; van Vliet, Erwin A; Aronica, Eleonora; Gorter, Jan; Potschka, Heidrun

    2014-05-01

    The glycine co-agonist binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartat (NMDA) receptor is discussed as an interesting target for different central nervous system diseases. Antagonism at this co-agonist site has been suggested as an alternative to the use of non-competitive or competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, which are associated with a pronounced adverse effect profile in chronic epilepsy models and epilepsy patients. In the present study, we addressed the hypothesis that sub-chronic administration of the glycine-binding site antagonist L-701,324 might exert disease-modifying effects in fully kindled mice during a period with frequent seizure elicitation (massive kindling). Moreover, we analyzed whether L-701,324 exposure during this phase affects the subsequent response to an antiepileptic drug. L-701,324 treatment during the massive kindling phase did not affect ictogenesis. Mean seizure severity and cumulative seizure duration proved to be comparable between vehicle- and L-701,324-treated mice. Following withdrawal of L-701,324 seizure thresholds did not differ in a significant manner from those in animals that received vehicle injections. A low dosage of phenobarbital caused a significant increase of the generalized seizure threshold in the L-701,324 pre-treated group, whereas it did not exert a comparable effect in animals that received vehicle during the massive kindling phase. Analysis of P-glycoprotein in the hilus of the hippocampus revealed lower expression rates in L-701,324 pre-treated kindled mice. In conclusion, the data indicate that targeting of the NMDA receptor glycine-binding site does not result in anticonvulsant or disease-modifying effects. However, it might improve antiepileptic drug responses. The findings might be linked to an impact on P-glycoprotein expression. However, future studies are necessary to further evaluate the mechanisms and assess the potential of respective add-on approaches.

  19. Identification of 70 calcium-sensing receptor mutations in hyper- and hypo-calcaemic patients: evidence for clustering of extracellular domain mutations at calcium-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Nesbit, M Andrew; Zhang, Chen; Cranston, Treena; Curley, Alan J; Harding, Brian; Fratter, Carl; Rust, Nigel; Christie, Paul T; Turner, Jeremy J O; Lemos, Manuel C; Bowl, Michael R; Bouillon, Roger; Brain, Caroline; Bridges, Nicola; Burren, Christine; Connell, John M; Jung, Heike; Marks, Eileen; McCredie, David; Mughal, Zulf; Rodda, Christine; Tollefsen, Sherida; Brown, Edward M; Yang, Jenny J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2012-06-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that has an extracellular bilobed venus flytrap domain (VFTD) predicted to contain five calcium (Ca(2+))-binding sites. To elucidate the structure-function relationships of the VFTD, we investigated 294 unrelated probands with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH), neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) or autosomal dominant hypocalcaemic hypercalciuria (ADHH) for CaSR mutations and performed in vitro functional expression studies and three-dimensional modelling of mutations involving the VFTD. A total of 70 different CaSR mutations were identified: 35 in FHH, 10 in NSHPT and 25 in ADHH patients. Furthermore, a CaSR variant (Glu250Lys) was identified in FHH and ADHH probands and demonstrated to represent a functionally neutral polymorphism. NSHPT was associated with a large proportion of truncating CaSR mutations that occurred in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. Thirty-four VFTD missense mutations were identified, and 18 mutations were located within 10 Å of one or more of the predicted Ca(2+)-binding sites, particularly at the VFTD cleft, which is the principal site of Ca(2+) binding. Mutations of residues 173 and 221, which are located at the entrance to the VFTD cleft binding site, were associated with both receptor activation (Leu173Phe and Pro221Leu) and inactivation (Leu173Pro and Pro221Gln), thereby highlighting the importance of these residues for entry and binding of Ca(2+) by the CaSR. Thus, these studies of disease-associated CaSR mutations have further elucidated the role of the VFTD cleft region in Ca(2+) binding and the function of the CaSR. PMID:22422767

  20. Identification of 70 calcium-sensing receptor mutations in hyper- and hypo-calcaemic patients: evidence for clustering of extracellular domain mutations at calcium-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Nesbit, M Andrew; Zhang, Chen; Cranston, Treena; Curley, Alan J; Harding, Brian; Fratter, Carl; Rust, Nigel; Christie, Paul T; Turner, Jeremy J O; Lemos, Manuel C; Bowl, Michael R; Bouillon, Roger; Brain, Caroline; Bridges, Nicola; Burren, Christine; Connell, John M; Jung, Heike; Marks, Eileen; McCredie, David; Mughal, Zulf; Rodda, Christine; Tollefsen, Sherida; Brown, Edward M; Yang, Jenny J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2012-06-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that has an extracellular bilobed venus flytrap domain (VFTD) predicted to contain five calcium (Ca(2+))-binding sites. To elucidate the structure-function relationships of the VFTD, we investigated 294 unrelated probands with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH), neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) or autosomal dominant hypocalcaemic hypercalciuria (ADHH) for CaSR mutations and performed in vitro functional expression studies and three-dimensional modelling of mutations involving the VFTD. A total of 70 different CaSR mutations were identified: 35 in FHH, 10 in NSHPT and 25 in ADHH patients. Furthermore, a CaSR variant (Glu250Lys) was identified in FHH and ADHH probands and demonstrated to represent a functionally neutral polymorphism. NSHPT was associated with a large proportion of truncating CaSR mutations that occurred in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. Thirty-four VFTD missense mutations were identified, and 18 mutations were located within 10 Å of one or more of the predicted Ca(2+)-binding sites, particularly at the VFTD cleft, which is the principal site of Ca(2+) binding. Mutations of residues 173 and 221, which are located at the entrance to the VFTD cleft binding site, were associated with both receptor activation (Leu173Phe and Pro221Leu) and inactivation (Leu173Pro and Pro221Gln), thereby highlighting the importance of these residues for entry and binding of Ca(2+) by the CaSR. Thus, these studies of disease-associated CaSR mutations have further elucidated the role of the VFTD cleft region in Ca(2+) binding and the function of the CaSR.

  1. Structure-function studies of the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by site-directed mutagenesis in the pore region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyun

    In nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), as in glycine, GABA A, serotonin 5-HT3, and GluCl glutamate receptors, a leucine residue at the approximate midpoint (the 9' position) of the M2 transmembrane domain is conserved across all known subunits. We expressed the embryonic mouse muscle nAChRs with varying numbers (m* s) of subunits (2 αs, 1 β, 1 γ, and 1 δ) mutated at this position in Xenopus oocytes and discovered that mutations to serine (Leu9'Ser) result in a tenfold higher receptor sensitivity to acetylcholine (ACh) for each subunit mutated. Moreover, increases of side-chain polarity increase the sensitivity to ACh when other natural and unnatural residues are incorporated into this position. The data also indicated an especially strong interaction between the γ and δ subunits in the pore region, suggesting a specific arrangement of subunits within the pentamer. Detailed single-channel kinetic studies reveal that Leu9'Ser AChRs have (1) longer voltage- relaxation time constants, (2) longer ACh-induced openings and bursts, and (3) more frequent spontaneous openings. These effects increase with m* s. Synthesized postsynaptic currents were produced with a piezoelectric micromanipulator that delivered brief ACh pulses to multi-channel patches. Their decay time constants were, as expected, similar to the channel burst duration. Thus, both longer and more frequent openings contribute to the >=104-fold increase in the receptor sensitivity to ACh from the wild-type receptor to the receptor with m*s=4; and the highly conserved 9' leucine is crucial for the brief synaptic events that are normally observed. We also explored the effects of ligand-binding domain mutations: γD174N and δD180N (aspartic acid (D) to asparagine (N)). Macroscopic dose-response relations revealed that these mutations decrease the receptor's sensitivity to ACh. The combined effect with Leu9'Ser, however, differs from that predicted from a linear or independent sum of effects from

  2. Constraining the factor analytical solutions obtained from multiple-year receptor modeling of ambient PM2.5 data from five speciation sites in Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofowote, Uwayemi M.; Su, Yushan; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Rastogi, Ankit K.; Brook, Jeff; Hopke, Philip K.

    2015-05-01

    Rotational ambiguity in factor analyses leads to solutions that are not always consistent with reality. The inherent non-negativity constraints in positive matrix factorization (PMF) help to prevent factor solutions from becoming overly unrealistic, but they are not sufficient to prevent unwanted rotations that could manifest in factors that should have similar compositions varying across multiple sites. The Canadian National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) network operates five fine particulate matter (PM2.5) speciation sites in Ontario. Data from these sites from 2005 to 2010 were subjected to PMF to obtain factors representing sources of particulate matter. Eight factors were found to be common across these sites. These factors had profiles that varied greatly from one site to the other, suggesting that the PMF solutions were impacted by some rotational ambiguity. New features in the EPA PMF V5 program allow the use of a priori information to impose mathematical constraints that guide the evolution of the factor solutions. These constraints reduce the rotational space. In situations where major emissions sources are known and located in the neighborhood of receptors, or emissions inventories and literature source profiles exist, it is easy to use these profiles to force the factor solutions to conform to the expected signatures. In our case, reported source profiles were neither available nor applicable due to the large spatial span of potential sources and receptor sites. This work describes how such constraints can be generated and used in these complex situations. The fundamental principle explored in this work is the concept of 'stiffness' of PMF solutions to identify the desirable non-rotating factors.

  3. Two Bacillus sphaericus binary toxins share the midgut receptor binding site: implications for resistance of Culex pipiens complex (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Silva-Filha, Maria Helena Neves Lobo; Oliveira, Cláudia Maria Fontes de; Regis, Lêda; Yuan, Zhiming; Rico, Clara Martinez; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina

    2004-12-15

    This work demonstrates that Bin1 and Bin2 toxins, produced by Bacillus sphaericus strains IAB59 and 2362, respectively, share a binding site in midgut brush border membranes (BBMF) from Culex pipiens complex larvae. However, a colony selected with strain IAB59, displaying a resistance ratio of only 42-fold to IAB59, but a 162,000-fold resistance to strain 2362, was found to miss receptors for Bin2 in the BBMF. This correlates with results showing that Bin1, produced in strain IAB59, failed to bind specifically to BBMF from other colony highly resistant to strain 2362. Data indicate the loss of the BBMF bound receptor as a general mechanism of resistance to binary toxins in mosquito. PMID:15598531

  4. Radioiodinated rat parathyroid hormone-(1-34) binds to its receptor on rat osteosarcoma cells in a manner consistent with two classes of binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, P.K.; Nickols, G.A.; Nickols, M.A.; McPherson, M.B.; Cooper, C.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled rat (r) PTH-(1-34) to ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic bone cells and to membranes from these cells was examined. Competitive binding inhibition experiments were performed using unlabeled rPTH-(1-34) with particular emphasis on concentrations of peptide below 1 nM. In intact cells, binding of labeled rPTH-(1-34) was highly specific, and inhibition of binding by unlabeled ligand suggested the presence of two classes of binding sites, one with high affinity and low capacity (KD = 40 pM, approximately 20% of total binding sites) and the other with lower affinity and high capacity (KD = 2 nM, approximately 80% of the sites). Membranes prepared from ROS cells also exhibited a pattern of binding from competitive inhibition curves consistent with two distinct binding sites (KD = 30 pM and 6 nM). In intact ROS cells, cellular cAMP levels increased over the range of 10(-11)-10(-9) M rPTH-(1-34) with an ED50 intermediate between the two KD values (0.25 nM). These data suggest that osteoblastic bone cells possess two distinct classes of membrane receptors for PTH. Since the KD of the higher affinity site more closely approximates circulating concentrations of PTH, binding to this site may have physiologic relevance.

  5. Point mutations at the local anesthetic receptor site modulate the state-dependent block of rat Na v1.4 sodium channels by pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2007-05-01

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides (PTIs) selectively block sodium channels at membrane potentials that promote slow sodium channel inactivation and are proposed to interact with a site that overlaps the local anesthetic (LA) receptor site. Mutagenesis studies identified two amino acid residues in the S6 segment of homology domain IV (Phe-1579 and Tyr-1586 in the rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channel) as principal elements of the LA receptor. To test the hypothesis that PTIs bind to the LA receptor, we constructed mutated Na(v)1.4/F1579A and Na(v)1.4/Y1586A cDNAs, expressed native and mutated channels in Xenopus oocytes, and examined the effects of these mutations on channel block by three PTIs (indoxacarb, its bioactivation product DCJW, and RH3421) by two-electrode voltage clamp. DCJW and RH3421 had no effect on Na(v)1.4 channels held at -120mV but caused a slowly developing block upon depolarization to -30mV. Estimated IC(50) values following 15min of exposure were 1 and 4muM for DCJW and RH3421, respectively. Indoxacarb failed to block Na(v)1.4 channels under all experimental conditions. Sensitivity to block by DCJW and RH3421 at -30mV was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.4/F1579A channels, a finding that is consistent with the impact of this mutation on drug binding. In contrast to its effect on drug binding, the Y1586A mutation increased the sensitivity of Na(v)1.4 channels held at -30mV to all three compounds, conferring modest sensitivity to indoxacarb and increasing sensitivity to DCJW and RH3421 by 58- and 16-fold, respectively. These results provide direct evidence for the action of PTIs at the LA receptor.

  6. A surface membrane protein of Entamoeba histolytica functions as a receptor for human chemokine IL-8: its role in the attraction of trophozoites to inflammation sites.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Valencia, J Daniel; Pérez-Yépez, Eloy Andrés; Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge Tonatiuh; Franco, Elizabeth; Meza, Isaura

    2015-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites respond to the presence of IL-8, moving by chemotaxis towards the source of the chemokine. IL-8 binds to the trophozoite membrane and triggers a response that activates signaling pathways that in turn regulate actin/myosin cytoskeleton organisation to initiate migration towards the chemokine, suggesting the presence of a receptor for IL-8 in the parasite. Antibodies directed to the human IL-8 receptor (CXCR1) specifically recognised a 29 kDa protein in trophozoite membrane fractions. The same protein was immunoprecipitated by this antibody from total amebic extracts. Peptide analysis of the immunoprecipitated protein revealed a sequence with high homology to a previously identified amebic outer membrane peroxiredoxin and a motif within the third loop of human CXCR1, which is an important site for IL-8 binding and activation of signaling processes. Immunodetection assays demonstrated that the anti-human CXCR1 antibody binds to the 29 kDa protein in a different but close site to where IL-8 binds to the trophozoite surface membrane, suggesting that human and amebic receptors for this chemokine share common epitopes. In the context of the human intestinal environment, a receptor for IL-8 could be a great advantage for E. histolytica trophozoite survival, as they could reach an inflammatory milieu containing abundant nutrients. In addition, it has been suggested that the high content of accessible thiol groups of the protein and its peroxidase activity could provide protection in the oxygen rich milieu of colonic lesions, allowing trophozoite invasion of other tissues and escape from the host immune response.

  7. Structure-Based Mutagenesis of the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Nrdp1/FLRF Identifies the Binding Site for the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ErbB3

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain,S.; Leahy, D.

    2007-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 A crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species.

  8. Atmospheric concentrations and gas-particle partitions of pesticides: Comparisons between measured and gas-particle partitioning models from source and receptor sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiki, Mustapha; Poissant, Laurier

    Atmospheric concentrations and gas-particles partition were measured for 83 pesticides including organochlorines (OCs), acid herbicides (AHs), neutral herbicides (NHs) and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). Samples have been collected in June 2005 at two sites, located in Québec, named St. Anicet (agricultural area) and Bay St. François wetland (receptor site). The highest vapor concentration was measured for metolachlor which was 23,600 pg m -3 and 12,200 pg m -3 at St. Anicet and Bay St. François (BSF), respectively. In the particulate phase, MCPA exhibited the highest level (323 pg m -3) at St. Anicet. Gas-particle partitions (GPPs) were also investigated and it was expressed as a function of the fraction of chemical in the particulate phase ( ϕ). The highest average of ϕ was observed for the AHs which were MCPB (75%) and MCPA (50%) at BSF and St. Anicet, respectively. Likewise, the GPPs were estimated by several models, namely Junge-Pankow model, KOA model, and polyparameter linear free energy relationships (ppLFERs). The estimated GPPs were compared to the observed ones and data showed a better correlation at BSF (receptor site) than that at St. Anicet. This suggests a kinetic effect on the GPPs of chemicals.

  9. Temporal variability of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a receptor site of the Puebla-Tlaxcala Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Z. V.; Torres, R.; Ruiz Suarez, L.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-05-01

    This contribution documents the presence and possible origin of PAHs, their temporal concentration patterns and correlations with other air pollutants in the so-called Puebla-Tlaxcala valley. This valley is located to the east of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area and is a very populated region which suffers of air pollution problems. Emission sources of PAHs include open burning, industrial boilers, automobiles and trucks, but vehicle emissions vary significantly depending on the use of: fuel, engine type and catalytic converter. An important emission source in the Puebla-Tlaxcala region is wood burning for cooking. Therefore, it is expected to have contributions of PAHS from this type of sources. PAHs measurements were performed in an air pollution semi-rural receptor site (Chipilo) southwest the City of Puebla, using an aerosol photoelectric sensor (PAS 2000 CE) to measure the concentration of PAHs and a diffuser charger (DC 2000 CE) to evaluate the active surface (DC) of the particles. The measuring period included March and April of 2012 during the ozne season in central Mexico. The use of these two sensors in parallel has been identified as a fingerprint technique to identify different types of particles from several combustion processes and is a useful tool to identify quantitatively the major source of emissions, as well as to describe thephysical and chemical characteristics of the particles. Correlations between PAHs and DC, with NOx and CO, together with an analysis of atmospheric transport may approximate the possible origin of these particles. The coefficient PAHs / DC associated with backward trajectory analysis represents a tool to identify potential areas of emission. The correlation between PAHs and NOx emissions reflects association with diesel combustion, while the correlation between PAHs and CO, the combustion of gasoline. The results show that vehicle emissions are the major source of PAHs with an associated increase in the concentration of

  10. CsTNF1, a teleost tumor necrosis factor that promotes antibacterial and antiviral immune defense in a manner that depends on the conserved receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo-fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is one of the most important cytokines involved in inflammation, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and stimulation of the immune system. The TNF gene has been cloned in teleost fish; however, the in vivo function of fish TNF is essentially unknown. In this study, we report the identification of a TNF homologue, CsTNF1, from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) and analysis of its expression and biological effect. CsTNF1 is composed of 242 amino acid residues and possesses a TNF domain and conserved receptor binding sites. Expression of CsTNF1 was detected in a wide range of tissues and up-regulated in a time-dependent manner by experimental challenge with bacterial and viral pathogens. Bacterial infection of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) caused extracellular secretion of CsTNF1. Purified recombinant CsTNF1 (rCsTNF1) was able to bind to PBL and stimulate the respiratory burst activity of PBL. In contrast, rCsTNF1M1 and rCsTNF1M2, the mutant CsTNF1 bearing substitutions at the receptor binding site, failed to activate PBL. Fish administered with rCsTNF1, but not with rCsTNF1M1 and rCsTNF1M2, exhibited enhanced expression of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-27, TLR9 and G3BP in a time-dependent manner and augmented resistance against bacterial and viral infection. These results provide the first evidence that the receptor binding sites are essential to a fish TNF, and that CsTNF1 is involved in the innate immune defense of fish against microbial pathogens. PMID:26478190

  11. The anterior cingulate cortex may enhance inhibition of lateral prefrontal cortex via m2 cholinergic receptors at dual synaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Medalla, Maria; Barbas, Helen

    2012-10-31

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC) share robust excitatory connections. However, during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, when cortical activity is dominated by acetylcholine, the ACC is activated but DLPFC is suppressed. Using pathway tracing and electron microscopy in nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta), we tested the hypothesis that the opposite states may reflect specific modulation by acetylcholine through strategic synaptic localization of muscarinic m2 receptors, which inhibit neurotransmitter release presynaptically, but are thought to be excitatory postsynaptically. In the ACC pathway to DLPFC (area 32 to area 9), m2 receptors predominated in ACC axon terminals and in more than half of the targeted dendrites of presumed inhibitory neurons, suggesting inhibitory cholinergic influence. In contrast, in a pathway linking the DLPFC area 46 to DLPFC area 9, postsynaptic m2 receptors predominated in targeted spines of presumed excitatory neurons, consistent with their mutual activation in working memory. These novel findings suggest that presynaptic and postsynaptic specificity of m2 cholinergic receptors may help explain the differential engagement of ACC and DLPFC areas in REM sleep for memory consolidation and synergism in awake states for cognitive control.

  12. Mapping Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s): Critical Molecular Determinant and Signaling Profile of GAT100, a Novel, Potent, and Irreversibly Binding Probe.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Kulkarni, Abhijit R; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Hurst, Dow P; Lynch, Diane; Reggio, Patricia H; Janero, David R; Pertwee, Roger G; Stevenson, Lesley A; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Thakur, Ganesh A

    2016-06-15

    One of the most abundant G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in brain, the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), is a tractable therapeutic target for treating diverse psychobehavioral and somatic disorders. Adverse on-target effects associated with small-molecule CB1R orthosteric agonists and inverse agonists/antagonists have plagued their translational potential. Allosteric CB1R modulators offer a potentially safer modality through which CB1R signaling may be directed for therapeutic benefit. Rational design of candidate, druglike CB1R allosteric modulators requires greater understanding of the architecture of the CB1R allosteric endodomain(s) and the capacity of CB1R allosteric ligands to tune the receptor's information output. We have recently reported the synthesis of a focused library of rationally designed, covalent analogues of Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1, two prototypic CB1R negative allosteric modulators (NAMs). Among the novel, pharmacologically active CB1R NAMs reported, the isothiocyanate GAT100 emerged as the lead by virtue of its exceptional potency in the [(35)S]GTPγS and β-arrestin signaling assays and its ability to label CB1R as a covalent allosteric probe with significantly reduced inverse agonism in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay as compared to Org27569. We report here a comprehensive functional profiling of GAT100 across an array of important downstream cell-signaling pathways and analysis of its potential orthosteric probe-dependence and signaling bias. The results demonstrate that GAT100 is a NAM of the orthosteric CB1R agonist CP55,940 and the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide for β-arrestin1 recruitment, PLCβ3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, cAMP accumulation, and CB1R internalization in HEK293A cells overexpressing CB1R and in Neuro2a and STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells endogenously expressing CB1R. Distinctively, GAT100 was a more potent and efficacious CB1R NAM than Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1 in all signaling assays and did not exhibit the inverse

  13. The ryanodine receptor pore blocker neomycin also inhibits channel activity via a previously undescribed high-affinity Ca(2+) binding site.

    PubMed

    Laver, Derek R; Hamada, Tomoyo; Fessenden, James D; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we present evidence for the mechanism of neomycin inhibition of skeletal ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In single-channel recordings, neomycin produced monophasic inhibition of RyR open probability and biphasic inhibition of [(3)H]ryanodine binding. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) for channel blockade by neomycin was dependent on membrane potential and cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)], suggesting that neomycin acts both as a pore plug and as a competitive antagonist at a cytoplasmic Ca(2+) binding site that causes allosteric inhibition. This novel Ca(2+)/neomycin binding site had a neomycin affinity of 100 nM: and a Ca(2+) affinity of 35 nM,: which is 30-fold higher than that of the well-described cytoplasmic Ca(2+) activation site. Therefore, a new high-affinity class of Ca(2+) binding site(s) on the RyR exists that mediates neomycin inhibition. Neomycin plugging of the channel pore induced brief (1-2 ms) conductance substates at 30% of the fully open conductance, whereas allosteric inhibition caused complete channel closure with durations that depended on the neomycin concentration. We quantitatively account for these results using a dual inhibition model for neomycin that incorporates voltage-dependent pore plugging and Ca(2+)-dependent allosteric inhibition.

  14. Structure of the high-affinity binding site for noncompetitive blockers of the acetylcholine receptor: serine-262 of the delta subunit is labeled by [3H]chlorpromazine.

    PubMed Central

    Giraudat, J; Dennis, M; Heidmann, T; Chang, J Y; Changeux, J P

    1986-01-01

    The membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata was photolabeled by the noncompetitive channel blocker [3H]chlorpromazine under equilibrium conditions in the presence of agonist. Incorporation of radioactivity into all subunits occurred and was reduced by addition of phencyclidine, a specific ligand for the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers. The delta subunit was purified and digested with trypsin, and the resulting fragments were fractionated by reversed-phase HPLC. The labeled peptide could not be purified to homogeneity because of its marked hydrophobic character, but a combination of differential CNBr subcleavage and cosequencing of partially purified fragments enabled us to identify Ser-262 as being labeled by [3H]chlorpromazine. The labeling of this particular residue was prevented by phencyclidine and thus took place at the level of, or in proximity to, the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers. Ser-262 is located in a hydrophobic and potentially transmembrane segment termed MII. Images PMID:3085104

  15. Two N-glycosylation Sites in the GluN1 Subunit Are Essential for Releasing N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptors from the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Lichnerova, Katarina; Kaniakova, Martina; Park, Seung Pyo; Skrenkova, Kristyna; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S.; Suh, Young Ho; Horak, Martin

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) comprise a subclass of neurotransmitter receptors whose surface expression is regulated at multiple levels, including processing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), intracellular trafficking via the Golgi apparatus, internalization, recycling, and degradation. With respect to early processing, NMDARs are regulated by the availability of GluN subunits within the ER, the presence of ER retention and export signals, and posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation and palmitoylation. However, the role of N-glycosylation, one of the most common posttranslational modifications, in regulating NMDAR processing has not been studied in detail. Using biochemistry, confocal and electron microscopy, and electrophysiology in conjunction with a lentivirus-based molecular replacement strategy, we found that NMDARs are released from the ER only when two asparagine residues in the GluN1 subunit (Asn-203 and Asn-368) are N-glycosylated. Although the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits are also N-glycosylated, their N-glycosylation sites do not appear to be essential for surface delivery of NMDARs. Furthermore, we found that removing N-glycans from native NMDARs altered the receptor affinity for glutamate. Our results suggest a novel mechanism by which neurons ensure that postsynaptic membranes contain sufficient numbers of functional NMDARs. PMID:26045554

  16. Lys39-Lysophosphatidate Carbonyl Oxygen Interaction Locks LPA1 N-terminal Cap to the Orthosteric Site and partners Arg124 During Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I.; Nagai, Jun; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 1 (LPA1) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors mediating the biological response to LPA species. Lack of detailed mechanism underlying LPA/LPA1 interaction has hampered the development of specific antagonists. Here, novel N-terminal Lys39 has been identified as a key residue during LPA-type agonist binding and LPA1 activation. Analysis of the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories showed that LPA-type agonist but not VPC-32183 (antagonist) evolved structures with classical GPCR activation signatures such as reduced cytoplasmic transmembrane (TM) 3/TM6 dynamic network, ruptured ionic lock, and formation of a continuous and highly ordered internal water pathway was also observed. In activated state, LPA-type agonists interact with Arg124 (R3.28), Gln125 (Q3.29), Lys294 (K7.36) and a novel N-terminal Lys39. Site-directed mutagenesis showed complete loss of intracellular calcium mobilization in B103 cells expressing R3.28A and Lys39Ala when treated with LPA-type agonists. Structurally, LPA-type agonist via Carbonyl-oxygen/Lys39 interaction facilitated the formation of a hypothetical N-terminal cap tightly packed over LPA1 heptahelical bundle. This packing may represent a key mechanism to distinguish an apo-receptor from bound LPA1. PMID:26268898

  17. Lys39-Lysophosphatidate Carbonyl Oxygen Interaction Locks LPA1 N-terminal Cap to the Orthosteric Site and partners Arg124 During Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I; Nagai, Jun; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 1 (LPA1) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors mediating the biological response to LPA species. Lack of detailed mechanism underlying LPA/LPA1 interaction has hampered the development of specific antagonists. Here, novel N-terminal Lys39 has been identified as a key residue during LPA-type agonist binding and LPA1 activation. Analysis of the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories showed that LPA-type agonist but not VPC-32183 (antagonist) evolved structures with classical GPCR activation signatures such as reduced cytoplasmic transmembrane (TM) 3/TM6 dynamic network, ruptured ionic lock, and formation of a continuous and highly ordered internal water pathway was also observed. In activated state, LPA-type agonists interact with Arg124 (R3.28), Gln125 (Q3.29), Lys294 (K7.36) and a novel N-terminal Lys39. Site-directed mutagenesis showed complete loss of intracellular calcium mobilization in B103 cells expressing R3.28A and Lys39Ala when treated with LPA-type agonists. Structurally, LPA-type agonist via Carbonyl-oxygen/Lys39 interaction facilitated the formation of a hypothetical N-terminal cap tightly packed over LPA1 heptahelical bundle. This packing may represent a key mechanism to distinguish an apo-receptor from bound LPA1. PMID:26268898

  18. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex. PMID:25513973

  19. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex.

  20. Homomers of alpha 8 and alpha 7 subunits of nicotinic receptors exhibit similar channel but contrasting binding site properties.

    PubMed

    Gerzanich, V; Anand, R; Lindstrom, J

    1994-02-01

    alpha 8 subunits of alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive chick neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes from cRNA are shown to form homomeric, acetylcholine-gated, rapidly desensitizing, inwardly rectifying, Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels similar to those of alpha 7 homomers. alpha 8 forms oligomers of several sizes, of which < 14% are expressed on the oocyte surface, which is less efficient than for alpha 7 homomers. alpha 8 homomers are more sensitive to agonists but less sensitive to antagonists than are alpha 7 homomers, and some agonists for alpha 8 homomers are partial agonists or antagonists for alpha 7 homomers. The pharmacological properties of homomers of alpha 8 and alpha 7 subunits generally reflect those of native alpha 8 and alpha 7 receptors.

  1. Differential expression of the beta4 neuronal nicotinic receptor subunit affects tolerance development and nicotinic binding sites following chronic nicotine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Erin E.; Loetz, Esteban C.; Marks, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The role of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) containing the β4 subunit in tolerance development and nicotinic binding site levels following chronic nicotine treatment was investigated. Mice differing in expression of the β4 nAChR subunit [wild-type (β4++), heterozygote (β4+−) and null mutant (β4−−)] were chronically treated for 10 days with nicotine (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mg/kg/hr) by constant intravenous infusion. Chronic nicotine treatment elicited dose-dependent tolerance development. β4−− mice developed significantly more tolerance than either β4++ or β4+− mice which was most evident following treatment with 4.0 mg/kg/hr nicotine. Subsets of [125I]-epibatidine binding were measured in several brain regions. Deletion of the β4 subunit had little effect on initial levels of cytisine-sensitive [125I]-epibatidine binding (primarily α4β2-nAChR sites) or their response (generally increased binding) to chronic nicotine treatment. In contrast, β4 gene-dose-dependent decreases in expression 5IA-85380 resistant [125I]-epibatidine binding sites (primarily β4*-nAChR) were observed. While these β4*nAChR sites were generally resistant to regulation by chronic nicotine treatment, significant increases in binding were noted for habenula and hindbrain. Comparison of previously published tolerance development in β2−− mice (less tolerance) to that of β4−− mice (more tolerance) supports a differential role for these receptor subtypes in regulating tolerance following chronic nicotine treatment. PMID:25560939

  2. Phosphorylation of arylsulphatase A occurs through multiple interactions with the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase proximal and distal to its retrieval site by the KDEL receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, F; von Figura, K

    1999-01-01

    Phosphorylation of oligosaccharides of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulphatase A (ASA), which accumulate in the secretions of cells that mis-sort most of the newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes due to a deficiency of mannose 6-phosphate receptors, was found to be site specific. ASA residing within the secretory route of these cells contains about one third of the incorporated [2-3H]mannose in phosphorylated oligosaccharides. Oligosaccharides carrying two phosphate groups are almost 2-fold less frequent than those with one phosphate group and only a few of the phosphate groups are uncovered. Addition of a KDEL (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu) retention signal prolongs the residence time of ASA within the secretory route 6-fold, but does not result in more efficient phosphorylation. In contrast, more than 90% of the [2-3H]mannose incorporated into secreted ASA (with or without a KDEL retention signal) is present in phosphorylated oligosaccharides. Those with two phosphate groups are almost twice as frequent as those with one phosphate group and most of the phosphate groups are uncovered. Thus, ASA receives N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphate groups in a sequential manner at two or more sites located within the secretory route proximal and distal to the site where ASA is retrieved by the KDEL receptor, i.e. proximal to the trans-Golgi. At each of these sites up to two N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphate groups can be added to a single oligosaccharide. Of several drugs known to inhibit transit of ASA through the secretory route only the ionophore monensin had a major inhibitory effect on phosphorylation, uncovering and sialylation. PMID:10359658

  3. Experimental attempt to stimulate receptor site environment. A 500-MHz /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance study of enkephalin amides

    SciTech Connect

    Temussi, P.A.; Tancredi, T.; Pastore, A.; Castiglione-Morelli, M.A.

    1987-12-01

    The amides of Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin, Met/sup 5/-enkephalin, and three analogues, D-Ala/sup 2/, Leu /sup 5/-enkephalin, (AcO)Tyr/sup 1/, Met/sup 5/-enkephalin, and (AcO)Tyr/sup 1/,D-Ala/sup 2/, Met/sup 5/-enkephalin, have been studied by means of /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy in two different solvent systems: Me/sub 2/SO-d/sub 6/ and CDC1/sub 3/. In the latter solvent the peptides were dissolved as complexes with 18-crown-6-ether, a coronand that binds strongly to the NH/sub 3//sup +/ groups. The crown ether complexation and the apolar solvent were used to simulate the anionic subsite of the receptor and they hydrophobic environment of the receptor cavity, respectively. The very unusual amide proton chemical shifts and their temperature coefficients suggest the presence of folded conformations in CDCl/sub 3/ for all peptides, consistent with several models of opioid receptors and with the crystal structure of Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin. The differences among the proposed cyclic conformations of the five peptides may be correlated, in part, with their different biological activity. All peptides in Me/sub 2/SO-d/sub 6/ are characterized by complex mixtures of extended fully solvated conformations.

  4. Identification and characterization of two nuclear factor-kappaB sites in the regulatory region of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Sandra; Fiorentini, Chiara; Busi, Chiara; Guerra, Nicoletta; Spano, PierFranco; Missale, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Regulation of D2 receptor (D2R) expression is crucial in the function of dopaminergic systems. Because alterations of D2R expression may contribute to the development of different disorders, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms regulating D2R gene transcription. We report the characterization of two putative nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) motifs, referred to as D2-kappaB sites, in the human D2R promoter, and demonstrate that they bind NF-kappaB subunits and stimulate D2R promoter activity. D2-kappaB sites show different degrees of conservation and specificity, when compared with canonical kB sites. The D2-kappaB1 site (from -407 to -398) is highly conserved and binds p50/p65 and p50/c-Rel complexes, whereas D2-kappaB2 (from -513 to -504) is more degenerated and only binds p50/p65 heterodimers. Activation of D2-kappaB sites in COS-7 cells expressing a luciferase reporter vector containing the D2R promoter resulted in increased transcriptional activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of each D2-kappaB site differentially modified D2R promoter activity. In particular, mutation of the D2-kappaB1 motif did not affect D2R promoter response to p50/c-Rel complexes, whereas inactivation of the D2-kappaB2 site decreased it. Mutations of either D2-kappaB1 or D2-kappaB2 sites attenuated the D2R promoter transcriptional efficiency induced by p50/p65 complexes. Thus, D2R transcription mediated by p50/c-Rel is supported mainly by the D2-kappaB2 site, whereas both sites are necessary to support the full transcriptional activity mediated by p50/p65 complexes. A correlation was found between NF-kappaB activity and D2R expression in the pituitary and pituitary-derived cells but not in the striatum, suggesting that NF-kappaB regulation of D2R expression could be a pituitary-specific mechanism.

  5. Identification of canonical tyrosine-dependent and non-canonical tyrosine-independent STAT3 activation sites in the intracellular domain of the interleukin 23 receptor.

    PubMed

    Floss, Doreen M; Mrotzek, Simone; Klöcker, Tobias; Schröder, Jutta; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2013-07-01

    Signaling of interleukin 23 (IL-23) via the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) and the shared IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) controls innate and adaptive immune responses and is involved in the differentiation and expansion of IL-17-producing CD4(+) T helper (TH17) cells. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) appears to be the major signaling pathway of IL-23, and STAT binding sites were predicted in the IL-23R but not in the IL-12Rβ1 chain. Using site-directed mutagenesis and deletion variants of the murine and human IL-23R, we showed that the predicted STAT binding sites (pYXXQ; including Tyr-504 and Tyr-626 in murine IL-23R and Tyr-484 and Tyr-611 in human IL-23R) mediated STAT3 activation. Furthermore, we identified two uncommon STAT3 binding/activation sites within the murine IL-23R. First, the murine IL-23R carried the Y(542)PNFQ sequence, which acts as an unusual Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding protein activation site of STAT3. Second, we identified a non-canonical, phosphotyrosine-independent STAT3 activation motif within the IL-23R. A third predicted site, Tyr-416 in murine and Tyr-397 in human IL-23R, is involved in the activation of PI3K/Akt and the MAPK pathway leading to STAT3-independent proliferation of Ba/F3 cells upon stimulation with IL-23. In contrast to IL-6-induced short term STAT3 phosphorylation, cellular activation by IL-23 resulted in a slower but long term STAT3 phosphorylation, indicating that the IL-23R might not be a major target of negative feedback inhibition by suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins. In summary, we characterized IL-23-dependent signal transduction with a focus on STAT3 phosphorylation and identified canonical tyrosine-dependent and non-canonical tyrosine-independent STAT3 activation sites in the IL-23R.

  6. Laminar and regional distribution of galanin binding sites in cat and monkey visual cortex determined by in vitro receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Rosier, A.M.; Vandesande, F.; Orban, G.A. )

    1991-03-08

    The distribution of galanin (GAL) binding sites in the visual cortex of cat and monkey was determined by autoradiographic visualization of ({sup 125}I)-GAL binding to tissue sections. Binding conditions were optimized and, as a result, the binding was saturable and specific. In cat visual cortex, GAL binding sites were concentrated in layers I, IVc, V, and VI. Areas 17, 18, and 19 exhibited a similar distribution pattern. In monkey primary visual cortex, the highest density of GAL binding sites was observed in layers II/III, lower IVc, and upper V. Layers IVA and VI contained moderate numbers of GAL binding sites, while layer I and the remaining parts of layer IV displayed the lowest density. In monkey secondary visual cortex, GAL binding sites were mainly concentrated in layers V-VI. Layer IV exhibited a moderate density, while the supragranular layers contained the lowest proportion of GAL binding sites. In both cat and monkey, we found little difference between regions subserving central and those subserving peripheral vision. Similarities in the distribution of GAL and acetylcholine binding sites are discussed.

  7. Analysis of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Type A24 Isolate Containing an SGD Receptor Recognition Site In Vitro and Its Pathogenesis in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Elizabeth; Henry, Tina; Duque, Hernando; Baxt, Barry

    2005-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by binding to integrin receptors via an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence found in the G-H loop of the structural protein VP1. Following serial passages of a type A24 Cruzeiro virus (A24Cru) in bovine, via tongue inoculation, a virus was generated which contained an SGD sequence in the cell receptor-binding site and expressed a turbid plaque phenotype in BHK-21 cells. Propagation of this virus in these cells resulted in the rapid selection of viruses that grew to higher titers, produced clear plaques, and now contained an RGD sequence in place of the original SGD. To study the role of the SGD sequence in FMDV receptor recognition and bovine virulence, we assembled an infectious cDNA clone of an RGD-containing A24Cru and derived mutant clones containing either SGD with a single nucleotide substitution in the R144 codon or double substitutions at this position to prevent mutation of the S to an R. The SGD viruses grew poorly in BHK-21 cells and stably maintained the sequence during propagation in BHK-21 cells expressing the bovine αVβ6 integrin (BHK3-αVβ6), as well as in experimentally infected and contact steers. While all the SGD-containing viruses used only the bovine αVβ6 integrin as a cellular receptor with relatively high efficiency, the revertant RGD viruses utilized either the αVβ1 or αVβ3 bovine integrins with higher efficiency than αVβ6 and grew well in BHK-21 cells. Replacing the R at the −1 SGD position with either K or E showed that this residue did not contribute to integrin utilization in vitro. These results illustrate the rapid evolution of FMDV with alteration in receptor specificity and suggest that viruses with sequences other than RGD, but closely related to it, can still infect via integrin receptors and induce and transmit the disease to susceptible animals. PMID:16189001

  8. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S.; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  9. Synthetic peptides used to locate the. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin binding site and immunogenic regions on. cap alpha. subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ralston, S.; Sarin, V.; Thanh, H.L.; Rivier, J.; Fox, J.L.; Lindstrom, J.

    1987-06-16

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to 57% of the sequence of ..cap alpha.. subunits of acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo californica electric organ and extending from the NH/sub 2/ to the COOCH terminus have been synthesized. The ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin binding site on denatured ..cap alpha.. subunits was mapped within the sequence ..cap alpha..185-199 by assaying binding of /sup 125/I-..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin to slot blots of synthetic peptides. Further studies showed that residues in the sequence ..cap alpha..190-194, especially cysteines-..cap alpha..192,193, were critical for binding ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Reduction and alkylation studies suggested that these cysteines must be disulfide linked for ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin to bind. Binding sites for serum antibodies to native receptors or ..cap alpha.. subunits were mapped by indirect immunoprecipitation of /sup 125/I-peptides. Several antigenic sequences were identified, but a synthetic peptide corresponding to the main immunogenic region (which is highly conformation dependent) was not identified.

  10. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  11. Mutation of putative GRK phosphorylation sites in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) confers resistance to cannabinoid tolerance and hypersensitivity to cannabinoids in mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Daniel J; Davis, Brian J; Kearn, Chris S; Marcus, David; Cook, Alex J; Wager-Miller, Jim; Straiker, Alex; Myoga, Michael H; Karduck, Jeffrey; Leishman, Emma; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Czyzyk, Traci A; Bradshaw, Heather B; Selley, Dana E; Mackie, Ken

    2014-04-01

    For many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R), desensitization has been proposed as a principal mechanism driving initial tolerance to agonists. GPCR desensitization typically requires phosphorylation by a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) and interaction of the phosphorylated receptor with an arrestin. In simple model systems, CB1R is desensitized by GRK phosphorylation at two serine residues (S426 and S430). However, the role of these serine residues in tolerance and dependence for cannabinoids in vivo was unclear. Therefore, we generated mice where S426 and S430 were mutated to nonphosphorylatable alanines (S426A/S430A). S426A/S430A mutant mice were more sensitive to acutely administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), have delayed tolerance to Δ(9)-THC, and showed increased dependence for Δ(9)-THC. S426A/S430A mutants also showed increased responses to elevated levels of endogenous cannabinoids. CB1R desensitization in the periaqueductal gray and spinal cord following 7 d of treatment with Δ(9)-THC was absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Δ(9)-THC-induced downregulation of CB1R in the spinal cord was also absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons from S426A/S430A mice showed enhanced endocannabinoid-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and reduced agonist-mediated desensitization of DSE. These results indicate that S426 and S430 play major roles in the acute response to, tolerance to, and dependence on cannabinoids. Additionally, S426A/S430A mice are a novel model for studying pathophysiological processes thought to involve excessive endocannabinoid signaling such as drug addiction and metabolic disease. These mice also validate the approach of mutating GRK phosphorylation sites involved in desensitization as a general means to confer exaggerated signaling to GPCRs in vivo.

  12. Differential recognition by CD28 of its cognate counter receptors CD80 (B7.1) and B70 (B7.2): analysis by site directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Truneh, A; Reddy, M; Ryan, P; Lyn, S D; Eichman, C; Couez, D; Hurle, M R; Sekaly, R P; Olive, D; Sweet, R

    1996-02-01

    CD28, which is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of molecules (IgSF), is a homodimer of two polypeptides containing a single V-like domain with short transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. It serves as a co-signalling molecule for T cell activation through binding to its cognate counter-receptors CD80 and B70, expressed on antigen presenting cells. In the current study, we investigated the regions of CD28 which are involved in its interactions with CD80 and B70, using site directed mutagenesis, CD28 mAb epitope mapping, receptor based adhesion assays and direct binding of Ig-fusion proteins to cell surface receptors. Truncation or substitution of a stretch of a proline rich "hallmark" sequence, "MYPPPY", abrogates binding to CD80 or B70, while retaining CD28 mAb epitopes and cell surface expression. On an Ig-fold model of the CD28 V-domain, this fully conserved motif localizes to a CDR3-like region. Mutations introduced into other loops, including the CDRI-like and CDR2-like regions, had very little effect on CD80 or B70 binding. Mutations introduced within the predicted beta-strand regions caused loss of receptor expression. Conservative substitution of both the flanking tyrosine residues within the "MYPPPY" motif with phenylalanine, caused loss of binding to B70 but not to CD80. These results show that, although the same overall region on CD28 may be involved in the interactions with CD80 and B70, subtle but important differences distinguish recognition by the two molecules. These finding, along with previous observations on the differential pattern of expression and tissue distribution of CD80 and B70, support the contention that these molecules play distinct roles in the regulation of immune responses in vivo.

  13. Magnolol, a major bioactive constituent of the bark of Magnolia officinalis, induces sleep via the benzodiazepine site of GABA(A) receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Rui; Zhou, Xu-Zhao; Luo, Yan-Jia; Huang, Zhi-Li; Urade, Yoshihiro; Qu, Wei-Min

    2012-11-01

    Magnolol (6,6',7,12-tetramethoxy-2,2'-dimethyl-1-beta-berbaman, C(18)H(18)O(2)), an active ingredient of the bark of Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to exert potent anti-epileptic effects via the GABA(A) receptor. The receptor also mediates sleep in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to determine whether magnolol could modulate sleep behaviors by recording EEG and electromyogram in mice. The results showed that magnolol administered i.p. at a dose of 5 or 25 mg/kg could significantly shorten the sleep latency, increase the amount of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep for 3 h after administration with an increase in the number of NREM and REM sleep episodes. Magnolol at doses of 5 and 25 mg/kg increased the number of bouts of wakefulness but decreased their duration. On the other hand, magnolol increased the number of state transitions from wakefulness to NREM sleep and subsequently from NREM sleep to wakefulness. Immunohistochemical study showed that magnolol increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of ventrolateral preoptic area, a sleep center in the anterior hypothalamus, and decreased c-Fos expression in the arousal tuberomammillary nucleus, which was located in the caudolateral hypothalamus. The sleep-promoting effects and changes in c-Fos induced by magnolol were reversed by flumazenil, an antagonist at the benzodiazepine site of the GABA(A) receptor. These results indicate that magnolol increased NREM and REM sleep via the GABA(A) receptor.

  14. Tianeptine: 5-HT uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors modulate memory formation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental task.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2002-05-01

    Recent studies using invertebrate and mammal species have revealed that, endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) modulates cognitive processes, particularly learning and memory, though, at present, it is unclear the manner, where, and how long 5-HT systems are involved. Hence in this work, an attempt was made to study the effects of 5-HT endogenous on memory formation, using a 5-HT uptake facilitator (tianeptine) and, selective 5-HT(1-7) receptor antagonists to determine whether 5-HT uptake sites and which 5-HT receptors are involved, respectively. Results showed that post-training tianeptine injection enhanced memory consolidation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task, which has been useful to detect changes on memory formation elicited by drugs or aging. On interaction experiments, ketanserin (5-HT(1D/2A/2C) antagonist) slightly enhanced tianeptine effects, while WAY 100635 (5-HT(1A) antagonist), SB-224289 (5-HT(1B) inverse agonist), SB-200646 (5-HT(2B/2C) antagonist), ondansetron (5-HT(3) antagonist), GR 127487 (5-HT(4) antagonist), Ro 04-6790 (5-HT(6) antagonist), DR 4004 (5-HT(7) antagonist), or fluoxetine (an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake) blocked the facilitatory tianeptine effect. Notably, together tianeptine and Ro 04-6790 impaired learning consolidation. Moreover, 5-HT depletion completely reversed the tianeptine effect. Tianeptine also normalized an impaired memory elicited by scopolamine (an antimuscarinic) or dizocilpine (non-competitive glutamatergic antagonist), while partially reversed that induced by TFMPP (5-HT(1B/1D/2A-2C/7) agonist/antagonist). Finally, tianeptine-fluoxetine coadministration had no effect on learning consolidation; nevertheless, administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, phenserine, potentiated subeffective tianeptine or fluoxetine doses. Collectively, these data confirmed that endogenously 5-HT modulates, via uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors, memory consolidation, and are consistent with the

  15. Genomic mapping of cAMP receptor protein (CRPMt) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: relation to transcriptional start sites and the role of CRPMt as a transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Kahramanoglou, Christina; Cortes, Teresa; Matange, Nishad; Hunt, Debbie M.; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.; Young, Douglas B.; Buxton, Roger S.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation identified 191 binding sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cAMP receptor protein (CRPMt) at endogenous expression levels using a specific α-CRPMt antibody. Under these native conditions an equal distribution between intragenic and intergenic locations was observed. CRPMt binding overlapped a palindromic consensus sequence. Analysis by RNA sequencing revealed widespread changes in transcriptional profile in a mutant strain lacking CRPMt during exponential growth, and in response to nutrient starvation. Differential expression of genes with a CRPMt-binding site represented only a minor portion of this transcriptional reprogramming with ∼19% of those representing transcriptional regulators potentially controlled by CRPMt. The subset of genes that are differentially expressed in the deletion mutant under both culture conditions conformed to a pattern resembling canonical CRP regulation in Escherichia coli, with binding close to the transcriptional start site associated with repression and upstream binding with activation. CRPMt can function as a classical transcription factor in M. tuberculosis, though this occurs at only a subset of CRPMt-binding sites. PMID:24957601

  16. Cellular and subcellular distributions of delta opioid receptor activation sites in the ventral oral pontine tegmentum of the cat.

    PubMed

    Alvira-Botero, Maria Ximena; Garzón, Miguel

    2006-12-01

    The ventral division of the reticular oral pontine nucleus (vRPO) is a pontine tegmentum region critically involved in REM sleep generation. Previous reports of morphine microinjections in the cat pontine tegmentum have shown that opioid receptor activation in this region modulates REM sleep. Even though opiate administration has marked effects on sleep-wake cycle architecture, the distribution of opioid receptors in vRPO has only been partially described. Using an antiserum directed against delta opioid receptor (DOR), to which morphine binds, in the present study, we use (1) light microscopy to determine DOR cellular distribution in the rostral pontine tegmentum and (2) electron microscopy to determine DOR subcellular distribution in the cat vRPO. In the dorsal pons, DOR immunoreactivity was evenly distributed throughout the neuropil of the reticular formation and was particularly intense in the parabrachial nuclei and locus coeruleus; the ventral and central areas of the RPO and locus coeruleus complex were especially rich in DOR-labeled somata. Within the vRPO, DOR was localized mainly in the cytoplasm and on plasma membranes of medium to large dendrites (47.8% of DOR-labeled profiles), which received both symmetric and asymmetric synaptic contacts mainly from non-labeled (82% of total inputs) axon terminals. Less frequently, DOR was distributed presynaptically in axon terminals (19% of DOR-labeled profiles). Our results suggest that DOR activation in vRPO regulates REM sleep occurrence by modulating postsynaptic responses to both excitatory and inhibitory afferents. DOR activation in vRPO could have, however, an additional role in direct modulation of neurotransmitter release from axon terminals.

  17. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  18. Oxytocin receptors on cultured astroglial cells. Kinetic and pharmacological characterization of oxytocin-binding sites on intact hypothalamic and hippocampic cells from foetal rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Di Scala-Guenot, D; Strosser, M T

    1992-01-01

    The ability of astroglial cells to exhibit oxytocin (OT)-binding sites has been investigated in embryonic hypothalamic and hippocampic astroglial cell cultures. The differential characteristics of binding of OT and [Arg8]vasopressin (AVP) agonists and antagonists to the OT-binding sites using the highly selective iodinated OT antagonist d(CH2)5-[Tyr(Me)2,Thr4,Tyr-NH2(9)]OVT ([125I]OTA) have been evaluated using intact cells maintained for 12 days in culture. The specific binding displayed features of reversibility. Computer analysis of the saturation studies using the LIGAND program indicated that, at 4 degrees C, the antagonist binds to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 0.02 nM and a low binding-site density of around 2 fmol/dish for hypothalamic cells and 6 fmol/dish for hippocampic cells. For hypothalamic cells, competition curves using unlabelled OT, AVP or V2 AVP agonist were characterized by a pseudo-Hill coefficient below unity (0.7), indicating possible heterogeneity among the binding sites. On the other hand, the dose-inhibition curves resulting from competition studies with hippocampic cells had a pseudo-Hill coefficient close to unity, except for OT. Computer analysis (LIGAND) indicated that the OT dose-inhibition curve was significantly better fitted to a two-site model, and this can be explained by two apparent forms of the receptor having high and low affinities for the displacing drug. The relative potencies of the peptides tested for binding to the high-affinity site were: AVP greater than OT greater than V1 AVP antagonist ([d(CH2)5-Tyr(Me)2]AVP) = V2 AVP agonist greater than AVP-Sar ([d(CH2)5-Sar7,Arg8]VP) in hypothalamic cultures, and OT = AVP greater than V1 AVP antagonist greater than V2 AVP agonist in hippocampic cultures. In addition, autoradiography allowed visualization of OT-binding sites, which are located on both soma and processes of astrocyte-like type of cells. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that glial

  19. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoetzel, Isidro . E-mail: ihotzel@gene.com; Cheevers, William P.

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain {beta}-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding.

  20. Changes in ligand binding to GABAA receptor sites in pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus) brain during spawning migration and "aging".

    PubMed

    Erdö, S L; Meyer, D L; Malz, C R; Hofmann, M H; Ebbesson, S O

    1992-01-01

    When several years old, pacific salmon return to the site of birth, to spawn. At this time, a rapid aging process begins and the fish die within a few weeks after reproducing. Age-related changes of high and low affinity GABA binding sites were studied in salmon brains at three different phases of the spawning migration, i.e. shortly after returning to the natal stream, at the time of spawning, and thereafter. High affinity GABA binding slightly increased while the fish deteriorated. The low affinity component showed a remarkable decrease in density and a concomitant increase in affinity during this final episode of salmon life.

  1. Site-specific conjugation of a lanthanide chelator and its effects on the chemical synthesis and receptor binding affinity of human relaxin-2 hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Bathgate, Ross A.D.; Belgi, Alessia; Chan, Linda J.; Nair, Vinojini B.; Wade, John D.; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mono-Eu-DTPA conjugated peptide ligand, Eu-DTPA-(A)-H2, has been developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The choice of a site for incorporation of a chelator is critical. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeled peptide retains full activity at the RXFP1 receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is markedly cheaper to produce and easier to use than radioactive probes. -- Abstract: Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) is a popular chelator agent for enabling the labeling of peptides for their use in structure-activity relationship study and biodistribution analysis. Solid phase peptide synthesis was employed to couple this commercially available chelator at the N-terminus of either the A-chain or B-chain of H2 relaxin. The coupling of the DTPA chelator at the N-terminus of the B-chain and subsequent loading of a lanthanide (europium) ion into the chelator led to a labeled peptide (Eu-DTPA-(B)-H2) in low yield and having very poor water solubility. On the other hand, coupling of the DTPA and loading of Eu at the N-terminus of the A-chain led to a water-soluble peptide (Eu-DTPA-(A)-H2) with a significantly improved final yield. The conjugation of the DTPA chelator at the N-terminus of the A-chain did not have any impact on the secondary structure of the peptide determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD). On the other hand, it was not possible to determine the secondary structure of Eu-DTPA-(B)-H2 because of its insolubility in phosphate buffer. The B-chain labeled peptide Eu-DTPA-(B)-H2 required solubilization in DMSO prior to carrying out binding assays, and showed lower affinity for binding to H2 relaxin receptor, RXFP1, compared to the water-soluble A-chain labeled peptide Eu-DTPA-(A)-H2. The mono-Eu-DTPA labeled A-chain peptide, Eu-DTPA-(A)-H2, thus can be used as a valuable probe to study ligand-receptor interactions of therapeutically important H2 relaxin analogs. Our results show that it is critical to

  2. Purinergic P2Y2 Receptor Control of Tissue Factor Transcription in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells: NEW AP-1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR SITE AND NEGATIVE REGULATOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Lingxin; Wang, Chuan; Roy, Shama; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) is the predominant nucleotide receptor expressed in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and that P2Y2R activation by ATP or UTP induces dramatic up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), a key initiator of the coagulation cascade. However, the molecular mechanism of this P2Y2R-TF axis remains unclear. Here, we report the role of a newly identified AP-1 consensus sequence in the TF gene promoter and its original binding components in P2Y2R regulation of TF transcription. Using bioinformatics tools, we found that a novel AP-1 site at -1363 bp of the human TF promoter region is highly conserved across multiple species. Activation of P2Y2R increased TF promoter activity and mRNA expression in HCAEC. Truncation, deletion, and mutation of this distal AP-1 site all significantly suppressed TF promoter activity in response to P2Y2R activation. EMSA and ChIP assays further confirmed that upon P2Y2R activation, c-Jun, ATF-2, and Fra-1, but not the typical c-Fos, bound to the new AP-1 site. In addition, loss-of-function studies using siRNAs confirmed a positive transactivation role of c-Jun and ATF-2 but unexpectedly revealed a strong negative role of Fra-1 in P2Y2R-induced TF up-regulation. Furthermore, we found that P2Y2R activation promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation through Src, leading to Fra-1 activation, whereas Rho/JNK mediated P2Y2R-induced activation of c-Jun and ATF-2. These findings reveal the molecular basis for P2Y G protein-coupled receptor control of endothelial TF expression and indicate that targeting the P2Y2R-Fra-1-TF pathway may be an attractive new strategy for controlling vascular inflammation and thrombogenicity associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Protons inhibit Cl- conductance by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA-binding site in the rat recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-De; Rahman, Mozibur; Zhu, Di

    2005-12-28

    Functional roles of external pH on the Cl- conductance were examined on Xenopus oocytes expressing rat recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors. Acidic pH inhibited GABA-response in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, significantly increasing the EC50 without appreciably changing the slope or maximal currents induced by GABA in the alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 receptors. In contrast, protonation did not influence the pentobarbital-gated currents in the alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors, suggesting that protons do not modulate channel activity by directly affecting the channel gating process. Protons competitively inhibited the bicuculline-induced antagonism on GABA in the alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors. The data support the hypothesis that protons inhibit GABAA receptor function by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA-binding site.

  4. Methods and results of an evaluation of aquatic receptor risk at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Klima, K.

    1995-12-31

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has historically released radionuclide chemicals of potential concern into the surrounding environment. The off-site environment was evaluated for Pu{sup 239/240} and Am{sup 241} occurrence. An evaluation of exposure and effects to the aquatic ecology within off-site areas including: Standley Lake, Great Western Reservoir, Mower Reservoir and portions of Big Dry Creek, Walnut Creek, and Woman Creek was performed for the completion of an Ecological Risk Assessment. Collocated sampling activities were performed for surface water, sediment, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. Results of the analytical data were used to assess ongoing exposure and effects. Data collected to determine effects (chemical content of fish tissue, diversity and density of macroinvertebrate populations) provided some of the necessary information needed to evaluate risk. However, due to conditions of interfering stressor effects, a quantitative evaluation of exposure through modeling techniques was also required to assess risk attributable to chemical of potential concern (COPC) occurrence. This paper presents the methods and results of both the effects and exposure assessment techniques applicable for this site and for the determination of risk.

  5. Indole Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Active in a Model of Dyslipidemia Act via a Unique Association with an Agonist Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Luz, John G; Carson, Matthew W; Condon, Bradley; Clawson, David; Pustilnik, Anna; Kohlman, Daniel T; Barr, Robert J; Bean, James S; Dill, M Joelle; Sindelar, Dana K; Maletic, Milan; Coghlan, Michael J

    2015-08-27

    To further elucidate the structural activity correlation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonism, the crystal structure of the GR ligand-binding domain (GR LBD) complex with a nonsteroidal antagonist, compound 8, was determined. This novel indole sulfonamide shows in vitro activity comparable to known GR antagonists such as mifepristone, and notably, this molecule lowers LDL (-74%) and raises HDL (+73%) in a hamster model of dyslipidemia. This is the first reported crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to a nonsteroidal antagonist, and this article provides additional elements for the design and pharmacology of clinically relevant nonsteroidal GR antagonists that may have greater selectivity and fewer side effects than their steroidal counterparts. PMID:26218343

  6. Distinct phosphorylation sites on the ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, establish a code that determines the functions of ß-arrestins.

    PubMed

    Bouzo-Lorenzo, Monica; Santo-Zas, Icía; Lodeiro, Maria; Nogueiras, Rubén; Casanueva, Felipe F; Castro, Marian; Pazos, Yolanda; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J; Camiña, Jesús P

    2016-03-03

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR1a, mediates the biological activities of ghrelin, which includes the secretion of growth hormone, as well as the stimulation of appetite, food intake and maintenance of energy homeostasis. Mapping phosphorylation sites on GHSR1a and knowledge of how these sites control specific functional consequences unlocks new strategies for the development of therapeutic agents targeting individual functions. Herein, we have identified the phosphorylation of different sets of sites within GHSR1a which engender distinct functionality of ß-arrestins. More specifically, the Ser(362), Ser(363) and Thr(366) residues at the carboxyl-terminal tail were primarily responsible for ß-arrestin 1 and 2 binding, internalization and ß-arrestin-mediated proliferation and adipogenesis. The Thr(350) and Ser(349) are not necessary for ß-arrestin recruitment, but are involved in the stabilization of the GHSR1a-ß-arrestin complex in a manner that determines the ultimate cellular consequences of ß-arrestin signaling. We further demonstrated that the mitogenic and adipogenic effect of ghrelin were mainly dependent on the ß-arrestin bound to the phosphorylated GHSR1a. In contrast, the ghrelin function on GH secretion was entirely mediated by G protein signaling. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that the phosphorylation pattern on the C terminus of GHSR1a determines the signaling and physiological output.

  7. Distinct phosphorylation sites on the ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, establish a code that determines the functions of ß-arrestins

    PubMed Central

    Bouzo-Lorenzo, Monica; Santo-Zas, Icía; Lodeiro, Maria; Nogueiras, Rubén; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Castro, Marian; Pazos, Yolanda; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J.; Camiña, Jesús P.

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR1a, mediates the biological activities of ghrelin, which includes the secretion of growth hormone, as well as the stimulation of appetite, food intake and maintenance of energy homeostasis. Mapping phosphorylation sites on GHSR1a and knowledge of how these sites control specific functional consequences unlocks new strategies for the development of therapeutic agents targeting individual functions. Herein, we have identified the phosphorylation of different sets of sites within GHSR1a which engender distinct functionality of ß-arrestins. More specifically, the Ser362, Ser363 and Thr366 residues at the carboxyl-terminal tail were primarily responsible for ß-arrestin 1 and 2 binding, internalization and ß-arrestin-mediated proliferation and adipogenesis. The Thr350 and Ser349 are not necessary for ß-arrestin recruitment, but are involved in the stabilization of the GHSR1a-ß-arrestin complex in a manner that determines the ultimate cellular consequences of ß-arrestin signaling. We further demonstrated that the mitogenic and adipogenic effect of ghrelin were mainly dependent on the ß-arrestin bound to the phosphorylated GHSR1a. In contrast, the ghrelin function on GH secretion was entirely mediated by G protein signaling. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that the phosphorylation pattern on the C terminus of GHSR1a determines the signaling and physiological output. PMID:26935831

  8. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: ( sup 3 H)nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, R.E.; Cohen, J.B. )

    1991-07-16

    The agonist ({sup 3}H)nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). ({sup 3}H)Nicotine binds at equilibrium with K{sub eq} = 0.6 {mu}M to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with ({sup 3}H)nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the {alpha}- and {gamma}-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the {alpha}-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the {gamma}-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the {alpha}-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by ({sup 3}H)nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde ({sup 3}H)Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193.

  9. Methylation at a transcription factor-binding site on the 5-HT1A receptor gene correlates with negative symptom treatment response in first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Dalton, Caroline F; Srisawat, Umarat; Zhang, Zhi Jun; Reynolds, Gavin P

    2014-04-01

    Individual variability and inadequate response of negative symptoms are major limitations of antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia. A functional polymorphism, rs6295, in the 5-HT1A-receptor gene (HTR1A) contributes to this variability in negative symptom response. The DNA sequence containing rs6295 is rich in cytosine methylation (CpG) sites; CpG methylation is an epigenetic factor that, like rs6295, can modify transcriptional control. To investigate whether DNA methylation influences response to antipsychotic treatment, we determined methylation at CpG sites close to rs6295 in DNA from 82 Chinese subjects with a first psychotic episode. Methylation of one CpG site within a recognition sequence for HES transcriptional repressors was found to correlate with changes in total PANSS score (p = 0.006) and negative factor sub-score (p < 0.001) following 10 wk initial antipsychotic treatment, as well as with baseline negative factor score (p = 0.019); the effect on symptom change remained after correction for this baseline score. An effect of rs6295 on negative symptom response was not seen in this sample, which may not have provided sufficient power for the pharmacogenetic association. These preliminary results indicate that epigenetic modification of transcriptional regulation by specific cytosine methylation may modulate HTR1A expression, resulting in effects on emotional dysfunction and negative symptom response to antipsychotic treatment. PMID:24331356

  10. Mutation of light-dependent phosphorylation sites of the Drosophila transient receptor potential-like (TRPL) ion channel affects its subcellular localization and stability.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Alexander C; Oberacker, Tina; Pfannstiel, Jens; Weigold, Sebastian; Will, Carina; Huber, Armin

    2013-05-31

    The Drosophila phototransduction cascade terminates in the opening of the ion channel transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL). Contrary to TRP, TRPL undergoes light-dependent subcellular trafficking between rhabdomeric photoreceptor membranes and an intracellular storage compartment, resulting in long term light adaptation. Here, we identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of TRPL that affect TRPL stability and localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed a light-dependent change in the TRPL phosphorylation pattern. Mutation of eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites neither affected multimerization of the channels nor the electrophysiological response of flies expressing the mutated channels. However, these mutations resulted in mislocalization and enhanced degradation of TRPL after prolonged dark-adaptation. Mutation of subsets of the eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites also led to a reduction of TRPL content and partial mislocalization in the dark. This suggests that a light-dependent switch in the phosphorylation pattern of the TRPL channel mediates stable expression of TRPL in the rhabdomeres upon prolonged dark-adaptation.

  11. Dimensions and ion selectivity of recombinant AMPA and kainate receptor channels and their dependence on Q/R site residues.

    PubMed Central

    Burnashev, N; Villarroel, A; Sakmann, B

    1996-01-01

    1. Recombinant alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) subunits (GluR-A or GluR-B) and kainate receptor (KAR) subunit (GluR-6) in their unedited (Q)- and edited (R)-forms were expressed in HEK 293 cells. To estimate the dimensions of the narrow portion of these channels, biionic reversal potentials for organic cations of different mean diameters were determined with Cs+ as the internal reference ion. 2. Homomeric channels assembled from Q-form subunits were cation selective. The relation between the relative permeability and the mean size of different organic cations suggests that the diameter of the narrow portion of Q-form channels is approximately 0.78 nm for AMPAR and 0.75 nm for KAR channels. 3. Homomeric channels assembled from R-form subunits were permeant for anions and cations. When probed with CsC1 gradients the relative chloride permeability (PC1/PCs) was estimated as 0.14 for GluR-B(R) and 0.74 for GluR-6(R)-subunit channels. The permeability versus mean size relation for large cations measured with the weakly permeant F- as anion, indicates that for the R-form KAR channels the apparent pore diameter is close to 0.76 nm. 4. Heteromeric AMPAR and KAR channels co-assembled from Q- and R-form subunits were cation selective. The diameter of the narrow portion of these channels is estimated to be in the range between 0.70 and 0.74 nm. 5. The results indicated that the diameters of the narrow portion of AMPAR and KAR channels of different subunit composition and of widely different ion selectivity are comparable. Therefore, the differences in the anion versus cation selectivity, in Ca2+ permeability and in channel conductance are likely to be determined by the difference in charge density of the channel. PMID:8910205

  12. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-01

    In our continuing program exploring glucose-based peptidomimetics of somatostatin (SRIF-14), we sought to improve the water solubility of our glycosides. This led to insights into the nature of the ligand binding sites at the SRIF receptor. Replacement of the C4 benzyl substituent in glucoside (+)-2 with pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners increased water solubility and enhanced affinity for the human SRIF subtype receptor 4 (sst4). We attribute this effect to hydrogen bond formation. The pyridin-3-ylmethyl substituent at C4, when combined with the imidazol-4-ylmethyl group at C2, generated (-)-19, which has the highest affinity of a glucose-based peptidomimetic at a human SRIF receptor to date (K(i) 53 +/- 23 nM, n = 6 at sst4). The C4 heterocyclic congeners of glucosides bearing a 1-methoxy substituent rather than an indole side chain at the anomeric carbon, such as (+)-16, also provided information about the Trp(8) binding pocket. We correlated the SARs at both the C4 and the Trp(8) binding pockets with calculations of the electrostatic potentials of the diverse C4 aromatic substituents using Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis. These calculations provide an approximate analysis of a molecule's ability to interact within a receptor binding site. Our binding studies show that benzene and indole rings, but not pyridinylmethyl nor pyrazin-2-ylmethyl rings, can bind the hydrophobic Trp(8) binding pocket of sst4. The Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis reveals significant negative electrostatic potential in the region of the pi-clouds for the benzene and indole rings but not for the pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners. Our data further demonstrate that the replacement of benzene or indole side chains by heterocyclic aromatic rings typified by pyridine and pyrazine not only enhances water solubility and hydrogen bonding capacity as expected, but can also profoundly diminish the ability of the pi-cloud of the aromatic substituent to interact with side chains

  13. In vitro analysis of essential binding sites on the promoter of the Serratia marcescens spn operon with the quorum-sensing receptor SpnR.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuriko; Kato, Norihiro

    2016-11-01

    The N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) receptor SpnR is a LuxR family protein that acts as a negative regulator of AHL-dependent quorum sensing (QS). SpnR binds to DNA in Serratia marcescens AS-1 via the spn box; however, the binding affinity of SpnR with the nucleotides on the spn box has not yet been investigated. In this study, we used an spn-box-modified sensor electrode, and quartz crystal microbalance analysis demonstrated a drastic reduction of the uptake of SpnR. The nucleotides G5 and C16 at the AHL-receptor complex-binding site are conserved in Gram-negative bacteria, including the lux box in Vibrio fischeri, the tra box in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the spn box in S. marcescens. Indeed, the affinity of SpnR to DNA was reduced to 8% by G5C substitution of the spn box. The affinity of SpnR tagged with maltose-binding protein to the immobilized gene promoter was reduced in the order of C16G and G5C substitutions, which corresponded with previous reports on the lux box. These results suggest that formation of hydrogen bonds at amino acid residues containing guanine at position 5 on a lux-box-like promoter universally contributes to the stability of the receptor complex, whose interaction initiates a sequential QS process in the LuxR family. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2513-2517. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27217017

  14. Mutation of the palmitoylation site of estrogen receptor α in vivo reveals tissue-specific roles for membrane versus nuclear actions

    PubMed Central

    Adlanmerini, Marine; Solinhac, Romain; Abot, Anne; Fabre, Aurélie; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Guihot, Anne-Laure; Boudou, Frédéric; Sautier, Lucile; Vessières, Emilie; Kim, Sung Hoon; Lière, Philippe; Fontaine, Coralie; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Gourdy, Pierre; Shaul, Philip W.; Henrion, Daniel; Arnal, Jean-François; Lenfant, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) activation functions AF-1 and AF-2 classically mediate gene transcription in response to estradiol (E2). A fraction of ERα is targeted to plasma membrane and elicits membrane-initiated steroid signaling (MISS), but the physiological roles of MISS in vivo are poorly understood. We therefore generated a mouse with a point mutation of the palmitoylation site of ERα (C451A-ERα) to obtain membrane-specific loss of function of ERα. The abrogation of membrane localization of ERα in vivo was confirmed in primary hepatocytes, and it resulted in female infertility with abnormal ovaries lacking corpora lutea and increase in luteinizing hormone levels. In contrast, E2 action in the uterus was preserved in C451A-ERα mice and endometrial epithelial proliferation was similar to wild type. However, E2 vascular actions such as rapid dilatation, acceleration of endothelial repair, and endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation were abrogated in C451A-ERα mice. A complementary mutant mouse lacking the transactivation function AF-2 of ERα (ERα-AF20) provided selective loss of function of nuclear ERα actions. In ERα-AF20, the acceleration of endothelial repair in response to estrogen–dendrimer conjugate, which is a membrane-selective ER ligand, was unaltered, demonstrating integrity of MISS actions. In genome-wide analysis of uterine gene expression, the vast majority of E2-dependent gene regulation was abrogated in ERα-AF20, whereas in C451A-ERα it was nearly fully preserved, indicating that membrane-to-nuclear receptor cross-talk in vivo is modest in the uterus. Thus, this work genetically segregated membrane versus nuclear actions of a steroid hormone receptor and demonstrated their in vivo tissue-specific roles. PMID:24371309

  15. In vitro analysis of essential binding sites on the promoter of the Serratia marcescens spn operon with the quorum-sensing receptor SpnR.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuriko; Kato, Norihiro

    2016-11-01

    The N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) receptor SpnR is a LuxR family protein that acts as a negative regulator of AHL-dependent quorum sensing (QS). SpnR binds to DNA in Serratia marcescens AS-1 via the spn box; however, the binding affinity of SpnR with the nucleotides on the spn box has not yet been investigated. In this study, we used an spn-box-modified sensor electrode, and quartz crystal microbalance analysis demonstrated a drastic reduction of the uptake of SpnR. The nucleotides G5 and C16 at the AHL-receptor complex-binding site are conserved in Gram-negative bacteria, including the lux box in Vibrio fischeri, the tra box in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the spn box in S. marcescens. Indeed, the affinity of SpnR to DNA was reduced to 8% by G5C substitution of the spn box. The affinity of SpnR tagged with maltose-binding protein to the immobilized gene promoter was reduced in the order of C16G and G5C substitutions, which corresponded with previous reports on the lux box. These results suggest that formation of hydrogen bonds at amino acid residues containing guanine at position 5 on a lux-box-like promoter universally contributes to the stability of the receptor complex, whose interaction initiates a sequential QS process in the LuxR family. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2513-2517. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Characterization of sulpipride-displaceable sup 3 H-YM-09151-2 binding sites in rat frontal cortex and the effects of subchronic treatment with haloperidol on cortical D-2 dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kazawa, Tetsushi; Higuchi, Teruhiko National Institute of Neuroscience, Tokyo ); Mikuni, Masahiko; Takahshi, Kiyohisa ); Arai, Ichiro; Yamauchi, Toshio )

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacological properties of the sulpiride-displaceable binding sites labeled by {sup 3}H-YM-09151-2 in rat frontal cortex, compared to those in striatum. The IC{sub 50} value of ketanserin was 486 nM, which was apparently different from its affinity for the 5HT-2 receptor. Various dopamine antagonists showed almost the same inhibitory effects for binding site in frontal cortex and striatum. Sulpiride-displaceable {sup 3}H-YM-09151-2 binding sites were considered to be D-2 dopamine receptors. After subchronic treatment with haloperidol, the D-2 receptor density of frontal cortex increased to the same extent as striatum without significant change in apparent affinity.

  17. Inactivation of influenza virus haemagglutinin by chlorine dioxide: oxidation of the conserved tryptophan 153 residue in the receptor-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2012-12-01

    Airborne influenza virus infection of mice can be prevented by gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). This study demonstrated that ClO(2) abolished the function of the haemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (H1N1) in a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent manner. The IC(50) during a 2 min reaction with ClO(2) at 25 °C was 13.7 µM, and the half-life time of HA with 100 µM ClO(2) at 25 °C was 19.5 s. Peptides generated from a tryptic digest of ClO(2)-treated virus were analysed by mass spectrometry. An HA fragment, (150)NLLWLTGK(157) was identified in which the tryptophan residue (W153) was 32 mass units greater than expected. The W153 residue of this peptide, which is derived from the central region of the receptor-binding site of HA, is highly conserved. It was shown that W153 was oxidized to N-formylkynurenine in ClO(2)-treated virus. It was concluded that the inactivation of influenza virus by ClO(2) is caused by oxidation of W153 in HA, thereby abolishing its receptor-binding ability.

  18. Evidence that estrogen receptor beta enhances MMP-13 promoter activity in HIG-82 cells and that this enhancement can be influenced by ligands and involves specific promoter sites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Achari, Yamini; Rattner, Jerome B; Hart, David A

    2007-06-01

    Degradation of articular cartilage is characteristic of osteoarthritis, and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has been implicated in this condition. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are present in connective tissues, indicating these tissues' potential responsiveness to estrogen. We based this study on the hypothesis that estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) can modulate MMP-13 promoter activity. Transfection of cells with ERbeta constructs led to the induction of the endogenous MMP-13 gene, as evidenced by increased mRNA levels. The results also indicated that MMP-13 promoter construct activity in the HIG-82 cell line significantly increased when ERbeta was present, and that estrogen downregulated this response in a dose-dependent manner. ERbeta was shown to enhance MMP-13 expression somewhat more strongly than ERalpha, and the impact of a number of selective ER modulators (tamoxifen, raloxifene, and ICI 182,780) on ERbeta enhancement of promoter activity was found to be significantly less than that of estrogen. Furthermore, transcription regulatory sites in the MMP-13 promoter, specifically AP-1 and PEA-3, were shown to act in conjunction to mediate ERbeta effects. Thus, ERbeta likely influences MMP-13 promoter expression in normal and disease processes.

  19. Use of chemical modifications and site-directed mutagenesis to probe the functional role of thiol groups on the. gamma. subunit of Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pradier, L.; Yee, A.S.; McNamee, M.G. )

    1989-08-08

    Alkylation of Torpedo californica purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) with N-phenylmaleimide (NPM) under nonreducing conditions led to ion flux inhibition without affecting ligand binding properties. The {gamma} subunit was shown to be preferentially labeled by ({sup 3}H)NPM with partial labeling of the {alpha} subunit at higher NPM concentrations. Alkylation occurs at cysteine residues as confirmed by amino acid analysis. Cyanogen bromide peptide mapping of the {gamma} subunit indicates that at least two residues corresponding to Cys-416, -420, or -451 are labeled. Residues 416 and 420 are part of the proposed amphipathic helix, and the functional role of these two cysteines is further investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of T. californica AChR cDNAs and expression of the mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes following injection of SP6 transcripts. Several features of SP6 transcripts are shown to be important for efficient translation in vivo. Mutations Cys {yields} Ser{gamma}416,420 and Cys {yields} Phe{gamma}416 did not perturb either the receptor functional properties or its expression levels. The double mutant Cys {yields} Phe{gamma}416,420 displayed a 30% decrease of normalized AChR activity. The relatively small effect of large steric mutations in the amphipathic helix argues against its presence in the tightly packed transmembrane domain of the protein.

  20. Interferon-gamma-responsive neuronal sites in the normal rat brain: receptor protein distribution and cell activation revealed by Fos induction.

    PubMed

    Robertson, B; Kong, G; Peng, Z; Bentivoglio, M; Kristensson, K

    2000-05-01

    Constitutive expression of the interferon-gamma receptor protein (IFN-gammaR), and the distribution of cells in which Fos, a marker of cell activation, is induced by intracerebroventricular administration of IFN-gamma, were studied in the rat brain by immunohistochemistry. IFN-gammaR immunopositivity was found in neuronal elements, which exhibited a selective distribution being concentrated in the piriform and entorhinal cortex, midline thalamus and medial hypothalamic structures, brainstem nociceptive relays (including the periaqueductal gray, the parabrachial nuclei and the caudal part of the spinal trigeminal nuclei), and circumventricular organs such as the median eminence and area postrema. IFN-gamma-induced Fos expression mostly corresponded to neuronal sites of receptor distribution. Because of its topographical distribution, it is suggested that activation of the IFN-gammaR in neurons may play a role to limit spread of infections in the brain and, in concert with other proinflammatory cytokines, to modulate adaptive responses to an antigen challenge mediated by the central nervous system. PMID:10779704

  1. Differential neuroprotective effects of the NMDA receptor-associated glycine site partial agonists 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACPC) and D-cycloserine in lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Steven L; Purvis, Rebecca S; Griffith, James W

    2004-09-01

    The status epilepticus (SE) induced in rats by lithium-pilocarpine (Li-pilo) shares many common features with soman-induced SE including a glutamatergic phase that is inhibited by NMDA antagonists. The present study determined whether 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACPC) or D-cycloserine (DCS), both partial agonists of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site on the NMDA receptor ionophore complex, exerted anticonvulsant or neuroprotectant activity in Li-pilo SE. ACPC or DCS were administered either immediately following pilocarpine (exposure treatment) or 5 min after the onset of SE as determined by ECoG activity. SE was allowed to proceed for 3 h before termination with propofol. The rats were sacrificed 24 h following pilocarpine administration. Neither drug had an effect on the latency to seizure onset or the duration of seizure activity. ACPC administered 5 min after SE onset produced significant neuroprotection in cortical regions, amygdala and CA1 of the hippocampus. In contrast, when administered as exposure treatment ACPC enhanced the neural damage in the thalamus and CA3 of the hippocampus suggesting the neuropathology in those regions is mediated by a different subset of NMDA receptors. DCS had no neuroprotectant activity in Li-pilo SE but exacerbated neuronal damage in the thalamus. Neither drug affected the cholinergic convulsions but both had differential effects on neural damage. This suggests that the SE-induced seizure activity and subsequent neuronal damage involve independent mechanisms.

  2. SRC Homology 2 Domain Binding Sites in Insulin, IGF-1 and FGF receptor mediated signaling networks reveal an extensive potential interactome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Specific peptide ligand recognition by modular interaction domains is essential for the fidelity of information flow through the signal transduction networks that control cell behavior in response to extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli. Src homology 2 (SH2) domains recognize distinct phosphotyrosine peptide motifs, but the specific sites that are phosphorylated and the complement of available SH2 domains varies considerably in individual cell types. Such differences are the basis for a wide range of available protein interaction microstates from which signaling can evolve in highly divergent ways. This underlying complexity suggests the need to broadly map the signaling potential of systems as a prerequisite for understanding signaling in specific cell types as well as various pathologies that involve signal transduction such as cancer, developmental defects and metabolic disorders. This report describes interactions between SH2 domains and potential binding partners that comprise initial signaling downstream of activated fibroblast growth factor (FGF), insulin (Ins), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptors. A panel of 50 SH2 domains screened against a set of 192 phosphotyrosine peptides defines an extensive potential interactome while demonstrating the selectivity of individual SH2 domains. The interactions described confirm virtually all previously reported associations while describing a large set of potential novel interactions that imply additional complexity in the signaling networks initiated from activated receptors. This study of pTyr ligand binding by SH2 domains provides valuable insight into the selectivity that underpins complex signaling networks that are assembled using modular protein interaction domains. PMID:22974441

  3. Concise site-specific synthesis of DTPA-peptide conjugates: application to imaging probes for the chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Ryo; Oishi, Shinya; Ohno, Hiroaki; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Saji, Hideo; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-05-15

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is a useful chelating agent for radionuclides such as (68)Ga, (99m)Tc and (111)In, which are applicable to nuclear medicine imaging. In this study, we established a facile synthetic protocol for the production of mono-DTPA-conjugated peptide probes. A novel monoreactive DTPA precursor reagent was synthesized in two steps using the chemistry of the o-nitrobenzenesulfonyl (Ns) protecting group, and under mild conditions this DTPA precursor was incorporated onto an N(ε)-bromoacetylated Lys of a protected peptide resin. The site-specific DTPA conjugation was facilitated by using a highly acid-labile 4-methyltrityl (Mtt) protecting group for the target site of the bioactive peptide during the solid-phase synthesis. A combination of both techniques yielded peptides with disulfide bonds, such as octreotide and polyphemusin II-derived CXCR4 antagonists. DTPA-peptide conjugates were purified in a single step following cleavage from the resin and disulfide bond formation. This site-specific on-resin construction strategy was used for the design and synthesis of a novel In-DTPA-labeled CXCR4 antagonist, which exhibited highly potent inhibitory activity against SDF-1-CXCR4 binding.

  4. Activation of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Decreases On-site Mortality in Crush Syndrome through Insulin Signaling-Na/K-ATPase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bo-Shi; Zhang, En-Hui; Wu, Miao; Guo, Jin-Min; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia; Yu, Jian-Guang

    2016-01-01

    On-site mortality in crush syndrome remains high due to lack of effective drugs based on definite diagnosis. Anisodamine (Ani) is widely used in China for treatment of shock, and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) mediates such antishock effect. The present work was designed to test whether activation of α7nAChR with Ani decreased mortality in crush syndrome shortly after decompression. Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice with crush syndrome were injected with Ani (20 mg/kg and 28 mg/kg respectively, i.p.) 30 min before decompression. Survival time, serum potassium, insulin, and glucose levels were observed shortly after decompression. Involvement of α7nAChR was verified with methyllycaconitine (selective α7nAChR antagonist) and PNU282987 (selective α7nAChR agonist), or in α7nAChR knockout mice. Effect of Ani was also appraised in C2C12 myotubes. Ani reduced mortality and serum potassium and enhanced insulin sensitivity shortly after decompression in animals with crush syndrome, and PNU282987 exerted similar effects. Such effects were counteracted by methyllycaconitine or in α7nAChR knockout mice. Mortality and serum potassium in rats with hyperkalemia were also reduced by Ani. Phosphorylation of Na/K-ATPase was enhanced by Ani in C2C12 myotubes. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase on insulin receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and Na/K-ATPase counteracted the effect of Ani on extracellular potassium. These findings demonstrated that activation of α7nAChR could decrease on-site mortality in crush syndrome, at least in part based on the decline of serum potassium through insulin signaling-Na/K-ATPase pathway. PMID:27065867

  5. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and tracazolate, and a diaryltriazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin and LY81067 on the saturable binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS in cortical membranes are compared. The present findings are consistent with the interpretation that /sup 35/S-TBPS bind at or near the picrotoxin-sensitive anion recognition sites of the GABA/benzodiazepine/picrotoxin receptor complex.

  6. A Distinct Functional Site in Ω-Neurotoxins: Novel Antagonists of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors from Snake Venom.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Puttaswamy, Varuna; Adams, David J; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2015-12-18

    Snake venom α-neurotoxins from the three-finger toxin (3FTx) family are competitive antagonists with nanomolar affinity and high selectivity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Here, we report the characterization of a new group of competitive nAChR antagonists: Ω-neurotoxins. Although they belong to the 3FTx family, the characteristic functional residues of α-neurotoxins are not conserved. We evaluated the subtype specificity and structure-function relationships of Oh9-1, an Ω-neurotoxin from Ophiophagus hannah venom. Recombinant Oh9-1 showed reversible postsynaptic neurotoxicity in the micromolar range. Experiments with different nAChR subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes indicated Oh9-1 is selective for rat muscle type α1β1εδ (adult) and α1β1γδ (fetal) and rat neuronal α3β2 subtypes. However, Oh9-1 showed low or no affinity for other human and rat neuronal subtypes. Twelve individual alanine-scan mutants encompassing all three loops of Oh9-1 were evaluated for binding to α1β1εδ and α3β2 subtypes. Oh9-1's loop-II residues (M25, F27) were the most critical for interactions and formed the common binding core. Mutations at T23 and F26 caused a significant loss in activity at α1β1εδ receptors but had no effect on the interaction with the α3β2 subtype. Similarly, mutations at loop-II (H7, K22, H30) and -III (K45) of Oh9-1 had a distinctly different impact on its activity with these subtypes. Thus, Oh9-1 interacts with these nAChRs via distinct residues. Unlike α-neurotoxins, the tip of loop-II is not involved. We reveal a novel mode of interaction, where both sides of the β-strand of Oh9-1's loop-II interact with α1β1εδ, but only one side interacts with α3β2. Phylogenetic analysis revealed functional organization of the Ω-neurotoxins independent of α-neurotoxins. Thus, Ω-neurotoxin: Oh9-1 may be a new, structurally distinct class of 3FTxs that, like α-neurotoxins, antagonize nAChRs. However, Oh9-1 binds to the ACh

  7. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1985-01-01

    It is now well established that the biological actions of tetradecapeptide somatostatin (somatostatin-14, S-14) are receptor-mediated. These receptors were first quantified in GH4C pituitary tumor cells using [125I-Tyr1] S-14 as radioligand which was found to exhibit high non-specific binding to membrane receptor preparations from normal tissues. Our studies have shown that [125I-Tyr11] S-14 in which the radiolabel is situated away from the N-terminus exhibits significantly lower non-specific binding and therefore is more suitable for S-14 receptor studies. In the CNS, highest concentration of S-14 receptors was found in the cerebral cortex, followed by thalamus, hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus while medulla-pons, cerebellum and spinal cord exhibited negligible binding. Outside the CNS membrane receptors for S-14 have been characterized in pituitary, adrenal cortex and pancreatic acini. In all these tissues a single class of high affinity binding sites for S-14 were present, the receptors in pancreatic acinar cells exhibiting significantly greater affinity for binding S-14 than in other tissues.

  8. Isolating the Epstein-Barr virus gp350/220 binding site on complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21).

    PubMed

    Young, Kendra A; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2007-12-14

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) is essential for the attachment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to the surface of B-lymphocytes in an interaction mediated by the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350. The heavily glycosylated structure of EBV gp350 has recently been elucidated by x-ray crystallography, and the CR2 binding site on this protein has been characterized. To identify the corresponding gp350 binding site on CR2, we have undertaken a site-directed mutagenesis study targeting regions of CR2 that have previously been implicated in the binding of CR2 to the C3d/C3dg fragments of complement component C3. Wild-type or mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on K562 cells, and the ability of these CR2-expressing cells to bind gp350 was measured using flow cytometry. Mutations directed toward the two N-terminal extracellular domains of CR2 (SCR1-2) reveal that a large contiguous surface of CR2 SCR1-2 is involved in gp350 binding, including a number of positively charged residues (Arg-13, (Arg-28, (Arg-36, Lys-41, Lys-57, Lys-67, and Arg-83). These data appear to complement the CR2 binding site on gp350, which is characterized by a preponderance of negative charge. In addition to identifying the importance of charge in the formation of a CR2-gp350 complex, we also provide evidence that both SCR1 and SCR2 make contact with gp350. Specifically, two anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies, designated as monoclonal antibodies 171 and 1048 whose primary epitopes are located within SCR2, inhibit binding of wild-type CR2 to EBV gp350; with regard to SCR1, both K562 cells expressing an S15P mutation and recombinant S15P CR2 proteins exhibit diminished gp350 binding.

  9. Chronic mild stress and antidepressant treatment alter 5-HT1A receptor expression by modifying DNA methylation of a conserved Sp4 site.

    PubMed

    Le François, Brice; Soo, Jeremy; Millar, Anne M; Daigle, Mireille; Le Guisquet, Anne-Marie; Leman, Samuel; Minier, Frédéric; Belzung, Catherine; Albert, Paul R

    2015-10-01

    The serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A), a critical regulator of the brain serotonergic tone, is implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD) where it is often found to be dys-regulated. However, the extent to which stress and antidepressant treatment impact 5-HT1A expression in adults remains unclear. To address this issue, we subjected adult male BALB/c mice to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) to induce a depression-like phenotype that was reversed by chronic treatment with the antidepressant imipramine. In prefrontal cortex (PFC) and midbrain tissue, UCMS increased 5-HT1A RNA and protein levels, changes that are expected to decrease the brain serotonergic activity. The stress-induced increase in 5-HT1A expression was paralleled by a specific increase in DNA methylation of the conserved -681 CpG promoter site, located within a Sp1-like element. We show that the -681 CpG site is recognized and repressed by Sp4, the predominant neuronal Sp1-like factor and that Sp4-induced repression is attenuated by DNA methylation, despite a stress-induced increase in PFC Sp4 levels. These results indicate that adult life stress induces DNA methylation of a conserved promoter site, antagonizing Sp4 repression to increase 5-HT1A expression. Chronic imipramine treatment fully reversed the UCMS-induced increase in methylation of the -681 CpG site in the PFC but not midbrain of stressed animals and also increased 5-HT1A expression in the PFC of control animals. Incomplete reversal by imipramine of stress-induced changes in 5-HT1A methylation and expression indicates a persistence of stress vulnerability, and that sustained reversal of behavioral impairments may require additional pathways.

  10. Isolating the Epstein-Barr virus gp350/220 binding site on complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21).

    PubMed

    Young, Kendra A; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2007-12-14

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) is essential for the attachment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to the surface of B-lymphocytes in an interaction mediated by the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350. The heavily glycosylated structure of EBV gp350 has recently been elucidated by x-ray crystallography, and the CR2 binding site on this protein has been characterized. To identify the corresponding gp350 binding site on CR2, we have undertaken a site-directed mutagenesis study targeting regions of CR2 that have previously been implicated in the binding of CR2 to the C3d/C3dg fragments of complement component C3. Wild-type or mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on K562 cells, and the ability of these CR2-expressing cells to bind gp350 was measured using flow cytometry. Mutations directed toward the two N-terminal extracellular domains of CR2 (SCR1-2) reveal that a large contiguous surface of CR2 SCR1-2 is involved in gp350 binding, including a number of positively charged residues (Arg-13, (Arg-28, (Arg-36, Lys-41, Lys-57, Lys-67, and Arg-83). These data appear to complement the CR2 binding site on gp350, which is characterized by a preponderance of negative charge. In addition to identifying the importance of charge in the formation of a CR2-gp350 complex, we also provide evidence that both SCR1 and SCR2 make contact with gp350. Specifically, two anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies, designated as monoclonal antibodies 171 and 1048 whose primary epitopes are located within SCR2, inhibit binding of wild-type CR2 to EBV gp350; with regard to SCR1, both K562 cells expressing an S15P mutation and recombinant S15P CR2 proteins exhibit diminished gp350 binding. PMID:17925391

  11. Seventeen Sxy-Dependent Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Site-Regulated Genes Are Needed for Natural Transformation in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Joshua C.; Redfield, Rosemary J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural competence is the ability of bacteria to actively take up extracellular DNA. This DNA can recombine with the host chromosome, transforming the host cell and altering its genotype. In Haemophilus influenzae, natural competence is induced by energy starvation and the depletion of nucleotide pools. This induces a 26-gene competence regulon (Sxy-dependent cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP-S] regulon) whose expression is controlled by two regulators, CRP and Sxy. The role of most of the CRP-S genes in DNA uptake and transformation is not known. We have therefore created in-frame deletions of each CRP-S gene and studied their competence phenotypes. All but one gene (ssb) could be deleted. Although none of the remaining CRP-S genes were required for growth in rich medium or survival under starvation conditions, DNA uptake and transformation were abolished or reduced in most of the mutants. Seventeen genes were absolutely required for transformation, with 14 of these genes being specifically required for the assembly and function of the type IV pilus DNA uptake machinery. Only five genes were dispensable for both competence and transformation. This is the first competence regulon for which all genes have been mutationally characterized. PMID:22821979

  12. The Synonymous Ala87 Mutation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Modifies Transcriptional Activation Through Both ERE and AP1 Sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Flouriot, Gilles; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) exerts regulatory actions through genomic mechanisms. In the classical pathway, ligand-activated ERα binds directly to DNA through estrogen response elements (ERE) located in the promoter of target genes. ERα can also exert indirect regulation of transcription via protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors such as AP-1.S everal ERα synonymous polymorphisms have been identified and efforts to understand their implications have been made. Nevertheless effects of synonymous polymorphisms are still neglected. This chapter focuses on the experimental procedure employed in order to characterize the transcriptional activity of a synonymous polymorphism of the ERα (rs746432) called Alanine 87 (Ala87). Activity of both WT and Ala87 ERα isoforms on transcriptional pathways can be analyzed in transiently transfected cells using different reporter constructs. ERα efficiency on the classical genomic pathway can be analyzed by determining its transactivation activity on an ERE-driven thymidine kinase (TK) promoter controlling the expression of the luciferase reporter gene. Transcriptional activity through the indirect genomic pathway can be analyzed by employing an AP-1 DNA response element-driven promoter also controlling the expression of luciferase reporter gene.

  13. The Synonymous Ala87 Mutation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Modifies Transcriptional Activation Through Both ERE and AP1 Sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Flouriot, Gilles; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) exerts regulatory actions through genomic mechanisms. In the classical pathway, ligand-activated ERα binds directly to DNA through estrogen response elements (ERE) located in the promoter of target genes. ERα can also exert indirect regulation of transcription via protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors such as AP-1.S everal ERα synonymous polymorphisms have been identified and efforts to understand their implications have been made. Nevertheless effects of synonymous polymorphisms are still neglected. This chapter focuses on the experimental procedure employed in order to characterize the transcriptional activity of a synonymous polymorphism of the ERα (rs746432) called Alanine 87 (Ala87). Activity of both WT and Ala87 ERα isoforms on transcriptional pathways can be analyzed in transiently transfected cells using different reporter constructs. ERα efficiency on the classical genomic pathway can be analyzed by determining its transactivation activity on an ERE-driven thymidine kinase (TK) promoter controlling the expression of the luciferase reporter gene. Transcriptional activity through the indirect genomic pathway can be analyzed by employing an AP-1 DNA response element-driven promoter also controlling the expression of luciferase reporter gene. PMID:26585143

  14. Evaluation of potential implication of membrane estrogen binding sites on ERE-dependent transcriptional activity and intracellular estrogen receptor-alpha regulation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye Sook; Leclercq, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The potential involvement of membrane estrogen binding sites in the induction of ERE-dependent transcriptional activity as well as in the regulation of intracellular estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) level under estradiol (E2) stimulation was investigated. Our approach relied upon the use of two DCC-treated E2-BSA (bovine serum albumin) solutions (E2-6-BSA and E2-17-BSA). The absence of detectable free E2 in these solutions was established. Both E2-BSA conjugates led to a transient dose-dependent stimulation of the expression of ERE-luciferase (LUC) reporter gene in MVLN cells (MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a pVit-tk-LUC reporter plasmid), a property not recorded with free E2, which maintained enhanced transcriptional activity during the whole experiment. A very low concentration of E2 (10 pM) synergistically acted with E2-BSA conjugates. Hence, ERE-dependent transcriptional activity induced by these conjugates appeared to result from their known interactions with membrane estrogen binding sites. Anti-estrogens (AEs: 4-OH-TAM and RU 58,668), which antagonize genomic ER responses, abrogated the luciferase activity induced by E2-BSA conjugates, confirming a potential relationship between membrane-related signals and intracellular ER. Moreover, induction of luciferase was recorded when the cells were exposed to IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) and cyclic nucleotides (cAMP/cGMP), suggesting the implication of the latter in the signal transduction pathway leading to the expression of the reporter gene. Growth factors (IGF-I, EGF and TGF-alpha) also slightly stimulated luciferase and synergistically acted with 10 pM E2, or 1 microM E2-BSA conjugates, in agreement with the concept of a cross-talk between steroids and peptides acting on the cell membrane. Remarkably, E2-BSA conjugates, IBMX and all investigated growth factors failed to down-regulate intracellular ER in MCF-7 cells, indicating the need for a direct intracellular interaction of the ligand with the

  15. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  16. Mapping general anesthetic binding site(s) in human α1β3 γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors with [³H]TDBzl-etomidate, a photoreactive etomidate analogue.

    PubMed

    Chiara, David C; Dostalova, Zuzana; Jayakar, Selwyn S; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Miller, Keith W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2012-01-31

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is a target for general anesthetics of diverse chemical structures, which act as positive allosteric modulators at clinical doses. Previously, in a heterogeneous mixture of GABA(A)Rs purified from bovine brain, [³H]azietomidate photolabeling of αMet-236 and βMet-286 in the αM1 and βM3 transmembrane helices identified an etomidate binding site in the GABA(A)R transmembrane domain at the interface between the β and α subunits [Li, G. D., et.al. (2006) J. Neurosci. 26, 11599-11605]. To further define GABA(A)R etomidate binding sites, we now use [³H]TDBzl-etomidate, an aryl diazirine with broader amino acid side chain reactivity than azietomidate, to photolabel purified human FLAG-α1β3 GABA(A)Rs and more extensively identify photolabeled GABA(A)R amino acids. [³H]TDBzl-etomidate photolabeled in an etomidate-inhibitable manner β3Val-290, in the β3M3 transmembrane helix, as well as α1Met-236 in α1M1, a residue photolabeled by [³H]azietomidate, while no photolabeling of amino acids in the αM2 and βM2 helices that also border the etomidate binding site was detected. The location of these photolabeled amino acids in GABA(A)R homology models derived from the recently determined structures of prokaryote (GLIC) or invertebrate (GluCl) homologues and the results of computational docking studies predict the orientation of [³H]TDBzl-etomidate bound in that site and the other amino acids contributing to this GABA(A)R intersubunit etomidate binding site. Etomidate-inhibitable photolabeling of β3Met-227 in βM1 by [³H]TDBzl-etomidate and [³H]azietomidate also provides evidence of a homologous etomidate binding site at the β3-β3 subunit interface in the α1β3 GABA(A)R.

  17. Interaction of SR 33557 with skeletal muscle calcium channel blocker receptors in the baboon: characterization of its binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sol-Rolland, J.; Joseph, M.; Rinaldi-Carmona, M. )

    1991-05-01

    A procedure for the isolation of primate skeletal microsomal membranes was initiated. Membranes exhibited specific enzymatic markers such as 5'-nucleotidase, Ca{sup 2}{sup +},Mg({sup 2}{sup +})-adenosine triphosphatase and an ATP-dependent calcium uptake. Baboon skeletal microsomes bound specifically with high-affinity potent Ca{sup 2}{sup +} channel blockers such as dihydropyridine, phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine derivatives. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding assays with ({sup 3}H)(+)-PN 200-110, ({sup 3}H)(-)-desmethoxyverapamil (( {sup 3}H)(-)-D888) and ({sup 3}H)-d-cis-dilitiazem were consistent with a single class of binding sites for the three radioligands. The pharmacological profile of SR 33557, an original compound with calcium antagonist properties, was investigated using radioligand binding studies. SR 33557 totally inhibited the specific binding of the three main classes of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} channel effectors and interacted allosterically with them. In addition, SR 33557 bound with high affinity to a homogeneous population of binding sites in baboon skeletal muscle.

  18. Human health risk assessment: models for predicting the effective exposure duration of on-site receptors exposed to contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Renato; Berardi, Simona; Verginelli, Iason

    2010-09-15

    Clean-up of contaminated sites is usually based on a risk-based approach for the definition of the remediation goals, which relies on the well known ASTM-RBCA standard procedure. In this procedure, migration of contaminants is described through simple analytical models and the source contaminants' concentration is supposed to be constant throughout the entire exposure period, i.e. 25-30 years. The latter assumption may often result over-protective of human health, leading to unrealistically low remediation goals. The aim of this work is to propose an alternative model taking in account the source depletion, while keeping the original simplicity and analytical form of the ASTM-RBCA approach. The results obtained by the application of this model are compared with those provided by the traditional ASTM-RBCA approach, by a model based on the source depletion algorithm of the RBCA ToolKit software and by a numerical model, allowing to assess its feasibility for inclusion in risk analysis procedures. The results discussed in this work are limited to on-site exposure to contaminated water by ingestion, but the approach proposed can be extended to other exposure pathways.

  19. Expression of Somatostatin Receptor Type 2A and PTEN in Neuroendocrine Neoplasms Is Associated with Tumor Grade but Not with Site of Origin.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideo; Matsuda, Katsuya; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Miura, Shiro; Ueki, Nozomi; Kinoshita, Akira; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ito, Masahiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are derived from endocrine cells in various organs and share common morphological features. This study aimed to clarify whether NENs of different organs are comparable at the molecular pathologic level. We retrospectively collected 99 cases of NENs from gastro-entero-pancreatic, lung, and other organs and reclassified these according to identical criteria. Grade, site, and molecular expression profile including NE markers, Ki-67, p53, somatostatin receptor type 2A (SSTR2A), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were compared. PTEN immunoreactivity was also compared with genomic copy number by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). No significant differences were observed in the immunoreactivities of NE markers, p53, SSTR2A, or PTEN expression in NENs between the different organ sites. PTEN and p53 functional inactivation along with the loss of membranous SSTR2A expression appeared to be commonly involved in high-grade NEN. FISH results were significantly correlated with the level of PTEN immunoreactivity and with the findings of ddPCR analyses. The demonstration that these tumors are comparable at the molecular level will likely contribute to the broadening of therapeutic options such as the use of somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors against NENs regardless of the affected organ, whereas molecular characterization of tumor grade will be useful for determining treatment strategy. PMID:27256098

  20. Receptor Binding Sites for Substance P, but not Substance K or Neuromedin K, are Expressed in High Concentrations by Arterioles, Venules, and Lymph Nodules in Surgical Specimens Obtained from Patients with Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantyh, Christopher R.; Gates, Troy S.; Zimmerman, Robert P.; Welton, Mark L.; Passaro, Edward P.; Vigna, Steven R.; Maggio, John E.; Kruger, Lawrence; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    1988-05-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that tachykinin neuropeptides [substance P (SP), substance K (SK), and neuromedin K (NK)] play a role in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses. To test this hypothesis in a human inflammatory disease, quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to examine possible abnormalities in tachykinin binding sites in surgical specimens from patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Surgical specimens of colon were obtained from patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 4) and Crohn disease (n = 4). Normal tissue was obtained from uninvolved areas of extensive resections for carcinoma (n = 6). In all cases, specimens were obtained <5 min after removal to minimize influences associated with degradation artifacts and were processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography by using 125I-labeled Bolton--Hunter conjugates of NK, SK, and SP. In the normal colon a low concentration of SP receptor binding sites is expressed by submucosal arterioles and venules and a moderate concentration is expressed by the external circular muscle, whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed in low concentrations by the external circular and longitudinal muscle. In contrast, specific NK binding sites were not observed in any area of the human colon. In colon tissue obtained from ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease patients, however, very high concentrations of SP receptor binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules located in the submucosa, muscularis mucosa, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and serosa. In addition, very high concentrations of SP receptor binding sites are expressed within the germinal center of lymph nodules, whereas the concentrations of SP and SK binding sites expressed by the external muscle layers are not altered significantly. These results demonstrate that receptor binding sites for SP, but not SK or NK, are ectopically expressed in high concentrations (1000-2000 times normal) by cells

  1. Site-specific labeling of the type 1 ryanodine receptor using biarsenical fluorophores targeted to engineered tetracysteine motifs.

    PubMed

    Fessenden, James D; Mahalingam, Mohana

    2013-01-01

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is an intracellular Ca(2+) release channel that mediates skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. While the overall shape of RyR1 has been elucidated using cryo electron microscopic reconstructions, fine structural details remain elusive. To better understand the structure of RyR1, we have previously used a cell-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method using a fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) donor and a fluorescent acceptor, Cy3NTA that binds specifically to short poly-histidine 'tags' engineered into RyR1. However, the need to permeabilize cells to allow Cy3NTA entry as well as the noncovalent binding of Cy3NTA to the His tag limits future applications of this technique for studying conformational changes of the RyR. To overcome these problems, we used a dodecapeptide sequence containing a tetracysteine (Tc) motif to target the biarsenical fluorophores, FlAsH and ReAsH to RyR1. These compounds freely cross intact cell membranes where they then bind covalently to the tetracysteine motif. First, we used this system to conduct FRET measurements in intact cells by fusing a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) FRET donor to the N-terminus of RyR1 and then targeting the FRET acceptor, ReAsH to an adjacent Tc tag. Moderate energy transfer (∼33%) was observed whereas ReAsH incubation of a YFPRyR1 fusion protein lacking the Tc tag resulted in no detectable FRET. We also developed a FRET-based system that did not require RyR fluorescent protein fusions by labeling N-terminal Tc-tagged RyR1 with FlAsH, a FRET donor and then targeting the FRET acceptor Cy3NTA to an adjacent decahistidine (His10) tag. A high degree of energy transfer (∼66%) indicated proper binding of both compounds to these unique recognition sequences in RyR1. Thus, these two systems should provide unprecedented flexibility in future FRET-based structural determinations of RyR1.

  2. Multiple Propofol-binding Sites in a γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor (GABAAR) Identified Using a Photoreactive Propofol Analog*♦

    PubMed Central

    Jayakar, Selwyn S.; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Chiara, David C.; Dostalova, Zuzana; Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Bruzik, Karol S.; Dailey, William P.; Miller, Keith W.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Propofol acts as a positive allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs), an interaction necessary for its anesthetic potency in vivo as a general anesthetic. Identifying the location of propofol-binding sites is necessary to understand its mechanism of GABAAR modulation. [3H]2-(3-Methyl-3H-diaziren-3-yl)ethyl 1-(phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (azietomidate) and R-[3H]5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (mTFD-MPAB), photoreactive analogs of 2-ethyl 1-(phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (etomidate) and mephobarbital, respectively, have identified two homologous but pharmacologically distinct classes of intersubunit-binding sites for general anesthetics in the GABAAR transmembrane domain. Here, we use a photoreactive analog of propofol (2-isopropyl-5-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]phenol ([3H]AziPm)) to identify propofol-binding sites in heterologously expressed human α1β3 GABAARs. Propofol, AziPm, etomidate, and R-mTFD-MPAB each inhibited [3H]AziPm photoincorporation into GABAAR subunits maximally by ∼50%. When the amino acids photolabeled by [3H]AziPm were identified by protein microsequencing, we found propofol-inhibitable photolabeling of amino acids in the β3-α1 subunit interface (β3Met-286 in β3M3 and α1Met-236 in α1M1), previously photolabeled by [3H]azietomidate, and α1Ile-239, located one helical turn below α1Met-236. There was also propofol-inhibitable [3H]AziPm photolabeling of β3Met-227 in βM1, the amino acid in the α1-β3 subunit interface photolabeled by R-[3H]mTFD-MPAB. The propofol-inhibitable [3H]AziPm photolabeling in the GABAAR β3 subunit in conjunction with the concentration dependence of inhibition of that photolabeling by etomidate or R-mTFD-MPAB also establish that each anesthetic binds to the homologous site at the β3-β3 subunit interface. These results establish that AziPm as well as propofol bind to the homologous intersubunit sites in the

  3. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  4. GLYX-13, a NMDA receptor glycine-site functional partial agonist, induces antidepressant-like effects without ketamine-like side effects.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Nicholson, Katherine L; Balster, Robert L; Leander, J David; Stanton, Patric K; Gross, Amanda L; Kroes, Roger A; Moskal, Joseph R

    2013-04-01

    Recent human clinical studies with the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine have revealed profound and long-lasting antidepressant effects with rapid onset in several clinical trials, but antidepressant effects were preceded by dissociative side effects. Here we show that GLYX-13, a novel NMDAR glycine-site functional partial agonist, produces an antidepressant-like effect in the Porsolt, novelty induced hypophagia, and learned helplessness tests in rats without exhibiting substance abuse-related, gating, and sedative side effects of ketamine in the drug discrimination, conditioned place preference, pre-pulse inhibition and open-field tests. Like ketamine, the GLYX-13-induced antidepressant-like effects required AMPA/kainate receptor activation, as evidenced by the ability of NBQX to abolish the antidepressant-like effect. Both GLYX-13 and ketamine persistently (24 h) enhanced the induction of long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission and the magnitude of NMDAR-NR2B conductance at rat Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in vitro. Cell surface biotinylation studies showed that both GLYX-13 and ketamine led to increases in both NR2B and GluR1 protein levels, as measured by Western analysis, whereas no changes were seen in mRNA expression (microarray and qRT-PCR). GLYX-13, unlike ketamine, produced its antidepressant-like effect when injected directly into the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). These results suggest that GLYX-13 produces an antidepressant-like effect without the side effects seen with ketamine at least in part by directly modulating NR2B-containing NMDARs in the MPFC. Furthermore, the enhancement of 'metaplasticity' by both GLYX-13 and ketamine may help explain the long-lasting antidepressant effects of these NMDAR modulators. GLYX-13 is currently in a Phase II clinical development program for treatment-resistant depression. PMID:23303054

  5. Allosteric uncoupling and up-regulation of benzodiazepine and GABA recognition sites following chronic diazepam treatment of HEK 293 cells stably transfected with alpha1beta2gamma2S subunits of GABA (A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Pericić, Danka; Strac, Dubravka Svob; Jembrek, Maja Jazvinsćak; Vlainić, Josipa

    2007-05-01

    Benzodiazepines are drugs known to produce tolerance and dependence and also to be abused and co-abused. The aim of this study was to further explore the mechanisms that underlie adaptive changes in GABA(A) receptors following prolonged exposure to these drugs. Human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells stably expressing recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2s GABA(A) receptors were exposed for 72 h to a high concentration of diazepam (50 microM) in the absence or presence of other drugs. Radioligand binding studies were used to determine the parameters of [(3)H]flunitrazepam and [(3)H]muscimol binding sites and allosteric interactions between these sites. Prolonged treatment with diazepam increased the maximum number (B (max)) of [(3)H]flunitrazepam and [(3)H]muscimol binding sites in the membranes, and of [(3)H]muscimol binding sites on the surface of HEK 293 cells. There was no change in the affinity (K (d)) of binding sites. The diazepam-induced increase in the B (max) value of [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding sites was reduced by two GABA(A) receptor antagonists, gabazine (1 and 10 microM) and picrotoxin (100 microM). In addition, it was reduced by cycloheximide (5 microg/ml), a protein synthesis inhibitor, and actinomycin D (7.5 microg/ml), an RNA synthesis inhibitor. Flumazenil (5 microM), the antagonist of benzodiazepine binding sites, also up-regulated [(3)H]flunitrazepam recognition sites. Simultaneous treatment with diazepam and flumazenil failed to produce an additive up-regulation. GABA (1 nM - 1 mM)-induced potentiation of [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding to membranes obtained from diazepam (50 microM)-pretreated cells was markedly reduced, suggesting functional uncoupling between GABA and benzodiazepine binding sites. The results suggest that diazepam up-regulated benzodiazepine binding sites on stably expressed GABA(A) receptors by stimulating their synthesis at both the transcriptional and translational levels. A comparable increase of [(3)H]muscimol binding sites

  6. The Drosophila nuclear receptors FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta compete as monomers for binding to a site in the fushi tarazu gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, C K; Ueda, H; Petkovich, M

    1994-01-01

    The striped pattern of fushi tarazu (ftz) expression found in the blastoderm of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo is generated largely through complex interactions between multiple transcription factors that bind to the zebra element of the ftz gene. A motif in the zebra element, the FTZ-F1 recognition element (F1RE), has been shown to bind a transcription factor, FTZ-F1 alpha, that is a member of the nuclear receptor family. We recently identified a second, related member of this family, FTZ-F1 beta, that also binds to this motif. To investigate the possibility that FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta coregulate ftz transcription through the F1RE, we have studied the DNA binding properties of FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta. We demonstrate that recombinant FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta proteins produce similar in vitro DNase I footprint patterns on a 14-nucleotide region of the zebra element and bind to this site with similar affinities and sequence specificities. Using wild-type and N-terminally truncated receptors, we have determined that FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta both bind as monomers to the 9-bp F1RE in the zebra element, as well as to an imperfect inverted F1RE repeat present in the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene. A polyclonal antibody raised against FTZ-F1 beta identifies a predominant F1RE-binding component in embryonic nuclear extracts. Although FTZ-F1 alpha is also present in these extracts, FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta do not appear to form heterodimers with each other. Cotransfection assays in mammalian cell culture indicate that both receptors contribute to the net transcriptional activity of a reporter gene through their direct interaction with the F1RE. These data suggest that FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta likely coregulate common target genes by competition for binding to a 9-bp recognition element. Images PMID:8164672

  7. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS - diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2013-04-01

    Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb) were obtained by time (1 h) and size (PM2.5 particulate matter < 2.5 μm) resolved aerosol samples analysed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) measurements. In the Marie Curie European Union framework of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies), the approach used is the simultaneous sampling at two monitoring sites in Barcelona (Spain) during September-October 2010: an urban background site (UB) and a street canyon traffic road site (RS). Elements related to primary non-exhaust traffic emission (Fe, Cu), dust resuspension (Ca) and anthropogenic Cl were found enhanced at the RS, whereas industrial related trace metals (Zn, Pb, Mn) were found at higher concentrations at the more ventilated UB site. When receptor modelling was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF), nine different aerosol sources were identified at both sites: three types of regional aerosols (regional sulphate (S) - 27%, biomass burning (K) - 5%, sea salt (Na-Mg) - 17%), three types of dust aerosols (soil dust (Al-Ti) - 17%, urban crustal dust (Ca) - 6%, and primary traffic non-exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu) - 7%), and three types of industrial aerosol plumes-like events (shipping oil combustion (V-Ni) - 17%, industrial smelters (Zn-Mn) - 3%, and industrial combustion (Pb-Cl) - 5%, percentages presented are average source contributions to the total elemental mass measured). The validity of the PMF solution of the PIXE data is supported by very good correlations with external single particle mass spectrometry measurements. Some important conclusions can be drawn about the PM2.5 mass fraction simultaneously measured at the UB and RS sites: (1) the regional aerosol sources impact both

  8. One-year observations of size distribution characteristics of major aerosol constituents at a coastal receptor site in Hong Kong - Part 1: Inorganic ions and oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Huang, X. H. H.; Yu, J. Z.

    2014-09-01

    Size distribution data of major aerosol constituents are essential in source apportioning of visibility degradation, testing and verification of air quality models incorporating aerosols. We report here 1-year observations of mass size distributions of major inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and oxalate at a coastal suburban receptor site in Hong Kong, China. A total of 43 sets of size-segregated samples in the size range of 0.056-18 μm were collected from March 2011 to February 2012. The size distributions of sulfate, ammonium, potassium and oxalate were characterized by a dominant droplet mode with a mass mean aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) in the range of ~ 0.7-0.9 μm. Oxalate had a slightly larger MMAD than sulfate on days with temperatures above 22 °C as a result of the process of volatilization and repartitioning. Nitrate was mostly dominated by the coarse mode but enhanced presence in fine mode was detected on winter days with lower temperature and lower concentrations of sea salt and soil particles. This data set reveals an inversely proportional relationship between the fraction of nitrate in the fine mode and product of the sum of sodium and calcium in equivalent concentrations and the dissociation constant of ammonium nitrate (i.e., (1/([Na+] + 2[Ca2+]) × (1/Ke')) when Pn_fine is significant (> 10%). The seasonal variation observed for sea salt aerosol abundance, with lower values in summer and winter, is possibly linked with the lower marine salinities in these two seasons. Positive matrix factorization was applied to estimate the relative contributions of local formation and transport to the observed ambient sulfate level through the use of the combined data sets of size-segregated sulfate and select gaseous air pollutants. On average, the regional/super-regional transport of air pollutants was the dominant source at this receptor site, especially on high-sulfate days while local formation

  9. One-year observations of size distribution characteristics of major aerosol constituents at a coastal receptor site in Hong Kong - Part 1: Inorganic ions and oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Huang, X. H. H.; Yu, J. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Size distribution data of major aerosol constituents are essential in source apportioning of visibility degradation, testing and verification of air quality models incorporating aerosols. We report here one-year observations of mass size distributions of major inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and oxalate at a coastal suburban receptor site in Hong Kong, China. A total of 43 sets of size segregated samples in the size range of 0.056-18 μm were collected from March 2011 to February 2012. The size distributions of sulfate, ammonium, potassium and oxalate were characterized by a dominant droplet mode with a mass mean aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) in the range of ~0.7-0.9 μm. Oxalate had a slightly larger MMAD than sulfate on days with temperatures above 22 °C as a result of the process of volatilization and repartitioning. Nitrate was mostly dominated by the coarse mode but enhanced presence in fine mode was detected on winter days with lower temperature and lower concentrations of sea salt and soil particles. This data set reveals an inversely proportional relationship between the fraction of nitrate in the fine mode and product of the sum of sodium and calcium in equivalent concentrations and the dissociation constant of ammonium nitrate (i.e., (1/[Na+] + 2[Ca2+]) × (1/Ke')). The seasonal variation observed for sea salt aerosol abundance, with lower values in summer and winter, is possibly linked with the lower marine salinities in these two seasons. Positive matrix factorization was applied to estimate the relative contributions of local formation and transport to the observed ambient sulfate level through the use of the combined datasets of size-segregated sulfate and select gaseous air pollutants. On average, the regional/super-regional transport of air pollutants was the dominant source at this receptor site, especially on high sulfate days, while local formation processes contributed approximately

  10. Identification of a Ser/Thr cluster in the C-terminal domain of the human prostaglandin receptor EP4 that is essential for agonist-induced beta-arrestin1 recruitment but differs from the apparent principal phosphorylation site.

    PubMed Central

    Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Hermosilla, Ricardo; Rehwald, Mathias; Rönnstrand, Lars; Schülein, Ralf; Wernstedt, Christer; Püschel, Gerhard Paul

    2004-01-01

    hEP4-R (human prostaglandin E2 receptor, subtype EP4) is a G(s)-linked heterotrimeric GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor). It undergoes agonist-induced desensitization and internalization that depend on the presence of its C-terminal domain. Desensitization and internalization of GPCRs are often linked to agonist-induced beta-arrestin complex formation, which is stabilized by phosphorylation. Subsequently beta-arrestin uncouples the receptor from its G-protein and links it to the endocytotic machinery. The C-terminal domain of hEP4-R contains 38 Ser/Thr residues that represent potential phosphorylation sites. The present study aimed to analyse the relevance of these Ser/Thr residues for agonist-induced phosphorylation, interaction with beta-arrestin and internalization. In response to agonist treatment, hEP4-R was phosphorylated. By analysis of proteolytic phosphopeptides of the wild-type receptor and mutants in which groups of Ser/Thr residues had been replaced by Ala, the principal phosphorylation site was mapped to a Ser/Thr-containing region comprising residues 370-382, the presence of which was necessary and sufficient to obtain full agonist-induced phosphorylation. A cluster of Ser/Thr residues (Ser-389-Ser-390-Thr-391-Ser-392) distal to this site, but not the principal phosphorylation site, was essential to allow agonist-induced recruitment of beta-arrestin1. However, phosphorylation greatly enhanced the stability of the beta-arrestin1-receptor complexes. For maximal agonist-induced internalization, phosphorylation of the principal phosphorylation site was not required, but both beta-arrestin1 recruitment and the presence of Ser/Thr residues in the distal half of the C-terminal domain were necessary. PMID:14709160

  11. Influence of the Southeast Asian biomass burnings on the atmospheric persistent organic pollutants observed at near sources and receptor site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shun-Shiang; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Wang, Lin-Chi; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    2013-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as PCDD/Fs, PCBs, PBDD/Fs, PBBs and PBDEs are bio-accumulative, toxic, and susceptible to long-range transport (LRT). This study is the first that comprehensively discusses the long-range atmospheric transport behavior of these five groups of POPs. The main goal is to investigate the atmospheric characteristics of these POPs at the biomass burning sites of Chiang Mai in Thailand, and Da Nang in Vietnam, as well as the influence of the Southeast Asian biomass burnings on the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (LABS) in Taiwan. Biomass burning in Southeast Asia is usually carried to remove the residues of agricultural activities. The ambient air in Da Nang seems to be more seriously affected by the local biomass burnings than that in Chiang Mai. The elevated atmospheric brominated POP (PBDD/Fs, PBBs and PBDEs) concentrations in Da Nang were attributed to the biomass burning and viewed as mostly unrelated to the local use of brominated flame retardants. In the spring of 2010, the mean atmospheric concentrations in LABS during the first and second Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) were 0.00428 and 0.00232 pg I-TEQ Nm-3 for PCDD/Fs, 0.000311 and 0.000282 pg WHO-TEQ m-3 for PCBs, 0.000379 and 0.000449 pg TEQ Nm-3 for total PBDD/Fs, 0.0208 and 0.0163 pg Nm-3 for total PBBs, and 109 and 18.2 pg Nm-3 for total PBDEs, respectively. These values represent the above concentrations due to the Southeast Asian biomass burnings. The affected atmospheric POP concentrations at the LABS were still at least one order lower than those in other atmospheric environments, except for the PBDE concentrations during the first IOP (109 pg Nm-3), which was surprisingly higher than those in Taiwanese metal complex areas (93.9 pg Nm-3) and urban areas (34.7 pg Nm-3). Atmospheric POP concentrations do not seem to dramatically decrease during long-range transport, and the reasons for this need to be further investigated.

  12. Identification of a low affinity mannose 6-phosphate-binding site in domain 5 of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sreelatha T; Chai, Wengang; Childs, Robert A; Page, Jimmy D; Feizi, Ten; Dahms, Nancy M

    2004-09-10

    The 300-kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) and the 46-kDa cation-dependent MPR (CD-MPR) are type I integral membrane glycoproteins that play a critical role in the intracellular delivery of newly synthesized mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-containing acid hydrolases to the lysosome. The extracytoplasmic region of the CI-MPR contains 15 contiguous domains, and the two high affinity ( approximately 1 nm) Man-6-P-binding sites have been mapped to domains 1-3 and 9, with essential residues localized to domains 3 and 9. Domain 5 of the CI-MPR exhibits significant sequence homology to domains 3 and 9 as well as to the CD-MPR. A structure-based sequence alignment was performed that predicts that domain 5 contains the four conserved key residues (Gln, Arg, Glu, and Tyr) identified as essential for carbohydrate recognition by the CD-MPR and domains 3 and 9 of the CI-MPR, but lacks two cysteine residues predicted to form a disulfide bond within the binding pocket. To determine whether domain 5 harbors a carbohydrate-binding site, a construct that encodes domain 5 alone (Dom5His) was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Microarray analysis using 30 different oligosaccharides demonstrated that Dom5His bound specifically to a Man-6-P-containing oligosaccharide (pentamannosyl 6-phosphate). Frontal affinity chromatography showed that the affinity of Dom5His for Man-6-P was approximately 300-fold lower (K(i) = 5.3 mm) than that observed for domains 1-3 and 9. The interaction affinity for the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase was also much lower (K(d) = 54 microm) as determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the CI-MPR contains a third Man-6-P recognition site that is located in domain 5 and that exhibits lower affinity than the carbohydrate-binding sites present in domains 1-3 and 9. PMID:15252023

  13. P2X-mediated AMPA receptor internalization and synaptic depression is controlled by two CaMKII phosphorylation sites on GluA1 in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Compans, Benjamin; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory synapses can be induced either by synaptic release of glutamate or the release of gliotransmitters such as ATP. Recently, we showed that postsynaptic P2X2 receptors activated by ATP released from astrocytes downregulate synaptic AMPAR, providing a novel mechanism by which glial cells modulate synaptic activity. ATP- and lNMDA-induced depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are additive, suggesting distinct molecular pathways. AMPARs are homo-or hetero-tetramers composed of GluA1-A4. Here, we first show that P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition is dependent on the subunit composition of AMPAR. GluA3 homomers are insensitive and their presence in heteromers alters P2X-mediated inhibition. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the two CaMKII phosphorylation sites S567 and S831 located in the cytoplasmic Loop1 and C-terminal tail of GluA1 subunits, respectively, are critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition recorded from co-expressing Xenopus oocytes and removal of surface AMPAR at synapses of hippocampal neurons imaged by the super-resolution dSTORM technique. Finally, using phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, we show that P2X-induced depression in hippocampal slices produces a dephosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit at S567, contrary to NMDAR-mediated LTD. These findings indicate that GluA1 phosphorylation of S567 and S831 is critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR internalization and ATP-driven synaptic depression. PMID:27624155

  14. Renal responses produced by microinjection of the kappa opioid receptor agonist, U50-488H, into sites within the rat lamina terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Cynthia; Fortepiani, Lourdes; Nguyen, Tin; Rangel, Yolanda; Strong, Randy; Gottlieb, Helmut B

    2015-01-01

    Activation of central kappa opioid receptors (KOR) has been demonstrated to produce marked free water diuresis with a concurrent increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). This study investigated the cardiovascular (CV) and renal effects evoked by central activation of KOR in two lamina terminalis sites, the median preoptic area (MPA) and anterolateral division of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST). Rats anesthetized with urethane alpha-chloralose were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, heart rate, RSNA, and urine output (V). Rats were infused with isotonic saline (25 μL/min) and urine samples were collected during two 10-min control periods and six consecutive 10-min experimental periods following microinjection of vehicle, U50-448H (U50, KOR agonist) alone or norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, KOR antagonist) plus U50. Microinjection of U50 into the BST increased V (peak at 30 min, 84.8 ± 12.9 μL/min) as compared to its respective control, vehicle, or nor-BNI plus U50. This diuretic effect occurred without any significant changes in CV parameters, RSNA, or urinary sodium excretion. In contrast, U50 injection into the MPA significantly increased RSNA (peak at 20 mins: 129 ± 9.9) without increasing the other parameters. This study demonstrated novel sites through which activation of KOR selectively increases V and RSNA. The ability of U50 to increase V without affecting sodium excretion and RSNA raises the possibility that LT neurons could be an important substrate through which drugs targeting KOR could selectively facilitate water excretion in sodium-retaining diseases such as congestive heart failure. PMID:26038693

  15. Characterization of the N-Acetyl-5-neuraminic Acid-binding Site of the Extracytoplasmic Solute Receptor (SiaP) of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strain 2019

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Jason W.; Coussens, Nathan P.; Allen, Simon; Houtman, Jon C.D.; Turner, Keith H.; Zaleski, Anthony; Ramaswamy, S.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Apicella, Michael A.

    2012-11-14

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic human pathogen causing otitis media in children and chronic bronchitis and pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The outer membrane of nontypeable H. influenzae is dominated by lipooligosaccharides (LOS), many of which incorporate sialic acid as a terminal nonreducing sugar. Sialic acid has been demonstrated to be an important factor in the survival of the bacteria within the host environment. H. influenzae is incapable of synthesizing sialic acid and is dependent on scavenging free sialic acid from the host environment. To achieve this, H. influenzae utilizes a tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter. In this study, we characterize the binding site of the extracytoplasmic solute receptor (SiaP) from nontypeable H. influenzae strain 2019. A crystal structure of N-acetyl-5-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-bound SiaP was determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Thermodynamic characterization of Neu5Ac binding shows this interaction is enthalpically driven with a substantial unfavorable contribution from entropy. This is expected because the binding of SiaP to Neu5Ac is mediated by numerous hydrogen bonds and has several buried water molecules. Point mutations targeting specific amino acids were introduced in the putative binding site. Complementation with the mutated siaP constructs resulted either in full, partial, or no complementation, depending on the role of specific residues. Mass spectrometry analysis of the O-deacylated LOS of the R127K point mutation confirmed the observation of reduced incorporation of Neu5Ac into the LOS. The decreased ability of H. influenzae to import sialic acid had negative effects on resistance to complement-mediated killing and viability of biofilms in vitro, confirming the importance of sialic acid transport to the bacterium.

  16. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H. )

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas.

  17. Renal responses produced by microinjection of the kappa opioid receptor agonist, U50-488H, into sites within the rat lamina terminalis.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Cynthia; Fortepiani, Lourdes; Nguyen, Tin; Rangel, Yolanda; Strong, Randy; Gottlieb, Helmut B

    2015-03-01

    Activation of central kappa opioid receptors (KOR) has been demonstrated to produce marked free water diuresis with a concurrent increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). This study investigated the cardiovascular (CV) and renal effects evoked by central activation of KOR in two lamina terminalis sites, the median preoptic area (MPA) and anterolateral division of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST). Rats anesthetized with urethane alpha-chloralose were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, heart rate, RSNA, and urine output (V). Rats were infused with isotonic saline (25 μL/min) and urine samples were collected during two 10-min control periods and six consecutive 10-min experimental periods following microinjection of vehicle, U50-448H (U50, KOR agonist) alone or norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, KOR antagonist) plus U50. Microinjection of U50 into the BST increased V (peak at 30 min, 84.8 ± 12.9 μL/min) as compared to its respective control, vehicle, or nor-BNI plus U50. This diuretic effect occurred without any significant changes in CV parameters, RSNA, or urinary sodium excretion. In contrast, U50 injection into the MPA significantly increased RSNA (peak at 20 mins: 129 ± 9.9) without increasing the other parameters. This study demonstrated novel sites through which activation of KOR selectively increases V and RSNA. The ability of U50 to increase V without affecting sodium excretion and RSNA raises the possibility that LT neurons could be an important substrate through which drugs targeting KOR could selectively facilitate water excretion in sodium-retaining diseases such as congestive heart failure. PMID:26038693

  18. High-Resolution Longitudinal Study of HIV-1 Env Vaccine-Elicited B Cell Responses to the Virus Primary Receptor Binding Site Reveals Affinity Maturation and Clonal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Sundling, Christopher; Wilson, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Yajing; Dai, Kaifan; Phad, Ganesh E; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Yongli; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing

    2016-05-01

    Because of the genetic variability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), the elicitation of neutralizing Abs to conserved neutralization determinants including the primary receptor binding site, CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development. To gain insight into the evolution of Env-elicited Ab responses, we used single B cell analysis to interrogate the memory B cell Ig repertoires from two rhesus macaques after five serial immunizations with Env/adjuvant. We observed that the CD4bs-specific repertoire displayed unique features in the third CDR of Ig H chains with minor alterations along the immunization course. Progressive affinity maturation occurred as evidenced by elevated levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in Ab sequences isolated at the late immunization time point compared with the early time point. Abs with higher SHM were associated with increased binding affinity and virus neutralization capacity. Moreover, a notable portion of the CD4bs-specific repertoire was maintained between early and late immunization time points, suggesting that persistent clonal lineages were induced by Env vaccination. Furthermore, we found that the predominant persistent CD4bs-specific clonal lineages had larger population sizes and higher affinities than that from the rest of the repertoires, underscoring the critical role of Ag affinity selection in Ab maturation and clonal expansion. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the accumulation of SHM in both framework regions and CDRs contributed to the clonal affinity and antigenicity evolution. Our longitudinal study provides high-resolution understanding of the dynamically evolving CD4bs-specific B cell response after Env immunization in primates. PMID:27001953

  19. P2X-mediated AMPA receptor internalization and synaptic depression is controlled by two CaMKII phosphorylation sites on GluA1 in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Compans, Benjamin; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory synapses can be induced either by synaptic release of glutamate or the release of gliotransmitters such as ATP. Recently, we showed that postsynaptic P2X2 receptors activated by ATP released from astrocytes downregulate synaptic AMPAR, providing a novel mechanism by which glial cells modulate synaptic activity. ATP- and lNMDA-induced depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are additive, suggesting distinct molecular pathways. AMPARs are homo-or hetero-tetramers composed of GluA1-A4. Here, we first show that P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition is dependent on the subunit composition of AMPAR. GluA3 homomers are insensitive and their presence in heteromers alters P2X-mediated inhibition. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the two CaMKII phosphorylation sites S567 and S831 located in the cytoplasmic Loop1 and C-terminal tail of GluA1 subunits, respectively, are critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition recorded from co-expressing Xenopus oocytes and removal of surface AMPAR at synapses of hippocampal neurons imaged by the super-resolution dSTORM technique. Finally, using phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, we show that P2X-induced depression in hippocampal slices produces a dephosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit at S567, contrary to NMDAR-mediated LTD. These findings indicate that GluA1 phosphorylation of S567 and S831 is critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR internalization and ATP-driven synaptic depression. PMID:27624155

  20. Differential ontogeny of alpha 1-adrenergic and cholinergic receptor sites in the atria and ventricles of the inbred Dahl hypertension-sensitive (S/JR) and -resistant (R/JR) rat.

    PubMed

    McCaughran, J A; Juno, C J; O'Malley, E

    1987-10-01

    The ontogeny of atrial and ventricular alpha 1-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor sites was investigated in inbred Dahl hypertension-sensitive (S/JR) and -resistant (R/JR) rats between 5 and 150 days of age. The density of sites in both cardiac regions was generally greater in the neonate than mature rat. A marked proliferation of sites was observed in neonatal and young adult rats that occurred in the following order: ventricular cholinoceptors----ventricular adrenoceptors----atrial cholinoceptors----atrial adrenoceptors. The density of ventricular adrenoceptors was greater in the S/JR rat than the R/JR rat at 5 days of age. At 150 days of age, the density of sites was less in the S/JR rat than the age-matched R/JR rat or the normotensive 50-day-old S/JR rat. The development of atrial adrenoceptors was similar between the strains, regardless of the blood pressure. The density of ventricular cholinergic receptors was greater in the S/JR strain at 5 and 15 days of age. However, the density of atrial cholinergic sites was consistently greater in the S/JR strain throughout development. The results of this study suggest that: (1) significant prenatal receptor development occurs in the heart; (2) receptor development may precede the functional maturation of postganglionic autonomic efferents; and (3) distinguishing differences in the regional density of alpha 1-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic binding sites are present between S/JR and R/JR rats at much earlier points in development than previously shown.

  1. A larger number of L chains (Tac) enhance the association rate of interleukin 2 to the high affinity site of the interleukin 2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The IL-2-R is composed of at least two proteins, that is, a 55-kD protein (p55, the L chain, or Tac) and a 75-kD protein (p75, the H chain, or converter). The high affinity binding of IL-2 results in the formation of the ternary complex consisting of IL-2, and the L and H chains. To distinguish the affinity conversion model and the binary complex model we have carried out kinetic studies on the IL-2 binding to the high affinity IL-2-R on T lymphocytes expressing various numbers of L chains and a relatively constant number of H chains. We found that expression of a larger number of L chains accelerated the association of IL-2 to the high affinity receptor. The results are not compatible with the binary complex model that assumes a fixed number of high affinity sites determined by the numbers of a limiting chain. Instead, the results are consistent with the prediction of the affinity conversion model that assumes association of IL-2 to the L chain as the first step of the ternary complex formation and they indicate that the possible role of excess L chains is to accelerate the formation of the ternary complex. The reaction rate constants calculated from the affinity conversion model were reasonably constant. PMID:3263463

  2. The oxidative potential and biological effects induced by PM10 obtained in Mexico City and at a receptor site during the MILAGRO Campaign.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Raul; Serrano, Jesús; Gómez, Virginia; de Foy, Benjamin; Miranda, Javier; Garcia-Cuellar, Claudia; Vega, Elizabeth; Vázquez-López, Inés; Molina, Luisa T; Manzano-León, Natalia; Rosas, Irma; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R

    2011-12-01

    As part of a field campaign that studied the impact of Mexico City pollution plume at the local, sub-regional and regional levels, we studied transport-related changes in PM(10) composition, oxidative potential and in vitro toxicological patterns (hemolysis, DNA degradation). We collected PM(10) in Mexico City (T(0)) and at a suburban-receptor site (T(1)), pooled according to two observed ventilation patterns (T(0) → T(1) influence and non-influence). T(0) samples contained more Cu, Zn, and carbon whereas; T(1) samples contained more of Al, Si, P, S, and K (p < 0.05). Only SO(4)(-2) increased in T(1) during the influence periods. Oxidative potential correlated with Cu/Zn content (r = 0.74; p < 0.05) but not with biological effects. T(1) PM(10) induced greater hemolysis and T(0) PM(10) induced greater DNA degradation. Influence/non-influence did not affect oxidative potential nor biological effects. Results indicate that ventilation patterns had little effect on intrinsic PM(10) composition and toxicological potential, which suggests a significant involvement of local sources. PMID:21899937

  3. The Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Membranous Web and Associated Nuclear Transport Machinery Limit Access of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Viral Replication Sites

    PubMed Central

    Neufeldt, Christopher J.; Joyce, Michael A.; Van Buuren, Nicholas; Levin, Aviad; Kirkegaard, Karla; Gale Jr., Michael; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J.; Wozniak, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-strand RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family and a major cause of liver disease worldwide. HCV replicates in the cytoplasm, and the synthesis of viral proteins induces extensive rearrangements of host cell membranes producing structures, collectively termed the membranous web (MW). The MW contains the sites of viral replication and assembly, and we have identified distinct membrane fractions derived from HCV-infected cells that contain replication and assembly complexes enriched for viral RNA and infectious virus, respectively. The complex membrane structure of the MW is thought to protect the viral genome limiting its interactions with cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and thereby preventing activation of cellular innate immune responses. Here we show that PRRs, including RIG-I and MDA5, and ribosomes are excluded from viral replication and assembly centers within the MW. Furthermore, we present evidence that components of the nuclear transport machinery regulate access of proteins to MW compartments. We show that the restricted assess of RIG-I to the MW can be overcome by the addition of a nuclear localization signal sequence, and that expression of a NLS-RIG-I construct leads to increased immune activation and the inhibition of viral replication. PMID:26863439

  4. The Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Membranous Web and Associated Nuclear Transport Machinery Limit Access of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Viral Replication Sites.

    PubMed

    Neufeldt, Christopher J; Joyce, Michael A; Van Buuren, Nicholas; Levin, Aviad; Kirkegaard, Karla; Gale, Michael; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Wozniak, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-strand RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family and a major cause of liver disease worldwide. HCV replicates in the cytoplasm, and the synthesis of viral proteins induces extensive rearrangements of host cell membranes producing structures, collectively termed the membranous web (MW). The MW contains the sites of viral replication and assembly, and we have identified distinct membrane fractions derived from HCV-infected cells that contain replication and assembly complexes enriched for viral RNA and infectious virus, respectively. The complex membrane structure of the MW is thought to protect the viral genome limiting its interactions with cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and thereby preventing activation of cellular innate immune responses. Here we show that PRRs, including RIG-I and MDA5, and ribosomes are excluded from viral replication and assembly centers within the MW. Furthermore, we present evidence that components of the nuclear transport machinery regulate access of proteins to MW compartments. We show that the restricted assess of RIG-I to the MW can be overcome by the addition of a nuclear localization signal sequence, and that expression of a NLS-RIG-I construct leads to increased immune activation and the inhibition of viral replication. PMID:26863439

  5. Characterization of the interaction constants for the binding of two unlabelled ligands to the sites of a receptor. An experimental strategy.

    PubMed

    Swillens, S; Gourdin, A; Delahaut, O

    1989-05-01

    The model describing the binding of three ligands to the sites of a receptor is theoretically studied in order to characterize the binding interaction between two unlabelled ligands. For this, the binding of a third labelled ligand, the affinity of which is dependent on the presence of the unlabelled ligands, must be measured in different conditions. This paper describes an experimental strategy leading to an accurate determination of the equilibrium parameters of the model. This strategy, which assumes that the model is compatible with the data, rests on the determination of the optimal experimental conditions, i.e. the choice of the ligand concentrations which minimize the error of the parameter estimates. For this purpose, a computer program which runs on a microcomputer under the MS-DOS operating system has been elaborated on the basis of the D-optimization criterion. This work shows that such a computer analysis is essential to the determination of the optimal experimental design, even when very simple biochemical systems are considered. PMID:2770883

  6. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a ‘holding trap’ rather than a ‘folding trap’ mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16177.001 PMID:27343349

  7. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/-S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and trazolate, and a diaryl-triazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin

  8. Rabphilin 3A retains NMDA receptors at synaptic sites through interaction with GluN2A/PSD-95 complex

    PubMed Central

    Stanic, Jennifer; Carta, Mario; Eberini, Ivano; Pelucchi, Silvia; Marcello, Elena; Genazzani, Armando A.; Racca, Claudia; Mulle, Christophe; Di Luca, Monica; Gardoni, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition and synaptic retention represent pivotal features in the physiology and pathology of excitatory synapses. Here, we identify Rabphilin 3A (Rph3A) as a new GluN2A subunit-binding partner. Rph3A is known as a synaptic vesicle-associated protein involved in the regulation of exo- and endocytosis processes at presynaptic sites. We find that Rph3A is enriched at dendritic spines. Protein–protein interaction assays reveals that Rph3A N-terminal domain interacts with GluN2A(1349–1389) as well as with PSD-95(PDZ3) domains, creating a ternary complex. Rph3A silencing in neurons reduces the surface localization of synaptic GluN2A and NMDAR currents. Moreover, perturbing GluN2A/Rph3A interaction with interfering peptides in organotypic slices or in vivo induces a decrease of the amplitude of NMDAR-mediated currents and GluN2A density at dendritic spines. In conclusion, Rph3A interacts with GluN2A and PSD-95 forming a complex that regulates NMDARs stabilization at postsynaptic membranes. PMID:26679993

  9. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a 'holding trap' rather than a 'folding trap' mechanism. PMID:27343349

  10. CONTAMINANT INTERACTIONS WITH STEROID RECEPTORS: EVIDENCE FOR RECEPTOR BINDING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid receptors are important determinants of endocrine disrupter consequences. As the most frequently proposed mechanism of endocrine-disrupting contaminant (EDC) action, steroid receptors are not only targets of natural steroids but are also commonly sites of nonsteroidal com...

  11. Predicted structure of the extracellular region of ligand-gated ion-channel receptors shows SH2-like and SH3-like domains forming the ligand-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gready, J. E.; Ranganathan, S.; Schofield, P. R.; Matsuo, Y.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    Fast synaptic neurotransmission is mediated by ligand-gated ion-channel (LGIC) receptors, which include receptors for acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, glycine, and glutamate. LGICs are pentamers with extracellular ligand-binding domains and form integral membrane ion channels that are selective for cations (acetylcholine and serotonin 5HT3 receptors) or anions (GABAA and glycine receptors and the invertebrate glutamate-binding chloride channel). They form a protein superfamily with no sequence similarity to any protein of known structure. Using a 1D-3D structure mapping approach, we have modeled the extracellular ligand-binding domain based on a significant match with the SH2 and SH3 domains of the biotin repressor structure. Refinement of the model based on knowledge of the large family of SH2 and SH3 structures, sequence alignments, and use of structure templates for loop building, allows the prediction of both monomer and pentamer models. These are consistent with medium-resolution electron microscopy structures and with experimental structure/function data from ligand-binding, antibody-binding, mutagenesis, protein-labeling and subunit-linking studies, and glycosylation sites. Also, the predicted polarity of the channel pore calculated from electrostatic potential maps of pentamer models of superfamily members is consistent with known ion selectivities. Using the glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit, which forms homopentamers, the monomeric and pentameric models define the agonist and antagonist (strychnine) binding sites to a deep crevice formed by an extended loop, which includes the invariant disulfide bridge, between the SH2 and SH3 domains. A detailed binding site for strychnine is reported that is in strong agreement with known structure/function data. A site for interaction of the extracellular ligand-binding domain with the activation of the M2 transmembrane helix is also suggested. PMID:9144769

  12. Localization of the fourth membrane spanning domain as a ligand binding site in the human platelet. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroaki; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Caron, M.G.; Regan, J.W. )

    1989-05-02

    The human platelet {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor is an integral membrane protein which binds epinephrine. The gene for this receptor has been cloned, and the primary structure is thus known. A model of its secondary structure predicts that the receptor has seven transmembrane spanning domains. By covalent labeling and peptide mapping, the authors have identified a region of the receptor that is directly involved with ligand binding. Partially purified preparations of the receptor were covalently radiolabeled with either of two specific photoaffinity ligands: ({sup 3}H)SKF 102229 (an antagonist) or p-azido({sup 3}H)clonidine (an agonist). The radiolabeled receptors were then digested with specific endopeptidases, and peptides containing the covalently bound radioligands were identified. Lysylendopeptidase treatment of ({sup 3}H)SKF 102229 labeled receptor yielded one peptide of M{sub r} 2400 as the product of a complete digest. Endopeptidase Arg-C gave a labeled peptide of M{sub r} 4000, which was further digested to the M{sub r} 2400 peptide by additional treatment with lysylendopeptidase. Using p-azido({sup 3}H)clonidine-labeled receptor, a similar M{sub r} 2400 peptide was obtained by lysylendopeptidase cleavage. This M{sub r} 2400 peptide corresponds to the fourth transmembrane spanning domain of the receptor. These data suggest that this region forms part of the ligand binding domain of the human platelet {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor.

  13. Geographic spread, genetics and functional characteristics of ryanodine receptor based target-site resistance to diamide insecticides in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Denise; Gutbrod, Oliver; Lümmen, Peter; Matthiesen, Svend; Schorn, Corinna; Nauen, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Anthranilic diamides and flubendiamide belong to a new chemical class of insecticides acting as conformation sensitive activators of the insect ryanodine receptor (RyR). These compounds control a diverse range of different herbivorous insects including diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), a notorious global pest on cruciferous crops, which recently developed resistance due to target-site mutations located in the trans-membrane domain of the Plutella RyR. In the present study we further investigated the genetics and functional implications of a RyR G4946E target-site mutation we recently identified in a Philippine diamondback moth strain (Sudlon). Strain Sudlon is homozygous for the G4946E mutation and has been maintained under laboratory conditions without selection pressure for almost four years, and still exhibit stable resistance ratios of >2000-fold to all commercial diamides. Its F1 progeny resulting from reciprocal crosses with a susceptible strain (BCS-S) revealed no maternal effects and a diamide susceptible phenotype, suggesting an autosomally almost recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequent back-crosses indicate a near monogenic nature of the diamide resistance in strain Sudlon. Radioligand binding studies with Plutella thoracic microsomal membrane preparations provided direct evidence for the dramatic functional implications of the RyR G4946E mutation on both diamide specific binding and its concentration dependent modulation of [(3)H]ryanodine binding. Computational modelling based on a cryo-EM structure of rabbit RyR1 suggests that Plutella G4946E is located in trans-membrane helix S4 close to S4-S5 linker domain supposed to be involved in the modulation of the voltage sensor, and another recently described mutation, I4790M in helix S2 approx. 13 Å opposite of G4946E. Genotyping by pyrosequencing revealed the presence of the RyR G4946E mutation in larvae collected in 2013/14 in regions of ten different countries where

  14. Conformational transitions linked to active site ligation in human thrombin: effect on the interaction with fibrinogen and the cleavable platelet receptor.

    PubMed

    De Cristofaro, R; De Candia, E; Picozzi, M; Landolfi, R

    1995-01-27

    An experimental strategy based on solution viscosity perturbation allowed us to study the energetics of amide-substrates, p-aminobenzamidine (p-ABZ) and proflavin binding to the catalytic site of two proteolyzed forms of alpha-thrombin, i.e. zeta- and gamma T-thrombin. These thrombin derivatives are cleaved at the Leu144-Gly150 loop and at the fibrinogen recognition exosite (FRS), respectively. A phenomenological analysis of thermodynamic data showed that the amide substrates and p-ABZ interactions with zeta-thrombin were respectively, associated with a chemical compensation (i.e. the linear relationship between entropy and enthalpy of binding) and a hydrophobic phenomenon (i.e. a change in the standard heat capacity). The latter was slightly lower than that previously observed for a alpha-thrombin (0.78 +/- 0.25 versus 1.01 +/- 0.17 kcal/mol K). Both phenomenon were absent in gamma T-thrombin. The interaction of a alpha-, zeta- and gamma T-thrombin with macromolecular substrates that "bridge-bind" to both the catalytic site (CS) and fibrinogen recognition exosite (FRS), such as fibrinogen and the cleavable platelet receptor (CPR), was also evaluated. These interactions were studied by following fibrinopeptide A (FpA) release and by measuring intraplatelet Ca2+ changes induced by thrombin-CPR interaction. It was found that the free energy of activation (RT ln Kcat/Km) for both fibrinogen and CPR hydrolysis followed the same hierarchy, i.e. alpha > zeta > gamma. Moreover, the values of delta Cp for alpha-, zeta- and gamma T-thrombin interaction with p-ABZ were found to be linearly correlated to the free energy of activation for both fibrinogen and CPR cleavage. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that: (1) the Leu144-Gly150 loop and the FRS are both involved in the conformational transition linked to the binding of p-aminobenzamidine to the thrombin active site; (2) the extent of thrombin's capacity to undergo conformational transitions in alpha-, zeta- and gamma

  15. Differential splicing of human androgen receptor pre-mRNA in X-linked reifenstein syndrome, because of a deletion involving a putative branch site

    SciTech Connect

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Verleun-Mooijman, M.C.T.; Blaeij, T.J.P. de; Brinkmann, A.O.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J. )

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, mRNA, and protein in a subject with X-linked Reifenstein syndrome (partial androgen insensitivity) is reported. The presence of two mature AR transcripts in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient is established, and, by reverse transcriptase-PCR and RNase transcription analysis, the wild-type transcript and a transcript in which exon 3 sequences are absent without disruption of the translational reading frame are identified. Sequencing and hybridization analysis show a deletion of >6 kb in intron 2 of the human AR gene, starting 18 bp upstream of exon 3. The deletion includes the putative branch-point sequence (BPS) but not the acceptor splice site on the intron 2/exon 3 boundary. The deletion of the putative intron 2 BPS results in 90% inhibition of wild-type splicing. The mutant transcript encodes an AR protein lacking the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Western/immunoblotting analysis is used to show that the mutant AR protein is expressed in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The residual 10% wild-type transcript can be the result of the use of a cryptic BPS located 63 bp upstream of the intron 2/exon 3 boundary of the mutant AR gene. The mutated AR protein has no transcription-activating potential and does not influence the transactivating properties of the wild-type AR, as tested in cotransfection studies. It is concluded that the partial androgen-insensitivity syndrome of this patient is the consequence of the limited amount of wild-type AR protein expressed in androgen target cells, resulting from the deletion of the intron 2 putative BPS. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hepatic encephalopathy induces site-specific changes in gene expression of GluN1 subunit of NMDA receptor in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Poureidi, Mahsa; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2015-08-01

    We investigate changes in gene expression of GluN1 subunit of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and striatum in a rat model of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). We used male Wistar rats in which HE was induced after a common bile duct ligation (BDL). The animals were divided into three sets, and each set included three groups of control, sham operated and BDL. In the first set of animals, blood samples collected for biochemical analysis on day 21 of BDL. In the second set, changes in nociception threshold was assessed on day 21 of BDL using a hotplate test. In the third set, whole brain extracted, and the PFC, the hippocampus and the striatum in each rat were immediately dissected. We used a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method for evaluating the GluN1 gene expression. The biochemical analyses showed that plasma levels of ammonia and bilirubin in BDL rats were significantly increased compared to the sham control group on day 21 of BDL (P < 0.01). Nociception threshold was also increased in rats with BDL compared to sham group (P < 0.001). The results revealed that the GluN1 gene expression at mRNA levels in BDL group was decreased by 19 % in the PFC (P < 0.05) but increased by 82 % in the hippocampus (P < 0.01) compared to the sham control group; however, no significant change was observed in the striatum. It can be concluded that HE affects the GluN1 gene expression in rat brain with a site-specific pattern, and the PFC and hippocampus are more sensitive areas than striatum. PMID:25896221

  17. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) binds independently to both sites of the IgG homodimer with identical affinity

    PubMed Central

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Yeung, Yik Andy; Chaparro-Riggers, Javier; Barman, Ishita; Strop, Pavel; Chin, Sherman Michael; Pham, Amber; Bolton, Gary; McDonough, Dan; Lindquist, Kevin; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is expressed by cells of epithelial, endothelial and myeloid lineages and performs multiple roles in adaptive immunity. Characterizing the FcRn/IgG interaction is fundamental to designing therapeutic antibodies because IgGs with moderately increased binding affinities for FcRn exhibit superior serum half-lives and efficacy. It has been hypothesized that 2 FcRn molecules bind an IgG homodimer with disparate affinities, yet their affinity constants are inconsistent across the literature. Using surface plasmon resonance biosensor assays that eliminated confounding experimental artifacts, we present data supporting an alternate hypothesis: 2 FcRn molecules saturate an IgG homodimer with identical affinities at independent sites, consistent with the symmetrical arrangement of the FcRn/Fc complex observed in the crystal structure published by Burmeister et al. in 1994. We find that human FcRn binds human IgG1 with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 760 ± 60 nM (N = 14) at 25°C and pH 5.8, and shows less than 25% variation across the other human subtypes. Human IgG1 binds cynomolgus monkey FcRn with a 2-fold higher affinity than human FcRn, and binds both mouse and rat FcRn with a 10-fold higher affinity than human FcRn. FcRn/IgG interactions from multiple species show less than a 2-fold weaker affinity at 37°C than at 25°C and appear independent of an IgG's variable region. Our in vivo data in mouse and rat models demonstrate that both affinity and avidity influence an IgG's serum half-life, which should be considered when choosing animals, especially transgenic systems, as surrogates. PMID:25658443

  18. Monoclonal antibody Cat-315 detects a glycoform of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/phosphacan early in CNS development that localizes to extrasynaptic sites prior to synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Dino, M R; Harroch, S; Hockfield, S; Matthews, R T

    2006-11-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) are lattice-like condensations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that envelop synapses and decorate the surface of subsets of neurons in the CNS. Previous work has suggested that, despite the fact that PNs themselves are not visualized until later in development, some PN component molecules are expressed in the rodent CNS even before synaptogenesis. In the adult mammalian brain, monoclonal antibody Cat-315 recognizes a glycoform of aggrecan, a major component of PNs. In primary cortical cultures, a Cat-315-reactive chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) is also expressed on neuronal surfaces and is secreted into culture media as early as 24 h after plating. In this study, we show that in primary cortical cultures, the Cat-315 CSPG detected in early neural development is expressed in extrasynaptic sites prior to synapse formation. This suggests that ECM components in the CNS, as in the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), may prepattern neuronal surfaces prior to innervation. We further show that while the Cat-315-reactive carbohydrate decorates aggrecan in the adult, it decorates a different CSPG in the developing CNS. Using receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta/protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta) knock-out mice and immunoprecipitation techniques, we demonstrate here that in the developing rodent brain Cat-315 recognizes RPTPbeta isoforms. Our further examination of the Cat-315 epitope suggests that it is an O-mannose linked epitope in the HNK-1 family. The presence of the Cat-315 reactive carbohydrate on different PN components--RPTPbeta and aggrecan--at different stages of synapse development suggests a potential role for this neuron-specific carbohydrate motif in synaptogenesis.

  19. Activation of a cryptic splice site in the growth hormone receptor associated with growth hormone insensitivity syndrome in a genetic isolate of Laron Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavi, A.; Bartlett, R.; Brown, M.

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease found worldwide. Despite various ethnic differences, all patients with LS described display classic dysmorphic features and extreme short stature due to defects in the growth hormone receptor (GHR). The vast majority of these patients are sporadic occurrences resulting from consanguineous matings; however, an Ecuadorian genetic isolate of LS has been reported. Our investigations have identified a genetic isolate of LS of Anglo Saxon origin. Seven individuals, by all clinical and biochemical criteria, have LS. As a result of extensive review of family and medical histories we have constructed a pedigree tracing the lineage of our affected patients through the 17th century. No GHR gross deletions were detected using an exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Previous molecular analyses have identified mutations in exons 2-7 in numerous patients with classical LS. Single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was performed on GHR exons 2-7, and a marked conformational shift was noted in exon 7. Cycle sequencing of exon 7 from three affected individuals, and from four first-degree relatives, revealed a C{r_arrow}T transition at position 766 of the cDNA, and a heterozygous C{r_arrow}T transition at the identical position in the obligate carriers studied. This mutation is predicted to activate a cryptic donor splice site 63 base pairs upstream from the 3{prime} end of exon 7, effectively truncating the GHR cDNA without changing the reading frame. The resultant GHR protein is shortened by a proposed 21 amino acids. The identification and conformation of this mutation not only identifies a novel mutation in the GHR, and the first to be described in LS patients of English descent, but also allows for comparisons between genotypes and phenotypes in an inbred population.

  20. Species B adenovirus serotypes 3, 7, 11 and 35 share similar binding sites on the membrane cofactor protein CD46 receptor.

    PubMed

    Fleischli, Christoph; Sirena, Dominique; Lesage, Guillaume; Havenga, Menzo J E; Cattaneo, Roberto; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2007-11-01

    We recently characterized the domains of the human cofactor protein CD46 involved in binding species B2 adenovirus (Ad) serotype 35. Here, the CD46 binding determinants are mapped for the species B1 Ad serotypes 3 and 7 and for the species B2 Ad11. Ad3, 7 and 11 bound and transduced CD46-positive rodent BHK cells at levels similar to Ad35. By using antibody-blocking experiments, hybrid CD46-CD4 receptor constructs and CD46 single point mutants, it is shown that Ad3, 7 and 11 share many of the Ad35-binding features on CD46. Both CD46 short consensus repeat domains SCR I and SCR II were necessary and sufficient for optimal binding and transgene expression, provided that they were positioned at an appropriate distance from the cell membrane. Similar to Ad35, most of the putative binding residues of Ad3, 7 and 11 were located on the same glycan-free, solvent-exposed face of the SCR I or SCR II domains, largely overlapping with the binding surface of the recently solved fiber knob Ad11-SCR I-II three-dimensional structure. Differences between species B1 and B2 Ads were documented with competition experiments based on anti-CD46 antibodies directed against epitopes flanking the putative Ad-binding sites, and with competition experiments based on soluble CD46 protein. It is concluded that the B1 and B2 species of Ad engage CD46 through similar binding surfaces.