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Sample records for lead-bismuth cooled fast

  1. Conceptual design of module fast reactor of ultimate safety cooled by lead-bismuth alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Myasnikov, V.O.; Stekolnikov, V.V.; Stepanov, V.S.; Gorshkov, V.T.; Kulikov, M.L.; Shulyndin, V.A.; Gromov, B.F.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Pashkin, Yu.G.

    1993-12-31

    During past time all basic problems arisen during working-out of NPP with lead-bismuth coolant were solved: physics and thermal physics of the cores, heat transfer and hydrodynamics, corrosion resistance of the structural materials and coolant technology, radiation and nuclear safety, investigations of emergency situations, development of fuel elements and absorbing elements of the reactor, equipment of the primary circuit and other circuits. A powerful experimental base equpped by unique rigs is made. A series of ship and test NPP has been constructed whereat repair of the plants and reactor refuelling are developed. Highly-skilled groups of investigators, designers and operation personnel capable of performing the development of the reactor plant with MFR within short terms have been formed. In this case MFR with lead-bismuth coolant may become the initial step in development of large-scale nuclear power engineering with fast reactors cooled by liquid lead.

  2. Design study of lead bismuth cooled fast reactors and capability of natural circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktamuliani, Sri; Su'ud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    A preliminary study designs SPINNOR (Small Power Reactor, Indonesia, No On-Site Refueling) liquid metal Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors, fuel (U, Pu)N, 150 MWth have been performed. Neutronic calculation uses SRAC which is designed cylindrical core 2D (R-Z) 90 × 135 cm, on the core fuel composed of heterogeneous with percentage difference of PuN 10, 12, 13% and the result of calculation is effective neutron multiplication 1.0488. Power density distribution of the output SRAC is generated for thermal hydraulic calculation using Delphi based on Pascal language that have been developed. The research designed a reactor that is capable of natural circulation at inlet temperature 300 °C with variation of total mass flow rate. Total mass flow rate affect pressure drop and temperature outlet of the reactor core. The greater the total mass flow rate, the smaller the outlet temperature, but increase the pressure drop so that the chimney needed more higher to achieve natural circulation or condition of the system does not require a pump. Optimization of the total mass flow rate produces optimal reactor design on the total mass flow rate of 5000 kg/s with outlet temperature 524,843 °C but require a chimney of 6,69 meters.

  3. Design study of lead bismuth cooled fast reactors and capability of natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oktamuliani, Sri Su’ud, Zaki

    2015-09-30

    A preliminary study designs SPINNOR (Small Power Reactor, Indonesia, No On-Site Refueling) liquid metal Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors, fuel (U, Pu)N, 150 MWth have been performed. Neutronic calculation uses SRAC which is designed cylindrical core 2D (R-Z) 90 × 135 cm, on the core fuel composed of heterogeneous with percentage difference of PuN 10, 12, 13% and the result of calculation is effective neutron multiplication 1.0488. Power density distribution of the output SRAC is generated for thermal hydraulic calculation using Delphi based on Pascal language that have been developed. The research designed a reactor that is capable of natural circulation at inlet temperature 300 °C with variation of total mass flow rate. Total mass flow rate affect pressure drop and temperature outlet of the reactor core. The greater the total mass flow rate, the smaller the outlet temperature, but increase the pressure drop so that the chimney needed more higher to achieve natural circulation or condition of the system does not require a pump. Optimization of the total mass flow rate produces optimal reactor design on the total mass flow rate of 5000 kg/s with outlet temperature 524,843 °C but require a chimney of 6,69 meters.

  4. Design of alumina forming FeCrAl steels for lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum alloys containing 15-20 wt.% Cr and 4-6 wt.% Al have shown excellent corrosion resistance in the temperature range up to 600 °C or higher in liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic environments by the formation of protective Al2O3 layers. However, the higher Cr and Al concentrations in ferritic alloys could be problematic because of severe embrittlement in the manufacturing process as well as in service, caused by the formation of brittle phases. For this reason, efforts worldwide have so far mainly focused on the development of aluminizing surface treatments. However, aluminizing surface treatments have major disadvantages of cost, processing difficulties and reliability issues. In this study, a new FeCrAl alloy is proposed for structural materials in lead and lead-bismuth cooled nuclear applications. The alloy design relied on corrosion experiments in high temperature lead and lead-bismuth eutectic environments and computational thermodynamic calculations using the commercial software, JMatPro. The design of new alloys has focused on the optimization of Cr and Al levels for the formation of an external Al2O3 layer which can provide excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance in liquid lead alloys in the temperature range 300-600 °C while still retaining workable mechanical properties.

  5. Preliminary study on nano- and micro-composite sol-gel based alumina coatings on structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Peng; Kasada, Ryuta

    2011-02-01

    In order to protect the structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors from liquid metal corrosion, Al 2O 3 nano- and micro-composite coatings were developed using an improved sol-gel process, which includes dipping specimens in a sol-gel solution dispersed with fine α-Al 2O 3 powders prepared by mechanical milling. Accelerated corrosion tests were conducted on coated specimens in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic at 500 °C under dynamic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that the coatings are composed of α-Al 2O 3 and they are about 10 μm thick. After the corrosion tests, no spallation occurred on the coatings, and neither Pb nor Bi penetrated into the coatings, which indicates that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance to lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion. The nano-structured composite particles integrated into the coatings play an important role in achieving such superior lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion resistance.

  6. Sol-gel composite coatings as anti-corrosion barrier for structural materials of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasada, Ryuta; Dou, Peng

    2013-09-01

    In order to protect the structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) from liquid metal corrosion, advanced aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings were developed using an improved sol-gel process, which includes dipping specimens in a Y-added sol-gel solution dispersed with ultrafine α-Al2O3 powders prepared by mechanical milling. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission electron probe microprobe analyzer (FE-EPMA) analyses revealed that the coatings are composed of alumina with high density. Accelerated corrosion tests were conducted on coated specimens in liquid LBE at 650 °C under dynamic conditions. After the corrosion tests, no cracking, spallation, erosion and liquid metal (e.g., lead) penetration occurred to the coatings, indicating that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance. The superior LBE corrosion resistance is due to the presence of the nano-structured composite particles integrated into the coatings and the addition of trace amount of yttrium. Severe erosion and penetration of liquid Pb occurred to the Al2O3 nano- and micro-composite coatings. After the corrosion tests, no cracking, spallation, erosion and liquid metal (e.g., lead) penetration occurred to the newly-developed aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings, indicating that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance. Therefore we can conclude that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance under the experimental conditions chosen here. It is a way to protect the structural materials of LBE cooled FBRs from liquid metal corrosion. The much improved corrosion resistance of aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings, relative to Al2O3 nano- and micro-composite coatings, is due to the much higher density and the significantly superior high temperature strength resulting from using of finer Al2O3 seeding particles and adding trace

  7. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor That Produces Low Cost Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    C. Davis; S. Herring; P. MacDonald; K. McCarthy; V. Shah; K. Weaver; J. Buongiorno; R. Ballinger; K. Doyoung; M. Driscoll; P. Hejzler; M. Kazimi; N. Todreas

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the suitability of lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. The choice of lead-bismuth for the reactor coolant is an actinide burning fast reactor offers enhanced safety and reliability. The advantages of lead-bismuth over sodium as a coolant are related to the following material characteristics: chemical inertness with air and water; higher atomic number; lower vapor pressure at operating temperatures; and higher boiling temperature. Given the status of the field, it was agreed that the focus of this investigation in the first two years will be on the assessment of approaches to optimize core and plant arrangements in order to provide maximum safety and economic potential in this type of reactor.

  8. One-group fission cross sections for plutonium and minor actinides inserted in calculated neutron spectra of fast reactor cooled with lead-208 or lead-bismuth eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Khorasanov, G. L.; Blokhin, A. I.

    2012-07-01

    The paper is dedicated to one-group fission cross sections of Pu and MA in LFRs spectra with the aim to increase these values by choosing a coolant which hardens neutron spectra. It is shown that replacement of coolant from Pb-Bi with Pb-208 in the fast reactor RBEC-M, designed in Russia, leads to increasing the core mean neutron energy. As concerns fuel Pu isotopes, their one-group fission cross sections become slightly changed, while more dramatically Am-241 one-group fission cross section is changed. Another situation occurs in the lateral blanket containing small quantities of minor actinides. It is shown that as a result of lateral blanket mean neutron energy hardening the one-group fission cross sections of Np-237, Am-241 and Am-243 increases up to 8-11%. This result allows reducing the time of minor actinides burning in FRs. (authors)

  9. Studies of Polonium Removal from Molten Lead-Bismuth for Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jacopo Buongiorno; Ken Czerwinski; Eric Loewen; Chris Larson

    2004-09-01

    The isotope 210Po is the main product of neutron activation in fast reactors cooled by molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). The isotope 210Po is a pure alpha emitter with a half-life of 138.38 days. For typical values of the neutron flux the 210Po concentration in the coolant can reach 1-10 Ci/kg. While exposure of plant personnel to Po is prevented under normal operating conditions because the primary system is sealed, Po does pose a radiological hazard during maintenance activities for which access to submerged structures is required as well as during accidents resulting in breach of the primary-system barrier. Obviously, continuous removal of Po from the LBE reduces this hazard. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which Po is formed in and released from the LBE. We summarize research performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to investigate the basic chemistry of four mechanisms of Po release, which could serve as the basis for a coolant cleanup system in LBE-cooled reactors. The mechanisms explored are lead polonide evaporation, formation of polonium hydride, rare-earth filtering, and alkaline extraction. For the key chemical species involved expressions are given for useful quantities such as formation energy, release, and deposition rates. It is concluded that the most promising removal mechanism is alkaline extraction, although a more systematic investigation of this mechanism is needed.

  10. Studies of Polonium Removal from Molten Lead-Bismuth for Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buongiorno, Jacopo; Loewen, Eric P.; Czerwinski, Kenneth; Larson, Christopher

    2004-09-15

    The isotope {sup 210}Po is the main product of neutron activation in fast reactors cooled by molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). The isotope {sup 210}Po is a pure alpha emitter with a half-life of 138.38 days. For typical values of the neutron flux the {sup 210}Po concentration in the coolant can reach 1-10 Ci/kg. While exposure of plant personnel to Po is prevented under normal operating conditions because the primary system is sealed, Po does pose a radiological hazard during maintenance activities for which access to submerged structures is required as well as during accidents resulting in breach of the primary-system barrier. Obviously, continuous removal of Po from the LBE reduces this hazard. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which Po is formed in and released from the LBE. We summarize research performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to investigate the basic chemistry of four mechanisms of Po release, which could serve as the basis for a coolant cleanup system in LBE-cooled reactors. The mechanisms explored are lead polonide evaporation, formation of polonium hydride, rare-earth filtering, and alkaline extraction. For the key chemical species involved expressions are given for useful quantities such as formation energy, release, and deposition rates. It is concluded that the most promising removal mechanism is alkaline extraction, although a more systematic investigation of this mechanism is needed.

  11. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth Cooled Natural Circulated Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Takaaki Sakai; Yasuhiro Enuma; Takashi Iwasaki; Kazuhiro Ohyama

    2002-07-01

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth cooled natural circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 100 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled natural circulation reactor designed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. PRACS (Primary Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System) is prepared for the JNC's concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 sec after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 Centigrade, because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporary reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system and the out let temperature decreases successfully. (authors)

  12. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Natural-Circulation Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takaaki; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2004-03-15

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multidimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural-circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 300-MW(thermal) lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400-MW(electric) lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactor designed by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. The primary reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) is prepared for the JNC concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 s after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 deg. C because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporarily reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system, and the outlet temperature decreases successfully.

  13. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-04-21

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation.

  14. Thermal fatigue due to beam interruptions in a Lead-Bismuth cooled ATW blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.

    2000-11-15

    Thermal fatigue consequences of frequent accelerator beam interruptions are quantified for both sodium and lead-bismuth cooled blankets in current designs for accelerator transmutation of waste devices. Temperature response was calculated using the SASSYS-1 systems analysis code for an immediate drop in beam current from full power to zero. Coolant temperatures from SASSYS-1 were fed into a multi-node structure temperature calculation to obtain thermal strains for various structural components. Fatigue curves from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code were used to determine the number of cycles that these components could endure, based on these thermal strains. Beam interruption frequency data from a current accelerator were used to estimate design lifetimes for components. Mitigation options for reducing thermal fatigue are discussed.

  15. Design of an Actinide-Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low-Cost Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Davis, Cliff Bybee; MIT folks

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) University Research Consortium (URC) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, material compatibility, plant engineering, and coolant activation. In the area of core neutronic design, the reactivity vs. burnup and discharge isotopics of both non-fertile and fertile fuels were evaluated. An innovative core for pure actinide burning that uses streaming, fertile-free fuel assemblies was studied in depth. This particular core exhibits excellent reactivity performance upon coolant voiding, even for voids that occur in the core center, and has a transuranic (TRU) destruction rate that is comparable to the proposed accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) facility. These studies suggest that a core can be designed to achieve a long life while maintaining safety and minimizing waste. In the area of material compatibility studies, an experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials has been designed and built at the INEEL. The INEEL forced-convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The corrosion cell is being used to test steel that is commercially available in the United States to temperatures above 650°C. Progress in plant engineering was made for two reactor concepts, one utilizing an indirect cycle with heat exchangers and the other utilizing a direct-contact steam cycle. The evaluation of the

  16. Solid electrolytes for use in lead-bismuth eutectic cooled nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariën, A.; Lim, J.; Rosseel, K.; Vandermeulen, W.; Van den Bosch, J.

    2012-08-01

    The operating temperature of electrochemical oxygen sensors can likely be lowered by reducing the solid electrolyte resistance. Most often, these sensors use yttria partially stabilized zirconia (e.g. (Y2O3)0.05(ZrO2)0.95, (5-YSZ)) as solid electrolyte. In this paper, we discuss the use of better conducting ceramics than yttria partially stabilized zirconia, as solid electrolytes for oxygen sensors that can be applied in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled nuclear reactors. Two stabilized zirconia ceramics ((Y2O3)0.08(ZrO2)0.92, (8-YSZ); (Sc2O3)0.1(CeO2)0.01(ZrO2)0.89) are investigated as well as a hypostoichiometric perovskite-type La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ. The results of microstructural analyses, thermochemical stability tests in LBE (at 360 °C), as well as mechanical tests and four-probe d.c. conductivity measurements (at 300-800 °C) are discussed and compared with the results that were obtained for a commercially available 5-YSZ (Friatec AG, Germany). Of the three studied ceramics, 8-YSZ was identified as the most promising solid electrolyte to reduce the operating temperature of electrochemical oxygen sensors. http://www.friatec.de/content/friatec/en/Ceramics/FRIALIT-DEGUSSIT-Oxide-Ceramics/downloads/Materials.pdf (this URL was last accessed on February 7th, 2012).

  17. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly †

    PubMed Central

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation. PMID:27110782

  18. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

  19. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor That Produces Low Cost Electricty - FY-02 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A. This is the third in a series of Annual Reports for this project, the others are also listed in Appendix A as FY-00 and FY-01 Annual Reports.

  20. Overview of the use of ATHENA for thermal-hydraulic analysis of systems with lead-bismuth coolant

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; A. S. Shieh

    2000-04-02

    The INEEL and MIT are investigating the suitability of lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. This paper is concerned with the general area of thermal-hydraulics of lead-bismuth cooled reactors. The ATHENA code is being used in the thermal-hydraulic design and analysis of lead-bismuth cooled reactors. The ATHENA code was reviewed to determine its applicability for simulating lead-bismuth cooled reactors. Two modifications were made to the code as a result of this review. Specifically, a correlation to represent heat transfer from rod bundles to a liquid metal and a void correlation based on data taken in a mixture of lead-bismuth and steam were added the code. The paper also summarizes the analytical work that is being performed with the code and plans for future analytical work.

  1. Overview of the Use of ATHENA for Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Systems with Lead-Bismuth Coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Cliff Bybee; Shieh, Arthur Shan Luk

    2000-04-01

    The INEEL and MIT are investigating the suitability of lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. This paper is concerned with the general area of thermal-hydraulics of lead-bismuth cooled reactors. The ATHENA code is being used in the thermal-hydraulic design and analysis of lead-bismuth cooled reactors. The ATHENA code was reviewed to determine its applicability for simulating lead-bismuth cooled reactors. Two modifications were made to the code as a result of this review. Specifically, a correlation to represent heat transfer from rod bundles to a liquid metal and a void correlation based on data taken in a mixture of lead-bismuth and steam were added the code. The paper also summarizes the analytical work that is being performed with the code and plans for future analytical work.

  2. A concept of the innovative nuclear technology based on standardized fast reactors SVBR-75/100 with lead-bismuth coolant for modular nuclear power plants of different capacity and purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.; Generalov, V.N.; Krushelnitsky, V.N.

    2007-07-01

    Today's nuclear power is in the state of an intrinsic conflict between economic and safety requirements. This fact makes difficult its sustainable development. One of the ways of finding the solution to the problem can be use of modular fast reactors SVBR-75/100 cooled by lead-bismuth coolant that has been mastered in conditions of operating reactors of Russian nuclear submarines. The inherent self-protection and passive safety properties are peculiar to that reactor due to physical features of small power fast reactors ({approx} 100 MWe), chemical inertness and high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant, integral design of the pool type primary circuit equipment. Due to small power of the reactor, it is possible to fabricate the whole reactor at the factory and to deliver it to the NPP site in practical readiness by using any kind of transport including the railway. Substantiation of the high level of reactor safety, adaptability of the SVBR-75/100 reactor relative to the fuel type and fuel cycle, issues of non-proliferation of nuclear fissile materials, opportunities of multi-purpose usage of the standard SVBR-75/100 reactors have been viewed in the paper. (authors)

  3. Transient Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of the Windowless Target System for the Lead Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Accelerator Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Fosco; Ferri, Roberta; Moreau, Vincent

    2006-07-01

    The target system, whose function is to supply an external neutron source to the ADS sub-critical core to sustain the neutron chain reaction, is the most critical part of an ADS being subject to severe thermo-mechanical loading and material damage due to accelerator protons and fission neutrons. A windowless option was chosen as reference configuration for the target system of the LBE-cooled ADS within the European PDS-XADS project in order to reduce the material damage and to increase its life. This document deals with the thermo-hydraulic results of the calculations performed with STAR-CD and RELAP5 codes for studying the behaviour of the windowless target system during off-normal operating conditions. It also reports a description of modifications properly implemented in the codes needed for this analysis. The windowless target system shows a satisfactory thermo-hydraulic behaviour for the analysed accidents, except for the loss of both pumps without proton beam shut-off and the beam trips lasting more than one second. (authors)

  4. Ultrasound in lead-bismuth eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Dierckx, M.; Van Dyck, D.

    2011-07-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN) is in the process of designing MYRRHA, a new multi-purpose irradiation facility to replace the ageing BR2. MYRRHA is a fast spectrum reactor cooled with lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). As liquid metal is opaque to visual light, ultrasonic measurement techniques are selected to fulfill essential tasks that, according to our assessment, will be demanded by licensing authorities, in particular: fuel assembly identification and localization of a lost fuel assembly. To that end, a considerable research effort at SCK.CEN is devoted to study ultrasonic propagation in LBE. As ultrasonic experiments in LBE are elaborate and expensive to set up, we are particularly interested in to what extent experiments in water can be extrapolated to LBE - one of the main focuses of this article. We describe and present results of a first experiment with this goal which shows that the signal to noise ratio is better in LBE and that we even see small diffuse reflections up to 40 deg. off normal. On the other hand, we do not see internal reflections in stainless steel objects in LBE which we do in water. Therefore, we conclude that experiments in water can be used to validate algorithms for LBE on the condition that they do not rely on internal reflections. We also present solutions to tackle the essential tasks: fuel assembly identification and lost object localization. The requirements for the ultrasonic equipment implementing these solutions are also discussed. (authors)

  5. Conceptual Design of Passive Safety System for Lead-Bismuth Cooled Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. G.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the conceptual design of passive safety systems for reactor power 225 MWth using Pb-Bi coolant. Main purpose of this research is to design of heat removal system from the reactor wall. The heat from the reactor wall is removed by RVACS system using the natural circulation from the atmosphere around the reactor at steady state. The calculation is performed numerically using Newton-Raphson method. The analysis involves the heat transfer systems in a radiation, conduction and natural convection. Heat transfer calculations is performed on the elements of the reactor vessel, outer wall of guard vessel and the separator plate. The simulation results conclude that the conceptual design is able to remove heat 1.33% to 4.67% from the thermal reactor power. It’s can be hypothesized if the reactor had an accident, the system can still overcome the heat due to decay.

  6. Lead-bismuth eutectic technology for Hyperion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Kapernick, R. J.; McClure, P. R.; Trapp, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    A small lead-bismuth eutectic-cooled reactor concept (referred to as the Hyperion reactor concept) is being studied at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Hyperion Power Generation. In this report, a critical assessment of the lead-bismuth eutectic technology for Hyperion reactor is presented based on currently available knowledge. Included are: material compatibility, oxygen control, thermal hydraulics, polonium control. The key advances in the technology and their applications to Hyperion reactor design are analyzed. Also, the near future studies in main areas of the technology are recommended for meeting the design requirements.

  7. The experience in handling of lead-bismuth coolant contaminated by Polonium-210

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, D.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Solodjankin, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    During exploitation of lead-bismuth cooled reactors a wide experience in handling of radioactive coolant containing polonium has been gained. By 1990 total time of this reactor operation has reached approximately 60 reactor years.

  8. An acclerator-based installation of small power with the lead-bismuth coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, V.T.; Yefimov, E.I.; Novikova, N.N.

    1995-10-01

    The structure of the accelerator-based installation is described that includes the subcritical reactor-blanket with power 15 MW(h) cooled with lead-bismuth, the lead-bismuth flow target where a beam of {alpha}-particle is injected, the equipment of a primary and secondary curcuits. Some results of calculations and estimations are discussed that have been carried out to justify the target and blanket constructions. Some main characteristics of the installation are presented.

  9. Visualization of Solidification Process in Lead-bismuth Eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yasushi; Sato, Hirotaka; Shinohara, Takenao

    Pulsed neutron transmission spectroscopy was applied to clarify a phase change phenomena of lead-bismuth eutectics (LBE). The melting and solidification behaviors of the LBE should be well understood to enhance the safety of an LBE-cooled accelerator driven system. In this study, the heating experiments were performed using a rectangular test section and LBE phase change process was visualized by the energy-resolved pulsed neutron imaging at BL22 RADEN facility in J-PARC and the solid/liquid interface was identified from the radiograph and Bragg edge information. The transient location of the interface was compared with measured temperature profiles and it would be useful to evaluate the LBE thermal properties.

  10. Alkaline extraction of polonium from liquid lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.

    2011-07-01

    The production of highly radiotoxic polonium isotopes poses serious safety concerns for the development of future nuclear systems cooled by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper it is shown that polonium can be extracted efficiently from LBE using a mixture of alkaline metal hydroxides (NaOH + KOH) in a temperature range between 180 and 350 °C. The extraction ratio was analyzed for different temperatures, gas blankets and phase ratios. A strong dependence of the extraction performance on the redox properties of the cover gas was found. While hydrogen facilitates the removal of polonium, oxygen has a negative influence on the extraction. These findings open new possibilities to back up the safety of future LBE based nuclear facilities.

  11. LFR "Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor"

    SciTech Connect

    Cinotti, L; Fazio, C; Knebel, J; Monti, S; Abderrahim, H A; Smith, C; Suh, K

    2006-05-11

    development already being carried out in different institutes participating in this STREP. This is particularly true in Europe where a large R&D program associated with the development of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is being actively pursued. The general objective of the ELSY project is to design an innovative lead-cooled fast reactor complemented by an analytical effort to assess the existing knowledge base in the field of lead-alloy coolants (i.e., lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and also lead/lithium) in order to extrapolate this knowledge base to pure lead. This analysis effort will be complemented with some limited R&D activities to acquire missing or confirmatory information about fundamental topics for ELSY that are not sufficiently covered in the ongoing European ADS program or elsewhere.

  12. Structural, electrical and magnetic measurements on oxide layers grown on 316L exposed to liquid lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, Peter; Hofer, Christian; Hlawacek, Gregor; Li, Ning; Maloy, Stuart A.; Teichert, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Fast reactors and spallation neutron sources may use lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) as a coolant. Its physical, chemical, and irradiation properties make it a safe coolant compared to Na cooled designs. However, LBE is a corrosive medium for most steels and container materials. The present study was performed to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the austenitic steel 316L (in two different delivery states). Detailed atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy analyses have been performed on the oxide layers to get a better understanding of the corrosion and oxidation mechanisms of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic stainless steel exposed to LBE. The oxide scale formed on the annealed 316L material consisted of multiple layers with different compositions, structures, and properties. The innermost oxide layer maintained the grain structure of what used to be the bulk steel material and shows two phases, while the outermost oxide layer possessed a columnar grain structure.

  13. Study of iron structure stability in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic with oxygen injection using molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Sudarko; Shafii, Mohammad Ali; Celino, Massimo

    2014-09-30

    Corrosion of structural materials in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic is a major problem for design of PbBi cooled reactor. One technique to inhibit corrosion process is to inject oxygen into coolant. In this paper we study and focus on a way of inhibiting the corrosion of iron using molecular dynamics method. For the simulation results we concluded that effective corrosion inhibition of iron may be achieved by injection 0.0532 wt% to 0.1156 wt% oxygen into liquid lead-bismuth. At this oxygen concentration the structure of iron material will be maintained at about 70% in bcc crystal structure during interaction with liquid metal.

  14. Study of iron structure stability in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic with oxygen injection using molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Sudarko, Shafii, Mohammad Ali; Celino, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    Corrosion of structural materials in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic is a major problem for design of PbBi cooled reactor. One technique to inhibit corrosion process is to inject oxygen into coolant. In this paper we study and focus on a way of inhibiting the corrosion of iron using molecular dynamics method. For the simulation results we concluded that effective corrosion inhibition of iron may be achieved by injection 0.0532 wt% to 0.1156 wt% oxygen into liquid lead-bismuth. At this oxygen concentration the structure of iron material will be maintained at about 70% in bcc crystal structure during interaction with liquid metal.

  15. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Afifah, Maryam Su’ud, Zaki; Miura, Ryosuke; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-30

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don’t need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  16. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  17. Luminescence quenching of Dy3+ ions in lead bismuthate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarski, Wojciech A.; Pisarska, Joanna; Lisiecki, Radosław; Dominiak-Dzik, Grażyna; Ryba-Romanowski, Witold

    2012-04-01

    Luminescence of lead bismuthate glasses PbO-Bi2O3-Ga2O3 containing Dy3+ ions has been studied. Two overlapping luminescence bands corresponding to 3P1-1S0 transition of Bi3+ and 4F9/2 -6H13/2 transition of Dy3+ were detected under 480 nm excitation. Comparison of luminescence features for the system under study to those reported for dysprosium-doped lead borate glass PbO-B2O3-Ga2O3 indicates that the luminescence of Dy3+ is efficiently quenched by Bi3+ ions. Analysis of luminescence dynamics implies that the excitation energy transfer from Dy3+ to Bi3+ is nonradiative. The theoretical calculations using Inokuti-Hirayama model confirm strong luminescence of Dy3+ ions in lead bismuthate glasses.

  18. Thermodynamic assessment of solubility and activity of iron, chromium, and nickel in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossé, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) is a heavy liquid alloy used as a coolant for the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors and spallation target for Accelerator Driven Systems. LBE is also considered in sodium fast reactor designs as coolant in secondary circuit to avoid any occurrence of the reaction between sodium and water in steam generators. Even if this coolant presents many advantages due to its thermophysical properties, corrosion towards structural materials remains one of the major issues of LBE. Because corrosion in LBE is partly driven by dissolution processes, the solubility and chemical activity of the main elements of the alloy are the key parameters to model the related corrosion processes. Using the Calphad method and the Thermo-Calc software, a thermodynamic database was developed to assess the interaction between Cr-Ni-Fe alloys and LBE. The current thermodynamic data on the Cr-Fe-Ni + Bi-Pb quinary system was reviewed and the Bi-Cr and Cr-Pb binary phase diagrams were assessed. Fe, Cr and Ni solubilities (in at. fraction, T in K) at LBE composition were calculated: Fe solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SFe)=0.5719-4398.6T (399-1173 K) Cr solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SCr)=-0.2757-3056.1T (399-1173 K) Ni solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SNi)=2.8717-2932.9T (528-742 K) log10 (SNi)=0.2871-1006.3T (742-1173 K) Then, the thermodynamic assessment performed in this study was used to predict more accurately the Fe, Cr and Ni activities and solubilities in the case of four austenitic model alloys also studied in the framework of corrosion tests [1]. The calculated activities and solubilities provide thermodynamic data to better understand dissolution or precipitation phenomena observed during LBE corrosion processes.

  19. Relaxation dynamics of lithium ions in lead bismuthate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2000-08-01

    We have investigated relaxation dynamics of lithium ions in lead bismuthate glasses in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 2 MHz and in the temperature range from 303-553 K. Using the Anderson-Stuart model, we have calculated the activation energy, which is observed to be lower than that of the dc conductivity. We have studied the relaxation mechanism of these glasses in the framework of the electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The microscopic parameters obtained from these formalisms have been compared. We have also calculated the decoupling index and correlated them with the stretched exponential relaxation parameter and the dc conductivity.

  20. Polonium problem in lead-bismuth flow target

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, D.V.; Yefimov, E.I.; Bugreev, M.I.

    1996-06-01

    Alpha-active polonium nuclides Po198 - Po210 are formed in a lead-bismuth target as results of reactions Bi{sup 209}(n,{gamma})Bi{sup 210} {yields} Po{sup 210}, Bi{sup 209}(p,xn)Po{sup 210} {yields} Po{sup 210 {minus} x} (x = 1-12), Pb{sup 208}({alpha},xn) {yields} Po{sup 210 {minus} x + 2} (x = 2-14). The most important nuclides are Po-210 (T{sub {1/2}}=138.4 day), Po-209 (T{sub {1/2}}=102 years) and Po-208 (T{sub {1/2}}=2.9 years). Polonium activity of the circuit for SINQ - conditions is about 15,000 Ci after 1-year operation. Polonium radiation hazard is connected with its output from the coolant and formation of aerosol and surface alpha-activity after the circuit break-down for repair works or in accidents. One of the important issues of polonium removal system creation is containing and storing polonium removed. Its storage in solidified alkaline is not expedient because of secondary neutron formation as a result of ({alpha},n) - reaction on oxygen and sodium nucleus. The estimations carried out demonstrated that by polonium concentration {approx} 100 Ci/l neutron current on the container surface can reach {approx} 10{sup 4}n/(cm{sup 2}s). Concentration and storage of polonium in solidified lead-bisumth seems the most convenient. The calculations demonstrated that in a 100 l container 50,000 Ci of polonium can be stored (as much as 3 times more than 1-year polonium product in SINQ-conditions) under temperature in the container less than melting point of lead bismuth (the wall temperature is about 100{degrees}C).

  1. Modeling astatine production in liquid lead-bismuth spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J. C.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; Ghali, S.; Leray, S.; Mancusi, D.; Zanini, L.

    2013-03-01

    Astatine isotopes can be produced in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic targets through proton-induced double charge exchange reactions on bismuth or in secondary helium-induced interactions. Models implemented into the most common high-energy transport codes generally have difficulties to correctly estimate their production yields as was shown recently by the ISOLDE Collaboration, which measured release rates from a lead-bismuth target irradiated by 1.4 and 1 GeV protons. In this paper, we first study the capability of the new version of the Liège intranuclear cascade model, INCL4.6, coupled to the deexcitation code ABLA07 to predict the different elementary reactions involved in the production of such isotopes through a detailed comparison of the model with the available experimental data from the literature. Although a few remaining deficiencies are identified, very satisfactory results are found, thanks in particular to improvements brought recently on the treatment of low-energy helium-induced reactions. The implementation of the models into MCNPX allows identifying the respective contributions of the different possible reaction channels in the ISOLDE case. Finally, the full simulation of the ISOLDE experiment is performed, taking into account the likely rather long diffusion time from the target, and compared with the measured diffusion rates for the different astatine isotopes, at the two studied energies, 1.4 and 1 GeV. The shape of the isotopic distribution is perfectly reproduced as well as the absolute release rates, assuming in the calculation a diffusion time between 5 and 10hours. This work finally shows that our model, thanks to the attention paid to the emission of high-energy clusters and to low-energy cluster induced reactions, can be safely used within MCNPX to predict isotopes with a charge larger than that of the target by two units in spallation targets, and, probably, more generally to isotopes created in secondary reactions induced by composite

  2. The Chemical Kinetics of Alkaline Extraction of Tellurium from Lead-Bismuth Eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence E. Auman; Eric P. Loewen; Thomas F. Gesell; Shuji Ohno

    2005-07-01

    Polonium-210 is an important radioactive product of neutron activation of molten lead-bismuth eutectic, a promising candidate coolant for advanced fast nuclear reactors. The radiological hazard potential associated with polonium can be significantly reduced by continuous online removal of polonium from the coolant. The removal method under investigation in this research is alkaline extraction. Chemical kinetic measurements were made to determine first and second order rate constants, activation energy, and heat of reaction at various temperatures using tellurium as a surrogate. First and second order alkaline extraction rate constants were measured to be: k1 = 10.05 e –52,274/RT and k2 = 167 e –97,224/RT. Alkaline extraction is dependent on temperature and was found to follow the Arrhenius rate law. The activation energy (Ea) ranged between 52,274 – 97,224 J mol-1. With a strong foundation of surrogate work completed, this work should be validated using polonium-210.

  3. Experimental investigation of forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubarsky, Bernard

    1951-01-01

    The forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of lead-bismuth eutectic were experimentally investigated. Experimental values of Nusselt number for lead-bismuth fell considerably below predicted values. The addition of a wetting agent did not change the heat transfer characteristics.

  4. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  5. Corrosion by liquid lead and lead-bismuth: experimental results review and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinsuo

    2008-01-01

    Liquid metal technologies for liquid lead and lead-bismuth alloy are under wide investigation and development for advanced nuclear energy systems and waste transmutation systems. Material corrosion is one of the main issues studied a lot recently in the development of the liquid metal technology. This study reviews corrosion by liquid lead and lead bismuth, including the corrosion mechanisms, corrosion inhibitor and the formation of the protective oxide layer. The available experimental data are analyzed by using a corrosion model in which the oxidation and scale removal are coupled. Based on the model, long-term behaviors of steels in liquid lead and lead-bismuth are predictable. This report provides information for the selection of structural materials for typical nuclear reactor coolant systems when selecting liquid lead or lead bismuth as heat transfer media.

  6. Gas-cooled fast reactor fuel fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Randall; Meyer, Mitch; Jue, Jan-Fong; Gan, Jian

    2007-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor is a high temperature helium-cooled Generation IV reactor concept. Operating parameters for this type of reactor are well beyond those of current fuels so a novel fuel must be developed. One fuel concept calls for UC particles dispersed throughout an SiC matrix. This study examines a hybrid reaction bonding process as a possible fabrication route for this fuel. Processing parameters are also optimized. The process combines carbon and SiC powders and a carbon yielding polymer. In order to obtain dense reaction bonded SiC samples the porosity to carbon ratio in the preform must be large enough to accommodate SiC formation from the carbon present in the sample, however too much porosity reduces mechanical integrity which leads to poor infiltration properties. The porosity must also be of a suitable size to allow silicon transport throughout the sample but keep residual silicon to a minimum.

  7. Safety Characteristics of LBE Cooled Long-Life Small Reactor, 'LSPR'

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Sekimoto; Shinichi Makino

    2002-07-01

    Lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) shows a good performance on neutron economy, and LBE cooled fast reactor can be designed as an excellent long-life small reactor. LBE is good not only for neutron economy but for chemical inertness and high boiling point, which may realize a much safer reactor than conventional sodium-cooled reactor. We have designed such a long-life small reactor and name it LSPR. This paper presents safety characteristics of LSPR. (authors)

  8. A resting bottom sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, D.

    2012-07-01

    This follows ICAPP 2011 paper 11059 'Fast Reactor with a Cold Bottom Vessel', on sodium cooled reactor vessels in thermal gradient, resting on soil. Sodium is frozen on vessel bottom plate, temperature increasing to the top. The vault cover rests on the safety vessel, the core diagrid welded to a toric collector forms a slab, supported by skirts resting on the bottom plate. Intermediate exchangers and pumps, fixed on the cover, plunge on the collector. At the vessel top, a skirt hanging from the cover plunges into sodium, leaving a thin circular slit partially filled by sodium covered by argon, providing leak-tightness and allowing vessel dilatation, as well as a radial relative holding due to sodium inertia. No 'air conditioning' at 400 deg. C is needed as for hanging vessels, and this allows a large economy. The sodium volume below the slab contains isolating refractory elements, stopping a hypothetical corium flow. The small gas volume around the vessel limits any LOCA. The liner cooling system of the concrete safety vessel may contribute to reactor cooling. The cold resting bottom vessel, proposed by the author for many years, could avoid the complete visual inspection required for hanging vessels. However, a double vessel, containing support skirts, would allow introduction of inspecting devices. Stress limiting thermal gradient is obtained by filling secondary sodium in the intermediate space. (authors)

  9. The Industrial Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel E. Bays; Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the use of enrichment and moderator zoning methods for optimizing the r-z power distribution within sodium cooled fast reactors. These methods allow overall greater fuel utilization in the core resulting in more fuel being irradiated near the maximum allowed thermal power. The peak-to-average power density was held to 1.18. This core design, in conjunction with a multiple-reheat Brayton power conversion system, has merit for producing an industrial level of electrical output (2400MWth, 1000MWe) from a relatively compact core size. The total core radius, including reflectors and shields, was held to 1.78m. Preliminary safety analysis suggests that positive reactivity insertion resulting from a leak between the sodium primary loop and helium power conversion system can be mitigated using simple gas-liquid centripetal separation strategies in the plant’s primary loop.

  10. Estimation of prompt neutron and residual gamma dose rates and induced activity from 0.1-1.0 GeV protons incident on lead-bismuth target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Biju, K.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2013-08-01

    The important parameters from the radiological safety points of view in the case of a lead bismuth target irradiated by protons of energy 100 MeV to 1 GeV are presented here. The prompt neutron yield and the neutron dose rates, time evolution of the induced activity and the resulting gamma dose rates from a lead-bismuth target irradiated by protons of 1 mA beam current for a period of one month are calculated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. Some of the results are compared with the values obtained by empirical expressions available in the literature for a medium Z target. The existing empirical relations are found to under predict the prompt neutron yield and the ambient dose equivalent values. A new set of empirical equations are proposed to calculate these parameters more accurately for 100 MeV-1 GeV protons incident on lead-bismuth target. 195Au, 201Tl, 203Pb, 205Bi, 206Bi, 207Bi, 208Po, 210Po and 3H are found to be the important radionuclides from the target handling perspective. The residual gamma dose rates obtained by the empirical relations appear to reproduce the results obtained in this study during the initial days of cooling.

  11. Numerical study: Iron corrosion-resistance in lead-bismuth eutectic coolant by molecular dynamics method

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Widayani,; Celino, Massimo

    2012-06-06

    In this present work, we report numerical results of iron (cladding) corrosion study in interaction with lead-bismuth eutectic coolant of advanced nuclear reactors. The goal of this work is to study how the oxygen can be used to reduce the corrosion rate of cladding. The molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate corrosion process. By evaluating the diffusion coefficients, RDF functions, MSD curves of the iron and also observed the crystal structure of iron before and after oxygen injection to the coolant then we concluded that a significant and effective reduction can be achieved by issuing about 2% number of oxygen atoms to lead-bismuth eutectic coolant.

  12. Development of oxygen meters for the use in lead-bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konys, J.; Muscher, H.; Voß, Z.; Wedemeyer, O.

    2001-07-01

    Liquid lead and the eutectic lead-bismuth alloy (PbBi) are considered both as a spallation target and coolant of an accelerator driven system (ADS) for the transmutation of long-lived actinides from nuclear waste into shorter living isotopes. It is known that both, pure lead and PbBi, exhibit a high corrosivity against austenitic and ferritic steels, because of the high solubility of nickel and iron in PbBi. One way of reducing the strong corrosion is the in situ formation of stable oxide scales on the steel surfaces. Thermodynamic calculations and experimental results have confirmed, that the control of oxygen in lead or PbBi within a defined activity range can lead to acceptable corrosion rates. To control the level of oxygen dissolved in lead or PbBi, a sensor for measuring the oxygen activity is required. Within the sodium fast breeder reactor development, an adequate technique was established for estimating oxygen in liquid sodium. This knowledge can be used for other metal/oxygen systems like oxygen in PbBi. For measuring the oxygen activity and calculating its concentration, the relevant thermodynamic and solubility data have to be considered. Two reference electrode systems: Pt/air and In/In 2O 3 (both based on yttria-stabilized zirconia as solid electrolyte) are investigated to evaluate their electromotive force (EMF)-temperature dependency in saturated and unsaturated oxygen solutions. Results with both types of oxygen meters in PbBi at different oxygen levels were compared with theoretical calculations. The experimental data indicate that the design, construction and integration of an oxygen control unit in a large scale PbBi-loop seems to be very feasible.

  13. Problems of development the pilot lead-bismuth target circuit TC-1 for ADS

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatiev, Sviatoslav; Leonchuk, Mikhail; Orlov, Yury; Pankratov, Dmitry; Suvorov, Gennady; Zabudko, Alexey

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Main problems on development of pilot molten lead-bismuth target circuit of 1 MW proton beam power (TC-1) as an important part of target-blanket accelerator driven system (ADS) for nuclear waste incineration are analyzed. (authors)

  14. Optimized sympathetic cooling of atomic mixtures via fast adiabatic strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Stephen; Sundaram, Bala; Onofrio, Roberto

    2011-11-15

    We discuss fast frictionless cooling techniques in the framework of sympathetic cooling of cold atomic mixtures. It is argued that optimal cooling of an atomic species--in which the deepest quantum degeneracy regime is achieved--may be obtained by means of sympathetic cooling with another species whose trapping frequency is dynamically changed to maintain constancy of the Lewis-Riesenfeld adiabatic invariant. Advantages and limitations of this cooling strategy are discussed, with particular regard to the possibility of cooling Fermi gases to a deeper degenerate regime.

  15. Design Study of Pb-Bi-Cooled and NaK-Cooled Small Reactors: PBWFR and DSFR

    SciTech Connect

    Otsubo, Akira; Takahashi, Minoru

    2004-07-01

    The liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (Pb-Bi) has good compatibility with water, which is different from sodium. It is expected that the Pb-Bi could be used as a coolant of the deep sea fast reactor (DSFR) and the Pb-Bi- cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR). Physics analysis of the Pb-Bi-cooled small reactor cores with and without inner control rods was performed using the computer program of General Purpose Neutronics Code System (SRAC95) developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The coolant of Pb-Bi seems to be good as well as NaK for small reactors. (authors)

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Lead or Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) Test Facility - R&D Requirements, Design Criteria, Design Concept, and Concept Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Loewen; Paul Demkowicz

    2005-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility will advance the state of nuclear technology relative to heavy-metal coolants (primarily Pb and Pb-Bi), thereby allowing the U.S. to maintain the pre-eminent position in overseas markets and a future domestic market. The end results will be a better qualitative understanding and quantitative measure of the thermal physics and chemistry conditions in the molten metal systems for varied flow conditions (single and multiphase), flow regime transitions, heat input methods, pumping requirements for varied conditions and geometries, and corrosion performance. Furthering INL knowledge in these areas is crucial to sustaining a competitive global position. This fundamental heavy-metal research supports the National Energy Policy Development Group’s stated need for energy systems to support electrical generation.1 The project will also assist the Department of Energy in achieving goals outlined in the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Long Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan,2 the Generation IV Roadmap for Lead Fast Reactor development, and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative research and development. This multi-unit Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility with its flexible and reconfigurable apparatus will maintain and extend the U.S. nuclear knowledge base, while educating young scientists and engineers. The uniqueness of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility is its integrated Pool Unit and Storage Unit. This combination will support large-scale investigation of structural and fuel cladding material compatibility issues with heavy-metal coolants, oxygen chemistry control, and thermal hydraulic physics properties. Its ability to reconfigure flow conditions and piping configurations to more accurately approximate prototypical reactor designs will provide a key resource for Lead Fast Reactor research and development. The other principal elements of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility

  17. Interim status report on lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) research and development.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Smith, C. F.; de Caro, M.; Halsey, W. G.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Bolind, A.; LLNL; LANL; Univ. of Illinois

    2008-03-31

    15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) and the initially 563 MWt PHENIX reactor attained 2.0 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) before one of three intermediate cooling loops was shut down due to concerns about potential steam generator tube failures. The calculations do not assume a test assembly location for advanced fuels and materials irradiation in place of a fuel assembly (e.g., at the center of the core); the calculations have not examined whether it would be feasible to replace the central assembly by a test assembly location. However, having only fifteen driver assemblies implies a significant effect due to perturbations introduced by the test assembly. The peak neutron fast flux is low compared with the fast fluxes previously achieved in FFTF and PHENIX. Furthermore, the peak neutron fluence is only about half of the limiting value (4 x 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}) typically used for ferritic steels. The results thus suggest that a larger power level (e.g., 400 MWt) and a larger core would be better for a TPP based upon the ELSY fuel assembly design and which can also perform irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials. In particular, a core having a higher power level and larger dimensions would achieve a suitable average discharge burnup, peak fast flux, peak fluence, and would support the inclusion of one or more test assembly locations. Participation in the Generation IV International Forum Provisional System Steering Committee for the LFR is being maintained throughout FY 2008. Results from the analysis of samples previously exposed to flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) in the DELTA loop are summarized and a model for the oxidation/corrosion kinetics of steels in heavy liquid metal coolants was applied to systematically compare the calculated long-term (i.e., following several years of growth) oxide layer thicknesses of several steels.

  18. Compatibility of Lead-Bismuth Eutectic with SiC-Coated Graphite at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Poulami; Ghosh, Abhijit; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Uniform coating of β-silicon carbide (β-SiC) was formed over a graphite pellet through slurry-based silicon coating followed by in situ reaction at 1873 K (1600 °C). The coated pellet was exposed to molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 1173 K (900 °C) in static condition for 200 h. Weight loss measurement, X-ray diffraction, and secondary electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy confirmed that the SiC coating could effectively prevent molten LBE from attacking the inner graphite material.

  19. Er-Doped Lead-Bismuthate Glasses:. Magnetic and Structural Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culea, E.; Pop, Lidia; Muntean, Raveca; Bosca, Maria; Bratu, I.; Bogdan, M.

    The effect of erbium-doping on the structural and magnetic properties of the xEr2O3-(1-x)[3Bi2O3·PbO] lead-bismuthate glasses was investigated. The glasses were investigated by infra-red spectroscopy (IR) and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The temperature dependence of the reciprocal susceptibility indicates that the erbium ions are isolated in samples with lower erbium ion content (x≤0.05) but for a higher content, a negative superexchange interaction between the magnetic erbium ions occurs. A structural model for the glasses is suggested on the basis of the IR spectral data.

  20. Optical transitions and frequency upconversion emission of Er 3+ions in novel lead-bismuthate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongtao; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Debao; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Junjie; Hu, Lili; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2004-12-01

    Er 3+-doped strontiam lead bismuth glass for developing upconversion lasers has been fabricated and characterized. The Judd-Ofelt analysis was performed on the absorption spectrum and the transition probabilities, excited state lifetimes, and the fluorescence branching ratios were calculated and discussed. Under 975 nm excitation, intense green and red emissions centered at 525, 546, and 657 nm, corresponding to the transitions 2H→4I, 4S→4I, and 4F→4I, respectively, were observed. The upconversion mechanisms are discussed based on the energy matching and quadratic dependence on excitation power, and the dominant mechanisms are excited state absorption and energy transfer upconversion for the green and red emissions.

  1. Polonium release from an ATW burner system with liquid lead-bismuth coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Yefimov, E.; Pankratov, D.

    1998-04-01

    The authors analyzed polonium release hazards in a conceptual pool-type ATW burner with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant. Simplified quantitative models are used based on experiments and real NPP experience. They found little Po contamination outside the burner under normal operating conditions with nominal leakage from the gas system. In sudden gas leak and/or coolant spill accidents, the P contamination level can reach above the regulation limit but short exposure would not lead to severe health consequences. They are evaluating and developing mitigation methods.

  2. Nanoscale characterization of HT-9 exposed to lead bismuth eutectic at 550 °C for 3000 h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, P.; Hawley, M. E.; Koury, D.; Welch, J.; Johnson, A. L.; Mori, G.; Li, N.; Maloy, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    Fast reactors and targets in spallation neutron sources may use lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as a coolant. Its physical and chemical properties and irradiation properties make it a safe and high performance coolant in radiation environments. However, LBE is a corrosive medium for most steels. In the present study, the atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, surface potential microscopy, and scanning electron analysis with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were performed to get a better understanding of the corrosion and oxidation mechanism of the HT-9 stainless steel in an LBE environment. What was believed in the past to be simply a double oxide layer structure was revealed here to be more complicated. It is found that the inner most oxide layer maintains the grain structure of what used to be the bulk steel material while the outer oxide layer possessed a columnar structure. The EDS line scans and the conductive and magnetic properties measured using the scanning probe techniques give us the local properties of the formed oxide layers. This leads to a more detailed view of the oxide layers formed on HT-9 in LBE.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of corrosion mitigation of iron in lead-bismuth eutectic using nitrogen as corrosion inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Sudarko; Hasan, Mohammad; Celino, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion of structural materials used in fast nuclear reactor design is a current major problem. It is due to the use of liquid metal as a coolant candidate in the heat transfer system. The liquid metal as lead-bismuth eutectic was found to make high corrosion to structural material as steel. One of the solutions of this problem is to inject some inhibitor into liquid metal. In this current work we simulate the effect of nitrogen injection as inhibitor candidate. The simulation will predict the proper concentration of injected nitrogen and also observe the microscopic structure of the material before and after injection to know the ability of nitrogen as an inhibitor. The simulation follows the molecular dynamics method and for preliminary study we use iron material rather than steel. We also use lennard-jones potential for simplification of the study. It is from our simulation we see nitrogen shows better corrosion mitigation compare with oxygen as in our previous study. The effective inhibition can be achieved by injecting at least 0.056wt.% nitrogen. This amount seems to be able to reduce the corrosion level of iron till about 99.5% for high corrosion at temperature 750 °C.

  4. Real Time Corrosion Monitoring in Lead and Lead-Bismuth Systems

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Stubbins; Alan Bolind; Ziang Chen

    2010-02-25

    The objective of this research program is to develop a real-time, in situ corrosion monitoring technique for flowing liquid Pb and eutectic PbBi (LBE) systems in a temperature range of 400 to 650 C. These conditions are relevant to future liquid metal cooled fast reactor operating parameters. THis program was aligned with the Gen IV Reactor initiative to develp technologies to support the design and opertion of a Pb or LBE-cooled fast reactor. The ability to monitor corrosion for protection of structural components is a high priority issue for the safe and prolonged operation of advanced liquid metal fast reactor systems. In those systems, protective oxide layers are intentionally formed and maintained to limit corrosion rates during operation. This program developed a real time, in situ corrosion monitoring tecnique using impedance spectroscopy (IS) technology.

  5. Potential containment materials for liquid-lead and lead-bismuth eutectic spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Lead (Pb) and lead-bismuth eutectic (44Pb-56Bi) have been the two primary candidate liquid-metal target materials for the production of spallation neutrons. Selection of a container material for the liquid-metal target will greatly affect the lifetime and safety of the target subsystem. For the lead target, niobium-1 (wt%) zirconium (Nb-1Zr) is a candidate containment material for liquid lead, but its poor oxidation resistance has been a major concern. The oxidation rate of Nb-1Zr was studied based on the calculations of thickness loss due to oxidation. According to these calculations, it appeared that uncoated Nb-1Zr may be used for a one-year operation at 900 C at P{sub O{sub 2}} = 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} torr, but the same material may not be used in argon with 5-ppm oxygen. Coating technologies to reduce the oxidation of Nb-1Zr are reviewed, as are other candidate refractory metals such as molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. For the Pb-Bi target, three candidate containment materials are suggested based on a literature survey of the materials compatibility and proton irradiation tests: Croloy 2-1/4, modified 9Cr-1Mo, and 12Cr-1Mo (HT-9) steel. These materials seem to be used only if the lead-bismuth is thoroughly deoxidized and treated with zirconium and magnesium.

  6. Thermodynamic properties and equation of state of liquid lead and lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. P.; Schuurmans, P.; Benamati, G.

    2008-06-01

    Since the 1950s, liquid lead (Pb) and lead-bismuth eutectic (Pb-Bi) have been studied in the USA, Canada and in the former-USSR as potential coolants for nuclear installations due to their very attractive thermophysical and neutronic properties. However, experimental data on the thermal properties of these coolants in the temperature range of interest are still incomplete and often contradictory. This makes it very difficult to perform design calculations and to analyse the normal and abnormal behaviour of nuclear installations where these coolants are expected to be used. Recently, a compilation of heavy liquid metal (HLM) properties along with recommendations for its use was prepared by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Fuel Cycle (WPFC) Expert Group on Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Technology. A brief review of this compilation and some new data are presented in this article. A set of correlations for the temperature dependence of the main thermodynamic properties of Pb and Pb-Bi(e) at normal pressure, and a set of simplified thermal and caloric equations of state for the liquid phase are proposed.

  7. Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2009-05-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Evaporation Behavior of Polonium and Rare-Earth Elements in Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Shuji Ohno; Shinya Miyahara; Yuji Kurata; Ryoei Katsura; Shigeru Yoshida

    2006-07-01

    Equilibrium evaporation behavior was experimentally investigated for polonium ({sup 210}Po) in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and for rare-earth elements gadolinium (Gd) and europium (Eu) in LBE to understand and clarify the transfer behavior of toxic impurities from LBE coolant to a gas phase. The experiments utilized the 'transpiration method' in which saturated vapor in an isothermal evaporation pot was transported by inert carrier gas and collected outside of the pot. While the previous paper ICONE12-49111 has already reported the evaporation behavior of LBE and of tellurium in LBE, this paper summarizes the outlines and the results of experiments for important impurity materials {sup 210}Po and rare-earth elements which are accumulated in liquid LBE as activation products and spallation products. In the experiments for rare-earth elements, non-radioactive isotope was used. The LBE pool is about 330-670 g in weight and has a surface area of 4 cm x 14 cm. {sup 210}Po experiments were carried out with a smaller test apparatus and radioactive {sup 210}Po produced through neutron irradiation of LBE in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). We obtained fundamental and instructive evaporation data such as vapor concentration, partial vapor pressure of {sup 210}Po in the gas phase, and gas-liquid equilibrium partition coefficients of the impurities in LBE under the temperature condition between 450 and 750 deg. C. The {sup 210}Po test revealed that Po had characteristics to be retained in LBE but was still more volatile than LBE solvent. A part of Eu tests implied high volatility of rare-earth elements comparable to that of Po. This tendency is possibly related to the local enrichment of the solute near the pool surface and needs to be investigated more. These results are useful and indispensable for the evaluation of radioactive materials transfer to the gas phase in LBE-cooled nuclear systems. (authors)

  9. Physical Properties of Novel Lead-Bismuthate Glasses with Large Transmitting Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-Tao; Zhang, De-Bao; Xu, Shi-Qing; Dai, Shi-Xun; Hu, Li-Li; Jiang, Zhong-Hong

    2004-09-01

    Novel lead-bismuthate glasses with low OH concentration have been obtained in the Bi2O3-PbO-SrO system. The role of the different components in the glass formation has been explored from the density, refractive index measurements, indicating that the physical properties are mainly affected by Bi2O3 and PbO contents. The densities and refractive indices of these glasses are in the ranges of 7.639-7.699 g/cm3 and 2.47-2.94, respectively. A wide transmitting window from visible to infrared (IR) regions and good thermal stability for some compositions of these glasses have been observed, which make them appealing candidates for different optical applications such as upconverting phosphors, new laser materials, optical waveguides and crystal-free fibre drawing.

  10. Overview of recent studies related to lead-alloy-cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sa, Rongyuan; Pramutadi, Asril; Yamaki-Irisawa, Eriko

    2012-06-01

    The recent progress of the studies related to lead alloy-cooled reactors (LFR) and the accelerator driven system (ADS) is summarized. The compatibility of materials with lead alloys has been clarified under steady and transient temperature conditions. Higher Cr content, Si and Al addition and Al-Fe alloy-coating improved the corrosion resistance of steels. The Al-Fe alloy-coated steel was not corroded even under high temperature transient conditions. The ceramics of SiC and Si3N4 are expected to be used as cladding material for high temperature LFR. For the analytical consideration of mass transport in lead alloy circuit, the diffusion coefficient of Ni was measured using the capillary methods. A new bubble visualization method in LBE using gamma-ray radiography was developed. The thermal interaction of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and lead droplets with sub-cooled water, and the behaviors of droplet fragmentation were investigated, and the visualization of volatile liquids in high temperature liquids was achieved.

  11. Overview of recent studies related to lead-alloy-cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sa, Rongyuan; Pramutadi, Asril; Yamaki-Irisawa, Eriko

    2012-06-06

    The recent progress of the studies related to lead alloy-cooled reactors (LFR) and the accelerator driven system (ADS) is summarized. The compatibility of materials with lead alloys has been clarified under steady and transient temperature conditions. Higher Cr content, Si and Al addition and Al-Fe alloy-coating improved the corrosion resistance of steels. The Al-Fe alloy-coated steel was not corroded even under high temperature transient conditions. The ceramics of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} are expected to be used as cladding material for high temperature LFR. For the analytical consideration of mass transport in lead alloy circuit, the diffusion coefficient of Ni was measured using the capillary methods. A new bubble visualization method in LBE using gamma-ray radiography was developed. The thermal interaction of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and lead droplets with sub-cooled water, and the behaviors of droplet fragmentation were investigated, and the visualization of volatile liquids in high temperature liquids was achieved.

  12. Fuel development for gas-cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. K.; Fielding, R.; Gan, J.

    2007-09-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems, US DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee and the Generation IV International Forum, December 2002]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the US and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic 'honeycomb' structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  13. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  14. High performance infrared fast cooled detectors for missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Espuno, Laurent; Taalat, Rachid; Sultan, Ahmad; Cassaigne, Pierre; Matallah, Noura

    2016-05-01

    SOFRADIR was selected in the late 90's for the production of 320×256 MW detectors for major European missile programs. This experience has established our company as a key player in the field of missile programs. SOFRADIR has since developed a vast portfolio of lightweight, compact and high performance JT-based solutions for missiles. ALTAN is a 384x288 Mid Wave infrared detector with 15μm pixel pitch, and is offered in a miniature ultra-fast Joule- Thomson cooled Dewar. Since Sofradir offers both Indium Antimonide (InSb) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride technologies (MCT), we are able to deliver the detectors best suited to customers' needs. In this paper we are discussing different figures of merit for very compact and innovative JT-cooled detectors and are highlighting the challenges for infrared detection technologies.

  15. Experiments Performed in Substantiation of the Conditioning of BN-350 Spent Cesium Traps Using Lead or Lead-Bismuth Alloy Filling Technology

    SciTech Connect

    O. Romanenko; I. Tazhibaeva; I. Yakovlev; A. Ivanov; D. Wells; A. Herrick; J. Michelbacher; S. Shiganakov

    2009-05-01

    The technology of cleaning cesium radionuclides from sodium coolant at the BN-350 fast reactor was realized in the form of cesium traps of two types: stationary devices connected to the circuit that was to be cleaned and in-core devices installed into the core of reactor when it was not under operation. Carbon-graphite materials were used as sorbents to collect and concentrate radioactive cesium, accumulated in the BN-350 reactor circuits over the decades of their operation, in relatively small volume traps which provided effective radiation-safe conditions for personnel working in proximity to the coolant and equipment of the primary circuit during BN-350 decommissioning. Spent cesium traps, as products unfit for further use, represent solid radioactive wastes. The presence of chemically active sodium, potassium and cesium that are able to react violently with water results in series of problems related to their disposal in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Considering the technology of filling spent cesium traps with lead/lead-bismuth alloy as a priority one for their conditioning, evaluations for safety substantiation were implemented. A set of experiments was implemented aimed at verification of calculations performed in substantiation of the proposed technology: filling a full scale cesium trap mock-up with sodium followed by its draining to determine the optimal regimes of draining; filling bench scale cesium trap mock-ups with sodium and cesium followed by sodium draining and filling with lead or lead-bismuth alloy at different temperatures and filling rates to chose the optimal regimes for filling spent cesium traps; implementation of leachability tests to determine the rate of cesium release from the filling materials into water. This paper provides a description of the experimental program carried out and the main results obtained.

  16. Interaction study between MOX fuel and eutectic lead-bismuth coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Popa, Karin; Tyrpekl, Vaclav; Gardeur, Sébastien; Freis, Daniel; Somers, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    In the frame of the MYRRHA reactor project, the interaction between fuel pellets and the reactor coolant is essential for safety evaluations, e.g. in case of a pin breach. Therefore, interaction tests between uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) pellets and molten lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) have been performed and three parameters were studied, namely the interaction temperature (500 °C and 800 °C), the oxygen content in LBE and the stoichiometry of the MOX (U0.7Pu0.3O2-x and U0.7Pu0.3O2.00). After 50 h of interaction in closed containers, the pellet integrity was preserved in all cases. Whatever the conditions, neither interaction compounds (crystalline or amorphous) nor lead and bismuth diffusion into the surface regions of the MOX pellets has been detected. In most of the conditions, actinide releases into LBE were very limited (in the range of 0.01-0.15 mg), with a homogeneous release of the different actinides present in the MOX. Detected values were significantly higher in the 800 °C and low LBE oxygen content tests for both U0.7Pu0.3O2-x and U0.7Pu0.3O2.00, with 1-2 mg of actinide released in these conditions.

  17. Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of Er3+/Yb3+ codoped lead bismuth alumina borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud, K. Krishna Murthy; Reddy, M. Chandra Shekhar; Rao, B. Appa

    2014-04-01

    Lead bismuth alumina borate glasses codoped with Er3+/Yb3+ were prepared by melt quenching technique. Optical absorption, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been studied. Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied to to the f ↔ f transitions for evaluating Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6 parameters. Radiative properties like branching ratio βr and the radiative life time τR have been determined on the basis of Judd-Ofelt theory. Upconversion emissions have been observed under 980nm laser excitation at room temperature. Green and red up-conversion emissions are centered at 530, 550 and 656 nm corresponding to 2H11/2→4I15/2, 4S3/2→4I15/2 and 4F9/2→4I15/2 transitions of Er3+ respectively. The results obtained are discussed quantitatively based on the energy transfer between Yb3+ and Er3+.

  18. Distribution and surface enrichment of radionuclides in lead-bismuth eutectic from spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer-Rotzler, Bernadette; Neuhausen, Jörg; Boutellier, Viktor; Wohlmuther, Michael; Zanini, L.; David, J.-C.; Türler, Andreas; Schumann, Dorothea

    2016-07-01

    With the development of new high-power neutron spallation sources --both for scientific application and as neutron production tool for accelerator-driven systems-- the demand for experimentally obtained nuclear data on the residue nuclei production in the target is constantly increasing. In the present work, we examined two lead-bismuth-eutectic targets, irradiated with high-energy protons, concerning their radionuclide content and the spatial distribution of selected isotopes. The first one was the so-called ISOLDE target, being irradiated with 1-1.4GeV protons at CERN-ISOLDE, the second one was the MEGAPIE target, irradiated at PSI with 590MeV protons. In particular, we investigated the phenomenon of radionuclide enrichment on free surfaces in both targets. It turned out that considerable accumulation can be found especially in the case of lanthanides. The depletion process is enhanced at increased temperatures. The results are compared with theoretical predictions; some possible consequences of the findings are illustrated.

  19. Concentration dependence of surface properties and molar volume of multicomponent system indium-tin-lead-bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, Dadashev; R, Kutuev; D, Elimkhanov

    2008-02-01

    The results of an experimental research of surface properties of the four-component system indium-tin-lead-bismuth are presented. The researches under discussion were carried out in a combined device in which the surface tension (σ) is measured by the method of maximum pressure in a drop, and density (ρ) is measured by advanced aerometry. Measurement errors are 0.7 % for surface tension measurement, and 0.2 % for density measurement. The study of the concentration dependence of σ in this system has revealed the influence of the third and fourth components upon the characteristics of surface tension isotherms of the binary system indium-tin. It was found out that with an increase in the content of the third and fourth components the depth of the minimum on the surface tension isotherms of the indium-tin system σ decreases. On the basis of the concentration dependence of the phenomenon of concentration bufferity is revealed. It is shown that despite the complex character, isotherms of σ on beam sections of a multicomponent system do not contain qualitatively new features in comparison with the isotherms of these properties in lateral binary systems.

  20. Shape optimization of a sodium cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Damien; Allaire, Grégoire; Pantz, Olivier; Pozin, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Traditional designs of sodium cooled fast reactors have a positive sodium expansion feedback. During a loss of flow transient without scram, sodium heating and boiling thus insert a positive reactivity and prevents the power from decreasing. Recent studies led at CEA, AREVA and EDF show that cores with complex geometries can feature a very low or even a negative sodium void worth.(1, 2) Usual optimization methods for core conception are based on a parametric description of a given core design(3).(4) New core concepts and shapes can then only be found by hand. Shape optimization methods have proven very efficient in the conception of optimal structures under thermal or mechanical constraints.(5, 6) First studies show that these methods could be applied to sodium cooled core conception.(7) In this paper, a shape optimization method is applied to the conception of a sodium cooled fast reactor core with low sodium void worth. An objective function to be minimized is defined. It includes the reactivity change induced by a 1% sodium density decrease. The optimization variable is a displacement field changing the core geometry from one shape to another. Additionally, a parametric optimization of the plutonium content distribution of the core is made, so as to ensure that the core is kept critical, and that the power shape is flat enough. The final shape obtained must then be adjusted to a get realistic core layout. Its caracteristics can be checked with reference neutronic codes such as ERANOS. Thanks to this method, new shapes of reactor cores could be inferred, and lead to new design ideas.

  1. Fast cool-down coaxial pulse tube microcooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nast, T.; Olson, J. R.; Champagne, P.; Roth, E.; Kaldas, G.; Saito, E.; Loung, V.; McCay, B. S.; Kenton, A. C.; Dobbins, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    We report the development and initial testing of the Lockheed Martin first-article, single-stage, compact, coaxial, Fast Cooldown Pulse Tube Microcryocooler (FC-PTM). The new cryocooler supports cooling requirements for emerging large, high operating temperature (105-150K) infrared focal plane array sensors with nominal cooling loads of 300 mW @105K @293K ambient. This is a sequel development that builds on our inline and coaxial pulse tube microcryocoolers reported at CEC 20137, ICC188,9, and CEC201510. The new FC-PTM and the prior units all share our long life space technology attributes, which typically have 10 year life requirements1. The new prototype microcryocooler builds on the previous development by incorporating cold head design improvements in two key areas: 1) reduced cool-down time and 2) novel repackaging that greatly reduces envelope. The new coldhead and Dewar were significantly redesigned from the earlier versions in order to achieve a cooldown time of 2-3 minutes- a projected requirement for tactical applications. A design approach was devised to reduce the cold head length from 115mm to 55mm, while at the same time reducing cooldown time. We present new FC-PTM performance test measurements with comparisons to our previous pulse-tube microcryocooler measurements and design predictions. The FC-PTM exhibits attractive small size, volume, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) features with sufficient cooling capacity over required ambient conditions that apply to an increasing variety of space and tactical applications.

  2. A summary of sodium-cooled fast reactor development

    SciTech Connect

    Aoto, Kazumi; Dufour, Philippe; Hongyi, Yang; Glatz, Jean Paul; Kim, Yeong-il; Ashurko, Yury; Hill, Robert; Uto, Nariaki

    2014-11-01

    Much of the basic technology for the Sodium-cooled fast Reactor (SFR) has been established through long term development experience with former fast reactor programs, and is being confirmed by the Phénix end-of-life tests in France, the restart of Monju in Japan, the lifetime extension of BN-600 in Russia, and the startup of the China Experimental Fast Reactor in China. Planned startup in 2014 for new SFRs: BN-800 in Russia and PFBR in India, will further enhance the confirmation of the SFR basic technology. Nowadays, the SFR development has advanced to aiming at establishment of the Generation-IV system which is dedicated to sustainable energy generation and actinide management, and several advanced SFR concepts are under development such as PRISM, JSFR, ASTRID, PGSFR, BN-1200, and CFR-600. Generation-IV International Forum is an international collaboration framework where various R&D activities are progressing on design of system and component, safety and operation, advanced fuel, and actinide cycle for the Generation-IV SFR development, and will play a beneficial role of promoting them thorough providing an opportunity to share the past experience and the latest data of design and R&D among countries developing SFR.

  3. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

    2005-09-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850ºC at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05).

  4. Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2007-03-08

    STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal

  5. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY04 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; T. C. Totemeier; D. E. Clark; E. E. Feldman; E. A. Hoffman; R. B. Vilim; T. Y. C. Wei; J. Gan; M. K. Meyer; W. F. Gale; M. J. Driscoll; M. Golay; G. Apostolakis; K. Czerwinski

    2004-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection.

  6. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

    2005-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in

  7. Separation of no-carrier-added astatine radionuclides from α-particle irradiated lead bismuth eutectic target: A classical method.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta; Kumar, Deepak; Choudhury, Dibyasree

    2017-09-01

    Possibility of separation of no-carrier-added (NCA) astatine radionuclides from the bulk lead-bismuth-eutectic (LBE) target was explored in a simple way in the laboratory scale. A LBE target was irradiated by 40MeV α-particles delivered from a cyclotron facility, India. Quantitative analysis of the irradiated target indicated the production of (210,209)At, (207)Po radionuclides in the target matrix. The (210,209)At radionuclides were separated by precipitation of bulk Pb, Bi and NCA radiotoxic Po radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate.

    PubMed

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-12

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  9. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  10. GCFR: The European Union Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Colin; Peers, Karen; Poette, Christian; Coddington, Paul; Somers, Joe; Van-Goethem, George

    2006-07-01

    In March 2005, the European Commission (EC) initiated a new 4-year Project on Gas Cooled Fast Reactors (GCFR) within its 6. Framework Programme. The EC and more than 10 participating companies, R and D organizations and universities finance the project in equal parts. The project contributes to the Generation IV ambitious goals requiring innovative solutions in terms environmental impact (robust fuel with no significant radioactive release), sustainability (core which is self sustaining and has the flexibility for waste reduction), proliferation resistant fuel cycle and economics (high coolant temperatures leading to increased thermodynamic efficiency). A matrix has been prepared for the Generation IV GFR studies to facilitate sharing the work between the members, which identifies seven combinations of design options. These option studies will lead to a pre-selection of a reference concept and alternatives and the preliminary GFR viability report. The GCFR project, which forms part of the EURATOM contribution to the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) has responsibility for the direct cycle and indirect cycle 600 MW options. In detail, the GCFR project will examine; the GFR (600 MW options) and ETDR, core and system design; GFR and ETDR safety analysis, including the analysis of selected transients; the qualification and benchmarking of the transient analysis codes through a series of benchmark exercises; and a review of candidate fuels and core materials, including their fabrication and irradiation. Education and communication to foster understanding of the growing needs for nuclear power in general and for the technology of the GCFR in particular is specific goal of the EU project. (authors)

  11. Experimental Study on Flow Technology and Steel Corrosion of Lead-Bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Minoru Takahashi; Hiroshi Sekimoto; Kotaro Ishikawa; Naoki Sawada; Tadashi Suzuki; Susumu Yoshida; Toyohiko Yano; Masamitsu Imai; Koji Hata; Suizheng Qiu

    2002-07-01

    For the feasibility study of Pb-Bi-cooled fast reactors (FR) and the Pb-Bi target of accelerator-driven nuclear transmutation systems, Pb-Bi flow technologies were developed and steel corrosion behavior in a Pb-Bi flow was investigated using a Pb-Bi circulation loop. The performance of an electro-magnetic flow meter with electrically insulated electrodes plated with Rh was better than those of conventional and tubular types. Oxygen concentration was controlled by continuous injection of Ar, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O mixture gas into the Pb-Bi flow. In order to have desired oxygen potential, the partial pressure ratio of P{sub H{sub 2}}/P{sub H{sub 2}}{sub O} was chosen in the range from 0.12 to 2.2 by bubbling the mixture of Ar and H{sub 2} in water columns at the room temperature. By injecting the mixture gas into the loop for sufficient time, the oxygen potentials measured by the oxygen sensor made of solid electrolyte ZrO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} agreed well with those in the injected gas mixture. In the first corrosion test, steels were exposed to a Pb-Bi flow at the temperature of 550 deg. C, the velocity of 2 m/s and the oxygen concentration of {approx}5.0x10{sup -7} wt.% for 959 hours. It was found that the weight loss was larger in the order of SS316, low Cr steel (SCM420) and high Cr steels (STBA26, SUS405, SUS430). Corrosion was suppressed by a Cr oxide layer for high Cr steels. A porous layer was formed on SS316 surface due to high solubility of Ni in Pb-Bi,. In the second corrosion test, the oxygen concentration was kept at 3.6x10{sup -7} wt.% by injecting Ar, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O mixture gas into a Pb-Bi flow, and steels were exposed to a Pb-Bi flow at the temperature of 550 deg. C, the velocity of 2 m/s for 1000 hours. Serious erosion damage was observed in SCM420 at the entrance, and some erosion damages appeared in low Cr steels: SCM420, F82H, STBA26 and HCM12 downstream. Crack type damage was observed on the surface of HCM12, and pitting-type damage

  12. Post-irradiation analysis of an ISOLDE lead-bismuth target: Stable and long-lived noble gas nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Grimberg, A.; David, J.-C.; Schumann, D.; Neuhausen, J.; Zanini, L.; Noah, E.

    2016-07-01

    We measured the isotopic concentrations of long-lived and stable He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe isotopes in a sample from a lead-bismuth eutectic target irradiated with 1.0 and 1.4 GeV protons. Our data indicate for most noble gases nearly complete release with retention fractions in the range of percent or less. Higher retention fractions result from the decay of long-lived radioactive progenitors from groups 1, 2, or 7 of the periodic table. From the data we can calculate a retention fraction for 3H of 2-3%. For alkaline metals we find retention fractions of about 10%, 30%, and 50% for Na, Rb, and Cs, respectively. For the alkaline earth metal Ba we found complete retention. Finally, the measured Kr and Xe concentrations indicate that there was some release of the halogens Br and I during and/or after the irradiation.

  13. Development of tellurium oxide and lead-bismuth oxide glasses for mid-wave infra-red transmission optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Beiming; Rapp, Charles F.; Driver, John K.; Myers, Michael J.; Myers, John D.; Goldstein, Jonathan; Utano, Rich; Gupta, Shantanu

    2013-03-01

    Heavy metal oxide glasses exhibiting high transmission in the Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) spectrum are often difficult to manufacture in large sizes with optimized physical and optical properties. In this work, we researched and developed improved tellurium-zinc-barium and lead-bismuth-gallium heavy metal oxide glasses for use in the manufacture of fiber optics, optical components and laser gain materials. Two glass families were investigated, one based upon tellurium and another based on lead-bismuth. Glass compositions were optimized for stability and high transmission in the MWIR. Targeted glass specifications included low hydroxyl concentration, extended MWIR transmission window, and high resistance against devitrification upon heating. Work included the processing of high purity raw materials, melting under controlled dry Redox balanced atmosphere, finning, casting and annealing. Batch melts as large as 4 kilograms were sprue cast into aluminum and stainless steel molds or temperature controlled bronze tube with mechanical bait. Small (100g) test melts were typically processed in-situ in a 5%Au°/95%Pt° crucible. Our group manufactured and evaluated over 100 different experimental heavy metal glass compositions during a two year period. A wide range of glass melting, fining, casting techniques and experimental protocols were employed. MWIR glass applications include remote sensing, directional infrared counter measures, detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents, laser detection tracking and ranging, range gated imaging and spectroscopy. Enhanced long range mid-infrared sensor performance is optimized when operating in the atmospheric windows from ~ 2.0 to 2.4μm, ~ 3.5 to 4.3μm and ~ 4.5 to 5.0μm.

  14. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  15. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  16. Case-based reasoning(CBR) model for ultra-fast cooling in plate mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Wang, Zhaodong; Wang, Guodong

    2014-11-01

    New generation thermo-mechanical control process(TMCP) based on ultra-fast cooling is being widely adopted in plate mill to product high-performance steel material at low cost. Ultra-fast cooling system is complex because of optimizing the temperature control error generated by heat transfer mathematical model and process parameters. In order to simplify the system and improve the temperature control precision in ultra-fast cooling process, several existing models of case-based reasoning(CBR) model are reviewed. Combining with ultra-fast cooling process, a developed R5 CBR model is proposed, which mainly improves the case representation, similarity relation and retrieval module. Certainty factor is defined in semantics memory unit of plate case which provides not only internal data reliability but also product performance reliability. Similarity relation is improved by defined power index similarity membership function. Retrieval process is simplified and retrieval efficiency is improved apparently by windmill retrieval algorithm. The proposed CBR model is used for predicting the case of cooling strategy and its capability is superior to traditional process model. In order to perform comprehensive investigations on ultra-fast cooling process, different steel plates are considered for the experiment. The validation experiment and industrial production of proposed CBR model are carried out, which demonstrated that finish cooling temperature(FCT) error is controlled within ±25°C and quality rate of product is more than 97%. The proposed CBR model can simplify ultra-fast cooling system and give quality performance for steel product.

  17. Fast-cool-down dual gas spray-cooler for pivoted IR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingst, Uwe G.

    2003-09-01

    Fast cool-down Joule-Thomson cooler for IR-detectors are required for all missiles, which shall be operable within a very short time, like IR-missiles being fired from ground against fast approaching fighter aircrafts at low flight-levels. New IR-seeker developments with larger look-angles require often that the IR-sensor is placed on the pivoted gimbal system. Due to space nd weight limitations the fast cool-down cooler for the sensor often cannot be installed there. The way out is the here presented two-stage "Fast Cool-down Dual Gas Spray Cooler." This by patents protected new fast cool-down cooler for pivoted IR-detectors contains an additionally installed 2nd-stage heat exchange-cooler. It comprises at the rear side of the detector-plate a nozzle through which a highly pressurized and pre-cooled gas (e.g. Argon, Nitrogen) is depressurized and thereby cooled down to its boiling temperature. The resulting liquid/vapor gas-flow behind the nozzle acts then as a spray-cooler for the detector. The 1st-stage apparatus consitutes a Joule-Thomson cooler, driven by a gas with a high cooling efficiency, like Methane (CH4) or Tetrafluoromethane (CF4 ≡ R14) to cool down the gas within the 2nd-stage cooler up to the 1st-stage gas boiling temperature. This cooler concept can be rigidly installed within the IR-seeker in such a way that the gas-orifice from the 2nd-stage cooler is just behind the pivoted IR-sensor plate. This solution requires no direct mechanical connection (gas tube) to the detector-plate. No additional weight impacts nor mechanical forces are provided to the gimbal system and its detector except the small kinetic cooler gas flow forces. With such a "Fast Cool-down Dual Gas Spray Cooler-System" with Argon and CF4 or alternatively CH4 a fast-cool down of the IR-detector to 100K (-173°C) has been achieved within less than 2.3 seconds from an ambient soak temperature of 323 K (+50°C). Compared with single-stage Joule-Thomson coolers this concept provides an

  18. Performance analysis of a Pb-Bi cooled fast reactor - PEACER-300 in proliferation resistance and transmutation aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, J. Y.; Kim, M. H.

    2006-07-01

    A design study of 850 MWt lead-bismuth cooled reactor cores is performed to maximize the transmutation of both TRU nuclides in homogeneous fuel pin and long-lived fission products in separate target pins. Transmutation of minor actinide under a closed recycling was analyzed with assumption that decontamination factors in pyro-reprocessing plant data be reasonably high. The optimized design parameter were chosen as of a flat core shape with 50 cm in active core height and 5 m in core diameter, loaded with 17 x 17 arrayed fuel assemblies. A pitch to diameter ratio is 2.2, operating coolant temperature range is 300 deg. C-400 deg. C, and core consists of 3 different enrichment zones with one year cycle length. In safety aspects, this core design satisfied large negative temperature feedback coefficients, and sufficient shutdown margin by primary shutdown system with 20 B{sub 4}C control assemblies and by secondary shutdown system with 40 w/o enriched 12 B{sub 4}C control assemblies. Performance of designed core showed a high transmutation capability with support ratio of 2.085 and less TEX values than other reactor types. Better proliferation resistance could be achieved than other reactor types. (authors)

  19. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-01-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion. PMID:26455901

  20. CALIOP: a multichannel design code for gas-cooled fast reactors. Code description and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.I.

    1980-10-01

    CALIOP is a design code for fluid-cooled reactors composed of parallel fuel tubes in hexagonal or cylindrical ducts. It may be used with gaseous or liquid coolants. It has been used chiefly for design of a helium-cooled fast breeder reactor and has built-in cross section information to permit calculations of fuel loading, breeding ratio, and doubling time. Optional cross-section input allows the code to be used with moderated cores and with other fuels.

  1. Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped lead bismuth alumina borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Goud, K. Krishna Murthy Reddy, M. Chandra Shekhar Rao, B. Appa

    2014-04-24

    Lead bismuth alumina borate glasses codoped with Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} were prepared by melt quenching technique. Optical absorption, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been studied. Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied to to the f ↔ f transitions for evaluating Ω{sub 2}, Ω{sub 4} and Ω{sub 6} parameters. Radiative properties like branching ratio β{sub r} and the radiative life time τ{sub R} have been determined on the basis of Judd-Ofelt theory. Upconversion emissions have been observed under 980nm laser excitation at room temperature. Green and red up-conversion emissions are centered at 530, 550 and 656 nm corresponding to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions of Er{sup 3+} respectively. The results obtained are discussed quantitatively based on the energy transfer between Yb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}.

  2. Oxidation mechanism of T91 steel in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic: with consideration of internal oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhongfei; Wang, Pei; Dong, Hong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Yutuo; Li, Yiyi

    2016-01-01

    Clarification of the microscopic events that occur during oxidation is of great importance for understanding and consequently controlling the oxidation process. In this study the oxidation product formed on T91 ferritic/martensitic steel in oxygen saturated liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 823 K was characterized at the nanoscale using focused-ion beam and transmission electron microscope. An internal oxidation zone (IOZ) under the duplex oxide scale has been confirmed and characterized systematically. Through the microscopic characterization of the IOZ and the inner oxide layer, the micron-scale and nano-scale diffusion of Cr during the oxidation in LBE has been determined for the first time. The micron-scale diffusion of Cr ensures the continuous advancement of IOZ and inner oxide layer, and nano-scale diffusion of Cr gives rise to the typical appearance of the IOZ. Finally, a refined oxidation mechanism including the internal oxidation and the transformation of IOZ to inner oxide layer is proposed based on the discussion. The proposed oxidation mechanism succeeds in bridging the gap between the existing models and experimental observations. PMID:27734928

  3. Oxidation mechanism of T91 steel in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic: with consideration of internal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhongfei; Wang, Pei; Dong, Hong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Yutuo; Li, Yiyi

    2016-10-01

    Clarification of the microscopic events that occur during oxidation is of great importance for understanding and consequently controlling the oxidation process. In this study the oxidation product formed on T91 ferritic/martensitic steel in oxygen saturated liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 823 K was characterized at the nanoscale using focused-ion beam and transmission electron microscope. An internal oxidation zone (IOZ) under the duplex oxide scale has been confirmed and characterized systematically. Through the microscopic characterization of the IOZ and the inner oxide layer, the micron-scale and nano-scale diffusion of Cr during the oxidation in LBE has been determined for the first time. The micron-scale diffusion of Cr ensures the continuous advancement of IOZ and inner oxide layer, and nano-scale diffusion of Cr gives rise to the typical appearance of the IOZ. Finally, a refined oxidation mechanism including the internal oxidation and the transformation of IOZ to inner oxide layer is proposed based on the discussion. The proposed oxidation mechanism succeeds in bridging the gap between the existing models and experimental observations.

  4. Stress corrosion behavior of T91 steel in static lead-bismuth eutectic at 480 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Jiang, Zhizhong; Tian, Shujian; Huang, Qunying; Liu, Yuejing

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of stressed C-rings made of martensitic steel T91 was investigated through constant strain tests. The specimens with different initial hoop stresses (0 MPa, 150 MPa and 300 MPa) were exposed to static oxygen saturated lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 480 °C for 500 h, 1000 h and 1500 h, respectively. The results showed that no crack was found on the outer surface of all the specimens after exposure; and the microscopic analysis showed that the specimens were covered with two oxide layers, which included a magnetite outer layer and a Fe-Cr spinel inner layer. The transformation of spinel into magnetite at the spinel/magnetite interface might be promoted by stress, which increased the difference between the thickness of the inner and outer layers. Moreover, the steel loss was estimated by the observed oxide layers; it increased rapidly when the stress was above 300 MPa, and was about 1.3 times of when the stress was absent.

  5. Capability demonstration of simultaneous proton beam irradiation during exposure to molten lead-bismuth eutectic for HT9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Staffan; Bolind, Alan Michael; Hosemann, Peter; Wang, Yongqiang; Tesmer, Joseph; De Caro, Magdalena Serrano; Bourke, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We report the design and assembly of a corrosion station to enable simultaneous proton irradiation of a metallic surface that was also in contact with molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). The capability has been established at the ion beam materials laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The engineering design focused on temperature and oxygen content control in the LBE, as well as the ability to achieve doses significantly in excess of 1 dpa in the contact region over the irradiation campaigns. In the preliminary demonstration of capability reported here, a sample made of HT9 steel was placed in contact with LBE at 450 °C and irradiated for 58 h at an average proton beam current of 0.3 μA/mm2. SRIM [1] calculations indicate that the nominal surface dose ranged from approximately 3-22 dpa. This paper outlines the experimental setup and design constraints. Characterization of the sample will be reported in a subsequent paper.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanism of Strengthening of Microalloyed Pipeline Steel: Ultra-Fast Cooling (UFC) Versus Laminar Cooling (LC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Wang, X.; Hu, W.; Kang, J.; Yuan, G.; Di, H.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2016-06-01

    A novel thermo-mechanical controlled processing (TMCP) schedule involving ultra-fast cooling (UFC) technique was used to process X70 (420 MPa) microalloyed pipeline steel with high strength-high toughness combination. A relative comparison is made between microstructure and mechanical properties between conventionally processed (CP) and ultra-fast cooled (UFC) pipeline steels, together with differences in strengthening mechanisms with respect to both types of processes. UFC-processed steel exhibited best combination of strength and good toughness compared to the CP process. The microstructure of CP pipeline steel mainly consisted of acicular ferrite (AF), bainitic ferrite (BF), and dispersed secondary martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent and a small fraction of fine quasi-polygonal ferrite. In contrast, the microstructure of UFC-processed pipeline steel was predominantly composed of finer AF, BF, and dispersed M/A constituent. The primary strengthening mechanisms in UFC pipeline steel were grain size strengthening and dislocation strengthening with strength increment of ~277 and ~151 MPa, respectively. However, the strengthening contribution in CP steel was related to grain size strengthening, dislocation strengthening, and precipitation strengthening, and the corresponding strength increments were ~212, ~149 and ~86 MPa, respectively. The decrease in strength induced by reducing Nb and Cr in UFC pipeline steel was compensated by enhancing the contribution of grain size strengthening in the UFC process. In conclusion, cooling schedule of UFC combined with LC is a promising method for processing low-cost pipeline steels.

  7. Fast cooling for a system of stochastic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yongxin Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Pavon, Michele

    2015-11-15

    We study feedback control of coupled nonlinear stochastic oscillators in a force field. We first consider the problem of asymptotically driving the system to a desired steady state corresponding to reduced thermal noise. Among the feedback controls achieving the desired asymptotic transfer, we find that the most efficient one from an energy point of view is characterized by time-reversibility. We also extend the theory of Schrödinger bridges to this model, thereby steering the system in finite time and with minimum effort to a target steady-state distribution. The system can then be maintained in this state through the optimal steady-state feedback control. The solution, in the finite-horizon case, involves a space-time harmonic function φ, and −logφ plays the role of an artificial, time-varying potential in which the desired evolution occurs. This framework appears extremely general and flexible and can be viewed as a considerable generalization of existing active control strategies such as macromolecular cooling. In the case of a quadratic potential, the results assume a form particularly attractive from the algorithmic viewpoint as the optimal control can be computed via deterministic matricial differential equations. An example involving inertial particles illustrates both transient and steady state optimal feedback control.

  8. "Universal" vitrification of cells by ultra-fast cooling.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yun Seok; Nagrath, Sunitha; Moore, Alessandra L; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Irimia, Daniel; Stott, Shannon L; Toth, Thomas L; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-03-01

    Long-term preservation of live cells is critical for a broad range of clinical and research applications. With the increasing diversity of cells that need to be preserved (e.g. oocytes, stem and other primary cells, genetically modified cells), careful optimization of preservation protocols becomes tedious and poses significant limitations for all but the most expert users. To address the challenge of long-term storage of critical, heterogeneous cell types, we propose a universal protocol for cell vitrification that is independent of cell phenotype and uses only low concentrations of cryoprotectant (1.5 M PROH and 0.5 M trehalose). We employed industrial grade microcapillaries made of highly conductive fused silica, which are commonly used for analytical chemistry applications. The minimal mass and thermal inertia of the microcapillaries enabled us to achieve ultrafast cooling rates up to 4,000 K/s. Using the same low, non-toxic concentration of cryoprotectant, we demonstrate high recovery and viability rates after vitrification for human mammary epithelial cells, rat hepatocytes, tumor cells from pleural effusions, and multiple cancer cell lines.

  9. Fast cooling for a system of stochastic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongxin; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Pavon, Michele

    2015-11-01

    We study feedback control of coupled nonlinear stochastic oscillators in a force field. We first consider the problem of asymptotically driving the system to a desired steady state corresponding to reduced thermal noise. Among the feedback controls achieving the desired asymptotic transfer, we find that the most efficient one from an energy point of view is characterized by time-reversibility. We also extend the theory of Schrödinger bridges to this model, thereby steering the system in finite time and with minimum effort to a target steady-state distribution. The system can then be maintained in this state through the optimal steady-state feedback control. The solution, in the finite-horizon case, involves a space-time harmonic function φ, and -logφ plays the role of an artificial, time-varying potential in which the desired evolution occurs. This framework appears extremely general and flexible and can be viewed as a considerable generalization of existing active control strategies such as macromolecular cooling. In the case of a quadratic potential, the results assume a form particularly attractive from the algorithmic viewpoint as the optimal control can be computed via deterministic matricial differential equations. An example involving inertial particles illustrates both transient and steady state optimal feedback control.

  10. Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Ludewig, Hans; Jo, Jae

    2006-07-01

    A series of transient analyses using the system code RELAP5-3d has been performed to confirm the efficacy of a proposed hybrid active/passive combination approach to the decay heat removal for an advanced 2400 MWt GEN-IV gas-cooled fast reactor. The accident sequence of interest is a station blackout simultaneous with a small break (10 sq.inch/0.645 m{sup 2}) in the reactor vessel. The analyses cover the three phases of decay heat removal in a depressurization accident: (1) forced flow cooling by the power conversion unit (PCU) coast down, (2) active forced flow cooling by a battery powered blower, and (3) passive cooling by natural circulation. The blower is part of an emergency cooling system (ECS) that by design is to sustain passive decay heat removal via natural circulation cooling 24 hours after shutdown. The RELAP5 model includes the helium-cooled reactor, the ECS (primary and secondary side), the PCU with all the rotating machinery (turbine and compressors) and the heat transfer components (recuperator, pre-cooler and inter-cooler), and the guard containment that surrounds the reactor and the PCU. The transient analysis has demonstrated the effectiveness of passive decay heat removal by natural circulation cooling when the guard containment pressure is maintained at or above 800 kPa. (authors)

  11. Gas-cooled fast reactor program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    Since the national Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program has been terminated, this document is the last progress report until reinstatement. It is divided into three sections: Core Flow Test Loop, GCFR shielding and physics, and GCFR pressure vessel and closure studies. (DLC)

  12. Chemical states of 3d transition metal impurities in a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic analyzed using first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeong-Hwan; Oda, Takuji

    2017-04-12

    Steels are easily corroded in a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) because their components, such as Fe, Cr and Ni, exhibit a high solubility in the liquid LBE. To understand the reason for such a high solubility of these 3d transition metals, we have performed first-principles molecular dynamics calculations and analyzed the pair-correlation functions, electronic densities of states, and Bader charges and volumes of the 3d transition metals dissolved in the liquid LBE as impurities. The calculations show that the 4s and 3d orbitals of the 3d impurity atoms largely interact with the 6p band of the LBE, which generates bonding orbitals. We suggest that the high stability of 3d metals in the liquid LBE is caused by the interactions of the 4s and 3d orbitals with the 6p band. Spin polarization is induced by V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co impurity atoms in a similar manner to the Slater-Pauling curve of solid transition metals, which exhibits a downward shift in the atomic number by approximately two. Based on the degree of spin polarization and the shifted trend of the Slater-Pauling curve, we suggest that Ni exhibits a higher solubility than Cr and Fe because of the differences in their interaction strengths between their 3d orbitals and the 6p band. In addition, the 4s and 3d orbitals of the 3d impurity atoms were found to interact more favorably with the Bi 6p band than the Pb 6p band, which is consistent with the fact that liquid Bi is more corrosive to steels than is liquid Pb.

  13. Rapid hydrothermal cooling above the axial melt lens at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Koepke, Juergen; Kirchner, Clemens; Götze, Niko; Behrens, Harald

    2014-09-11

    Axial melt lenses sandwiched between the lower oceanic crust and the sheeted dike sequences at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are assumed to be the major magma source of oceanic crust accretion. According to the widely discussed "gabbro glacier" model, the formation of the lower oceanic crust requires efficient cooling of the axial melt lens, leading to partial crystallization and crystal-melt mush subsiding down to lower crust. These processes are believed to be controlled by periodical magma replenishment and hydrothermal circulation above the melt lens. Here we quantify the cooling rate above melt lens using chemical zoning of plagioclase from hornfelsic recrystallized sheeted dikes drilled from the East Pacific at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D. We estimate the cooling rate using a forward modelling approach based on CaAl-NaSi interdiffusion in plagioclase. The results show that cooling from the peak thermal overprint at 1000-1050°C to 600°C are yielded within about 10-30 years as a result of hydrothermal circulation above melt lens during magma starvation. The estimated rapid hydrothermal cooling explains how the effective heat extraction from melt lens is achieved at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  14. Rapid hydrothermal cooling above the axial melt lens at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Koepke, Juergen; Kirchner, Clemens; Götze, Niko; Behrens, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Axial melt lenses sandwiched between the lower oceanic crust and the sheeted dike sequences at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are assumed to be the major magma source of oceanic crust accretion. According to the widely discussed “gabbro glacier” model, the formation of the lower oceanic crust requires efficient cooling of the axial melt lens, leading to partial crystallization and crystal-melt mush subsiding down to lower crust. These processes are believed to be controlled by periodical magma replenishment and hydrothermal circulation above the melt lens. Here we quantify the cooling rate above melt lens using chemical zoning of plagioclase from hornfelsic recrystallized sheeted dikes drilled from the East Pacific at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D. We estimate the cooling rate using a forward modelling approach based on CaAl-NaSi interdiffusion in plagioclase. The results show that cooling from the peak thermal overprint at 1000–1050°C to 600°C are yielded within about 10–30 years as a result of hydrothermal circulation above melt lens during magma starvation. The estimated rapid hydrothermal cooling explains how the effective heat extraction from melt lens is achieved at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges. PMID:25209311

  15. Ultra fast cooling of hot steel plate by air atomized spray with salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Soumya S.; Ravikumar, Satya V.; Jha, Jay M.; Singh, Akhilendra K.; Bhattacharya, Chandrima; Pal, Surjya K.; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the applicability of air atomized spray with the salt added water has been studied for ultra fast cooling (UFC) of a 6 mm thick AISI-304 hot steel plate. The investigation includes the effect of salt (NaCl and MgSO4) concentration and spray mass flux on the cooling rate. The initial temperature of the steel plate before the commencement of cooling is kept at 900 °C or above, which is usually observed as the "finish rolling temperature" in the hot strip mill of a steel plant. The heat transfer analysis shows that air atomized spray with the MgSO4 salt produces 1.5 times higher cooling rate than atomized spray with the pure water, whereas air atomized spray with NaCl produces only 1.2 times higher cooling rate. In transition boiling regime, the salt deposition occurs which causes enhancement in heat transfer rate by conduction. Moreover, surface tension is the governing parameter behind the vapour film instability and this length scale increases with increase in surface tension of coolant. Overall, the achieved cooling rates produced by both types of salt added air atomized spray are found to be in the UFC regime.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  17. Accident Analysis Simulation in Modular 300MWt Gas Cooled Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Su'ud

    2017-01-01

    Safety analysis of 300MWt helium gas cooled long-life fast reactors has been performed. The analysis of unprotected loss of flow(ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient overpower (UTOP) are discussed. Some simulations for 300 MWt He gas cooled fast reactors has been performed and the results show that the reactor can anticipate complete pumping failure inherently by reducing power through reactivity feedback and remove the rest of heat through natural circulations. GCFR relatively has hard spectrum so it has relatively small Doppler coefficient. In the UTOP accident case the analysis has been performed against external reactivity up to 0.002dk/k. In addition the steam generator design has also consider excess power during severe UTOP case..

  18. Development of fast cooling pulsed magnets at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tao; Sun, Quqin; Zhao, Jianlong; Jiang, Fan; Li, Liang; Xu, Qiang; Herlach, Fritz

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed magnets with fast cooling channels have been developed at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. Between the inner and outer sections of a coil wound with a continuous length of CuNb wire, G10 rods with cross section 4 mm × 5 mm were inserted as spacers around the entire circumference, parallel to the coil axis. The free space between adjacent rods is 6 mm. The liquid nitrogen flows freely in the channels between these rods, and in the direction perpendicular to the rods through grooves provided in the rods. For a typical 60 T pulsed magnetic field with pulse duration of 40 ms, the cooling time between subsequent pulses is reduced from 160 min to 35 min. Subsequently, the same technology was applied to a 50 T magnet with 300 ms pulse duration. The cooling time of this magnet was reduced from 480 min to 65 min.

  19. Development of fast cooling pulsed magnets at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Tao; Sun, Quqin; Zhao, Jianlong; Jiang, Fan; Li, Liang; Xu, Qiang; Herlach, Fritz

    2013-12-15

    Pulsed magnets with fast cooling channels have been developed at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. Between the inner and outer sections of a coil wound with a continuous length of CuNb wire, G10 rods with cross section 4 mm × 5 mm were inserted as spacers around the entire circumference, parallel to the coil axis. The free space between adjacent rods is 6 mm. The liquid nitrogen flows freely in the channels between these rods, and in the direction perpendicular to the rods through grooves provided in the rods. For a typical 60 T pulsed magnetic field with pulse duration of 40 ms, the cooling time between subsequent pulses is reduced from 160 min to 35 min. Subsequently, the same technology was applied to a 50 T magnet with 300 ms pulse duration. The cooling time of this magnet was reduced from 480 min to 65 min.

  20. Development of fast cooling pulsed magnets at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tao; Sun, Quqin; Zhao, Jianlong; Jiang, Fan; Li, Liang; Xu, Qiang; Herlach, Fritz

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed magnets with fast cooling channels have been developed at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. Between the inner and outer sections of a coil wound with a continuous length of CuNb wire, G10 rods with cross section 4 mm × 5 mm were inserted as spacers around the entire circumference, parallel to the coil axis. The free space between adjacent rods is 6 mm. The liquid nitrogen flows freely in the channels between these rods, and in the direction perpendicular to the rods through grooves provided in the rods. For a typical 60 T pulsed magnetic field with pulse duration of 40 ms, the cooling time between subsequent pulses is reduced from 160 min to 35 min. Subsequently, the same technology was applied to a 50 T magnet with 300 ms pulse duration. The cooling time of this magnet was reduced from 480 min to 65 min.

  1. Measurements of thermal-hydraulic parameters in liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sackett, J.I.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses instrumentation for liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR's). Included is instrumentation to measure sodium flow, pressure, temperature, acoustic noise, sodium purity, and leakage. The paper identifies the overall instrumentation requirements for LMFBR's and those aspects of instrumentation which are unique or of special concern to LMFBR systems. It also gives an overview of the status of instrument design and performance.

  2. Development of a neutronics calculation method for designing commercial type Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Shimazu, Y.; Hibi, K.; Fujimura, K.

    2012-07-01

    Under the R and D project to improve the modeling accuracy for the design of fast breeder reactors the authors are developing a neutronics calculation method for designing a large commercial type sodium- cooled fast reactor. The calculation method is established by taking into account the special features of the reactor such as the use of annular fuel pellet, inner duct tube in large fuel assemblies, large core. The Verification and Validation, and Uncertainty Qualification (V and V and UQ) of the calculation method is being performed by using measured data from the prototype FBR Monju. The results of this project will be used in the design and analysis of the commercial type demonstration FBR, known as the Japanese Sodium fast Reactor (JSFR). (authors)

  3. Numerical model of crustal accretion and cooling rates of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machetel, P.; Garrido, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We designed a thermo-mechanical numerical model for fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge with variable viscosity, hydrothermal cooling, latent heat release, sheeted dyke layer, and variable melt intrusion possibilities. The model allows for modulating several accretion possibilities such as the "gabbro glacier" (G), the "sheeted sills" (S) or the "mixed shallow and MTZ lenses" (M). These three crustal accretion modes have been explored assuming viscosity contrasts of 2 to 3 orders of magnitude between strong and weak phases and various hydrothermal cooling conditions depending on the cracking temperatures value. Mass conservation (stream-function), momentum (vorticity) and temperature equations are solved in 2-D cartesian geometry using 2-D, alternate direction, implicit and semi-implicit finite-difference scheme. In a first step, an Eulerian approach is used solving iteratively the motion and temperature equations until reaching steady states. With this procedure, the temperature patterns and motions that are obtained for the various crustal intrusion modes and hydrothermal cooling hypotheses display significant differences near the mid-ocean ridge axis. In a second step, a Lagrangian approach is used, recording the thermal histories and cooling rates of tracers travelling from the ridge axis to their final emplacements in the crust far from the mid-ocean ridge axis. The results show that the tracer's thermal histories are depending on the temperature patterns and the crustal accretion modes near the mid-ocean ridge axis. The instantaneous cooling rates obtained from these thermal histories betray these discrepancies and might therefore be used to characterize the crustal accretion mode at the ridge axis. These deciphering effects are even more pronounced if we consider the average cooling rates occurring over a prescribed temperature range. Two situations were tested at 1275-1125 °C and 1050-850 °C. The first temperature range covers mainly the crystallization range

  4. SSTAR: The U.S. Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C F; Halsey, W G; Brown, N W; Sienicki, J J; Moisseytsev, A; Wade, D C

    2007-09-25

    It is widely recognized that the developing world is the next area for major energy demand growth, including demand for new and advanced nuclear energy systems. With limited existing industrial and grid infrastructures, there will be an important need for future nuclear energy systems that can provide small or moderate increments of electric power (10-700 MWe) on small or immature grids in developing nations. Most recently, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) has identified, as one of its key objectives, the development and demonstration of concepts for small and medium sized reactors (SMRs) that can be globally deployed while assuring a high level of proliferation resistance. Lead-cooled systems offer several key advantages in meeting these goals. The small lead-cooled fast reactor concept known as the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) reactor has been under ongoing development under the U.S. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. It a system designed to provide energy security to developing nations while incorporating features to achieve nonproliferation aims, anticipating GNEP objectives. This paper presents the motivation for development of internationally deployable nuclear energy systems as well as a summary of one such system, SSTAR, which is the U.S. Generation IV Lead-cooled Fast Reactor system.

  5. Performance of Liquid Metals in Natural Circulation Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ceballos, Carlos; Lathouwers, Danny; Verkooijen, Adrian

    2004-07-01

    The inherent safety capability of natural circulation makes reactor design more reliable. Additionally, the construction and operation of a nuclear power plant with natural circulation in the primary cooling circuit is an interesting alternative for nuclear plant designers, due to their lower operational and investment costs obtained by simplifying systems and controls. This paper deals with the feasibility of application of natural circulation in the primary cooling circuit of a liquid metal fast reactor. The methodology employed is a non-dimensional analysis, which describes the relationship between the physical properties and system variables. The performance criterion is bounded by a safety argument, referring to the maximum cladding temperature allowed during operation. The study considers several coolants, which can play a part in reactor cooling systems, such as lead, lead-bismuth and sodium. Bismuth and gallium are included in this analysis, in order to extend the range of properties for reference purposes. The results present a characterization of natural circulation flow in a reactor and compare the cooling capabilities from different liquid metals coolants. (authors)

  6. Systems design of direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Okano, Yashushi

    1995-01-01

    The system design of a direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactor is presented. The supercritical water does not exhibit a change of phase. the recirculation system, steam separator, and dryer of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are unnecessary. Roughly speaking, the reactor pressure vessel and control rods are similar to those of a pressurized water reactor, the containment and emergency core cooling system are similar to a BWR, and the balance of plant is similar to a supercritical-pressure fossil-fired power plant (FPP). the electric power of the fast converter is 1,508 MW(electric). The number of coolant loops is only two because of the high coolant enthalpy. Containment volume is much reduced. The thermal efficiency is improved 24% over a BWR. The coolant void reactivity is negative by placing thin zirconium-hydride layers between seeds and blankets. The power costs would be much reduced compared with those of a light water reactor (LWR) and a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor. The concept is based on the huge amount of experience with the water coolant technology of LWRs and FPPs. The oxidation of stainless steel cladding is avoided by adopting a much lower coolant temperature than that of the FPP.

  7. Test case specifications for coupled neutronics-thermal hydraulics calculation of Gas-cooled Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuský, F.; Bahdanovich, R.; Farkas, G.; Haščík, J.; Tikhomirov, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is focused on development of the coupled neutronics-thermal hydraulics model for the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor. It is necessary to carefully investigate coupled calculations of new concepts to avoid recriticality scenarios, as it is not possible to ensure sub-critical state for a fast reactor core under core disruptive accident conditions. Above mentioned calculations are also very suitable for development of new passive or inherent safety systems that can mitigate the occurrence of the recriticality scenarios. In the paper, the most promising fuel material compositions together with a geometry model are described for the Gas-cooled fast reactor. Seven fuel pin and fuel assembly geometry is proposed as a test case for coupled calculation with three different enrichments of fissile material in the form of Pu-UC. The reflective boundary condition is used in radial directions of the test case and vacuum boundary condition is used in axial directions. During these condition, the nuclear system is in super-critical state and to achieve a stable state (which is numerical representation of operational conditions) it is necessary to decrease the reactivity of the system. The iteration scheme is proposed, where SCALE code system is used for collapsing of a macroscopic cross-section into few group representation as input for coupled code NESTLE.

  8. ATWS Transients for the 2400 MWt Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng,L.Y.; Ludewig, H.

    2007-08-05

    Reactivity transients have been analyzed with an updated RELAPS-3D (ver. 2.4.2) system model of the pin core design for the 2400MWt gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR). Additional reactivity parameters were incorporated in the RELAP5 point-kinetics model to account for reactivity feedbacks due to axial and radial expansion of the core, fuel temperature changes (Doppler effect), and pressure changes (helium density changes). Three reactivity transients without scram were analyzed and the incidents were initiated respectively by reactivity ramp, loss of load, and depressurization. During the course of the analysis the turbine bypass model for the power conversion unit (PCU) was revised to enable a better utilization of forced flow cooling after the PCU is tripped. The analysis of the reactivity transients demonstrates the significant impact of the PCU on system pressure and core flow. Results from the modified turbine bypass model suggest a success path for the GCFR to mitigate reactivity transients without scram.

  9. Post-dryout heat transfer in sodium-cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    The heat-transfer behavior of a heat-generating, dry, particulate bed resulting from a postulated core meltdown accident in sodium-cooled fast reactors is investigated theoretically. The processes of combined conduction and thermal radiation in the dry particulate bed and transient heat conduction in the structure in contact with the bed are modeled. Also modeled is the contribution of direct gamma-ray radiation to heat transfer. Results for the transient temperature distribution of the system are obtained by the method of successive approximation. Various post-dryout situations are considered and the conditions leading either to an incipient melting system or to a coolable non-melting system are identified. These are found to depend on four groups of dimensionless parameters, namely, the thermal property group, the radiation and internal heating group, the gamma-ray heating group, and the external cooling group.

  10. Effect of accidental steam entry on gas-cooled fast reactor integral neutronics parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Morman, J.A.; Bucher, R.G.; Smith, D.M.; Robinson, W.R.; Bennett, E.F.

    1980-10-01

    A possible accident scenario in a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is the leakage of secondary steam into the core. A full-scale experimental study of the physics effects of such an accidental condition has been performed on the zero power reactor (ZPR)-9 critical facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The results of integral neutronics measurements performed on the simulated steam-flooded GCFR core are reported, and comparisons with corresponding results for the reference GCFR core presented. Results of calculations of these parameters with ENDF/B-IV nuclear data and standard design methods are also presented. 26 refs.

  11. Qualification of Simulation Software for Safety Assessment of Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors. Requirements and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Pointer, William David; Sieger, Matt; Flanagan, George F.; Moe, Wayne; HolbrookINL, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this review is to enable application of codes or software packages for safety assessment of advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) designs. To address near-term programmatic needs, the authors have focused on two objectives. First, the authors have focused on identification of requirements for software QA that must be satisfied to enable the application of software to future safety analyses. Second, the authors have collected best practices applied by other code development teams to minimize cost and time of initial code qualification activities and to recommend a path to the stated goal.

  12. Pattern recognition techniques applied to acoustic detection of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor cooling defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet, M.; Dubuisson, B.

    1983-08-01

    In the event of a partial or total blockage of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core subassembly, a boiling zone may be created. Acoustic signals from such a zone could provide a means of early detection of accident conditions. A three-step method, based on pattern recognition techniques, is described and used to analyze data from three experiments that simulate core cooling fault conditions. This method is shown to be capable of detecting the abnormal situation in each of the experiments analyzed.

  13. Numerical studies of fast ion slowing down rates in cool magnetized plasma using LSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eugene S.; Kolmes, Elijah; Cohen, Samuel A.; Rognlien, Tom; Cohen, Bruce; Meier, Eric; Welch, Dale R.

    2016-10-01

    In MFE devices, rapid transport of fusion products from the core into the scrape-off layer (SOL) could perform the dual roles of energy and ash removal. The first-orbit trajectories of most fusion products from small field-reversed configuration (FRC) devices will traverse the SOL, allowing those particles to deposit their energy in the SOL and be exhausted along the open field lines. Thus, the fast ion slowing-down time should affect the energy balance of an FRC reactor and its neutron emissions. However, the dynamics of fast ion energy loss processes under the conditions expected in the FRC SOL (with ρe <λDe) are analytically complex, and not yet fully understood. We use LSP, a 3D electromagnetic PIC code, to examine the effects of SOL density and background B-field on the slowing-down time of fast ions in a cool plasma. As we use explicit algorithms, these simulations must spatially resolve both ρe and λDe, as well as temporally resolve both Ωe and ωpe, increasing computation time. Scaling studies of the fast ion charge (Z) and background plasma density are in good agreement with unmagnetized slowing down theory. Notably, Z-scaling represents a viable way to dramatically reduce the required CPU time for each simulation. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Inherent Prevention and Mitigation of Severe Accident Consequences in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Roald A. Wigeland; James E. Cahalan

    2011-04-01

    Safety challenges for sodium-cooled fast reactors include maintaining core temperatures within design limits and assuring the geometry and integrity of the reactor core. Due to the high power density in the reactor core, heat removal requirements encourage the use of high-heat-transfer coolants such as liquid sodium. The variation of power across the core requires ducted assemblies to control fuel and coolant temperatures, which are also used to constrain core geometry. In a fast reactor, the fuel is not in the most neutronically reactive configuration during normal operation. Accidents leading to fuel melting, fuel pin failure, and fuel relocation can result in positive reactivity, increasing power, and possibly resulting in severe accident consequences including recriticalities that could threaten reactor and containment integrity. Inherent safety concepts, including favorable reactivity feedback, natural circulation cooling, and design choices resulting in favorable dispersive characteristics for failed fuel, can be used to increase the level of safety to the point where it is highly unlikely, or perhaps even not credible, for such severe accident consequences to occur.

  15. An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

    2007-11-01

    The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs – loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphénix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANL’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed.

  16. Plant control of a fast breeder reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, T.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    1997-12-01

    Supercritical water does not exhibit a change of phase. The plant system of the supercritical water cooled reactor is the once-through, direct-cycle where the steam-water separator and coolant recirculation systems are eliminated. It is different from those of BWR and PWR. The reactor is sensitive to the perturbations of the feedwater flow rate, since the whole core coolant driven by the feedwater pumps flows to the turbines. The axial coolant density change is larger than that of a BWR. Pressure control by the feedwater like the supercritical fossil-fired power plant (FPP) is not appropriate because the change of feedwater flow rate largely affects the core power through the coolant density feedback. It is necessary to analyze the controllability of the plant against coolant flow and pressure perturbations for assessing the technical feasibility of the reactor. The plant behaviors of a fast breeder reactor cooled by supercritical water (SCFBR) are analyzed for three principal perturbations: the change of the control rod position, the feedwater flow rate and the turbine control valve opening. Based on the step responses to the perturbations, the plant control system is designed: the pressure is controlled by the turbine control valves, the main steam temperature is controlled by the feedwater flow rate and the core power is controlled by the control rods. Parameters of the control system are selected by the test calculations to satisfy both fast convergence and stability criteria. The plant behaviors with the designed plant control system are stable against the perturbations. The reactor cooled by supercritical light water is controllable with the plant control system designed here. 7 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. A 100 MWe advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor core concept

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R. N.

    2012-07-01

    An Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) was developed targeting a small electrical grid to be transportable to the plant site and operable for a long time without frequent refueling. The reactor power rating was strategically decided to be 100 MWe, and the core barrel diameter was limited to 3.0 m for transportability. The design parameters were determined by relaxing the peak fast fluence limit and bulk coolant outlet temperature to beyond irradiation experience assuming that advanced cladding and structural materials developed under US-DOE programs would be available when the AFR-100 is deployed. With a de-rated power density and U-Zr binary metallic fuel, the AFR-100 can maintain criticality for 30 years without refueling. The average discharge burnup of 101 MWd/kg is comparable to conventional design values, but the peak discharge fast fluence of {approx}6x10{sup 23} neutrons/cm{sup 2} is beyond the current irradiation experiences with HT-9 cladding. The evaluated reactivity coefficients provide sufficient negative feedbacks and the reactivity control systems provide sufficient shutdown margins. The integral reactivity parameters obtained from quasi-static reactivity balance analysis indicate that the AFR-100 meets the sufficient conditions for acceptable asymptotic core outlet temperature following postulated unprotected accidents. Additionally, the AFR-100 has sufficient thermal margins by grouping the fuel assemblies into eight orifice zones. (authors)

  18. Effect of welding thermal cycles on the oxidation resistance of 9 wt.% Cr heat resistant steels in 550 °C lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Rong, Lijian; Li, Dianzhong; Lu, Shanping

    2016-12-01

    The oxidation resistance for the heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal of 9 wt.% Cr heat resistant steel in 550 °C lead-bismuth eutectic has been investigated. The oxide film presents a three-layer structure. The outer layer is Fe3O4 while the inner layer is mainly FeCr2O4. The oxide film thickness becomes thinner and thinner in turns of the coarse grained HAZ, fine grained HAZ, inter-critical HAZ and base metal. The oxygen diffusion is the rate determining step during the oxidation process. The Cr-enriched M23C6 plays a significant role on the oxidation rate at the initial stage of oxidation. Increasing the carbon content is a useful method to improve the oxidation resistance.

  19. Engineering the mobility increment in pentacene-based field-effect transistors by fast cooling of polymeric modification layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Haifeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Chen, Yan; Shao, Yaqing; Li, Wen; Li, Huanqun; Chen, Xudong; Yi, Mingdong; Xie, Linghai; Huang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of the cooling rate of polymeric modification layers (PMLs) on the mobility improvement of pentacene-based organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). In contrast to slow cooling (SC), the OFETs fabricated through fast cooling (FC) with PMLs containing side chain-phenyl rings, such as polystyrene (PS) and poly (4-vinylphenol) (PVP), show an obvious mobility incensement compared with that of π-group free polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and x-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations have showed that fast-cooled PMLs could effectively enhance the crystallinity of pentacene, which might be related to the optimized homogeneity of surface energy on the surface of polymeric dielectrics. Our work has demonstrated that FC treatment could be a potential strategy for performance modulation of OFETs.

  20. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-30

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  1. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  2. Safety design approach for external events in Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, H.; Kubo, S.; Tani, A.; Nishino, H.; Sakai, T.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a safety design approach for external events in the design study of Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor. An emphasis is introduction of a design extension external condition (DEEC). In addition to seismic design, other external events such as tsunami, strong wind, abnormal temperature, etc. were addressed in this study. From a wide variety of external events consisting of natural hazards and human-induced ones, a screening method was developed in terms of siting, consequence, frequency to select representative events. Design approaches for these events were categorized on the probabilistic, statistical and deterministic basis. External hazard conditions were considered mainly for DEECs. In the probabilistic approach, the DEECs of earthquake, tsunami and strong wind were defined as 1/10 of exceedance probability of the external design bases. The other representative DEECs were also defined based on statistical or deterministic approaches. (authors)

  3. Method of detecting leakage of reactor core components of liquid metal cooled fast reactors

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Fred E.; Cash, Robert J.; Schenter, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of detecting the failure of a sealed non-fueled core component of a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor having an inert cover gas. A gas mixture is incorporated in the component which includes Xenon-124; under neutron irradiation, Xenon-124 is converted to radioactive Xenon-125. The cover gas is scanned by a radiation detector. The occurrence of 188 Kev gamma radiation and/or other identifying gamma radiation-energy level indicates the presence of Xenon-125 and therefore leakage of a component. Similarly, Xe-126, which transmutes to Xe-127 and Kr-84, which produces Kr-85.sup.m can be used for detection of leakage. Different components are charged with mixtures including different ratios of isotopes other than Xenon-124. On detection of the identifying radiation, the cover gas is subjected to mass spectroscopic analysis to locate the leaking component.

  4. A Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor with a Fusion Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.; Beavers, V.L.; Casino, W.A.; Cheatham, J.R.; Friis, Z.W.; Green, R.D.; Hamilton, W.R.; Haufler, K.W.; Hutchinson, J.D.; Lackey, W.J.; Lorio, R.A.; Maddox, J.W.; Mandrekas, J.; Manzoor, A.A.; Noelke, C.A.; Oliveira, C. de; Park, M.; Tedder, D.W.; Terry, M.R.; Hoffman, E.A.

    2005-05-15

    A design is presented for a subcritical, He-cooled fast reactor, driven by a tokamak D-T fusion neutron source, for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The reactor is fueled with coated transuranic (TRU) particles and is intended for the deep-burn (>90%) transmutation of the TRUs in SNF without reprocessing of the coated fuel particles. The reactor design is based on the materials, fuel, and separations technologies under near-term development in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Program and on the plasma physics and fusion technologies under near-term development in the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program, with the objective of intermediate-term ({approx}2040) deployment. The physical and performance characteristics and research and development requirements of such a reactor are described.

  5. Impact of nuclear data on sodium-cooled fast reactor calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aures, Alexander; Bostelmann, Friederike; Zwermann, Winfried; Velkov, Kiril

    2016-03-01

    Neutron transport and depletion calculations are performed in combination with various nuclear data libraries in order to assess the impact of nuclear data on safety-relevant parameters of sodium-cooled fast reactors. These calculations are supplemented by systematic uncertainty analyses with respect to nuclear data. Analysed quantities are the multiplication factor and nuclide densities as a function of burn-up and the Doppler and Na-void reactivity coefficients at begin of cycle. While ENDF/B-VII.0 / -VII.1 yield rather consistent results, larger discrepancies are observed between the JEFF libraries. While the newest evaluation, JEFF-3.2, agrees with the ENDF/B-VII libraries, the JEFF-3.1.2 library yields significant larger multiplication factors.

  6. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  7. Electrochemical and Mechanical Behavior of Lead-Silver and Lead-Bismuth Casting Alloys for Lead-Acid Battery Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Wislei R.; Peixoto, Leandro C.; Garcia, Amauri

    2015-09-01

    The present study focuses on the interrelation of microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of Pb-Ag and Pb-Bi casting alloys, which can be used in the manufacture of lead-acid battery components, as potential alternatives to alloys currently used. A water-cooled solidification system is used, in which vertical upward directional solidification is promoted permitting a wide range of microstructures to be investigated. Correlations between microstructural arrays, tensile strengths, and corrosion resistances of Pb-1 wt pct Ag, Pb-2.5 wt pct Ag, Pb-1 wt pct Bi, and Pb-2.5 wt pct Bi alloys are envisaged. It is shown that a compromise between corrosion resistance (represented by the corrosion current density) and mechanical properties (represented by the ultimate tensile strength) can be obtained. Comparisons between specific strengths and mechanical/corrosion ratios are also made. It is also shown that, for microstructures solidified under cooling rates higher than 10 K/s, the Pb-Ag alloys exhibit higher specific strength and mechanical/corrosion ratio. In contrast, for casting processes in which the cooling rates are lower than 5 K/s, the dilute Pb-Bi alloy ( i.e., 1 wt pct Bi) is shown to have more appropriate requirements for lead-acid battery components. Comparisons between specific strengths, mechanical/corrosion ratio, and relative weight and cost with Pb-Sn and Pb-Sb alloys are also made.

  8. Experimental investigation of a new method for advanced fast reactor shutdown cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakholkov, V. V.; Kandaurov, A. A.; Potseluev, A. I.; Rogozhkin, S. A.; Sergeev, D. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Shepelev, S. F.

    2017-07-01

    We consider a new method for fast reactor shutdown cooling using a decay heat removal system (DHRS) with a check valve. In this method, a coolant from the decay heat exchanger (DHX) immersed into the reactor upper plenum is supplied to the high-pressure plenum and, then, inside the fuel subassemblies (SAs). A check valve installed at the DHX outlet opens by the force of gravity after primary pumps (PP-1) are shut down. Experimental studies of the new and alternative methods of shutdown cooling were performed at the TISEY test facility at OKBM. The velocity fields in the upper plenum of the reactor model were obtained using the optical particle image velocimetry developed at the Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences). The study considers the process of development of natural circulation in the reactor and the DHRS models and the corresponding evolution of the temperature and velocity fields. A considerable influence of the valve position in the displacer of the primary pump on the natural circulation of water in the reactor through the DHX was discovered (in some modes, circulation reversal through the DHX was obtained). Alternative DHRS designs without a shell at the DHX outlet with open and closed check valve are also studied. For an open check valve, in spite of the absence of a shell, part of the flow is supplied through the DHX pipeline and then inside the SA simulators. When simulating power modes of the reactor operation, temperature stratification of the liquid was observed, which increased in the cooling mode via the DHRS. These data qualitatively agree with the results of tests at BN-600 and BN-800 reactors.

  9. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Lap-Yan; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2009-01-01

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow weremore » evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.« less

  10. CFD Modeling of Sodium-Oxide Deposition in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Compact Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Tatli, Emre; Ferroni, Paolo; Mazzoccoli, Jason

    2015-09-02

    The possible use of compact heat exchangers (HXs) in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) employing a Brayton cycle is promising due to their high power density and resulting small volume in comparison with conventional shell-and-tube HXs. However, the small diameter of their channels makes them more susceptible to plugging due to Na2O deposition during accident conditions. Although cold traps are designed to reduce oxygen impurity levels in the sodium coolant, their failure, in conjunction with accidental air ingress into the sodium boundary, could result in coolant oxygen levels that are above the saturation limit in the cooler parts of the HX channels. This can result in Na2O crystallization and the formation of solid deposits on cooled channel surfaces, limiting or even blocking coolant flow. The development of analysis tools capable of modeling the formation of these deposits in the presence of sodium flow will allow designers of SFRs to properly size the HX channels so that, in the scenario mentioned above, the reactor operator has sufficient time to detect and react to the affected HX. Until now, analytical methodologies to predict the formation of these deposits have been developed, but never implemented in a high-fidelity computational tool suited to modern reactor design techniques. This paper summarizes the challenges and the current status in the development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology to predict deposit formation, with particular emphasis on sensitivity studies on some parameters affecting deposition.

  11. A physics study for negative void reactivity in compact supercritical CO{sub 2}-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Hartanto, D.; Lee, J. I.

    2013-07-01

    A compact S-CO{sub 2}-cooled fast reactor which has negative Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR) has been investigated. A negative CVR is important for the gas cooled fast reactor as an inherent safety mechanism to prevent the sudden positive reactivity insertion when the loss of coolant accident happens. An alternative solution to reduce the CVR is investigated in this study by using O-17 instead of O-16 in UO{sub 2} fuel. By using O-17 in the fuel, it is found that the CVR can even be negative. Impacts of the radial reflector on the CVR are also evaluated for the small SCO{sub 2} cooled fast reactor in this study. We have considered a pure lead (Pb) reflector and a lead magnesium eutectic (LME) reflector as alternative radial reflectors of the S-CO 2-cooled fast reactor. It has been shown that, with the LME radial reflector, the CVR can be negative, while the pure lead reflector provides a slightly positive CVR. (authors)

  12. Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R.; Hodgson, K.M.

    2008-01-15

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the

  13. Analysis of the conceptual shielding design for the upflow Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.; Reed, D.A.; Cramer, S.N.; Emmett, M.B.; Tomlinson, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    Conceptual Shielding Configuration III for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) was analyzed by performing global calculations of neutron and gamma-ray fluences and correcting the results as appropriate with bias factors from localized calculations. Included among the localized calculations were the radial and axial cell streaming calculations, plus extensive preliminary calculations and three final confirmation calculations of the plenum flow-through shields. The global calculations were performed on the GCFR mid-level and the lower and upper plenum regions. Calculated activities were examined with respect to the design constraint, if any, imposed on the particular activity. The spatial distributions of several activities of interest were examined with the aid of isoplots (i.e., symbols are used to describe a surface on which the activity level is everywhere the same). In general the results showed that most activities were below the respective design constraints. Only the total neutron fluence in the core barrel appeared to be marginal with the present reactor design. Since similar results were obtained for an earlier design, it has been proposed that the core barrel be cooled with inlet plenum gas to maintain it at a temperature low enough that it can withstand a higher fluence limit. Radiation levels in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) and liner appeared to be sufficiently below the design constraint that expected results from the Radial Shield Heterogeneity Experiment should not force any levels above the design constraint. A list was also made of a number of issues which should be examined before completion of the final shielding design.

  14. Prediction of engine performance and wall erosion due to film cooling for the 'fast track' ablative thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts have been made at the Propulsion Laboratory (MSFC) to design and develop new liquid rocket engines for small-class launch vehicles. Emphasis of the efforts is to reduce the engine development time with the use of conventional designs while meeting engine reliability criteria. Consequently, the engine cost should be reduced. A demonstrative ablative thrust chamber, called 'fast-track', has been built. To support the design of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber, predictions of the wall temperature and ablation erosion rate of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber have been performed using the computational fluid dynamics program REFLEQS (Reactive Flow Equation Solver). The analysis is intended to assess the amount of fuel to be used for film cooling so that the erosion rate of the chamber ablation does not exceed its allowable limit. In addition, the thrust chamber performance loss due to an increase of the film cooling is examined.

  15. Self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, V.; Barbot, L.; Filliatre, P.; Hellesen, C.; Jammes, C.; Svärd, S. Jacobsson

    2017-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor. Diverse possibilities of detector system installation must be studied for various locations in the reactor vessel in order to detect any perturbations in the core. Results from a previous paper indicated that it is possible to detect changes in neutron source distribution initiated by an inadvertent withdrawal of outer control rod with in-vessel fission chambers located azimuthally around the core. It is, however, not possible to follow inner control rod withdrawal and precisely know the location of the perturbation in the core. Hence the use of complimentary in-core detectors coupled with the peripheral fission chambers is proposed to enable robust core monitoring across the radial direction. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of using self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local changes in the power distribution when the reactor is operated at nominal power. We study the neutron and gamma contributions to the total output current of the detector modelled with Platinum as the emitter material. It is shown that this SPND placed in an SFR-like environment would give a sufficiently measurable prompt neutron induced current of the order of 600 nA/m. The corresponding induced current in the connecting cable is two orders of magnitude lower and can be neglected. This means that the SPND can follow in-core power fluctuations. This validates the operability of an SPND in an SFR-like environment.

  16. Mechanical performance and microstructure array of as-cast lead-silver and lead-bismuth alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Wislei R.; Bortolozo, Ausdinir D.; Peixoto, Leandro C.; Garcia, Amauri

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to establish correlations between mechanical properties of Pb-Ag and Pb-Bi alloys and parametric features of their as-cast microstructures, as well as to develop a comparative analysis with the corresponding properties of Pb-Sn alloys considering applications of these alloys in the manufacture of Pb-acid battery components. A wide range of microstructures are obtained using an upward water-cooled directional solidification system. Ultimate (UTS) and yield tensile strengths (YS) and elongation are experimentally determined as a function of cellular and dendritic spacings, and Hall-Petch type experimental equations are proposed relating UTS to these microstructure parameters. Despite the higher specific strengths of Pb-Ag alloys, as compared with those of Pb-Bi and Pb-Sn alloys, their corresponding relative costs are the highest of all Pb-based alloys examined. It is found that the Pb-Bi and Pb-Sn alloys examined have similar specific strengths and relative costs.

  17. Conceptual design features of the Kalimer-600 sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Dohee; Kim, Yeong-Il; Kim, Seong-O; Lee, Jae-Han; Lee, Yong-Bum; Jeong, Hae-Yong

    2007-07-01

    An advanced sodium cooled fast reactor concept, KALIMER-600, has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute to satisfy the Gen-IV technology goals of sustainability, safety and reliability, economics and proliferation resistance. The concept enables an efficient utilization of uranium resources and a reduction of the radioactive waste. The core design has been developed with a strong emphasis on a proliferation resistance by adopting a single enrichment fuel without blanket assemblies. In addition, a passive residual heat removal system, shortened intermediate heat-transport system piping and seismic isolation have been realized in the reactor system design as enhancements to its safety and economics. The inherent safety characteristics of the KALIMER-600 design were verified through a safety analysis of its bounding events. The results for various unprotected events imply that the KALIMER-600 design can accommodate all the analyzed ATWS events. This self-regulation capability of the power without a scram is mainly attributed to the inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms implemented in the metal fuel core design and completely passive decay heat removal system. (authors)

  18. Multiple lead seal assembly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.

    1977-03-15

    A reusable multiple lead seal assembly provides leak-free passage of stainless-steel-clad instrument leads through the cover on the primary tank of a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder nuclear reactor. The seal isolates radioactive argon cover gas and sodium vapor within the primary tank from the exterior atmosphere and permits reuse of the assembly and the stainless-steel-clad instrument leads. Leads are placed in flutes in a seal body, and a seal shell is then placed around the seal body. Circumferential channels in the body and inner surface of the shell are contiguous and together form a conduit which intersects each of the flutes, placing them in communication with a port through the wall of the seal shell. Liquid silicone rubber sealant is injected into the flutes through the port and conduit; the sealant fills the space in the flutes not occupied by the leads themselves and dries to a rubbery hardness. A nut, threaded onto a portion of the seal body not covered by the seal shell, jacks the body out of the shell and shears the sealant without damage to the body, shell, or leads. The leads may then be removed from the body. The sheared sealant is cleaned from the body, leads, and shell and the assembly may then be reused with the same or different leads.

  19. Comparative analysis of thorium and uranium fuel for transuranic recycle in a sodium cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. Fiorina; N. E. Stauff; F. Franceschini; M. T. Wenner; A. Stanculescu; T. K. Kim; A. Cammi; M. E. Ricotti; R. N. Hill; T. A. Taiwo; M. Salvatores

    2013-12-01

    The present paper compares the reactor physics and transmutation performance of sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (FRs) for TRansUranic (TRU) burning with thorium (Th) or uranium (U) as fertile materials. The 1000 MWt Toshiba-Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) conceptual core has been used as benchmark for the comparison. Both burner and breakeven configurations sustained or started with a TRU supply, and assuming full actinide homogeneous recycle strategy, have been developed. State-of-the-art core physics tools have been employed to establish fuel inventory and reactor physics performances for equilibrium and transition cycles. Results show that Th fosters large improvements in the reactivity coefficients associated with coolant expansion and voiding, which enhances safety margins and, for a burner design, can be traded for maximizing the TRU burning rate. A trade-off of Th compared to U is the significantly larger fuel inventory required to achieve a breakeven design, which entails additional blankets at the detriment of core compactness as well as fuel manufacturing and separation requirements. The gamma field generated by the progeny of U-232 in the U bred from Th challenges fuel handling and manufacturing, but in case of full recycle, the high contents of Am and Cm in the transmutation fuel impose remote fuel operations regardless of the presence of U-232.

  20. Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Asiah, Nur; Shafii, M. Ali; Khairurrijal

    2010-12-23

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

  1. An actively cooled 120-kW coaxial winding transformer for fast charging electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Klontz, K.W.; Divan, D.M.; Novotny, D.W.

    1995-11-01

    A 120-kW coaxial winding transformer has been built and tested to verify previous indications that a high power transformer is feasible with the key attributes of this novel design, namely: low leakage inductance, minimal effect of leakage field on core losses, low copper losses, and a convenient nesting structure well-suited for separability of the windings. The power transfer capability is more than double that of any previously published result for coaxial winding transformers. The application chosen for the fabricated transformer was an inductive coupler for fast charging of electric vehicles. Presented are the key parametric decisions, their impact on transformer fabrication and characteristics, and the results of these design choices as observed in the experimental data. The final design has active cooling to facilitate high power density and a separable core to allow the primary and secondary windings to be coupled and uncoupled. The experimental data shows performance better than expected, with a magnetizing to leakage inductance ratio of 1,000:1, efficiency well over 99% and power density of 25kW/kg.

  2. Physics model of a gas-cooled fast reactor: Review and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.

    2012-07-01

    The current physics design and analysis model was reviewed and assessed for its application to a long-life gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) design. The physics design uses MICROX, BURP, and DIF3D for the cross section generation, depletion calculation, and criticality and flux calculation, respectively. For the application to the long-life GFR, the depletion model was adjusted such that more lumped fission products are included in the burn-up chain to preserve the reaction rate and fuel mass. The performance of the physics design tools including the adjustment of the depletion model was assessed against Monte Carlo depletion calculations. The comparison has shown that the excess reactivity and cycle length of the long-life GFR are reasonably predicted. Some discrepancies were found at the beginning of cycle, which can be attributed to the differences between the nuclear data used in each model. Further studies will be carried out to update the cross section library of the MICROX code for agreement with the latest sets and to expand the fuel burn-up chain for the high burn-up and recycling fuel cycle analysis. (authors)

  3. Definition of a Robust Supervisory Control Scheme for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ponciroli, Roberto; Passerini, Stefano; Vilim, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an innovative control approach for metal-fueled Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors is proposed. With respect to the classical approach adopted for base-load Nuclear Power Plants, an alternative control strategy for operating the reactor at different power levels by respecting the system physical constraints is presented. In order to achieve a higher operational flexibility along with ensuring that the implemented control loops do not influence the system inherent passive safety features, a dedicated supervisory control scheme for the dynamic definition of the corresponding set-points to be supplied to the PID controllers is designed. In particular, the traditional approach based on the adoption of tabulated lookup tables for the set-point definition is found not to be robust enough when failures of the implemented SISO (Single Input Single Output) actuators occur. Therefore, a feedback algorithm based on the Reference Governor approach, which allows for the optimization of reference signals according to the system operating conditions, is proposed.

  4. Fuel Design and Core Layout for a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rooijen, W.F.G. van; Kloosterman, J.L.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Dam, H. van

    2005-09-15

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is regarded as the primary candidate for a future sustainable nuclear power system. In this paper a general core layout is presented for a 2400-MW(thermal) GCFR. Two fuel elements are discussed: a TRISO-based coated particle and the innovative hollow sphere concept. Sustainability calls for recycling of all minor actinides (MAs) in the core and a breeding gain close to unity. A fuel cycle is designed allowing operation over a long period, requiring refueling with {sup 238}U only. The evolution of nuclides in the GCFR core is calculated using the SCALE system (one-dimensional and three-dimensional). Calculations were done over multiple irradiation cycles including reprocessing. The result is that it is possible to design a fuel and GCFR core with a breeding gain around unity, with recycling of all MAs from cycle to cycle. The burnup reactivity swing is small, improving safety. After several fuel batches an equilibrium core is reached. MA loading in the core remains limited, and the fuel temperature coefficient is always negative.

  5. Gas cooled fast reactor control rod drive mechanism deceleration unit. Test program

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, T.H.

    1981-10-01

    This report presents the results of the airtesting portion of the proof-of-principle testing of a Control Rod Scram Deceleration Device developed for use in the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). The device utilizes a grooved flywheel to decelerate the translating assembly (T/A). Two cam followers on the translating assembly travel in the flywheel grooves and transfer the energy of the T/A to the flywheel. The grooves in the flywheel are straight for most of the flywheel length. Near the bottom of the T/A stroke the grooves are spiraled in a decreasing slope helix so that the cam followers accelerate the flywheel as they transfer the energy of the falling T/A. To expedite proof-of-principle testing, some of the materials used in the fabrication of certain test article components were not prototypic. With these exceptions the concept appears to be acceptable. The initial test of 300 scrams was completed with only one failure and the failure was that of a non-prototypic cam follower outer sleeve material.

  6. Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Asiah, Nur; Shafii, M. Ali

    2010-12-01

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (keff) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

  7. Definition of a Robust Supervisory Control Scheme for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ponciroli, R.; Passerini, S.; Vilim, R. B.

    2016-04-17

    In this work, an innovative control approach for metal-fueled Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors is proposed. With respect to the classical approach adopted for base-load Nuclear Power Plants, an alternative control strategy for operating the reactor at different power levels by respecting the system physical constraints is presented. In order to achieve a higher operational flexibility along with ensuring that the implemented control loops do not influence the system inherent passive safety features, a dedicated supervisory control scheme for the dynamic definition of the corresponding set-points to be supplied to the PID controllers is designed. In particular, the traditional approach based on the adoption of tabulated lookup tables for the set-point definition is found not to be robust enough when failures of the implemented SISO (Single Input Single Output) actuators occur. Therefore, a feedback algorithm based on the Reference Governor approach, which allows for the optimization of reference signals according to the system operating conditions, is proposed.

  8. Effects of Ultra Fast Cooling on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yong; Li, Qun; Wang, Zhao-dong; Wang, Guo-dong

    2015-09-01

    X70 (steel A) and X80 (steel B) pipeline steels were fabricated by ultra fast cooling (UFC). UFC processing improves not only ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), yield ratio (YS/UTS), and total elongation of both steels, but also their Charpy absorbed energy ( A K) as well. The microstructures of both steels were all composed of quasi polygonal, acicular ferrite (AF), and granular bainite. MA islands (the mixtures of brittle martensite and residual austenite) are more finely dispersed in steel B, and the amount of AF in steel B is much more than that in steel A. The strength of steel B is higher than that of steel A. This is mainly attributed to the effect of the ferrite grain refinement which is resulted from UFC processing. The finely dispersed MA islands not only provide dispersion strengthening, but also reduce loss of impact properties to pipeline steels. UFC produces low-temperature transformation microstructures containing larger amounts of AFs. The presence of AF is a crucial factor in achieving desired mechanical properties for both steels. It is suggested that the toughness of the experimental steel increases with increasing the amount of AF.

  9. A study of the neutron irradiation effects on the susceptibility to embrittlement of A316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapundjiev, D.; Al Mazouzi, A.; Van Dyck, S.

    2006-09-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the susceptibility to liquid metal embrittlement of two primary selected materials for MYRRHA project an accelerator driven system (ADS), was investigated by means of slow strain rate tests (SSRT). The latter were carried out at 200 °C in nitrogen and in liquid Pb-Bi at a strain rate of 5 × 10 -6 s -1. The small tensile specimens were irradiated at the BR-2 reactor in the MISTRAL irradiation rig at 200 °C for 3 reactor cycles to reach a dose of about 1.50 dpa. The SSR tests were carried out under poor and under dissolved oxygen conditions (˜1.5 × 10 -12 wt% dissolved oxygen) which at this temperature will favour formation of iron and chromium oxides. Although both materials differ in structure (fcc for A316L against bcc for T91), their flow behaviour in contact with liquid lead bismuth eutectic before and after irradiation is very similar. Under these testing conditions none of them was found susceptible to liquid metal embrittlement (LME).

  10. Dissolution corrosion of 316L austenitic stainless steels in contact with static liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrinou, Konstantina; Charalampopoulou, Evangelia; Van der Donck, Tom; Delville, Rémi; Schryvers, Dominique

    2017-07-01

    This work addresses the dissolution corrosion behaviour of 316L austenitic stainless steels. For this purpose, solution-annealed and cold-deformed 316L steels were simultaneously exposed to oxygen-poor (<10-8 mass%) static liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) for 253-3282 h at 500 °C. Corrosion was consistently more severe for the cold-drawn steels than the solution-annealed steel, indicating the importance of the steel thermomechanical state. The thickness of the dissolution-affected zone was non-uniform, and sites of locally-enhanced dissolution were occasionally observed. The progress of LBE dissolution attack was promoted by the interplay of certain steel microstructural features (grain boundaries, deformation twin laths, precipitates) with the dissolution corrosion process. The identified dissolution mechanisms were selective leaching leading to steel ferritization, and non-selective leaching; the latter was mainly observed in the solution-annealed steel. The maximum corrosion rate decreased with exposure time and was found to be inversely proportional to the depth of dissolution attack.

  11. Creep, creep-rupture tests of Al-surface-alloyed T91 steel in liquid lead bismuth at 500 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, A.; Jianu, A.; An, W.; Fetzer, R.; Del Giacco, Mattia; Heinzel, A.; Müller, G.; Markov, V. G.; Kasthanov, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Surface layers made of FeCrAl alloys on T91 steel have shown their capability as corrosion protection barriers in lead bismuth. Pulsed electron beam treatment improves the density and more over the adherence of such layers. After the treatment of previously deposited coatings a surface graded material is achieved with a metallic bonded interface. Creep-rupture tests of T91 in lead-alloy at 550 °C reveal significant reduced creep strength of non-modified T91 test specimens. Oxide scales protecting the steels from attacks of the liquid metal will crack at a certain strain leading to a direct contact between the steel and the liquid metal. The negative influence of the lead-alloy on the creep behavior of non-modified T91 is stress dependent, but below a threshold stress value of 120 MPa at 550 °C this influence becomes almost negligible. At 500 °C and stress values of 200 MPa and 220 MPa the creep rates are comparable between them and significantly lower than creep rates at 180 MPa of original T91 in air at 550 °C. No signs of LBE influence are detected. The surface modified specimens tested at high stress levels instead had creep-rupture times similar to T91 (original state) tested in air. The thin oxide layers formed on the surface modified steel samples are less susceptible to crack formation and therefore to lead-alloy enhanced creep.

  12. Determination of cobalt, nickel, lead, bismuth and indium in ores, soils and related materials by atomic-absorption spectrometry after separation by xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1989-05-01

    A method for determining approximately 0.5, mug/g or more of cobalt, nickel and lead and approximately 3 mug/g or more of bismuth and indium in ores, soils and related materials is described. After sample decomposition and dissolution of the salts in dilute hydrochloric-tartaric acid solution, iron(III) is reduced with ascorbic acid and the resultant iron(II) is complexed with ammonium fluoride. Cobalt, nickel, lead, bismuth and indium are subsequently separated from iron, aluminium, zinc and other matrix elements by a triple chloroform extraction of their xanthate complexes at pH 2.00 +/- 0.05. After the removal of chloroform by evaporation and the destruction of the xanthates with nitric and perchloric acids, the solution is evaporated to dryness and the individual elements are ultimately determined in a 20% v/v hydrochloric acid medium containing 1000 mug/ml potassium by atomic-absorption spectrometry with an air-acetylene flame. Co-extraction of arsenic and antimony is avoided by volatilizing them as the bromides during the decomposition step. Small amounts of co-extracted molybdenum, iron and copper do not interfere.

  13. Silicon-containing ferritic/martensitic steel after exposure to oxygen-containing flowing lead-bismuth eutectic at 450 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Carsten; Koch, Verena; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    A ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steel with 9 and 3 mass% of chromium (Cr) and silicon (Si), respectively, was tested on performance in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 450 and 550 °C, each at concentrations of solved oxygen of both 10-7 and 10-6 mass%. The 9Cr-3Si steel generally exhibits the same basic corrosion modes as other f/m materials with 9 mass% Cr and typically lower Si content, namely Steel T91. The Si-rich steel shows an overall improved performance in comparison to T91 at 450 °C and 10-7 mass% solved oxygen, but especially at 450 °C and 10-6 mass% solved oxygen. The advantage of higher Si-content in 9Cr steel is less clear at 550 °C. Especially high oxygen content in flowing LBE at 550 °C, between >10-6 mass% and oxygen saturation, seems detrimental for the high-Si material in respect of the initiation and progress of a solution-based corrosion.

  14. Effect of irradiation defects on the corrosion behaviors of steels exposed to lead bismuth eutectic in ADS: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yange; You, Yu-Wei; Li, Dong-Dong; Xu, Yichun; Liu, C S; Pan, B C; Wang, Zhiguang

    2015-05-14

    In accelerator driven systems (ADSs), steels will suffer not only from the irradiation damage produced by protons or neutrons, but also from the dissolution corrosion induced by the liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this work we investigate the interactions between LBE atoms (Pb, Bi) and the irradiation induced defects X (X is helium, vacancy or divacancy) in α-Fe based on first-principles calculations. It is found that LBE atoms repulse each other without irradiation defects, while they aggregate easily with the defects to form X-Pbn and X-Bin complexes. This indicates that the irradiation defects could promote the aggregation of LBE atoms in iron, especially Bi atoms. The total binding energies of the X-Pbn and X-Bin complexes increase with the number of Pb and Bi atoms, respectively. The origin of the total binding energies of the complexes is further discussed via the electronic structures and the distortion of the crystalline lattice. Finally, the concentration evolutions of the Vac-(Bi)n complexes and unbound vacancies with temperature are predicted by the mass action analysis. This work provides important information for the synergistic effect of irradiation and LBE corrosion on the steels in the ADSs, which can be used as basic parameters for further study.

  15. Numerical investigations of transient heat transfer characteristics and vitrification tendencies in ultra-fast cell cooling processes.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Anjun; Han, Xu; Critser, John K; Ma, Hongbin

    2006-06-01

    During freezing, cells are often damaged directly or indirectly by ice formation. Vitrification is an alternative approach to cryopreservation that avoids ice formation. The common method to achieve vitrification is to use relatively high concentrations of cryoprotectant agents (CPA) in combination with a relatively slow cooling rate. However, high concentrations of CPAs have potentially damaging toxic and/or osmotic effects on cells. Therefore, establishing methods to achieve vitrification with lower concentrations of CPAs through ultra-fast cooling rates would be advantageous in these aspects. These ultra-fast cooling rates can be realized by a cooling system with an ultra-high heat transfer coefficient (h) between the sample and coolant. The oscillating motion heat pipe (OHP), a novel cooling device utilizing the pressure change to excite the oscillation motion of the liquid plugs and vapor bubbles, can significantly increase h and may fulfill this aim. The current investigation was designed to numerically study the effects of different values of h on the transient heat transfer characteristics and vitrification tendencies of the cell suspension during the cooling processes in an ultra-thin straw (100 microm in diameter). The transient temperature distribution, the cooling rate and the volume ratio (x) of the ice quantity to the maximum crystallizable ice of the suspension were calculated. From these numerical results, it is concluded that the ultra-high h (>10(4) W/m2 K) obtained by OHPs could facilitate vitrification by efficiently decreasing x as well as the time to pass through the dangerous temperature region where the maximum ice formation happens. For comparison, OHPs can decrease both of the parameters to less than 20% of those from the widely used open pulled straw methods. Therefore, the OHP method will be a promising approach to improving vitrification tendencies of CPA solutions and could also decrease the required concentration of CPAs for

  16. Fast optical cooling of nanomechanical cantilever with the dynamical Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Zou, Jin-Hua; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wen; Li, Yong; Feng, Mang

    2013-12-02

    We propose an efficient optical electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) cooling scheme for a cantilever with a nitrogen-vacancy center attached in a non-uniform magnetic field using dynamical Zeeman effect. In our scheme, the Zeeman effect combined with the quantum interference effect enhances the desired cooling transition and suppresses the undesired heating transitions. As a result, the cantilever can be cooled down to nearly the vibrational ground state under realistic experimental conditions within a short time. This efficient optical EIT cooling scheme can be reduced to the typical EIT cooling scheme under special conditions.

  17. Hard X-ray Ptychography: Making It Cool, Colorful and Fast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Junjing

    Ptychography is a recently developed coherent imaging technique for extended objects, with a resolution not limited by the lens. Because X-rays have short wavelengths and high penetration ability, X-ray ptychography provides a powerful and unique tool for studying thick samples at high spatial resolution. We have advanced X-ray ptychography by making it cool, colorful, and fast. We make it cool by carrying out ptychography experiments at cryogenic conditions to image frozen-hydrated specimens. This largely removes the limitations of radiation damage on the achievable resolution, and allows one to obtain excellent preservation of structure and chemistry in biological specimens. We make it colorful by combining it with X-ray fluorescence measurements of chemical element distributions. In studies of biological specimens, this means that ptychography can reveal cellular ultrastructure at high contrast and at a resolution well beyond that of X-ray focusing optics, while X-ray fluorescence is used to simultaneously image the distribution of trace elements in cells (such as metals that play key roles in cell functions and which can be used in various disease therapeutic agents). Because X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular materials, this combined approach provides the unique tool to obtain simultaneous views of ultrastructure and elemental compositions of specimens. We make it fast by using continuous-scan (or "fly-scan") methods. Conventional ptychography is implemented in a move-settle-measure approach, which is slow due to the positioning overheads. To overcome this bottleneck, we have developed fly-scan ptychography that is able to speed up the data collection, and real time on-site data analysis can be achieved by using a parallelized reconstruction code. With these advances, we conducted combined cryo X-ray ptychography and fluorescence imaging at 5.2 keV in a more practical way using fly

  18. Conceptual Design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor With Modified CANDLE Burn-up Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Asiah, A.; Su'ud, Zaki; Ferhat, A.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, conceptual design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. In this study Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is slightly modified by employing modified CANDLE burn-up scheme so that it can use Natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Due to their hard spectrum, GCFR in this study showed very good performance in converting U-238 to plutonium in order to maintain the operation condition requirement of long-life reactors. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. With such condition we got an optimal design of 325 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input. The average discharge burn-up is about 290 GWd/ton HM.

  19. RELAP5 Analysis of the Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Cliff Davis

    2008-06-01

    An innovative hybrid loop-pool design for sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR-Hybrid) has been recently proposed. This design takes advantage of the inherent safety of a pool design and the compactness of a loop design to improve economics and safety of SFRs. In the hybrid loop-pool design, primary loops are formed by connecting the reactor outlet plenum (hot pool), intermediate heat exchangers (IHX), primary pumps and the reactor inlet plenum with pipes. The primary loops are immersed in the cold pool (buffer pool). Passive safety systems -- modular Pool Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (PRACS) – are added to transfer decay heat from the primary system to the buffer pool during loss of forced circulation (LOFC) transients. The primary systems and the buffer pool are thermally coupled by the PRACS, which is composed of PRACS heat exchangers (PHX), fluidic diodes and connecting pipes. Fluidic diodes are simple, passive devices that provide large flow resistance in one direction and small flow resistance in reverse direction. Direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) are immersed in the cold pool to transfer decay heat to the environment by natural circulation. To prove the design concepts, especially how the passive safety systems behave during transients such as LOFC with scram, a RELAP5-3D model for the hybrid loop-pool design was developed. The simulations were done for both steady-state and transient conditions. This paper presents the details of RELAP5-3D analysis as well as the calculated thermal response during LOFC with scram. The 250 MW thermal power conventional pool type design of GNEP’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) developed by Argonne National Laboratory was used as the reference reactor core and primary loop design. The reactor inlet temperature is 355 °C and the outlet temperature is 510 °C. The core design is the same as that for ABTR. The steady state buffer pool temperature is the same as the reactor inlet

  20. Design of small gas cooled fast reactor with two region of natural Uranium fuel fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Monado, Fiber; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-01

    A design study of small Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with two region fuel has been performed. In this study, design GCFR with Helium coolant which can be continuously operated by supplying mixed Natural Uranium without fuel enrichment plant or fuel reprocessing plant. The active reactor cores are divided into two region fuel i.e. 60% fuel fraction of Natural Uranium as inner core and 65% fuel fraction of Natural Uranium as outer core. Each fuel core regions are subdivided into ten parts (region-1 until region-10) with the same volume in the axial direction. The fresh Natural Uranium initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 filled by fresh Natural Uranium. This concept is basically applied to all regions in both cores area, i.e. shifted the core of ith region into i+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. For the next cycles, we will add only Natural Uranium on each region-1. The burn-up calculation is performed using collision probability method PIJ (cell burn-up calculation) in SRAC code which then given eight energy group macroscopic cross section data to be used in two dimensional R-Z geometry multi groups diffusion calculation in CITATION code. This reactor can results power thermal 600 MWth with average power density i.e. 80 watt/cc. After reactor start-up the operation, furthermore reactor only needs Natural Uranium supply for continue operation along 100 years. This calculation result then compared with one region fuel design i.e. 60% and 65% fuel fraction. This core design with two region fuel fraction can be an option for fuel optimization.

  1. Analysis and Development of A Robust Fuel for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Travis W

    2010-01-31

    The focus of this effort was on the development of an advanced fuel for gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) applications. This composite design is based on carbide fuel kernels dispersed in a ZrC matrix. The choice of ZrC is based on its high temperature properties and good thermal conductivity and improved retention of fission products to temperatures beyond that of traditional SiC based coated particle fuels. A key component of this study was the development and understanding of advanced fabrication techniques for GFR fuels that have potential to reduce minor actinide (MA) losses during fabrication owing to their higher vapor pressures and greater volatility. The major accomplishments of this work were the study of combustion synthesis methods for fabrication of the ZrC matrix, fabrication of high density UC electrodes for use in the rotating electrode process, production of UC particles by rotating electrode method, integration of UC kernels in the ZrC matrix, and the full characterization of each component. Major accomplishments in the near-term have been the greater characterization of the UC kernels produced by the rotating electrode method and their condition following the integration in the composite (ZrC matrix) following the short time but high temperature combustion synthesis process. This work has generated four journal publications, one conference proceeding paper, and one additional journal paper submitted for publication (under review). The greater significance of the work can be understood in that it achieved an objective of the DOE Generation IV (GenIV) roadmap for GFR Fuel—namely the demonstration of a composite carbide fuel with 30% volume fuel. This near-term accomplishment is even more significant given the expected or possible time frame for implementation of the GFR in the years 2030 -2050 or beyond.

  2. Validation of CONTAIN-LMR code for accident analysis of sodium-cooled fast reactor containments

    SciTech Connect

    Gordeev, S.; Hering, W.; Schikorr, M.; Stieglitz, R.

    2012-07-01

    CONTAIN-LMR 1 is an analytical tool for the containment performance of sodium cooled fast reactors. In this code, the modelling for the sodium fire is included: the oxygen diffusion model for the sodium pool fire, and the liquid droplet model for the sodium spray fire. CONTAIN-LMR is also able to model the interaction of liquid sodium with concrete structure. It may be applicable to different concrete compositions. Testing and validation of these models will help to qualify the simulation results. Three experiments with sodium performed in the FAUNA facility at FZK have been used for the validation of CONTAIN-LMR. For pool fire tests, calculations have been performed with two models. The first model consists of one gas cell representing the volume of the burn compartment. The volume of the second model is subdivided into 32 coupled gas cells. The agreement between calculations and experimental data is acceptable. The detailed pool fire model shows less deviation from experiments. In the spray fire, the direct heating from the sodium burning in the media is dominant. Therefore, single cell modeling is enough to describe the phenomena. Calculation results have reasonable agreement with experimental data. Limitations of the implemented spray model can cause the overestimation of predicted pressure and temperature in the cell atmosphere. The ability of the CONTAIN-LMR to simulate the sodium pool fire accompanied by sodium-concrete reactions was tested using the experimental study of sodium-concrete interactions for construction concrete as well as for shielding concrete. The model provides a reasonably good representation of chemical processes during sodium-concrete interaction. The comparison of time-temperature profiles of sodium and concrete shows, that the model requires modifications for predictions of the test results. (authors)

  3. The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor: Report on Safety System Design for Decay Heat Removal

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Y. C. Wei; E. E. Feldman; M. J. Driscoll; H. Ludewig

    2003-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radiotoxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. This report addresses/discusses the decay heat removal options available to the GFR, and the current solutions. While it is possible to design a GFR with complete passive safety (i.e., reliance solely on conductive and radiative heat transfer for decay heat removal), it has been shown that the low power density results in unacceptable fuel cycle costs for the GFR. However, increasing power density results in higher decay heat rates, and the attendant temperature increase in the fuel and core. Use of active movers, or blowers/fans, is possible during accident conditions, which only requires 3% of nominal flow to remove the decay heat. Unfortunately, this requires reliance on active systems. In order to incorporate passive systems, innovative designs have been studied, and a mix of passive and active systems appears to meet the requirements for decay heat removal during accident conditions.

  4. Mixed-method pre-cooling reduces physiological demand without improving performance of medium-fast bowling in the heat.

    PubMed

    Minett, Geoffrey M; Duffield, Rob; Kellett, Aaron; Portus, Marc

    2012-05-01

    This study examined physiological and performance effects of pre-cooling on medium-fast bowling in the heat. Ten, medium-fast bowlers completed two randomised trials involving either cooling (mixed-methods) or control (no cooling) interventions before a 6-over bowling spell in 31.9±2.1°C and 63.5±9.3% relative humidity. Measures included bowling performance (ball speed, accuracy and run-up speeds), physical characteristics (global positioning system monitoring and counter-movement jump height), physiological (heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature and sweat loss), biochemical (serum concentrations of damage, stress and inflammation) and perceptual variables (perceived exertion and thermal sensation). Mean ball speed (114.5±7.1 vs. 114.1±7.2 km · h(-1); P = 0.63; d = 0.09), accuracy (43.1±10.6 vs. 44.2±12.5 AU; P = 0.76; d = 0.14) and total run-up speed (19.1±4.1 vs. 19.3±3.8 km · h(-1); P = 0.66; d = 0.06) did not differ between pre-cooling and control respectively; however 20-m sprint speed between overs was 5.9±7.3% greater at Over 4 after pre-cooling (P = 0.03; d = 0.75). Pre-cooling reduced skin temperature after the intervention period (P = 0.006; d = 2.28), core temperature and pre-over heart rates throughout (P = 0.01-0.04; d = 0.96-1.74) and sweat loss by 0.4±0.3 kg (P = 0.01; d = 0.34). Mean rating of perceived exertion and thermal sensation were lower during pre-cooling trials (P = 0.004-0.03; d = 0.77-3.13). Despite no observed improvement in bowling performance, pre-cooling maintained between-over sprint speeds and blunted physiological and perceptual demands to ease the thermoregulatory demands of medium-fast bowling in hot conditions.

  5. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  6. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  7. Dissolution and oxidation behaviour of various austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys in lead-bismuth eutectic at 520 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Marion; Martinelli, Laure; Ginestar, Kevin; Favergeon, Jérôme; Moulin, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Ten austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys were tested in static lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 520 °C in order to obtain a selection of austenitic steels having promising corrosion behaviour in LBE. A test of 1850 h was carried out with a dissolved oxygen concentration between 10-9 and 5 10-4 g kg-1. The combination of thermodynamic of the studied system and literature results leads to the determination of an expression of the dissolved oxygen content in LBE as a function of temperature: RT(K)ln[O](wt%) = -57584/T(K) -55.876T(K) + 254546 (R is the gas constant in J mol-1 K-1). This relation can be considered as a threshold of oxygen content above which only oxidation is observed on the AISI 316L and AISI 304L austenitic alloys in static LBE between 400 °C and 600 °C. The oxygen content during the test leads to both dissolution and oxidation of the samples during the first 190 h and leads to pure oxidation for the rest of the test. Results of mixed oxidation and dissolution test showed that only four types of corrosion behaviour were observed: usual austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys behaviour including the reference alloy 17Cr-12Ni-2.5Mo (AISI 316LN), the 20Cr-31Ni alloy one, the Si containing alloy one and the Al containing alloy one. According to the proposed criteria of oxidation and dissolution kinetics, silicon rich alloys and aluminum rich alloy presented a promising corrosion behaviour.

  8. Simulation of Radioactive Corrosion Product in Primary Cooling System of Japanese Sodium-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Miyahara, Shinya; Izumi, Yoshinobu

    Radioactive Corrosion Product (CP) is a main cause of personal radiation exposure during maintenance with no breached fuel in fast breeder reactor (FBR) plants. The most important CP is 54Mn and 60Co. In order to establish techniques of radiation dose estimation for radiation workers in radiation-controlled areas of the FBR, the PSYCHE (Program SYstem for Corrosion Hazard Evaluation) code was developed. We add the Particle Model to the conventional PSYCHE analytical model. In this paper, we performed calculation of CP transfer in JOYO using an improved calculation code in which the Particle Model was added to the PSYCHE. The C/E (calculated / experimentally observed) value for CP deposition was improved through use of this improved PSYCHE incorporating the Particle Model. Moreover, among the percentage of total radioactive deposition accounted for by CP in particle form, 54Mn was estimated to constitute approximately 20 % and 60Co approximately 40 % in the cold-leg region. These calculation results are consistent with the measured results for the actual cold-leg piping in the JOYO.

  9. Effects of mixed-method cooling on recovery of medium-fast bowling performance in hot conditions on consecutive days.

    PubMed

    Minett, Geoffrey M; Duffield, Rob; Kellett, Aaron; Portus, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined physiological and performance effects of cooling on recovery of medium-fast bowlers in the heat. Eight, medium-fast bowlers completed two randomised trials, involving two sessions completed on consecutive days (Session 1: 10-overs and Session 2: 4-overs) in 31 ± 3°C and 55 ± 17% relative humidity. Recovery interventions were administered for 20 min (mixed-method cooling vs. control) after Session 1. Measures included bowling performance (ball speed, accuracy, run-up speeds), physical demands (global positioning system, counter-movement jump), physiological (heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, sweat loss), biochemical (creatine kinase, C-reactive protein) and perceptual variables (perceived exertion, thermal sensation, muscle soreness). Mean ball speed was higher after cooling in Session 2 (118.9 ± 8.1 vs. 115.5 ± 8.6 km · h⁻¹; P = 0.001; d = 0.67), reducing declines in ball speed between sessions (0.24 vs. -3.18 km · h⁻¹; P = 0.03; d = 1.80). Large effects indicated higher accuracy in Session 2 after cooling (46.0 ± 11.2 vs. 39.4 ± 8.6 arbitrary units [AU]; P = 0.13; d = 0.93) without affecting total run-up speed (19.0 ± 3.1 vs. 19.0 ± 2.5 km · h⁻¹; P = 0.97; d = 0.01). Cooling reduced core temperature, skin temperature and thermal sensation throughout the intervention (P = 0.001-0.05; d = 1.31-5.78) and attenuated creatine kinase (P = 0.04; d = 0.56) and muscle soreness at 24-h (P = 0.03; d = 2.05). Accordingly, mixed-method cooling can reduce thermal strain after a 10-over spell and improve markers of muscular damage and discomfort alongside maintained medium-fast bowling performance on consecutive days in hot conditions.

  10. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Nuclear Data File/B-Version V FENDL Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library HLMC Heavy Liquid Metal Coolant LBE Lead-Bismuth Eutectic LMFBR ...According to a Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems report29 released February 21, 2006, the core outlet temperature and peak cladding temperature...24 sodium for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor ( LMFBR ) systems worldwide.32 The pumping power requirements for lead, LBE and tin are much

  11. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  12. In-situ probing of metallic glass formation and crystallization upon heating and cooling via fast differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogatscher, S.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2014-06-01

    The crystallization of small-scale Au-based metallic glass samples was investigated by fast differential scanning calorimetry. Rapid cooling and heating makes possible in-situ probing of glass formation from the supercooled liquid state or direct transition from the glassy state to the equilibrium liquid and, thereby, the determination of a critical cooling (Φc ˜ 600 Ks-1) and heating rate (Φh ˜ 6 × 103 Ks-1) for crystallization. Crystallization kinetics was studied in the whole supercooled liquid region by linear heating and isothermal calorimetry. We show that the temperature dependence of crystal growth is reflected in a "Kissinger plot" for Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 and compares well with a model for crystal growth in a glassy system. Linear heating and isothermal measurements after heating the glass show that its crystallization is always growth-controlled up to its temperature of melting. In contrast, for a low degree of direct undercooling from the equilibrium liquid isothermal crystallization is nucleation-controlled, whereas it is again growth-controlled at large undercooling. The overall crystallization behavior of the metallic glass is presented in a complete time-temperature-transformation map on cooling and, so far not accessible, on heating after various cooling procedures.

  13. Stability analysis of a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiyue

    This dissertation is aimed at nuclear-coupled thermal hydraulics stability analysis of a natural circulation lead cooled fast reactor design. The stability concerns arise from the fact that natural circulation operation makes the system susceptible to flow instabilities similar to those observed in boiling water reactors. In order to capture the regional effects, modal expansion method which incorporates higher azimuthal modes is used to model the neutronics part of the system. A reduced order model is used in this work for the thermal-hydraulics. Consistent with the number of heat exchangers (HXs), the reactor core is divided into four equal quadrants. Each quadrant has its corresponding external segments such as riser, plenum, pipes and HX forming an equivalent 1-D closed loop. The local pressure loss along the loop is represented by a lumped friction factor. The heat transfer process in the HX is represented by a model for the coolant temperature at the core inlet that depends on the coolant temperature at the core outlet and the coolant velocity. Additionally, time lag effects are incorporated into this HX model due to the finite coolant speed. A conventional model is used for the fuel pin heat conduction to couple the neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. The feedback mechanisms include Doppler, axial/radial thermal expansion and coolant density effects. These effects are represented by a linear variation of the macroscopic cross sections with the fuel temperature. The weighted residual method is used to convert the governing PDEs to ODEs. Retaining the first and second modes, leads to six ODEs for neutronics, and five ODEs for the thermal-hydraulics in each quadrant. Three models are developed. These are: 1) natural circulation model with a closed coolant flow path but without coupled neutronics, 2) forced circulation model with constant external pressure drop across the heated channels but without coupled neutronics, 3) coupled system including neutronics with

  14. Development of variable width ribbon heating elements for liquid metal and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor fuel rod simulators

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Lovell, R.T.; Post, D.W.; Snyder, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Variable width ribbon heating elements have been fabricated which provide a chopped cosine, variable heat flux profile for fuel rod simulators used in test loops by the Breeder Reactor Program Thermal Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety test facility and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Core Flow Test Loop. Thermal, mechanical, and electrical design considerations result in the derivation of an analytical expression for the ribbon contours. From this, the ribbons are machined and wound on numerically controlled equipment. Postprocessing and inspection results in a wound, variable width ribbon with the precise dimensional, electrical, and mechanical properties needed for use in fuel pin simulators.

  15. Modeling and Validation of Sodium Plugging for Heat Exchangers in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ferroni, Paolo; Tatli, Emre; Czerniak, Luke; Sienicki, James J.; Chien, Hual-Te; Yoichi, Momozaki; Bakhtiari, Sasan

    2016-06-29

    The project “Modeling and Validation of Sodium Plugging for Heat Exchangers in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor Systems” was conducted jointly by Westinghouse Electric Company (Westinghouse) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), over the period October 1, 2013- March 31, 2016. The project’s motivation was the need to provide designers of Sodium Fast Reactors (SFRs) with a validated, state-of-the-art computational tool for the prediction of sodium oxide (Na2O) deposition in small-diameter sodium heat exchanger (HX) channels, such as those in the diffusion bonded HXs proposed for SFRs coupled with a supercritical CO2 (sCO2) Brayton cycle power conversion system. In SFRs, Na2O deposition can potentially occur following accidental air ingress in the intermediate heat transport system (IHTS) sodium and simultaneous failure of the IHTS sodium cold trap. In this scenario, oxygen can travel through the IHTS loop and reach the coldest regions, represented by the cold end of the sodium channels of the HXs, where Na2O precipitation may initiate and continue. In addition to deteriorating HX heat transfer and pressure drop performance, Na2O deposition can lead to channel plugging especially when the size of the sodium channels is small, which is the case for diffusion bonded HXs whose sodium channel hydraulic diameter is generally below 5 mm. Sodium oxide melts at a high temperature well above the sodium melting temperature such that removal of a solid plug such as through dissolution by pure sodium could take a lengthy time. The Sodium Plugging Phenomena Loop (SPPL) was developed at ANL, prior to this project, for investigating Na2O deposition phenomena within sodium channels that are prototypical of the diffusion bonded HX channels envisioned for SFR-sCO2 systems. In this project, a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model capable of simulating the thermal-hydraulics of the SPPL test

  16. Investigation of Nuclear Data Libraries with TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo Code for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-K.; Brun, E.

    2014-04-01

    The Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor ASTRID is currently under design and development in France. Traditional ECCO/ERANOS fast reactor code system used for ASTRID core design calculations relies on multi-group JEFF-3.1.1 data library. To gauge the use of ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data libraries in the fast reactor applications, two recent OECD/NEA computational benchmarks specified by Argonne National Laboratory were calculated. Using the continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code, both ABR-1000 MWth MOX core and metallic (U-Pu) core were investigated. Under two different fast neutron spectra and two data libraries, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1, reactivity impact studies were performed. Using JEFF-3.1.1 library under the BOEC (Beginning of equilibrium cycle) condition, high reactivity effects of 808 ± 17 pcm and 1208 ± 17 pcm were observed for ABR-1000 MOX core and metallic core respectively. To analyze the causes of these differences in reactivity, several TRIPOLI-4 runs using mixed data libraries feature allow us to identify the nuclides and the nuclear data accounting for the major part of the observed reactivity discrepancies.

  17. Preliminary Design Study of Medium Sized Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriyanti, Su'ud, Zaki; Rijal, K.; Zuhair, Ferhat, A.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    In this study a fesibility design study of medium sized (1000 MWt) gas cooled fast reactors which can utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input has been conducted. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is among six types of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants. GFR with its hard neuron spectrum is superior for closed fuel cycle, and its ability to be operated in high temperature (850° C) makes various options of utilizations become possible. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input, modified CANDLE burn-up scheme[1-6] is adopted this GFR system by dividing the core into 10 parts of equal volume axially. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. As an optimization results, a design of 1000 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input is discussed. The average discharge burn-up is about 280 GWd/ton HM. Enough margin for criticallity was obtained for this reactor.

  18. Effect of cold rolling on the oxidation resistance of T91 steel in oxygen-saturated stagnant liquid lead-bismuth eutectic at 450 °C and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hong; Ye, Zhongfei; Wang, Pei; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Yutuo; Li, Yiyi

    2016-08-01

    The compatibility of T91 steels having different preparation processes with oxygen-saturated stagnant lead-bismuth eutectic have been investigated at 450 °C and 550 °C. It is found that cold rolling decreases the thickness of the oxide scale of T91 steel by forming a continuous enhanced Cr-rich belt in the inner oxide layer next to the internal oxidation zone, which is attributed to the rapid diffusion of Cr induced by numerous non-equilibrium grain boundaries and migrating dislocations.

  19. Performance evaluation and post-irradiation examination of a novel LWR fuel composed of U0.17ZrH1.6 fuel pellets bonded to Zircaloy-2 cladding by lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balooch, Mehdi; Olander, Donald R.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Hosemann, Peter; Casella, Andrew M.; Senor, David J.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2017-04-01

    A novel light water reactor fuel has been designed and fabricated at the University of California, Berkeley; irradiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor; and examined within the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This fuel consists of U0.17ZrH1.6 fuel pellets core-drilled from TRIGA reactor fuel elements that are clad in Zircaloy-2 and bonded with lead-bismuth eutectic. The performance evaluation and post irradiation examination of this fuel are presented here.

  20. Low-power lead-cooled fast reactor loaded with MOX-fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitdikov, E. R.; Terekhova, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Fast reactor for the purpose of implementation of research, education of undergraduate and doctoral students in handling innovative fast reactors and training specialists for atomic research centers and nuclear power plants (BRUTs) was considered. Hard neutron spectrum achieved in the fast reactor with compact core and lead coolant. Possibility of prompt neutron runaway of the reactor is excluded due to the low reactivity margin which is less than the effective fraction of delayed neutrons. The possibility of using MOX fuel in the BRUTs reactor was examined. The effect of Keff growth connected with replacement of natural lead coolant to 208Pb coolant was evaluated. The calculations and reactor core model were performed using the Serpent Monte Carlo code.

  1. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    In light of the scientific evidence for changes in the climate caused by greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities, the world is in ever more desperate need of new, inexhaustible, safe and clean primary energy sources. A viable solution to this problem is the widespread adoption of nuclear breeder reactor technology. Innovative breeder reactor concepts using liquid-metal coolants such as sodium or lead will be able to utilize the waste produced by the current light water reactor fuel cycle to power the entire world for several centuries to come. Breed & burn (B&B) type fast reactor cores can unlock the energy potential of readily available fertile material such as depleted uranium without the need for chemical reprocessing. Using B&B technology, nuclear waste generation, uranium mining needs and proliferation concerns can be greatly reduced, and after a transitional period, enrichment facilities may no longer be needed. In this dissertation, new passively operating safety systems for fast reactors cores are presented. New analysis and optimization methods for B&B core design have been developed, along with a comprehensive computer code that couples neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and structural mechanics and enables a completely automated and optimized fast reactor core design process. In addition, an experiment that expands the knowledge-base of corrosion issues of lead-based coolants in nuclear reactors was designed and built. The motivation behind the work presented in this thesis is to help facilitate the widespread adoption of safe and efficient fast reactor technology.

  2. Behavior of fast moving flow of compressible gas in cylindrical pipe in presence of cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varshavsky, G A

    1951-01-01

    For compressible flow with friction in a cylindrical pipe the momentum, continuity, and heat-transfer equations are examined to determine whether an increase in Mach number ("thermal" Laval nozzle) is obtainable through heat conduction from the gas through the pipe walls. The analysis is based on the assumption that the wall temperature is negligibly small in comparison with the stagnation temperature of the gas. The analysis leads to a negative result. When the gas cooling is increased by also considering radiation to the wall, a limited region at high temperatures is obtained where Mach number increases were theoretically possible. Obtaining this condition practically is considered impossible.

  3. Ways of improvement for the materials of sodium cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, E.

    2012-07-01

    The French sodium cooled prototype reactor ASTRID will take into account 'Generation IV' requirements, especially a long operational life-time (60 years) and a high efficiency. The good behavior of austenitic steel AISI316L(N), should be confirmed for a use, in moderately irradiated and unirradiated parts of ASTRID. Parts recovered from dismantled French sodium-cooled reactors will be characterized. Further experiments must be carried out concerning ageing of these components. Other materials will be chosen for fuel wrapping and cladding, in order to reduce creep and swelling under irradiation, (either conventional, or oxide-dispersed strengthened steels (ODSS). Corrosion of ODSS in the presence of sodium needs a serious assessment The lifetime of primary pumps components made of Duplex steels should also be assessed. The disruptions in steam generator tubes should be minimized and controlled; therefore, optimised designs and geometries must be established before defining the corresponding materials. Either Modified 9Cr1Mo or Incoloy 800H, might be candidates;it will be necessary to check whether austenitic steels are compatible with Modified 9Cr1Mo or Incoloy 800H in the same circuit. For all materials, the best manufacturing processes must be combined with thermal, mechanical treatments; calculations of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) might be used to optimise both treatments and chemical compositions. (authors)

  4. Ferritic steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors: Design principles and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the current status of development of ferritic steels for emerging fast reactor technologies is presented in this paper. The creep-resistant 9-12Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are classically known for steam generator applications. The excellent void swelling resistance of ferritic steels enabled the identification of their potential for core component applications of fast reactors. Since then, an extensive knowledge base has been generated by identifying the empirical correlations between chemistry of the steels, heat treatment, structure, and properties, in addition to their in-reactor behavior. A few concerns have also been identified which pertain to high-temperature irradiation creep, embrittlement, Type IV cracking in creep-loaded weldments, and hard zone formation in dissimilar joints. The origin of these problems and the methodologies to overcome the limitations are highlighted. Finally, the suitability of the ferritic steels is re-evaluated in the emerging scenario of the fast reactor technology, with a target of achieving better breeding ratio and improved thermal efficiency.

  5. Phase characteristics of rare earth elements in metallic fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor by injection casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuk, Seoung Woo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Oh, Seok Jin; Park, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Chan Bock; Youn, Young-Sang; Kim, Jong-Yun

    2017-04-01

    Uranium-zirconium-rare earth (U-Zr-RE) fuel slugs for a sodium-cooled fast reactor were manufactured using a modified injection casting method, and investigated with respect to their uniformity, distribution, composition, and phase behavior according to RE content. Nd, Ce, Pr, and La were chosen as four representative lanthanide elements because they are considered to be major RE components of fuel ingots after pyroprocessing. Immiscible layers were found on the top layers of the melt-residue commensurate with higher fuel slug RE content. Scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) data showed that RE elements in the melt-residue were distributed uniformly throughout the fuel slugs. RE element agglomeration did not contaminate the fuel slugs but strongly affected the RE content of the slugs.

  6. Application of GRS method to evaluation of uncertainties of calculation parameters of perspective sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Peregudov, A.; Andrianova, O.; Raskach, K.; Tsibulya, A.

    2012-07-01

    A number of recent studies have been devoted to the estimation of errors of reactor calculation parameters by the GRS (Generation Random Sampled) method. This method is based on direct sampling input data resulting in formation of random sets of input parameters which are used for multiple calculations. Once these calculations are performed, statistical processing of the calculation results is carried out to determine the mean value and the variance of each calculation parameter of interest. In our study this method is used for estimation of errors of calculation parameters (K{sub eff}, power density, dose rate) of a perspective sodium-cooled fast reactor. Neutron transport calculations were performed by the nodal diffusion code TRIGEX and Monte Carlo code MMK. (authors)

  7. Special power supply and control system for the gas-cooled fast reactor-core flow test loop

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.L.

    1981-09-01

    The test bundle in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor-Core Flow Test Loop (GCFR-CFTL) requires a source of electrical power that can be controlled accurately and reliably over a wide range of steady-state and transient power levels and skewed power distributions to simulate GCFR operating conditions. Both ac and dc power systems were studied, and only those employing silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCRs) could meet the requirements. This report summarizes the studies, tests, evaluations, and development work leading to the selection. it also presents the design, procurement, testing, and evaluation of the first 500-kVa LMPL supply. The results show that the LMPL can control 60-Hz sine wave power from 200 W to 500 kVA.

  8. Preliminary Study of Lead-Oxide Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as an Input Fuel with Reactor Shuffling Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudah, Rida SN; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary study of lead-oxide cooled fast reactor with natural uranium as an input fuel using reactor shuffling strategy has been conducted. In this study, reactor core is divided into four zone with the same volume, each zone use different uranium enrichment. The enrichment number is estimated so that in the end of reactor’s operation, we only need to add natural uranium as the fresh input fuel. This study used UN-PuN as the fuel and lead oxide as the coolant. Several parameter studies have been conducted to determine the most suitable input condition. It is confirmed in this study that with fuel : cladding : coolant ratio of 53 : 10 : 37, and uranium enrichment in the first to the fourth zone of 0%, 6.25%, 7.5% and 8%, respectively, the reactor can operate as long as 20 years of operation with terminal k-eff of 1.0004.

  9. Preliminary safety analysis of Pb-Bi cooled 800 MWt modified CANDLE burn-up scheme based fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2014-09-30

    Pb-Bi Cooled fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme with 10 regions and 10 years cycle length has been investigated from neutronic aspects. In this study the safety aspect of such reactors have been investigated and discussed. Several condition of unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP) have been simulated and the results show that the reactors excellent safety performance. At 80 seconds after unprotected loss of flow condition, the core flow rate drop to about 25% of its initial flow and slowly move toward its natural circulation level. The maximum fuel temperature can be managed below 1000°C and the maximum cladding temperature can be managed below 700°C. The dominant reactivity feedback is radial core expansion and Doppler effect, followed by coolant density effect and fuel axial expansion effect.

  10. Preliminary safety analysis of Pb-Bi cooled 800 MWt modified CANDLE burn-up scheme based fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2014-09-01

    Pb-Bi Cooled fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme with 10 regions and 10 years cycle length has been investigated from neutronic aspects. In this study the safety aspect of such reactors have been investigated and discussed. Several condition of unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP) have been simulated and the results show that the reactors excellent safety performance. At 80 seconds after unprotected loss of flow condition, the core flow rate drop to about 25% of its initial flow and slowly move toward its natural circulation level. The maximum fuel temperature can be managed below 1000°C and the maximum cladding temperature can be managed below 700°C. The dominant reactivity feedback is radial core expansion and Doppler effect, followed by coolant density effect and fuel axial expansion effect.

  11. Design Study of Modular Nuclear Power Plant with Small Long Life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors Utilizing MOX Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilham, Muhammad; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Growing energy needed due to increasing of the world’s population encourages development of technology and science of nuclear power plant in its safety and security. In this research, it will be explained about design study of modular fast reactor with helium gas cooling (GCFR) small long life reactor, which can be operated over 20 years. It had been conducted about neutronic design GCFR with Mixed Oxide (UO2-PuO2) fuel in range of 100-200 MWth NPPs of power and 50-60% of fuel fraction variation with cylindrical pin cell and cylindrical balance of reactor core geometry. Calculation method used SRAC-CITATION code. The obtained results are the effective multiplication factor and density value of core reactor power (with geometry optimalization) to obtain optimum design core reactor power, whereas the obtained of optimum core reactor power is 200 MWth with 55% of fuel fraction and 9-13% of percentages.

  12. A review of inherent safety characteristics of metal alloy sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel against postulated accidents

    DOE PAGES

    Sofu, Tanju

    2015-04-01

    The thermal, mechanical, and neutronic performance of the metal alloy fast reactor fuel design complements the safety advantages of the liquid metal cooling and the pool-type primary system. Together, these features provide large safety margins in both normal operating modes and for a wide range of postulated accidents. In particular, they maximize the measures of safety associated with inherent reactor response to unprotected, double-fault accidents, and to minimize risk to the public and plant investment. High thermal conductivity and high gap conductance play the most significant role in safety advantages of the metallic fuel, resulting in a flatter radial temperaturemore » profile within the pin and much lower normal operation and transient temperatures in comparison to oxide fuel. Despite the big difference in melting point, both oxide and metal fuels have a relatively similar margin to melting during postulated accidents. When the metal fuel cladding fails, it typically occurs below the coolant boiling point and the damaged fuel pins remain coolable. Metal fuel is compatible with sodium coolant, eliminating the potential of energetic fuel--coolant reactions and flow blockages. All these, and the low retained heat leading to a longer grace period for operator action, are significant contributing factors to the inherently benign response of metallic fuel to postulated accidents. This paper summarizes the past analytical and experimental results obtained in past sodium-cooled fast reactor safety programs in the United States, and presents an overview of fuel safety performance as observed in laboratory and in-pile tests.« less

  13. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  14. Neutronic/Thermalhydraulic Coupling Technigues for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Ragusa; Andrew Siegel; Jean-Michel Ruggieri

    2010-09-28

    The objective of this project was to test new coupling algorithms and enable efficient and scalable multi-physics simulations of advanced nuclear reactors, with considerations regarding the implementation of such algorithms in massively parallel environments. Numerical tests were carried out to verify the proposed approach and the examples included some reactor transients. The project was directly related to the Sodium Fast Reactor program element of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and the Advanced Fuel cycle Initiative, and, supported the requirement of high-fidelity simulation as a mean of achieving the goals of the presidential Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) vision.

  15. Building on knowledge base of sodium cooled fast spectrum reactors to develop materials technology for fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara

    2009-04-01

    The alloys 316L(N) and Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel are the major structural materials for fabrication of structural components in sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Various factors influencing the mechanical behaviour of these alloys and different modes of deformation and failure in SFR systems, their analysis and the simulated tests performed on components for assessment of structural integrity and the applicability of RCC-MR code for the design and validation of components are highlighted. The procedures followed for optimal design of die and punch for the near net shape forming of petals of main vessel of 500 MWe prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR); the safe temperature and strain rate domains established using dynamic materials model for forming of 316L(N) and 9Cr-1Mo steels components by various industrial processes are illustrated. Weldability problems associated with 316L(N) and Mo. 9Cr-1Mo are briefly discussed. The utilization of artificial neural network models for prediction of creep rupture life and delta-ferrite in austenitic stainless steel welds is described. The usage of non-destructive examination techniques in characterization of deformation, fracture and various microstructural features in SFR materials is briefly discussed. Most of the experience gained on SFR systems could be utilized in developing science and technology for fusion reactors. Summary of the current status of knowledge on various aspects of fission and fusion systems with emphasis on cross fertilization of research is presented.

  16. Experimental Study on Flow Optimization in Upper Plenum of Reactor Vessel for a Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Kenji; Kamide, Hideki; Itoh, Masami; Sekine, Tadashi

    2005-11-15

    An innovative sodium-cooled fast reactor has been investigated in a feasibility study of fast breeder reactor cycle systems in Japan. A compact reactor vessel and a column-type upper inner structure with a radial slit for an arm of a fuel-handling machine (FHM) are adopted. Dipped plates are set in the reactor vessel below the free surface to prevent gas entrainment. We performed a one-tenth-scaled model water experiment for the upper plenum of the reactor vessel. Gas entrainment was not observed in the experiment under the same velocity condition as the reactor. Three vortex cavitations were observed near the hot-leg inlet. A vertical rib on the reactor vessel wall was set to restrict the rotating flow near the hot leg. The vortex cavitation between the reactor vessel wall and the hot leg was suppressed by the rib under the same cavitation factor condition as in the reactor. The cylindrical plug was installed through the hole in the dipped plates for the FHM to reduce the flow toward the free surface. It was effective when the plug was submerged into the middle height in the upper plenum. This combination of two components had a possibility to optimize the flow in the compact reactor vessel.

  17. Minor Actinide Recycle in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Using Heterogeneous Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Bays; Pavel Medvedev; Michael Pope; Rodolfo Ferrer; Benoit Forget; Mehdi Asgari

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the plausible design of transmutation target assemblies for minor actinides (MA) in Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR). A heterogeneous recycling strategy is investigated, whereby after each reactor pass, un-burned MAs from the targets are blended with MAs produced by the driver fuel and additional MAs from Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). A design iteration methodology was adopted for customizing the core design, target assembly design and matrix composition design. The overall design was constrained against allowable peak or maximum in-core performances. While respecting these criteria, the overall design was adjusted to reduce the total number of assemblies fabricated per refueling cycle. It was found that an inert metal-hydride MA-Zr-Hx target matrix gave the highest transmutation efficiency, thus allowing for the least number of targets to be fabricated per reactor cycle.

  18. Passive acoustic leak detection for sodium cooled fast reactors using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Riber Marklund, A.; Prakash, V.; Rajan, K.K.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic leak detection for steam generators of sodium fast reactors have been an active research topic since the early 1970's and several methods have been tested over the years. Inspired by its success in the field of automatic speech recognition, we here apply hidden Markov models (HMM) in combination with Gaussian mixture models (GMM) to the problem. To achieve this, we propose a new feature calculation scheme, based on the temporal evolution of the power spectral density (PSD) of the signal. Using acoustic signals recorded during steam/water injection experiments done at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), the proposed method is tested. We perform parametric studies on the HMM+GMM model size and demonstrate that the proposed method a) performs well without a priori knowledge of injection noise, b) can incorporate several noise models and c) has an output distribution that simplifies false alarm rate control. (authors)

  19. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D. L.; H. J. M. Chichester; Medvedev, P. G.; Hayes, S. L.; Teague, M. C.

    2015-06-17

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at. % burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactor designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low metaling points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). Lastly, a model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.

  20. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Porter, D. L.; H. J. M. Chichester; Medvedev, P. G.; ...

    2015-06-17

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at. % burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactormore » designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low metaling points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). Lastly, a model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.« less

  1. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Chichester, H. J. M.; Medvedev, P. G.; Hayes, S. L.; Teague, M. C.

    2015-10-01

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at.% burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactor designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low melting points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). A model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.

  2. Highly c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr, Ti)O₃ thin films on si wafer prepared by fast cooling immediately after sputter deposition.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shinya; Hanzawa, Hiroaki; Wasa, Kiyotaka; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2014-09-01

    We successfully developed sputter deposition technology to obtain a highly c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) thin film on a Si wafer by fast cooling (~-180°C/min) of the substrate after deposition. The c-axis orientation ratio of a fast-cooled film was about 90%, whereas that of a slow-cooled (~-40°C/min) film was only 10%. The c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr0.5, Ti0.5)O3 films showed reasonably large piezoelectric coefficients, e(31,f) = ~-11 C/m(2), with remarkably small dielectric constants, ϵ(r) = ~220. As a result, an excellent figure of merit (FOM) was obtained for piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) such as a piezoelectric gyroscope. This c-axis orientation technology on Si will extend industrial applications of PZT-based thin films and contribute further to the development of piezoelectric MEMS.

  3. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    The Ultra-Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ˜0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528 and 530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermo-electrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronic noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs' gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs' gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. A gain of ˜100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the edge harmonic oscillation in quiescent H-mode plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS' capabilities.

  4. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Truong, D D; Fonck, R J; McKee, G R

    2016-11-01

    The Ultra-Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ∼0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528 and 530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermo-electrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronic noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs' gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs' gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. A gain of ∼100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the edge harmonic oscillation in quiescent H-mode plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS' capabilities.

  5. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2016-09-23

    The Ultra Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ~0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528-530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermoelectrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronicmore » noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤ 1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs’ gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs’ gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. Here, a gain of ~100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the Edge Harmonic Oscillation (EHO) in Quiescent H-mode (QH) plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS’ capabilities.« less

  6. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2016-09-23

    The Ultra Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ~0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528-530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermoelectrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronic noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤ 1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs’ gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs’ gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. Here, a gain of ~100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the Edge Harmonic Oscillation (EHO) in Quiescent H-mode (QH) plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS’ capabilities.

  7. Design and Testing of D.C. Conduction Pump for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nashine, B.K.; Dash, S.K.; Gurumurthy, K.; Rajan, M.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2006-07-01

    DC Conduction pump immersed in sodium forms a part of Failed Fuel Location Module (FFLM) of 500 MWe Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) currently under construction. FFLM housed in control plug of the reactor, is used to locate the failed fuel sub-assembly due to clad rupture in the fuel pin. The DC conduction pump sucks the sodium from the top of fuel sub-assemblies through the selector valve and pumps the sodium to hold up for detecting the presence of delayed neutrons. Presence of delayed neutron is the indication of failure in the sampled fuel sub-assembly. The DC Conduction Pump was chosen because of its low voltage operation (2 V) where argon/alumina ceramic can provide required electrical insulation even at operating temperature of 560 deg. C without much complication on the manufacturing front. Sampling of sodium from top of different sub-assemblies is achieved by operation of selector valve in-conjunction with the drive motor. FFLM requires the pump to be immersed in sodium pool at {approx} 560 deg. C located above the fuel sub-assemblies in the reactor. The Pump of 0.36 m{sup 3}/h capacity and developing 1.45 Kg/ cm{sup 2} pressure was designed, manufactured and tested. The DC Conduction Pump has a stainless steel duct filled with liquid sodium, which is to be pumped. The stainless steel duct is kept in magnetic field obtained by means of electromagnet. The electromagnet is made of soft iron and the coil made of copper conductor surrounds the yoke portion of electromagnet. The external DC source of 2000 Amps, 2 Volt is used to send current through sodium placed in the stainless steel duct and the same current is sent through copper coil of electromagnet for producing required magneto motive force, which in turn produces required magnetic field. The interaction of current in sodium (placed in stainless steel duct) and magnetic field produced by the electromagnet in the duct region produces pumping force in the sodium. Electromagnet, copper coil, stainless steel

  8. The development of a realistic source term for sodium-cooled fast reactors : assessment of current status and future needs.

    SciTech Connect

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Phillips, Jesse; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Middleton, Bobby D.

    2011-06-01

    Sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) continue to be proposed and designed throughout the United States and the world. Although the number of SFRs actually operating has declined substantially since the 1980s, a significant interest in advancing these types of reactor systems remains. Of the many issues associated with the development and deployment of SFRs, one of high regulatory importance is the source term to be used in the siting of the reactor. A substantial amount of modeling and experimental work has been performed over the past four decades on accident analysis, sodium coolant behavior, and radionuclide release for SFRs. The objective of this report is to aid in determining the gaps and issues related to the development of a realistic, mechanistically derived source term for SFRs. This report will allow the reader to become familiar with the severe accident source term concept and gain a broad understanding of the current status of the models and experimental work. Further, this report will allow insight into future work, in terms of both model development and experimental validation, which is necessary in order to develop a realistic source term for SFRs.

  9. Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-09-01

    This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) metal- and oxide- fuel fabrication. The similar work has been previously done for PWR MOX fuel [1]. The analysis will be performed based on the assumption that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate SFR fuels. Only non-gaseous FPs have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1 of Reference 1). Throughout of this report, we define the mixture of Pu and FPs as PuFP. The main objective of this analysis is to quantify the increase of the Pu content of SFR fuels necessary to maintain the same average burnup at discharge independently of the amount of FP in the Pu stream, i.e. independently of the PuFP composition. The FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

  10. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  11. Reanalysis of the Gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility Proteus - Spectral indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero power reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute which has been employed during the 1970's to study experimentally the physics of the gas-cooled fast reactor. Reaction rate distributions, flux spectrum and reactivity effects have been measured in several configurations featuring PuO2/UO2 fuel, absorbers, large iron shields, and thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasihomogeneously in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. This papers focus on the spectral indices - including fission and capture in 232Th and 237Np - measured in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattices and their predictions with an MCNPX model specially developed for the PROTEUS-GCFR core. Predictions were obtained with JEFF-3.1 and -3.11, ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, and JENDL-3.3 and -4.0. A general good agreement was demonstrated. The ratio of 232Th fission to 239Pu fission, however, was under-predicted by 8.7±2.1% and 6.5±2.1% using ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, respectively. Finally, the capture rates in 237Np tended to be underpredicted by the JEFF and JENDL libraries, although the new cross section in JEFF-3.1.1 slightly improved the 237Np capture to 239Pu fission results (3.4±2.4%).

  12. Neutron-induced nuclear data for the MYRRHA fast spectrum facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romojaro, Pablo; Žerovnik, Gašper; Álvarez-Velarde, Francisco; Stankovskiy, Alexey; Kodeli, Ivan; Fiorito, Luca; Díez, Carlos Javier; Cabellos, Óscar; García-Herranz, Nuria; Heyse, Jan; Paradela, Carlos; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Eynde, Gert Van den

    2017-09-01

    The MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) concept is a flexible experimental lead-bismuth cooled and mixed-oxide (MOX) fueled fast spectrum facility designed to operate both in sub-critical (accelerator driven) and critical modes. One of the key issues for the safe operation of the reactor is the uncertainty assessment during the design works. The main objective of the European project CHANDA (solving CHAllenges in Nuclear DAta) Work Package 10 is to improve MYRRHA relevant nuclear data in order to reduce the reactor parameter uncertainties derived from them. In order to achieve this goal, several tasks have been undertaken. First, a sensitivity study of MYRRHA integral parameters, such as energy dependent cross sections, fission spectra and neutron multiplicities, to nuclear data has been conducted resulting in a list of MYRRHA relevant quantities (nuclides and reactions). On the second task, an analysis of the existing experimental data and evaluations for the quantities included in the list has been carried out. In this framework, the impact on the multiplication factor of quantities from different nuclear data libraries for different nuclides, reactions and energy regions has been investigated on the MYRRHA MOX critical core model. As the next step, new experiments and evaluations will be performed in order to improve existing nuclear data libraries.

  13. Time resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast-and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Rau, A.; Xiong, S.; Axelsson, M.; Baring, M. G.; Dermer, C. D.; Iyyani, S.; Kocevski, D.; Omodei, N.; Ryde, F.; Vianello, G.

    2014-02-27

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. Therefore, the GRB spectrum is modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. In order to produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index α is consistent with a synchrotron component with α = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of α = –2/3 and α = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. Additionally, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  14. Time resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast-and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    DOE PAGES

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; ...

    2014-02-27

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. Therefore, the GRB spectrum is modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. Inmore » order to produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index α is consistent with a synchrotron component with α = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of α = –2/3 and α = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. Additionally, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.« less

  15. Application of ATHLET/DYN3D coupled codes system for fast liquid metal cooled reactor steady state simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V.; Samokhin, A.; Danicheva, I.; Khrennikov, N.; Bouscuet, J.; Velkov, K.; Pasichnyk, I.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the approaches used for developing of the BN-800 reactor test model and for validation of coupled neutron-physic and thermohydraulic calculations are described. Coupled codes ATHLET 3.0 (code for thermohydraulic calculations of reactor transients) and DYN3D (3-dimensional code of neutron kinetics) are used for calculations. The main calculation results of reactor steady state condition are provided. 3-D model used for neutron calculations was developed for start reactor BN-800 load. The homogeneous approach is used for description of reactor assemblies. Along with main simplifications, the main reactor BN-800 core zones are described (LEZ, MEZ, HEZ, MOX, blankets). The 3D neutron physics calculations were provided with 28-group library, which is based on estimated nuclear data ENDF/B-7.0. Neutron SCALE code was used for preparation of group constants. Nodalization hydraulic model has boundary conditions by coolant mass-flow rate for core inlet part, by pressure and enthalpy for core outlet part, which can be chosen depending on reactor state. Core inlet and outlet temperatures were chosen according to reactor nominal state. The coolant mass flow rate profiling through the core is based on reactor power distribution. The test thermohydraulic calculations made with using of developed model showed acceptable results in coolant mass flow rate distribution through the reactor core and in axial temperature and pressure distribution. The developed model will be upgraded in future for different transient analysis in metal-cooled fast reactors of BN type including reactivity transients (control rods withdrawal, stop of the main circulation pump, etc.).

  16. Time-resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast- and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Xiong, S.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Rau, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C. A.; Axelsson, M.; Baring, M. G.; Dermer, C. D.; Iyyani, S.; Kocevski, D. E-mail: Rob.Preece@nasa.gov E-mail: baring@rice.edu; and others

    2014-03-20

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. The GRB spectrum is therefore modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. To produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index α is consistent with a synchrotron component with α = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of α = –2/3 and α = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. In addition, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  17. Fuel Fraction Analysis of 500 MWth Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Nitride (UN-PuN) Fuel without Refueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Su'ud, Zaki; Basar, Khairul; Irwanto, Dwi

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is one of candidates which can support electricity demand in the world. The Generation IV NPP has fourth main objective, i.e. sustainability, economics competitiveness, safety and reliability, and proliferation and physical protection. One of Gen-IV reactor type is Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). In this study, the analysis of fuel fraction in small GFR with nitride fuel has been done. The calculation was performed by SRAC code, both Pij and CITATION calculation. SRAC2002 system is a code system applicable to analyze the neutronics of variety reactor type. And for the data library used JENDL-3.2. The step of SRAC calculation is fuel pin calculated by Pij calculation until the data homogenized, after it homogenized we calculate core reactor. The variation of fuel fraction is 40% up to 65%. The optimum design of 500MWth GFR without refueling with 10 years burn up time reach when radius F1:F2:F3 = 50cm:30cm:30cm and height F1:F2:F3 = 50cm:40cm:30cm, variation percentage Plutonium in F1:F2:F3 = 7%:10%:13%. The optimum fuel fraction is 41% with addition 2% Plutonium weapon grade mix in the fuel. The excess reactivity value in this case 1.848% and the k-eff value is 1.01883. The high burn up reached when the fuel fraction is low. In this study 41% fuel fraction produce faster fissile fuel, so it has highest burn-up level than the other fuel fraction.

  18. Constrains on Crustal Accretion Obtained from Cooling Rate Calculations with a Thermo-Mechanical Model of Fast-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, C. J.; Machetel, P.

    2012-12-01

    We have used a thermo-mechanical model designed to find steady-state solutions of motion and temperature with variable viscosity, heat diffusion, heat advection, hydrothermal cooling and latent heat release. Cases analogous to the "gabbro glacier" (G accretion structure), "sheeted sills" (S structure) and "mixed shallow and MTZ lenses" (M structure) were computed with and without sheeted dyke level modeling. The results show that thermal patterns near the ridge mainly depend on hydrothermal cooling. Several hydrothermal cooling cracking temperature have been used in order to illustrate the present scientific debate on the penetration depth and efficiency of hydrothermal flows. Second, higher cooling rates are obtained for the G structures. Third, whereas the subsolidus cooling rates, SCR, decrease monotonically with depth, the igneous cooling rates, ICR, display local minima at the merging levels of the upper and lower lenses. It appears that ICR reveal the near-ridge thermal and mechanical structures, whereas the lower value of the initial-to-closure temperature ranges used for SCR cause shifts farther from the ridge that reduces the ability of SCR to discriminate the ridge thermo-mechanical configuration. It also indicates that the common assumption that ICR and SCR should be similar is probably over-simplified. Finally, the cooling rates obtained bears the clear signature of the three intrusion hypothesis. The results show that numerical modeling of the lower crust's thermo-mechanical properties may provide new insights to discriminate among hypotheses related to G, M and S structures for fast-spreading ridges.; Thermal history obtained for the Gabro Glacier (top panels), Mixed shallow and MTZ zone (middle panels) and Sheeted Sills hypothesis (bottom panels)for the magma intrusion at ridge. Columns corresponds to various hydrothermal cooling and viscosity hypothesis.

  19. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation☆

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations (~1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 106–7 K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid nitrogen as its working fluid and investigated its heat transport capability to assess its application for achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell cryopreservation. The experimental results showed that the apparent heat transfer coefficient of the COHP can reach 2 × 105 W/m2·K, which is two orders of the magnitude higher than traditional heat pipes. Theoretical analyzes showed that the average local heat transfer coefficient in the thin film evaporation region of the COHP can reach 1.2 × 106 W/m2·K, which is approximately 103 times higher than that achievable with standard pool-boiling approaches. Based on these results, a novel device design applying the COHP and microfabrication techniques is proposed and its efficiency for cell vitrification is demonstrated through numerical simulation. The estimated average cooling rates achieved through this approach is 106–7 K/min, which is much faster than the currently available methods and sufficient for achieving vitrification with relatively low concentrations of CPA. PMID:18430413

  20. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K

    2008-06-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations ( approximately 1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 10(6-7) K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid nitrogen as its working fluid and investigated its heat transport capability to assess its application for achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell cryopreservation. The experimental results showed that the apparent heat transfer coefficient of the COHP can reach 2 x 10(5) W/m(2).K, which is two orders of the magnitude higher than traditional heat pipes. Theoretical analyzes showed that the average local heat transfer coefficient in the thin film evaporation region of the COHP can reach 1.2 x 10(6) W/m(2).K, which is approximately 10(3) times higher than that achievable with standard pool-boiling approaches. Based on these results, a novel device design applying the COHP and microfabrication techniques is proposed and its efficiency for cell vitrification is demonstrated through numerical simulation. The estimated average cooling rates achieved through this approach is 10(6-7)K/min, which is much faster than the currently available methods and sufficient for achieving vitrification with relatively low concentrations of CPA.

  1. Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

    2013-03-01

    If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time

  2. Toward a Mechanistic Source Term in Advanced Reactors: Characterization of Radionuclide Transport and Retention in a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brunett, Acacia J.; Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David

    2016-04-17

    A vital component of the U.S. reactor licensing process is an integrated safety analysis in which a source term representing the release of radionuclides during normal operation and accident sequences is analyzed. Historically, source term analyses have utilized bounding, deterministic assumptions regarding radionuclide release. However, advancements in technical capabilities and the knowledge state have enabled the development of more realistic and best-estimate retention and release models such that a mechanistic source term assessment can be expected to be a required component of future licensing of advanced reactors. Recently, as part of a Regulatory Technology Development Plan effort for sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), Argonne National Laboratory has investigated the current state of knowledge of potential source terms in an SFR via an extensive review of previous domestic experiments, accidents, and operation. As part of this work, the significant sources and transport processes of radionuclides in an SFR have been identified and characterized. This effort examines all stages of release and source term evolution, beginning with release from the fuel pin and ending with retention in containment. Radionuclide sources considered in this effort include releases originating both in-vessel (e.g. in-core fuel, primary sodium, cover gas cleanup system, etc.) and ex-vessel (e.g. spent fuel storage, handling, and movement). Releases resulting from a primary sodium fire are also considered as a potential source. For each release group, dominant transport phenomena are identified and qualitatively discussed. The key product of this effort was the development of concise, inclusive diagrams that illustrate the release and retention mechanisms at a high level, where unique schematics have been developed for in-vessel, ex-vessel and sodium fire releases. This review effort has also found that despite the substantial range of phenomena affecting radionuclide release, the

  3. Feasibility study on ultralong-cycle operation and material performance for compact liquid metal-cooled fast reactors: a review work

    SciTech Connect

    Tak, Taewoo; Choe, Jiwon; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung; Kim, T. K.; Hong, Ser Gi

    2015-11-01

    This paper reviews the feasibility of ultralong-cycle operation on a compact liquid metal-cooled fast reactor (LMR) firstly by assessing the operation of a long-life fast reactor core and secondly by evaluating material performance in respect to both long-cycle operation and compact-size fast reactor. Many kinds of reactor concepts have been proposed, and LMR and small modular reactor (SMR) are the issued leading technologies for generation four (Gen-IV) reactor system development. The breed-and-burn strategy was proposed as a core burning strategy to operate a long cycle, and it has been evaluated in this paper with two reactor concepts: constant axial shape of neutron flux, nuclide densities, and power shape during life of energy and ultralong cycle fast reactor. In addition, Super-Safe, Small, and Simple and small modular fast reactor, compact LMR concepts, have been simulated to evaluate their long-life operation strategies. For the other practical issues, the materials for fuel, coolant, and structure have been identified and some of them are selected to have their performance optimized specifically for compact LMR with a long-cycle operation. It is believed that this comprehensive review will propose a proper direction for future reactor development and will be followed by the next step research for a complete reactor model with the other reactor components.

  4. Compact cryogenically cooled Ti:Sapphire dual multi-kilohertz amplifiers for synchrotron radiation ultra-fast x-ray applications.

    PubMed

    Feng, J; Nasiatka, J; Hertlein, M; Rude, B; Padmore, H

    2013-05-01

    A titanium-doped sapphire regenerative dual-amplifier array operating at multi-kHz repetition rates has been developed for synchrotron radiation ultra-fast x-ray applications. The thermal lensing of the crystal in the amplifiers is virtually eliminated by cryogenic cooling of the laser crystal. The output energy of the amplifiers is measured to be greater than 2.6 mJ and the pulse length was compressed to less than 70 fs. The output laser mode is a near perfect Gaussian TEM00 with an M(2) factor of 1.02. The performance of the amplifier system is in excellent agreement with theoretical calculation.

  5. Compact cryogenically cooled Ti:Sapphire dual multi-kilohertz amplifiers for synchrotron radiation ultra-fast x-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, J.; Nasiatka, J.; Hertlein, M.; Rude, B.; Padmore, H.

    2013-05-01

    A titanium-doped sapphire regenerative dual-amplifier array operating at multi-kHz repetition rates has been developed for synchrotron radiation ultra-fast x-ray applications. The thermal lensing of the crystal in the amplifiers is virtually eliminated by cryogenic cooling of the laser crystal. The output energy of the amplifiers is measured to be greater than 2.6 mJ and the pulse length was compressed to less than 70 fs. The output laser mode is a near perfect Gaussian TEM00 with an M2 factor of 1.02. The performance of the amplifier system is in excellent agreement with theoretical calculation.

  6. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    SciTech Connect

    Monado, Fiber; Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Permana, Sidik; Aziz, Ferhat; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-02-12

    A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance.

  7. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monado, Fiber; Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Aziz, Ferhat; Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance.

  8. Direct Energy Conversion for Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.; Cooper, J.; Vogt, D.; Chapline, G.; Turchi, P.; Barbee Jr., T.; Farmer, J.

    2000-07-01

    Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), should improve the speed and decrease the cost of developing new TEGs. The system concept to be evaluated is shown in Figure 1. Liquid metal is used to transport heat away from the nuclear heat source and to the TEG. Air or liquid (water or a liquid metal) is used to transport heat away from the cold side of the TEG. Typical reactor coolants include sodium or eutectic mixtures of lead-bismuth. These are coolants that have been used to cool fast neutron reactors. Heat from the liquid metal coolant is rejected through the thermal electric materials, thereby producing electrical power directly. The temperature gradient could extend from as high as 1300 K to 300 K, although fast reactor structural materials (including those used to clad the fuel) currently used limit the high temperature to about 825K.

  9. Invasion of Seawater-Derived Fluids at Very High Temperatures in the Oman Ophiolite - a Key for Cooling the Deep Crust at Fast-Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, J.; Mueller, T.; Linsler, S.; Schuth, S.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C. D.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prominent conceptual models for the formation of the deep, fast-spread crust are the "gabbro-glacier" model, where the lower crust is formed in the axial melt lens, and the "sheeted sill" model, where the lower gabbros are generated by the intrusion of sills of gabbroic mushes. A requirement for the latter model is a substantial hydrothermal cooling of the oceanic crust in the depth, and as long as the "Rosetta stone" for the mechanism of this deep cooling is not found, the "sheeted sill" model and derivatives cannot be accepted as reliable option how the deep oceanic fast-spread crust is formed. In recent field campaigns for establishing a geochemical and petrological profile through typical fast-spreading oceanic crust in the Wadi Gideah (Wadi Tayin massif, Oman ophiolite), we discovered several, often more than 100 m wide fault zones, cutting a coherent series of layered gabbro at many places. These zones are characterized by pervasive alteration, mainly in greenschist and sub-greenschist facies. Isotope geochemical studies of these zones imply that these zones can be interpreted as pathways for channeled hydrothermal flux, in accord with observations of Coogan et al. (2006). In most of the fault zones, we observed the occurrence of varitextured hornblende gabbro, alternating with zones of former layered gabbros showing intense overgrowth of high- temperature amphibole, and sometimes with flasered amphibolites. The petrologic record implies fluid flux in the center of this zones at very high temperatures (≤ 1000°C), enabling even the production of hornblende gabbros by hydrous partial melting of layered gabbro, shielded by zones formed at high-temperature conditions (formation of high-T amphiboles) and at low-temperature conditions (greenschist facies rocks). First thermal modeling based on the petrological record of these zones are in progress. Coogan LA, Howard KA, Gillis KM, Bickle MJ, Chapman H, Boyce AJ, Jenkin GRT, Wilson RN (2006) Am. J. Sci. 306: 389-427

  10. Status report on the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) /Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and supporting research and development.

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Yang, W. S.; Wade, D. C.; Nikiforova, A.; Hanania, P.; Ryu, H. J.; Kulesza, K. P.; Kim, S. J.; Halsey, W. G.; Smith, C. F.; Brown, N. W.; Greenspan, E.; de Caro, M.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Yu, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division; LLNL; LANL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Ecole des Mines de Paris; Oregon State Univ.; Univ.of California at Berkley

    2008-06-23

    This report provides an update on development of a pre-conceptual design for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) plant concept and supporting research and development activities. SSTAR is a small, 20 MWe (45 MWt), natural circulation, fast reactor plant for international deployment concept incorporating proliferation resistance for deployment in non-fuel cycle states and developing nations, fissile self-sufficiency for efficient utilization of uranium resources, autonomous load following making it suitable for small or immature grid applications, and a high degree of passive safety further supporting deployment in developing nations. In FY 2006, improvements have been made at ANL to the pre-conceptual design of both the reactor system and the energy converter which incorporates a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle providing higher plant efficiency (44 %) and improved economic competitiveness. The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle technology is also applicable to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors providing the same benefits. One key accomplishment has been the development of a control strategy for automatic control of the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle in principle enabling autonomous load following over the full power range between nominal and essentially zero power. Under autonomous load following operation, the reactor core power adjusts itself to equal the heat removal from the reactor system to the power converter through the large reactivity feedback of the fast spectrum core without the need for motion of control rods, while the automatic control of the power converter matches the heat removal from the reactor to the grid load. The report includes early calculations for an international benchmarking problem for a LBE-cooled, nitride-fueled fast reactor core organized by the IAEA as part of a Coordinated Research Project on Small Reactors without Onsite Refueling; the calculations use the same neutronics

  11. Development of a multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in steam generators of sodium-cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Uchibori, Akihiro; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-31

    A multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors was newly developed. The analysis system consists of the mechanistic numerical analysis codes, SERAPHIM, TACT, and RELAP5. The SERAPHIM code calculates the multicomponent multiphase flow and sodium-water chemical reaction caused by discharging of pressurized water vapor. Applicability of the SERAPHIM code was confirmed through the analyses of the experiment on water vapor discharging in liquid sodium. The TACT code was developed to calculate heat transfer from the reacting jet to the adjacent tube and to predict the tube failure occurrence. The numerical models integrated into the TACT code were verified through some related experiments. The RELAP5 code evaluates thermal hydraulic behavior of water inside the tube. The original heat transfer correlations were corrected for the tube rapidly heated by the reacting jet. The developed system enables evaluation of the wastage environment and the possibility of the failure propagation.

  12. Compact cryogenically cooled Ti:Sapphire dual multi-kilohertz amplifiers for synchrotron radiation ultra-fast x-ray applications

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; Nasiatka, J.; Hertlein, M.; Rude, B.; Padmore, H.

    2013-05-15

    A titanium-doped sapphire regenerative dual-amplifier array operating at multi-kHz repetition rates has been developed for synchrotron radiation ultra-fast x-ray applications. The thermal lensing of the crystal in the amplifiers is virtually eliminated by cryogenic cooling of the laser crystal. The output energy of the amplifiers is measured to be greater than 2.6 mJ and the pulse length was compressed to less than 70 fs. The output laser mode is a near perfect Gaussian TEM00 with an M{sup 2} factor of 1.02. The performance of the amplifier system is in excellent agreement with theoretical calculation.

  13. Development of variable-width ribbon heating elements for liquid-metal and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor fuel-pin simulators

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Post, D.W.; Lovell, R.T.; Snyder, S.D.

    1981-04-01

    Variable-width ribbon heating elements that provide a chopped-cosine variable heat flux profile have been fabricated for fuel pin simulators used in test loops by the Breeder Reactor Program Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety test facility and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor-Core Flow Test Loop. Thermal, mechanical, and electrical design considerations are used to derive an analytical expression that precisely describes ribbon contour in terms of the major fabrication parameters. These parameters are used to generate numerical control tapes that control ribbon cutting and winding machines. Infrared scanning techniques are developed to determine the optimum transient thermal profile of the coils and relate this profile to that generated by the coils in completed fuel pin simulators.

  14. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars in the fast-cooling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-07-01

    In the external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of a very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution, N^' }_e({γ ^' })∝ {γ ^' }^{-p}, with spectral index p ˜ 1.3 is formed below the minimum energy of injection electrons when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e. inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat-spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum and can explain in reasonable fashion the very hard Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) spectrum of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December.

  15. Development of a multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in steam generators of sodium-cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchibori, Akihiro; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    A multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors was newly developed. The analysis system consists of the mechanistic numerical analysis codes, SERAPHIM, TACT, and RELAP5. The SERAPHIM code calculates the multicomponent multiphase flow and sodium-water chemical reaction caused by discharging of pressurized water vapor. Applicability of the SERAPHIM code was confirmed through the analyses of the experiment on water vapor discharging in liquid sodium. The TACT code was developed to calculate heat transfer from the reacting jet to the adjacent tube and to predict the tube failure occurrence. The numerical models integrated into the TACT code were verified through some related experiments. The RELAP5 code evaluates thermal hydraulic behavior of water inside the tube. The original heat transfer correlations were corrected for the tube rapidly heated by the reacting jet. The developed system enables evaluation of the wastage environment and the possibility of the failure propagation.

  16. Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) Design: Safety, Neutronics, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Mechanics, Fuel, Core, and Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C

    2010-02-22

    The idea of developing fast spectrum reactors with molten lead (or lead alloy) as a coolant is not a new one. Although initially considered in the West in the 1950s, such technology was not pursued to completion because of anticipated difficulties associated with the corrosive nature of these coolant materials. However, in the Soviet Union, such technology was actively pursued during the same time frame (1950s through the 1980s) for the specialized role of submarine propulsion. More recently, there has been a renewal of interest in the West for such technology, both for critical systems as well as for Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) systems. Meanwhile, interest in the former Soviet Union, primarily Russia, has remained strong and has expanded well beyond the original limited mission of submarine propulsion. This section reviews the past and current status of LFR development.

  17. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-09-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

  18. IODP Expedition 345: Structural characteristics of fast spread lower ocean crust, implications for growth and cooling of ocean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, B. E.; Ceuleneer, G.; Cheadle, M. J.; Harigane, Y.

    2013-12-01

    IODP Expedition 345 to the Hess Deep Rift sampled ~1 Ma, fast-spread East Pacific Rise gabbroic crust exposed as a dismembered, lower crustal section. Sixteen holes were drilled at Site U1415, centered on a sub-horizontal, 200-m wide E-W-trending bench between 4675 and 4850 mbsl. The bench was formed as a rotational slide within a 1km high slump along the southern wall of the intra-rift ridge. Primitive olivine gabbro and troctolite (Mg# 76-89) were sampled in four discrete, 30 to ≥ 65 m sized blocks formed by the mass wasting that dominates the southwestern slope of the ridge. Igneous fabric orientations (both layering and foliation) in the blocks vary from sub-vertical to gently dipping, suggesting some of the blocks have rotated at least 90°. Magmatic fabrics including spectacular modal and/or grain size layering are prevalent in >50% of the recovered core. Magmatic foliation in all blocks is defined by plagioclase crystal shape, but may also be defined by olivine and, to a lesser extent, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene when the crystals have suitable habits. In all cases, this foliation is controlled by both the preferred orientation and shape anisotropy of the crystals. Fabric intensity varies from moderate to strong in the block with simple modal layering, weak to absent in the two blocks of troctolite, and largely absent in the block with heterogeneous textures and/or diffuse banding. Intrinsic to the layering and banding is the common development of dendritic and/or skeletal olivine textures (grain size up to 3 cm). The preservation of these delicate olivine grains showing only limited subgrain formation, and no kinking precludes significant low melt fraction (<20%) crystal plastic flow of the cumulates. This observation prohibits ocean crust formation models that require homogeneous deformation/flow at low melt fractions. Down-temperature sub-solidus crystal plastic deformation and/or shear zones are virtually absent from the recovered core. Significant

  19. A domain-specific analysis system for examining nuclear reactor simulation data for light-water and sodium-cooled fast reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Billings, Jay Jay; Deyton, Jordan H.; Forest Hull, S.; ...

    2015-07-17

    Building new fission reactors in the United States presents many technical and regulatory challenges. Chief among the technical challenges is the need to share and present results from new high- fidelity, high- performance simulations in an easily consumable way. In light of the modern multi-scale, multi-physics simulations can generate petabytes of data, this will require the development of new techniques and methods to reduce the data to familiar quantities of interest with a more reasonable resolution and size. Furthermore, some of the results from these simulations may be new quantities for which visualization and analysis techniques are not immediately availablemore » in the community and need to be developed. Our paper describes a new system for managing high-performance simulation results in a domain-specific way that naturally exposes quantities of interest for light water and sodium-cooled fast reactors. It enables easy qualitative and quantitative comparisons between simulation results with a graphical user interface and cross-platform, multi-language input- output libraries for use by developers to work with the data. One example comparing results from two different simulation suites for a single assembly in a light-water reactor is presented along with a detailed discussion of the system s requirements and design.« less

  20. The feasibility study of small long-life gas cooled fast reactor with mixed natural Uranium/Thorium as fuel cycle input

    SciTech Connect

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal,; Monado, Fiber; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-06

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme has been performed. In this study, design GCFR with Helium coolant which can be continuously operated by supplying mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium without fuel enrichment plant or fuel reprocessing plant. The active reactor cores are divided into two region, Thorium fuel region and Uranium fuel region. Each fuel core regions are subdivided into ten parts (region-1 until region-10) with the same volume in the axial direction. The fresh Natural Uranium and Thorium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh natural Uranium/Thorium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions in both cores area, i.e. shifted the core of i{sup th} region into i+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. For the next cycles, we will add only Natural Uranium and Thorium on each region-1. The calculation results show the reactivity reached by mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium with volume ratio is 4.7:1. This reactor can results power thermal 550 MWth. After reactor start-up the operation, furthermore reactor only needs Natural Uranium/Thorium supply for continue operation along 100 years.

  1. Vitrification by Ultra-fast Cooling at a Low Concentration of Cryoprotectants in a Quartz Microcapillary: A Study Using Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoming; Park, Eric Y.H.; Fowler, Alex; Yarmush, Martin L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Conventional cryopreservation protocols for slow-freezing or vitrification involve cell injury due to ice formation/cell dehydration or toxicity of high cryoprotectant (CPA) concentrations, respectively. In this study, we developed a novel cryopreservation technique to achieve ultra-fast cooling rates using a quartz microcapillary (QMC). The QMC enabled vitrification of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells using an intracellular cryoprotectant concentration in the range used for slowing freezing (1–2 M). The cryoprotectants used included 2 M 1,2-propanediol (PROH, cell membrane permeable) and 0.5 M extracellular trehalose (cell membrane impermeable). More than 70% of the murine ES cells post-vitrification attached with respect to non-frozen control cells, and the proliferation rates of the two groups were similar. Preservation of undifferentiated properties of the pluripotent murine ES cells post vitrification cryopreservation was verified using three different types of assays: the expression of transcription factor Oct-4, the presentation of the membrane surface glycoprotein SSEA-1, and the elevated expression of the intracellular enzyme alkaline phosphatase. These results indicate that vitrification at a low concentration (2 M) of intracellular cryoprotectants is a viable and effective approach for the cryopreservation of murine embryonic stem cells. PMID:18462712

  2. Effects of Ultra-Fast Cooling After Hot Rolling and Intercritical Treatment on Microstructure and Cryogenic Toughness of 3.5%Ni Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Liu, Zhenyu

    2017-07-01

    A novel process comprised of ultra-fast cooling after control rolling, intercritical quenching and tempering (UFC-LT) was applied to 3.5%Ni steel. In addition, quenching and tempering (QT) treatment was conducted in comparison. The present study focuses on the relationship between the microstructure and cryogenic toughness of 3.5%Ni steel. Results show that the microstructure of steel treated by UFC-LT consisted of tempered martensite, intercritical ferrite and two types of reversed austenite (RA) (needle shape and blocky). Compared to the QT sample, the UFC-LT sample's ultimate tensile strength decreased slightly, while its elongation increased from 32.3 to 35.7%, and its Charpy absorption energy at -135 °C increased from 112 to 237 J. The ductile-brittle transition temperature of UFC-LT sample was lower than that of the QT sample by 18 °C. The superior cryogenic toughness after UFC-LT compared to QT treatment can be attributed to the dissolution of cementite, approximately 3.0% increase in RA and the decrease in effective grain size.

  3. Transient accident analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous lead-cooled fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-08-01

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is a promising advanced alternative to the Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle for the energy converters of specific reactor concepts belonging to the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. A new plant dynamics analysis computer code has been developed for simulation of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to an autonomous, natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). The plant dynamics code was used to simulate the whole-plant response to accident conditions. The specific design features of the reactor concept influencing passive safety are discussed and accident scenarios are identified for analysis. Results of calculations of the whole-plant response to loss-of-heat sink, loss-of-load, and pipe break accidents are demonstrated. The passive safety performance of the reactor concept is confirmed by the results of the plant dynamics code calculations for the selected accident scenarios.

  4. Transient Accident Analysis of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Converter Coupled to an Autonomous Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, Anton; Sienicki, James J.

    2006-07-01

    The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising advanced alternative to the Rankine saturated steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle for the energy converters of specific reactor concepts belonging to the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. A new plant dynamics analysis computer code has been developed for simulation of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to an autonomous, natural circulation Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The plant dynamics code was used to simulate the whole-plant response to accident conditions. The specific design features of the reactor concept influencing passive safety are discussed and accident scenarios are identified for analysis. Results of calculations of the whole-plant response to loss-of-heat sink, loss-of-load, and pipe break accidents are demonstrated. The passive safety performance of the reactor concept is confirmed by the results of the plant dynamics code calculations for the selected accident scenarios. (authors)

  5. The feasibility study of small long-life gas cooled fast reactor with mixed natural Uranium/Thorium as fuel cycle input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Monado, Fiber; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme has been performed. In this study, design GCFR with Helium coolant which can be continuously operated by supplying mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium without fuel enrichment plant or fuel reprocessing plant. The active reactor cores are divided into two region, Thorium fuel region and Uranium fuel region. Each fuel core regions are subdivided into ten parts (region-1 until region-10) with the same volume in the axial direction. The fresh Natural Uranium and Thorium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh natural Uranium/Thorium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions in both cores area, i.e. shifted the core of ith region into i+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. For the next cycles, we will add only Natural Uranium and Thorium on each region-1. The calculation results show the reactivity reached by mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium with volume ratio is 4.7:1. This reactor can results power thermal 550 MWth. After reactor start-up the operation, furthermore reactor only needs Natural Uranium/Thorium supply for continue operation along 100 years.

  6. Lead-cooled system design and challenges in the frame of Generation IV International Forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinotti, Luciano; Smith, Craig F.; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Mansani, Luigi; Reale, Marco; Sienicki, James J.

    2011-08-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Technology Roadmap identified the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) as a technology well suited for electricity generation, hydrogen production and actinide management in a closed fuel cycle. One of the most important features of the LFR is the fact that lead is a relatively inert coolant, a feature that conveys significant advantages in terms of safety, system simplification, and the consequent potential for economic performance. In 2004, the GIF LFR Provisional System Steering Committee was organized and began to develop the LFR System Research Plan. The committee selected two pool-type reactor concepts as candidates for international cooperation and joint development in the GIF framework: these are the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR); and the European Lead-cooled System (ELSY). The high boiling point (1745 °C) of lead has a beneficial impact to the safety of the system, whereas its high melting point (327.4 °C) requires new engineering strategies, especially for In-Service-Inspection and refuelling. Lead, especially at high temperatures, is also relatively corrosive towards structural materials. This necessitates that coolant purity and the level of dissolved oxygen be carefully controlled, in addition to the proper selection of structural materials. For the GIF LFR concepts, lead has been chosen as the coolant rather than Lead-Bismuth Eutectic primarily because of its greatly reduced generation of the alpha-emitting 210Po isotope formed in the coolant. This results in significantly reduced levels of radioactive contamination of the coolant while minimizing the effect of decay power in the coolant from such contaminants; an additional consideration is the desire to eliminate dependence on bismuth which might be a limited resource. This paper provides an overview of the historical development of the LFR, a summary of the advantages and challenges associated with heavy liquid metal coolants, and an

  7. The study of capability natural uranium as fuel cycle input for long life gas cooled fast reactors with helium as coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, Menik; Satya, Octavianus Cakra; Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present research is to assess the feasibility design of small long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with helium as coolant. GCFR included in the Generation-IV reactor systems are being developed to provide sustainable energy resources that meet future energy demand in a reliable, safe, and proliferation-resistant manner. This reactor can be operated without enrichment and reprocessing forever, once it starts. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was adopted in this system with different core design. This study has compared the core with three designs of core reactors with the same thermal power 600 MWth. The fuel composition each design was arranged by divided core into several parts of equal volume axially i.e. 6, 8 and 10 parts related to material burn-up history. The fresh natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of the region (i) into region (i+1) region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The calculation results shows that for the burn-up strategy on "Region-8" and "Region-10" core designs, after the reactors start-up the operation furthermore they only needs natural uranium supply to the next life operation until one period of refueling (10 years).

  8. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN-PuN) fuel for 25- 100MWe gas cooled fast reactor long life without refuelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syarifah, R. D.; Su'ud, Z.; Basar, K.; Irwanto, D.

    2016-11-01

    The prospect of uranium nitride (UN-PuN) fuel for 25-100MWe Gas Cooled Fast Reactor has been done. This research use helium coolant which has low neutron moderation, chemical inert and single phase. This study use natural uranium and plutonium. Plutonium taken from spent fuel of LWR (Light Water Reactor). So, it can reduced spent fuel in the world. The calculation use SRAC2006 and JENDL 4.0 for the data libraries. First, we calculate PIJ for fuel pin cell calculation and CITATION for core calculation. The reflector radial-axial width is 50 cm. The variation of fuel fraction is 40% until 65%, cladding 10%, and moderator 25% up to 50%. The variation of the power is 75-300 MWth (25-100 MWe). The calculation of survey parameter has been done. The variation of percentage plutonium is 7% up to 13%. We have optimum k-eff value in percentage of plutonium 11%. The high powers cause k-eff value high too. Second, the core configuration divided by three variation fuel (F1, F2, and F3). F1 is located in the central core, F2 middle core and F3 outer core. The variation percentage Plutonium for fuel F1:F2:F3 = 8%:10%:12%. The increasing power level make the burn up level increase. All case can reach burn up time plus than 20 years. The thermal powers increase cause the peak power density increase. The power 150 MWth, 225 MWth, and 300 MWth have excess reactivity (%Ak/k) less than 2%.

  9. The study of capability natural uranium as fuel cycle input for long life gas cooled fast reactors with helium as coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Ariani, Menik Satya, Octavianus Cakra; Monado, Fiber; Su’ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-03-11

    The objective of the present research is to assess the feasibility design of small long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with helium as coolant. GCFR included in the Generation-IV reactor systems are being developed to provide sustainable energy resources that meet future energy demand in a reliable, safe, and proliferation-resistant manner. This reactor can be operated without enrichment and reprocessing forever, once it starts. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was adopted in this system with different core design. This study has compared the core with three designs of core reactors with the same thermal power 600 MWth. The fuel composition each design was arranged by divided core into several parts of equal volume axially i.e. 6, 8 and 10 parts related to material burn-up history. The fresh natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of the region (i) into region (i+1) region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The calculation results shows that for the burn-up strategy on “Region-8” and “Region-10” core designs, after the reactors start-up the operation furthermore they only needs natural uranium supply to the next life operation until one period of refueling (10 years).

  10. Scaling approach and thermal-hydraulic analysis in the reactor cavity cooling system of a high temperature gas -cooled reactor and thermal-jet mixing in a sodium fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotowa, Olumuyiwa A.

    This dissertation develops and demonstrates the application of the top-down and bottom-up scaling methodologies to thermal-hydraulic flows in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and upper plenum of the sodium fast reactor (SFR), respectively. The need to integrate scaled separate effects and integral tests was identified. Experimental studies and computational tools (CFD) have been integrated to guide the engineering design, analysis and assessment of this scaling methods under single and two-phase flow conditions. To test this methods, two applicable case studies are considered, and original contributions are noted. Case 1: "Experimental Study of RCCS for the HTGR". Contributions include validation of scaling analysis using the top-down approach as guide to a ¼-scale integral test facility. System code, RELAP5, was developed based on the derived scaling parameters. Tests performed included system sensitivity to decay heat load and heat sink inventory variations. System behavior under steady-state and transient scenarios were predicted. Results show that the system has the capacity to protect the cavity walls from over-heating during normal operations and provide a means for decay heat removal under accident scenarios. A full width half maximum statistical method was devised to characterize the thermal-hydraulics of the non-linear two-phase oscillatory behavior. This facilitated understanding of the thermal hydraulic coupling of the loop segments of the RCCS, the heat transfer, and the two-phase flashing flow phenomena; thus the impact of scaling overall. Case 2: "Computational Studies of Thermal Jet Mixing in SFR". In the pool-type SFR, susceptible regions to thermal striping are the upper instrumentation structure and the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). We investigated the thermal mixing above the core to UIS and the potential impact due to poor mixing. The thermal mixing of dual-jet flows at different

  11. Isotopic age constraints on provenance of exotic terranes, latest Permian collision and fast Late Triassic post-collisional cooling and tectonic exhumation of the Korean collision belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Koenraad; Han, Seokyoung; Ruffet, Gilles; Yi, Keewook

    2016-04-01

    and amphibole from different units of the Imjingang Belt yielded tightly clustered Ar/Ar plateau ages between 255±1 and 249±1 Ma, dating fast cooling after peak temperature conditions. Slightly younger 243±1 and 240±1 Ma muscovite plateau ages in strongly retrogressed mylonites in the top of the Gyeonggi Massif and 241-237 Ma age components (Taean Formation) point to collisional tectonism. Concordant 233-229 Ma isotopic ages of titanite, hornblende and mica in Hongseong zone and Taean Formation, and detrital muscovite in Jurassic Gimpo sandstones reveal a regional thermal event affecting large portions of the peninsula's crust, also manifested in widespread 237-226 Ma mantle-sourced Mg-rich potassic magmatism and associated mafic dykes truncating folds and tectonic foliations. The Late Triassic thermal pulse implies rapid advective-conductive asthenospheric heat transport promoted by extension and magmatic underplating during post- or late-collisional lower crust and uppermost mantle delamination and/or oceanic slab break-off. The efficiency of cooling is underlined by identical biotite (228±1 Ma) and hornblende (230±1 Ma) plateau ages in Hongseong amphibolites that are partly concordant with 243-229 Ma (average: ˜235 Ma) U-Pb zircon ages in the Gyeonggi Massif and the Hongseong zone, in the literature. This indicates that the Gyeonggi Massif is a Late Triassic core complex.

  12. Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

    2006-09-01

    Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature

  13. Stacking with stochastic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, Fritz; Möhl, Dieter

    2004-10-01

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 105 the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the 'old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some considerations to the 'azimuthal' schemes.

  14. Investigation of plant control strategies for the supercritical C0{sub 2}Brayton cycle for a sodium-cooled fast reactor using the plant dynamics code.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J.

    2011-04-12

    The development of a control strategy for the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the investigation of alternate control strategies for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) nuclear power plant incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle power converter. The SFR assumed is the 400 MWe (1000 MWt) ABR-1000 preconceptual design incorporating metallic fuel. Three alternative idealized schemes for controlling the reactor side of the plant in combination with the existing automatic control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle are explored using the ANL Plant Dynamics Code together with the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) Analysis Code System coupled together using the iterative coupling formulation previously developed and implemented into the Plant Dynamics Code. The first option assumes that the reactor side can be ideally controlled through movement of control rods and changing the speeds of both the primary and intermediate coolant system sodium pumps such that the intermediate sodium flow rate and inlet temperature to the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger (RHX) remain unvarying while the intermediate sodium outlet temperature changes as the load demand from the electric grid changes and the S-CO{sub 2} cycle conditions adjust according to the S-CO{sub 2} cycle control strategy. For this option, the reactor plant follows an assumed change in load demand from 100 to 0 % nominal at 5 % reduction per minute in a suitable fashion. The second option allows the reactor core power and primary and intermediate coolant system sodium pump flow rates to change autonomously in response to the strong reactivity feedbacks of the metallic fueled core and assumed constant pump torques representing unchanging output from the pump electric motors. The plant behavior to the assumed load demand reduction is surprising close to that calculated for the first option. The only negative result observed is a slight increase in the intermediate

  15. Ultraefficient cooling of resonators: beating sideband cooling with quantum control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Strauch, Frederick W; Jacobs, Kurt

    2011-10-21

    The present state of the art in cooling mechanical resonators is a version of sideband cooling. Here we present a method that uses the same configuration as sideband cooling-coupling the resonator to be cooled to a second microwave (or optical) auxiliary resonator-but will cool significantly colder. This is achieved by varying the strength of the coupling between the two resonators over a time on the order of the period of the mechanical resonator. As part of our analysis, we also obtain a method for fast, high-fidelity quantum information transfer between resonators. © 2011 American Physical Society

  16. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  17. Integrated system for temperature-controlled fast protein liquid chromatography comprising improved copolymer modified beaded agarose adsorbents and a travelling cooling zone reactor arrangement.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias K H; Cao, Ping; Ewert, Stephanie; Wohlgemuth, Jonas; Liu, Haiyang; Willett, Thomas C; Theodosiou, Eirini; Thomas, Owen R T; Franzreb, Matthias

    2013-04-12

    An integrated approach to temperature-controlled chromatography, involving copolymer modified agarose adsorbents and a novel travelling cooling zone reactor (TCZR) arrangement, is described. Sepharose CL6B was transformed into a thermoresponsive cation exchange adsorbent (thermoCEX) in four synthetic steps: (i) epichlorohydrin activation; (ii) amine capping; (iii) 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid) immobilization; and 'graft from' polymerization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-tert-butylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide). FT-IR, (1)H NMR, gravimetry and chemical assays allowed precise determination of the adsorbent's copolymer composition and loading, and identified the initial epoxy activation step as a critical determinant of 'on-support' copolymer loading, and in turn, protein binding performance. In batch binding studies with lactoferrin, thermoCEX's binding affinity and maximum adsorption capacity rose smoothly with temperature increase from 20 to 50 °C. In temperature shifting chromatography experiments employing thermoCEX in thermally jacketed columns, 44-51% of the lactoferrin adsorbed at 42 °C could be desorbed under binding conditions by cooling the column to 22 °C, but the elution peaks exhibited strong tailing. To more fully exploit the potential of thermoresponsive chromatography adsorbents, a new column arrangement, the TCZR, was developed. In TCZR chromatography, a narrow discrete cooling zone (special assembly of copper blocks and Peltier elements) is moved along a bespoke fixed-bed separation columnfilled with stationary phase. In tests with thermoCEX, it was possible to recover 65% of the lactoferrin bound at 35 °C using 8 successive movements of the cooling zone at a velocity of 0.1mm/s; over half of the recovered protein was eluted in the first peak in more concentrated form than in the feed. Intra-particle diffusion of desorbed protein out of the support pores, and the ratio between the velocities of the cooling

  18. CFD Analysis for Flow Behavior Characteristics in the Upper Plenum during low flow/low pressure transients for the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Theron Marshall; Kevan Weaver; Hans Gougar

    2007-05-01

    Gas coolant at low pressure exhibits poor heat transfer characteristics. This is an area of concern for the passive response targeted by the Generation IV GCFR design. For the first 24 hour period, the decay heat removal for the GCFR design is dependent on an actively powered blower, which also would reduce the temperature in the fuel during transients, before depending on the passive operation. Natural circulation cooling initiates when the blower is stopped for the final phase of the decay heat removal, as under forced convection the core decay heat is adequately cooled by the running blower. The ability of the coolant to flow in the reverse direction or having recirculation, when the blowers are off, necessitates more understanding of the flow behavior characteristics in the upper plenum. The work done here focuses primarily on the period after the blower has been turned off, as the core is adequately cooled when the blowers are running, thus there was no need to carry out the analysis for the first 24 hours. In order to understand the plume behavior for the GCFR upper plenum several cases were run, with air, helium and helium-air mixture. For each case, the FLUENT was used to characterize the steady state velocity vectors and corresponding temperature in the upper plenum under passive decay heat removal conditions. This study will provide better insight into the plume interaction in the upper plenum at low flow and low pressure conditions.

  19. Advanced MOX Core Design Study of Sodium Cooled Reactors in Current Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Niwa, H.

    2002-07-01

    The Sodium cooled MOX core design studies are performed with the target burnup of 150 GWd/t and measures against the recriticality issues in core disruptive accidents (CDAs). Four types of core are comparatively studied in viewpoints of core performance and reliability. Result shows that all the types of core satisfy the target and that the homogeneous core with axial blanket partial elimination subassembly is the most superior concept in case the effectiveness of measures against recriticality issues by the axial blanket partial elimination is assured. (authors)

  20. Cooling Rates of Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Hewins, R. H.; Eiben, B. A.

    1995-09-01

    Cooling rates for chondrules are among many aspects of chondrule forming events currently under debate and estimates by different authors vary considerably. Calculations based on radiation from isolated chondrules yield an extremely high cooling rate of ~10^5 degrees C/hr [1]. The cooling rates derived from previous petrological and experimental studies are much lower but inconsistent, ranging from 5 - 100 degrees C/hr [2] to ~1000 degrees C/hr [3]. Since cooling rates bear important information about the chondrule-forming environment, they need to be more tightly constrained. Here we re-evaluate the chondrule cooling rates based on the results of our recent flash heating experiments, mainly the volatile loss data, as well as textures, and olivine zoning profiles of the chondrule analog materials. Linear cooling vs. cooling curves. Many previous studies either assumed or used linear cooling rates for chondrules [2,3]. In reality, even with simple radiative cooling, the cooling rates should have followed a non-linear path, according to the Stefan- Boltzmann law. We used non-linear cooling rates throughout our experiments, and our observations show that the initial cooling rate at the high temperature end of a specific cooling curve affects chondrule properties most. Volatile loss results. Our Na and S loss experiments [4] have shown that to reproduce the very high Na contents [5,6] and primary sulfide [7] found in some natural chondrules, heating has to be brief, but fast cooling and relatively high fO2 are also essential. With an fO2 of ~10^(-10) atm, for a type II chondrule flash heated to its liquidus temperature, cooling curves beginning at ~2500 degrees C/hr are necessary to retain >90% of its original Na content or part of its S, unless the ambient gas is very enriched in these elements [8]. Under lower fO2, or for type I chondrule composition, even higher cooling rates are required. Textures and olivine zoning with ~10^1 - ~10^3 degrees C/hr initial cooling

  1. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  2. Strikingly enhanced cooling performance for a micro-cooler using unique Cu nanowire array with high electrical conductivity and fast heat transfer behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming; Wang, Xiuzhen; Hao, Yanming; Deng, Yuan

    2017-06-01

    It was found that phonons/electrons are less scattered along (1 1 1)-preferred Cu nanowires than in ordinary structure films and that the interface of Cu nanowires electrode and thermoelectric materials are more compatible. Here highly ordered, high-crystal-quality, high-density Cu nanowire array was successfully fabricated by a magnetron sputtering method. The Cu nanowire array was successfully incorporated using mask-assisted deposition technology as electrodes for thin-film thermoelectric coolers, which would greatly improve electrical/thermal transport and enhance performance of micro-coolers. The cooling performance of the micro-cooler with Cu nanowire array electrode is over 200% higher than that of the cooler with ordinary film electrode.

  3. Preliminary Study of Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor with Heterogen Percentage of Uranium–Plutonium Carbide based fuel and 300 MWt Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clief Pattipawaej, Sandro; Su’ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary design study of GFR with helium gas-cooled has been performed. In this study used natural uranium and plutonium results LWR waste as fuel. Fuel with a small percentage of plutonium are arranged on the inside of the core area, and the fuel with a greater percentage set on the outside of the core area. The configuration of such fuel is deliberately set to increase breeding in this part of the central core and reduce the leakage of neutrons on the outer side of the core, in order to get long-lived reactor with a small reactivity. Configuration of fuel as it is also useful to generate a peak power reactors with relatively low in both the direction of axial or radial. Optimization has been done to fuel fraction 45.0% was found that the reactor may be operating in more than 10 year time with excess reactivity less than 1%.

  4. Fibre optic sensor based measurements of flow-induced vibration in a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pauw, B.; Vanlanduit, S.; Van Tichelen, K.; Geernaert, T.; Thienpont, H.; Berghmans, F.

    2017-04-01

    Fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should not be excessive as these can compromise the lifetime of the assembly and lead to safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants. We therefore demonstrate accurate measurements of the vibrations of a fuel assembly in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation with fibre Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors. The use of FBGs in combination with a dedicated sensor integration approach allows accounting for the severe geometrical constraints and providing for the required minimal intrusiveness of the instrumentation, identifying the vibration modes with required accuracy and observing the differences between the vibration amplitudes of the individual fuel pins as well as evidencing a low frequency fuel pin vibration mode resulting from the supports.

  5. Investigation of vessel exterior air cooling for an HLMC reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    2000-07-01

    The secure transportable autonomous reactor (STAR) concept under development at Argonne National Laboratory provides a small [300-MW(thermal)] reactor module for steam supply that incorporates design features to attain proliferation resistance, heightened passive safety, and improved cost competitiveness through extreme simplification. Examples are the achievement of 100% + natural-circulation heat removal from the low-power-density/low-pressure-drop ultralong lifetime core and utilization of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant enabling elimination of main coolant pumps as well as the need for an intermediate heat transport circuit. It is required to provide a passive means of removing decay heat and effecting reactor cooldown in the event that the normal steam generator heat sink, including its normal shutdown heat removal mode, is postulated to be unavailable. In the present approach, denoted as the reactor exterior cooling system (RECS), passive decay heat removal is provided by cooling the outside of the containment/guard vessel with air. RECS is similar to the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) incorporated into the PRISM design. However, to enhance the heat removal, RECS incorporates fins on the containment vessel exterior to enhance heat transfer to air as well as removable steel venetian conductors that provide a conduction heat transfer path across the reactor vessel-containment vessel gap to enhance heat transfer between the vessels. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of air cooling in removing heat from the vessel and limiting the coolant temperature increase following a sudden complete loss of the steam generator heat sink.

  6. Investigation of vessel exterior air cooling for a HLMC reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J. J.; Spencer, B. W.

    2000-01-13

    The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (STAR) concept under development at Argonne National Laboratory provides a small (300 MWt) reactor module for steam supply that incorporates design features to attain proliferation resistance, heightened passive safety, and improved cost competitiveness through extreme simplification. Examples are the achievement of 100%+ natural circulation heat removal from the low power density/low pressure drop ultra-long lifetime core and utilization of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant enabling elimination of main coolant pumps as well as the need for an intermediate heat transport circuit. It is required to provide a passive means of removing decay heat and effecting reactor cooldown in the event that the normal steam generator heat sink, including its normal shutdown heat removal mode, is postulated to be unavailable. In the present approach, denoted as the Reactor Exterior Cooling System (RECS), passive decay heat removal is provided by cooling the outside of the containment/guard vessel with air. RECS is similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) incorporated into the PRISM design. However, to enhance the heat removal, RECS incorporates fins on the containment vessel exterior to enhance heat transfer to air as well as removable steel venetian conductors that provide a conduction heat transfer path across the reactor vessel-containment vessel gap to enhance heat transfer between the vessels. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of air cooling in removing heat from the vessel and limiting the coolant temperature increase following a sudden complete loss of the steam generator heat sink.

  7. Discovery of the thallium, lead, bismuth, and polonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Forty-two thallium, forty-two lead, forty-one bismuth, and forty-two polonium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  8. Spectroscopic study of neodymium doped lead-bismuth-borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, Altaf; Dayani, P.; Negalur, Mahesh; Swamy, Manjunatha; Abhiram, J.; Rajaramakrishna, R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on different physical and optical properties of rare earth doped heavy metal oxide glasses. The glass composition of 10Bi2O3-30PbO-60B2O3-xNd2O3 where x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1 (in mol %) has been synthesized using melt-quenching technique. Refractive index measurements for these glasses were done and physical parameters were studied. Structural properties of these glasses were analysed through infrared spectra that was recorded between 1600cm-1 and 300cm-1 in transmission mode. The optical absorption spectra were recorded in the wavelength range from 300 to 700 nm. The transitions originated from ground state energy 4I9/2. The energy level analysis has been carried out by considering absorption spectral bands. The results thus obtained are comparable with reports on similar glasses, indicating that the prepared glasses may have potential laser applications.

  9. Compatibility tests of steels in flowing liquid lead-bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, F.; Benamati, G.; Fazio, C.; Rusanov, A.

    2001-06-01

    The behaviour of steels exposed to flowing Pb-55Bi was evaluated. The materials tested are the two austenitic steels AISI 316L and 1.4970, and the six martensitic steels Optifer IVc, T91, Batman 27, Batman 28, EP823 and EM10 which were exposed to flowing Pb-55Bi for 1000, 2000 and 3000 h and at two temperatures (573 and 743 K). The corrosion tests were conducted in the non-isothermal loop of IPPE-Obninsk under a controlled oxygen level (10 -6 wt%). The compatibility study showed that at a lower temperature, a very thin oxide layer (<1 μm) was formed on the steels. At higher temperature, austenitic steels also exhibited a thin oxide layer sufficient to prevent their dissolution in the melt. A thicker oxide, which grew according to a parabolic law, was observed on the surface of the martensitic steels. The oxidation resistance behaviour of the martensitic steels was correlated with their alloying elements.

  10. Atomistic simulation of liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celino, Massimo; Conversano, Roberto; Rosato, Vittorio

    2002-02-01

    Lead and the Pb-Bi eutectic (Pb 55.9 at.%) have been modeled by a n-body potential derived from a second moment approximation of a tight binding Hamiltonian. The thermal behavior of the two systems in the liquid phase has been reproduced and relevant structural parameters have been evaluated and compared with experimental data. The diffusion coefficients and the activation energy for diffusion have been also evaluated.

  11. Atomic Environment in Lead-Bismuthate Glasses Containing Manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, V.; Bako-Szilagyi, H.; Neumann, M.; Chiuzbăian, S. G.; Simon, S.

    The atomic environment of 20MnO . 80(xBi2O3 . yPbO) glass samples having the ratio of bismuth to lead atoms of 8:1 and 3:1 was investigated with respect to the thermal induced structural changes, cationic field strength and electronic structure of the compound. The position and full width at half maximum of X-ray photoelectron peaks were estimated using spectra simulation based on the summation of Lorentzian and Gaussian functions. Data obtained from XPS core-level spectra Bi 4f, Pb 4f, Mn 2p, and O 1s indicate a reduction of glass disorder both by heat treatment and by increasing the PbO content in the samples. The cations behave essentially as network formers that could be correlated with an intermediate range structure.

  12. Spectroscopic study of neodymium doped lead-bismuth-borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Pasha, Altaf; Dayani, P.; Negalur, Mahesh; Swamy, Manjunatha; Abhiram, J.; Rajaramakrishna, R.

    2016-05-06

    This paper reports on different physical and optical properties of rare earth doped heavy metal oxide glasses. The glass composition of 10Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30PbO-60B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-xNd{sub 2}O{sub 3} where x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1 (in mol %) has been synthesized using melt-quenching technique. Refractive index measurements for these glasses were done and physical parameters were studied. Structural properties of these glasses were analysed through infrared spectra that was recorded between 1600cm{sup −1} and 300cm{sup −1} in transmission mode. The optical absorption spectra were recorded in the wavelength range from 300 to 700 nm. The transitions originated from ground state energy {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}. The energy level analysis has been carried out by considering absorption spectral bands. The results thus obtained are comparable with reports on similar glasses, indicating that the prepared glasses may have potential laser applications.

  13. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  14. Cool & Connected

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Cool & Connected planning assistance program helps communities develop strategies and an action plan for using broadband to promote environmentally and economically sustainable community development.

  15. Winds from cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral observations of cool stars enable study of the presence and character of winds and the mass loss process in objects with effective temperatures, gravities, and atmospheric compositions which differ from that of the Sun. A wealth of recent spectroscopic measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer complement high resolution ground-based measures in the optical and infrared spectral regions. Such observations when combined with realistic semi-empirical atmospheric modeling allow us to estimate the physical conditions in the atmospheres and winds of many classes of cool stars. Line profiles support turbulent heating and mass motions. In low gravity stars, evidence is found for relatively fast (approximately 200 km s(exp -1)), warm winds with rapid acceleration occurring in the chromosphere. In some cases outflows commensurate with stellar escape velocities are present. Our current understanding of cool star winds will be reviewed including the implications of stellar observations for identification of atmospheric heating and acceleration processes.

  16. Comparative Study on Various Geometrical Core Design of 300 MWth Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with UN-PuN Fuel Longlife without Refuelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Su'ud, Zaki; Basar, Khairul; Irwanto, Dwi

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear power has progressive improvement in the operating performance of exiting reactors and ensuring economic competitiveness of nuclear electricity around the world. The GFR use gas coolant and fast neutron spectrum. This research use helium coolant which has low neutron moderation, chemical inert and single phase. Comparative study on various geometrical core design for modular GFR with UN-PuN fuel long life without refuelling has been done. The calculation use SRAC2006 code both PIJ calculation and CITATION calculation. The data libraries use JENDL 4.0. The variation of fuel fraction is 40% until 65%. In this research, we varied the geometry of core reactor to find the optimum geometry design. The variation of the geometry design is balance cylinder; it means that the diameter active core (D) same with height active core (H). Second, pancake cylinder (D>H) and third, tall cylinder (D

  17. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  18. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  19. Electron Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Timothy J. P.

    1991-08-01

    Electron cooling is a method of reducing the 6 -dimensional phase space volume of a stored ion beam. The technique was invented by Budker and first developed by him and his colleagues at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk. Further studies of electron cooling were subsequently performed at CERN and Fermilab. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) an electron cooling system was designed, built, and commissioned in 1988. This was the highest energy system built to date (270 keV for cooling 500 MeV protons) and the first such system to be used as an instrument for performing nuclear and atomic physics experiments. This dissertation summarizes the design principles; measurements of the longitudinal drag rate (cooling force), equilibrium cooled beam properties and effective longitudinal electron beam temperature. These measurements are compared with theory and with the measured performance of other cooling systems. In addition the feasibility of extending this technology to energies an order of magnitude higher are discussed.

  20. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  1. Cool Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    ILC, Dover Division's lightweight cooling garment, called Cool Vest was designed to eliminate the harmful effects of heat stress; increases tolerance time in hot environments by almost 300 percent. Made of urethane-coated nylon used in Apollo, it works to keep the body cool, circulating chilled water throughout the lining by means of a small battery-powered pump. A pocket houses the pump, battery and the coolant which can be ice or a frozen gel, a valve control allows temperature regulation. One version is self-contained and portable for unrestrained movement, another has an umbilical line attached to an external source of coolant, such as standard tap water, when extended mobility is not required. It is reported from customers that the Cool Vest pays for itself in increased productivity in very high temperatures.

  2. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  3. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  4. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  5. Rectlinear cooling scheme for bright muon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-05-03

    A fast cooling technique is described that simultaneously reduces all six phase-space dimensions of a charged particle beam. In this process, cooling is accomplished by reducing the beam momentum through ionization energy loss in absorbers and replenishing the momentum loss only in the longitudinal direction rf cavities. In this work we review its main features and describe the main results.

  6. Cooling vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, J.; Kane, J.; Coverdale, J.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive vest of heat-sealable urethane material, when strapped to person's body, presents significant uncomplicated cooling system for environments where heavy accumulation of metabolic heat exists. Garment is applicable to occupations where physical exertion is required under heavy protective clothing.

  7. Cool Andromeda

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-28

    In this new view of the Andromeda, also known as M31, galaxy from the Herschel space observatory, cool lanes of forming stars are revealed in the finest detail yet. M31 is the nearest major galaxy to our own Milky Way at a distance of 2.5 million light-ye

  8. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path.

  9. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  10. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  11. Cooling technique

    DOEpatents

    Salamon, Todd R; Vyas, Brijesh; Kota, Krishna; Simon, Elina

    2017-01-31

    An apparatus and a method are provided. Use is made of a wick structure configured to receive a liquid and generate vapor in when such wick structure is heated by heat transferred from heat sources to be cooled off. A vapor channel is provided configured to receive the vapor generated and direct said vapor away from the wick structure. In some embodiments, heat conductors are used to transfer the heat from the heat sources to the liquid in the wick structure.

  12. Cooling device

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, L.

    1984-02-21

    A cooling device is claimed for coal dust comprising a housing, a motor-driven conveyor system therein to transport the coal dust over coolable trays in the housing and conveyor-wheel arms of spiral curvature for moving the coal dust from one or more inlets to one or more outlets via a series of communicating passages in the trays over which the conveyor-wheel arms pass under actuation of a hydraulic motor mounted above the housing and driving a vertical shaft, to which the conveyor-wheel arms are attached, extending centrally downwardly through the housing.

  13. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  14. How Fast Is Fast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, Abe

    1994-01-01

    Presents an activity that enables students to answer for themselves the question of how fast a body must travel before the nonrelativistic expression must be replaced with the correct relativistic expression by deciding on the accuracy required in describing the kinetic energy of a body. (ZWH)

  15. Fuel assembly cooling experience at the FFTF IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, P.W.

    1985-11-01

    To date, 13 fuel assemblies requiring forced cooling have been processed through the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) interim examination and maintenance (IEM) cell. Of these, two assemblies experienced overtemperature conditions due to inadequate forced cooling. Both of the occurrences have contributed significantly to the process of learning how to operate a fuel assembly cooling system remotely in an argon atmosphere hot cell. Many innovations have been made to the cooling system to enhance safety and increase productivity, and are briefly described.

  16. Enhanced photothermal cooling of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guccione, G.; Hosseini, M.; Mirzaei, A.; Slatyer, H. J.; Buchler, B. C.; Lam, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the optomechanical interaction between light and metallic nanowires through the action of bolometric forces. We show that the response time of the photothermal forces induced on the nanowire is fast and the strength of the interaction can overcome the radiation pressure force. Furthermore, we suggest the photothermal forces can be enhanced by surface plasmon excitation to cool the sub-megahertz vibrational modes of the nanowires close to its quantum limit.

  17. Geminga: A cooling superfluid neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Dany

    1994-01-01

    We compare the recent temperature estimate for Geminga with neutron star cooling models. Because of its age (approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 5) yr), Geminga is in the photon cooling era. We show that its surface temperature (approximately 5.2 x 10(exp 5) K) can be understood by both types of neutrino cooling scenarios, i.e., slow neutrino cooling by the modified Urca process or fast neutrino cooling by the direct Urca process or by some exotic matter, and thus does not allow us to discriminate between these two competing schemes. However, for both types of scenarios, agreement with the observed temperature can only be obtained if baryon pairing is present in most, if not all, of the core of the star. Within the slow neutrino cooling scenario, early neutrino cooling is not sufficient to explain the observed low temperature, and extensive pairing in the core is necessary to reduce the specific heat and increase the cooling rate in the present photon cooling era. Within all the fast neutrino cooling scenarios, pairing is necessary throughout the whole core to control the enormous early neutrino emission which, without pairing suppression, would result in a surface temperature at the present time much lower than observed. We also comment on the recent temperature estimates for PSR 0656+14 and PSR 1055-52, which pertain to the same photon cooling era. If one assumes that all neutron stars undergo fast neutrino cooling, then these two objects also provide evidence for extensive baryon pairing in their core; but observational uncertainties also permit a more conservative interpretation, with slow neutrino emission and no pairing at all. We argue though that observational evidence for the slow neutrino cooling model (the 'standard' model) is in fact very dim and that the interpretation of the surface temperature of all neutron stars could be done with a reasonable theoretical a priori within the fast neutrino cooling scenarios only. In this case, Geminga, PSR 0656+14, and PSR

  18. Geminga: A cooling superfluid neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Dany

    1994-01-01

    We compare the recent temperature estimate for Geminga with neutron star cooling models. Because of its age (approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 5) yr), Geminga is in the photon cooling era. We show that its surface temperature (approximately 5.2 x 10(exp 5) K) can be understood by both types of neutrino cooling scenarios, i.e., slow neutrino cooling by the modified Urca process or fast neutrino cooling by the direct Urca process or by some exotic matter, and thus does not allow us to discriminate between these two competing schemes. However, for both types of scenarios, agreement with the observed temperature can only be obtained if baryon pairing is present in most, if not all, of the core of the star. Within the slow neutrino cooling scenario, early neutrino cooling is not sufficient to explain the observed low temperature, and extensive pairing in the core is necessary to reduce the specific heat and increase the cooling rate in the present photon cooling era. Within all the fast neutrino cooling scenarios, pairing is necessary throughout the whole core to control the enormous early neutrino emission which, without pairing suppression, would result in a surface temperature at the present time much lower than observed. We also comment on the recent temperature estimates for PSR 0656+14 and PSR 1055-52, which pertain to the same photon cooling era. If one assumes that all neutron stars undergo fast neutrino cooling, then these two objects also provide evidence for extensive baryon pairing in their core; but observational uncertainties also permit a more conservative interpretation, with slow neutrino emission and no pairing at all. We argue though that observational evidence for the slow neutrino cooling model (the 'standard' model) is in fact very dim and that the interpretation of the surface temperature of all neutron stars could be done with a reasonable theoretical a priori within the fast neutrino cooling scenarios only. In this case, Geminga, PSR 0656+14, and PSR

  19. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  1. Integrals for IBS and beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Simulation of beam cooling usually requires performing certain integral transformations every time step or so, which is a significant burden on the CPU. Examples are the dispersion integrals (Hilbert transforms) in the stochastic cooling, wake fields and IBS integrals. An original method is suggested for fast and sufficiently accurate computation of the integrals. This method is applied for the dispersion integral. Some methodical aspects of the IBS analysis are discussed.

  2. Integrals for IBS and Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.

    2005-06-08

    Simulation of beam cooling usually requires performing certain integral transformations every time step or so, which is a significant burden on the CPU. Examples are the dispersion integrals (Hilbert transforms) in the stochastic cooling, wake fields and IBS integrals. An original method is suggested for fast and sufficiently accurate computation of the integrals. This method is applied for the dispersion integral. Some methodical aspects of the IBS analysis are discussed.

  3. Water-Cooled Total-Temperature Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Reece, Garland D.

    1992-01-01

    Water-cooled supersonic total-pressure, static-pressure, and total-temperature probes developed to study high-temperature jet plumes. Total-temperature probe tested up to 2,000 degrees F incorporates annular cooling system up to thermocouple lead. Lead extends into test chamber to sense temperature of supersonic external flow. Design novel and significant. Applicable in development of jet engines and in research on fast flows of hot gases.

  4. Renewable Heating and Cooling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  5. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  6. Use of Multi-Purpose Modular Fast Reactors SVBR-75/100 in Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N.; Kopytov, I.I.; Krushelnitsky, V.N.

    2006-07-01

    This report presents an innovative nuclear power technology (NPT), based on the use of modular type fast-neutron reactors (FR) (SVBR-75/100) having heavy liquid-metal coolant (HLMC) i.e. eutectic lead-bismuth alloy, which was mastered in Russia for the nuclear submarine (NS) reactors. Reactor SVBR-75/100 possesses inherent self-protection and passive safety properties that allows elimination of many safety systems necessary for traditional type reactors. Use of this NPT makes it possible to eliminate conflicting requirements among safety needs and economic factors, which is particularly found in traditional reactors, to increase considerably the investment attractiveness of nuclear power (NP) based on the use of fast-neutron reactors for the near future, when the cost of natural uranium is low and to assure NP development in the market conditions. On the basis of the factory-fabricated 'standard' reactor modules, it is possible to construct the nuclear power plants (NPP) with different power and purposes. (authors)

  7. Review of High Temperature Water and Steam Cooled Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2002-07-01

    This review summarizes design concepts of supercritical-pressure water cooled reactors (SCR), nuclear superheaters and steam cooled fast reactors from 1950's to the present time. It includes water moderated supercritical steam cooled reactor, SCOTT-R and SC-PWR of Westinghouse, heavy water moderated light water cooled SCR of GE, SCLWR and SCFR of the University of Tokyo, B-500SKDI of Kurchatov Institute, CANDU -X of AECL, nuclear superheaters of GE, subcritical-pressure steam cooled FBR of KFK and B and W, Supercritical-pressure steam cooled FBR of B and W, subcritical-pressure steam cooled high converter by Edlund and Schultz and subcritical-pressure water-steam cooled FBR by Alekseev. This paper is prepared based on the previous review of SCR2000 symposium, and some author's comments are added. (author)

  8. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  9. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOEpatents

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  10. Advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, M.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, improved passive safety, and the development of a prototype fuel cycle facility. 14 refs.

  11. Fuel assembly cooling experience at the FFTF/IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    In the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), sodium wetted irradiated fuel assemblies are discharged to the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell for disassembly and post-irradiation examination in an inert argon atmosphere. While in the IEM Cell, fuel assemblies are cooled by the IEM Cell Subassembly Cooling System. This paper describes the cooling system design, performance, and lessons learned, including a discussion of two overtemperature incidents. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Fast quench reactor method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  13. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  14. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.; Berry, Ray A.

    1999-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  15. Axion cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    Cooling simulations of neutron stars and their comparison with the data from thermally emitting x-ray sources put constraints on the properties of axions, and by extension, of any light pseudoscalar dark matter particles, whose existence has been postulated to solve the strong-C P problem of QCD. We incorporate the axion emission by pair-breaking and formation processes by S - and P -wave nucleonic condensates in a benchmark code for cooling simulations, as well as provide fit formulas for the rates of these processes. Axion cooling of neutron stars has been simulated for 24 models covering the mass range 1 to 1.8 solar masses, featuring nonaccreted iron and accreted light-element envelopes, and a range of nucleon-axion couplings. The models are based on an equation state predicting conservative physics of superdense nuclear matter that does not allow for the onset of fast cooling processes induced by phase transitions to non-nucleonic forms of matter or high proton concentration. The cooling tracks in the temperature vs age plane were confronted with the (time-averaged) measured surface temperature of the central compact object in the Cas A supernova remnant as well as surface temperatures of three nearby middle-aged thermally emitting pulsars. We find that the axion coupling is limited to fa/107 GeV ≥(5 - 10 ) , which translates into an upper bound on axion mass ma≤(0.06 - 0.12 ) eV for Peccei-Quinn charges of the neutron |Cn|˜0.04 and proton |Cp|˜0.4 characteristic for hadronic models of axions.

  16. Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pisanti, O.

    The following sections are included: * Elementary Considerations * The Integral Equation to the Neutron Distribution * The Critical Size for a Fast Reactor * Supercritical Reactors * Problems and Exercises

  17. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    DOE PAGES

    Neuffer, David

    2017-09-25

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this study, we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  18. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuffer, D.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this paper we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  19. Turbopump thermodynamic cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, T. C.; Mckee, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    System for cooling turbopumps used in cryogenic fluid storage facilities is described. Technique uses thermodynamic propellant vent to intercept pump heat at desired conditions. Cooling system uses hydrogen from outside source or residual hydrogen from cryogenic storage tank.

  20. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  1. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  2. Metamaterial enhances natural cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-03-01

    A new metamaterial film that uses passive radiative cooling to dissipate heat from an object and provides cooling without a power input has been developed by a team at the University of Colorado Boulder in the US.

  3. Cooling Water Intakes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Industries use large volumes of water for cooling. The water intakes pull large numbers of fish and other organisms into the cooling systems. EPA issues regulations on intake structures in order to minimize adverse environmental impacts.

  4. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  5. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  6. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  7. Heat pipe cooling of an aerospace foam mold manufacturing process

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, D.R.; Feldman, K.T.; Marjon, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    A passive heat pipe cooling system was developed to cool a Bendix foam mold used to manufacture aerospace foam parts. The cooling system consists of ten copper-water heat pipes with cooling fins implanted into the aluminum mold and cooled by a domestic size fan blowing ambient air. The number and location of the heat pipes was determined to provide the most effective cooling and mold isothermalization based on experimental measurements of mold temperatures during the exothermic foaming process and from practical considerations of the mold geometry and use. Performance tests were cnducted on an individual heat pipe and on the ten heat pipes implanted in the mold. Both exothermic foam heating and internal electrical heat input were used in the experiments. The experimental test results indicate that the heat pipe cooling system with a fan is four to six times faster than free convection cooling of the mold with no heat pipes or fan and nearly twice as fast as cooling by the fan only. Similarly fast increases in mold heating time in the cure furnace could be realized if the heat pipes are used during this part of the production process. The heat pipes also cool hot spots in the mold and help isothermalize the mold so that better quality foam parts should be produced.

  8. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrodnikov, A. V.; Toshinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.

    2011-08-01

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  9. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  10. Postexercise Cooling Rates in 2 Cooling Jackets

    PubMed Central

    Brade, Carly; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen; Polglaze, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Cooling jackets are a common method for removing stored heat accumulated during exercise. To date, the efficiency and practicality of different types of cooling jackets have received minimal investigation. Objective: To examine whether a cooling jacket containing a phase-change material (PC17) results in more rapid postexercise cooling than a gel cooling jacket and a no-jacket (control) condition. Design: Randomized, counterbalanced design with 3 experimental conditions. Setting: Participants exercised at 75% V̇o2max workload in a hot climate chamber (temperature  =  35.0 ± 1.4°C, relative humidity  =  52 ± 4%) for 30 minutes, followed by postexercise cooling for 30 minutes in cool laboratory conditions (ambient temperature  =  24.9 ± 1.8°C, relative humidity  =  39% ± 10%). Patients or Other Participants: Twelve physically active men (age  =  21.3 ± 1.1 years, height  =  182.7 ± 7.1 cm, body mass  =  76.2 ± 9.5 kg, sum of 6 skinfolds  =  50.5 ± 6.9 mm, body surface area  =  1.98 ± 0.14 m2, V̇o2max  =  49.0 ± 7.0 mL·kg−1·min−1) participated. Intervention(s): Three experimental conditions, consisting of a PC17 jacket, a gel jacket, and no jacket. Main Outcome Measure(s): Core temperature (TC), mean skin temperature (TSk), and TC cooling rate (°C/min). Results: Mean peak TC postexercise was 38.49 ± 0.42°C, 38.57 ± 0.41°C, and 38.55 ± 0.40°C for the PC17 jacket, gel jacket, and control conditions, respectively. No differences were observed in peak TC cooling rates among the PC17 jacket (0.038 ± 0.007°C/min), gel jacket (0.040 ± 0.009°C/min), and control (0.034 ± 0.010°C/min, P > .05) conditions. Between trials, no differences were calculated for mean TSk cooling. Conclusions: Similar cooling rates for all 3 conditions indicate that there is no benefit associated with wearing the PC17 or gel jacket. PMID:20210620

  11. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  12. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  13. Simultaneous Synchrotron WAXD and Fast Scanning (Chip) Calorimetry: On the (Isothermal) Crystallization of HDPE and PA11 at High Supercoolings and Cooling Rates up to 200 °C s(-1).

    PubMed

    Baeten, Dorien; Mathot, Vincent B F; Pijpers, Thijs F J; Verkinderen, Olivier; Portale, Giuseppe; Van Puyvelde, Peter; Goderis, Bart

    2015-06-01

    An experimental setup, making use of a Flash DSC 1 prototype, is presented in which materials can be studied simultaneously by fast scanning calorimetry (FSC) and synchrotron wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Accumulation of multiple, identical measurements results in high quality, millisecond WAXD patterns. Patterns at every degree during the crystallization and melting of high density polyethylene at FSC typical scanning rates from 20 up to 200 °C s(-1) are discussed in terms of the temperature and scanning rate dependent material crystallinities and crystal densities. Interestingly, the combined approach reveals FSC thermal lag issues, for which can be corrected. For polyamide 11, isothermal solidification at high supercooling yields a mesomorphic phase in less than a second, whereas at very low supercooling crystals are obtained. At intermediate supercooling, mixtures of mesomorphic and crystalline material are generated at a ratio proportional to the supercooling. This ratio is constant over the isothermal solidification time. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  15. NASA Microclimate Cooling Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this outline form presentation is to present NASA's challenges in microclimate cooling as related to the spacesuit. An overview of spacesuit flight-rated personal cooling systems is presented, which includes a brief history of cooling systems from Gemini through Space Station missions. The roles of the liquid cooling garment, thermal environment extremes, the sublimator, multi-layer insulation, and helmet visor UV and solar coatings are reviewed. A second section is presented on advanced personal cooling systems studies, which include heat acquisition studies on cooling garments, heat rejection studies on water boiler & radiators, thermal storage studies, and insulation studies. Past and present research and development and challenges are summarized for the advanced studies.

  16. Gas turbine cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Bancalari, Eduardo E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

  17. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  18. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  19. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  20. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-09-24

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  1. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  2. The cooling of particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling.

  3. Hydrogen film cooling investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Effects of flow turning, flow acceleration, and supersonic flow on film cooling were determined experimentally and correlated in terms of an entrainment film cooling model. Experiments were conducted using thin walled metal test sections, hot nitrogen mainstream gas, and ambient hydrogen or nitrogen as film coolants. The entrainment film cooling model relates film cooling effectiveness to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. The experimental apparatus and the analytical model used are described in detail and correlations for the entrainment fraction and film coolant-to-wall heat transfer coefficient are presented.

  4. Coherent electron cooling.

    PubMed

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Derbenev, Yaroslav S

    2009-03-20

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams poses a major challenge for modern accelerator physics. The synchrotron radiation emitted from such beams is feeble; even in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating with 7 TeV protons, the longitudinal damping time is about 13 hours. None of the traditional cooling methods seem able to cool LHC-class protons beams. In this Letter, we present a novel method of coherent electron cooling based on a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL). This technique could be critical for reaching high luminosities in hadron and electron-hadron colliders.

  5. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  6. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  7. District cooling gets hot

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1996-07-01

    Utilities across the country are adopting cool storage methods, such as ice-storage and chilled-water tanks, as an economical and environmentally safe way to provide cooling for cities and towns. The use of district cooling, in which cold water or steam is pumped to absorption chillers and then to buildings via a central community chiller plant, is growing strongly in the US. In Chicago, San Diego, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and elsewhere, independent district-energy companies and utilities are refurbishing neglected district-heating systems and adding district cooling, a technology first developed approximately 35 years ago.

  8. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  9. Radiation Pressure Cooling as a Quantum Dynamical Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bing; Yang, Liu; Lin, Qing; Xiao, Min

    2017-06-01

    One of the most fundamental problems in optomechanical cooling is how small the thermal phonon number of a mechanical oscillator can be achieved under the radiation pressure of a proper cavity field. Different from previous theoretical predictions, which were based on an optomechanical system's time-independent steady states, we treat such cooling as a dynamical process of driving the mechanical oscillator from its initial thermal state, due to its thermal equilibrium with the environment, to a stabilized quantum state of higher purity. We find that the stabilized thermal phonon number left in the end actually depends on how fast the cooling process could be. The cooling speed is decided by an effective optomechanical coupling intensity, which constitutes an essential parameter for cooling, in addition to the sideband resolution parameter that has been considered in other theoretical studies. The limiting thermal phonon number that any cooling process cannot surpass exhibits a discontinuous jump across a certain value of the parameter.

  10. Evolution of cooling-channel properties for varying aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzarelli, M.; Nasuti, F.; Onofri, M.

    2016-07-01

    A trade-off analysis is performed on a cooling channel system representative of liquid rocket engine cooling systems. This analysis requires multiple cooling channel flow calculations which are performed by means of a proper numerical approach, referred to as quasi-two-dimensional (2D) model. This model, which is suited to high-aspect-ratio cooling channels (HARCC), permits to have a fast prediction of both the coolant flow evolution and the temperature distribution along the whole cooling channel structure. Before using the quasi-2D model for the trade-off analysis, its validation by comparison with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results is presented and discussed. The results show that the pump power required to overcome losses in the cooling circuit can be minimized selecting a channel shaped with a suitably high aspect ratio.

  11. Changes in copper sulfate crystal habit during cooling crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulietti, M.; Seckler, M. M.; Derenzo, S.; Valarelli, J. V.

    1996-09-01

    The morphology of technical grade copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate crystals produced from batch cooling experiments in the temperature range of 70 to 30°C is described and correlated with the process conditions. A slow linear cooling rate (batch time of 90 min) predominantly caused the appearance of well-formed crystals. Exponential cooling (120 min) resulted in the additional formation of agglomerates and twins. The presence of seeds for both cooling modes led to round crystals, agglomerates and twins. Fast linear cooling (15 min) gave rise to a mixture of the former types. Broken crystals and adhering fragments were often found. Growth zoning was pronounced in seeded and linear cooling experiments. Fluid inclusions were always found and were more pronounced for larger particles. The occurrence of twinning, zoning and fluid inclusions was qualitatively explained in terms of fundamental principles.

  12. Benchmarking of thermal hydraulic loop models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES), phase-I: Isothermal steady state forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Batta, A.; Casamassima, V.; Cheng, X.; Choi, Yong Joon; Hwang, Il Soon; Lim, Jun; Meloni, P.; Nitti, F. S.; Dedul, V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Komlev, O.; Jaeger, W.; Sedov, A.; Kim, Ji Hak; Puspitarini, D.

    2011-08-01

    As highly promising coolant for new generation nuclear reactors, liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic has been extensively worldwide investigated. With high expectation about this advanced coolant, a multi-national systematic study on LBE was proposed in 2007, which covers benchmarking of thermal hydraulic prediction models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES). This international collaboration has been organized by OECD/NEA, and nine organizations - ENEA, ERSE, GIDROPRESS, IAEA, IPPE, KIT/IKET, KIT/INR, NUTRECK, and RRC KI - contribute their efforts to LACANES benchmarking. To produce experimental data for LACANES benchmarking, thermal-hydraulic tests were conducted by using a 12-m tall LBE integral test facility, named as Heavy Eutectic liquid metal loop for integral test of Operability and Safety of PEACER (HELIOS) which has been constructed in 2005 at the Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. LACANES benchmark campaigns consist of a forced convection (phase-I) and a natural circulation (phase-II). In the forced convection case, the predictions of pressure losses based on handbook correlations and that obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics code simulation were compared with the measured data for various components of the HELIOS test facility. Based on comparative analyses of the predictions and the measured data, recommendations for the prediction methods of a pressure loss in LACANES were obtained. In this paper, results for the forced convection case (phase-I) of LACANES benchmarking are described.

  13. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-12-31

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers.

  14. Fast valve

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  15. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  16. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  17. Elastocaloric cooling: Stretch to actively cool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossmer, Hinnerk; Kohl, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    The elastocaloric effect can be exploited in solid-state cooling technologies as an alternative to conventional vapour compression. Now, an elastocaloric device based on the concept of active regeneration achieves a temperature lift of 15.3 K and efficiencies competitive with other caloric-based approaches.

  18. DOAS, Radiant Cooling Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The article discusses dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS) and radiant cooling technologies. Both of these topics were covered in previous ASHRAE Journal columns. This article reviews the technologies and their increasing acceptance. The two steps that ASHRAE is taking to disseminate DOAS information to the design community, available energy savings and the market potential of radiant cooling systems are addressed as well.

  19. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  20. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2016-07-12

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  1. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  2. Why Cool Roofs?

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2010-01-01

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  3. S'COOL Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one fifth grade's participation in in NASA's S'COOL (Students' Cloud Observations On-Line) Project, making cloud observations, reporting them online, exploring weather concepts, and gleaning some of the things involved in authentic scientific research. S?COOL is part of a real scientific study of the effect of clouds on…

  4. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  5. District cooling in Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, B.

    1996-11-01

    This paper will present the status of the development of district cooling systems in Scandinavia over the last 5 years. It will describe the technologies used in the systems that have been constructed as well as the options considered in different locations. It will identify the drivers for the development of the cooling business to-date, and what future drivers for a continuing development of district cooling in Sweden. To-date, approximately 25 different cities of varying sizes have completed feasibility studies to determine if district cooling is an attractive option. In a survey, that was conducted by the Swedish District Heating Association, some 25 cities expected to have district cooling systems in place by the year 2000. In Sweden, district heating systems with hot water is very common. In many cases, it is simply an addition to the current service for the district heating company to also supply district cooling to the building owners. A parallel from this can be drawn to North America where district cooling systems now are developing rapidly. I am convinced that in these cities a district heating service will be added as a natural expansion of the district cooling company`s service.

  6. S'COOL Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one fifth grade's participation in in NASA's S'COOL (Students' Cloud Observations On-Line) Project, making cloud observations, reporting them online, exploring weather concepts, and gleaning some of the things involved in authentic scientific research. S?COOL is part of a real scientific study of the effect of clouds on…

  7. Liquid Cooled Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Astronauts working on the surface of the moon had to wear liquid-cooled garments under their space suits as protection from lunar temperatures which sometimes reach 250 degrees Fahrenheit. In community service projects conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center, the technology developed for astronaut needs has been adapted to portable cooling systems which will permit two youngsters to lead more normal lives.

  8. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2016-07-12

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  9. NSCool: Neutron star cooling code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Dany

    2016-09-01

    NSCool is a 1D (i.e., spherically symmetric) neutron star cooling code written in Fortran 77. The package also contains a series of EOSs (equation of state) to build stars, a series of pre-built stars, and a TOV (Tolman- Oppenheimer-Volkoff) integrator to build stars from an EOS. It can also handle “strange stars” that have a huge density discontinuity between the quark matter and the covering thin baryonic crust. NSCool solves the heat transport and energy balance equations in whole GR, resulting in a time sequence of temperature profiles (and, in particular, a Teff - age curve). Several heating processes are included, and more can easily be incorporated. In particular it can evolve a star undergoing accretion with the resulting deep crustal heating, under a steady or time-variable accretion rate. NSCool is robust, very fast, and highly modular, making it easy to add new subroutines for new processes.

  10. Fast molecular shocks. II - Emission from fast dissociative shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    The line radiations emitted in the cooling gas behind a fast dissociative shock are studied. The intensities emitted in high rotational transitions of the neutral molecules CO, SiO, HCN, CN, NO, and SO are estimated, as well as in rovibrational transitions of the molecular ions HeH(+) and OH(+) in radio recombination lines of atomic hydrogen and in fine-structure transitions of C, C(+), O, and Si(+). The predictions are compared with the observed intensities of line emission from the Orion-KL region. For Orion-KL the observations do not exclude, but probably do not require, the presence of a fast dissociative shock. Emission from SiO in high-J rotational states and from vibrationally excited OH(+), HeH(+), HeH(+), and SO(+) may be detectable from dissociative shocks under suitable conditions of preshock density and shock velocity; such emission may prove to be a useful diagnostic probe of fast shock activity.

  11. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  12. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  13. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  14. Modeling gasodynamic vortex cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Fauve, S.

    2017-08-01

    We aim at studying gasodynamic vortex cooling in an analytically solvable, thermodynamically consistent model that can explain limitations on the cooling efficiency. To this end, we study an angular plus radial flow between two (coaxial) rotating permeable cylinders. Full account is taken of compressibility, viscosity, and heat conductivity. For a weak inward radial flow the model qualitatively describes the vortex cooling effect, in terms of both temperature and the decrease of the stagnation enthalpy, seen in short uniflow vortex (Ranque) tubes. The cooling does not result from external work and its efficiency is defined as the ratio of the lowest temperature reached adiabatically (for the given pressure gradient) to the lowest temperature actually reached. We show that for the vortex cooling the efficiency is strictly smaller than 1, but in another configuration with an outward radial flow, we find that the efficiency can be larger than 1. This is related to both the geometry and the finite heat conductivity.

  15. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  16. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  17. Hydronic rooftop cooling systems

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C [Davis, CA; Lee, Brian Eric [Monterey, CA; Berman, Mark J [Davis, CA

    2008-01-29

    A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

  18. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system.

  19. Project FAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essexville-Hampton Public Schools, MI.

    Described are components of Project FAST (Functional Analysis Systems Training) a nationally validated project to provide more effective educational and support services to learning disordered children and their regular elementary classroom teachers. The program is seen to be based on a series of modules of delivery systems ranging from mainstream…

  20. Fast CRCs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    or any other computing topic, please visit our Digital Library at www.computer.org/publications/ dlib . NGUYEN: FAST CRCS 1331 Authorized licensed use... Library at http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ TC.2009.83. The notation ðk; l; dÞ denotes a systematic code with k ¼ the total bit length of

  1. Cooled-Spool Piston Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed cooled-spool piston compressor driven by hydraulic power and features internal cooling of piston by flowing hydraulic fluid to limit temperature of compressed gas. Provides sufficient cooling for higher compression ratios or reactive gases. Unlike conventional piston compressors, all parts of compressed gas lie at all times within relatively short distance of cooled surface so that gas cooled more effectively.

  2. Dehydration Comes on Fast and Can Be Fatal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Holiday and Seasonal Dehydration comes on fast and can be fatal During the hot summer months,the ... cool and keeping hydrated. “Dehydration is verydangerous. It can lead to an emergency visit, and it can ...

  3. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGES

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  4. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  5. Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki; Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki; GOTO, Shoji

    2006-07-01

    Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

  6. Cryogenic generator cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckels, P. W.; Fagan, T. J.; Parker, J. H., Jr.; Long, L. J.; Shestak, E. J.; Calfo, R. M.; Hannon, W. F.; Brown, D. B.; Barkell, J. W.; Patterson, A.

    The concept for a hydrogen cooled aluminum cryogenic generator was presented by Schlicher and Oberly in 1985. Following their lead, this paper describes the thermal design of a high voltage dc, multimegawatt generator of high power density. The rotor and stator are cooled by saturated liquid and supercritical hydrogen, respectively. The brushless exciter on the same shaft is also cooled by liquid hydrogen. Component development testing is well under way and some of the test results concerning the thermohydraulic performance of the conductors are reported. The aluminum cryogenic generator's characteristics are attractive for hydrogen economy applications.

  7. Personal Cooling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Cool Head, a personal cooling system for use in heat stress occupations, is a spinoff of a channeled cooling garment for space wear. It is portable and includes a heat exchanger, control display unit, liquid reservoir and temperature control unit. The user can eliminate 40 to 60 percent of his body's heat storage and lower heart rate by 50 to 80 beats a minute. The system is used by the Army, Navy, crop dusting pilots, heavy equipment operators and auto racing drivers and is marketed by Life Enhancement Technologies, LLC. Further applications are under consideration.

  8. Grain Coarsening of Cast Magnesium Alloys at High Cooling Rate: A New Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yahia; You, Guoqiang; Pan, Fusheng; Zhang, Ming-Xing

    2017-01-01

    Most studies in the area of grain refinement have always taken for granted that higher cooling rate results in finer grains. However, when microstructural variation of the as-cast Mg with cooling rate was investigated using a specially designed V-shaped copper mold, the results were different. Although fast cooling during solidification led to microstructural refining in pure Mg, grain coarsening was observed at a higher cooling rate in Mg alloys that were inoculation treated with 1.0wt pctZr and 1.4wt pctCaO, and in the Mg-Al binary alloys. It is considered that the grain coarsening at higher cooling rate was attributed to the smaller constitutional undercooling zone formed at fast cooling due to the high temperature gradient in the three Mg alloys. These results can help in redefining the role of cooling rate in the grain refinement process.

  9. Microbial analysis of meatballs cooled with vacuum and conventional cooling.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Hande Mutlu; Ozturk, Harun Kemal; Koçar, Gunnur

    2017-08-01

    Vacuum cooling is a rapid evaporative cooling technique and can be used for pre-cooling of leafy vegetables, mushroom, bakery, fishery, sauces, cooked food, meat and particulate foods. The aim of this study was to apply the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling techniques for the cooling of the meatball and to show the vacuum pressure effect on the cooling time, the temperature decrease and microbial growth rate. The results of the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling (cooling in the refrigerator) were compared with each other for different temperatures. The study shows that the conventional cooling was much slower than the vacuum cooling. Moreover, the microbial growth rate of the vacuum cooling was extremely low compared with the conventional cooling. Thus, the lowest microbial growth occurred at 0.7 kPa and the highest microbial growth was observed at 1.5 kPa for the vacuum cooling. The mass loss ratio for the conventional cooling and vacuum cooling was about 5 and 9% respectively.

  10. Cooling Devices in Laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Das, Anupam; Sarda, Aarti; De, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Cooling devices and methods are now integrated into most laser systems, with a view to protecting the epidermis, reducing pain and erythema and improving the efficacy of laser. On the basis of method employed, it can be divided into contact cooling and non-contact cooling. With respect to timing of irradiation of laser, the nomenclatures include pre-cooling, parallel cooling and post-cooling. The choice of the cooling device is dictated by the laser device, the physician's personal choice with respect to user-friendliness, comfort of the patient, the price and maintenance costs of the device. We hereby briefly review the various techniques of cooling, employed in laser practice.

  11. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  12. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  13. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  14. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  15. Cooling of a sunspot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boruta, N.

    1977-01-01

    The question of whether a perturbed photospheric area can grow into a region of reduced temperature resembling a sunspot is investigated by considering whether instabilities exist that can lead to a growing temperature change and corresponding magnetic-field concentration in some region of the photosphere. After showing that Alfven cooling can lead to these instabilities, the effect of a heat sink on the temperature development of a perturbed portion of the photosphere is studied. A simple form of Alfven-wave cooling is postulated, and computations are performed to determine whether growing modes exist for physically relevant boundary conditions. The results indicate that simple inhibition of convection does not give growing modes, but Alfven-wave production can result in cooling that leads to growing field concentration. It is concluded that since growing instabilities can occur with strong enough cooling, it is quite possible that energy loss through Alfven waves gives rise to a self-generating temperature change and sunspot formation.

  16. Bunched beam stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie.

    1992-01-01

    The scaling laws for bunched-beam stochastic cooling has been derived in terms of the optimum cooling rate and the mixing condition. In the case that particles occupy the entire sinusoidal rf bucket, the optimum cooling rate of the bunched beam is shown to be similar to that predicted from the coasting-beam theory using a beam of the same average density and mixing factor. However, in the case that particles occupy only the center of the bucket, the optimum rate decrease in proportion to the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. The cooling efficiency can be significantly improved if the synchrotron side-band spectrum is effectively broadened, e.g. by the transverse tune spread or by using a double rf system.

  17. Bunched beam stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie

    1992-09-01

    The scaling laws for bunched-beam stochastic cooling has been derived in terms of the optimum cooling rate and the mixing condition. In the case that particles occupy the entire sinusoidal rf bucket, the optimum cooling rate of the bunched beam is shown to be similar to that predicted from the coasting-beam theory using a beam of the same average density and mixing factor. However, in the case that particles occupy only the center of the bucket, the optimum rate decrease in proportion to the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. The cooling efficiency can be significantly improved if the synchrotron side-band spectrum is effectively broadened, e.g. by the transverse tune spread or by using a double rf system.

  18. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  19. Growth and superconductivity of lead and lead-bismuth alloys in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Mustafa Murat

    Superconductivity is a collective quantum phenomenon that is inevitably suppressed in reduced dimensionality. Questions of how thin superconducting wires or films can be before they lose their superconducting properties have important technological ramifications and go to the heart of understanding formation, coherence, and robustness of the superconducting state in quantum confined geometries. Suppression of superconductivity in low dimensions is usually attributed to thermal or quantum fluctuations, or to pair-breaking Coulomb interactions in the presence of strong disorder. Control and quantification of a film's disorder length scale remained a critical experimental obstacle, however. Here, we exploit quantum confinement of itinerant electrons in a soft metal (Pb), to stabilize atomically-flat superconductors with lateral dimensions of the order of a few millimeters and vertical dimensions of only a few atomic layers. These extremely thin superconductors show no indication of defect- or fluctuation-driven suppression of superconductivity and sustain macroscopic super-currents of up to ˜10% of the theoretical depairing current density. The extreme hardness of the critical state can be attributed to the presence of intrinsic vortex traps that are stabilized by quantum confinement. We furthermore show that the quantum growth and superconductive properties of the films can be tailored by Fermi surface engineering via controlled alloying. The present study paints a conceptually appealing, elegant picture of a model nano-scale superconductor with calculable critical state properties. It furthermore indicates the intriguing possibility of achieving and exploiting superconductivity in the ultimate low-dimensional limit.

  20. Iron Influence on Optical and Magnetic Properties of Lead-Bismuthate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, V.; Pop, R.; Puşcaş, N. N.

    Results concerning the structural, optical and magnetic properties of xFe2O3 . (100 - x)[3Bi2O3 . 2PbO] glasses (0 = x = 20 mol%) are reported. The transparence in the infrared range was investigated. The homogeneous absorption cross section was determined from the optical absorption spectra using the density matrix formalism of the McCumber theoretical model. From the temperature dependence of reciprocal magnetic susceptibility, negative paramagnetic Curie temperatures have been found suggesting the antiferromagnetic nature of the magnetic interaction between the iron ions in the studied samples. The iron ions occur both in the (II) and (III) valence state. The Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio was determined from the experimental values of the magnetic moments for all samples. The glass transition temperature with increasing Fe2O3 content was also investigated.

  1. Low-Temperature Study of Magnetic Behavior of Europium in Lead-Bismuthate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, L.; Ristoiu, T.; Dempsey, N.; Culea, M.; Culea, E.

    Glasses of the xEu2O3(1-x)[3Bi2O3PbO] system with x=0-0.25 were prepared and studied using low-temperature magnetization measurements. The obtained data suggest the presence of both Eu3+ and Eu2+ ions in the host glass matrix. The determined fraction of the Eu2+ ions/total number of europium ions was very small (2.1-3.4%). Magnetization data show that the europium ions exert superexchange interactions and show an important clustering tendency.

  2. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  3. Liquid cooled helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, William (Inventor); Williams, Bill A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Liquid cooled helmet comprising a cap of flexible material adapted to fit the head of a person, cooling panels mounted inside the cap forming passageways for carrying a liquid coolant, the panels being positioned to engage the cranium and neck of a person wearing the helmet, inlet and outlet lines communicating with the passageways, and releasable straps for securing the helmet about the neck of the wearer.

  4. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Seiber, Larry E.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  5. Cooled Ion Frequency Standard.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    experiments 1. Laser cooled atomic clock . We have completed work on the first frequency standard based on laser cooled atoms . This work which was...inaccuracy essentially equal to the U.S. best Cesium atomic clock with a clear direction for improvement and (2) this system facilitates studies of generic...problems are (1) to suppress second order and residual first order Doppler shifts in atomic frequency standards in a fundamental way--by substantially

  6. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  7. Liquid metal cooled reactors for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, S.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Van Hoomissen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The technology basis for evaluation of liquid metal cooled space reactors is summarized. Requirements for space nuclear power which are relevant to selection of the reactor subsystem are then reviewed. The attributes of liquid metal cooled reactors are considered in relation to these requirements in the areas of liquid metal properties, neutron spectrum characteristics, and fuel form. Key features of typical reactor designs are illustrated. It is concluded that liquid metal cooled fast spectrum reactors provide a high confidence, flexible option for meeting requirements for SP-100 and beyond.

  8. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  9. MOLTEN PLUTONIUM FUELED FAST BREEDER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kiehn, R.M.; King, L.D.P.; Peterson, R.E.; Swickard, E.O. Jr.

    1962-06-26

    A description is given of a nuclear fast reactor fueled with molten plutonium containing about 20 kg of plutonium in a tantalum container, cooled by circulating liquid sodium at about 600 to 650 deg C, having a large negative temperature coefficient of reactivity, and control rods and movable reflector for criticality control. (AEC)

  10. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  11. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  12. Cool Flame Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Cool flame quenching distances are generally presumed to be larger than those associated with hot flames, because the quenching distance scales with the inverse of the flame propagation speed, and cool flame propagation speeds are often times slower than those associated with hot flames. To date, this presumption has never been put to a rigorous test, because unstirred, non-isothermal cool flame studies on Earth are complicated by natural convection. Moreover, the critical Peclet number (Pe) for quenching of cool flames has never been established and may not be the same as that associated with wall quenching due to conduction heat loss in hot flames, Pe approx. = 40-60. The objectives of this ground-based study are to: (1) better understand the role of conduction heat loss and species diffusion on cool flame quenching (i.e., Lewis number effects), (2) determine cool flame quenching distances (i.e, critical Peclet number, Pe) for different experimental parameters and vessel surface pretreatments, and (3) understand the mechanisms that govern the quenching distances in premixtures that support cool flames as well as hot flames induced by spark-ignition. Objective (3) poses a unique fire safety hazard if conditions exist where cool flame quenching distances are smaller than those associated with hot flames. For example, a significant, yet unexplored risk, can occur if a multi-stage ignition (a cool flame that transitions to a hot flame) occurs in a vessel size that is smaller than that associated with the hot quenching distance. To accomplish the above objectives, a variety of hydrocarbon-air mixtures will be tested in a static reactor at elevated temperature in the laboratory (1g). In addition, reactions with chemical induction times that are sufficiently short will be tested aboard NASA's KC-135 microgravity (mu-g) aircraft. The mu-g results will be compared to a numerical model that includes species diffusion, heat conduction, and a skeletal kinetic mechanism

  13. Passive Safety of the STAR-LM HLMC Natural Convection Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, James J.; Petkov, Plamen V.

    2002-07-01

    The STAR-LM 300 to 400 MWt class modular, factory fabricated, fully transportable, proliferation resistant, autonomous, reactor system achieves passive safety by taking advantage of the intrinsic benefits of inert lead-bismuth eutectic heavy liquid metal coolant, 100+% natural circulation heat transport, a fast neutron spectrum core utilizing high thermal conductivity transuranic nitride fuel, redundant passive air cooling of the outside of the guard/containment vessel driven by natural circulation, and seismic isolation where required by site conditions. Postulated loss-of-heat sink without scram, overcooling without scram, and unprotected transient overpower accidents are analyzed for the 300 MWt STAR-LM design using a coupled thermal hydraulics-neutron kinetics plant dynamics analysis computer code. In all cases, STAR-LM is calculated to exhibit passive safety with peak cladding and coolant temperatures remaining within the existing database for lead-bismuth eutectic coolant and ferritic steel core materials. (authors)

  14. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. K. Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  15. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  16. Integral fast reactor safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents.

  17. Cooling in a compound bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Hu, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Electron cooling in the Fermilab Recycler ring is found to create correlation between longitudinal and transverse tails of the antiproton distribution. By separating the core of the beam from the tail and cooling the tail using 'gated' stochastic cooling while applying electron cooling on the entire beam, one may be able to significantly increase the overall cooling rate. In this paper, we describe the procedure and first experimental results.

  18. Czochralski crystal growth for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cittadino, Giovanni; Volpi, Azzurra; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    In laser cooling of crystals in solid-state physics, it is really important to obtain crystals with a large size at a relatively fast growth rate and high-optical quality that is defect-free. To get that, one of the methods to grow crystals is the Czochralski technique. The Czochralski technique will be presented and, in particular, the furnaces in New Materials for Laser Applications Laboratories of Pisa for this application will be discussed. Afterward the parameters for the growth of crystal fluorides are depicted and it is shown how these parameters lead to build samples suitable for optical cooling. All processes that are necessary to avoid contamination inside crystals like OH- ion and how to avoid reduction of Yb to Yb will be given. Spectroscopy of all samples will be treated in order to obtain the cooling parameters λf and αb for each sample. Afterward, an efficiency model will be discussed and the data efficiency of cooling obtained by a sample's own crystals will be shown.

  19. Laser cooling transitions in atomic erbium.

    PubMed

    Ban, H; Jacka, M; Hanssen, J; Reader, J; McClelland, J

    2005-04-18

    We discuss laser cooling opportunities in atomic erbium, identifying five J ? J + 1 transitions from the 4f126s2 3H6 ground state that are accessible to common visible and near-infrared continuous-wave tunable lasers. We present lifetime measurements for the 4f11(4Io 15/2)5d5/26s2 (15/2, 5/2)7o state at 11888 cm-1 and the 4f11(4Io 13/2)5d3/26s2 (13/2, 5/2)7o state at 15847 cm-1, showing values of 20 +/- 4 micros and 5.6 +/- 1.4 micros, respectively. We also present a calculated value of 13 +/- 7 s-1 for the transition rate from the 4f11(4Io 15/2)5d3/26s2 (15/2, 3/2)7 o state at 7697 cm-1 to the ground state, based on scaled Hartree-Fock energy parameters. Laser cooling on these transitions in combination with a strong, fast (5.8 ns) laser cooling transition at 401 nm, suggest new opportunities for narrowband laser cooling of a large-magnetic moment atom, with possible applications in quantum information processing, high-precision atomic clocks, quantum degenerate gases, and deterministic single-atom doping of materials.

  20. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Don E; Ezell, Matthew A; Becklehimer, Jeff; Donovan, Matthew J; Layton, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  1. Bunch beam cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryzgunov, M. I.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Reva, V. B.; Yang, X. D.; Zhao, H.

    2017-07-01

    Electron cooling is used for damping both transverse and longitudinal oscillations of heavy particle. The cooling of bunch ion beam (with RF voltage on) is important part of experiments with inner target, ion collision system, stacking and RF manipulation. The short length of an ion bunch increases the peak luminosity, gives a start-time point for using of the time-of-flight methods and obtains a short extraction beam pulse. This article describes the review of last experiments with electron cooling carried out on the CSRm, CSRe (China) and COSY (Germany) storage rings. The accumulated experience may be used for the project of electron cooler on 2.5 MeV (NICA) and 0.5 MeV HIAF for obtaining high luminosity, depressing beam-beam effects and RF manipulation.

  2. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.BRENNAN,J.M.CAMERON,P.WEI,J.

    2003-05-12

    Emittance growth due to Intra-Beam Scattering significantly reduces the heavy ion luminosity lifetime in RHIC. Stochastic cooling of the stored beam could improve things considerably by counteracting IBS and preventing particles from escaping the rf bucket [1]. High frequency bunched-beam stochastic cooling is especially challenging but observations of Schottky signals in the 4-8 GHz band indicate that conditions are favorable in RHIC [2]. We report here on measurements of the longitudinal beam transfer function carried out with a pickup kicker pair on loan from FNAL TEVATRON. Results imply that for ions a coasting beam description is applicable and we outline some general features of a viable momentum cooling system for RHIC.

  3. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  4. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  5. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  6. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  7. How cool is Uchimizu?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solcerova, Anna; van Emmerik, Tim; Hilgersom, Koen; van de Ven, Frans; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-04-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) was first described 200 years ago, but ways to mitigate heat in urban areas reach much further into the past. Uchimizu is a 17th century Japanese tradition, in which water is sprinkled around houses, temples, and in gardens to cool the ground surface and the air, and to settle the dust. Nowadays, megacities such as Tokyo are aiming to revive the - by modern technology suppressed - method, and uchimizu is promoted by local authorities as a "clever way to feel cool". Unfortunately, the number of published studies that have quantified the cooling effects of uchimizu is limited, and only uses measurements of the surface temperature, or air temperature at a single height, as a measure of the cooling effect. In this research a dense 3D Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) setup was used to measure air temperature within once cubic meter of air above an urban surface with high spatial and temporal resolution. Six experiments were performed to systematically study the effect of (1) applied water amount, (2) initial surface temperature, and (3) shading on the cooling effect of uchimizu. We present the results and the subsequent analyses of these experiments, done during summer in Delft, The Netherlands. We show that this simple water sprinkling method has the potential to decrease extreme temperatures in impervious and paved parts of urban areas considerably. Besides mitigating the UHI, uchimizu practice is also an opportunity to increase awareness among citizens, and stimulate citizen participation in solving heat stress problems and energy saving. By providing refreshing insights on the cooling effect of uchimizu, we aim to contribute to the modern revival of this old tradition.

  8. Research on cooling effectiveness in stepped slot film cooling vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Wu, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Rong, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine, film cooling technology has been widely used. Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature, uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use. The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air, thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential. A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially. Through numerical methods, the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched. This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions, then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results. The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio. Under this condition, the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness, and also retained a low pressure loss.

  9. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  10. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  11. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  12. Cyclic cooling algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Florian; Mahler, Guenter; Michel, Mathias

    2007-09-15

    We introduce a scheme to perform the cooling algorithm, first presented by Boykin et al. in 2002, for an arbitrary number of times on the same set of qbits. We achieve this goal by adding an additional SWAP gate and a bath contact to the algorithm. This way one qbit may repeatedly be cooled without adding additional qbits to the system. By using a product Liouville space to model the bath contact we calculate the density matrix of the system after a given number of applications of the algorithm.

  13. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2004-11-02

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  14. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  15. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  16. Mechanisms for fast flare reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, G.; Deeds, D.; Tachi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Normal collisional-resistivity mechanisms of magnetic reconnection have the drawback that they are too slow to explain the fast rise of solar flares. Two methods are examined which are proposed for the speed-up of the magnetic tearing instability: the anomalous enhancement of resistivity by the injection of MHD turbulence and the increase of Coulomb resistivity by radiative cooling. The results are described for nonlinear numerical simulations of these processes which show that the first does not provide the claimed effects, while the second yields impressive rates of reconnection, but low saturated energy outputs.

  17. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Rau, G. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Roshan, H.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Markowska, M.; Jex, C. N.; Graham, P. W.; Mariethoz, G.; Acworth, R. I.; Baker, A.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ18O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

  18. Runaway electron generation in a cooling plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.; Helander, P.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Fueloep, T.

    2005-12-15

    The usual calculation of Dreicer [Phys. Rev. 115, 238 (1959); 117, 329 (1960)] generation of runaway electrons assumes that the plasma is in a steady state. In a tokamak disruption this is not necessarily true since the plasma cools down quickly and the collision time for electrons at the runaway threshold energy can be comparable to the cooling time. The electron distribution function then acquires a high-energy tail which can easily be converted to a burst of runaways by the rising electric field. This process is investigated and simple criteria for its importance are derived. If no rapid losses of fast electrons occur, this can be a more important source of runaway electrons than ordinary Dreicer generation in tokamak disruptions.

  19. Cavity cooling of an ensemble spin system.

    PubMed

    Wood, Christopher J; Borneman, Troy W; Cory, David G

    2014-02-07

    We describe how sideband cooling techniques may be applied to large spin ensembles in magnetic resonance. Using the Tavis-Cummings model in the presence of a Rabi drive, we solve a Markovian master equation describing the joint spin-cavity dynamics to derive cooling rates as a function of ensemble size. Our calculations indicate that the coupled angular momentum subspaces of a spin ensemble containing roughly 10(11) electron spins may be polarized in a time many orders of magnitude shorter than the typical thermal relaxation time. The described techniques should permit efficient removal of entropy for spin-based quantum information processors and fast polarization of spin samples. The proposed application of a standard technique in quantum optics to magnetic resonance also serves to reinforce the connection between the two fields, which has recently begun to be explored in further detail due to the development of hybrid designs for manufacturing noise-resilient quantum devices.

  20. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Rau, G. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Roshan, H.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Markowska, M.; Jex, C. N.; Graham, P. W.; Mariethoz, G.; Acworth, R. I.; Baker, A.

    2014-06-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ18O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change.

  1. Heating, Cooling, and Cratering: One Asteroid's Complicated Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2008-07-01

    In a simple, orderly world, the parent asteroid for the H-chondrites would have heated by short-lived aluminum-26, and then cooled slowly. The deeper regions would have been heated more and cooled slowest, with less heating and faster cooling moving outwards from the center of the asteroid. A large set of mineralogical and age data fit this orderly picture, called the onion-shell model, for several meteorites, as shown by chronological investigations by Mario Trieloff and his colleagues at Heidelberg, Germany, and Paris, France, and by Thornsten Kleine and his colleagues in Switzerland, Germany, England, and the United States. Other meteorites are nonconformist renegades. Some of the most metamorphosed (heated to highest temperatures) cooled too fast, while some of the least metamorphosed (lowest temperatures) cooled too slowly. This conflicting evidence, if borne out by further studies, suggests something more complicated than an onion shell. The H-chondrite asteroid may have suffered one or more large impacts that excavated deep enough that some hot regions were suddenly much closer to a cooling boundary than they had been, and some more rapidly-cooling areas were buried by hot debris thrown out of the crater, slowing their cooling rates.

  2. Startup of the FFTF sodium cooled reactor. [Acceptance Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Redekopp, R.D.; Umek, A.M.

    1981-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is a 3 Loop 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor with a primary mission to test fuels and materials for development of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). Bringing FFTF to a condition to accomplish this mission is the goal of the Acceptance Test Program (ATP). This program was the mechanism for achieving startup of the FFTF. Highlights of the ATP involving the system inerting, liquid metal and inerted cell testing and initial ascent to full power are discussed.

  3. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, Kent Goran; McLaurin, Leroy Dixon; Bertsch, Oran Leroy; Lowe, Perry Eugene

    1998-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  4. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  5. Curved film cooling admission tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Papell, S. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Effective film cooling to protect a wall surface from a hot fluid which impinges on or flows along the surface is provided. A film of cooling fluid having increased area is provided by changing the direction of a stream of cooling fluid through an angle of from 135 deg. to 165 deg. before injecting it through the wall into the hot flowing gas. The 1, cooling fluid is injected from an orifice through a wall into a hot flowing gas at an angle to form a cooling fluid film. Cooling fluid is supplied to the orifice from a cooling fluid source via a turbulence control passageway having a curved portion between two straight portions. The angle through which the direction of the cooling fluid is turned results in less mixing of the cooling fluid with the hot gas, thereby substantially increasing the length of the film in a downstream direction.

  6. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  7. Brain cooling therapy.

    PubMed

    Gancia, P; Pomero, G

    2010-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (whole body or selective head cooling) is becoming standard of care for brain injury in infants with perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Brain cooling reduces the rate of apoptosis and early necrosis, reduces cerebral metabolic rate and the release of nitric oxide and free radicals. Animal models of perinatal brain injury show histological and functional improvement due to of early hypothermia. The brain protection depends on the temperature and time delay between insult and beginning of treatment (more effective with cooling to 33 +/- 0.5 degrees C, and less than 6 hours after hypoxic-ischemic insult). Recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews in human neonates show reduction in mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental disability at 12-24 months of age, with more favourable effects in the less severe forms of HIE. The authors describe their experience in 53 term newborns with moderate-severe HIE treated with whole body cooling between 2001 and 2009, and studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and general movements (GMs) assessment. The creation of a network connecting the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with the level I-II hospitals of the reference area, as part of regional network, is of paramount importance to enroll potential candidates and to start therapeutic hypothermia within optimal time window.

  8. Guide to Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    Traditional dark-colored roofing materials absorb sunlight, making them warm in the sun and increasing the need for air conditioning. White or special "cool color" roofs absorb less sunlight, stay cooler in the sun and transmit less heat into the building.

  9. Designing Cool Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA SBIR contract served as the beginning for the development of Daat Research Corporation's Coolit software. Coolit is a unique computational fluid dynamics (CFD) application aimed at thermal and cooling design problems. Coolit can generate 3-D representations of the thermofluid environment and "sketch" the component on the computer. The software modeling reduces time and effort in prototype building and testing.

  10. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  11. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  12. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  13. The nominal cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, R.

    1995-12-31

    The heat Rejection Industry defines a nominal cooling tower as circulating three gallons of water per minute (GPM) per ton of refrigeration from entering the tower at 95{degrees}F. Hot Water temperature (HWT) Leaving at 85{degrees}F Cold Water Temperature (CWT) at a Design Wet Bulb of 70{degrees}F (WBT). Manufacturers then provide a selection chart based on various wet bulb temperatures and HWTs. The wet bulb fluctuates and varies through out the world since it is the combination ambient temperature, relative humidity, and/or dew point. Different HWT and CWT requirements are usually charted as they change, so that the user can select the nominal cooling tower model recommended by the manufacturer. Ask any HVAC operator, refinery manager, power generating station operator what happens when the Wet Bulb reaches or exceeds the design WBT of the area. He probably will tell you, {open_quotes}My cooling tower works quite well, but in the summer time, I usually have trouble with it.{close_quotes} This occurs because he is operating a nominal cooling tower.

  14. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2001-05-13

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling.

  15. Elementary stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Dugan, G

    1983-12-01

    Major headings in this review include: proton sources; antiproton production; antiproton sources and Liouville, the role of the Debuncher; transverse stochastic cooling, time domain; the accumulator; frequency domain; pickups and kickers; Fokker-Planck equation; calculation of constants in the Fokker-Planck equation; and beam feedback. (GHT)

  16. Analytical studies of coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2009-05-04

    Under certain assumptions and simplifications, we studied a few physics processes of Coherent Electron Cooling using analytical approach. In the modulation process, the effect due to merging the ion beam with the electron beam is studied under single kick approximation. In the free electron laser (FEL) amplifier, we studied the amplification of the electron density modulation using 1D analytical approach. Both the electron charge density and the phase space density are derived in the frequency domain. The solutions are then transformed into the space domain through Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT).

  17. Electron Cooling Study for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhang; Douglas, David R.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  18. A Helical Cooling Channel System for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuya Yonehara, Rolland Johnson, Michael Neubauer, Yaroslav Derbenev

    2010-03-01

    Fast muon beam six dimensional (6D) phase space cooling is essential for muon colliders. The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) uses hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities imbedded in a magnet system with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components that provide the continuous dispersion needed for emittance exchange and effective 6D beam cooling. A series of HCC segments, each with sequentially smaller aperture, higher magnetic field, and higher RF frequency to match the beam size as it is cooled, has been optimized by numerical simulation to achieve a factor of 105 emittance reduction in a 300 m long channel with only a 40% loss of beam. Conceptual designs of the hardware required for this HCC system and the status of the RF studies and HTS helical solenoid magnet prototypes are described.

  19. Design of Helical Cooling Channel for Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2010-07-30

    Fast muon beam six dimensional (6D) phase space cooling is essential for muon colliders. The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) uses hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities imbedded in a magnet system with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components that provide the continuous dispersion needed for emittance exchange and effective 6D beam cooling. A series of HCC segments, each with sequentially smaller aperture, higher magnetic field, and higher RF frequency to match the beam size as it is cooled, has been optimized by numerical simulation to achieve a factor of 10{sup 5} emittance reduction in a 300 m long channel with only a 40% loss of beam. Conceptual designs of the hardware required for this HCC system and the status of the RF studies and HTS helical solenoid magnet prototypes are described.

  20. Cooling Devices in Laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Sarda, Aarti; De, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Cooling devices and methods are now integrated into most laser systems, with a view to protecting the epidermis, reducing pain and erythema and improving the efficacy of laser. On the basis of method employed, it can be divided into contact cooling and non-contact cooling. With respect to timing of irradiation of laser, the nomenclatures include pre-cooling, parallel cooling and post-cooling. The choice of the cooling device is dictated by the laser device, the physician's personal choice with respect to user-friendliness, comfort of the patient, the price and maintenance costs of the device. We hereby briefly review the various techniques of cooling, employed in laser practice. PMID:28163450

  1. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.

    2005-05-16

    Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

  2. Conjugate Heat Transfer and Thermal Mechanical Analysis for the Fast Spectrum Neutron Source for Materials Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas, Eric Richard

    2016-02-04

    A conjugate heat transfer and thermal structural analysis was completed, with the objective of determining the following: Lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) peak temperature, free convective velocity patterns in the LBE, peak beam window temperature, and thermal stress/deformation in the window.

  3. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  4. Self pumping magnetic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, V.; Wang, Z.; Ray, A.; Sridhar, I.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    Efficient thermal management and heat recovery devices are of high technological significance for innovative energy conservation solutions. We describe a study of a self-pumping magnetic cooling device, which does not require external energy input, employing Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles suspended in water. The device performance depends strongly on magnetic field strength, nanoparticle content in the fluid and heat load temperature. Cooling (ΔT) by ~20 °C and ~28 °C was achieved by the application of 0.3 T magnetic field when the initial temperature of the heat load was 64 °C and 87 °C, respectively. These experiments results were in good agreement with simulations performed with COMSOL Multiphysics. Our system is a self-regulating device; as the heat load increases, the magnetization of the ferrofluid decreases; leading to an increase in the fluid velocity and consequently, faster heat transfer from the heat source to the heat sink.

  5. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  6. Cooling our tomorrows economically

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, J.R. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that summer cooling poses unprecedented problems in the years ahead for architects, engineers, manufacturers, contractors and users. True, millions of tons of fine volcanic ash from the Philippines' Mt. Pinatubo and soot from Kuwait's burned oil wells now encircle the globe, creating temporary shade. The eruption also sent up related weights of sulfur dioxide (convertible to stratospheric sulfate aerosols) for further shading. Together, they may briefly counteract global warming, but rising greenhouse gases guarantee the latter will return with renewed force. Greenhouse gas production continues, making global warming certain, even if all CFCs are phased out, for they are minor greenhouse problems. Cooling loads will increase faster than rising temperatures as populations increase and move south, and as comfort and clean air standards rise. In addition, the fear of skin cancer, cataracts and related retinal and immune system damage may shortly keep more people indoors in summer, thereby raising internal loads.

  7. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  8. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  9. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  10. Cooling loads in laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, C.K.; Cook, M.R.

    1999-07-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system for a laboratory must be designed with consideration for safety, air cleanliness, and space temperature. The primary safety concern is to ensure proper coordination between fume hood exhaust and makeup air supply. Air cleanliness is maintained by properly filtering supply air, by delivering adequate room air changes, and by ensuring proper pressure relationships between the laboratory and adjacent spaces. Space temperature is maintained by supplying enough cooling air to offset the amount of heat generated in the room. Each of these factors must be considered, and the one that results in the largest ventilation rate is used to establish the supply and exhaust airflows. The project described in this paper illustrates a case where cooling load is the determining factor in the sizing of the air systems.

  11. Cooling options for Astromag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maytal, B. Z.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison of the various cooling options for the Astromag particle physics experiment is presented. The baseline design for the cryogenic system involves using a natural circulation fountain-effect driven flow loop (Hofmann type). The present paper considers two alternative options for cooling. The first design involves a thermal strap made of a high-conductivity metal, e.g., high-purity aluminum or copper, which connects the coil to the helium reservoir. Venting helium vapor can also be used to minimize the temperature of the magnet and recover from a quench. The second design is based on an He II heat pipe concept where steady state heat transport is by counterflow. Cavitation is prevented by use of a porous plug. Forced flow He II is also available but only during extraordinary operating conditions.

  12. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Pulliam, Elias Noel

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  13. Laser Cooling of Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    journal.org) Schematic of an optical refrigeration system. Pump light is efficiently generated by a semicon- ductor diode laser. The laser light en- ters...efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs). Various methods have been devised to remedy this prob- lem for LEDs but not all are applicable to laser...cooling: light quanta in the red tail of the absorption spectrum are absorbed from a monochro- matic source followed by spontaneous emission of more

  14. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  15. Cooled Ion Frequency Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-27

    on Frequency Standards and Metrology, Ancona , Italy (Springer Verlag, 1988) to be published. 8. "High Accuracy Spectroscopy of Stored Ions," D.J...Wineland, W.M. Itano, J.S. Bergquist, J.J. Bollinger, F. Diedrich and S.L. Gilbert, Proc. 4th Symp. on Frequency Standards and Metrology, Ancona , Italy...Proc. 4th Symp. on Frequency Standards and Metrology, Ancona , Italy (Springer Verlag, 1988) to be published. 10. "Quantative Study of Laser Cooling in

  16. Frequency Comb Cooling Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...Aug-2011 18-May-2012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final report on frequency comb cooling project The views, opinions and/or... frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected average powers above 10 kW. We

  17. Designing modern furnace cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merry, J.; Sarvinis, J.; Voermann, N.

    2000-02-01

    An integrated multidisciplinary approach to furnace design that considers the interdependence between furnace cooling elements and other furnace systems, such as binding, cooling water, and instrumentation, is necessary to achieve maximum furnace production and a long refractory life. The retrofit of the BHP Hartley electric furnace and the Kidd Creek copper converting furnace are successful examples of an integrated approach to furnace cooling design.

  18. Water-Cooled Optical Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menna, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    Water-cooled optical probe measures temperature of nearby radiating object. Intended primarily for use in silicon-growing furnace for measuring and controlling temperatures of silicon ribbon, meniscus, cartridge surfaces, heaters, or other parts. Cooling water and flushing gas cool fiber-optic probe and keep it clean. Fiber passes thermal radiation from observed surface to measuring instrument.

  19. Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

    1980-11-01

    Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications.

  20. Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study

    SciTech Connect

    Minato, A; Ueda, N; Wade, D; Greenspan, E; Brown, N

    2005-11-02

    The Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study documents results from activities conducted under Small Liquid Metal Fast Reactor Coordination Program (SLMFR-CP) Agreement, January 2004, between the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)[1]. Evaluations were completed on topics that are important to the safety of small sodium cooled and lead alloy cooled reactors. CRIEPI investigated approaches for evaluating postulated severe accidents using the CANIS computer code. The methods being developed are improvements on codes such as SAS 4A used in the US to analyze sodium cooled reactors and they depend on calibration using safety testing of metal fuel that has been completed in the TREAT facility. The 4S and the small lead cooled reactors in the US are being designed to preclude core disruption from all mechanistic scenarios, including selected unprotected transients. However, postulated core disruption is being evaluated to support the risk analysis. Argonne National Laboratory and the University of California Berkeley also supported LLNL with evaluation of cores with small positive void worth and core designs that would limit void worth. Assessments were also completed for lead cooled reactors in the following areas: (1) continuing operations with cladding failure, (2) large bubbles passing through the core and (3) recommendations concerning reflector control. The design approach used in the US emphasizes reducing the reactivity in the control mechanisms with core designs that have essentially no, or a very small, reactivity change over the core life. This leads to some positive void worth in the core that is not considered to be safety problem because of the inability to identify scenarios that would lead to voiding of lead. It is also believed that the void worth will not dominate the severe accident analysis. The approach used by 4S requires negative void worth throughout