Science.gov

Sample records for leading edge aerothermodynamics

  1. The artificially blunted leading edge concept for aerothermodynamic performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anurag

    An innovative aerothermodynamic performance enhancement concept for blunted geometries in hypervelocity flight is described. An Artificially Blunted Leading Edge (ABLE) is sought to be created by the use of a flow-through channel sized to choke at supersonic (in the normal direction) conditions. As a result, a normal shock stands off the channel but the high post-shock pressures have no wall to act on, leading to a reduction in wave drag. The effective blunt body flow structure can be effective at preventing the rise in heat transfer rates at channel entrance lips. In lifting flight, the flow in the channel creates suction at the lip, significantly enhancing lift for non-slender shapes. CFD studies using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations provide proof-of- concept for drag reduction for blunted slender geometries and L/D enhancements for sphere-cones. The ABLE flow mechanism's robustness and its effectiveness at off- design conditions is demonstrated. The computed sphere- cone L/D enhancements are also validated with experimental results from Aeroballistic Range tests. As opposed to straight channels, ABLE variants with curved channels that provide for better volumetric efficiency, reduced viscous drag penalties and better performance were designed and investigated. The channels curve outward and exhaust the flow close to the leading edge. Even while exhausting tangentially, the exhaust-mean flow interactions were shown to enhance or create lift. The force amplification due to such interactions can also be leveraged with the channel flow exhausting nearly normal to the surface. The potential of such thrust vectoring to reduce trim drag and augment directional control in the high-speed regime was demonstrated numerically. To evaluate the concept's effectiveness at improving cd or L/D values without paying any penalties in lift, enclosed volume and peak heating rates, Multidisciplinary Design Optimization techniques are used to characterize the design space

  2. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  3. Moveable Leading Edge Device for a Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitt, Dale M. (Inventor); Eckstein, Nicholas Stephen (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for managing a flight control surface system. A leading edge section on a wing of an aircraft is extended into a deployed position. A deformable section connects the leading edge section to a trailing section. The deformable section changes from a deformed shape to an original shape when the leading edge section is moved into the deployed position. The leading edge section on the wing is moved from the deployed position to an undeployed position. The deformable section changes to the deformed shape inside of the wing.

  4. Aerothermal Performance Constraints for Hypervelocity Small Radius Unswept Leading Edges and Nosetips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziej, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Small radius leading edges and nosetips were utilized to minimize wave drag in early hypervelocity vehicle concepts until further analysis demonstrated that extreme aerothermodynamic heating would cause severe ablation or blunting of the available thermal protection system materials. Recent studies indicate that ultrahigh temperature ceramic (UHTC) materials are shape stable at temperatures approaching 3033 K and will be available for use as sharp UHTC leading edge components in the near future. Aerothermal performance constraints for sharp components made from these materials are presented in this work to demonstrate the effects of convective blocking, surface catalycity, surface emissivity, and rarefied flow effects on steady state operation at altitudes from sea level to 90 km. These components are capable of steady state operation at velocities up to 7.9 km/s at attitudes near 90 km.

  5. Cavitation on hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation characteristics of hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge were examined experimentally at a Reynolds number of 7.2 × 105. The hydrofoils had an underlying NACA 634-021 profile and an aspect ratio of 4.3. The sinusoidal leading edge geometries included three amplitudes of 2.5%, 5%, and 12% and two wavelengths of 25% and 50% of the mean chord length. Results revealed that cavitation on the leading edge-modified hydrofoils existed in pockets behind the troughs whereas the baseline hydrofoil produced cavitation along its entire span. Moreover, cavitation on the modified hydrofoils appeared at consistently lower angles of attack than on the baseline hydrofoil.

  6. Leading edge protection for composite blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, J. W.; Irwin, T. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A laminated filament composite structure, such as an airfoil for use in an environment in which it is subjected to both foreign object impact and bending is provided with improved leading edge protection. At least one fine wire mesh layer is partially bonded within the composite structure along its neutral bending axis. A portion of the wire mesh layer extends beyond the neutral bending axis and partially around the leading edge where it is bonded to the outer periphery of the primary composite structure. The wire mesh is clad with a metal such as nickel to provide an improved leading edge protective device which is firmly anchored within the composite structure. Also described is a novel method of constructing a composite airfoil so as to further minimize the possibility of losing the leading edge protective device due to delamination caused by impact and bending.

  7. Imaging The Leading Edge Of A Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optical system integrated into plasma arc welding torch provides image of leading edge of weld pool and welding-arc-initiation point. Welding torch aligned better with joint. System includes coherent bundle of optical fibers and transparent cup.

  8. Computation of leading-edge vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, R. W.; Thomas, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The simulation of the leading edge vortex flow about a series of conical delta wings through solution of the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations is studied. The occurrence, the validity, and the usefulness of separated flow solutions to the Euler equations of particular interest. Central and upwind difference solutions to the governing equations are compared for a series of cross sectional shapes, including both rounded and sharp tip geometries. For the rounded leading edge and the flight condition considered, viscous solutions obtained with either central or upwind difference methods predict the classic structure of vortical flow over a highly swept delta wing. Predicted features include the primary vortex due to leading edge separation and the secondary vortex due to crossflow separation. Central difference solutions to the Euler equations show a marked sensitivity to grid refinement. On a coarse grid, the flow separates due to numerical error and a primary vortex which resembles that of the viscous solution is predicted. In contrast, the upwind difference solutions to the Euler equations predict attached flow even for first-order solutions on coarse grids. On a sufficiently fine grid, both methods agree closely and correctly predict a shock-curvature-induced inviscid separation near the leeward plane of symmetry. Upwind difference solutions to the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations are presented for two sharp leading edge geometries. The viscous solutions are quite similar to the rounded leading edge results with vortices of similar shape and size. The upwind Euler solutions predict attached flow with no separation for both geometries. However, with sufficient grid refinement near the tip or through the use of more accurate spatial differencing, leading edge separation results. Once the leading edge separation is established, the upwind solution agrees with recently published central difference solutions to the Euler equations.

  9. Development of Columbia Leading Edge Reconstruction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trautwein, John; Wegerif, Dan

    2004-01-01

    After the loss of Columbia in 2003, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board and NASA KSC directed personnel at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) to design and build high fidelity mock-ups of Columbia's left wing leading edges. These leading edge segments, constructed of reinforced carbon-carbon, were a major point of inquiry by the investigation team. The LETF engineers developed a concept of building a clear Lexan panel with an aluminum support structure ten percent larger than the original panel. The leading edge debris are attached to the Lexan panels and both the front and back side of each panel are visible for inspection. The entire assembly can be rotated, to provide visual access to the entire panel. Six carts were fabricated to support the thirteen panels. These carts could be set up in order, next to each other, to provide the desired inspection access. The carts and attached debris are currently located in the Vehicle Assembly Building at KSC.

  10. Wing Leading Edge Concepts for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin; Yadlin, Yoram; Pitera, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of wing leading edge concepts for noise reduction during high-lift operations, without compromising landing stall speeds, stall characteristics or cruise performance. High-lift geometries, which can be obtained by conventional mechanical systems or morphing structures have been considered. A systematic aerodynamic analysis procedure was used to arrive at several promising configurations. The aerodynamic design of new wing leading edge shapes is obtained from a robust Computational Fluid Dynamics procedure. Acoustic benefits are qualitatively established through the evaluation of the computed flow fields.

  11. Airplane wing leading edge variable camber flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The invention and design of an aerodynamic high lift device which provided a solution to an aircraft performance problem are described. The performance problem of converting a high speed cruise airfoil into a low speed aerodynamic shape that would provide landing and take-off characteristics superior to those available with contemporary high lift devices are addressed. The need for an improved wing leading edge device that would complement the high lift performance of a triple slotted trailing edge flap is examined. The mechanical and structural aspects of the variable camber flap are discussed and the aerodynamic performance aspects only as they relate to the invention and design of the device are presented.

  12. Cavitation on Hydrofoils with Leading Edge Protuberances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, Derrick; Henoch, Charles; Johari, Hamid; Office of Naval Research Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The effects of spanwise-uniform sinusoidal leading edge protuberances on the flow characteristics and forces of finite-span hydrofoils under vaporous cavitation conditions were examined experimentally over angles of attack ranging from -9° α <= 27°. Two planforms were studied, rectangular and swept, at a Reynolds number of ~ 720,000. Two protuberance wavelengths, λ = 0.25 c and 0.50 c, and three amplitudes, A = 0.025 c, 0.05 c, and 0.12 c, were examined as they resemble the humpback whale flipper morphology. All hydrofoils retain a mean NACA 634-021 profile. The forces and moments were measured at a freestream velocity of 7.2 m/s, and high-speed digital photography was used to capture flow field images at several angles of attack. The cavitation number corresponding to incipient leading edge cavitation was also calculated. As far as forces and cavitation number are concerned, results show that the baseline hydrofoil tends to have nearly equal or improved performance over the modified hydrofoils at most angles of attack tested. Flow images reveal that it is possible that the extent of sheet and tip vortex cavitation can be reduced with the introduction of leading edge protuberances. The forces and cavitation characteristics will be presented. Sponsored by the ONR-ULI program.

  13. Investigation of a Laminar Flow Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny

    1994-01-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in utilizing laminar flow on aircraft surfaces for reduction in skin friction drag has generated a considerable amount of research in natural laminar flow (NLF) and hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) on transonic aircraft wings. This research has focused primarily on airfoil design and understanding transition behavior with little concern for the surface imperfections and manufacturing variations inherent to most production aircraft. In order for laminar flow to find wide-spread use on production aircraft, techniques for constructing the wings must be found such that the large surface imperfections present in the leading edge region of current aircraft do not occur. Toward this end, a modification to existing leading edge construction techniques was devised such that the resulting surface did not contain large gaps and steps as are common on current production aircraft of this class. A lowspeed experiment was first conducted on a simulation of the surface that would result from this construction technique. Preston tube measurements of the boundary layer downstream of the simulated joint and flow visualization using sublimation chemicals validated the literature on the effects of steps on a laminar boundary layer. These results also indicated that the construction technique was indeed compatible with laminar flow. In order to fully validate the compatibility of this construction technique with laminar flow, thus proving that it is possible to build wings that are smooth enough to be used on business jets and light transports in a manner compatible with laminar flow, a flight experiment is being conducted. In this experiment Mach number and Reynolds number will be matched in a real flight environment. The experiment is being conducted using the NASA Dryden F-104 Flight Test Fixture (FTF). The FTF is a low aspect ratio ventral fin mounted beneath an F-104G research aircraft. A new nose shape was designed and constructed for this

  14. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  15. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Leading Edge Stagnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2004-01-01

    A multigrid solver is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in evaluating the discrete residuals. TME in solving the incompressible inviscid fluid equations is demonstrated for leading- edge stagnation flows. The contributions of this paper include (1) a special formulation of the boundary conditions near stagnation allowing convergence of the Newton iterations on coarse grids, (2) the boundary relaxation technique to facilitate relaxation and residual restriction near the boundaries, (3) a modified relaxation scheme to prevent initial error amplification, and (4) new general analysis techniques for multigrid solvers. Convergence of algebraic errors below the level of discretization errors is attained by a full multigrid (FMG) solver with one full approximation scheme (F.4S) cycle per grid. Asymptotic convergence rates of the F.4S cycles for the full system of flow equations are very fast, approaching those for scalar elliptic equations.

  16. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Leading Edge Stagnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2004-01-01

    A multigrid solver is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in evaluating the discrete residuals. TME in solving the incompressible inviscid fluid equations is demonstrated for leading-edge stagnation flows. The contributions of this paper include (1) a special formulation of the boundary conditions near stagnation allowing convergence of the Newton iterations on coarse grids, (2) the boundary relaxation technique to facilitate relaxation and residual restriction near the boundaries, (3) a modified relaxation scheme to prevent initial error amplification, and (4) new general analysis techniques for multigrid solvers. Convergence of algebraic errors below the level of discretization errors is attained by a full multigrid (FMG) solver with one full approximation scheme (FAS) cycle per grid. Asymptotic convergence rates of the FAS cycles for the full system of flow equations are very fast, approaching those for scalar elliptic equations.

  17. Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Systems in Simulated Airline Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving laminar flow on the wings of a commercial transport involves difficult problems associated with the wing leading edge. The NASA Leading Edge Flight Test Program has made major progress toward the solution of these problems. The effectiveness and practicality of candidate laminar flow leading edge systems were proven under representative airline service conditions. This was accomplished in a series of simulated airline service flights by modifying a JetStar aircraft with laminar flow leading edge systems and operating it out of three commercial airports in the United States. The aircraft was operated as an airliner would under actual air traffic conditions, in bad weather, and in insect infested environments.

  18. Development of X-43A Mach 10 Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Glass, David E.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Lindell, Michael C.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Dirling, R. B., Jr.; Hogenson, P. A.; Nichols, J. M.; Risner, N. W.; Thompson, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The nose leading edge of the Hyper-X Mach 10 vehicle was orginally anticipated to reach temperatures near 4000 F at the leading-edge stagnation line. A SiC coated carbon/carbon (C/C) leading-edge material will not survive that extreme temperature for even a short duration single flight. To identify a suitable leading edge for the Mach 10 vehicle, arc-jet testing was performed on thirteen leading-edge segments fabricated from different material systems to evaluate their performance in a simulated flight environment. Hf, Zr, Si, and Ir based materials, in most cases as a coating on C/C, were included in the evaluation. Afterwards, MER, Tucson, AZ was selected as the supplier of the flight vehicle leading edges. The nose and the vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the top surface of the C/C, followed by a chemical vapor deposited layer of SiC, followed by a thin chemical vapor deposited layer of HfC. This paper will describe the fabrication of the Mach 10 C/C leading edges and the testing performed to validate performance.

  19. Aerothermodynamic Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Space shuttle aerothermodynamic data, collected from a continuing series of wind tunnel tests, are permanently stored with the Data Management Services (DMS) system. Information pertaining to current baseline configuration definition is also stored. A list of documentation of DMS processed data arranged sequentially and by space shuttle configuration is presented. The listing provides an up to date record of all applicable aerothermodynamic data collected, processed, or summarized during the space shuttle program. Tables are designed to provide survey information to the various space shuttle managerial and technical levels.

  20. Turbulent Wing-Leading-Edge Correlation Assessment for the Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Rudolph A.; Vaughan, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted in support of the Orbiter damage assessment activity that takes place for each Shuttle mission since STS-107 (STS - Space Transportation System). As part of the damage assessment activity, the state of boundary layer (laminar or turbulent) during reentry needs to be estimated in order to define the aerothermal environment on the Orbiter. Premature turbulence on the wing leading edge (WLE) is possible if a surface irregularity promotes early transition and the resulting turbulent wedge flow contaminates the WLE flow. The objective of this analysis is to develop a criterion to determine if and when the flow along the WLE experiences turbulent heating given an incoming turbulent boundary layer that contaminates the attachment line. The data to be analyzed were all obtained as part of the MH-13 Space Shuttle Orbiter Aerothermodynamic Test conducted on a 1.8%-scale Orbiter model at Calspan/University of Buffalo Research Center in the Large Energy National Shock Tunnels facility. A rational framework was used to develop a means to assess the state of the WLE flow on the Orbiter during reentry given a contaminated attachment-line flow. Evidence of turbulent flow on the WLE has been recently documented for a few STS missions during the Orbiter s flight history, albeit late in the reentry trajectory. The criterion developed herein will be compared to these flight results.

  1. Leading-Edge "Pop-Up" Spoiler For Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.; Lance, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    New concept places spoiler in leading edge of airfoil, hinged along its trailing edge, so airflow helps to deploy it and force it against mechanical stop. Deployed "pop-up" spoiler quickly eliminates almost all aerodynamic lift of stabilator. Designed to be added to leading edge of existing stabilator, without major rework. Though initial application to be on helicopter stabilators, equally applicable to wings or winglike components.

  2. Numerical study of delta wing leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, David; Tavella, Domingo; Roberts, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    Spanwise and tangential leading edge blowing as a means of controlling the position and strength of the leading edge vortices are studied by numerical solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The leading edge jet is simulated by defining a permeable boundary, corresponding to the jet slot, where suitable boundary conditions are implemented. Numerical results are shown to compare favorably with experimental measurements. It is found that the use of spanwise leading edge blowing at moderate angle of attack magnifies the size and strength of the leading edge vortices, and moves the vortex cores outboard and upward. The increase in lift primarily comes from the greater nonlinear vortex lift. However, spanwise blowing causes earlier vortex breakdown, thus decreasing the stall angle. The effects of tangential blowing at low to moderate angles of attack tend to reduce the pressure peaks associated with leading edge vortices and to increase the suction peak around the leading edge, so that the integrated value of the surface pressure remains about the same. Tangential leading edge blowing in post-stall conditions is shown to re-establish vortical flow and delay vortex bursting, thus increasing C sub L sub max and stall angle.

  3. Heat-Pipe-Cooled Leading Edges for Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Heat pipes can be used to effectively cool wing leading edges of hypersonic vehicles. . Heat-pipe leading edge development. Design validation heat pipe testing confirmed design. Three heat pipes embedded and tested in C/C. Single J-tube heat pipe fabricated and testing initiated. HPCLE work is currently underway at several locations.

  4. Timing discriminator using leading-edge extrapolation

    DOEpatents

    Gottschalk, B.

    1981-07-30

    A discriminator circuit to recover timing information from slow-rising pulses by means of an output trailing edge, a fixed time after the starting corner of the input pulse, which is nearly independent of risetime and threshold setting is described. This apparatus comprises means for comparing pulses with a threshold voltage; a capacitor to be charged at a certain rate when the input signal is one-third threshold voltage, and at a lower rate when the input signal is two-thirds threshold voltage; current-generating means for charging the capacitor; means for comparing voltage capacitor with a bias voltage; a flip-flop to be set when the input pulse reaches threshold voltage and reset when capacitor voltage reaches the bias voltage; and a clamping means for discharging the capacitor when the input signal returns below one-third threshold voltage.

  5. Timing discriminator using leading-edge extrapolation

    DOEpatents

    Gottschalk, Bernard

    1983-01-01

    A discriminator circuit to recover timing information from slow-rising pulses by means of an output trailing edge, a fixed time after the starting corner of the input pulse, which is nearly independent of risetime and threshold setting. This apparatus comprises means for comparing pulses with a threshold voltage; a capacitor to be charged at a certain rate when the input signal is one-third threshold voltage, and at a lower rate when the input signal is two-thirds threshold voltage; current-generating means for charging the capacitor; means for comparing voltage capacitor with a bias voltage; a flip-flop to be set when the input pulse reaches threshold voltage and reset when capacitor voltage reaches the bias voltage; and a clamping means for discharging the capacitor when the input signal returns below one-third threshold voltage.

  6. Vortex leading edge flap assembly for supersonic airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A leading edge flap (16) for supersonic transport airplanes is disclosed. In its stowed position, the leading edge flap forms the lower surface of the wing leading edge up to the horizontal center of the leading edge radius. For low speed operation, the vortex leading edge flap moves forward and rotates down. The upward curve of the flap leading edge triggers flow separation on the flap and rotational flow on the upper surface of the flap (vortex). The rounded shape of the upper fixed leading edge provides the conditions for a controlled reattachment of the flow on the upper wing surface and therefore a stable vortex. The vortex generates lift and a nose-up pitching moment. This improves maximum lift at low speed, reduces attitude for a given lift coefficient and improves lift to drag ratio. The mechanism (27) to move the vortex flap consists of two spanwise supports (24) with two diverging straight tracks (64 and 68) each and a screw drive mechanism (62) in the center of the flap panel (29). The flap motion is essentially normal to the airloads and therefore requires only low actuation forces.

  7. Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yap, Keng C.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge. The Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLE IDS) and the Impact Analysis Process are also described to monitor WLE debris threats. The contents include: 1) Risk Management via SHM; 2) Hardware Overview; 3) Instrumentation; 4) Sensor Configuration; 5) Debris Hazard Monitoring; 6) Ascent Response Summary; 7) Response Signal; 8) Distribution of Flight Indications; 9) Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA); 10) Model Correlation; 11) Impact Tests; 12) Wing Leading Edge Modeling; 13) Ascent Debris PRA Results; and 14) MM/OD PRA Results.

  8. Sharp Refractory Composite Leading Edges on Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.; Sullivan, Brian J.

    2003-01-01

    On-going research of advanced sharp refractory composite leading edges for use on hypersonic air-breathing vehicles is presented in this paper. Intense magnitudes of heating and of heating gradients on the leading edge lead to thermal stresses that challenge the survivability of current material systems. A fundamental understanding of the problem is needed to further design development. Methodology for furthering the technology along with the use of advanced fiber architectures to improve the thermal-structural response is explored in the current work. Thermal and structural finite element analyses are conducted for several advanced fiber architectures of interest. A tailored thermal shock parameter for sharp orthotropic leading edges is identified for evaluating composite material systems. The use of the tailored thermal shock parameter has the potential to eliminate the need for detailed thermal-structural finite element analyses for initial screening of material systems being considered for a leading edge component.

  9. Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites for Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.

    2004-01-01

    Issues associated with the development and use of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites (UHTCC) for leading edges of hypersonic vehicles will be discussed. These include attachments, constituent selection, processing, oxidation, physical and mechanical properties, and attachments.

  10. Shock Interaction Control for Scramjet Cowl Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Venkat, Venki, S.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to qualitatively determine the effectiveness of stagnation-region gas injection in protecting a scramjet cowl leading edge from the intense heating produced by Type III and Type IV shock interactions. The model consisted of a two-dimensional leading edge, representative of that of a scramjet cowl. Tests were conducted at a nominal freestream Mach number of 6. Gaseous nitrogen was supersonically injected through the leading-edge nozzles at various mass flux ratios and with the model pitched at angles of 0deg and -20deg relative to the freestream flow. Qualitative data, in the form of focusing and conventional schlieren images, were obtained of the shock interaction patterns. Results indicate that large shock displacements can be achieved and both the Type III and IV interactions can be altered such that the interaction does not impinge on the leading edge surface.

  11. Dynamic Stall Characteristics of Drooped Leading Edge Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Sahin, Mehmet; Gopal, Naveen

    2000-01-01

    Helicopters in high-speed forward flight usually experience large regions of dynamic stall over the retreating side of the rotor disk. The rapid variations in the lift and pitching moments associated with the stall process can result in vibratory loads, and can cause fatigue and failure of pitch links. In some instances, the large time lag between the aerodynamic forces and the blade motion can trigger stall flutter. A number of techniques for the alleviation of dynamic stall have been proposed and studied by researchers. Passive and active control techniques have both been explored. Passive techniques include the use of high solidity rotors that reduce the lift coefficients of individual blades, leading edge slots and leading edge slats. Active control techniques include steady and unsteady blowing, and dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE) airfoils. Considerable amount of experimental and numerical data has been collected on the effectiveness of these concepts. One concept that has not received as much attention is the drooped-leading edge airfoil idea. It has been observed in wind tunnel studies and flight tests that drooped leading edge airfoils can have a milder dynamic stall, with a significantly milder load hysteresis. Drooped leading edge airfoils may not, however, be suitable at other conditions, e.g. in hover, or in transonic flow. Work needs to be done on the analysis and design of drooped leading edge airfoils for efficient operation in a variety of flight regimes (hover, dynamic stall, and transonic flow). One concept that is worthy of investigation is the dynamically drooping airfoil, where the leading edge shape is changed roughly once-per-rev to mitigate the dynamic stall.

  12. A Thermostructural Analysis of a Diboride Composite Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Tom; Buesking, Kent; Kolodziej, Paul; Bull, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to support the design of zirconium diboride composite leading edges for hypersonic vehicles, a finite element model (FEM) of a prototype leading edge was created and finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to assess its thermal and structural response to aerothermal boundary conditions. Unidirectional material properties for the structural components of the leading edge, a continuous fiber reinforced diboride composite, were computed with COSTAR. These properties agree well with those experimentally measured. To verify the analytical approach taken with COSMOS/M, an independent FEA of one of the leading edge assembly components was also done with COSTAR. Good agreement was obtained between the two codes. Both showed that a unidirectional lay-up had the best margin of safety for a simple loading case. Both located the maximum stress in the same region and ply. The magnitudes agreed within 4 percent. Trajectory based aerothermal heating was then applied to the leading edge assembly FEM created with COSMOS/M to determine steady state temperature response, displacement, stresses, and contact forces due to thermal expansion and thermal strains. Results show that the leading edge stagnation line temperature reached 4700 F. The maximum computed failure index for the laminated composite components peaks at 4.2, and is located at the bolt flange in layer 2 of the side bracket. The temperature gradient in the tip causes a compressive stress of 279 ksi along its width and substantial tensile stresses within its depth.

  13. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number. PMID:24116405

  14. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number.

  15. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 1: Detailed test plan for leading edge tile development. Leading edge material development and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Staszak, Paul; Hinkle, Karrie

    1995-05-01

    This task develops two alternative candidate tile materials for leading edge applications: coated alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) tile and silicone impregnated reusable ceramic ablator (SIRCA) tile. Upon reentry of the X-33/RLV space vehicle, the leading edges experience the highest heating rates and temperatures. The wing leading edge and nose cap experience peak temperatures in the range 2000 to 2700 F. Replacing reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) with tile-based thermal protection system (TPS) materials is the primary objective. Weight, complexity, coating impact damage, and repairability are among the problems that this tile technology development addresses. The following subtasks will be performed in this development effort: tile coating development; SIRCA tile development; robustness testing of tiles; tile repair development; tile operations/processing; tile leading edge configuration; and life cycle testing.

  16. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 1: Detailed test plan for leading edge tile development. Leading edge material development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Staszak, Paul; Hinkle, Karrie

    1995-01-01

    This task develops two alternative candidate tile materials for leading edge applications: coated alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) tile and silicone impregnated reusable ceramic ablator (SIRCA) tile. Upon reentry of the X-33/RLV space vehicle, the leading edges experience the highest heating rates and temperatures. The wing leading edge and nose cap experience peak temperatures in the range 2000 to 2700 F. Replacing reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) with tile-based thermal protection system (TPS) materials is the primary objective. Weight, complexity, coating impact damage, and repairability are among the problems that this tile technology development addresses. The following subtasks will be performed in this development effort: tile coating development; SIRCA tile development; robustness testing of tiles; tile repair development; tile operations/processing; tile leading edge configuration; and life cycle testing.

  17. Fluid-thermal-structural study of aerodynamically heated leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deuchamphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.; Wieting, Allan R.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element approach for integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis of aerodynamically heated leading edges is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for high speed compressible flow, the energy equation, and the quasi-static equilibrium equations for the leading edge are solved using a single finite element approach in one integrated, vectorized computer program called LIFTS. The fluid-thermal-structural coupling is studied for Mach 6.47 flow over a 3-in diam cylinder for which the flow behavior and the aerothermal loads are calibrated by experimental data. Issues of the thermal-structural response are studied for hydrogen-cooled, super thermal conducting leading edges subjected to intense aerodynamic heating.

  18. Design and Analysis of UHTC Leading Edge Attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nemeth, Noel N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center was contacted to provide technical support to NASA Ames Research Center in the design and analysis of an ultra high temperature ceramic (UHTC) leading edge. UHTC materials are being considered for reusable launch vehicles because their high temperature capability may allow for un-cooled sharp leading edge designs. While ceramic materials have the design benefit of allowing subcomponents to run hot, they also provide a design challenge in that they invariably must be in contact with cooler subcomponents elsewhere in the structure. NASA Glenn Research Center proposed a modification to an existing attachment design. Thermal and structural analyses of the leading edge assembly were carried out using ABAQUS finite element software. Final results showed that the proposed modifications aided in thermally isolating hot and cold subcomponents and reducing bearing stresses at the attachment location.

  19. Effect of Leading Edge Tubercles on Marine Tidal Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Mark; Gruber, Timothy; Fredriksson, David

    2010-11-01

    This project investigated the impact that the addition of leading edge protuberances (tubercles) have on the effectiveness of marine tidal turbine blades, especially at lower flow speeds. The addition of leading edge tubercles to lifting foils has been shown, in previous research, to delay the onset of stall without significant hydrodynamic costs. The experimental results obtained utilizing three different blade designs (baseline and two tubercle modified) are compared. All blades were designed in SolidWorks and manufactured utilizing rapid prototype techniques. All tests were conducted in the 120 ft tow tank at the U.S. Naval Academy using a specifically designed experimental apparatus. Results for power coefficients are presented for a range of tip speed ratios. Cut-in velocity is also compared between the blade designs. For all test criteria, the tubercle modified blades significantly outperformed the smooth leading edge baseline design blades.

  20. Contact angle at the leading edge controls cell protrusion rate.

    PubMed

    Gabella, Chiara; Bertseva, Elena; Bottier, Céline; Piacentini, Niccolò; Bornert, Alicia; Jeney, Sylvia; Forró, László; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2014-05-19

    Plasma membrane tension and the pressure generated by actin polymerization are two antagonistic forces believed to define the protrusion rate at the leading edge of migrating cells [1-5]. Quantitatively, resistance to actin protrusion is a product of membrane tension and mean local curvature (Laplace's law); thus, it depends on the local geometry of the membrane interface. However, the role of the geometry of the leading edge in protrusion control has not been yet investigated. Here, we manipulate both the cell shape and substrate topography in the model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. We find that the protrusion rate does not correlate with membrane tension, but, instead, strongly correlates with cell roundness, and that the leading edge of the cell exhibits pinning on substrate ridges-a phenomenon characteristic of spreading of liquid drops. These results indicate that the leading edge could be considered a triple interface between the substrate, membrane, and extracellular medium and that the contact angle between the membrane and the substrate determines the load on actin polymerization and, therefore, the protrusion rate. Our findings thus illuminate a novel relationship between the 3D shape of the cell and its dynamics, which may have implications for cell migration in 3D environments.

  1. Leading-edge receptivity for blunt-nose bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    This research program investigates boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region for bodies with blunt leading edges. Receptivity theory provides the link between the unsteady distrubance environment in the free stream and the initial amplitudes of the instability waves in the boundary layer. This is a critical problem which must be addressed in order to develop more accurate prediction methods for boundary-layer transition. The first phase of this project examines the effects of leading-edge bluntness and aerodynamic loading for low Mach number flows. In the second phase of the project, the investigation is extended to supersonic Mach numbers. Singular perturbation techniques are utilized to develop an asymptotic theory for high Reynolds numbers. In the first year, the asymptotic theory was developed for leading-edge receptivity in low Mach number flows. The case of a parabolic nose is considered. Substantial progress was made on the Navier-Sotkes computations. Analytical solutions for the steady and unsteady potential flow fields were incorporated into the code, greatly expanding the types of free-stream disturbances that can be considered while also significantly reducing the the computational requirements. The time-stepping algorithm was modified so that the potential flow perturbations induced by the unsteady pressure field are directly introduced throughout the computational domain, avoiding an artificial 'numerical diffusion' of these from the outer boundary. In addition, the start-up process was modified by introducing the transient Stokes wave solution into the downstream boundary conditions.

  2. Analysis of Bird Impact on a Composite Tailplane Leading Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, M.; Marulo, F.; Meo, M.; Riccio, M.

    2008-11-01

    One of the main structural requirements of a leading edge of a tailplane is to ensure that any significant damage caused by foreign object (i.e. birdstrike, etc...) would still allow the aircraft to land safely. In particular, leading edge must be certified for a proven level of bird impact resistance. Since the experimental tests are expensive and difficult to perform, numerical simulations can provide significant help in designing high-efficiency bird-proof structures. The aim of this research paper was to evaluate two different leading edge designs by reducing the testing costs by employing state-of-the-art numerical simulations. The material considered was a sandwich structure made up of aluminium skins and flexcore as core. Before each test was carried out, pre-test numerical analyses of birdstrike were performed adopting a lagrangian approach on a tailplane leading edge of a large scale aircraft using the MSC/Dytran solver code. The numerical and experimental correlation have shown good results both in terms of global behaviour of the test article and local evolution of some measurable parameters confirming the validity of the approach and possible guidelines for structural design including the bird impact requirements.

  3. Laminar flow control leading edge glove flight test article development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.; Mcnay, D. E.; Thelander, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A laminar flow control (LFC) flight test article was designed and fabricated to fit into the right leading edge of a JetStar aircraft. The article was designed to attach to the front spar and fill in approx. 70 inches of the leading edge that are normally occupied by the large slipper fuel tank. The outer contour of the test article was constrained to align with an external fairing aft of the front spar which provided a surface pressure distribution over the test region representative of an LFC airfoil. LFC is achieved by applying suction through a finely perforated surface, which removes a small fraction of the boundary layer. The LFC test article has a retractable high lift shield to protect the laminar surface from contamination by airborne debris during takeoff and low altitude operation. The shield is designed to intercept insects and other particles that could otherwise impact the leading edge. Because the shield will intercept freezing rain and ice, a oozing glycol ice protection system is installed on the shield leading edge. In addition to the shield, a liquid freezing point depressant can be sprayed on the back of the shield.

  4. Vortex interaction with a leading-edge of finite thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, D.; Rockwell, Donald

    1987-01-01

    Vortex interaction with a thick elliptical leading-edge at zero relative offset produces a pronounced secondary vortes of opposite sense that travels with the same phase speed as the primaty vortex along the lower surface of the edge. The edge thickness (scale) relative to the incident vorticity field has a strong effect on the distortion of the incident primary vortex during the impingement processs. When the thickness is sufficiently small, there is a definite severing of the incident vortex and the portion of the incident vortex that travels along the upper part of the elliptical surface has a considerably larger phase speed than that along the lower surface; this suggests that the integrated loading along the upper surface is more strongly correlated. When the thickness becomes too large, then most, if not all, of the incident vortex passes below the leading-edge. On the other hand, the relative tranverse offset of the edge with respect to the center of the incident vortex has a significant effect on the secondary vortex formation.

  5. Membrane insertion at the leading edge of motile fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, J E; Kupfer, A; Singer, S J

    1983-01-01

    We are concerned with the mechanisms involved in the directed migration of eukaryotic cells. Previously we found that, inside cells at the edge of an experimental wound, the Golgi apparatus and the microtubule-organizing center were rapidly repositioned forward of the nucleus in the direction of subsequent cell migration into the wound. This repositioning was proposed to serve the purpose of introducing new membrane mass at the leading edge of the cell, by directing Golgi apparatus-derived vesicles bound for the plasma membrane to that edge. We now provide evidence to support this proposal. Cultured fibroblastic cells at the edge of a wound were infected with a temperature-sensitive mutant (0-45) of vesicular stomatitis virus. It is known that the G-protein, an integral membrane protein of the virus, is synthesized and remains in the rough endoplasmic reticulum at the nonpermissive temperature, but when the infected cells are shifted to the permissive temperature, the G-protein moves through the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. By immunofluorescence microscopy, we here show that the first appearance of the G-protein at the cell surface corresponds to the leading edge of the motile cell. These observations are incorporated into a coherent scheme for the mechanisms involved in cell migration. Images PMID:6298789

  6. Detail view of the leading and top edge of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the leading and top edge of the vertical stabilizer of the Orbiter Discovery showing the thermal protection system components with the white Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) blanket and the black High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) tiles along the outer edges. The marks seen on the HRSI tiles are injection point marks and holes for the application of waterproofing material. This view was taken from a service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  7. The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge vortex.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Daghooghi, Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    The tail (caudal fin) is one of the most prominent characteristics of fishes, and the analysis of the flow pattern it creates is fundamental to understanding how its motion generates locomotor forces. A mechanism that is known to greatly enhance locomotor forces in insect and bird flight is the leading edge vortex (LEV) reattachment, i.e. a vortex (separation bubble) that stays attached at the leading edge of a wing. However, this mechanism has not been reported in fish-like swimming probably owing to the overemphasis on the trailing wake, and the fact that the flow does not separate along the body of undulating swimmers. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the vortex reattachment at the leading edge of the fish tail using three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of self-propelled virtual swimmers with different tail shapes. We show that at Strouhal numbers (a measure of lateral velocity to the axial velocity) at which most fish swim in nature (approx. 0.25) an attached LEV is formed, whereas at a higher Strouhal number of approximately 0.6 the LEV does not reattach. We show that the evolution of the LEV drastically alters the pressure distribution on the tail and the force it generates. We also show that the tail's delta shape is not necessary for the LEV reattachment and fish-like kinematics is capable of stabilising the LEV. Our results suggest the need for a paradigm shift in fish-like swimming research to turn the focus from the trailing edge to the leading edge of the tail.

  8. HEART Aerothermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the aerothermodynamic environment around an 8.3 meter High Energy Atmospheric Reentry Test (HEART) vehicle. This study generated twelve nose shape configurations and compared their responses at the peak heating trajectory point against the baseline nose shape. The heat flux sensitivity to the angle of attack variations are also discussed. The possibility of a two-piece Thermal Protection System (TPS) design at the nose is also considered, as are the surface catalytic affects of the aeroheating environment of such configuration. Based on these analyses, an optimum nose shape is proposed to minimize the surface heating. A recommendation is also made for a two-piece TPS design, for which the surface catalytic uncertainty associated with the jump in heating at the nose-IAD juncture is reduced by a minimum of 93%. In this paper, the aeroshell is assumed to be rigid and the inflatable fluid interaction effect is left for future investigations.

  9. X-38 Experimental Aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Merski, N. Ronald; Fitzgerald, Steve M.

    2000-01-01

    The X-38 program seeks to demonstrate an autonomously returned orbital test flight vehicle to support the development of an operational Crew Return Vehicle for the International Space Station. The test flight, anticipated in 2002, is intended to demonstrate the entire mission profile of returning Space Station crew members safely back to earth in the event of medical or mechanical emergency. Integral to the formulation of the X-38 flight data book and the design of the thermal protection system, the aerothermodynamic environment is being defined through a synergistic combination of ground based testing and computational fluid dynamics. This report provides an overview of the hypersonic aerothermodynamic wind tunnel program conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in support of the X-38 development. Global and discrete surface heat transfer force and moment, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on scaled models of the proposed X-38 configuration in different test gases at Mach 6, 10 and 20. The test parametrics include angle of attack from 0 to 50 degs, unit Reynolds numbers from 0.3 x 10 (exp 6) to 16 x 10 (exp 6)/ ft, rudder deflections of 0, 2, and 5 deg. and body flap deflections from 0 to 30 deg. Results from hypersonic aerodynamic screening studies that were conducted as the configuration evolved to the present shape at, presented. Heavy gas simulation tests have indicated that the primary real gas effects on X-38 aerodynamics at trim conditions are expected to favorably influence flap effectiveness. Comparisons of the experimental heating and force and moment data to prediction and the current aerodynamic data book are highlighted. The effects of discrete roughness elements on boundary layer transition were investigated at Mach 6 and the development of a transition correlation for the X-38 vehicle is described. Extrapolation of ground based heating measurements to flight radiation equilibrium wall temperatures at Mach 6 and 10 were

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation for the Space Shuttle's Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Winfree, William P.; Prosser, William H.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Cramer, K. Elliot

    2005-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia highlighted concerns about the integrity of the Shuttle's thermal protection system, which includes Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) on the leading edge. This led NASA to investigate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for certifying the integrity of the Shuttle's wing leading edge. That investigation was performed simultaneously with a large study conducted to understand the impact damage caused by errant debris. Among the many advanced NDE methods investigated for applicability to the RCC material, advanced digital radiography, high resolution computed tomography, thermography, ultrasound, acoustic emission and eddy current systems have demonstrated the maturity and success for application to the Shuttle RCC panels. For the purposes of evaluating the RCC panels while they are installed on the orbiters, thermographic detection incorporating principal component analysis (PCA) and eddy current array scanning systems demonstrated the ability to measure the RCC panels from one side only and to detect several flaw types of concern. These systems were field tested at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and at several locations where impact testing was being conducted. Another advanced method that NASA has been investigating is an automated acoustic based detection system. Such a system would be based in part on methods developed over the years for acoustic emission testing. Impact sensing has been demonstrated through numerous impact tests on both reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. A variety of impact materials and conditions have been evaluated including foam, ice, and ablator materials at ascent velocities as well as simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. These tests have successfully demonstrated the capability to detect and localize impact events on Shuttle's wing structures. A first generation impact sensing

  11. Experimental Aerothermodynamics In Support Of The Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    The technical foundation for the most probable damage scenario reported in the Columbia Accident Investigation Board's final report was largely derived from synergistic aerodynamic/aerothermodynamic wind tunnel measurements and inviscid predictions made at NASA Langley Research Center and later corroborated with engineering analysis, high fidelity numerical viscous simulations, and foam impact testing near the close of the investigation. This report provides an overview of the hypersonic aerothermodynamic wind tunnel program conducted at NASA Langley and illustrates how the ground-based heating measurements provided early insight that guided the direction and utilization of agency resources in support of the investigation. Global surface heat transfer mappings, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on 0.0075 scale models of the Orbiter configuration with and without postulated damage to the thermal protection system. Test parametrics include angle of attack from 38 to 42 degs, sideslip angles of 38 to 42 degs, sideslip angles of plus or minus 1 deg, Reynolds numbers based upon model length from 0.05 x 10(exp 6) to 6.5 x 10(exp 6), and normal shock density ratios of 5 (Mach 6 Air) and 12 (Mach 6 CF4). The primary objective of the testing was to provide surface heating characteristics on scaled Orbiter models with outer mold line perturbations to simulate various forms of localized surface damage to the thermal protection system. Initial experimental testing conducted within two weeks of the accident simulated a broad spectrum of thermal protection system damage to the Orbiter windward surface and was used to refute several hypothesized forms of thermal protection system damage, which included gouges in the windward thermal protection system tiles, breaches through the wing new the main landing gear door, and protuberances along the wing leading edge that produced asymmetric boundary layer transition. As the forensic phase of the investigation

  12. Probabilistic Structural Health Monitoring of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yap, Keng C.; Macias, Jesus; Kaouk, Mohamed; Gafka, Tammy L.; Kerr, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    A structural health monitoring (SHM) system can contribute to the risk management of a structure operating under hazardous conditions. An example is the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) that monitors the debris hazards to the Space Shuttle Orbiter s Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels. Since Return-to-Flight (RTF) after the Columbia accident, WLEIDS was developed and subsequently deployed on board the Orbiter to detect ascent and on-orbit debris impacts, so as to support the assessment of wing leading edge structural integrity prior to Orbiter re-entry. As SHM is inherently an inverse problem, the analyses involved, including those performed for WLEIDS, tend to be associated with significant uncertainty. The use of probabilistic approaches to handle the uncertainty has resulted in the successful implementation of many development and application milestones.

  13. Heat pipes for wing leading edges of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boman, B. L.; Citrin, K. M.; Garner, E. C.; Stone, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    Wing leading edge heat pipes were conceptually designed for three types of vehicle: an entry research vehicle, aero-space plane, and advanced shuttle. A full scale, internally instrumented sodium/Hastelloy X heat pipe was successfully designed and fabricated for the advanced shuttle application. The 69.4 inch long heat pipe reduces peak leading edge temperatures from 3500 F to 1800 F. It is internally instrumented with thermocouples and pressure transducers to measure sodium vapor qualities. Large thermal gradients and consequently large thermal stresses, which have the potential of limiting heat pipe life, were predicted to occur during startup. A test stand and test plan were developed for subsequent testing of this heat pipe. Heat pipe manufacturing technology was advanced during this program, including the development of an innovative technique for wick installation.

  14. Space Shuttle hypersonic aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic flight research and the comparison to ground test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Shafer, Mary F.

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic comparisons between flight and ground test for the Space Shuttle at hypersonic speeds are discussed. All of the comparisons are taken from papers published by researchers active in the Space Shuttle program. The aerodynamic comparisons include stability and control derivatives, center-of-pressure location, and reaction control jet interaction. Comparisons are also discussed for various forms of heating, including catalytic, boundary layer, top centerline, side fuselage, OMS pod, wing leading edge, and shock interaction. The jet interaction and center-of-pressure location flight values exceeded not only the predictions but also the uncertainties of the predictions. Predictions were significantly exceeded for the heating caused by the vortex impingement on the OMS pods and for heating caused by the wing leading-edge shock interaction.

  15. Leading-edge vortex solutions with large total pressure losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Earll M.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Goodsell, Aga M.; Landahl, Marten T.

    1987-01-01

    Computations are presented for a Lambda = 75 deg delta wing in a supersonic freestream under two conditions which lead to leading-edge vortices. For one condition, analysis of the computed vortical flow reveals a closed streamline in the core. From varying computational parameters, it appears that this is due to truncation error of the convective derivatives. For the other condition, comparisons are made with wind-tunnel data, and good agreement is noted for pitot pressure distributions, flow angles on the symmetry plane, and the position of an embedded shock. Many of the aerodynamic parameters are shown to be insensitive to grid spacing.

  16. Optimization of the leading edge segment of a corrugated wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Manas; Chahl, Javaan

    2014-03-01

    Insect wings consist of flat plates of membranes stiffened by spars. The effect of this structure is that the wings appear as corrugated surfaces when considered on chordwise sections. We know that aerodynamically efficient insects such as a dragonfly engage in fixed wing flight modes for extended periods. The analysis in the literature has shown that the aerodynamic efficiency (cl/cd) of a corrugated aerofoil is sensitive to Reynolds number (Re) and angle-of-attack (AoA), yet the conclusions established are on the basis of flow analysis on a single baseline shape only. The sample size of the aerofoils must be extended further so that the influence and merits of corrugated shape features can be established. In this work, a design-of-experiments (DoE) approach is applied to induce systematic shape perturbations on a select, off-the-shelf baseline shape one feature at a time over a set number of increments. At each shape increment, the aerodynamic forces are established using a high fidelity CFD solver. The design space is modeled at a Re of 20,000 and 34,000 and at flow angle of 4.0° to represent a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) in glide. The results confirmed the importance of the leading and trailing edge deflections on cl/cd. At Re = 20, 000, cl/cd of a corrugated aerofoil with deflection at the leading edge region only is 16% higher than the baseline shape, and 39% higher than the flat plate. At Re = 34, 000, cl/cd performance is sensitive to the trailing edge deflection. At the optimum deflection setting, cl/cd is 18% higher than the baseline shape and 23% higher than the flat plate. The results confirm that the leading and trailing edge deflections are critical to cl/cd for a MAV in glide.

  17. Structure of leading-edge vortex flows including vortex breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structure of leading-edge vortex flows on thin sharp-edged delta wings was carried out at low Reynolds numbers. Flow-visualization techniques were used to study the topology of the vortex and the phenomenon of vortex breakdown. Seven-hole probe-wake surveys and laser-doppler-anemometer measurements were obtained and compared. Delta wings with sweep angles of 70, 75, 80, and 85/sup 0/ were tested at angles of attack of 10, 20, 30, and 40/sup 0/. The test were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ to 6.4 x 10/sup 5/. Smoke-flow visualization revealed the presence of small Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortical structures in the shear layer of a leading-edge vortex. These shear-layer vortices follow a helical path and grow in the streamwise direction as they wind into the vortex core where the individual shear layers merge. The phenomenon of vortex breakdown was studied using high-speed cinema photography. The bubble and spiral types of breakdown were observed and appear to represent the extremes in a continuum of breakdown forms.

  18. An Aeroacoustic Study of a Leading Edge Slat Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J. M.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroacoustic evaluations of high-lift devices have been carried out in the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center. The present paper describes detailed flow and acoustic measurements that have been made in order to better understand the noise generated from airflow over a wing leading edge slat configuration, and to possibly predict and reduce this noise source. The acoustic database is obtained by a moveable Small Aperture Directional Array of microphones designed to electronically steer to different portions of models under study. The slat is shown to be a uniform distributed noise source. The data was processed such that spectra and directivity were determined with respect to a one-foot span of slat. The spectra are normalized in various fashions to demonstrate slat noise character. In order to equate portions of the spectra to different slat noise components, trailing edge noise predictions using measured slat boundary layer parameters as inputs are compared to the measured slat noise spectra.

  19. Flexible Plug Repair for Shuttle Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Sikora, Joseph; Smith, Russel; Rivers, H.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Fuller, Alan M.; Klacka, Robert; Reinders, Martin; Schwind, Francis; Sullivan, Brian; Lester, Dean

    2012-01-01

    In response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, a plug repair kit has been developed to enable astronauts to repair the space shuttle's wing leading edge (WLE) during orbit. The plug repair kit consists of several 17.78- cm-diameter carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) cover plates of various curvatures that can be attached to the refractory carbon-carbon WLE panels using a TZM refractory metal attach mechanism. The attach mechanism is inserted through the damage in the WLE panel and, as it is tightened, the cover plate flexes to conform to the curvature of the WLE panel within 0.050 mm. An astronaut installs the repair during an extravehicular activity (EVA). After installing the plug repair, edge gaps are checked and the perimeter of the repair is sealed using a proprietary material, developed to fill cracks and small holes in the WLE.

  20. Simulation and Optimization of an Airfoil with Leading Edge Slat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, Matthias; Stoevesandt, Bernhard; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    A gradient-based optimization is used in order to improve the shape of a leading edge slat upstream of a DU 91-W2-250 airfoil. The simulations are performed by solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) using the open source CFD code OpenFOAM. Gradients are computed via the adjoint approach, which is suitable to deal with many design parameters, but keeping the computational costs low. The implementation is verified by comparing the gradients from the adjoint method with gradients obtained by finite differences for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The simulations of the leading edge slat are validated against measurements from the acoustic wind tunnel of Oldenburg University at a Reynolds number of Re = 6 • 105. The shape of the slat is optimized using the adjoint approach resulting in a drag reduction of 2%. Although the optimization is done for Re = 6 • 105, the improvements also hold for a higher Reynolds number of Re = 7.9 • 106, which is more realistic at modern wind turbines.

  1. The effect of leading edge tubercles on dynamic stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrynuk, John

    The effect of the leading edge tubercles of humpback whales has been heavily studied for their static benefits. These studies have shown that tubercles inhibit flow separation, limit spanwise flow, and extend the operating angle of a wing beyond the static stall point while maintaining lift, all while having a comparatively low negative impact on drag. The current study extends the prior work to investigating the effect of tubercles on dynamic stall, a fundamental flow phenomenon that occurs when wings undergo dynamic pitching motions. Flow fields around the wing models tested were studied using Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV).Resulting velocity fields show that the dynamics of the formation and separation of the leading edge vortex were fundamentally different between the straight wing and the tubercled wing. Tracking of the Dynamic Stall Vortex (DSV) and Shear Layer Vortices (SLVs), which may have a significant impact on the overall flow behavior, was done along with calculations of vortex circulation. Proximity to the wing surface and total circulation were used to evaluate potential dynamic lift increases provided by the tubercles. The effects of pitch rate on the formation process and benefits of the tubercles were also studied and were generally consistent with prior dynamic stall studies. However, tubercles were shown to affect the SLV formation and the circulation differently at higher pitch rates.

  2. Leading Edge Vortex Detection Using On-Body Pressure Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jeff; Dahl, Jason; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Ongoing experiments within the Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling (CENSAM) have shown that the low pressure region characteristic of a vortex allows for their detection and tracking using pressure sensors alone. While early experiments were conducted with wall mounted pressure sensors and externally generated vortices, a new series of experiments has succeeded in detecting separated flow generated by the sensing body. A combined pressure sensing and particle image velocimetry (PIV) approach was used to detect the leading edge vortex shed from a hydrofoil accelerated at a fixed angle of attack. A NACA 0018 foil was instrumented with four pressure sensors at discrete locations along the foil in the chord-wise direction. When accelerated from rest, the traces from each of the four pressure sensors displayed a distinctive, transient drop, consistent with results observed in previous experiments. From the pressure sensor results, it was theorized that a leading edge vortex was being created, and subsequently shed and convected along the foil chord. Two-dimensional PIV techniques were used to image the flow near the foil surface, allowing the anticipated vortex formation and shedding to be verified.

  3. Method for a Leading Edge Slat on a Wing of an Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitt, Dale M. (Inventor); Eckstein, Nicholas Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for managing a flight control surface system. A leading edge device is moved on a leading edge from an undeployed position to a deployed position. The leading edge device has an outer surface, an inner surface, and a deformable fairing attached to the leading edge device such that the deformable fairing covers at least a portion of the inner surface. The deformable fairing changes from a deformed shape to an original shape when the leading edge device is moved to the deployed position. The leading edge device is then moved from the deployed position to the undeployed position, wherein the deformable fairing changes from the original shape to the deformed shape.

  4. Control of leading-edge vortices on a delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magness, C.; Robinson, O.; Rockwell, D.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady flow structure of leading-edge vortices on a delta wing has been investigated using new types of experimental techniques, in order to provide insight into the consequences of various forms of active control. These investigations involve global control of the entire wing and local control applied at crucial locations on or adjacent to the wing. Transient control having long and short time-scales, relative to the convective time-scale C/U(sub infinity), allows substantial modification of the unsteady and time-mean flow structure. Global control at long time-scale involves pitching the wing at rates an order of magnitude lower than the convective time-scale C/U(sub infinity), but at large amplitudes. The functional form of the pitching maneuver exerts a predominant influence on the trajectory of the feeding sheet, the instantaneous vorticity distribution, and the instantaneous location of vortex breakdown. Global control at short time-scales of the order of the inherent frequency of the shear layer separating from the leading-edge and the natural frequency of vortex breakdown shows that 'resonant' response of the excited shear layer-vortex breakdown system is attainable. The spectral content of the induced disturbance is preserved not only across the entire core of the vortex, but also along the axis of the vortex into the region of vortex breakdown. This unsteady modification results in time-mean alteration of the axial and swirl velocity fields and the location of vortex breakdown. Localized control at long and short time-scales involves application of various transient forms of suction and blowing using small probes upstream and downstream of the location of vortex breakdown, as well as distributed suction and blowing along the leading-edge of the wing applied in a direction tangential to the feeding sheet. These local control techniques can result in substantial alteration of the location of vortex breakdown; in some cases, it is possible to

  5. Particle rebound characteristics of turbomachinery cascade leading edge geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siravuri, Sastri

    The objective of this research work is to investigate and understand the complex phenomena associated with the mechanism of particle impacts on turbomachinery cascade leading edge geometry. At present, there is a need for experimental work in basic and applied research to find out the parameters that are relevant to particle rebound characteristics on turbomachinery blades. In the present work, experiments were conducted with air velocity at 15 m/s (˜50 ft/sec) and at 30 m/s (˜100 ft/sec) using high-speed photography and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Silica sand particles of 1000--1500 micron size were used for this study. In the present investigation, particle rebound data was obtained for cylindrical targets with radius of curvature representative of leading edge geometry (cylinder diameter = 4.5mm & 6.5 mm) using LDV. The numerical simulations, which are based on non-linear dynamic analysis, were also performed using the finite element code DYNA3-D. Several different material models viz elastic-elastic, elastic-plastic, elastic-plastic with friction & isotropic-elastic-plastic with dynamic friction and particle rotation were used in the DYNA3-D numerical analysis. The computational results include a time history of the displacement, stress and strain profiles through the particle collision. Numerical results are presented for the rebound conditions of spherical silica sand particle for different pre-collision velocities. The computed particle restitution coefficients, after they reach steady rebound conditions, are compared with experimental results obtained from LDV. A probabilistic model was developed to incorporate the uncertainties in the impact velocity in the numerical model. Histograms and Cumulative Distribution Functions (CDFs) for impact velocity were obtained from experimental LDV data. Ten randomly selected probabilities for each impact angle were used to calculate the impact velocity from cumulative distribution function. This randomly selected

  6. Multiple shock-shock interference on a cylindrical leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.

    1991-01-01

    The details of an experimental study of shock wave interference heating on a cylindrical leading edge representative of the cowl of a rectangular hypersonic engine inlet are presented. This Mach 8 study has provided the first detailed pressure and heat transfer rate distributions on a cylinder resulting from a two-dimensional shockwave interference pattern created by two incident oblique shock waves intersecting the cylinder bow shock wave. The peak heat transfer rate was 38 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point level and occurred when the two oblique shock waves coalesced prior to intersecting the cylinder bow shock wave. Development of pressure deflection diagrams identified a new interference pattern consisting of concomitant supersonic jets separated from each other by a shear layer and submerged in the subsonic region between the bow shock wave and body.

  7. Managed aquifer recharge: rediscovering nature as a leading edge technology.

    PubMed

    Dillon, P; Toze, S; Page, D; Vanderzalm, J; Bekele, E; Sidhu, J; Rinck-Pfeiffer, S

    2010-01-01

    Use of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) has rapidly increased in Australia, USA, and Europe in recent years as an efficient means of recycling stormwater or treated sewage effluent for non-potable and indirect potable reuse in urban and rural areas. Yet aquifers have been relied on knowingly for water storage and unwittingly for water treatment for millennia. Hence if 'leading edge' is defined as 'the foremost part of a trend; a vanguard', it would be misleading to claim managed aquifer recharge as a leading edge technology. However it has taken a significant investment in scientific research in recent years to demonstrate the effectiveness of aquifers as sustainable treatment systems to enable managed aquifer recharge to be recognised along side engineered treatment systems in water recycling. It is a 'cross-over' technology that is applicable to water and wastewater treatment and makes use of passive low energy processes to spectacularly reduce the energy requirements for water supply. It is robust within limits, has low cost, is suitable from village to city scale supplies, and offers as yet almost untapped opportunities for producing safe drinking water supplies where they do not yet exist. It will have an increasingly valued role in securing water supplies to sustain cities affected by climate change and population growth. However it is not a universal panacea and relies on the presence of suitable aquifers and sources of water together with effective governance to ensure human health and environment protection and water resources planning and management. This paper describes managed aquifer recharge, illustrates its use in Australia, outlining economics, guidelines and policies, and presents some of the knowledge about aquifer treatment processes that are revealing the latent value of aquifers as urban water infrastructure and provide a driver to improving our understanding of urban hydrogeology. PMID:21076220

  8. Rotational accelerations stabilize leading edge vortices on revolving fly wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Dickinson, Michael H

    2009-08-01

    The aerodynamic performance of hovering insects is largely explained by the presence of a stably attached leading edge vortex (LEV) on top of their wings. Although LEVs have been visualized on real, physically modeled, and simulated insects, the physical mechanisms responsible for their stability are poorly understood. To gain fundamental insight into LEV stability on flapping fly wings we expressed the Navier-Stokes equations in a rotating frame of reference attached to the wing's surface. Using these equations we show that LEV dynamics on flapping wings are governed by three terms: angular, centripetal and Coriolis acceleration. Our analysis for hovering conditions shows that angular acceleration is proportional to the inverse of dimensionless stroke amplitude, whereas Coriolis and centripetal acceleration are proportional to the inverse of the Rossby number. Using a dynamically scaled robot model of a flapping fruit fly wing to systematically vary these dimensionless numbers, we determined which of the three accelerations mediate LEV stability. Our force measurements and flow visualizations indicate that the LEV is stabilized by the ;quasi-steady' centripetal and Coriolis accelerations that are present at low Rossby number and result from the propeller-like sweep of the wing. In contrast, the unsteady angular acceleration that results from the back and forth motion of a flapping wing does not appear to play a role in the stable attachment of the LEV. Angular acceleration is, however, critical for LEV integrity as we found it can mediate LEV spiral bursting, a high Reynolds number effect. Our analysis and experiments further suggest that the mechanism responsible for LEV stability is not dependent on Reynolds number, at least over the range most relevant for insect flight (100

  9. Rotational accelerations stabilize leading edge vortices on revolving fly wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Dickinson, Michael H

    2009-08-01

    The aerodynamic performance of hovering insects is largely explained by the presence of a stably attached leading edge vortex (LEV) on top of their wings. Although LEVs have been visualized on real, physically modeled, and simulated insects, the physical mechanisms responsible for their stability are poorly understood. To gain fundamental insight into LEV stability on flapping fly wings we expressed the Navier-Stokes equations in a rotating frame of reference attached to the wing's surface. Using these equations we show that LEV dynamics on flapping wings are governed by three terms: angular, centripetal and Coriolis acceleration. Our analysis for hovering conditions shows that angular acceleration is proportional to the inverse of dimensionless stroke amplitude, whereas Coriolis and centripetal acceleration are proportional to the inverse of the Rossby number. Using a dynamically scaled robot model of a flapping fruit fly wing to systematically vary these dimensionless numbers, we determined which of the three accelerations mediate LEV stability. Our force measurements and flow visualizations indicate that the LEV is stabilized by the ;quasi-steady' centripetal and Coriolis accelerations that are present at low Rossby number and result from the propeller-like sweep of the wing. In contrast, the unsteady angular acceleration that results from the back and forth motion of a flapping wing does not appear to play a role in the stable attachment of the LEV. Angular acceleration is, however, critical for LEV integrity as we found it can mediate LEV spiral bursting, a high Reynolds number effect. Our analysis and experiments further suggest that the mechanism responsible for LEV stability is not dependent on Reynolds number, at least over the range most relevant for insect flight (100

  10. Effects of leading-edge tubercles on wing flutter speeds.

    PubMed

    Ng, B F; New, T H; Palacios, R

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic aeroelastic effects on wings modified with bio-inspired leading-edge (LE) tubercles are examined in this study. We adopt a state-space aeroelastic model via the coupling of unsteady vortex-lattice method and a composite beam to evaluate stability margins as a result of LE tubercles on a generic wing. The unsteady aerodynamics and spanwise mass variations due to LE tubercles have counteracting effects on stability margins with the former having dominant influence. When coupled, flutter speed is observed to be 5% higher, and this is accompanied by close to 6% decrease in reduced frequencies as an indication of lower structural stiffness requirements for wings with LE tubercles. Both tubercle amplitude and wavelength have similar influences over the change in flutter speeds, and such modifications to the LE would have minimal effect on stability margins when concentrated inboard of the wing. Lastly, when used in sweptback wings, LE tubercles are observed to have smaller impacts on stability margins as the sweep angle is increased. PMID:27070824

  11. Characteristics of surface roughness associated with leading edge ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon

    1994-01-01

    Detailed size measurements of surface roughness associated with leading edge ice accretions are presented to provide information on characteristics of roughness and trends of roughness development with various icing parameters. Data was obtained from icing tests conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) using a NACA 0012 airfoil. Measurements include diameters, heights, and spacing of roughness elements along with chordwise icing limits. Results confirm the existence of smooth and rough ice zones and that the boundary between the two zones (surface roughness transition region) moves upstream towards stagnation region with time. The height of roughness grows as the air temperature and the liquid water content increase, however, the airspeed has little effect on the roughness height. Results also show that the roughness in the surface roughness transition region grows during a very early stage of accretion but reaches a critical height and then remains fairly constant. Results also indicate that a uniformly distributed roughness model is only valid at a very initial stage of the ice accretion process.

  12. Leading edge vortex in a slow-flying passerine

    PubMed Central

    Muijres, Florian T.; Johansson, L. Christoffer; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Most hovering animals, such as insects and hummingbirds, enhance lift by producing leading edge vortices (LEVs) and by using both the downstroke and upstroke for lift production. By contrast, most hovering passerine birds primarily use the downstroke to generate lift. To compensate for the nearly inactive upstroke, weight support during the downstroke needs to be relatively higher in passerines when compared with, e.g. hummingbirds. Here we show, by capturing the airflow around the wing of a freely flying pied flycatcher, that passerines may use LEVs during the downstroke to increase lift. The LEV contributes up to 49 per cent to weight support, which is three times higher than in hummingbirds, suggesting that avian hoverers compensate for the nearly inactive upstroke by generating stronger LEVs. Contrary to other animals, the LEV strength in the flycatcher is lowest near the wing tip, instead of highest. This is correlated with a spanwise reduction of the wing's angle-of-attack, partly owing to upward bending of primary feathers. We suggest that this helps to delay bursting and shedding of the particularly strong LEV in passerines. PMID:22417792

  13. Mechanisms of leading edge protrusion in interstitial migration

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kerry; Lewalle, Alexandre; Fritzsche, Marco; Thorogate, Richard; Duke, Tom; Charras, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    While the molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying cell protrusion on two-dimensional substrates are well understood, our knowledge of the actin structures driving protrusion in three-dimensional environments is poor, despite relevance to inflammation, development and cancer. Here we report that, during chemotactic migration through microchannels with 5 μm × 5 μm cross-sections, HL60 neutrophil-like cells assemble an actin-rich slab filling the whole channel cross-section at their front. This leading edge comprises two distinct F-actin networks: an adherent network that polymerizes perpendicular to cell-wall interfaces and a ‘free’ network that grows from the free membrane at the cell front. Each network is polymerized by a distinct nucleator and, due to their geometrical arrangement, the networks interact mechanically. On the basis of our experimental data, we propose that, during interstitial migration, medial growth of the adherent network compresses the free network preventing its retrograde movement and enabling new polymerization to be converted into forward protrusion. PMID:24305616

  14. Unsteady flow phenomena associated with leading-edge vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitsamter, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents selected results from extensive experimental investigations on turbulent flow fields and unsteady surface pressures caused by leading-edge vortices, in particular, for vortex breakdown flow. Such turbulent flows may cause severe dynamic aeroelastic problems like wing and/or fin buffeting on fighter-type aircraft. The wind tunnel models used include a generic delta wing as well as a detailed aircraft configuration of canard-delta wing type. The turbulent flow structures are analyzed by root-mean-square and spectral distributions of velocity and pressure fluctuations. Downstream of bursting local maxima of velocity fluctuations occur in a limited radial range around the vortex center. The corresponding spectra exhibit significant peaks indicating that turbulent kinetic energy is channeled into a narrow band. These quasi-periodic velocity oscillations arise from a helical mode instability of the breakdown flow. Due to vortex bursting there is a characteristic increase in surface pressure fluctuations with increasing angle of attack, especially when the burst location moves closer to the apex. The pressure fluctuations also show dominant frequencies corresponding to those of the velocity fluctuations. Using the measured flow field data, scaling parameters are derived for design purposes. It is shown that a frequency parameter based on the local semi-span and the sinus of angle of attack can be used to estimate the frequencies of dynamic loads evoked by vortex bursting.

  15. Mask rule check for inspection of leading-edge photomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Wakahiko; Yamasaki, Kiyoshi; Narukawa, Shogo; Hayashi, Naoya

    2005-11-01

    Leading-edge photomask, to which optical proximity correction (OPC) and dummy pattern are applied, almost always has complex patterns. Complex patterns such as "Narrow Space", "Thin Pattern", "Dummy Pattern", "Closely Face-to-Face Heads" of Posi Serifs, "Narrow Waisted Pattern" formed by a Nega Serif, "Jogs", etc. are a factor to complicate photomask manufacturing. Some the problems caused by complex patterns are increase in EB writing time, and decrease in performance of etching and cleaning process caused by Cr peeling and, above all, increase in the inspection time. Patterns whose complexity is beyond the resolution limit of inspection tool are detected as false defects. Therefore, it will greatly take time for the data investigation and re-inspection, etc. for assurance, and this causes congestion of half-finished products. To improve the process efficiency, it is necessary to locate false defects, so that the Do-Not-Inspection-Area(DNIR) or replaced with simpler patterns. In order to locate false defects, it is proposed to apply Mask Rule Check (MRC) to mask data for EB-writing.

  16. Development of Advanced High Lift Leading Edge Technology for Laminar Flow Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Korntheuer, Andrea; Komadina, Steve; Lin, John C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Advanced High Lift Leading Edge (AHLLE) task performed by Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, Aerospace Systems (NGAS) for the NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing project in an effort to develop enabling high-lift technology for laminar flow wings. Based on a known laminar cruise airfoil that incorporated an NGAS-developed integrated slot design, this effort involved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis and quality function deployment (QFD) analysis on several leading edge concepts, and subsequently down-selected to two blown leading-edge concepts for testing. A 7-foot-span AHLLE airfoil model was designed and fabricated at NGAS and then tested at the NGAS 7 x 10 Low Speed Wind Tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. The model configurations tested included: baseline, deflected trailing edge, blown deflected trailing edge, blown leading edge, morphed leading edge, and blown/morphed leading edge. A successful demonstration of high lift leading edge technology was achieved, and the target goals for improved lift were exceeded by 30% with a maximum section lift coefficient (Cl) of 5.2. Maximum incremental section lift coefficients ( Cl) of 3.5 and 3.1 were achieved for a blown drooped (morphed) leading edge concept and a non-drooped leading edge blowing concept, respectively. The most effective AHLLE design yielded an estimated 94% lift improvement over the conventional high lift Krueger flap configurations while providing laminar flow capability on the cruise configuration.

  17. Hypersonic aerospace vehicle leading edge cooling using heat pipe, transpiration and film cooling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modlin, James Michael

    An investigation was conducted to study the feasibility of cooling hypersonic vehicle leading edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heat fluxes using a combination of liquid metal heat pipes and surface mass transfer cooling techniques. A generalized, transient, finite difference based hypersonic leading edge cooling model was developed that incorporated these effects and was demonstrated on an assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section and a SCRAMJET engine inlet leading edge section. The hypersonic leading edge cooling model was developed using an existing, experimentally verified heat pipe model. Two applications of the hypersonic leading edge cooling model were examined. An assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section exposed to a severe laminar, hypersonic aerodynamic surface heat flux was studied. A second application of the hypersonic leading edge cooling model was conducted on an assumed one-quarter inch nose diameter SCRAMJET engine inlet leading edge section exposed to both a transient laminar, hypersonic aerodynamic surface heat flux and a type 4 shock interference surface heat flux. The investigation led to the conclusion that cooling leading edge structures exposed to severe hypersonic flight environments using a combination of liquid metal heat pipe, surface transpiration, and film cooling methods appeared feasible.

  18. Aerothermodynamics of the Mars Global Surveyor Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shane, Russell W.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    The aerothermodynamics characteristics of the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft are investigated and reported. These results have been used by the Mars Global Surveyor mission planners to design the aerobraking phase of the mission. Analytical and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo computer codes were used with a detailed, three dimensional model of the spacecraft to evaluate spacecraft aerobraking characteristics for flight in free molecular and transitional flow regimes. The spacecraft is found to be aerodynamically stable in aerobraking and planned contingency configurations. Aerodynamic forces, moments, and heating are found to be highly dependent on atmospheric density. Accommodation coefficient. is seen to strongly influence drag coefficient. Transitional flow effects are found to reduce overall solar panel heating. Attitude control thruster plumes are shown to interact with the freestream, diminishing the effectiveness of the attitude control system and even leading to thrust reversal. These plume-freestream interaction effects are found to be highly dependent on freestream density.

  19. The Columbia River--on the Leading Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    On the leading edge of the North American plate, the Columbia River is the largest of the world's 40 or so rivers with drainage areas greater than 500,000 square kilometers to drain toward a convergent plate boundary. This unique setting results in a unique continental river basin; marked by episodic and cataclysmic geologic disturbance, but also famously fecund with perhaps 10 to 16 million salmon historically spawning in its waters each year. Now transformed by dams, transportation infrastructure, dikes and diversions, the Columbia River presents an expensive conundrum for management of its many values. Inclusion of river ecology and geomorphology in discussions of river management is generally limited to observations of the last 200 years-a time period of little natural disturbance and low sediment transport. However, consideration of longer timescales provides additional perspective of historical ecologic and geomorphic conditions. Only 230 km from its mouth, the Columbia River bisects the volcanic arc of the Cascade Range, forming the Columbia River Gorge. Cenozoic lava flows have blocked the river, forcing diversions and new canyon cutting. Holocene eruptions of Mount Mazama (Crater Lake), Mount Hood, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Rainier have shed immense quantities of sediment into the lower Columbia River, forming a large percentage of the Holocene sediment transported through the lower river. Quaternary landslides, perhaps triggered by great earthquakes, have descended from the 1000-m-high gorge walls, also blocking and diverting the river, one as recently as 550 years ago. These geologic disturbances, mostly outside the realm of historical observation and operating at timescales of 100s to 1000s of years in the gorge and elsewhere, have clearly affected basin geomorphology, riverine ecology, and past and present cultural utilization of river resources. The historic productivity of the river, however, hints at extraordinary resilience (and perhaps

  20. Morphological Variations of Leading-Edge Serrations in Owls (Strigiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Weger, Matthias; Wagner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Background Owls have developed serrations, comb-like structures, along the leading edge of their wings. Serrations were investigated from a morphological and a mechanical point of view, but were not yet quantitatively compared for different species. Such a comparative investigation of serrations from species of different sizes and activity patterns may provide new information about the function of the serrations. Results Serrations on complete wings and on tenth primary remiges of seven owl species were investigated. Small, middle-sized, and large owl species were investigated as well as species being more active during the day and owls being more active during the night. Serrations occurred at the outer parts of the wings, predominantly at tenth primary remiges, but also on further wing feathers in most species. Serration tips were oriented away from the feather rachis so that they faced into the air stream during flight. The serrations of nocturnal owl species were higher developed as demonstrated by a larger inclination angle (the angle between the base of the barb and the rachis), a larger tip displacement angle (the angle between the tip of the serration and the base of the serration) and a longer length. Putting the measured data into a clustering algorithm yielded dendrograms that suggested a strong influence of activity pattern, but only a weak influence of size on the development of the serrations. Conclusions Serrations are supposed to be involved in noise reduction during flight and also depend on the aerodynamic properties that in turn depend on body size. Since especially nocturnal owls have to rely on hearing during prey capture, the more pronounced serrations of nocturnal species lend further support to the notion that serrations have an important function in noise reduction. The differences in shape of the serrations investigated indicate that a silent flight requires well-developed serrations. PMID:26934104

  1. Trailing edges projected to move faster than leading edges for large pelagic fish habitats under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, L. M.; Hobday, A. J.; Possingham, H. P.; Richardson, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that many species are shifting their ranges in concordance with the climate velocity of their preferred environmental conditions/habitat. While accelerated rates in species' range shifts have been noted in areas of intense warming, due to climate change, few studies have considered the influence that both spatial temperature gradients and rates of warming (i.e., the two components of climate velocity) could have on rates of movement in species habitats. We compared projected shifts in the core habitat of nine large pelagic fish species (five tuna, two billfish and two shark species) off the east coast of Australia at different spatial points (centre, leading and trailing edges of the core habitat), during different seasons (summer and winter), in the near-(2030) and long-term (2070), using independent species distribution models and habitat suitability models. Model projections incorporated depth integrated temperature data from 11 climate models with a focus on the IPCC SRES A2 general emission scenario. Projections showed a number of consistent patterns: southern (poleward) shifts in all species' core habitats; trailing edges shifted faster than leading edges; shifts were faster by 2070 than 2030; and there was little difference in shifts among species and between seasons. Averaging across all species and climate models, rates of habitat shifts for 2030 were 45-60 km decade-1 at the trailing edge, 40-45 km decade-1 at the centre, and 20-30 km decade-1 at the leading edge. Habitat shifts for 2070 were 60-70 km decade-1 at the trailing edge, 50-55 km decade-1 at the centre, and 30-40 km decade-1 at the leading edge. It is often assumed that the leading edge of a species range will shift faster than the trailing edge, but there are few projections or observations in large pelagic fish to validate this assumption. We found that projected shifts at the trailing edge were greater than at the centre and leading of core habitats in

  2. Method and Apparatus for a Leading Edge Slat on a Wing of an Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitt, Dale M. (Inventor); Eckstein, Nicholas Stephen (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for managing a flight control surface system. A leading edge device is moved on a leading edge from an undeployed position to a deployed position. The leading edge device has an outer surface, an inner surface, and a deformable fairing attached to the leading edge device such that the deformable fairing covers at least a portion of the inner surface. The deformable fairing changes from a deformed shape to an original shape when the leading edge device is moved to the deployed position. The leading edge device is then moved from the deployed position to the undeployed position, wherein the deformable fairing changes from the original shape to the deformed shape.

  3. A numerical model for the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge of hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongpeng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    A new design, the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge, is discussed for the thermal management to prevent damage to hypersonic vehicle leading edge component. For calculating the steady state behavior of platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge, a numerical model based on the principles of evaporation, convection, and condensation of a working fluid is presented. And then its effectiveness is validated by comparing the wall and vapor temperature against experimental data for a conventional heat pipe. Further investigations indicate that alloy IN718, with sodium as the working fluid is a feasible combination for Mach 8 flight with a 15 mm leading edge radius.

  4. Combined overlay, focus and CD metrology for leading edge lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Martin; Cramer, Hugo; Tel, Wim; Kubis, Michael; Megens, Henry

    2011-04-01

    As leading edge lithography moves to 22-nm design rules, low k1 technologies like double patterning are the new resolution enablers, and system control and setup are the new drivers to meet remarkably tight process requirements. The way of thinking and executing setup and control of lithography scanners is changing in four ways. First, unusually tight process tolerances call for very dense sampling [1], which in effect means measurements at high throughput combined with high order modeling and corrections to compensate for wafer spatial fingerprint. Second, complex interactions between scanner and process no longer allow separation of error sources through traditional metrology approaches, which are based on using one set of metrology tools and methods for setup and another for scanner performance control. Moreover, setup and control of overlay is done independently from CD uniformity, which in effect leads to independent and conflicting adjustments for the scanner. Third, traditional CD setup and control is based on the focus and dose calculated from their CD response and not from measurement of their effect on pattern profile, which allows a clean and orthogonal de-convolution of focus and dose variations across the wafer. Fourth, scanner setup and control has to take into consideration the final goal of lithography, which is the accurate printing of a complex pattern describing a real device layout. To this end we introduce a new setup and control metrology step: measuring-to-match scanner 1D and 2D proximity. In this paper we will describe the strategy for setup and control of overlay, focus, CD and proximity based on the YieldStarTM metrology tool and present the resulting performance. YieldStar-200 is a new, high throughput metrology tool based on a high numerical aperture scatterometer concept. The tool can be used stand-alone as well as integrated in a processing track. It is suitable for determining process offsets in X,Y and Z directions through Overlay

  5. Preparation and Support of a Tap Test on the Leading Edge Surfaces of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohr, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on a Tap test for the leading edge surfaces of the Space Shuttle. A description of the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) flight system is given, and the rationale and approach for improving the WLEIDS system. The three phases of the strategy of the test project amd the results of the tests are reviewed.

  6. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 4. Boston Arts Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  7. Leading-edge deflection optimization for a highly swept arrow wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Huffman, J. K.; Fenbert, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were also conducted to determine the sensitivity of the lateral stability derivative C sub l sub beta to geometric anhedral. The optimized leading edge deflection was developed by aligning the leading edge with the incoming flow along the entire span. Owing to the spanwise variation of upwash, the resulting optimized leading edge was a smooth, continuously warped surface. For the particular configuration studied, levels of leading edge suction on the order of 90 percent were achieved with the smooth, continuously warped leading edge contour. The results of tests conducted to determine the sensitivity of C sub l sub beta to geometric anhedral indicate values of delta C sub l sub beta/delta T which are in reasonable agreement with estimates provided by simple vortex lattice theories.

  8. Experimental study of unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena on shock-tube wall using fast-response temperature-sensitive paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes an experimental study that used a fast-response temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) to investigate the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena occurring on a shock-tube wall. To understand these phenomena in detail, a fast-response TSP with high temperature sensitivity developed for transient temperature measurement was applied to the wall. The shock-tube experiment was carried out under the over-tailored condition, with a pressure ratio of 110 for test gases of air in driver/driven tubes. The following aspects were clarified using the TSP: (a) the TSP could be used to visualize the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena and estimate the quantitative heat flux on the shock-tube wall; (b) an x-t diagram based on the TSP response showed shock-tube wall characteristics that included the incident/reflected shocks, laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transition, streaks in the turbulent boundary layer, reflected shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction, and waves reflected from a contact surface; (c) the TSP graphically showed that a transition front from the plate's leading edge and turbulent spots moved with 80% of the free-stream velocity behind the incident shock. In addition, the TSP could track the growth of the turbulent spots on the wall.

  9. Aerothermodynamic Flight Simulation Capabilities for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles G.

    1998-01-01

    Aerothermodynamics, encompassing aerodynamics, aeroheating, and fluid dynamics and physical processes, is the genesis for the design and development of advanced space transportation vehicles and provides crucial information to other disciplines such as structures, materials, propulsion, avionics, and guidance, navigation and control. Sources of aerothermodynamic information are ground-based facilities, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) and engineering computer codes, and flight experiments. Utilization of this aerothermodynamic triad provides the optimum aerothermodynamic design to safely satisfy mission requirements while reducing design conservatism, risk and cost. The iterative aerothermodynamic process for initial screening/assessment of aerospace vehicle concepts, optimization of aerolines to achieve/exceed mission requirements, and benchmark studies for final design and establishment of the flight data book are reviewed. Aerothermodynamic methodology centered on synergism between ground-based testing and CFD predictions is discussed for various flow regimes encountered by a vehicle entering the Earth s atmosphere from low Earth orbit. An overview of the resources/infrastructure required to provide accurate/creditable aerothermodynamic information in a timely manner is presented. Impacts on Langley s aerothermodynamic capabilities due to recent programmatic changes such as Center reorganization, downsizing, outsourcing, industry (as opposed to NASA) led programs, and so forth are discussed. Sample applications of these capabilities to high Agency priority, fast-paced programs such as Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)/X-33 Phases I and 11, X-34, Hyper-X and X-38 are presented and lessons learned discussed. Lastly, enhancements in ground-based testing/CFD capabilities necessary to partially/fully satisfy future requirements are addressed.

  10. Opportunities for research in aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    "Aerothermodynamics' involves the disciplines of chemistry, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer which have collaborative importance in propulsion systems. There are growing opportunities for the further application of these disciplines to improve the methodology for the design of advanced gas turbines; particularly, the combustor and turbine. Design procedures follow empirical or cut and try guidelines. The tremendous advances in computational analysis and in instrumentation techniques hold promise for research answers to complex physical processes that are currently not well understood. The transfer of basic research understanding to engineering design should result in shorter, less expensive development commitments for engines. The status and anticipated opportunities in research topics relevant to combustors and turbines is reviewed.

  11. Air-Cooled Turbine Blades with Tip Cap For Improved Leading-Edge Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, Howard F.; Meyer, Andre J., Jr.; Morgan, William C.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in a modified turbojet engine to determine the cooling characteristics of the semistrut corrugated air- cooled turbine blade and to compare and evaluate a leading-edge tip cap as a means for improving the leading-edge cooling characteristics of cooled turbine blades. Temperature data were obtained from uncapped air-cooled blades (blade A), cooled blades with the leading-edge tip area capped (blade B), and blades with slanted corrugations in addition to leading-edge tip caps (blade C). All data are for rated engine speed and turbine-inlet temperature (1660 F). A comparison of temperature data from blades A and B showed a leading-edge temperature reduction of about 130 F that could be attributed to the use of tip caps. Even better leading-edge cooling was obtained with blade C. Blade C also operated with the smallest chordwise temperature gradients of the blades tested, but tip-capped blade B operated with the lowest average chordwise temperature. According to a correlation of the experimental data, all three blade types 0 could operate satisfactorily with a turbine-inlet temperature of 2000 F and a coolant flow of 3 percent of engine mass flow or less, with an average chordwise temperature limit of 1400 F. Within the range of coolant flows investigated, however, only blade C could maintain a leading-edge temperature of 1400 F for a turbine-inlet temperature of 2000 F.

  12. Leading-edge vortex burst on a low-aspect-ratio rotating flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Jones, Anya R.

    2016-08-01

    This study experimentally investigates the phenomenon of leading-edge-vortex burst on rotating flat plate wings. An aspect-ratio-2 wing was driven in pure rotation at a Reynolds number of Re=2500 . Of primary interest is the evolution of the leading-edge vortex along the wing span over a single-revolution wing stroke. Direct force measurements of the lift produced by the wing revealed a single global lift maximum relatively early in the wing stroke. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was applied to several chordwise planes to quantify the structure and strength of the leading-edge vortex and its effect on lift production. This analysis revealed opposite-sign vorticity entrainment into the core of the leading-edge vortex, originating from a layer of secondary vorticity along the wing surface. Coincident with the lift peak, there emerged both a concentration of opposite vorticity in the leading-edge-vortex core, as well as axial flow stagnation within the leading-edge-vortex core. Planar control volume analysis was performed at the midspan to quantify the contributions of vorticity transport mechanisms to the leading-edge-vortex circulation. The rate of circulation annihilation by opposite-signed vorticity entrainment was found to be minimal during peak lift production, where convection balanced the flux of vorticity resulting in stagnation and eventually reversal of axial flow. Finally, vortex burst was found to be correlated with swirl number, where bursting occurs at a swirl threshold of Sw<0.6 .

  13. The influence of leading-edge load alleviation on supersonic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental program to assess the effect of leading-edge load constraints on wing design and performance was conducted. For a planform characterized by a highly swept leading edge on the inboard region, linear theory was used to design camber surfaces which produced minimum drag-due-to-lift at the design lift coefficient of 0.08 and a design Mach number of 2.4. In an effort to delay the formation of leading edge vortices which often occur on highly swept wings, two approaches were used in the design criteria to limit the loadings on the leading edge. One wing was constrained to have the normal Mach number less than one everywhere along the leading edge and the second wing was constrained to have a pressure coefficient of zero on the leading edge. Force tests were run on the two constrained wings, on a flat reference wing and on an optimized wing with no leading edge constraints. All wings had identical planforms and thicknesses and were tested over a range of Mach numbers from 1.8 to 2.8 and a range in angles of attack from -5 deg to 8 deg. A comparison of the experimental performance of these four models is shown. Correlations of these results with theoretical predictions and flow visualization photographs are also included.

  14. Introduction: Assessment of aerothermodynamic flight prediction tools through ground and flight experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmisseur, John D.; Erbland, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an introduction and overview to the efforts of NATO Research and Technology Organization Task Group AVT-136, Assessment of Aerothermodynamic Flight Prediction Tools through Ground and Flight Experimentation. During the period of 2006-2010, AVT-136 coordinated international contributions to assess the state-of-the-art and research challenges for the prediction of critical aerothermodynamic flight phenomena based on the extrapolation of ground test and numerical simulation. To achieve this goal, efforts were organized around six scientific topic areas: (1) Noses and leading edges, (2) Shock Interactions and Control Surfaces, (3) Shock Layers and Radiation, (4) Boundary Layer Transition, (5) Gas-Surface Interactions, and (6) Base and Afterbody Flows. A key component of the AVT-136 strategy was comparison of state-of-the-art numerical simulations with data to be acquired from planned flight research programs. Although it was recognized from the onset of AVT-136 activities that reliance on flight research data yet to be collected posed a significant risk, the group concluded the substantial benefit to be derived from comparison of computational simulations with flight data warranted pursuit of such a program of work. Unfortunately, program delays and failures in the flight programs contributing to the AVT-136 effort prevented timely access to flight research data. Despite this setback, most of the scientific topic areas developed by the Task Group made significant progress in the assessment of current capabilities. Additionally, the activities of AVT-136 generated substantial interest within the international scientific research community and the work of the Task Group was prominently featured in a total of six invited sessions in European and American technical conferences. In addition to this overview, reviews of the state-of-the-art and research challenges identified by the six research thrusts of AVT-136 are also included in this special

  15. Effect of leading-edge load constraints on the design and performance of supersonic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the effect of leading-edge load constraints on supersonic wing design and performance. In the effort to delay flow separation and the formation of leading-edge vortices, two constrained, linear-theory optimization approaches were used to limit the loadings on the leading edge of a variable-sweep planform design. Experimental force and moment tests were made on two constrained camber wings, a flat uncambered wing, and an optimum design with no constraints. Results indicate that vortex strength and separation regions were mildest on the severely and moderately constrained wings.

  16. Simulated airline service experience with laminar-flow control leading-edge systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Fisher, David F.; Jennett, Lisa A.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The first JetStar leading edge flight test was made November 30, 1983. The JetStar was flown for more than 3 years. The titanium leading edge test articles today remain in virtually the same condition as they were in on that first flight. No degradation of laminar flow performance has occurred as a result of service. The JetStar simulated airline service flights have demonstrated that effective, practical leading edge systems are available for future commercial transports. Specific conclusions based on the results of the simulated airline service test program are summarized.

  17. Overview of the Aerothermodynamics Analysis Conducted in Support of the STS-107 Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.

    2004-01-01

    A graphic presentation of the aerothermodynamics analysis conducted in support of the STS-107 accident investigation. Investigation efforts were conducted as part of an integrated AATS team (Aero, Aerothermal, Thermal, Stress) directed by OVEWG. Graphics presented are: STS-107 Entry trajectory and timeline (1st off-nominal event to Post-LOS); Indications from OI telemetry data; Aero/aerothermo/thermal analysis process; Selected STS-107 side fuselage/OMS pod off-nominal temperatures; Leading edge structural subsystem; Relevant forensics evidence; External aerothermal environments; STS-107 Pre-entry EOM3 heating profile; Surface heating and temperatures; Orbiter wing leading edge damage survey; Internal aerothermal environments; Orbiter wing CAD model; Aerodynamic flight reconstruction; Chronology of aerodynamic/aerothermoydynamic contributions; Acreage TPS tile damage; Larger OML perturbations; Missing RCC panel(s); Localized damage to RCC panel/missing T-seal; RCC breach with flow ingestion; and Aero-aerothermal closure. NAIT served as the interface between the CAIB and NASA investigation teams; and CAIB requests for study were addressed.

  18. Evolution and Control of the Leading Edge Vortex on an Unsteady Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkala, James; Buchholz, James

    2015-11-01

    The development of the leading-edge vortex is investigated on a periodically plunging plate within a uniform free stream. Vortex circulation is governed primarily by the strength of the leading edge shear layer, which provides the primary source of circulation, and a substantial opposite-sign contribution due to the pressure-gradient-driven diffusive flux of vorticity from the suction surface of the plate. The latter has been shown to produce a substantial reduction in leading-edge vortex strength, and leads to the development of a secondary vortex whose evolution influences the interaction between the leading edge vortex and the surface, and thus alters the surface pressure gradients. Suction is applied in the vicinity of the secondary vortex in an attempt to regulate the aerodynamic loads in the presence of the leading-edge vortex. The effect on vorticity transport, leading-edge vortex dynamics, and the resulting aerodynamic loads is discussed. This work was supported, in part, by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant number FA9550-11-1-0019 and the National Science Foundation under EPSCoR grant EPS1101284.

  19. Reynolds Number Effects on Leading Edge Radius Variations of a Supersonic Transport at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M. B.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    A computational study focused on leading-edge radius effects and associated Reynolds number sensitivity for a High Speed Civil Transport configuration at transonic conditions was conducted as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes were to assess the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics to predict Reynolds number effects for a range of leading-edge radius distributions on a second-generation supersonic transport configuration, and to evaluate the potential performance benefits of each at the transonic cruise condition. Five leading-edge radius distributions are described, and the potential performance benefit including the Reynolds number sensitivity for each is presented. Computational results for two leading-edge radius distributions are compared with experimental results acquired in the National Transonic Facility over a broad Reynolds number range.

  20. User's manual for interfacing a leading edge, vortex rollup program with two linear panel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, B. M. E.; Medan, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Sufficient instructions are provided for interfacing the Mangler-Smith, leading edge vortex rollup program with a vortex lattice (POTFAN) method and an advanced higher order, singularity linear analysis for computing the vortex effects for simple canard wing combinations.

  1. Simulation of brush insert for leading-edge-passage convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.; Canacci, V.; Mullen, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Current and proposed high speed aircraft have high leading edge heat transfer (to 160 MW/sq m, 100 Btu/sq in/sec) and surface temperatures to 1370 K (2000 F). Without cooling, these surfaces could not survive. In one proposal the coolant hydrogen is circulated to the leading edge through a passage and returned to be consumed by the propulsion system. Simulated flow studies and visualizations have shown flow separation within the passage with a stagnation locus that isolates a zone of recirculation at the most critical portion of the passage, namely the leading edge itself. A novel method is described for mitigating the flow separation and the isolated recirculation zones by using a brush insert in the flow passage near the leading edge zone, thus providing a significant increase in heat transfer.

  2. Asymmetric distribution of Echinoid defines the epidermal leading edge during Drosophila dorsal closure

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    During Drosophila melanogaster dorsal closure, lateral sheets of embryonic epidermis assemble an actomyosin cable at their leading edge and migrate dorsally over the amnioserosa, converging at the dorsal midline. We show that disappearance of the homophilic cell adhesion molecule Echinoid (Ed) from the amnioserosa just before dorsal closure eliminates homophilic interactions with the adjacent dorsal-most epidermal (DME) cells, which comprise the leading edge. The resulting planar polarized distribution of Ed in the DME cells is essential for the localized accumulation of actin regulators and for actomyosin cable formation at the leading edge and for the polarized localization of the scaffolding protein Bazooka/PAR-3. DME cells with uniform Ed fail to assemble a cable and protrude dorsally, suggesting that the cable restricts dorsal migration. The planar polarized distribution of Ed in the DME cells thus provides a spatial cue that polarizes the DME cell actin cytoskeleton, defining the epidermal leading edge and establishing its contractile properties. PMID:21263031

  3. Manipulation of upstream rotor leading edge vortex and its effects on counter rotating propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Becky

    1993-01-01

    The leading edge vortex of a counter rotating propeller (CRP) model was altered by using shrouds and by turning the upstream rotors to a forward sweep configuration. Performance, flow, and acoustic data were used to determine the effect of vortex impingement on the noise signature of the CRP system. Forward sweep was found to eliminate the leading edge vortex of the upstream blades. Removal of the vortex had little effect on the tone noise at the forward and rear blade passing frequencies (BPF's) but significantly altered both the sound pressure level and directivity of the interaction tone which occurs at the sum of the two BPF's. A separate manipulation of the leading edge vortex performed by installing shrouds of various inlet length on the CRP verified that diverting the vortex path increases the noise level of the interaction tone. An unexpected link has been established between the interaction tone and the leading edge vortex-blade interaction phenomenon.

  4. Aerodynamic and Aerothermodynamic Layout of the Hypersonic Flight Experiment Shefex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Th.

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of the SHarp Edge Flight EXperiment SHEFEX is the investigation of possible new shapes for future launcher or reentry vehicles [1]. The main focus is the improvement of common space vehicle shapes by application of facetted surfaces and sharp edges. The experiment will enable the time accurate investigation of the flow effects and their structural answer during the hypersonic flight from 90 km down to an altitude of 20 km. The project, being performed under responsibility of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is scheduled to fly on top of a two-stage solid propellant sounding rocket for the first half of 2005. The paper contains a survey of the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic layout of the experimental vehicle. The results are inputs for the definition of the structural layout, the TPS and the flight instrumentation as well as for the preparation of the flight test performed by the Mobile Rocket Base of DLR.

  5. Space shuttle orbiter leading-edge flight performance compared to design goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.; Johnson, D. W.; Kelly, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Thermo-structural performance of the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia's leading-edge structural subsystem for the first five (5) flights is compared with the design goals. Lessons learned from thse initial flights of the first reusable manned spacecraft are discussed in order to assess design maturity, deficiencies, and modifications required to rectify the design deficiencies. Flight data and post-flight inspections support the conclusion that the leading-edge structural subsystem hardware performance was outstanding for the initial five (5) flights.

  6. Design and fabrication of a high temperature leading edge heating array, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Progress during a Phase 1 program to design a high temperature heating array is reported for environmentally testing full-scale shuttle leading edges (30 inch span, 6 to 15 inch radius) at flight heating rates and pressures. Heat transfer analyses of the heating array, individual modules, and the shuttle leading edge were performed, which influenced the array design, and the design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype heater module.

  7. Reduction of wing rock amplitudes using leading-edge vortex manipulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James; Katz, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A mechanically operated leading edge flap system was used to perturb leading edge vortex position on a free-to-roll double-delta wing. The motion of the flaps was synchronized with the wing rolling oscillations and the effect of the phase shift between the oscillations of the wing and the flaps was investigated. Experimental results indicated that this simple approach was effective in reducing the amplitude of the unintended rolling motion and its implementation to actual airplane configurations is rather simple.

  8. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Unexpected performance degradation occurs in wind turbine blades due to leading edge defect when suffering from continuous impacts with rain drops, hails, insects, or solid particles during its operation life. To assess this issue, this paper numerically investigates the steady and dynamic stall characteristics of an S809 airfoil with various leading edge defects. More leading edge defect sizes and much closer to practical parameters are investigated in the paper. Methodology Numerical computation is conducted using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and the method has been validated by comparison with existed published data. In order to ensure the calculation convergence, the residuals for the continuity equation are set to be less than 10−7 and 10−6 in steady state and dynamic stall cases. The simulations are conducted with the software ANSYS Fluent 13.0. Results It is found that the characteristics of aerodynamic coefficients and flow fields are sensitive to leading edge defect both in steady and dynamic conditions. For airfoils with the defect thickness of 6%tc, leading edge defect has a relative small influence on the aerodynamics of S809 airfoil. For other investigated defect thicknesses, leading edge defect has much greater influence on the flow field structures, pressure coefficients and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at relative small defect lengths. For example, the lift coefficients decrease and drag coefficients increase sharply after the appearance of leading edge defect. However, the aerodynamic characteristics could reach a constant value when the defect length is large enough. The flow field, pressure coefficient distribution and aerodynamic coefficients do not change a lot when the defect lengths reach to 0.5%c,1%c, 2%c and 3%c with defect thicknesses of 6%tc, 12%tc,18%tc and 25%tc, respectively. In addition, the results also show that the critical defect length/thickness ratio is 0.5, beyond which the aerodynamic characteristics

  9. Analytical model and stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a passively morphing ornithopter wing.

    PubMed

    Wissa, Aimy; Calogero, Joseph; Wereley, Norman; Hubbard, James E; Frecker, Mary

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a flapping wing unmanned air vehicle with a compliant spine inserted in it. The compliant spine is a mechanism that was designed to be flexible during the upstroke and stiff during the downstroke. Inserting a variable stiffness mechanism into the leading edge spar affects its structural stability. The model for the spar-spine system was formulated in terms of the well-known Mathieu's equation, in which the compliant spine was modeled as a torsional spring with a sinusoidal stiffness function. Experimental data was used to validate the model and results show agreement within 11%. The structural stability of the leading edge spar-spine system was determined analytically and graphically using a phase plane plot and Strutt diagrams. Lastly, a torsional viscous damper was added to the leading edge spar-spine model to investigate the effect of damping on stability. Results show that for the un-damped case, the leading edge spar-spine response was stable and bounded; however, there were areas of instability that appear for a range of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses. Results also show that there exist a damping ratio between 0.2 and 0.5, for which the leading edge spar-spine system was stable for all values of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses. PMID:26502210

  10. Analytical model and stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a passively morphing ornithopter wing.

    PubMed

    Wissa, Aimy; Calogero, Joseph; Wereley, Norman; Hubbard, James E; Frecker, Mary

    2015-10-26

    This paper presents the stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a flapping wing unmanned air vehicle with a compliant spine inserted in it. The compliant spine is a mechanism that was designed to be flexible during the upstroke and stiff during the downstroke. Inserting a variable stiffness mechanism into the leading edge spar affects its structural stability. The model for the spar-spine system was formulated in terms of the well-known Mathieu's equation, in which the compliant spine was modeled as a torsional spring with a sinusoidal stiffness function. Experimental data was used to validate the model and results show agreement within 11%. The structural stability of the leading edge spar-spine system was determined analytically and graphically using a phase plane plot and Strutt diagrams. Lastly, a torsional viscous damper was added to the leading edge spar-spine model to investigate the effect of damping on stability. Results show that for the un-damped case, the leading edge spar-spine response was stable and bounded; however, there were areas of instability that appear for a range of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses. Results also show that there exist a damping ratio between 0.2 and 0.5, for which the leading edge spar-spine system was stable for all values of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses.

  11. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  12. An experimental investigation of leading-edge vortex augmentation by blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, R. G.; Wray, W. O.; Smith, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the effects of over-the-wing blowing as a means of augmenting the leading-edge vortex flow of several pointed-tip, sharp-edged planforms. Arrow, delta, and diamond wings with leading-edge sweeps of 30 and 45 degrees were mounted on a body-of-revolution fuselage and tested in a low-speed wind tunnel at a Mach number of 0.2. Nozzle location data, pitch data, and flow-visualization pictures were obtained for a range of blowing rates. Results show pronounced increases in vortex lift due to the blowing.

  13. Shuttle Wing Leading Edge Root Cause NDE Team Findings and Implementation of Quantitative Flash Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Eric R.

    2009-01-01

    Comparison metrics can be established to reliably and repeatedly establish the health of the joggle region of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge reinforced carbon carbon (RCC) panels. Using these metrics can greatly reduced the man hours needed to perform, wing leading edge scanning for service induced damage. These time savings have allowed for more thorough inspections to be preformed in the necessary areas with out affecting orbiter flow schedule. Using specialized local inspections allows for a larger margin of safety by allowing for more complete characterizations of panel defects. The presence of the t-seal during thermographic inspection can have adverse masking affects on ability properly characterize defects that exist in the joggle region of the RCC panels. This masking affect dictates the final specialized inspection should be preformed with the t-seal removed. Removal of the t-seal and use of the higher magnification optics has lead to the most effective and repeatable inspection method for characterizing and tracking defects in the wing leading edge. Through this study some inadequacies in the main health monitoring system for the orbiter wing leading edge have been identified and corrected. The use of metrics and local specialized inspection have lead to a greatly increased reliability and repeatable inspection of the shuttle wing leading edge.

  14. Evaluation of cloud detection instruments and performance of laminar-flow leading-edge test articles during NASA Leading-Edge Flight-Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard E.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.; Fisher, David F.; Young, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    Summary evaluations of the performance of laminar-flow control (LFC) leading edge test articles on a NASA JetStar aircraft are presented. Statistics, presented for the test articles' performance in haze and cloud situations, as well as in clear air, show a significant effect of cloud particle concentrations on the extent of laminar flow. The cloud particle environment was monitored by two instruments, a cloud particle spectrometer (Knollenberg probe) and a charging patch. Both instruments are evaluated as diagnostic aids for avoiding laminar-flow detrimental particle concentrations in future LFC aircraft operations. The data base covers 19 flights in the simulated airline service phase of the NASA Leading-Edge Flight-Test (LEFT) Program.

  15. Preferential attachment of membrane glycoproteins to the cytoskeleton at the leading edge of lamella

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The active forward movement of cells is often associated with the rearward transport of particles over the surfaces of their lamellae. Unlike the rest of the lamella, we found that the leading edge (within 0.5 microns of the cell boundary) is specialized for rearward transport of membrane-bound particles, such as Con A-coated latex microspheres. Using a single-beam optical gradient trap (optical tweezers) to apply restraining forces to particles, we can capture, move and release particles at will. When first bound on the central lamellar surface, Con A-coated particles would diffuse randomly; when such bound particles were brought to the leading edge of the lamella with the optical tweezers, they were often transported rearward. As in our previous studies, particle transport occurred with a concurrent decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient, consistent with attachment to the cytoskeleton. For particles at the leading edge of the lamella, weak attachment to the cytoskeleton and transport occurred with a half- time of 3 s; equivalent particles elsewhere on the lamella showed no detectable attachment when monitored for several minutes. Particles held on the cell surface by the laser trap attached more strongly to the cytoskeleton with time. These particles could escape a trapping force of 0.7 X 10(-6) dyne after 18 +/- 14 (sd) s at the leading edge, and after 64 +/- 34 (SD) s elsewhere on the lamella. Fluorescent succinylated Con A staining showed no corresponding concentration of general glycoproteins at the leading edge, but cytochalasin D-resistant filamentous actin was found at the leading edge. Our results have implications for cell motility: if the forces used for rearward particle transport were applied to a rigid substratum, cells would move forward. Such a mechanism would be most efficient if the leading edge of the cell contained preferential sites for attachment and transport. PMID:1874785

  16. Numerical prediction of vortex cores of the leading and trailing edges of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, O. A.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to predict the roll-up of the vortex sheets emanating from the leading- and trailing-edges of delta wings with emphasis on the interaction of vortex cores beyond the trailing edge. The motivation behind the present work is the recent experimental data published by Hummel. The Nonlinear Discrete-Vortex method (NDV-method) is modified and extended to predict the leading- and trailing-vortex cores beyond the trailing edge. The present model alleviates the problems previously encountered in predicting satisfactory pressure distributions. This is accomplished by lumping the free-vortex lines during the iteration procedure. The leading- and trailing-edge cores and their feeding sheets are obtained as parts of the solution. The numerical results show that the NDV-method is successful in confirming the formation of a trailing-edge core with opposite circulation and opposite roll-up to those of the leading-edge core. This work is a breakthrough in the high angle of attack aerodynamics and moreover, it is the first numerical prediction done on this problem

  17. A Perspective on Computational Aerothermodynamics at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving role of computational aerothermodynamics (CA) within NASA over the past 20 years is reviewed. The presentation highlights contributions to understanding the Space Shuttle pitching moment anomaly observed in the first shuttle flight, prediction of a static instability for Mars Pathfinder, and the use of CA for damage assessment in post-Columbia mission support. In the view forward, several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified.

  18. Space Shuttle aerothermodynamic data report, phase C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Space shuttle aerothermodynamic data, collected from a continuing series of wind tunnel tests, are permanently stored with the Data Management Services (DMS) system. Information pertaining to current baseline configuration definition is also stored. Documentation of DMS processed data arranged sequentially and by space shuttle configuration are included. An up-to-date record of all applicable aerothermodynamic data collected, processed, or summarized during the space shuttle program is provided. Tables are designed to provide suvery information to the various space shuttle managerial and technical levels.

  19. Studies on wake-affected heat transfer around the circular leading edge of blunt body

    SciTech Connect

    Funazaki, K.

    1996-07-01

    Detailed measurements are performed about time-averaged heat transfer distributions around the leading edge of a blunt body, which is affected by incoming periodic wakes from the upstream moving bars. The blunt body is a test model of a front portion of a turbine blade in gas turbines and consists of a semicircular cylindrical leading edge and a flat plate afterbody. A wide range of the steady and unsteady flow conditions are adopted as for the Reynolds number based on the diameter of the leading edge and the bar-passing Strouhal number. The measured heat transfer distributions indicate that the wakes passing over the leading edge cause a significant increase in heat transfer before the separation and the higher Strouhal number results in higher heat transfer. From this experiment, a correlation for the heat transfer enhancement around the leading edge due to the periodic wakes is deduced as a function of the Stanton number and it is reviewed by comparison with the other experimental works.

  20. The three-dimensional leading-edge vortex of a 'hovering' model hawkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Berg, C. van den; Ellington, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Recent flow visualisation experiments with the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, revealed small but clear leading-edge vortex and a pronounced three-dimensional flow. Details of this flow pattern were studied with a scaled-up, robotic insect ('the flapper') that accurately mimicked the wing movements of a hovering hawkmoth. Smoke released from the leading edge of the flapper wing confirmed the existence of a small, strong and stable leading-edge vortex, increasing in size from wingbase to wingtip. Between 25 and 75 per cent of the wing length, its diameter increased approximately from 10 to 50 per cent of the wing chord. The leading-edge vortex had a strong axial flow veolocity, which stabilized it and reduced its diamater. The vortex separated from the wing at approximately 75 per cent of the wing length and thus fed vorticity into a large, tangled tip vortex. If the circulation of the leading-edge vortex were fully used for lift generation, it could support up to two-thirds of the hawkmoth's weight during the downstroke. The growth of this circulation with time and spanwise position clearly identify dynamic stall as the unsteady aerodynamic mechanism responsible for high lift production by hovering hawkmoths and possibly also by many other insect species.

  1. Acoustic Receptivity of Mach 4.5 Boundary Layer with Leading- Edge Bluntness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2007-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional slow and fast acoustic waves is investigated by solving Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 4.5 flow over a flat plate with a finite-thickness leading edge. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution whereby the flat-plate leading edge region is resolved by providing a sufficiently refined grid. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary-layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves (by almost a factor of 20) as compared to the fast waves. Hence, this leading-edge receptivity mechanism is expected to be more relevant in the transition process for high Mach number flows where second mode instability is dominant. Computations are performed to investigate the effect of leading-edge thickness and it is found that bluntness tends to stabilize the boundary layer. Furthermore, the relative significance of fast acoustic waves is enhanced in the presence of bluntness. The effect of acoustic wave incidence angle is also studied and it is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases by more than a factor of 4 when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 45 deg. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle.

  2. SiC/SiC Leading Edge Turbine Airfoil Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for use in gas turbine engine hot-sections. A high pressure burner rig was used to expose both a baseline metal airfoil and ceramic matrix composite leading edge airfoil to typical gas turbine conditions to comparatively evaluate the material response at high temperatures. To eliminate many of the concerns related to an entirely ceramic, rotating airfoil, this study has focused on equipping a stationary metal airfoil with a ceramic leading edge insert to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. Here, the idea was to allow the SiC/SiC composite to be integrated as the airfoil's leading edge, operating in a "free-floating" or unrestrained manner. and provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The test included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were air-cooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the same internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). Results show the leading edge insert remained structurally intact after 200 simulated flight cycles with only a slightly oxidized surface. The instrumentation clearly suggested a significant reduction (approximately 600 F) in internal metal temperatures as a result of the ceramic leading edge. The object of this testing was to validate the design and analysis done by Materials Research and Design of Rosemont, PA and to determine the feasibility of this design for the intended application.

  3. Multiple laminar-turbulent transition cycles around a swept leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, R.; Narasimha, R.; Viswanath, P. R.; Crouch, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Certain interesting flow features involving multiple transition/relaminarization cycles on the leading edge of a swept wing at low speeds are reported here. The wing geometry tested had a circular nose and a leading edge sweep of 60°. Tests were made at a chord Reynolds number of 1.3 × 106 with model incidence α varied in the range of 3°-18° in discrete steps. Measurements made included wing chord-wise surface pressure distributions and wall shear stress fluctuations (using hot-film gages) within about 10 % of the chord in the leading edge zone. Results at α = 16° and 18° showed that several (often incomplete) transition cycles between laminar-like and turbulent-like flows occurred. These rather surprising results are attributable chiefly to the fact that the Launder acceleration parameter K (appropriately modified for swept wings) can exceed a critical range more than once along the contour of the airfoil in the leading edge region. Each such crossing results in a relaminarization followed by direct retransition to turbulence as K drops to sufficiently low values. It is further shown that the extent of each observed transition zone (of either type) is consistent with earlier data acquired in more detailed studies of direct transition and relaminarization. Swept leading edge boundary layers therefore pose strong challenges to numerical modelling.

  4. The Three-Dimensional Leading-Edge Vortex of a "Hovering" Model Hawkmoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Coen; Ellington, Charles P.

    1997-03-01

    Recent flow visualization experiments with the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, revealed a small but clear leading-edge vortex and a pronounced three-dimensional flow. Details of this flow pattern were studied with a scaled-up, robotic insect ('the flapper') that accurately mimicked the wing movements of a hovering hawkmoth. Smoke released from the leading edge of the flapper wing confirmed the existence of a small, strong and stable leading-edge vortex, increasing in size from wingbase to wingtip. Between 25 and 75% of the wing length, its diameter increased approximately from 10 to 50% of the wing chord. The leading-edge vortex had a strong axial flow velocity, which stabilized it and reduced its diameter. The vortex separated from the wing at approximately 75% of the wing length and thus fed vorticity into a large, tangled tip vortex. If the circulation of the leading-edge vortex were fully used for lift generation, it could support up to two-thirds of the hawkmoth's weight during the downstroke. The growth of this circulation with time and spanwise position clearly identify dynamic stall as the unsteady aerodynamic mechanism responsible for high lift production by hovering hawkmoths and possibly also by many other insect species.

  5. Subsonic balance and pressure investigation of a 60 deg delta wing with leading edge devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingas, S. A.; Rao, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Low supersonic wave drag makes the thin highly swept delta wing the logical choice for use on aircraft designed for supersonic cruise. However, the high-lift maneuver capability of the aircraft is limited by severe induced-drag penalties attributed to loss of potential flow leading-edge suction. This drag increase may be alleviated through leading-edge flow control to recover lost aerodynamic thrust through either retention of attached leading-edge flow to higher angles of attack or exploitation of the increased suction potential of separation-induced vortex flow. A low-speed wind-tunnel investigation was undertaken to examine the high-lift devices such as fences, chordwise slots, pylon vortex generators, leading-edge vortex flaps, and sharp leading-edge extensions. The devices were tested individually and in combinations in an attempt to improve high-alpha drag performance with a minimum of low-alpha drag penalty. This report presents an analysis of the force, moment, and static pressure data obtained in angles of attack up to 23 deg, at Mach and Reynolds numbers of 0.16 and 3.85 x 10 to the 6th power per meter, respectively. The results indicate that all the devices produced drag and longitudinal/lateral stability improvements at high lift with, in most cases, minor drag penalties at low angles of attack.

  6. Transonic flight test of a laminar flow leading edge with surface excrescences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuniga, Fanny A.; Drake, Aaron; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.; Westphal, Russell V.

    1994-01-01

    A flight experiment, conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, investigated the effects of surface excrescences, specifically gaps and steps, on boundary-layer transition in the vicinity of a leading edge at transonic flight conditions. A natural laminar flow leading-edge model was designed for this experiment with a spanwise slot manufactured into the leading-edge model to simulate gaps and steps like those present at skin joints of small transonic aircraft wings. The leading-edge model was flown with the flight test fixture, a low-aspect ratio fin mounted beneath an F-104G aircraft. Test points were obtained over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.5 to 2.5 million/ft and a Mach number range of 0.5 to 0.8. Results for a smooth surface showed that laminar flow extended to approximately 12 in. behind the leading edge at Mach number 0.7 over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.5 to 2.0 million/ft. The maximum size of the gap-and-step configuration over which laminar flow was maintained consisted of two 0.06-in. gaps with a 0.02-in. step at a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million/ft.

  7. Aerothermodynamic Analyses of Towed Ballutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Buck, Greg; Moss, James N.; Nielsen, Eric; Berger, Karen; Jones, William T.; Rudavsky, Rena

    2006-01-01

    A ballute (balloon-parachute) is an inflatable, aerodynamic drag device for application to planetary entry vehicles. Two challenging aspects of aerothermal simulation of towed ballutes are considered. The first challenge, simulation of a complete system including inflatable tethers and a trailing toroidal ballute, is addressed using the unstructured-grid, Navier-Stokes solver FUN3D. Auxiliary simulations of a semi-infinite cylinder using the rarefied flow, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo solver, DSV2, provide additional insight into limiting behavior of the aerothermal environment around tethers directly exposed to the free stream. Simulations reveal pressures higher than stagnation and corresponding large heating rates on the tether as it emerges from the spacecraft base flow and passes through the spacecraft bow shock. The footprint of the tether shock on the toroidal ballute is also subject to heating amplification. Design options to accommodate or reduce these environments are discussed. The second challenge addresses time-accurate simulation to detect the onset of unsteady flow interactions as a function of geometry and Reynolds number. Video of unsteady interactions measured in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Laboratory 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel and CFD simulations using the structured grid, Navier-Stokes solver LAURA are compared for flow over a rigid spacecraft-sting-toroid system. The experimental data provides qualitative information on the amplitude and onset of unsteady motion which is captured in the numerical simulations. The presence of severe unsteady fluid - structure interactions is undesirable and numerical simulation must be able to predict the onset of such motion.

  8. Simulated big sagebrush regeneration supports predicted changes at the trailing and leading edges of distribution shifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Taylor, Kyle A.; Pennington, Victoria E.; Nelson, Kellen N.; Martin, Trace E.; Rottler, Caitlin M.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Many semi-arid plant communities in western North America are dominated by big sagebrush. These ecosystems are being reduced in extent and quality due to economic development, invasive species, and climate change. These pervasive modifications have generated concern about the long-term viability of sagebrush habitat and sagebrush-obligate wildlife species (notably greater sage-grouse), highlighting the need for better understanding of the future big sagebrush distribution, particularly at the species' range margins. These leading and trailing edges of potential climate-driven sagebrush distribution shifts are likely to be areas most sensitive to climate change. We used a process-based regeneration model for big sagebrush, which simulates potential germination and seedling survival in response to climatic and edaphic conditions and tested expectations about current and future regeneration responses at trailing and leading edges that were previously identified using traditional species distribution models. Our results confirmed expectations of increased probability of regeneration at the leading edge and decreased probability of regeneration at the trailing edge below current levels. Our simulations indicated that soil water dynamics at the leading edge became more similar to the typical seasonal ecohydrological conditions observed within the current range of big sagebrush ecosystems. At the trailing edge, an increased winter and spring dryness represented a departure from conditions typically supportive of big sagebrush. Our results highlighted that minimum and maximum daily temperatures as well as soil water recharge and summer dry periods are important constraints for big sagebrush regeneration. Overall, our results confirmed previous predictions, i.e., we see consistent changes in areas identified as trailing and leading edges; however, we also identified potential local refugia within the trailing edge, mostly at sites at higher elevation. Decreasing

  9. Improved Method for Prediction of Attainable Wing Leading-Edge Thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; McElroy, Marcus O.; Lessard, Wendy B.; McCullers, L. Arnold

    1996-01-01

    Prediction of the loss of wing leading-edge thrust and the accompanying increase in drag due to lift, when flow is not completely attached, presents a difficult but commonly encountered problem. A method (called the previous method) for the prediction of attainable leading-edge thrust and the resultant effect on airplane aerodynamic performance has been in use for more than a decade. Recently, the method has been revised to enhance its applicability to current airplane design and evaluation problems. The improved method (called the present method) provides for a greater range of airfoil shapes from very sharp to very blunt leading edges. It is also based on a wider range of Reynolds numbers than was available for the previous method. The present method, when employed in computer codes for aerodynamic analysis, generally results in improved correlation with experimental wing-body axial-force data and provides reasonable estimates of the measured drag.

  10. Fabrication and Testing of a Leading-Edge-Shaped Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Merrigan, Michael A.; Sena, J. Tom; Reid, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled leading edge has evolved from the design stage to the fabrication and testing of a full size, leading-edge-shaped heat pipe. The heat pipe had a 'D-shaped' cross section and was fabricated from arc cast Mo-4lRe. An artery was included in the wick. Several issues were resolved with the fabrication of the sharp leading edge radius heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested in a vacuum chamber at Los Alamos National Laboratory using induction heating and was started up from the frozen state several times. However, design temperatures and heat fluxes were not obtained due to premature failure of the heat pipe resulting from electrical discharge between the induction heating apparatus and the heat pipe. Though a testing anomaly caused premature failure of the heat pipe, successful startup and operation of the heat pipe was demonstrated.

  11. A flight test of laminar flow control leading-edge systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Wright, A. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    NASA's program for development of a laminar flow technology base for application to commercial transports has made significant progress since its inception in 1976. Current efforts are focused on development of practical reliable systems for the leading-edge region where the most difficult problems in applying laminar flow exist. Practical solutions to these problems will remove many concerns about the ultimate practicality of laminar flow. To address these issues, two contractors performed studies, conducted development tests, and designed and fabricated fully functional leading-edge test articles for installation on the NASA JetStar aircraft. Systems evaluation and performance testing will be conducted to thoroughly evaluate all system capabilities and characteristics. A simulated airline service flight test program will be performed to obtain the operational sensitivity, maintenance, and reliability data needed to establish that practical solutions exist for the difficult leading-edge area of a future commercial transport employing laminar flow control.

  12. Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Sánchez, Paula; Schmitt, Sebastian; Snaidero, Nicolas; Mitkovski, Mišo; Velte, Caroline; Brückner, Bastian R; Alexopoulos, Ioannis; Czopka, Tim; Jung, Sang Y; Rhee, Jeong S; Janshoff, Andreas; Witke, Walter; Schaap, Iwan A T; Lyons, David A; Simons, Mikael

    2015-07-27

    During CNS development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multilamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic, and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as an essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading.

  13. Closed Form Equations for the Preliminary Design of a Heat-Pipe-Cooled Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    1998-01-01

    A set of closed form equations for the preliminary evaluation and design of a heat-pipe-cooled leading edge is presented. The set of equations can provide a leading-edge designer with a quick evaluation of the feasibility of using heat-pipe cooling. The heat pipes can be embedded in a metallic or composite structure. The maximum heat flux, total integrated heat load, and thermal properties of the structure and heat-pipe container are required input. The heat-pipe operating temperature, maximum surface temperature, heat-pipe length, and heat pipe-spacing can be estimated. Results using the design equations compared well with those from a 3-D finite element analysis for both a large and small radius leading edge.

  14. Test and Analysis Correlation of Form Impact onto Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge RCC Panel 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan; Melis, Matthew; Carney, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Soon after the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) began their study of the space shuttle Columbia accident, "physics-based" analyses using LS-DYNA were applied to characterize the expected damage to the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) leading edge from high-speed foam impacts. Forensic evidence quickly led CAIB investigators to concentrate on the left wing leading edge RCC panels. This paper will concentrate on the test of the left-wing RCC panel 8 conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the correlation with an LS-DYNA analysis. The successful correlation of the LS-DYNA model has resulted in the use of LS-DYNA as a predictive tool for characterizing the threshold of damage for impacts of various debris such as foam, ice, and ablators onto the RCC leading edge for shuttle return-to-flight.

  15. An analytical design procedure for the determination of effective leading edge extensions on thick delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, F.; Chaturvedi, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical design procedure for leading edge extensions (LEE) was developed for thick delta wings. This LEE device is designed to be mounted to a wing along the pseudo-stagnation stream surface associated with the attached flow design lift coefficient of greater than zero. The intended purpose of this device is to improve the aerodynamic performance of high subsonic and low supersonic aircraft at incidences above that of attached flow design lift coefficient, by using a vortex system emanating along the leading edges of the device. The low pressure associated with these vortices would act on the LEE upper surface and the forward facing area at the wing leading edges, providing an additional lift and effective leading edge thrust recovery. The first application of this technique was to a thick, round edged, twisted and cambered wing of approximately triangular planform having a sweep of 58 deg and aspect ratio of 2.30. The panel aerodynamics and vortex lattice method with suction analogy computer codes were employed to determine the pseudo-stagnation stream surface and an optimized LEE planform shape.

  16. Aerothermodynamics at NASA-Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. James

    2001-01-01

    The Aerothermodynamics Branch at NASA - Langley Research Center is tasked with developing, assessing and applying aerothermodynamic technologies to enable the development of hypersonic aircraft, launch vehicles, and planetary/earth entry systems. To accomplish this mission, the Branch capitalizes on the synergism between the experimental and computational facilities/tools which reside in the branch and a staff that can draw on five decades of experience in aerothermodynamics. The Aerothermodynamics Branch is staffed by 30 scientists/engineers. The staff, of which two-thirds are less than 40 years old, is split evenly between experimentalists and computationalists. Approximately 90 percent of the staff work on space transportation systems while the remainder work on planetary missions. The Branch manages 5 hypersonic wind tunnels which are staffed by 14 technicians, numerous high end work stations and a SGI Origin 2000 system. The Branch also utilizes other test facilities located at Langley as well as other national and international test sites. Large scale computational requirements are met by access to Agency resources.

  17. Computational Aerothermodynamic Design Issues for Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Olynick, David R.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1997-01-01

    A brief review of the evolutionary progress in computational aerothermodynamics is presented. The current status of computational aerothermodynamics is then discussed, with emphasis on its capabilities and limitations for contributions to the design process of hypersonic vehicles. Some topics to be highlighted include: (1) aerodynamic coefficient predictions with emphasis on high temperature gas effects; (2) surface heating and temperature predictions for thermal protection system (TPS) design in a high temperature, thermochemical nonequilibrium environment; (3) methods for extracting and extending computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solutions for efficient utilization by all members of a multidisciplinary design team; (4) physical models; (5) validation process and error estimation; and (6) gridding and solution generation strategies. Recent experiences in the design of X-33 will be featured. Computational aerothermodynamic contributions to Mars Pathfinder, METEOR, and Stardust (Comet Sample return) will also provide context for this discussion. Some of the barriers that currently limit computational aerothermodynamics to a predominantly reactive mode in the design process will also be discussed, with the goal of providing focus for future research.

  18. Computational Aerothermodynamic Design Issues for Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olynick, David R.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2004-01-01

    A brief review of the evolutionary progress in computational aerothermodynamics is presented. The current status of computational aerothermodynamics is then discussed, with emphasis on its capabilities and limitations for contributions to the design process of hypersonic vehicles. Some topics to be highlighted include: (1) aerodynamic coefficient predictions with emphasis on high temperature gas effects; (2) surface heating and temperature predictions for thermal protection system (TPS) design in a high temperature, thermochemical nonequilibrium environment; (3) methods for extracting and extending computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solutions for efficient utilization by all members of a multidisciplinary design team; (4) physical models; (5) validation process and error estimation; and (6) gridding and solution generation strategies. Recent experiences in the design of X-33 will be featured. Computational aerothermodynamic contributions to Mars Pathfinder, METEOR, and Stardust (Comet Sample return) will also provide context for this discussion. Some of the barriers that currently limit computational aerothermodynamics to a predominantly reactive mode in the design process will also be discussed, with the goal of providing focus for future research.

  19. Computational Aerothermodynamic Design Issues for Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Olynick, David R.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2005-01-01

    A brief review of the evolutionary progress in computational aerothermodynamics is presented. The current status of computational aerothermodynamics is then discussed, with emphasis on its capabilities and limitations for contributions to the design process of hypersonic vehicles. Some topics to be highlighted include: (1) aerodynamic coefficient predictions with emphasis on high temperature gas effects; (2) surface heating and temperature predictions for thermal protection system (TPS) design in a high temperature, thermochemical nonequilibrium environment; (3) methods for extracting and extending computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solutions for efficient utilization by all members of a multidisciplinary design team; (4) physical models; (5) validation process and error estimation; and (6) gridding and solution generation strategies. Recent experiences in the design of X-33 will be featured. Computational aerothermodynamic contributions to Mars Path finder, METEOR, and Stardust (Comet Sample return) will also provide context for this discussion. Some of the barriers that currently limit computational aerothermodynamics to a predominantly reactive mode in the design process will also be discussed, with the goal of providing focus for future research.

  20. Impingement cooling with film coolant extraction in the airfoil leading edge regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liguo; Li, Zhaohui

    An extensive experimental study is conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of arrays of air jets impinging on perforated target surfaces in turbine blade leading edge regions by six large-scale models. The relations of pressure loss and Nusselt number to jet Reynolds number are obtained in a wide range of parameter combinations of interest in cooled airfoil practice for various models, respectively. These parameter combinations are covered in a test matrix, including combinations of variations in jet Reynolds number, airfoil leading edge curvature radius-to-diameter ratio, jet pitch-to-diameter ratio, and jet impingement gap-to-diameter ratio.

  1. Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow and experimental program for resilient leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, B. H.

    1979-01-01

    The potential of natural laminar flow for significant drag reduction and improved efficiency for aircraft is assessed. Past experience with natural laminar flow as reported in published and unpublished data and personal observations of various researchers is summarized. Aspects discussed include surface contour, waviness, and smoothness requirements; noise and vibration effects on boundary layer transition, boundary layer stability criteria; flight experience with natural laminar flow and suction stabilized boundary layers; and propeller slipstream, rain, frost, ice and insect contamination effects on boundary layer transition. The resilient leading edge appears to be a very promising method to prevent leading edge insect contamination.

  2. Image analysis tools to quantify cell shape and protein dynamics near the leading edge.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Gillian L; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of flexible image analysis tools to analyze dynamics of cell shape and protein concentrations near the leading edge of cells adhered to glass coverslips. Plugins for ImageJ streamline common analyses of microscopic images of cells, including the calculation of leading edge speeds, total and average intensities of fluorescent markers, and retrograde flow rate measurements of fluorescent single-molecule speckles. We also provide automated calculations of auto- and cross-correlation functions between velocity and intensity measurements. The application of the methods is illustrated on images of XTC cells.

  3. Method and equipment for induction surface hardening of the leading edges of turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokina, T.M.; Dymchenko, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Methodology and equipment for hardening the leading edges of blades for large nuclear reactor steam turbines was investigated using blades made of 15Kh11MF hardened and tempered steel. A machine was designed and built for hardening the blade leading edges with a vacuum-tube oscillator and 66,000 Hz frequency. The electrical parameters of the induction heating were recorded. Hardening of the actual blades made it possible to obtain a hardened case with a depth of 1-3 mm and up to 5 mm in the lower portion of the blade and increased erosion resistance.

  4. Reynolds Number and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on a 65 deg Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    A 65 degree delta wing has been tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at mean aerodynamic chord Reynolds numbers from 6 million to 120 million at subsonic and transonic speeds. The configuration incorporated systematic variation of the leading edge bluntness. The analysis for this paper is focused on the Reynolds number and bluntness effects at subsonic speeds (M = 0.4) from this data set. The results show significant effects of both these parameters on the onset and progression of leading-edge vortex separation.

  5. Reynolds Number and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on a 65 Deg Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    A 65 deg delta wing has been tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at mean aerodynamic chord Reynolds numbers from 6 million to 120 million at subsonic and transonic speeds. The configuration incorporated systematic variation of the leading edge bluntness. The analysis for this paper is focused on the Reynolds number and bluntness effects at subsonic speeds (M = 0.4) from this data set. The results show significant effects of both these parameters on the onset and progression of leading-edge vortex separation.

  6. Reynolds Number, Compressibility, and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on Delta-Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of Reynolds number, compressibility, and leading edge bluntness effects is presented for a 65 degree delta wing. The results of this study address both attached and vortex-flow aerodynamics and are based upon a unique data set obtained in the NASA-Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) for i) Reynolds numbers ranging from conventional wind-tunnel to flight values, ii) Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to transonic speeds, and iii) leading-edge bluntness values that span practical slender wing applications. The data were obtained so as to isolate the subject effects and they present many challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies.

  7. Space Shuttle Orbiter nose cap and wing leading edge certification test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppanz, M. J.; Grimaud, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    A reinforced carbon-carbon thermal protection system is used on the space shuttle orbiter vehicle's nose cap and wing leading edge regions where temperatures reach 1538 C (2800 F). To verify the analyses used to certify reinforced carbon-carbon for the first flight and operational missions, a multi-environment incremental test program was developed and implemented through the combined efforts of Rockwell International and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Three separate facilities at the Johnson Space Center were used to subject full-scale nose cap and wing leading edge test articles to simulated critical launch, on-orbit, and atmospheric entry environments.

  8. Experimental study of delta wing leading-edge devices for drag reduction at high lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. D., Jr.; Rao, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The drag reduction devices selected for evaluation were the fence, slot, pylon-type vortex generator, and sharp leading-edge extension. These devices were tested on a 60 degree flatplate delta (with blunt leading edges) in the Langley Research Center 7- by 10-foot high-speed tunnel at low speed and to angles of attack of 28 degrees. Balance and static pressure measurements were taken. The results indicate that all the devices had significant drag reduction capability and improved longitudinal stability while a slight loss of lift and increased cruise drag occurred.

  9. On the effect of leading edge blowing on circulation control airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    In the present context the term circulation control is used to denote a method of lift generation that utilizes tangential jet blowing over the upper surface of a rounded trailing edge airfoil to determine the location of the boundary layer separation points, thus setting an effective Kutta condition. At present little information exists on the flow structure generated by circulation control airfoils under leading edge blowing. Consequently, no theoretical methods exist to predict airfoil performance under such conditions. An experimental study of the flow field generated by a two dimensional circulation control airfoil under steady leading and trailing edge blowing was undertaken. The objective was to fundamentally understand the overall flow structure generated and its relation to airfoil performance. Flow visualization was performed to define the overall flow field structure. Measurements of the airfoil forces were also made to provide a correlation of the observed flow field structure to airfoil performance. Preliminary results are presented, specifically on the effect on the flow field structure of leading edge blowing, alone and in conjunction with trailing edge blowing.

  10. The Leading Edge: A Career Development Workshop Series for Young Adults. Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Career Development Foundation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet is designed for participants in "The Leading Edge: A Career Development Workshop Series for Young Adults." It provides the 27 participant handouts for the six workshops in the series. The first in the series, "Setting the Stage: The Changing World of Work," is a workshop to clarify what is occurring in the world of work and apply that…

  11. The Leading Edge: Competencies for Community College Leadership in the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desjardins, Carolyn

    Published in collaboration with the National Institute for Leadership Development (NILD), this monograph reports on a study of leading-edge community college presidents. The authors cluster the 22 competencies identified through the study into four categories. Each category is presented as a chapter which identifies and provides examples of the…

  12. Project 2000-3 Leading Edge Enterprise: Insights into Employment and Training Practices. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Michael; Fischer, John

    Leading-edge firms (LEFs)--at the forefront of their industry in terms of growth or market share--may influence skill development through diffusion of technology, products, or practices and use of market power to set standards or change customer businesses. Study of LEFs can identify the type and mix of skills needed in the industry. LEFs are…

  13. A leading edge heating array and a flat surface heating array - operation, maintenance and repair manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A general description of the leading edge/flat surface heating array is presented along with its components, assembly instructions, installation instructions, operation procedures, maintenance instructions, repair procedures, schematics, spare parts lists, engineering drawings of the array, and functional acceptance test log sheets. The proper replacement of components, correct torque values, step-by-step maintenance instructions, and pretest checkouts are described.

  14. Spanwise gradients in flow speed help stabilize leading-edge vortices on revolving wings.

    PubMed

    Jardin, T; David, L

    2014-07-01

    While a leading-edge vortex on an infinite translating wing is shed after a short distance of travel, its counterpart on a finite span revolving insect wing or maple seed membrane exhibits robust attachment. The latter explains the aerodynamic lift generated by such biological species. Here we analyze the mechanisms responsible for leading-edge vortex attachment. We compute the Navier-Stokes solution of the flow past a finite span wing (i) embedded in a uniform oncoming flow, (ii) embedded in a spanwise varying oncoming flow, and (iii) revolving about its root. We show that over flapping amplitudes typical of insect flight (ϕ = 120°), the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed may suffice in maintaining leading-edge vortex attachment. We correlate this result with the development of spanwise flow, driven by the spanwise gradient of pressure, and we evaluate the sensitivity of such a mechanism to the Reynolds number. It is noted, however, that leading-edge vortex attachment through the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed does not promote large lift, which ultimately arises from centrifugal and Coriolis effects. PMID:25122373

  15. Direct numerical simulations of leading-edge receptivity for freestream sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuciarelli, David A.; Reed, Helen L.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review our efforts in spatial direct numerical simulations for modeling leading-edge receptivity to freestream sound and vorticity. These results begin to provide the link between the freestream and the initial boundary-layer response and can provide the upstream conditions for further simulations marching through the transition process toward turbulence.

  16. Effects of Fin Leading Edge Sweep on Shock-Shock Interaction at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of fin leading edge sweep on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interaction have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The shock interaction was produced by the intersection of a planar incident shock (16.8 deg shock angle relative to the freestream, generated by a 9 deg wedge) with the bow shock formed around a O.5-inch diameter cylindrical leading edge fin. Heating distributions along the leading edge stagnation line have been obtained using densely spaced thin film resistive-type sensors. Schlieren images were obtained to illustrate the very complex shock-shock interactions. The fin leading edge sweep angle was varied from 15-degrees swept back to 45-degrees swept forward for a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2 x 10(exp 6)/ft. Two models were utilized during the study, one with 0.025-inch spacing between gage centers, and the other 0.015-inch spacing. Gage spatial resolution on the order of 0.015-in appeared to accurately capture the narrow spike in heating. Peak heating due to shock interaction was maximized when the fin was swept forward 15 deg and 25 deg, both promoting augmentations about 7 times the baseline value. The schlieren images for these cases revealed Type 4 and Type 3 interactions, respectively.

  17. The Leading Edge: A Career Development Workshop Series for Young Adults. Facilitator Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Career Development Foundation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet is designed to be used by facilitators of the Canadian Career Development Foundation's "The Leading Edge: A Career Development Workshop Series for Young Adults." The guide provides information, including objectives of the workshops and lists of required materials, needed in order to facilitate an introductory session as well as the…

  18. New American High Schools: Profiles of the Nation's Leading Edge Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This booklet profiles "leading edge" schools committed to ensuring that all students meet challenging academic standards and are prepared for college and careers. In 1996, these 10 New American High Schools were chosen by the U.S. Department of Education for their innovation and commitment to academic excellence. As these award-winning,…

  19. Spanwise gradients in flow speed help stabilize leading-edge vortices on revolving wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, T.; David, L.

    2014-07-01

    While a leading-edge vortex on an infinite translating wing is shed after a short distance of travel, its counterpart on a finite span revolving insect wing or maple seed membrane exhibits robust attachment. The latter explains the aerodynamic lift generated by such biological species. Here we analyze the mechanisms responsible for leading-edge vortex attachment. We compute the Navier-Stokes solution of the flow past a finite span wing (i) embedded in a uniform oncoming flow, (ii) embedded in a spanwise varying oncoming flow, and (iii) revolving about its root. We show that over flapping amplitudes typical of insect flight (ϕ =120∘), the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed may suffice in maintaining leading-edge vortex attachment. We correlate this result with the development of spanwise flow, driven by the spanwise gradient of pressure, and we evaluate the sensitivity of such a mechanism to the Reynolds number. It is noted, however, that leading-edge vortex attachment through the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed does not promote large lift, which ultimately arises from centrifugal and Coriolis effects.

  20. A role for actin arcs in the leading edge advance of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Burnette, Dylan T.; Manley, Suliana; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Sougrat, Rachid; Davidson, Michael W.; Kachar, Bechara; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The migration of epithelial cells requires coordination of two actin modules at the leading edge: one in the lamellipodium and one in the lamella. How the two modules connect mechanistically to regulate directed edge motion is not understood. Using a combination of live-cell imaging and photoactivation approaches, we demonstrate that the actin network of the lamellipodium evolves spatio-temporally into the lamella. This occurs during the retraction phase of edge motion when myosin II redistributes to the cell edge and condenses the lamellipodial-actin into an arc-like bundle (i.e., actin arc) parallel to the edge. The newly formed actin arc moves rearward and couples to focal adhesions as it enters the lamella. We propose net edge extension occurs by nascent focal adhesions advancing the site at which new actin arcs slow down and form the base of the next protrusion event. The actin arc thus serves as a structural element underlying the temporal and spatial connection between the lamellipodium and lamella to drive directed cell motion. PMID:21423177

  1. Design & fabrication of two seated aircraft with an advanced rotating leading edge wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Ahmari, Saeed Abdullah Saeed

    The title of this thesis is "Design & Fabrication of two Seated Aircraft with an Advanced Rotating Leading Edge Wing", this gives almost a good description of the work has been done. In this research, the moving surface boundary-layer control (MSBC) concept was investigated and implemented. An experimental model was constructed and tested in wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics using the leading edge moving surface of modified semi-symmetric airfoil NACA1214. The moving surface is provided by a high speed rotating cylinder, which replaces the leading edge of the airfoil. The angle of attack, the cylinder surfaces velocity ratio Uc/U, and the flap deflection angle effects on the lift and drag coefficients and the stall angle of attack were investigated. This new technology was applied to a 2-seat light-sport aircraft that is designed and built in the Aerospace Engineering Department at KFUPM. The project team is led by the aerospace department chairman Dr. Ahmed Z. AL-Garni and Dr. Wael G. Abdelrahman and includes graduate and under graduate student. The wing was modified to include a rotating cylinder along the leading edge of the flap portion. This produced very promising results such as the increase of the maximum lift coefficient at Uc/U=3 by 82% when flaps up and 111% when flaps down at 40° and stall was delayed by 8degrees in both cases. The laboratory results also showed that the effective range of the leading-edge rotating cylinder is at low angles of attack which reduce the need for higher angles of attack for STOL aircraft.

  2. Experimental And Numerical Study Of CMC Leading Edges In Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Markus; Esser, Burkard; Gulhan, Ali; Dalenbring, Mats; Cavagna, Luca

    2011-05-01

    Future transportation concepts aim at high supersonic or hypersonic speeds, where the formerly sharp boundaries between aeronautic and aerospace applications become blurred. One of the major issues involved to high speed flight are extremely high aerothermal loads, which especially appear at the leading edges of the plane’s wings and at sharp edged air intake components of the propulsion system. As classical materials like metals or simple ceramics would thermally and structurally fail here, new materials have to be applied. In this context, lightweight ceramic matrix composites (CMC) seem to be prospective candidates as they are high-temperature resistant and offer low thermal expansion along with high specific strength at elevated temperature levels. A generic leading edge model with a ceramic wing assembly with a sweep back angle of 53° was designed, which allowed for easy leading edge sample integration of different CMC materials. The samples consisted of the materials C/C-SiC (non-oxide), OXIPOL and WHIPOX (both oxide) with a nose radius of 2 mm. In addition, a sharp edged C/C-SiC sample was prepared to investigate the nose radius influence. Overall, 13 thermocouples were installed inside the entire model to measure the temperature evolution at specific locations, whereby 5 thermocouples were placed inside the leading edge sample itself. In addition, non-intrusive techniques were applied for surface temperature measurements: An infrared camera was used to measure the surface temperature distribution and at specific spots, the surface temperature was also measured by pyrometers. Following, the model was investigated in DLR’s arc-heated facility L3K at a total enthalpy of 8.5 MJ/kg, Mach number of 7.8, different angles of attack and varying wing inclination angles. These experiments provide a sound basis for the simulation of aerothermally loaded CMC leading edge structures. Such fluid-structure coupled approaches have been performed by FOI, basing on a

  3. Overview of aerothermodynamic loads definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1989-01-01

    Over the years, NASA has been conducting the Advanced Earth-to-Orbit (AETO) Propulsion Technology Program to provide the knowledge, understanding, and design methodology that will allow the development of advanced Earth-to-orbit propulsion systems with high performance, extended service life, automated operations, and diagnostics for in-flight health monitoring. The objective of the Aerothermodynamic Loads Definition Study is to develop methods to more accurately predict the operating environment in AETO propulsion systems, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) powerhead. The approach taken consists of 2 parts: to modify, apply, and disseminate existing computational fluid dynamics tools in response to current needs and to develop new technology that will enable more accurate computation of the time averaged and unsteady aerothermodynamic loads in the SSME powerhead. The software tools are detailed. Significant progress was made in the area of turbomachinery, where there is an overlap between the AETO efforts and research in the aeronautical gas turbine field.

  4. A theoretical investigation of the aerodynamics of low-aspect-ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical method is developed to predict distributed and total aerodynamic characteristics for low aspect-ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation. The flow is assumed to be steady and inviscid. The wing boundary condition is formulated by the quasi-vortex-lattice method. The leading-edge separated vortices are represented by discrete free vortex elements which are aligned with the local velocity vector at mid-points to satisfy the force free condition. The wake behind the trailing-edge is also force free. The flow tangency boundary condition is satisfied on the wing, including the leading- and trailing-edges. Comparison of the predicted results with complete leading-edge separation has shown reasonably good agreement. For cases with partial leading-edge separation, the lift is found to be highly nonlinear with angle of attack.

  5. Aerothermodynamic Insight From The HIFIRE Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Roger L.; Adamczak, David; Dolvin, Douglas; Borg, Matthew; Stanfield, Scott

    2011-05-01

    The HIFiRE (Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation) program is a joint venture of the United States Air Force Research Laboratory and Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation to utilize economical flight research opportunities in the exploration of flight science issues for space access systems. Flights 1 and 5 focus on collecting high-resolution experimental data on critical aerothermodynamic phenomena, including laminar-turbulent transition and shock/boundary layer interactions. Flight 1, successfully flown in March 2010, employed a test article composed of a 7-deg right angle cone, followed by a cylinder and flare. The test article remained attached to the second-stage booster throughout the ballistic trajectory. Flight 5, to be launched in a similar fashion, will feature a 2:1 elliptic cross-section cone as the test article. For both flights significant resources have been invested in pre-flight aerothermodynamic analysis and testing. This manuscript will summarize the overall strategy of the HIFiRE program, review the pre-flight aerothermodynamic analysis for Flights 1 and 5, and present a brief look at preliminary results from the post-flight analysis of Flight 1.

  6. Wind-tunnel studies of advanced cargo aircraft concepts. [leading edge vortex flaps for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Goglia, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Accomplishments in vortex flap research are summarized. A singular feature of the vortex flap is that, throughout the range of angle of attack range, the flow type remains qualitatively unchanged. Accordingly, no large or sudden change in the aerodynamic characteristics, as happens when forcibly maintained attached flow suddenly reverts to separation, will occur with the vortex flap. Typical wind tunnel test data are presented which show the drag reduction potential of the vortex flap concept applied to a supersonic cruise airplane configuration. The new technology offers a means of aerodynamically augmenting roll-control effectiveness on slender wings at higher angles of attack by manipulating the vortex flow generated from leading edge separation. The proposed manipulator takes the form of a flap hinged at or close to the leading edge, normally retracted flush with the wing upper surface to conform to the airfoil shape.

  7. High-order aberration control during exposure for leading-edge lithography projection optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Yasuhiro; Tsuge, Yosuke; Hirayama, Toru; Ikezawa, Hironori; Inoue, Daisuke; Kitamura, Yasuhiro; Koizumi, Yukio; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Nakashima, Toshiharu; Kikuchi, Takahisa; Onda, Minoru; Takase, Yohei; Nagahiro, Akimasa; Isago, Susumu; Kawahara, Hidetaka

    2016-03-01

    High throughput with high resolution imaging has been key to the development of leading-edge microlithography. However, management of thermal aberrations due to lens heating during exposure has become critical for simultaneous achievement of high throughput and high resolution. Thermal aberrations cause CD drift and overlay error, and these errors lead directly to edge placement errors (EPE). Management and control of high order thermal aberrations is a critical requirement. In this paper, we will show practical performance of the lens heating with dipole and other typical illumination conditions for finer patterning. We confirm that our new control system can reduce the high-order aberrations and enable critical-dimension uniformity CDU during the exposure.

  8. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Forrest; Bons, Jeffrey

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness

  9. Leading edge reflection patterns for cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, F.; Guardone, A.

    2016-09-01

    The unsteady reflection of cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles is investigated numerically. At the leading edge, numerical simulations show the occurrence of all types of regular and irregular reflections predicted by the pseudo-steady theory for planar shock-wave reflections over planar surfaces, although for different combinations of wedge angles and incident shock Mach number. The domain of occurrence of each reflection type and its evolution in time due to shock acceleration and to the non-planar geometry is determined and it is compared to the results of the pseudo-steady theory. The dependence of the reflection pattern on the (local) values of the wedge angle is in good agreement with the pseudo-steady theory. Less complex reflection patterns are instead observed at larger values of the leading edge shock Mach number at which the pseudo-steady theory predicts the occurrence of more complex reflection patterns.

  10. Test and Analysis of a Hyper-X Carbon-Carbon Leading Edge Chine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Russell W.; Sikora, Joseph G.; Lindell, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    During parts production for the X43A Mach 10 hypersonic vehicle nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of a leading edge chine detected on imbedded delamination near the lower surface of the part. An ultimate proof test was conducted to verify the ultimate strength of this leading edge chine part. The ultimate proof test setup used a pressure bladder design to impose a uniform distributed pressure field over the bi-planar surface of the chine test article. A detailed description of the chine test article and experimental test setup is presented. Analysis results from a linear status model of the test article are also presented and discussed. Post-test inspection of the specimen revealed no visible failures or areas of delamination.

  11. A Reduced-Complexity Investigation of Blunt Leading-Edge Separation Motivated by UCAV Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Boelens, Okko J.

    2015-01-01

    A reduced complexity investigation for blunt-leading-edge vortical separation has been undertaken. The overall approach is to design the fundamental work in such a way so that it relates to the aerodynamics of a more complex Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) concept known as SACCON. Some of the challenges associated with both the vehicle-class aerodynamics and the fundamental vortical flows are reviewed, and principles from a hierarchical complexity approach are used to relate flow fundamentals to system-level interests. The work is part of roughly 6-year research program on blunt-leading-edge separation pertinent to UCAVs, and was conducted under the NATO Science and Technology Organization, Applied Vehicle Technology panel.

  12. Single velocity-component modeling of leading edge turbulence interaction noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, J; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2015-06-01

    A computational aeroacoustics approach is used to predict leading edge turbulence interaction noise for real airfoils. One-component (transverse), two-component (transverse and streamwise), and three-component (transverse, streamwise, and spanwise) synthesized turbulence disturbances are modeled instead of harmonic transverse gusts, to which previous computational studies of leading edge noise have often been confined. The effects of the inclusion of streamwise and spanwise disturbances on the noise are assessed. It is shown that accurate noise predictions can be made by modeling only transverse disturbances which reduces the computational expense of simulations. The accuracy of using only transverse disturbances is assessed for symmetric and cambered airfoils, and also for airfoils at non-zero angle of attack.

  13. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  14. Effects of Nose Radius and Aerodynamic Loading on Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammerton, P. W.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effects of airfoil thickness and mean aerodynamic loading on boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region. The case of acoustic free-stream disturbances, incident on a thin cambered airfoil with a parabolic leading edge in a low Mach number flow, is considered. An asymptotic analysis based on large Reynolds number is developed, supplemented by numerical results. The airfoil thickness distribution enters the theory through a Strouhal number based on the nose radius of the airfoil, S = (omega)tau(sub n)/U, where omega is the frequency of the acoustic wave and U is the mean flow speed. The influence of mean aerodynamic loading enters through an effective angle-of-attack parameter ti, related to flow around the leading edge from the lower surface to the upper. The variation of the receptivity level is analyzed as a function of S, mu, and characteristics of the free-stream acoustic wave. For an unloaded leading edge, a finite nose radius dramatically reduces the receptivity level compared to that for a flat plate, the amplitude of the instability waves in the boundary layer being decreased by an order of magnitude when S = 0.3. Modest levels of aerodynamic loading are found to further decrease the receptivity level for the upper surface of the airfoil, while an increase in receptivity level occurs for the lower surface. For larger angles of attack close to the critical angle for boundary layer separation, a local rise in the receptivity level occurs for the upper surface, while for the lower surface the receptivity decreases. The effects of aerodynamic loading are more pronounced at larger values of S. Oblique acoustic waves produce much higher receptivity levels than acoustic waves propagating downstream parallel to the airfoil chord.

  15. Visualization of leading edge vortices on a series of flat plate delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, Francis M.; Ng, T. Terry; Nelson, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of flow visualization data obtained as part of NASA Grant NAG2-258 is presented. During the course of this study, many still and high speed motion pictures were taken of the leading edge vortices on a series of flat plate delta wings at varying angles of attack. The purpose is to present a systematic collection of photographs showing the state of vortices as a function of the angle of attack for the four models tested.

  16. Increased heat transfer to a cylindrical leading edge due to spanwise variations in the freestream velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study numerically demonstrates how small spanwise variations in velocity upstream of a body can cause relatively large increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer to the leading edge. Vorticity introduced by spanwise variations, first decays as it drifts downstream, then amplifies in the stagnation region as a result of vortex stretching. This amplification can cause a periodic array of 3 D structures, similar to horseshoe vortices, to form. The numerical results indicate that, for the given wavelength, there is an amplitude threshold below which a structure does not form. A one-dimensional analysis, to predict the decay of vorticity in the absence of the body, in conjunction with the full numerical results indicated that the threshold is more accurately stated as minimum level of vorticity required in the leading edge region for a structure to form. It is possible, using the one-dimensional analysis, to compute an optimum wavelength in terms of the maximum vorticity reaching the leading edge region for given amplitude. A discussion is presented which relates experimentally observed trends to the trends of the present phenomena.

  17. Formation and Development of the Dynamic Stall Vortex on a Wing with Leading Edge Tubercles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrynuk, John; Bohl, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    Humpback whales are unique in that their flippers have leading edge ``bumps'' or tubercles. Past work on airfoils inspired by whale flippers has centered on the static aerodynamic characteristics of these airfoils. The current study uses Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV) to investigate the effects of tubercles on dynamically pitching NACA 0012 airfoils. A baseline (i.e. straight leading edge) wing and one modified with leading edge tubercles are investigated. Tracking of the Dynamic Stall Vortex (DSV) is performed to quantitatively compare the DSV formation location, path, and convective velocity for tubercled and baseline wings. The results show that there is a spanwise variation in the initial formation location and motion of the DSV on the modified wing. Once formed, the DSV aligns into a more uniform spanwise structure. As the pitching motion progresses, the DSV on the modified wing convects away from the airfoil surface later and slower than is observed for the baseline airfoil. The results indicate that the tubercles may delay stall when compared to the baseline airfoil. This work was supported by NSF Grant # 0845882.

  18. Application of a flush airdata sensing system to a wing leading edge (LE-FADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Czerniejewski, Mark W.; Nichols, Douglas A.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of locating a flush airdata sensing (FADS) system on a wing leading edge where the operation of the avionics or fire control radar system will not be hindered is investigated. The leading-edge FADS system (LE-FADS) was installed on an unswept symmetrical airfoil and a series of low-speed wind-tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of the system. As a result of the tests it is concluded that the aerodynamic models formulated for use on aircraft nosetips are directly applicable to wing leading edges and that the calibration process is similar. Furthermore, the agreement between the airdata calculations for angle of attack and total pressure from the LE-FADS and known wind-tunnel values suggest that wing-based flush airdata systems can be calibrated to a high degree of accuracy. Static wind-tunnel tests for angles of attack from -50 deg to 50 deg and dynamic pressures from 3.6 to 11.4 lb/sq ft were performed.

  19. A theory for the core flow of leading-edge vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    1986-01-01

    Separation-induced leading-edge vortices can dominate the flow about slender wings at moderate to high angles of attack, often with favorable aerodynamic effects. However, at the high angles of attack which are desirable for takeoff and landing as well as subsonic-transonic maneuver the vortices can breakdown or burst in the vicinity of the aircraft causing many adverse effects; these include lift loss, pitchup, and buffet. The flow in the core of leading-edge vortices is generally affiliated with the vortex breakdown phenomenon. A theory is presented for the flow in the core of separation-induced, leading-edge vortices at practical Reynolds numbers. The theory is based on matching inner and outer representations of the vortex. The inner representation models continuously distributed vorticity and includes an asymptotic viscous subcore. The outer representation models concentrated spiral sheets of vorticity and is fully three dimensional. A parameter is identified which closely tracks the vortex breakdown stability boundary for delta, arrow, and diamond wings.

  20. Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Snaidero, Nicolas; Mitkovski, Mišo; Velte, Caroline; Brückner, Bastian R.; Alexopoulos, Ioannis; Czopka, Tim; Jung, Sang Y.; Rhee, Jeong S.; Janshoff, Andreas; Witke, Walter; Schaap, Iwan A.T.; Lyons, David A.; Simons, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Summary During central nervous system development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multi-lamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/Cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading. PMID:26166299

  1. Simulation of Flow Through Breach in Leading Edge at Mach 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A baseline solution for CFD Point 1 (Mach 24) in the STS-107 accident investigation was modified to include effects of holes through the leading edge into a vented cavity. The simulations were generated relatively quickly and early in the investigation by making simplifications to the leading edge cavity geometry. These simplifications in the breach simulations enabled: 1) A very quick grid generation procedure; 2) High fidelity corroboration of jet physics with internal surface impingements ensuing from a breach through the leading edge, fully coupled to the external shock layer flow at flight conditions. These simulations provided early evidence that the flow through a 2 inch diameter (or larger) breach enters the cavity with significant retention of external flow directionality. A normal jet directed into the cavity was not an appropriate model for these conditions at CFD Point 1 (Mach 24). The breach diameters were of the same order or larger than the local, external boundary-layer thickness. High impingement heating and pressures on the downstream lip of the breach were computed. It is likely that hole shape would evolve as a slot cut in the direction of the external streamlines. In the case of the 6 inch diameter breach the boundary layer is fully ingested.

  2. LFC leading edge glove flight: Aircraft modification design, test article development and systems integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etchberger, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    Reduction of skin friction drag by suction of boundary layer air to maintain laminar flow has been known since Prandtl's published work in 1904. The dramatic increases in fuel costs and the potential for periods of limited fuel availability provided the impetus to explore technologies to reduce transport aircraft fuel consumption. NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. This report documents the Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments in designing and fabricating a leading-edge flight test article incorporating boundary layer suction slots to be flown by NASA on their modified JetStar aircraft. Lockheed-Georgia Company performed as the integration contractor to design the JetStar aircraft modification to accept both a Lockheed and a McDonnell Douglas flight test article. McDonnell Douglas uses a porous skin concept. The report describes aerodynamic analyses, fabrication techniques, JetStar modifications, instrumentation requirements, and structural analyses and testing for the Lockheed test article. NASA will flight test the two LFC leading-edge test articles in a simulated commercial environment over a 6 to 8 month period in 1984. The objective of the flight test program is to evaluate the effectiveness of LFC leading-edge systems in reducing skin friction drag and consequently improving fuel efficiency.

  3. Spanwise gradients in flow speed and leading edge vortex attachment on low Reynolds number wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Thierry; David, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    It is now accepted that the aerodynamic performance of low aspect ratio revolving wings, such as insect wings or maple seed membranes, largely relies on sustained leading edge vortex attachment. However, the mechanisms responsible for this sustained attachment are still poorly understood. Here, we compute the Navier-Stokes solution of the flow around a finite wing (i) subjected to a uniform oncoming flow, (ii) subjected to a spanwise varying oncoming flow and (iii) revolving about its root. Therefore, we are able to isolate the mechanisms associated with the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed from those associated with centrifugal and Coriolis effects. We show that over flapping amplitudes typical of insect flight the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed may suffice in maintaining leading edge vortex attachment. We correlate this result with the development of spanwise flow and we evaluate the sensitivity of such a mechanism to the Reynolds number. It is noted, however, that leading edge vortex attachment through the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed does not promote large lift, which ultimately arises from centrifugal and Coriolis effects.

  4. Fibronectin Rigidity Response through Fyn and p130Cas Recruitment to the Leading Edge

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Ana

    2006-01-01

    Cell motility on extracellular matrices critically depends on matrix rigidity, which affects cell adhesion and formation of focal contacts. Receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα) and the αvβ3 integrin form a rigidity-responsive complex at the leading edge. Here we show that the rigidity response through increased spreading and growth correlates with leading edge recruitment of Fyn, but not endogenous c-Src. Recruitment of Fyn requires the palmitoylation site near the N-terminus and addition of that site to c-Src enables it to support a rigidity response. In all cases, the rigidity response correlates with the recruitment of the Src family kinase to early adhesions. The stretch-activated substrate of Fyn and c-Src, p130Cas, is also required for a rigidity response and it is phosphorylated at the leading edge in a Fyn-dependent process. A possible mechanism for the fibronectin rigidity response involves force-dependent Fyn phosphorylation of p130Cas with rigidity-dependent displacement. With the greater displacement of Fyn from p130Cas on softer surfaces, there will be less phosphorylation. These studies emphasize the importance of force and nanometer-level movements in cell growth and function. PMID:16597701

  5. Thermal-structural analysis of the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge of hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongpeng, Liu; Weiqiang, Liu

    2016-10-01

    One of the main challenges for the hypersonic vehicle is its thermal protection, more specifically, the cooling of its leading edge. To investigate the feasibility of a platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge structure, thermal/stress distributions for steady-state flight conditions are calculated numerically. Studies are carried on for IN718/Na, C-103/Na and T-111/Li compatible material combinations of heat pipe under nominal operations and a central heat pipe failure cases, and the influence of wall thickness on the design robustness is also investigated. And the heat transfer limits (the sonic limit, the capillary limit and the boiling limit) are also computed to check the operation of platelet heat pipes. The results indicate that, with a 15 mm leading edge radius and a wall thickness of 0.5 mm, C-103/Na and T-111/Li combinations of heat pipe is capable of withstanding both nominal and failure conditions for Mach 8 and Mach 10 flight respectively.

  6. Experimental investigation of the leading edge vortex on vertical axis wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Reeve; McKeon, Beverley

    2012-11-01

    A NACA 0018 airfoil is pitched about the leading edge over a large angle of attack range (+/- ~40°) at a chord Reynolds number of 110,000 to simulate the flow over a single blade in a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements are made to investigate the effects of pitching on leading edge vortex (LEV) development and separation. Time resolved experiments are performed to track vortex formation and convection over the airfoil for sinusoidal pitching motions corresponding to a VAWT trajectory as well as impulsive pitch up and pitch down motions. These results are compared to the wake of steady, post stall, high angle of attack airfoils (α =20° -30°). The characteristics of the leading edge vortex development and subsequent separation from the airfoil are discussed, with a view to characterizing its effect on power generation with VAWTs and future flow control strategies for turbine performance improvement. Funding from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Controlled vortical flow on delta wings through unsteady leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Roberts, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The vortical flow over a delta wing contributes an important part of the lift - the so called nonlinear lift. Controlling this vortical flow with its favorable influence would enhance aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack. Several previous studies have shown that control of the vortical flow field is possible through the use of blowing jets. The present experimental research studies vortical flow control by applying a new blowing scheme to the rounded leading edge of a delta wing; this blowing scheme is called Tangential Leading Edge Blowing (TLEB). Vortical flow response both to steady blowing and to unsteady blowing is investigated. It is found that TLEB can redevelop stable, strong vortices even in the post-stall angle of attack regime. Analysis of the steady data shows that the effect of leading edge blowing can be interpreted as an effective change in angle of attack. The examination of the fundamental time scales for vortical flow re-organization after the application of blowing for different initial states of the flow field is studied. Different time scales for flow re-organization are shown to depend upon the effective angle of attack. A faster response time can be achieved at angles of attack beyond stall by a suitable choice of the initial blowing momentum strength. Consequently, TLEB shows the potential of controlling the vortical flow over a wide range of angles of attack; i.e., in both for pre-stall and post-stall conditions.

  8. A Reynolds Number Study of Wing Leading-Edge Effects on a Supersonic Transport Model at Mach 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. Susan; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Chu, Julio

    1999-01-01

    A representative supersonic transport design was tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) in its original configuration with small-radius leading-edge flaps and also with modified large-radius inboard leading-edge flaps. Aerodynamic data were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers at a Mach number of 0.3 and angles of attack up to 16 deg. Increasing the radius of the inboard leading-edge flap delayed nose-up pitching moment to a higher lift coefficient. Deflecting the large-radius leading-edge flap produced an overall decrease in lift coefficient and delayed nose-up pitching moment to even higher angles of attack as compared with the undeflected large- radius leading-edge flap. At angles of attack corresponding to the maximum untrimmed lift-to-drag ratio, lift and drag coefficients decreased while lift-to-drag ratio increased with increasing Reynolds number. At an angle of attack of 13.5 deg., the pitching-moment coefficient was nearly constant with increasing Reynolds number for both the small-radius leading-edge flap and the deflected large-radius leading-edge flap. However, the pitching moment coefficient increased with increasing Reynolds number for the undeflected large-radius leading-edge flap above a chord Reynolds number of about 35 x 10 (exp 6).

  9. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 3. University Park Campus School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  10. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 1. Academy of the Pacific Rim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  11. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 2. Noble Street Charter High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  12. Translocating myonuclei have distinct leading and lagging edges that require kinesin and dynein.

    PubMed

    Folker, Eric S; Schulman, Victoria K; Baylies, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Nuclei are precisely positioned within all cells, and mispositioned nuclei are a hallmark of many muscle diseases. Myonuclear positioning is dependent on Kinesin and Dynein, but interactions between these motor proteins and their mechanisms of action are unclear. We find that in developing Drosophila muscles, Dynein and Kinesin work together to move nuclei in a single direction by two separate mechanisms that are spatially segregated. First, the two motors work together in a sequential pathway that acts from the cell cortex at the muscle poles. This mechanism requires Kinesin-dependent localization of Dynein to cell cortex near the muscle pole. From this location Dynein can pull microtubule minus-ends and the attached myonuclei toward the muscle pole. Second, the motors exert forces directly on individual nuclei independently of the cortical pathway. However, the activities of the two motors on the nucleus are polarized relative to the direction of myonuclear translocation: Kinesin acts at the leading edge of the nucleus, whereas Dynein acts at the lagging edge of the nucleus. Consistent with the activities of Kinesin and Dynein being polarized on the nucleus, nuclei rarely change direction, and those that do, reorient to maintain the same leading edge. Conversely, nuclei in both Kinesin and Dynein mutant embryos change direction more often and do not maintain the same leading edge when changing directions. These data implicate Kinesin and Dynein in two distinct and independently regulated mechanisms of moving myonuclei, which together maximize the ability of myonuclei to achieve their proper localizations within the constraints imposed by embryonic development.

  13. Precocious reproduction increases at the leading edge of a mangrove range expansion.

    PubMed

    Dangremond, Emily M; Feller, Ilka C

    2016-07-01

    Climate change-driven shifts in species ranges are ongoing and expected to increase. However, life-history traits may interact with climate to influence species ranges, potentially accelerating or slowing range shifts in response to climate change. Tropical mangroves have expanded their ranges poleward in the last three decades. Here, we report on a shift at the range edge in life-history traits related to reproduction and dispersal. With a common garden experiment and field observations, we show that Rhizophora mangle individuals from northern populations reproduce at a younger age than those from southern populations. In a common garden at the northern range limit, 38% of individuals from the northernmost population were reproductive by age 2, but less than 10% of individuals from the southernmost population were reproductive by the same age, with intermediate amounts of reproduction from intermediate latitudes. Field observations show a similar pattern of younger reproductive individuals toward the northern range limit. We also demonstrate a shift toward larger propagule size in populations at the leading range edge, which may aid seedling growth. The substantial increase in precocious reproduction at the leading edge of the R. mangle range could accelerate population growth and hasten the expansion of mangroves into salt marshes. PMID:27547335

  14. Leading- and trailing-edge effects on the aeromechanics of membrane aerofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbós-Torrent, Sara; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Palacios, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    This study explores the effect that geometry of silver steel supports have on the aeromechanic performance of membrane aerofoils. Tests are performed at low Reynolds numbers, Re=9×104, and incidences of 2°-25° High-speed photogrammetry as well as force measurements are carried out to explore the effects of four different leading-edge (LE) and trailing-edge (TE) designs on the performance of membrane aerofoils. Results indicate that the mean camber as well as membrane vibrations (both mode shape and frequency) change with geometry and size of the LE and TE supports. The LE/TE supports with a rectangular cross-section consistently provide higher lift forces and higher mean camber deformations compared to the support with circular cross-section. The membrane vibrations are also found to be higher for aerofoils with LE/TE supports with rectangular cross-section. Moreover, it is shown that the LE/TE supports deflect under aerodynamic loading and consequently alter the performance of the aerofoil. Furthermore, some of the supports are found to vibrate at their resonance frequency. In all, this study quantifies the impact of the leading- and trailing-edge support on the membrane and provides guidelines for geometry selection for future studies.

  15. An experimental investigation of convective heat transfer at the leading edge of a gas turbine airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendron, S.; Marchand, N. J.; Korn, C.; Immarigeon, J. P.; Kacprzynski, J. J.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental methods used to determine the surface temperatures and heat-transfer coefficients at the leading edge, and elsewhere over the surface, of a specially designed double-edge wedge shell specimen subjected to cyclic heating in a high velocity hot gas stream generated by a burner rig. The methods included temperature measurements with thermocouples (embedded below the surface) as well as surface temperature measurements by optical pyrometry. The experiments were carried out at gas temperatures between 806 to 1323 C and velocities in the range from Mach 0.32 to Mach 0.39. The calibration procedures for each method, the various testing conditions to which the airfoil-like specimen was exposed and the results pertaining to the determination of the surface temperatures and heat-transfer coefficients are described and discussed.

  16. Flow visualization of vortices locked by spanwise blowing over wings featuring a unique leading and trailing-edge flap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Flow visualization studies were conducted to qualitatively determine the effects of active generation and augmentation of vortex flow over wings by blowing a discrete jet in a spanwise direction in the channel formed by extension of upper surface leading- and trailing-edge flaps. Spanwise blowing from a reflection plane over a rectangular wing was found to generate and lock a dual corotating vortex system within the channel and, at sufficient blowing rates, cause the separated flow off the upper end of the leading-edge flap to reattach to the trailing-edge flap. Test parameters included wing angle of attack, jet momentum coefficient, leading- and trailing-edge flap deflection angle, and jet location above the wing surface. Effects due to removal of the leading- and trailing-edge flap were also investigated.

  17. Development of AFE aerobrake aerothermodynamic data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Paul C.; Rochelle, W. C.; Mueller, S. R.; Colovin, J. E.; Scott, C. D.; Curry, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The computation method developed for the NASA Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) data book generates a design reference for the AFE's aerothermodynamic environment using an optimized technology for a 4100-lb vehicle. This environment is defined by convective, radiative, and total heating rates, radiation equilibrium temperatures, and local surface pressures along the AFE pitch-plane and associated off-pitch planes. The Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure is the major program code used in this analysis; a partially catalytic wall was assumed on the basis of measured recombination rates.

  18. How differential deflection of the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps affected the handling qua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    How differential deflection of the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps affected the handling qualities of this modified F/A-18A was evaluated during the first check flight in the Active Aeroelastic Wing program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Active Aeroelastic Wing program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center seeks to determine the advantages of twisting flexible wings for primary maneuvering roll control at transonic and supersonic speeds, with traditional control surfaces such as ailerons and leading-edge flaps used to aerodynamically induce the twist. From flight test and simulation data, the program intends to develop structural modeling techniques and tools to help design lighter, more flexible high aspect-ratio wings for future high-performance aircraft, which could translate to more economical operation or greater payload capability. AAW flight tests began in November, 2002 with checkout and parameter-identification flights. Based on data obtained during the first flight series, new flight control software will be developed and a second series of research flights will then evaluate the AAW concept in a real-world environment. The program uses wings that were modified to the flexibility of the original pre-production F-18 wing. Other modifications include a new actuator to operate the outboard leading edge flap over a greater range and rate, and a research flight control system to host the aeroelastic wing control laws. The Active Aeroelastic Wing Program is jointly funded and managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, with Boeing's Phantom Works as prime contractor for wing modifications and flight control software development. The F/A-18A aircraft was provided by the Naval Aviation Systems Test Team and modified for its research role by NASA Dryden technicians.

  19. Flexible Metallic Overwrap Concept Developed for On-Orbit Repair of Space Shuttle Orbiter Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank J.; Nesbitt, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The Columbia accident has focused attention on the critical need for on-orbit repair concepts for leading edges in the event that damage is incurred during space shuttle orbiter flight. Damage that is considered as potentially catastrophic for orbiter leading edges ranges from simple cracks to holes as large as 16 in. in diameter. NASA is particularly interested in examining potential solutions for areas of larger damage since such a problem was identified as the cause for the Columbia disaster. One possible idea for the on-orbit repair of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) leading edges is an overwrap concept that would use a metallic sheet flexible enough to conform to the contours of the orbiter and robust enough to protect any problem area from catastrophic failure during reentry. The simplified view of the application of a refractory metal sheet over a mockup of shuttle orbiter panel 9, which experiences the highest temperatures on the shuttle during reentry is shown. The metallic overwrap concept is attractive because of its versatility as well as the ease with which it can be included in an onboard repair kit. Reentry of the orbiter into Earth's atmosphere imposes extreme requirements on repair materials. Temperatures can exceed 1650 C for up to 15 min in the presence of an extremely oxidizing plasma environment. Several other factors are critical, including catalysity, emissivity, and vibrational and aerodynamic loads. Materials chosen for this application will need to be evaluated with respect to high-temperature capability, resistance to oxidation, strength, coefficient of thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. The temperature profile across panel 9 during reentry as well as a schematic of the overwrap concept itself is shown.

  20. Flow visualization of leading-edge vortex enhancement by spanwise blowing. [swept wings - wind tunnel stability tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Flow visualization studies were conducted in a small pilot wind tunnel to determine qualitative effects of blowing a discrete jet essentially parallel to the leading edge of a 45 deg-swept trapezoidal wing featuring leading- and trailing-edge flaps. Test parameters included wing angle-of-attack, jet momentum coefficient, leading- and trailing-edge flap deflections, and nozzle chordwise displacement. Results of this study indicate that blowing from a reflection plane over the wing enhances the leading-edge vortex and delays vortex bursting to higher angles-of-attack and greater span distances. Increased blowing rates decrease vortex size, growth rate, and vertical displacement above the wing surface at a given span station and also extend the spanwise effectiveness of lateral blowing. Deflection of a leading-edge flap delays the beneficial effects of spanwise blowing to higher angles-of-attack. Nozzle chordwise locations investigated for the wing with and without leading-edge flap deflection appear equally effective in enhancing the separated leading-edge flow.

  1. Hypersonic aerospace vehicle leading-edge cooling using heat-pipe, transpiration and film-cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Modlin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of cooling hypersonic-vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heat fluxes was studied, using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipes and surface-mass-transfer cooling techniques. A generalized, transient, finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed that incorporated these effects and was demonstrated on an assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section and a SCRAMJET engine inlet leading-edge section. The hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed using an existing, experimentally verified heat-pipe model. Then the existing heat-pipe model was modified by adding both transpiration and film-cooling options as new surface boundary conditions. The models used to predict the leading-edge surface heat-transfer reduction effects of the transpiration and film cooling were modifications of more-generalized, empirically based models obtained from the literature. It is concluded that cooling leading-edge structures exposed to severe hypersonic-flight environments using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipe, surface transpiration, and film cooling methods appears feasible.

  2. The Leading Edge 250: Oblique wing aircraft configuration project, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Andre; Moore, Peri; Nguyen, Dan; Oganesyan, Petros; Palmer, Charles

    1988-01-01

    The design of a high speed transport aircraft using the oblique wing concept as a part of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft study is the Leading Edge 250 capable of travelling at Mach 4 with 250 passengers and has a 6,500 nautical mile range. Its innovation lies within its use of the unconventional oblique wing to provide efficient flight at any Mach number. Wave drag is kept to a minimum at high speed, while high lift is attained during critical takeoff and landing maneuvers by varying the sweep of the wing.

  3. Leading-edge vortex research: Some nonplanar concepts and current challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Osborn, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Some background information is provided for the Vortex Flow Aerodynamics Conference and that current slender wing airplanes do not use variable leading edge geometry to improve transonic drag polar is shown. Highlights of some of the initial studies combining wing camber, or flaps, with vortex flow are presented. Current vortex flap studies were reviewed to show that there is a large subsonic data base and that transonic and supersonic generic studies have begun. There is a need for validated flow field solvers to calculate vortex/shock interactions at transonic and supersonic speeds. Many important research opportunities exist for fundamental vortex flow investigations and for designing advanced fighter concepts.

  4. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Particulate Reinforced Diboride Composites for High Temperature Leading Edge Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Donald T.; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Bull, Jeff; Laub, Bernie; Reuther, James; Kinney, David; Kontinos, Dean; Beckman, Sarah; Stuffle, Kevin; Cull, A. D.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previous work on refractory diboride composites has shown that these systems have the potential for use in high temperature leading edge applications for reusable reentry vehicles. Experiments in reentry environments have shown that these materials have multiple use temperatures greater than 1900 C. The work to be discussed focuses on three compositions: HfB2/SiC, ZrB2/SiC, and ZrB2/C/SiC. These composites have been hot pressed and their mechanical properties measured at room and elevated temperatures. Extensive microstructural characterization has been conducted on polished cross sections and the fracture surfaces have been examined to determine their failure origins.

  5. Structure of unsteady flows at leading- and trailing-edges: Flow visualization and its interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockwell, D.; Atta, R.; Kramer, L.; Lawson, R.; Lusseyran, D.; Magness, C.; Sohn, D.; Staubli, T.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady two- and three-dimensional flow structure at leading and trailing edges of bodies can be characterized effectively using recently developed techniques for acquisition and interpretation of flow visualization. The techniques addressed here include: flow image/surface pressure correlations; 3-D reconstruction of flow structure from flow images; and interactive interpretation of flow images with theoretical simulations. These techniques can be employed in conjunction with: visual correlation and ensemble-averaging, both within a given image and between images; recognition of patterns from images; and estimates of velocity eigenfunctions from images.

  6. Estimating Blade Section Airloads from Blade Leading-Edge Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanAken, Johannes M.

    2003-01-01

    The Tilt-Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) test in the Duitse-Nederlandse Wind (DNW) Tunnel acquired blade pressure data for forward flight test conditions of a tiltrotor in helicopter mode. Chordwise pressure data at seven radial locations were integrated to obtain the blade section normal force. The present investigation evaluates the use of linear regression analysis and of neural networks in estimating the blade section normal force coefficient from a limited number of blade leading-edge pressure measurements and representative operating conditions. These network models are subsequently used to estimate the airloads at intermediate radial locations where only blade pressure measurements at the 3.5% chordwise stations are available.

  7. Carbon dioxide gas purification and analytical measurement for leading edge 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle Vogt, Sarah; Landoni, Cristian; Applegarth, Chuck; Browning, Matt; Succi, Marco; Pirola, Simona; Macchi, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    The use of purified carbon dioxide (CO2) has become a reality for leading edge 193 nm immersion lithography scanners. Traditionally, both dry and immersion 193 nm lithographic processes have constantly purged the optics stack with ultrahigh purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA). CO2 has been utilized for a similar purpose as UHPCDA. Airborne molecular contamniation (AMC) purification technologies and analytical measurement methods have been extensively developed to support the Lithography Tool Manufacturers purity requirements. This paper covers the analytical tests and characterizations carried out to assess impurity removal from 3.0 N CO2 (beverage grade) for its final utilization in 193 nm and EUV scanners.

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation Tests Performed on Space Shuttle Leading- Edge Materials Subjected to Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Martin, Richard E.; Bodis, James R.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the space shuttle Return To Flight efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center, a series of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tests were performed on reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite panels subjected to ballistic foam impact. The impact tests were conducted to refine and verify analytical models of an external tank foam strike on the space shuttle leading edge. The NDE tests were conducted to quantify the size and location of the resulting damage zone as well as to identify hidden damage.

  9. Initial development of an ablative leading edge for the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daforno, G.; Rose, L.; Graham, J.; Roy, P.

    1974-01-01

    A state-of-the-art preliminary design for typical wing areas is developed. Seven medium-density ablators (with/without honeycomb, flown on Apollo, Prime, X15A2) are evaluated. The screening tests include: (1) leading-edge models sequentially subjected to ascent heating, cold soak, entry heating, post-entry pressure fluctuations, and touchdown shock, and (2) virgin/charred models subjected to bondline strains. Two honeycomb reinforced 30 pcf elastomeric ablators were selected. Roughness/recession degradation of low speed aerodynamics appears acceptable. The design, including attachments, substructure and joints, is presented.

  10. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation in momentum on leading edge heat transfer is discussed. Numerical and experimental results are presented for both a circular leading edge and a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. Reynolds numbers in the range of 10,000 to 240,000 based on leading edge diameter are investigated. The surface of the body is held at a constant uniform temperature. Numerical and experimental results with and without spanwise variations are presented. Direct comparison of the two-dimensional results, that is, with no spanwise variations, to the analytical results of Frossling is very good. The numerical calculation, which uses the PARC3D code, solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, assuming steady laminar flow on the leading edge region. Experimentally, increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficient as high as 50 percent above the two-dimensional value were observed. Numerically, the heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase by as much as 25 percent. In general, under the same flow conditions, the circular leading edge produced a higher heat transfer rate than the elliptical leading edge. As a percentage of the respective two-dimensional values, the circular and elliptical leading edges showed similar sensitivity to span wise variations in momentum. By equating the root mean square of the amplitude of the spanwise variation in momentum to the turbulence intensity, a qualitative comparison between the present work and turbulent results was possible. It is shown that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  11. Subsonic balance and pressure investigation of a 60-deg delta wing with leading-edge devices (data report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Tingas, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    The drag reduction potential of leading edge devices on a 60 degree delta wing at high lift was examined. Geometric variations of fences, chordwise slots, pylon type vortex generators, leading edge vortex flaps, and sharp leading edge extensions were tested individually and in specific combinations to improve high-alpha drag performance with a minimum of low-alpha drag penalty. The force, moment, and surface static pressure data for angles of attack up to 23 degrees, at Mach and Reynolds numbers of 0.16 and 3.85 x 10 to the 6th power per meter are documented.

  12. Flow-induced noise control behind bluff bodies with various leading edges using the surface perturbation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. B.; Halim, D.; Cheng, L.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper is devoted to an investigation on the flow-induced noise control downstream of bluff bodies with various leading edges using the surface perturbation technique. Four typical leading edges used in various engineering applications were studied in this work: the semi-circular, square, 30° symmetric trapezoid and 30° asymmetric trapezoid leading edges. The surface perturbation was created by piezo-ceramic actuators embedded underneath the surface of a bluff body placed in a cross flow. To suppress the flow-induced noise downstream bluff bodies with those leading edges, the surface perturbation technique was implemented. Based on the experiments, a noise reduction in the duct of more than 14.0 dB has been achieved for all leading-edge cases. These results indicated that the vortex shedding and its flow-induced noise have been successfully suppressed by the proposed control scheme. The flow structure alteration around the bluff bodies and the shear layer shift phenomenon observed on the trailing edges were then investigated for interpreting the control mechanism for this flow-induced noise suppression, which were based on the vortex shedding strength suppression and vortex shedding frequency shift phenomenon. The effective control position for various leading edges was also studied for developing optimal control strategies for practical engineering applications.

  13. Dynamic Stall Measurements and Computations for a VR-12 Airfoil with a Variable Droop Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P. B.; McAlister, K. W.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Geissler, W.

    2003-01-01

    High density-altitude operations of helicopters with advanced performance and maneuver capabilities have lead to fundamental research on active high-lift system concepts for rotor blades. The requirement for this type of system was to improve the sectional lift-to-drag ratio by alleviating dynamic stall on the retreating blade while simultaneously reducing the transonic drag rise of the advancing blade. Both measured and computational results showed that a Variable Droop Leading Edge (VDLE) airfoil is a viable concept for application to a rotor high-lift system. Results are presented for a series of 2D compressible dynamic stall wind tunnel tests with supporting CFD results for selected test cases. These measurements and computations show a dramatic decrease in the drag and pitching moment associated with severe dynamic stall when the VDLE concept is applied to the Boeing VR-12 airfoil. Test results also show an elimination of the negative pitch damping observed in the baseline moment hysteresis curves.

  14. Leading-edge receptivity to a vortical freestream disturbance: A numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buter, Thomas A.; Reed, Helen L.

    1991-01-01

    The receptivity to freestream vorticity of the boundary layer over a flat plate with an elliptic leading edge is investigated numerically. The flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes system in general curvilinear coordinates with the vorticity and stream function as dependent variables. A finite-difference scheme which is second-order accurate in both space and time is used. As a first step, the steady basic-state solution is computed. Then a small amplitude vortical disturbance is introduced at the upstream boundary and the governing equations are solved time-accurately to evaluate the spatial and temporal growth of the perturbations leading to instability waves (Tollmien-Schlichting waves) inside the boundary layer. Preliminary results for a symmetric, 2-D disturbance reveal the presence of Tollmien-Schlichting waves aft of the flat-plate/ellipse juncture.

  15. The effect of undulating leading-edge modifications on NACA 0021 airfoil characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamzadeh, N.; Kelso, R. M.; Dally, B. B.; Hansen, K. L.

    2013-11-01

    In spite of its mammoth physical size, the humpback whale's manoeuvrability in hunting has captured the attention of biologists as well as fluid mechanists. It has now been established that the protrusions on the leading-edges of the humpback's pectoral flippers, known as tubercles, account for this species' agility and manoeuvrability. In the present work, Prandtl's nonlinear lifting-line theory was employed to propose a hypothesis that the favourable traits observed in the performance of tubercled lifting bodies are not exclusive to this form of leading-edge configuration. Accordingly, a novel alternative to tubercles was introduced and incorporated into the design of four airfoils that underwent wind tunnel force and pressure measurement tests in the transitional flow regime. In addition, a Computation Fluid Dynamics study was performed using the Shear Stress Transport transitional model in the context of unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes at several attack angles. The results from the numerical investigation are in reasonable agreement with those of the experiments, and suggest the presence of features that are also observed in flows over tubercled foils, most notably a distinct pair of streamwise vortices for each wavelength of the tubercle-like feature.

  16. Analog filtering methods improve leading edge timing performance of multiplexed SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, M. F.; Cates, J. W.; Grant, A. M.; Levin, C. S.

    2016-08-01

    Multiplexing many SiPMs to a single readout channel is an attractive option to reduce the readout complexity of high performance time of flight (TOF) PET systems. However, the additional dark counts and shaping from each SiPM cause significant baseline fluctuations in the output waveform, degrading timing measurements using a leading edge threshold. This work proposes the use of a simple analog filtering network to reduce the baseline fluctuations in highly multiplexed SiPM readouts. With 16 SiPMs multiplexed, the FWHM coincident timing resolution for single 3~\\text{mm}× 3~\\text{mm}× 20 mm LYSO crystals was improved from 401  ±  4 ps without filtering to 248  ±  5 ps with filtering. With 4 SiPMs multiplexed, using an array of 3~\\text{mm}× 3~\\text{mm}× 20 mm LFS crystals the mean time resolution was improved from 436  ±  6 ps to 249  ±  2 ps. Position information was acquired with a novel binary positioning network. All experiments were performed at room temperature with no active temperature regulation. These results show a promising technique for the construction of high performance multiplexed TOF PET readout systems using analog leading edge timing pickoff.

  17. Two Functionally Distinct Sources of Actin Monomers Supply the Leading Edge of Lamellipodia

    PubMed Central

    Vitriol, Eric A.; McMillen, Laura M.; Kapustina, Maryna; Gomez, Shawn M.; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Zheng, James Q.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lamellipodia, the sheet-like protrusions of motile cells, consist of networks of actin filaments (F-actin) regulated by the ordered assembly from and disassembly into actin monomers (G-actin). Traditionally, G-actin is thought to exist as a homogeneous pool. Here, we show that there are two functionally and molecularly distinct sources of G-actin that supply lamellipodial actin networks. G-actin originating from the cytosolic pool requires the monomer binding protein thymosin β4 (Tβ4) for optimal leading edge localization, is targeted to formins, and is responsible for creating an elevated G/F-actin ratio that promotes membrane protrusion. The second source of G-actin comes from recycled lamellipodia F-actin. Recycling occurs independently of Tβ4 and appears to regulate lamellipodia homeostasis. Tβ4-bound G-actin specifically localizes to the leading edge because it doesn’t interact with Arp2/3-mediated polymerization sites found throughout the lamellipodia. These findings demonstrate that actin networks can be constructed from multiple sources of monomers with discrete spatiotemporal functions. PMID:25865895

  18. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-11-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  19. Analog filtering methods improve leading edge timing performance of multiplexed SiPMs.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, M F; Cates, J W; Grant, A M; Levin, C S

    2016-08-21

    Multiplexing many SiPMs to a single readout channel is an attractive option to reduce the readout complexity of high performance time of flight (TOF) PET systems. However, the additional dark counts and shaping from each SiPM cause significant baseline fluctuations in the output waveform, degrading timing measurements using a leading edge threshold. This work proposes the use of a simple analog filtering network to reduce the baseline fluctuations in highly multiplexed SiPM readouts. With 16 SiPMs multiplexed, the FWHM coincident timing resolution for single [Formula: see text] mm LYSO crystals was improved from 401  ±  4 ps without filtering to 248  ±  5 ps with filtering. With 4 SiPMs multiplexed, using an array of [Formula: see text] mm LFS crystals the mean time resolution was improved from 436  ±  6 ps to 249  ±  2 ps. Position information was acquired with a novel binary positioning network. All experiments were performed at room temperature with no active temperature regulation. These results show a promising technique for the construction of high performance multiplexed TOF PET readout systems using analog leading edge timing pickoff.

  20. Analytical impact models and experimental test validation for the Columbia shuttle wing leading edge panels.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Metzinger, Kurt Evan; Gwinn, Kenneth West; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Korellis, John S.

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the analyses and the experimental mechanics program to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigation of the Shuttle Columbia accident. A synergism of the analysis and experimental effort is required to insure that the final analysis is valid - the experimental program provides both the material behavior and a basis for validation, while the analysis is required to insure the experimental effort provides behavior in the correct loading regime. Preliminary scoping calculations of foam impact onto the Shuttle Columbia's wing leading edge determined if enough energy was available to damage the leading edge panel. These analyses also determined the strain-rate regimes for various materials to provide the material test conditions. Experimental testing of the reinforced carbon-carbon wing panels then proceeded to provide the material behavior in a variety of configurations and strain-rates for flown or conditioned samples of the material. After determination of the important failure mechanisms of the material, validation experiments were designed to provide a basis of comparison for the analytical effort. Using this basis, the final analyses were used for test configuration, instrumentation location, and calibration definition in support of full-scale testing of the panels in June 2003. These tests subsequently confirmed the accident cause.

  1. The leading-edge stall of airfoils with various nose shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraljic, Matthew; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2015-11-01

    We study the inception of leading-edge stall on stationary, smooth thin airfoils with various nose shapes of the form xa (where 0 < a < 1 / 2) at low to moderately high chord Reynolds number flows. A reduced-order, multi-scale model problem is developed and solved using numerical simulations. The asymptotic theory demonstrates that a subsonic flow about a thin airfoil can be described in terms of an outer region, around most of the airfoil's chord, and an inner region, around the nose, that asymptotically match each other. The flow in the outer region is dominated by the classical thin airfoil theory. Scaled (magnified) coordinates and a modified (smaller) Reynolds number ReM are used to correctly account for the nonlinear behavior and extreme velocity changes in the inner region, where both the near-stagnation and high suction areas occur. The inner region problem is solved numerically to determine the inception of leading-edge stall on the nose. It is found that stall is delayed to higher angles of attack with the decrease of nose parameter a. Specifically, new airfoil shapes are proposed with increased stall angle at subsonic speeds and higher critical Mach numbers at transonic speeds.

  2. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  3. Dynamics Impact Tolerance of Shuttle RCC Leading Edge Panels Using LS-DYNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Jones, Lisa E.; Hardy, Robin C.; Spellman, Regina L.; Carney, Kelly S.; Melis, Matthew E.; Stockwell, Alan E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a research program conducted to enable accurate prediction of the impact tolerance of the shuttle Orbiter leading-edge wing panels using physics-based codes such as LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. The shuttle leading-edge panels are constructed of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon (RCC) composite material, which is used because of its thermal properties to protect the shuttle during reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. Accurate predictions of impact damage from insulating foam and other debris strikes that occur during launch required materials characterization of expected debris, including strain-rate effects. First, analytical models of individual foam and RCC materials were validated. Next, analytical models of foam cylinders impacting 6- in. x 6-in. RCC flat plates were developed and validated. LS-DYNA pre-test models of the RCC flat plate specimens established the impact velocity of the test for three damage levels: no-detectable damage, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) detectable damage, or visible damage such as a through crack or hole. Finally, the threshold of impact damage for RCC on representative Orbiter wing panels was predicted for both a small through crack and for NDE-detectable damage.

  4. Dynamic Impact Tolerance of Shuttle RCC Leading Edge Panels using LS-DYNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Jones, Lisa E.; Hardy, Robin C.; Spellman, Regina L.; Carney, Kelly S.; Melis, Matthew E.; Stockwell, Alan E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a research program conducted to enable accurate prediction of the impact tolerance of the shuttle Orbiter leading-edge wing panels using 'physics-based- codes such as LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. The shuttle leading-edge panels are constructed of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon (RCC) composite material, which issued because of its thermal properties to protect the shuttle during re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere. Accurate predictions of impact damage from insulating foam and other debris strikes that occur during launch required materials characterization of expected debris, including strain-rate effects. First, analytical models of individual foam and RCC materials were validated. Next, analytical models of individual foam cylinders impacting 6-in. x 6-in. RCC flat plates were developed and validated. LS-DYNA pre-test models of the RCC flat plate specimens established the impact velocity of the test for three damage levels: no-detectable damage, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) detectable damage, or visible damage such as a through crack or hole. Finally, the threshold of impact damage for RCC on representative Orbiter wing panels was predicted for both a small through crack and for NDE-detectable damage.

  5. Aerodynamic effects of leading-edge serrations on a two-dimensional airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the flow field and aerodynamic effects of leading-edge serrations on a two-dimensional airfoil at a Mach number of 0.13. The model was a NACA 66-012 airfoil section with a 0.76 m (30 in.) chord, 1.02 m (40 in.) span, and floor and end plates. It was mounted in the Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. Serrated brass strips of various sizes and shapes were attached to the model in the region of the leading edge. Force and moment data, and photographs of tuft patterns and of oil flow patterns are presented. Results indicated that the smaller serrations, when properly placed on the airfoil, created vortices that increased maximum lift and angle of attack for maximum lift. The drag of the airfoil was not increased by these serrations at airfoil angles of attack near zero and was decreased at large angles of attack. Important parameters were serration size, position on the airfoil, and spacing between serrations.

  6. Low-speed cascade investigation of loaded leading-edge compressor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, James C

    1956-01-01

    Six percent thick NACA 63-series compressor-blade sections having a loaded leading-edge A4K6 mean line have been investigated systematically in a two-dimensional porous-wall cascade over a range of Reynolds numbers from 160,000 to 385,000. Blades cambered to have isolated-airfoil lift coefficients of 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, and 2.4 were tested over the usable angle-of-attack range at inlet-air angles of 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees and solidities of 1.0 and 1.5. A comparison with data of NACA RM L51G31, shows that the angle-of-attack operating range is 2 degrees to 4 degrees less than the range for the uniformly loaded section; however, the wake losses near design angle of attack are slightly lower than those for the uniformly loaded section. Except for highly cambered blades at high inlet angles, the 63-(C s oA4K6)06 compressor-blade sections are capable of more efficient operation for moderate-speed subsonic compressors at design angle of attack than are the 65-(C s oa10)10 or the 65-(c s oA2I8b)10 compressor-blade sections. In contrast to the other sections, the loaded leading-edge sections are capable of operating efficiently at the lower Reynolds numbers.

  7. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter wing comprises of 22 leading edge panels on each side of the wing. These panels are part of the thermal protection system that protects the Orbiter wings from extreme heating that take place on the reentry in to the earth atmosphere. On some panels that experience extreme heating, liberation of silicon carbon (SiC) coating was observed on the slip side regions of the panels. Global structural and local fracture mechanics analyses were performed on these panels as a part of the root cause investigation of this coating liberation anomaly. The wing-leading-edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels, Panel 9, T-seal 10, and Panel 10, are shown in Figure 1 and the progression of the stress analysis models is presented in Figure 2. The global structural analyses showed minimal interaction between adjacent panels and the T-seal that bridges the gap between the panels. A bounding uniform temperature is applied to a representative panel and the resulting stress distribution is examined. For this loading condition, the interlaminar normal stresses showed negligible variation in the chord direction and increased values in the vicinity of the slip-side joggle shoulder. As such, a representative span wise slice on the panel can be taken and the cross section can be analyzed using plane strain analysis.

  8. Experimental Measurement and CFD Model Development of Thick Wind Turbine Airfoils with Leading Edge Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniaci, David C.; White, Edward B.; Wilcox, Benjamin; Langel, Christopher M.; van Dam, C. P.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2016-09-01

    Leading edge erosion and roughness accumulation is an issue observed with great variability by wind plant operators, but with little understanding of the effect on wind turbine performance. In wind tunnels, airfoil models are typically tested with standard grit roughness and trip tape to simulate the effects of roughness and erosion observed in field operation, but there is a lack of established relation between field measurements and wind tunnel test conditions. A research collaboration between lab, academic, and industry partners has sought to establish a method to estimate the effect of erosion in wind turbine blades that correlates to roughness and erosion measured in the field. Measurements of roughness and erosion were taken off of operational utility wind turbine blades using a profilometer. The field measurements were statistically reproduced in the wind tunnel on representative tip and midspan airfoils. Simultaneously, a computational model was developed and calibrated to capture the effect of roughness and erosion on airfoil transition and performance characteristics. The results indicate that the effects of field roughness fall between clean airfoil performance and the effects of transition tape. Severe leading edge erosion can cause detrimental performance effects beyond standard roughness. The results also indicate that a heavily eroded wind turbine blade can reduce annual energy production by over 5% for a utility scale wind turbine.

  9. Some Effects of Leading-Edge Sweep on Boundary-Layer Transition at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Gray T.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of crossflow and shock strength on transition of the laminar boundary layer behind a swept leading edge have been investigated analytically and with the aid of available experimental data. An approximate method of determining the crossflow Reynolds number on a leading edge of circular cross section at supersonic speeds is presented. The applicability of the critical crossflow criterion described by Owen and Randall for transition on swept wings in subsonic flow was examined for the case of supersonic flow over swept circular cylinders. A wide range of applicability of the subsonic critical values is indicated. The corresponding magnitude of crossflow velocity necessary to cause instability on the surface of a swept wing at supersonic speeds was also calculated and found to be small. The effects of shock strength on transition caused by Tollmien-Schlichting type of instability are discussed briefly. Changes in local Reynolds number, due to shock strength, were found analytically to have considerably more effect on transition caused by Tollmien-Schlichting instability than on transition caused by crossflow instability. Changes in the mechanism controlling transition from Tollmien-Schlichting instability to crossflow instability were found to be possible as a wing is swept back and to result in large reductions in the length of laminar flow.

  10. Reynolds number effects on leading edge vortex development on a waving wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. R.; Babinsky, H.

    2011-07-01

    The waving wing experiment is a fully three-dimensional simplification of the flapping wing motion observed in nature. The spanwise velocity gradient and wing starting and stopping acceleration that exist on an insect-like flapping wing are generated by rotational motion of a finite span wing. The flow development around a waving wing at Reynolds number between 10,000 and 60,000 has been studied using flow visualization and high-speed PIV to capture the unsteady velocity field. Lift and drag forces have been measured over a range of angles of attack, and the lift curve shape was similar in all cases. A transient high-lift peak approximately 1.5 times the quasi-steady value occurred in the first chord length of travel, caused by the formation of a strong attached leading edge vortex. This vortex appears to develop and shed more quickly at lower Reynolds numbers. The circulation of the leading edge vortex has been measured and agrees well with force data.

  11. Navier-Stokes analysis of airfoils with leading edge ice accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the flowfield characteristics and the performance degradation of an airfoil with leading edge ice accretions was performed. The important fluid dynamic processes were identified and calculated. Among these were the leading edge separation bubble at low angles of attack, complete separation on the low pressure surface resulting in premature shell, drag rise due to the ice shape, and the effects of angle of attack on the separated flow field. Comparisons to experimental results were conducted to confirm these calculations. A computer code which solves the Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions, ARC2D, was used to perform the calculations. A Modified Mixing Length turbulence model was developed to produce grids for several ice shape and airfoil combinations. Results indicate that the ability to predict overall performance characteristics, such as lift and drag, at low angles of attack is excellent. Transition location is important for accurately determining separation bubble shape. Details of the flowfield in and downstream of the separated regions requires some modifications. Calculations for the stalled airfoil indicate periodic shedding of vorticity that was generated aft of the ice accretion. Time averaged pressure values produce results which compare favorably with experimental information. A turbulence model which accounts for the history effects in the flow may be justified.

  12. Segregation of leading-edge and uropod components into specific lipid rafts during T cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Moutón, Concepción; Abad, Jose Luis; Mira, Emilia; Lacalle, Rosa Ana; Gallardo, Eduard; Jiménez-Baranda, Sonia; Illa, Isabel; Bernad, Antonio; Mañes, Santos; Martínez-A., Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Redistribution of specialized molecules in migrating cells develops asymmetry between two opposite cell poles, the leading edge and the uropod. We show that acquisition of a motile phenotype in T lymphocytes results in the asymmetric redistribution of ganglioside GM3- and GM1-enriched raft domains to the leading edge and to the uropod, respectively. This segregation to each cell pole parallels the specific redistribution of membrane proteins associated to each raft subfraction. Our data suggest that raft partitioning is a major determinant for protein redistribution in polarized T cells, as ectopic expression of raft-associated proteins results in their asymmetric redistribution, whereas non-raft-partitioned mutants of these proteins are distributed homogeneously in the polarized cell membrane. Both acquisition of a migratory phenotype and SDF-1α-induced chemotaxis are cholesterol depletion-sensitive. Finally, GM3 and GM1 raft redistribution requires an intact actin cytoskeleton, but is insensitive to microtubule disruption. We propose that membrane protein segregation not only between raft and nonraft domains but also between distinct raft subdomains may be an organizational principle that mediates redistribution of specialized molecules needed for T cell migration. PMID:11493690

  13. Experimental Study of Shock Wave Interference Heating on a Cylindrical Leading Edge. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study of shock wave interference heating on a cylindrical leading edge representative of the cowl of a rectangular hypersonic engine inlet at Mach numbers of 6.3, 6.5, and 8.0 is presented. Stream Reynolds numbers ranged from 0.5 x 106 to 4.9 x 106 per ft. and stream total temperature ranged from 2100 to 3400 R. The model consisted of a 3" dia. cylinder and a shock generation wedge articulated to angles of 10, 12.5, and 15 deg. A fundamental understanding was obtained of the fluid mechanics of shock wave interference induced flow impingement on a cylindrical leading edge and the attendant surface pressure and heat flux distributions. The first detailed heat transfer rate and pressure distributions for two dimensional shock wave interference on a cylinder was provided along with insight into the effects of specific heat variation with temperature on the phenomena. Results show that the flow around a body in hypersonic flow is altered significantly by the shock wave interference pattern that is created by an oblique shock wave from an external source intersecting the bow shock wave produced in front of the body.

  14. Space Shuttle Orbiter Wing-Leading-Edge Panel Thermo-Mechanical Analysis for Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2010-01-01

    Linear elastic, thermo-mechanical stress analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels is presented for entry heating conditions. The wing-leading-edge panels are made from reinforced carbon-carbon and serve as a part of the overall thermal protection system. Three-dimensional finite element models are described for three configurations: integrated configuration, an independent single-panel configuration, and a local lower-apex joggle segment. Entry temperature conditions are imposed and the through-the-thickness response is examined. From the integrated model, it was concluded that individual panels can be analyzed independently since minimal interaction between adjacent components occurred. From the independent single-panel model, it was concluded that increased through-the-thickness stress levels developed all along the chord of a panel s slip-side joggle region, and hence isolated local joggle sections will exhibit the same trend. From the local joggle models, it was concluded that two-dimensional plane-strain models can be used to study the influence of subsurface defects along the slip-side joggle region of these panels.

  15. Analytical observations on the aerodynamics of a delta wing with leading edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, S.; Tavella, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a leading edge flap on the aerodynamics of a low aspect ratio delta wing is studied analytically. The separated flow field about the wing is represented by a simple vortex model composed of a conical straight vortex sheet and a concentrated vortex. The analysis is carried out in the cross flow plane by mapping the wing trace, by means of the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation into the real axis of the transformed plane. Particular attention is given to the influence of the angle of attack and flap deflection angle on lift and drag forces. Both lift and drag decrease with flap deflection, while the lift-to-drag ratioe increases. A simple coordinate transformation is used to obtain a closed form expression for the lift-to-drag ratio as a function of flap deflection. The main effect of leading edge flap deflection is a partial suppression of the separated flow on the leeside of the wing. Qualitative comparison with experiments is presented, showing agreement in the general trends.

  16. Leading edge vortex dynamics on a pitching delta wing. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemay, Scott P.

    1988-01-01

    The leading edge flow structure was investigated on a 70 deg flat plate delta wing which was pitched about its 1/2 chord position, to increase understanding of the high angle of attack aerodynamics on an unsteady delta wing. The wing was sinusoidally pitched at reduced frequencies ranging from k being identical with 2pi fc/u = 0.05 to 0.30 at chord Reynolds numbers between 90,000 and 350,000, for angle of attack ranges of alpha = 29 to 39 deg and alpha = 0 to 45 deg. The wing was also impulsively pitched at an approximate rate of 0.7 rad/s. During these dynamic motions, visualization of the leading edge vorticies was obtained by entraining titanium tetrachloride into the flow at the model apex. The location of vortex breakdown was recorded using 16mm high speed motion picture photography. When the wing was sinusoidally pitched, a hysteresis was observed in the location of breakdown position. This hysteresis increased with reduced frequency. The velocity of breakdown propagation along the wing, and the phase lag between model motion and breakdown location were also determined. When the wing was impulsively pitched, several convective times were required for the vortex flow to reach a steady state. Detailed information was also obtained on the oscillation of breakdown position in both static and dynamic cases.

  17. Aerothermodynamic challenges of the Saenger space-transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschel, E. H.

    1991-09-01

    The two-stage-to-orbit Saenger space transportation system is the reference concept of the German hypersonics technology program. The technology development concentrates first on the needs of the lower stage. Its requirements on aerothermodynamics and propulsion integration are sketched. The aerothermodynamic design challenge is discussed and the design tools and the design methodology are reviewed. The calibration of both the computational and the experimental methods, as well as the test of vehicle components like the inlet, control surfaces etc., make the Hypersonic Technology Experimental vehicle (HYTEX) mandatory. Contents and workplan of the technology program 'aerothermodynamics and propulsion integration' are laid out. Selected results from the current work are presented.

  18. Metallic Concepts for Repair of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Space Shuttle Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Nesbitt, James

    2007-01-01

    The Columbia accident has focused attention on the critical need for on-orbit repair concepts for wing leading edges in the event that potentially catastrophic damage is incurred during Space Shuttle Orbiter flight. The leading edge of the space shuttle wings consists of a series of eleven panels on each side of the orbiter. These panels are fabricated from reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) which is a light weight composite with attractive strength at very high temperatures. The damage that was responsible for the loss of the Colombia space shuttle was deemed due to formation of a large hole in one these RCC leading edge panels produced by the impact of a large piece of foam. However, even small cracks in the RCC are considered as potentially catastrophic because of the high temperature re-entry environment. After the Columbia accident, NASA has explored various means to perform on-orbit repairs in the event that damage is sustained in future shuttle flights. Although large areas of damage, such as that which doomed Columbia, are not anticipated to re-occur due to various improvements to the shuttle, especially the foam attachment, NASA has also explored various options for both small and large area repair. This paper reports one large area repair concept referred to as the "metallic over-wrap." Environmental conditions during re-entry of the orbiter impose extreme requirements on the RCC leading edges as well as on any repair concepts. These requirements include temperatures up to 3000 F (1650 C) for up to 15 minutes in the presence of an extremely oxidizing plasma environment. Figure 1 shows the temperature profile across one panel (#9) which is subject to the highest temperatures during re-entry. Although the RCC possesses adequate mechanical strength at these temperatures, it lacks oxidation resistance. Oxidation protection is afforded by converting the outer layers of the RCC to SiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). At high temperatures in an oxidizing

  19. Effects of increased leading-edge thickness on performance of a transonic rotor blade. [in single stage transonic compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Urasek, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    A single-stage transonic compressor was tested with two rotor blade leading-edge configurations to investigate the effect of increased leading-edge thickness on the performance of a transonic blade row. The original rotor blade configuration was modified by cutting back the leading edge sufficiently to double the blade leading-edge thickness and thus the blade gap blockage in the tip region. At design speed this modification resulted in a decrease in rotor overall peak efficiency of four points. The major portion of this decrement in rotor overall peak efficienty was attributed to the flow conditions in the outer 30 percent of the blade span. At 70 and 90 percent of design speed, the modification had very little effect on rotor overall performance.

  20. Effect of canard position and wing leading-edge flap deflection on wing buffet at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.; Henderson, W. P.; Huffman, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model, with canard and wing planform typical of highly maneuverable aircraft, was tested. The addition of a canard above the wing chord plane, for the configuration with leading-edge flaps undeflected, produced substantially higher total configuration lift coefficients before buffet onset than the configuration with the canard off and leading-edge flaps undeflected. The wing buffet intensity was substantially lower for the canard-wing configuration than the wing-alone configuration. The low-canard configuration generally displayed the poorest buffet characteristics. Deflecting the wing leading-edge flaps substantially improved the wing buffet characteristics for canard-off configurations. The addition of the high canard did not appear to substantially improve the wing buffet characteristics of the wing with leading-edge flaps deflected.

  1. Aerothermodynamic testing requirements for future space transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Miller, Charles G., III

    1995-03-01

    Aerothermodynamics, encompassing aerodynamics, aeroheating, and fluid dynamic and physical processes, is the genesis for the design and development of advanced space transportation vehicles. It provides crucial information to other disciplines involved in the development process such as structures, materials, propulsion, and avionics. Sources of aerothermodynamic information include ground-based facilities, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and engineering computer codes, and flight experiments. Utilization of this triad is required to provide the optimum requirements while reducing undue design conservatism, risk, and cost. This paper discusses the role of ground-based facilities in the design of future space transportation system concepts. Testing methodology is addressed, including the iterative approach often required for the assessment and optimization of configurations from an aerothermodynamic perspective. The influence of vehicle shape and the transition from parametric studies for optimization to benchmark studies for final design and establishment of the flight data book is discussed. Future aerothermodynamic testing requirements including the need for new facilities are also presented.

  2. Quasi-chemostat behavior in the leading edge of B. subtilis biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a gram positive bacterium that is a model system commonly used to study biofilm formation. By performing wide-field time-lapse microscopy on a fluorescently labeled B. subtilis strain, we observe a well defined steady boundary layer at the edge of a biofilm growing on an nutrient infused agar gel substrate, within which the outward radial expansion growth predominantly occurs. Using distinct fluorescent protein markers as proxies of gene expression, we quantitatively measure how the width, velocity and ratio of motile cell to matrix cell phenotypes within this boundary layer responds to changes in environmental conditions (such as substrate agar percentage & temperature). We further propose that the steady state at the leading edge can be interpreted as a quasi-chemostat which may enable well controlled response experiments on a colony scale. Finally, we show that for low agar concentration (0.5 wt%), the cells exhibit swarming behavior, whose dynamics and swimming velocities are characterized using differential dynamic microscopy. We show the swarming state is associated with an unstable front which gives rise to fingering and branching growth patterns, illustrating the varied morphological response of the biofilm to environmental conditions

  3. A computer program for calculating aerodynamic characteristics of low aspect-ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The necessary information for using a computer program to predict distributed and total aerodynamic characteristics for low aspect ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation is presented. The flow is assumed to be steady and inviscid. The wing boundary condition is formulated by the Quasi-Vortex-Lattice method. The leading edge separated vortices are represented by discrete free vortex elements which are aligned with the local velocity vector at midpoints to satisfy the force free condition. The wake behind the trailing edge is also force free. The flow tangency boundary condition is satisfied on the wing, including the leading and trailing edges. The program is restricted to delta wings with zero thickness and no camber. It is written in FORTRAN language and runs on CDC 6600 computer.

  4. Aerothermodynamic data base. Data file contents report, phase C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Space shuttle aerothermodynamic data, collected from a continuing series of wind tunnel tests, are permanently stored with the Data Management Services (DMS) system. Information pertaining to current baseline configuration definition is also stored. Documentation of DMS processed data arranged sequentially and by space shuttle configuration is listed to provide an up-to-date record of all applicable aerothermodynamic data collected, processed, or summarized during the space shuttle program. Tables provide survey information to the various space shuttle managerial and technical levels.

  5. Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamics Research Facilty (STARFAC) instrumentation requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M.; Siemers, P. M.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Hoffman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation requirements for the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC) are presented. The typical physical properties of the terrestrial atmosphere are given along with representative atmospheric daytime ion concentrations and the equilibrium and nonequilibrium gas property comparison from a point away from a wall. STARFAC science and engineering measurements are given as are the TSS free stream gas analysis. The potential nonintrusive measurement techniques for hypersonic boundary layer research are outlined along with the quantitative physical measurement methods for aerothermodynamic studies.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Leading Edge Slats on Rigid Wing Sail Catamarans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelsea; O'Neill, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Rigid wing sails have created the fastest catamarans in history, however with the addition of a leading edge slat higher lift and faster speeds may be achieved. Slats are currently used on airplane wings to increase lift, but have not been implemented on a rigid wing sail catamaran. Using 3D modeling and computational fluid dynamics software, this research investigates the effect that slats have on the performance of rigid wing sail catamarans. Aerodynamics and hydrodynamics form the basis of the research. The preliminary results show an increase in the coefficient of lift for sail models with slats over sail models without slats, allowing the catamaran to perform at higher speeds. The ability of the slat to rotate has also been identified as a key factor in increasing the benefit of the slat. This work was supported by NSF site award 1358991.

  7. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  8. Experimental investigation on the composite cooling of a semicylinder leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ji-Rui; Ji, Hong-Hu

    Composite cooling of the leading edge region of a semicylinder simulating a turbine vane was studied experimentally. The cylinder's inner surface served as an impingement target for studying impingement cooling; the outer surface was used to study the film cooling effectiveness. The equipment for composite cooling was a sucked-wind tunnel with the test section of 140 x 200-sq m in cross section and with transparent windows for flow visualization. Three test models and five different impingement tubes were used. The effects of geometrical parameters of the test models and impingement tubes and of the location and direction of the film holes on both the impingement and the film cooling are described.

  9. Measurement of the temperature field downstream of simulated leading-edge film-cooling holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mee, D. J.; Ireland, P. T.; Bather, S.

    Experiments to measure the temperature field downstream of simulated leading-edge-region film-cooling holes were performed in an 11 m/s wind tunnel flow. Heated air was passed to a hollow 140 mm diameter cylinder in which three 10.5 mm diameter, spanwise-inclined, film-cooling holes had been machined. A fine nylon mesh, coated with encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals, was used to measure temperature contours downstream of the holes by moving the mesh relative to the holes and adjusting the power to the air heater. The measurements indicate the extent of the lateral spreading of the coolant gas and show the influence of hole location and coolant mass flow rate on film trajectory and spreading.

  10. Computational study of transition front on a swept wing leading-edge model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit; Spall, Robert E.; Dagenhart, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The e(N) method is employed with Navier-Stokes calculations to study 3D supersonic boundary layers at the leading-edge region of swept wings with attention given to the conditions for linear stability. Mean-flow profiles are computed as solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations, and the e(N) method is used to identify the onset of the transition. Specific treatment is given to the identification of parameters which affect the transition such as free-stream Reynolds number, wall cooling, and boundary-layer suction levels. The boundary layer can be stabilized to below N=10 levels in all locations by utilizing distributed suction, and enhanced stabilization can also be achieved by employing wall cooling and reduced free-stream Reynolds numbers. This study presents key calculations for corresponding experimental investigations by shedding light on requirements for test conditions and measurement requirements.

  11. Multiple leading edge vortices of unexpected strength in freely flying hawkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, L. Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Kelber, Almut; Heerenbrink, Marco Klein; Hedenström, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) is a universal mechanism enhancing lift in flying organisms. LEVs, generally illustrated as a single vortex attached to the wing throughout the downstroke, have not been studied quantitatively in freely flying insects. Previous findings are either qualitative or from flappers and tethered insects. We measure the flow above the wing of freely flying hawkmoths and find multiple simultaneous LEVs of varying strength and structure along the wingspan. At the inner wing there is a single, attached LEV, while at mid wing there are multiple LEVs, and towards the wingtip flow separates. At mid wing the LEV circulation is ~40% higher than in the wake, implying that the circulation unrelated to the LEV may reduce lift. The strong and complex LEV suggests relatively high flight power in hawmoths. The variable LEV structure may result in variable force production, influencing flight control in the animals. PMID:24253180

  12. Leading edge serrations which reduce the noise of low-speed rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic effects of serrated brass strips attached near the leading edges of two different size rotors were investigated. The two bladed rotors were tested in hover. Rotor rotational speed, blade angle, serration shape, and serration position were varied. The serrations were more effective as noise suppressors at rotor tip speeds less than 135 m/sec (444 ft/sec) than at higher speeds. high frequency noise was reduced but the low frequency rotational noise was little affected. Noise reductions from 4 to 8 db overall sound pressure level and 3 to 17 db in the upper octave bands were achieved on the 1.52 m (5.0 ft) diameter rotor. Noise reductions up to 4 db overall sound pressure level were measured for the 2.59 m (8.5 ft) diameter rotor at some conditions.

  13. 3D characterization of leading-edge vortex formation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Kyohei; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    We examine the vorticity transport mechanisms responsible for regulating the stability and strength of the leading-edge vortex (LEV) on rapidly pitching plates with different planforms (swept vs. rectangular) in a uniform airflow. All experiments are carried out using a cyber-physical experimental setup (Onoue et al., 2015, JFS vol. 55) and synchronized 3D PIV measurements. In the case of a swept wing, two distinct regions of intense spanwise flow are observed around the LEV centroid--a feature conspicuously absent on a rectangular pitching plate. The interaction between these spanwise flows and the LEV core seems to play a role in prolonging the LEV residence time at the cost of the vortex circulation growth rate and magnitude. Detailed control volume analysis is performed to elucidate the flow physics at work. This research is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  14. An experimental study of pressures on 60 deg Delta wings with leading edge vortex flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchman, J. F., III; Terry, J. E.; Donatelli, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel to determine surface pressures over a 60 deg sweep delta wing with three vortex flap designs. Extensive pressure data was collected to provide a base data set for comparison with computational design codes and to allow a better understanding of the flow over vortex flaps. The results indicated that vortex flaps can be designed which will contain the leading edge vortex with no spillage onto the wing upper surface. However, the tests also showed that flaps designed without accounting for flap thickness will not be optimum and the result can be oversized flaps, early flap vortex reattachment and a second separation and vortex at the wing/flap hinge line.

  15. Pressure investigation of NASA leading edge vortex flaps on a 60 deg Delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchman, J. F., III; Donatelli, D. A.; Terry, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Pressure distributions on a 60 deg Delta Wing with NASA designed leading edge vortex flaps (LEVF) were found in order to provide more pressure data for LEVF and to help verify NASA computer codes used in designing these flaps. These flaps were intended to be optimized designs based on these computer codes. However, the pressure distributions show that the flaps wre not optimum for the size and deflection specified. A second drag-producing vortex forming over the wing indicated that the flap was too large for the specified deflection. Also, it became apparent that flap thickness has a possible effect on the reattachment location of the vortex. Research is continuing to determine proper flap size and deflection relationships that provide well-behaved flowfields and acceptable hinge-moment characteristics.

  16. Application of superplastically formed and diffusion bonded aluminum to a laminar flow control leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyear, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. Laminar flow control was one such technology. Two approaches for achieving laminar flow were designed and manufactured under NASA sponsored programs: the perforated skin concept used at McDonnell Douglas and the slotted design used at Lockheed-Georgia. Both achieved laminar flow, with the slotted design to a lesser degree (JetStar flight test program). The latter design had several fabrication problems concerning springback and adhesive flow clogging the air flow passages. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments is documented in designing and fabricating a small section of a leading edge article addressing a simpler fabrication method to overcome the previous program's manufacturing problems, i.e., design and fabrication using advanced technologies such as diffusion bonding of aluminum, which has not been used on aerospace structures to date, and the superplastic forming of aluminum.

  17. Leading-edge transition and relaminarization phenomena on a subsonic high-lift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dam, C. P.; Vijgen, P. M. H. W.; Yip, L. P.; Potter, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Boundary-layer transition and relaminarization may have a critical effect on the flow development about multielement high-lift systems of subsonic transport aircraft with swept wings. The purpose of this paper is a study of transition phenomena in the leading-edge region of the various elements of a high-lift system. The flow phenomena studied include transition of the attachment-line flow, relaminarization, and crossflow instability. The calculations are based on pressure distributions measured in flight on the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle (Boeing 737-100) at a wing station where the flow approximated infinite swept wing conditions. The results indicate that significant regions of laminar flow can exist on all flap elements in flight. In future flight experiments the extent of these regions will be measured, and the transition mechanisms and the effect of laminar flow on the high-lift characteristics of the multi-element system will be further explored.

  18. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  19. Vibration and sound of an elastic wing actuated at its leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2012-01-01

    The motion and sound of a thin elastic plate, subject to uniform low-Mach flow and actuated at its leading edge, is studied. The linearized response to arbitrary small-amplitude translation and rotation is analyzed using Fourier decomposition of the forcing signal. Both periodic (sinusoidal) and non-periodic ("step-jump") actuations are investigated. When the frequency spectrum of the forcing signal contains an eigenfrequency Ωres of the unforced system, a resonance motion is excited and the plate oscillates at the corresponding eigenmode. The dynamical description is applied to formulate the acoustic problem, where the sources of sound include the plate velocity and fluid vorticity. Acoustic radiation of a dipole type is calculated and discussed in the limit where the plate is acoustically compact. In the case of sinusoidal excitation, plate elasticity has two opposite effects on sound radiation, depending on the forcing frequency: at frequencies close to Ωres, the near-resonance motion results in the generation of high sound levels; however, at frequencies far from Ωres, plate elasticity reduces the amplitude of plate deflection (compared to that of a rigid plate), leading to noise reduction. In the case of non-periodic actuation, the plate-fluid system amplifies those frequencies that are closest to Ωres, which, in turn, dominate the acoustic signature. The results identify the trailing edge noise as the main source of sound, dominating the sound generated by direct plate motion. We suggest the present theory as a preliminary tool for examining the acoustic signature of flapping flight, common in insects and flapping micro-air-vehicles.

  20. Cavitation on a semicircular leading-edge plate and NACA0015 hydrofoil: Visualization and velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. Yu.; Markovich, D. M.; Pervunin, K. S.; Timoshevskii, M. V.; Hanjalić, K.

    2014-12-01

    Using high-speed visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV), cavitating flows near a plane plate with a rounded leading edge and NACA0015 hydrofoil at angles of attack from 0° to 9° are studied. In the experiments, several known types of cavitation, as well as some differences, were detected with variation of the cavitation number. In particular, at small angles of attack (up to 3°), cavitation on the plate appears in the form of a streak array; on the hydrofoil, it appears in the form of individual bubbles. For the NACA0015 hydrofoil, isolated and intermittent streaks are divided and grow in regimes with developed cavitation; then, however, they merge in bubble clouds and form an extremely regular cellular structure. With an increase in the angle of attack to 9°, the structure of the cavitation cavity on the hydrofoil is changed by the streak structure, like in the case with the plate. In this work, it is shown that PIV permits one to measure the velocity in cavitating flows, in particular, within the gas-vapor phase. It was established from the analysis of distributions of the average flow velocity and moments of velocity fluctuations that the cavitation generation is caused by the development of the carrier fluid flow near the leading edge of the hydrofoil. Down the stream, however, the flow structure strongly depends on the cavitation regime, which is seen from the comparison of the distributions with the case of a single-phase flow. The presented measurements qualitatively verify general trends and show some quantitative distinctions for the two considered flowpast bodies.

  1. A mechanism for mitigation of blade-vortex interaction using leading edge blowing flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Chris; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of a vortical unsteady flow with structures is often encountered in engineering applications. Such flow structure interactions (FSI) can be responsible for generating significant loads and can have many detrimental structural and acoustic side effects, such as structural fatigue, radiated noise and even catastrophic results. Amongst the different types of FSI, the parallel blade-vortex interaction (BVI) is the most common, often encountered in helicopters and propulsors. In this work, we report on the implementation of leading edge blowing (LEB) active flow control for successfully minimizing the parallel BVI. Our results show reduction of the airfoil vibrations up to 38% based on the root-mean-square of the vibration velocity amplitude. This technique is based on displacing an incident vortex using a jet issued from the leading edge of a sharp airfoil effectively increasing the stand-off distance of the vortex from the body. The effectiveness of the method was experimentally analyzed using time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (TRDPIV) recorded at an 800 Hz rate, which is sufficient to resolve the spatio-temporal dynamics of the flow field and it was combined with simultaneous accelerometer measurements of the airfoil, which was free to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the freestream. Analysis of the flow field spectra and a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) of the TRDPIV data of the temporally resolved planar flow fields indicate that the LEB effectively modified the flow field surrounding the airfoil and increased the convecting vortices stand-off distance for over half of the airfoil chord length. It is shown that LEB also causes a redistribution of the flow field spectral energy over a larger range of frequencies.

  2. Insect Residue Contamination on Wing Leading Edge Surfaces: A Materials Investigation for Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzi, Tyler M.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2011-01-01

    Flight tests have shown that residue from insect strikes on aircraft wing leading edge surfaces may induce localized transition of laminar to turbulent flow. The highest density of insect populations have been observed between ground level and 153 m during light winds (2.6 -- 5.1 m/s), high humidity, and temperatures from 21 -- 29 C. At a critical residue height, dependent on the airfoil and Reynolds number, boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent results in increased drag and fuel consumption. Although this represents a minimal increase in fuel burn for conventional transport aircraft, future aircraft designs will rely on maintaining laminar flow across a larger portion of wing surfaces to reduce fuel burn during cruise. Thus, insect residue adhesion mitigation is most critical during takeoff and initial climb to maintain laminar flow in fuel-efficient aircraft configurations. Several exterior treatments investigated to mitigate insect residue buildup (e.g., paper, scrapers, surfactants, flexible surfaces) have shown potential; however, implementation has proven to be impractical. Current research is focused on evaluation of wing leading edge surface coatings that may reduce insect residue adhesion. Initial work under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Program focused on evaluation of several commercially available products (commercial off-the-shelf, COTS), polymers, and substituted alkoxy silanes that were applied to aluminum (Al) substrates. Surface energies of these coatings were determined from contact angle data and were correlated to residual insect excrescence on coated aluminum substrates using a custom-built "bug gun." Quantification of insect excrescence surface coverage was evaluated by a series of digital photographic image processing techniques.

  3. Overview of aerothermodynamic loads definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Aerothermodynamic Loads Definition Study is to develop methods of accurately predicting the operating environment in advanced Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) propulsion systems, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) powerhead. Development of time averaged and time dependent three dimensional viscous computer codes as well as experimental verification and engine diagnostic testing are considered to be essential in achieving that objective. Time-averaged, nonsteady, and transient operating loads must all be well defined in order to accurately predict powerhead life. Described here is work in unsteady heat flow analysis, improved modeling of preburner flow, turbulence modeling for turbomachinery, computation of three dimensional flow with heat transfer, and unsteady viscous multi-blade row turbine analysis.

  4. A comparison of experimental and calculated thin-shell leading-edge buckling due to thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1988-01-01

    High-temperature thin-shell leading-edge buckling test data are analyzed using NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) as a finite element tool for predicting thermal buckling characteristics. Buckling points are predicted for several combinations of edge boundary conditions. The problem of relating the appropriate plate area to the edge stress distribution and the stress gradient is addressed in terms of analysis assumptions. Local plasticity was found to occur on the specimen analyzed, and this tended to simplify the basic problem since it effectively equalized the stress gradient from loaded edge to loaded edge. The initial loading was found to be difficult to select for the buckling analysis because of the transient nature of thermal stress. Multiple initial model loadings are likely required for complicated thermal stress time histories before a pertinent finite element buckling analysis can be achieved. The basic mode shapes determined from experimentation were correctly identified from computation.

  5. A Mesh Refinement Study on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2006-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the influence of varying mesh density on an LS-DYNA simulation of a rectangular-shaped foam projectile impacting the space shuttle leading edge Panel 6. The shuttle leading-edge panels are fabricated of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. During the study, nine cases were executed with all possible combinations of coarse, baseline, and fine meshes of the foam and panel. For each simulation, the same material properties and impact conditions were specified and only the mesh density was varied. In the baseline model, the shell elements representing the RCC panel are approximately 0.2-in. on edge, whereas the foam elements are about 0.5-in. on edge. The element nominal edge-length for the baseline panel was halved to create a fine panel (0.1-in. edge length) mesh and doubled to create a coarse panel (0.4-in. edge length) mesh. In addition, the element nominal edge-length of the baseline foam projectile was halved (0.25-in. edge length) to create a fine foam mesh and doubled (1.0-in. edge length) to create a coarse foam mesh. The initial impact velocity of the foam was 775 ft/s. The simulations were executed in LS-DYNA for 6 ms of simulation time. Contour plots of resultant panel displacement and effective stress in the foam were compared at four discrete time intervals. Also, time-history responses of internal and kinetic energy of the panel, kinetic and hourglass energy of the foam, and resultant contact force were plotted to determine the influence of mesh density.

  6. A Three-Dimensional Solution of Flows over Wings with Leading-Edge Vortex Separation. Part 1: Engineering Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, G. W.; Weber, J. A.; Johnson, F. T.; Lu, P.; Rubbert, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method of predicting forces, moments, and detailed surface pressures on thin, sharp-edged wings with leading-edge vortex separation in incompressible flow is presented. The method employs an inviscid flow model in which the wing and the rolled-up vortex sheets are represented by piecewise, continuous quadratic doublet sheet distributions. The Kutta condition is imposed on all wing edges. Computed results are compared with experimental data and with the predictions of the leading-edge suction analogy for a selected number of wing planforms over a wide range of angle of attack. These comparisons show the method to be very promising, capable of producing not only force predictions, but also accurate predictions of detailed surface pressure distributions, loads, and moments.

  7. Influence of leading edge bluntness on hypersonic flow in a generic internal-compression inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoy, V.; Egorov, I.; Mosharov, V.; Radchenko, V.; Skuratov, A.; Struminskaya, I.

    2015-06-01

    Flow and heat transfer inside a generic inlet are investigated experimentally. The cross section of the inlet is rectangular. The inlet is installed on a flat plat at a significant distance from the leading edge. The experiments are performed in TsAGI wind tunnel UT-1M working in the Ludwieg tube mode at Mach number M∞ = 5 and Reynolds numbers (based on the plate length L = 320 mm) Re∞L = 23 · 106 and 13 · 106. Steady flow duration is 40 ms. Optical panoramic methods are used for investigation of flow outside and inside the inlet as well. For this purpose, the cowl and one of two compressing wedges are made of a transparent material. Heat flux distribution is measured by thin luminescent Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP). Surface flow and shear stress visualization is performed by viscous oil containing luminophor particles. The investigation shows that at high contraction ratio of the inlet, an increase of plate or cowl bluntness to some critical value leads to sudden change of the flow structure.

  8. Spin-dependent transport for armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons between ferromagnetic leads.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benhu; Chen, Xiongwen; Zhou, Benliang; Ding, Kai-He; Zhou, Guanghui

    2011-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin-dependent transport for the system of an armchair-edge graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) between two ferromagnetic (FM) leads with arbitrary polarization directions at low temperatures, where a magnetic insulator is deposited on the AGNR to induce an exchange splitting between spin-up and -down carriers. By using the standard nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique, it is demonstrated that the spin-resolved transport property for the system depends sensitively on both the width of AGNR and the polarization strength of FM leads. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) around zero bias voltage possesses a pronounced plateau structure for a system with semiconducting 7-AGNR or metallic 8-AGNR in the absence of exchange splitting, but this plateau structure for the 8-AGNR system is remarkably broader than that for the 7-AGNR one. Interestingly, an increase of the exchange splitting Δ suppresses the amplitude of the structure for the 7-AGNR system. However, the TMR is much enhanced for the 8-AGNR system under a bias amplitude comparable to the splitting strength. Further, the current-induced spin-transfer torque (STT) for the 7-AGNR system is systematically larger than that for the 8-AGNR one. The findings here suggest the design of GNR-based spintronic devices by using a metallic AGNR, but it is more favorable to fabricate a current-controlled magnetic memory element by using a semiconducting AGNR.

  9. A simplified method for thermal analysis of a cowl leading edge subject to intense local shock-wave-interference heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, David M.; Camarda, Charles J.; Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-03-01

    Type IV shock wave interference heating on a blunt body causes extremely intense heating over a very localized region of the body. An analytical solution is presented to a heat transfer problem that approximates the shock wave interference heating of an engine cowl leading edge of the National Aero-Space Plane. The problem uses a simplified geometry to represent the leading edge. An analytical solution is developed that provides a means for approximating maximum temperature differences between the outer and inner surface temperatures of the leading edge. The solution is computationally efficient and, as a result, is well suited for conceptual and preliminary design or trade studies. Transient and steady state analyses are conducted, and results obtained from the analytical solution are compared with results of 2-D thermal finite element analyses over a wide range of design parameters. Isotropic materials as well as laminated composite materials are studied. Results of parametric studies are presented to indicate the effects of the thickness of the cowl leading edge and the width of the region heated by the shock wave interference on the thermal response of the leading edge.

  10. A simplified method for thermal analysis of a cowl leading edge subject to intense local shock-wave-interference heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, David M.; Camarda, Charles J.; Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Type IV shock wave interference heating on a blunt body causes extremely intense heating over a very localized region of the body. An analytical solution is presented to a heat transfer problem that approximates the shock wave interference heating of an engine cowl leading edge of the National Aero-Space Plane. The problem uses a simplified geometry to represent the leading edge. An analytical solution is developed that provides a means for approximating maximum temperature differences between the outer and inner surface temperatures of the leading edge. The solution is computationally efficient and, as a result, is well suited for conceptual and preliminary design or trade studies. Transient and steady state analyses are conducted, and results obtained from the analytical solution are compared with results of 2-D thermal finite element analyses over a wide range of design parameters. Isotropic materials as well as laminated composite materials are studied. Results of parametric studies are presented to indicate the effects of the thickness of the cowl leading edge and the width of the region heated by the shock wave interference on the thermal response of the leading edge.

  11. SIMS chemical analysis of extended impacts on the leading and trailing edges of LDEF experiment AO187-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amari, S.; Foote, J.; Simon, Charles G.; Swan, P.; Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Jessberger, E. K.; Lange, G.; Stadermann, F.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment AO187-2 consisted of 237 capture cells, 120 on the leading edge and 117 on the trailing edge. Each cell was made of polished Ge plates covered with 2.5 micron thick mylar foil at 200 microns from the Ge. Although all leading edge cells and 105 trailing edge cells had lost their plastic covers during flight, optical and electron microscope examination revealed extended impacts in bare cells from either edge that apparently were produced by high velocity projectiles while the plastic foils were still in place. Detailed optical scanning yielded 53 extended impacts on 100 bare cells from the trailing edge that were selected for SIMS chemical analysis. Lateral multi-element ion probe profiles were obtained on 40 of these impacts. Material that can be attributed to the incoming projectiles was found in all analyzed extended compact features and most seem to be associated with cosmic dust particles. However, LDEF deposits are systematically enriched in the refractory elements Al, Ca, and Ti relative to Mg and Fe when compared to IDP's collected in the stratosphere and to chondritic compositions. These differences are most likely due to elemental fractionation effects during the high velocity impact but real differences between interplanetary particles captured on LDEF and stratospheric IDP's cannot be excluded. Recently we extended our studies to cells from the leading edge and the covered cells from the trailing edge. The 12 covered cells contain 20 extended impact candidates. Ion probe analysis of 3 yielded results similar to those obtained for impacts on the bare cells from the trailing edge. Optical scanning of the bare leading edge cell also reveals many extended impacts (42 on 22 cells scanned to date), demonstrating that the cover foils remained intact at least for some time. However, SIMS analysis showed elements that can reasonably be attributed to micrometeoroids in only 2 out of 11 impacts. Eight impacts

  12. SIMS chemical analysis of extended impacts on the leading and trailing edges of LDEF experiment AO187-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amari, S.; Foote, J.; Swan, P.; Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Lange, G.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous 'extended impacts' found in both leading and trailing edge capture cells were successfully analyzed for the chemical composition of projectile residues by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Most data were obtained from the trailing edge cells where 45 of 58 impacts were classified as 'probably natural' and the remainder as 'possibly man-made debris.' This is in striking contrast to leading edge cells where 9 of 11 impacts so far measured are definitely classified as orbital debris. Although all the leading edge cells had lost their plastic entrance foils during flight, the rate of foil failure was similar to that of the trailing edge cells, 10 percent of which were recovered intact. Ultraviolet embrittlement is suspected as the major cause of failure on both leading and trailing edges. The major impediment to the accurate determination of projectile chemistry is the fractionation of volatile and refractory elements in the hypervelocity impact and redeposition processes. This effect had been noted in a simulation experiment but is more pronounced in the LDEF capture cells, probably due to the higher average velocities of the space impacts. Surface contamination of the pure Ge surfaces with a substance rich in Si, but also containing Mg and Al, provides an additional problem for the accurate determination of impactor chemistry. The effect is variable, being much larger on surfaces that were exposed to space than in those cells that remained intact. Future work will concentrate on the analyses of more leading edge impacts and the development of new SIMS techniques for the measurement of elemental abundances in extended impacts.

  13. Preservation of wing leading edge suction at the plane of symmetry as a factor in wing-fuselage design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    Most fuselage geometries cover a portion of the wing leading edge near the plane of symmetry, and it seems reasonable to expect that a large fraction of the leading edge suction which would be developed by the covered wing at high angles of attack is not developed on the fuselage. This is one of the reasons that the Oswald span efficiency factor for the wing body combination fails to approach the value predicted by lifting line theory for the isolated wing. Some traditional and recent literature on wing-body interference is discussed and high Reynolds number data on wing-body-nacelle drag are reviewed. An exposed central leading edge geometry has been developed for a sailplane configuration. Low Reynolds number tests have not validated the design concept.

  14. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  15. Stroke plane angle controls leading edge vortex in a bat-inspired flapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekkoek, Gide; Muijres, Florian T.; Johansson, L. Christoffer; Stuiver, Melanie; van Oudheusden, Bas W.; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The present interest in micro air vehicles has given the research on bat flight a new impulse. With the use of high speed cameras and improved PIV techniques, the kinematics and aerodynamics of bats have been studied in great detail. A robotic flapper makes it possible to do measurements by systematically changing only one parameter at a time and investigate the parameter space outside the natural flight envelope of bats without risking animal safety. For this study, a robotic flapper (RoBat), inspired by Leptonycteris yerbabuenae was developed and tested over the speed range 1-7 m/s, with variable maximum angles of attacks ( AoA=55° and 15°, respectively) and constant AoA=55°. These measurements show the presence of a leading edge vortex (LEV) for low speeds and a fully attached flow for high speeds at low AoA, which is in line with natural bat flight. A LEV occurs for AoA=55° throughout the complete flight speed range, and throughout which the LEV circulation coefficient remains rather constant. This implies that bats and micro air vehicles could use LEVs for high load maneuvers also at relatively high flight speeds. However, at high flight speeds the LEV bursts, which causes increased drag, most likely due to a decrease in Strouhal number.

  16. Prediction and Assessment of Reynolds Number Sensitivities Associated with Wing Leading-Edge Radius Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, Richard A.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to expand the data base showing the effects of LE radius distribution and corresponding sensitivity to Rn at subsonic and transonic conditions, and to assess the predictive capability of CFD for these effects. Several key elements led to the initiation of this project: 1) the necessity of meeting multipoint design requirements to enable a viable HSCT, 2) the demonstration that blunt supersonic leading-edges can be associated with performance gain at supersonic speeds , and 3) limited data. A test of a modified Reference H model with the TCA planform and 2 LE radius distributions was performed in the NTF, in addition to Navier-Stokes analysis for an additional 3 LE radius distributions. Results indicate that there is a tremendous potential to improve high-lift performance through the use of a blunt LE across the span given an integrated, fully optimized design, and that low Rn data alone is probably not sufficient to demonstrate the benefit.

  17. Prediction and Assessment of Reynolds Number Sensitivities Associated with Wing Leading-Edge Radius Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, Richard A.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Owen, Lewis R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to expand the data base showing the effects of LE radius distribution and corresponding . sensitivity to Rn at subsonic and transonic conditions, and to assess the predictive capability of CFD for these effects. Several key elements led to the initiation of this project: 1) the necessity of meeting multipoint design requirements to enable a viable HSCT, 2) the demonstration that blunt supersonic leading-edges can be associated with performance gain at supersonic speeds , and 3) limited data. A test of a modified Reference H model with the TCA planform and 2 LE radius distributions was performed in the NTF, in addition to Navier-Stokes analysis for an additional 3 LE radius distributions. Results indicate that there is a tremendous potential to improve high-lift performance through the use of a blunt LE across the span given an integrated, fully optimized design, and that low Rn data alone is probably not sufficient to demonstrate the benefit.

  18. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  19. Development and Validation of a Novel Bird Strike Resistant Composite Leading Edge Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermanidis, Th.; Labeas, G.; Sunaric, M.; Ubels, L.

    2005-11-01

    A novel design of a fibre-reinforced composite Leading Edge (LE) of a Horizontal Tail Plain (HTP) is proposed. The development and validation approach of the innovative composite LE structure are described. The main design goal is the satisfactory impact resistance of the novel composite LE in the case of bird strike. The design concept is based on the absorption of the major portion of the bird kinetic energy by the composite skins, in order to protect the ribs and the inner LE structure from damaging, thus preserving the tail plane functionality for safe landing. To this purpose, the LE skin is fabricated from specially designed composite panels, so called ‘tensor skin’ panels, comprising folded layers, which unfold under the impact load and increase the energy absorption capability of the LE. A numerical model simulating the bird strike process is developed and bird strike experimental testing is performed, in order to validate the proposed layout and prove the capability of the structure to successfully withstand the impact loading. The numerical modelling issues and the critical parameters of the simulation are discussed. The present work is part of the European Aeronautics Research Project, ‘Crashworthiness of aircraft for high velocity impact CRAHVI’ [1].

  20. Augmentation of fighter-aircraft performance by spanwise blowing over the wing leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Salomon, M.

    1983-01-01

    Spanwise blowing over the wing and canard of a 1:35 model of a close-coupled-canard fighter-airplane configuration (similar to the Kfir-C2) was investigated experimentally in low-speed flow. Tests were conducted at airspeeds of 30 m/sec (Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10 to the 5th power based on mean aerodynamic chord) with angle-of-attack sweeps from -8 deg to 60 deg, and yaw-angle sweeps from -8 deg to 36 deg at fixed angles of attack 0 deg, 10 deg, 20 deg, 25 deg, 30 deg, and 35 deg. Significant improvement in lift-curve slope, maximum lift, drag polar and lateral/directional stability was found, enlarging the flight envelope beyond its previous low-speed/maximum-lift limit. In spite of the highly swept (60 deg) leading edge, the efficiency of the lift augmentation by blowing was relatively high and was found to increase with increasing blowing momentum on the close-coupled-canard configuration. Interesting possibilities of obtaining much higher efficiencies with swirling jets were indicated.

  1. Thermostructural Evaluation of Joggle Region on the Shuttle Orbiter's Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.; Warren, Jerry E.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation was initiated to determine the cause of coating spallation occurring on the Shuttle Orbiter's wing leading edge panels in the slip-side joggle region. The coating spallation events were observed, post flight, on differing panels on different missions. As part of the investigation, the high re-entry heating occurring on the joggles was considered here as a possible cause. Thus, a thermostructural evaluation was conducted to determine the detailed state-of-stress in the joggle region during re-entry and the feasibility of a laboratory test on a local joggle specimen to replicate this state-of-stress. A detailed three-dimensional finite element model of a panel slip-side joggle region was developed. Parametric and sensitivity studies revealed significant stresses occur in the joggle during peak heating. A critical interlaminar normal stress concentration was predicted in the substrate at the coating interface and was confined to the curved joggle region. Specifically, the high interlaminar normal stress is identified to be the cause for the occurrence of failure in the form of local subsurface material separation occurring in the slip-side joggle. The predicted critical stresses are coincident with material separations that had been observed with microscopy in joggle specimens obtained from flight panels.

  2. Wing Leading Edge RCC Rapid Response Damage Prediction Tool (IMPACT2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert; Cottter, Paul; Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    This rapid response computer program predicts Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE) damage caused by ice or foam impact during a Space Shuttle launch (Program "IMPACT2"). The program was developed after the Columbia accident in order to assess quickly WLE damage due to ice, foam, or metal impact (if any) during a Shuttle launch. IMPACT2 simulates an impact event in a few minutes for foam impactors, and in seconds for ice and metal impactors. The damage criterion is derived from results obtained from one sophisticated commercial program, which requires hours to carry out simulations of the same impact events. The program was designed to run much faster than the commercial program with prediction of projectile threshold velocities within 10 to 15% of commercial-program values. The mathematical model involves coupling of Orbiter wing normal modes of vibration to nonlinear or linear springmass models. IMPACT2 solves nonlinear or linear impact problems using classical normal modes of vibration of a target, and nonlinear/ linear time-domain equations for the projectile. Impact loads and stresses developed in the target are computed as functions of time. This model is novel because of its speed of execution. A typical model of foam, or other projectile characterized by material nonlinearities, impacting an RCC panel is executed in minutes instead of hours needed by the commercial programs. Target damage due to impact can be assessed quickly, provided that target vibration modes and allowable stress are known.

  3. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  4. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  5. Effect of Impact Location on the Response of Shuttle Wing Leading Edge Panel 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.; Hardy, Robin C.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the results of several simulations performed to determine the worst-case location for a foam impact on the Space Shuttle wing leading edge. The simulations were performed using the commercial non-linear transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. These simulations represent the first in a series of parametric studies performed to support the selection of the worst-case impact scenario. Panel 9 was selected for this study to enable comparisons with previous simulations performed during the Columbia Accident Investigation. The projectile for this study is a 5.5-in cube of typical external tank foam weighing 0.23 lb. Seven locations spanning the panel surface were impacted with the foam cube. For each of these cases, the foam was traveling at 1000 ft/s directly aft, along the orbiter X-axis. Results compared from the parametric studies included strains, contact forces, and material energies for various simulations. The results show that the worst case impact location was on the top surface, near the apex.

  6. Pressure-Velocity Correlations in the Cove of a Leading Edge Slat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen; Richard, Patrick; Hall, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    One of the major sources of aircraft airframe noise is related to the deployment of high-lift devices, such as leading-edge slats, particularly when the aircraft is preparing to land. As the engines are throttled back, the noise produced by the airframe itself is of great concern, as the aircraft is low enough for the noise to impact civilian populations. In order to reduce the aeroacoustic noise sources associated with these high lift devices for the next generation of aircraft an experimental investigation of the correlation between multi-point surface-mounted fluctuating pressures measured via flush-mounted microphones and the simultaneously measured two-component velocity field measured via Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is studied. The development of the resulting shear-layer within the slat cove is studied for Re =80,000, based on the wing chord. For low Mach number flows in air, the major acoustic source is a dipole acoustic source tied to fluctuating surface pressures on solid boundaries, such as the underside of the slat itself. Regions of high correlations between the pressure and velocity field near the surface will likely indicate a strong acoustic dipole source. In order to study the underlying physical mechanisms and understand their role in the development of aeroacoustic noise, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) by the method of snapshots is employed on the velocity field. The correlation between low-order reconstructions and the surface-pressure measurements are also studied.

  7. Numerical Predictions of Sonic Boom Signatures for a Straight Line Segmented Leading Edge Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Wilcox, Floyd J.; Cliff, Susan; Thomas, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A sonic boom wind tunnel test was conducted on a straight-line segmented leading edge (SLSLE) model in the NASA Langley 4- by 4- Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The purpose of the test was to determine whether accurate sonic boom measurements could be obtained while continuously moving the SLSLE model past a conical pressure probe. Sonic boom signatures were also obtained using the conventional move-pause data acquisition method for comparison. The continuous data acquisition approach allows for accurate signatures approximately 15 times faster than a move-pause technique. These successful results provide an incentive for future testing with greatly increased efficiency using the continuous model translation technique with the single probe to measure sonic boom signatures. Two widely used NASA codes, USM3D (Navier-Stokes) and CART3D-AERO (Euler, adjoint-based adaptive mesh), were used to compute off-body sonic boom pressure signatures of the SLSLE model at several different altitudes below the model at Mach 2.0. The computed pressure signatures compared well with wind tunnel data. The effect of the different altitude for signature extraction was evaluated by extrapolating the near field signatures to the ground and comparing pressure signatures and sonic boom loudness levels.

  8. Suppression of dynamic stall with a leading-edge slat on a VR-7 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Tung, C.

    1993-01-01

    The VR-7 airfoil was experimentally studied with and without a leading-edge slat at fixed angles of attack from 0 deg to 30 deg at Re = 200,000 and for unsteady pitching motions described by alpha equals alpha(sub m) + 10 deg(sin(wt)). The models were two dimensional, and the test was performed in a water tunnel at Ames Research Center. The unsteady conditions ranged over Re equals 100,000 to 250,000, k equals 0.001 to 0.2, and alpha(sub m) = 10 deg to 20 deg. Unsteady lift, drag, and pitching-moment measurements were obtained along with fluorescent-dye flow visualizations. The addition of the slat was found to delay the static-drag and static-moment stall by about 5 degrees and to eliminate completely the development of a dynamic-stall vortex during unsteady motions that reached angles as high as 25 degrees. In all of the unsteady cases studied, the slat caused a significant reduction in the force and moment hysteresis amplitudes. The reduced frequency was found to have the greatest effect on the results, whereas the Reynolds number had little effect on the behavior of either the basic or the slatted airfoil. The slat caused a slight drag penalty at low angles of attack, but generally increased the lift/drag ratio when averaged over the full cycle of oscillation.

  9. Control of Flow Structure on Low Swept Delta Wing with Steady Leading Edge Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Ilhan; Zharfa, Mohammadreza; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2014-11-01

    Interest in unmanned combat air vehicles (UCAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) has stimulated investigation of the flow structure, as well as its control, on delta wings having low and moderate values of sweep angle. In the present study, the flow structure is characterized on a delta wing of low sweep 35-degree angle, which is subjected to steady leading edge blowing. The techniques of laser illuminated smoke visualization, laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), and surface pressure measurements are employed to investigate the steady and unsteady nature of the flow structure on delta wing, in relation to the dimensionless magnitude of the blowing coefficient. Using statistics and spectral analysis, unsteadiness of the flow structure is studied in detail. Different injection locations are utilized to apply different blowing patterns in order to identify the most efficient control, which provides the upmost change in the flow structure with the minimum energy input. The study aims to find the optimum flow control strategy to delay or to prevent the stall and possibly to reduce the buffeting on the wing surface. Since the blowing set-up is computer controlled, the unsteady blowing patterns compared to the present steady blowing patterns will be studied next. This project was supported by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (Project Number: 3501 111M732).

  10. Augmentation of Fighter-Aircraft Performance by Spanwise Blowing over the Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Salomon, M.

    1983-01-01

    Spanwise blowing over the wing and canard of a 1:35 model of a close-coupled-canard fighter airplane configuration (similar to the Kfir-C2) was investigated experimentally in low-speed flow. Tests were conducted at airspeeds of 30 m/sec (Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10 to the 5th power based on mean aerodynamic chord) with angle-of-attack sweeps from -8 to 60 deg, and yaw-angle sweeps from -8 to 36 deg at fixed angles of attack 0, 10, 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg. Significant improvement in lift-curve slope, maximum lift, drag polar and lateral/directional stability was found, enlarging the flight envelope beyond its previous low-speed/maximum-lift limit. In spite of the highly swept (60 deg) leading edge, the efficiency of the lift augmentation by blowing was relatively high and was found to increase with increasing blowing momentum on the close-coupled-canard configuration. Interesting possibilities of obtaining much higher efficiencies with swirling jets were indicated.

  11. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de T cnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 meters/second.

  12. Development of Detectability Limits for On-Orbit Inspection of Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.; Johnson, David G.; Mastropietro, A. J.; Ancarrow, Walt C.

    2005-01-01

    At the conclusion of the Columbia Accident Investigation, one of the recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) was that NASA develop and implement an inspection plan for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) system components of the Space Shuttle. To address these issues, a group of scientists and engineers at NASA Langley Research Center proposed the use of an IR camera to inspect the RCC. Any crack in an RCC panel changes the thermal resistance of the material in the direction perpendicular to the crack. The change in thermal resistance can be made visible by introducing a heat flow across the crack and using an IR camera to image the resulting surface temperature distribution. The temperature difference across the crack depends on the change in the thermal resistance, the length of the crack, the local thermal gradient, and the rate of radiation exchange with the environment. This paper describes how the authors derived the minimum thermal gradient detectability limits for a through crack in an RCC panel. This paper will also show, through the use of a transient, 3-dimensional, finite element model, that these minimum gradients naturally exist on-orbit. The results from the finite element model confirm that there are sufficient thermal gradient to detect a crack on 96% of the RCC leading edge.

  13. Performance of laminar-flow leading-edge test articles in cloud encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard E.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive data bank of concurrent measurements of laminar flow (LF), particle concentration, and aircraft charging state was gathered for the first time. From this data bank, 13 flights in the simulated airline service (SAS) portion were analyzed to date. A total of 6.86 hours of data at one-second resolution were analyzed. An extensive statistical analysis, for both leading-edge test articles, shows that there is a significant effect of cloud and haze particles on the extent of laminar flow obtained. Approximately 93 percent of data points simulating LFC flight were obtained in clear air conditions; approximately 7 percent were obtained in cloud and haze. These percentages are consistent with earlier USAF and NASA estimates and results. The Hall laminar flow loss criteria was verified qualitatively. Larger particles and higher particle concentrations have a more marked effect on LF than do small particles. A particle spectrometer of a charging patch are both acceptable as diagnostic indicators of the presence of particles detrimental to laminar flow.

  14. Tropomyosin Promotes Lamellipodial Persistence by Collaborating with Arp2/3 at the Leading Edge.

    PubMed

    Brayford, Simon; Bryce, Nicole S; Schevzov, Galina; Haynes, Elizabeth M; Bear, James E; Hardeman, Edna C; Gunning, Peter W

    2016-05-23

    At the leading edge of migrating cells, protrusion of the lamellipodium is driven by Arp2/3-mediated polymerization of actin filaments [1]. This dense, branched actin network is promoted and stabilized by cortactin [2, 3]. In order to drive filament turnover, Arp2/3 networks are remodeled by proteins such as GMF, which blocks the actin-Arp2/3 interaction [4, 5], and coronin 1B, which acts by directing SSH1L to the lamellipodium where it activates the actin-severing protein cofilin [6, 7]. It has been shown in vitro that cofilin-mediated severing of Arp2/3 actin networks results in the generation of new pointed ends to which the actin-stabilizing protein tropomyosin (Tpm) can bind [8]. The presence of Tpm in lamellipodia, however, is disputed in the literature [9-19]. Here, we report that the Tpm isoforms 1.8/9 are enriched in the lamellipodium of fibroblasts as detected with a novel isoform-specific monoclonal antibody. RNAi-mediated silencing of Tpm1.8/9 led to an increase of Arp2/3 accumulation at the cell periphery and a decrease in the persistence of lamellipodia and cell motility, a phenotype consistent with cortactin- and coronin 1B-deficient cells [2, 7]. In the absence of coronin 1B or cofilin, Tpm1.8/9 protein levels are reduced while, conversely, inhibition of Arp2/3 with CK666 leads to an increase in Tpm1.8/9 protein. These findings establish a novel regulatory mechanism within the lamellipodium whereby Tpm collaborates with Arp2/3 to promote lamellipodial-based cell migration. PMID:27112294

  15. Method and System for Weakening Shock Wave Strength at Leading Edge Surfaces of Vehicle in Supersonic Atmospheric Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Inventor); Pritchett, Victor E., II (Inventor); Wang, Ten-See (Inventor); Farr, Rebecca Ann (Inventor); Auslender, Aaron Howard (Inventor); Blankson, Isaiah M. (Inventor); Plotkin, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system are provided to weaken shock wave strength at leading edge surfaces of a vehicle in atmospheric flight. One or more flight-related attribute sensed along a vehicle's outer mold line are used to control the injection of a non-heated, non-plasma-producing gas into a local external flowfield of the vehicle from at least one leading-edge surface location along the vehicle's outer mold line. Pressure and/or mass flow rate of the gas so-injected is adjusted in order to cause a Rankine-Hugoniot Jump Condition along the vehicle's outer mold line to be violated.

  16. An overview of the fundamental aerodynamics branch's research activities in wing leading-edge vortex flows at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. S.; Wood, R. M.; Covell, P. F.

    1986-01-01

    For the past 3 years, a research program pertaining to the study of wing leading edge vortices at supersonic speeds has been conducted in the Fundamental Aerodynamics Branch of the High-Speed Aerodynamics Division at the Langley Research Center. The purpose of the research is to provide an understanding of the factors governing the formation and the control of wing leading-edge vortices and to evaluate the use of these vortices for improving supersonic aerodynamic performance. The studies include both experimental and theoretical investigations and focus primarily on planform, thickness and camber effects for delta wings. An overview of this research activity is presented.

  17. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  18. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-14

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  19. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  20. Aeroassist flight experiment aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    The problem is to determine the transitional flow aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, including the base flow characteristics, of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The justification for the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) Application stems from MSFC's system integration responsibility for the AFE. To insure that the AFE objectives are met, MSFC must understand the limitations and uncertainties of the design data. Perhaps the only method capable of handling the complex physics of the rarefied high energy AFE trajectory is Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The 3-D code used in this analysis is applicable only to the AFE geometry. It uses the Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) collision model and five specie chemistry model available from Langley Research Center. The code is benchmarked against the AFE flight data and used as an Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design tool. The code is being used to understand the AFE flow field and verify or modify existing design data. Continued application to lower altitudes is testing the capability of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) to handle 3-D DSMC and its practicality as an ASTV/AFE design tool.

  1. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  2. Uncertainty Assessment of Hypersonic Aerothermodynamics Prediction Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Brown, James L.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gnoffo, Peter; Johnston, Christopher O.; Hollis, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The present paper provides the background of a focused effort to assess uncertainties in predictions of heat flux and pressure in hypersonic flight (airbreathing or atmospheric entry) using state-of-the-art aerothermodynamics codes. The assessment is performed for four mission relevant problems: (1) shock turbulent boundary layer interaction on a compression corner, (2) shock turbulent boundary layer interaction due a impinging shock, (3) high-mass Mars entry and aerocapture, and (4) high speed return to Earth. A validation based uncertainty assessment approach with reliance on subject matter expertise is used. A code verification exercise with code-to-code comparisons and comparisons against well established correlations is also included in this effort. A thorough review of the literature in search of validation experiments is performed, which identified a scarcity of ground based validation experiments at hypersonic conditions. In particular, a shortage of useable experimental data at flight like enthalpies and Reynolds numbers is found. The uncertainty was quantified using metrics that measured discrepancy between model predictions and experimental data. The discrepancy data is statistically analyzed and investigated for physics based trends in order to define a meaningful quantified uncertainty. The detailed uncertainty assessment of each mission relevant problem is found in the four companion papers.

  3. Subsonic Investigation of a Leading-Edge Boundary Layer Control Suction System on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Coe, Paul L., Jr.; Owens, D. Bruce; Gile, Brenda E.; Parikh, Pradip G.; Smith, Don

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a leading edge boundary layer control system was conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.08 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.79 x 10(exp 6) to 5.76 x 10(exp 6). Variations in the amount of suction, as well as the size and location of the suction area, were tested with outboard leading edge flaps deflected 0 and 30 deg and trailing-edge flaps deflected 0 and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein.

  4. An Overview of the Space Shuttle Aerothermodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Fred

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System was one of the three areas that required the development of new technology. The talk discusses the pre-flight development of the aerothermodynamic environment which was based on Mach 8 wind tunnel data. A high level overview of the pre-flight heating rate predictions and comparison to the Orbiter Flight Test (OFT) data is presented, along with a discussion of the dramatic improvement in the state-of-the-art in aerothermodynamic capability that has been used to support the Shuttle Program. A high level review of the Orbiter aerothermodynamic design is discussed, along with improvements in Computational Fluid Dynamics and wind tunnel testing that was required for flight support during the last 30 years. The units have been removed from the plots, and the discussion is kept at a high level.

  5. Data acquisition electronics for gamma ray emission tomography using width-modulated leading-edge discriminators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lage, E.; Tapias, G.; Villena, J.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    We present a new high-performance and low-cost approach for implementing radiation detection acquisition systems. The basic elements used are charge-integrating ADCs and a set of components encapsulated in an HDL (hardware definition language) library which makes it possible to implement several acquisition tasks such as time pickoff and coincidence detection using a new and simple trigger technique that we name WMLET (width-modulated leading-edge timing). As proof of concept, a 32-channel hybrid PET/SPECT acquisition system based on these elements was developed and tested. This demonstrator consists of a master module responsible for the generation and distribution of trigger signals, 2 × 16-channel ADC cards (12-bit resolution) for data digitization and a 32-bit digital I/O PCI card for handling data transmission to a personal computer. System characteristics such as linearity, maximum transmission rates or timing resolution in coincidence mode were evaluated with test and real detector signals. Imaging capabilities of the prototype were also evaluated using different detector configurations. The performance tests showed that this implementation is able to handle data rates in excess of 600k events s-1 when acquiring simultaneously 32 channels (96-byte events). ADC channel linearity is >98.5% in energy quantification. Time resolution in PET mode for the tested configurations ranges from 3.64 ns FWHM to 7.88 ns FWHM when signals from LYSO-based detectors are used. The measured energy resolution matched the expected values for the detectors evaluated and single elements of crystal matrices can be neatly separated in the acquired flood histograms.

  6. Data acquisition electronics for gamma ray emission tomography using width-modulated leading-edge discriminators.

    PubMed

    Lage, E; Tapias, G; Villena, J; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2010-08-01

    We present a new high-performance and low-cost approach for implementing radiation detection acquisition systems. The basic elements used are charge-integrating ADCs and a set of components encapsulated in an HDL (hardware definition language) library which makes it possible to implement several acquisition tasks such as time pickoff and coincidence detection using a new and simple trigger technique that we name WMLET (width-modulated leading-edge timing). As proof of concept, a 32-channel hybrid PET/SPECT acquisition system based on these elements was developed and tested. This demonstrator consists of a master module responsible for the generation and distribution of trigger signals, 2 x 16-channel ADC cards (12-bit resolution) for data digitization and a 32-bit digital I/O PCI card for handling data transmission to a personal computer. System characteristics such as linearity, maximum transmission rates or timing resolution in coincidence mode were evaluated with test and real detector signals. Imaging capabilities of the prototype were also evaluated using different detector configurations. The performance tests showed that this implementation is able to handle data rates in excess of 600k events s(-1) when acquiring simultaneously 32 channels (96-byte events). ADC channel linearity is >98.5% in energy quantification. Time resolution in PET mode for the tested configurations ranges from 3.64 ns FWHM to 7.88 ns FWHM when signals from LYSO-based detectors are used. The measured energy resolution matched the expected values for the detectors evaluated and single elements of crystal matrices can be neatly separated in the acquired flood histograms.

  7. A numerical and experimental study of the effects of dynamic roughness on laminar leading edge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Peter D.

    The aircraft industry, as a whole, has been deeply concerned with improving the aerodynamic efficiency of current and future flight vehicles, particularly in the commercial and military markets. However, of particular interest to the field of aerodynamics is the elusive concept of a workable flow control mechanism. Effective flow control is a concept which if properly applied can increase aerodynamic efficiency. Various concepts and ideas to obtain successful flow control have been studied in an attempt to reap these rewards. Some examples include boundary layer blowing (steady and periodic), suction, and compliant walls for laminar flow control. The overall goal of flow control is to increase performance by increasing lift, reducing drag, and delaying or eliminating leading edge separation. The specific objectives of flow control are to (1) delay or eliminate flow separation, (2) delay boundary layer transition, and (3) and reduce skin friction drag. The purpose of this research is to investigate dynamic roughness as a novel method of flow control technology for external boundary layer flows. As opposed to standard surface roughness, dynamic roughness incorporates small time dependent perturbations to the surface of the airfoil. These surface perturbations are actual humps and/or ridges on the surface of the airfoil that are on the scale of the laminar boundary, and oscillate with an unsteady motion. Research has shown that this can provide a means to modify the instantaneous and mean velocity profile near the wall and favorably control the existing state of the boundary layer. Several flow control parameters were studied including dynamic roughness frequency, amplitude, and geometry. The results of this study have shown, both numerically and experimentally, that dynamic roughness can provide an effective means for eliminating both a short and long laminar separation bubble and possibly prove a viable alternative in effective flow control, hence reaping some of

  8. Space environmental effects on LDEF composites: A leading edge coated graphite epoxy panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete E.; Dursch, Harry W.; Hill, Sylvester G.

    1993-01-01

    The electronics module cover for the leading edge (Row D 9) experiment M0003-8 was fabricated from T300 graphite/934 epoxy unidirectional prepreg tape in a (O(sub 2), +/- 45, O(sub 2), +/- 45, 90, 0)(sub s) layup. This 11.75 in x 16.75 in panel was covered with thermal control coatings in three of the four quadrants with the fourth quadrant uncoated. The composite panel experienced different thermal cycling extremes in each quadrant due to the different optical properties of the coatings and bare composite. The panel also experienced ultraviolet (UV) and atomic oxygen (AO) attack as well as micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. An AO reactivity of 0.99 x 10(exp -24) cm(sup 3)/atom was calculated for the bare composite based on thickness loss. The white urethane thermal control coatings (A276 and BMS 1060) prevented AO attack of the composite substrate. However, the black urethane thermal control coating (Z306) was severely eroded by AO, allowing some AO attack of the composite substrate. An interesting banding pattern on the AO eroded bare composite surface was investigated and found to match the dimensions of the graphite fiber tow widths as prepregged. Also, erosion depths were greater in the darker bands. Five micrometeoroid/space debris impacts were cross sectioned to investigate possible structural damage as well as impact/AO interactions. Local crushing and delaminations were found to some extent in all of the impacts. No signs of coating undercutting were observed despite the extensive AO erosion patterns seen in the exposed composite material at the impact sites. An extensive microcrack study was performed on the panel along with modeling of the thermal environment to estimate temperature extremes and thermal shock. The white coated composite substrate displayed almost no microcracking while the black coated and bare composite showed extensive microcracking. Significant AO erosion was seen in many of the cracks in the bare composite.

  9. Heat transfer and material temperature conditions in the leading edge area of impingement-cooled turbine vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, H. P.; Pfaff, K.; Hennecke, D. K.

    The resultant effects on the cooling effectiveness at the leading edge area of an impingement-cooled turbine vane by varying certain geometrical parameters is described with reference to local internal heat transfer coefficients determined from experiment and temperature calculations. The local heat transfer on the cooling-air side is determined experimentally with the aid of the analogy between heat- and mass transfer. The impingement cooling is provided from an inserted sheet-metal containing a single row of holes. The Reynolds Number and several of the cooling geometry parameters were varied. The results demonstrate the high local resolution of the method of measurement, which allows improved analytical treatment of the leading-edge cooling configuration. These experiments also point to the necessity of not always performing model tests under idealized conditions. This becomes very clear in the case of the tests performed on an application-oriented impingement-cooling configuration like that often encountered in engine manufacture. In conclusion, as an example, temperature calculations are employed to demonstrate the effect on the cooling effectiveness of varying the distances between insert and inner surface of the leading edge. It shows how the effectiveness of the leading edge cooling can be increased by simple geometrical measures, which results in a considerable improvement in service life.

  10. Turbulent Vortex-Flow Simulation Over a 65 deg Sharp and Blunt Leading-Edge Delta Wing at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent thin-layer, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions, based on a multi-block structured grid, are presented for a 65 deg delta wing having either a sharp leading edge (SLE) or blunt leading edge (BLE) geometry. The primary objective of the study is to assess the prediction capability of the method for simulating the leading-edge flow separation and the ensuing vortex flow characteristics. Computational results are obtained for two angles of attack of approximately 13 and 20 deg, at free-stream Mach number of 0.40 and Reynolds number of 6 million based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord. The effects of two turbulence models of Baldwin-Lomax with Degani-Schiff (BL/DS) and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) on the numerical results are also discussed. The computations also explore the effects of two numerical flux-splitting schemes, i.e., flux difference splitting (fds) and flux vector splitting (fvs), on the solution development and convergence characteristics. The resulting trends in solution sensitivity to grid resolution for the selected leading-edge geometries, angles of attack, turbulence models and flux splitting schemes are also presented. The validity of the numerical results is evaluated against a unique set of experimental wind-tunnel data that was obtained in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  11. Grainyhead-like factor Get1/Grhl3 regulates formation of the epidermal leading edge during eyelid closure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhengquan; Bhandari, Ambica; Mannik, Jaana; Pham, Thu; Xu, Xiaoman; Andersen, Bogi

    2008-07-01

    Grainyhead transcription factors play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating epidermal terminal differentiation. One such factor, the mammalian Grainyhead-like epithelial transactivator (Get1/Grhl3), is important for epidermal barrier formation. In addition to a role in barrier formation, Grainyhead genes play roles in closure of several structures such as the mouse neural tube and Drosophila wounds. Consistent with these observations, we found that Get1 knockout mice have an eye-open at birth phenotype. The failure of eyelid closure appears to be due to critical functions of Get1 in promoting F-actin polymerization, filopodia formation, and the cell shape changes that are required for migration of the keratinocytes at the leading edge during eyelid closure. The expression of TGFalpha, a known regulator of leading edge formation, is decreased in the eyelid tip of Get1(-/-) mice. Levels of phospho-EGFR and phospho-ERK are also decreased at the leading edge tip. Furthermore, in an organ culture model, TGFalpha can increase levels of phospho-EGFR and promote cell shape changes as well as leading edge formation in Get1(-/-) eyelids, indicating that in eyelid closure Get1 acts upstream of TGFalpha in the EGFR/ERK pathway.

  12. "Partners in Science": A Model Cooperative Program Introducing High School Teachers and Students to Leading-Edge Pharmaceutical Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woska, Joseph R., Jr.; Collins, Danielle M.; Canney, Brian J.; Arcario, Erin L.; Reilly, Patricia L.

    2005-01-01

    "Partners in Science" is a cooperative program between Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and area high schools in the community surrounding our Connecticut campus. It is a two-phase program that introduces high school students and teachers to the world of drug discovery and leading-edge pharmaceutical research. Phase 1 involves a series…

  13. Effects of leading-edge devices on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a highly-swept arrow-wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, S. J.; Nicks, O. W.; Imbrie, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Texas A&M University 7 by 10 foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel to provide a direct comparison of the effect of several leading edge devices on the aerodynamic performance of a highly swept wing configuration. Analysis of the data indicates that for the configuration with undeflected leading edges, vortex separation first occurs on the outboard wing panel for angles of attack of approximately 2, and wing apex vorticies become apparent for alpha or = 4 deg. However, the occurrence of the leading edge vortex flow may be postponed with leading edge devices. Of the devices considered, the most promising were a simple leading edge deflection of 30 deg and a leading edge slat system. The trailing edge flap effectiveness was found to be essentially the same for the configuration employing either of these more promising leading edge devices. Analysis of the lateral directional data showed that for all of the concepts considered, deflecting leading edge downward in an attempt to postpone leading edge vortex flows, has the favorable effect of reducing the effective dihedral.

  14. A general aerodynamic approach to the problem of decaying or growing vibrations of thin, flexible wings with supersonic leading and trailing edges and no side edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Indicial aerodynamic influence coefficients were evaluated from potential theory for a thin, flexible wing with supersonic leading and trailing edges only. The analysis is based on the use of small surface areas in which the downwash is assumed uniform. Within this limitation, the results are exact except for the restriction of linearized theory. The areas are not restricted either to square boxes or Mach boxes. A given area may be any rectangle or square which may or may not be cut by the Mach forecone, and any area can be used anywhere in the forecone without loss of accuracy.

  15. NASA's hypersonic fluid and thermal physics program (Aerothermodynamics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A.; Hunt, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    This survey paper gives an overview of NASA's hypersonic fluid and thermal physics program (recently renamed aerothermodynamics). The purpose is to present the elements of, example results from, and rationale and projection for this program. The program is based on improving the fundamental understanding of aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic flow phenomena over hypersonic vehicles in the continuum, transitional, and rarefied flow regimes. Vehicle design capabilities, computational fluid dynamics, computational chemistry, turbulence modeling, aerothermal loads, orbiter flight data analysis, orbiter experiments, laser photodiagnostics, and facilities are discussed.

  16. The Influence of Mesh Density on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the influence of varying mesh density on an LS-DYNA simulation of a rectangular-shaped foam projectile impacting the space shuttle leading edge Panel 6. The shuttle leading-edge panels are fabricated of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. During the study, nine cases were executed with all possible combinations of coarse, baseline, and fine meshes of the foam and panel. For each simulation, the same material properties and impact conditions were specified and only the mesh density was varied. In the baseline model, the shell elements representing the RCC panel are approximately 0.2-in. on edge, whereas the foam elements are about 0.5-in. on edge. The element nominal edge-length for the baseline panel was halved to create a fine panel (0.1-in. edge length) mesh and doubled to create a coarse panel (0.4-in. edge length) mesh. In addition, the element nominal edge-length of the baseline foam projectile was halved (0.25-in. edge length) to create a fine foam mesh and doubled (1.0- in. edge length) to create a coarse foam mesh. The initial impact velocity of the foam was 775 ft/s. The simulations were executed in LS-DYNA version 960 for 6 ms of simulation time. Contour plots of resultant panel displacement and effective stress in the foam were compared at five discrete time intervals. Also, time-history responses of internal and kinetic energy of the panel, kinetic and hourglass energy of the foam, and resultant contact force were plotted to determine the influence of mesh density. As a final comparison, the model with a fine panel and fine foam mesh was executed with slightly different material properties for the RCC. For this model, the average degraded properties of the RCC were replaced with the maximum degraded properties. Similar comparisons of panel and foam responses were made for the average and maximum degraded models.

  17. The International Polar Year (IPY) Circumpolar Flaw Lead (CFL) system study: a focus on fast ice edge systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. G.; Mundy, C. J.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; MacDonald, R. W.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Gosselin, M.; Hanesiak, J.; Tremblay, J.; Ferguson, S.; Stern, G.; Meakin, S.; Deming, J. W.; Leitch, D.

    2009-12-01

    The Circumpolar Flaw Lead (CFL) system study supported a large multidisciplinary overwintering in the Banks Island (NT) flaw lead over the period September 2007 to August 2008 as part of the International Polar Year (IPY). The CFL system is formed when the central pack ice (which is mobile) moves away from coastal fast ice, opening a flaw lead. The CFL forms in the fall and continues as thin ice or open water throughout the winter. The flaw lead is circumpolar, with recurrent and interconnected polynyas occurring throughout the Arctic. The overarching objectives of the CFL project were to contrast the physical and biological systems of the flaw lead open water and thin ice to the adjacent landfast ice cover. The Canadian Research Icebreaker (NGCC Amundsen) completed the first-ever overwintering of a research icebreaker in the flaw lead. She supported a total of 11,000 person days distributed across 295 investigators from 28 different countries. The project obtained many first-ever measurements of a complete suite of physical, biogeochemical, contaminant and marine ecosystem variables across the open water - fast ice contrast. In this paper we present an overview of the early results from this study with a particular focus on the role of fast ice edges in modifying the physical, biological and geochemical processes that occur at the fast ice edge interface. Traditional knowledge of these ice edges illustrates a rich physical and ecological environment. Western science results show the temporal nature of fast ice edges and the associated stimulation of biological productivity make these a particularly important part of the flaw lead system.

  18. Subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration having spanwise leading-edge vortex enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A configuration which integrates a close coupled canard wing combination, spanwise blowing for enhancement of the wing leading edge vortex, an engine-over-wing concept, and a wing trailing edge coanda-effect flap is studied. The data on the configuration are presented in tabular from without discussion. The investigation was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-foot high speed tunnel at a Mach number of 0.166 through an angle-of-attack range from -2 to 22 deg. Rectangular main engine nozzles of aspect ratio 4, 6, and 8 were tested over a momentum coefficient range from 1.0 to 1.8.

  19. Measurement of Fuel Concentration Profile at Leading Edge of Lifted Flame with Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Mitsutomo; Sekine, Kazushi; Hashimoto, Kouta; Saiki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hidemi; Masuya, Goro

    This is a study of the leading-edge characteristics of a methane-air triple flame. Few experiment results are available for physical examination of such characteristics, so further experimental investigations are strongly needed to understand the stability mechanism in a mixture with a steep concentration gradient. To this end, we measured concentration profiles at the leading edge of a flame using acetone laser-induced fluorescence (acetone LIF). The results demonstrated that the lifted height of the flame changed when acetone was added to the mixture and correlated well with increased C2 radical behind the flame edge. However, the OH radical luminous intensity, measured with a spectroscope, did not change with addition of acetone. Moreover, the burning velocity obtained by the Bunsen-burner method remained constant when acetone was added to the mixture. Therefore, acetone had little influence on burning intensity. Acetone LIF can thus be employed to measure the local concentration gradient at the leading edge of a flame. The acetone LIF signals could be corrected to consider the thermal effect by using silicone oil vanishing-plane data. From the corrected acetone LIF data, the width between the lean and rich flammability limits (flammability limit width) in the flow upstream of the flame with a steep concentration gradient was clearly observed and could be quantitatively compared with the recent numerical results.

  20. The aerodynamics of Manduca sexta: digital particle image velocimetry analysis of the leading-edge vortex.

    PubMed

    Bomphrey, Richard J; Lawson, Nicholas J; Harding, Nicholas J; Taylor, Graham K; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2005-03-01

    Here we present the first digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) analysis of the flow field around the wings of an insect (the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, tethered to a 6-component force-moment balance in a wind tunnel). A leading-edge vortex (LEV) is present above the wings towards the end of the downstroke, as the net upward force peaks. Our DPIV analyses and smoke visualisations match the results of previous flow visualisation experiments at midwing, and we extend the experiments to provide the first analysis of the flow field above the thorax. Detailed DPIV measurements show that towards the end of the downstroke, the LEV structure is consistent with that recently reported in free-flying butterflies and dragonflies: the LEV is continuous across the thorax and runs along each wing to the wingtip, where it inflects to form the wingtip trailing vortices. The LEV core is 2-3 mm in diameter (approximately 10% of local wing chord) both at the midwing position and over the centreline at 1.2 m s(-1) and at 3.5 m s(-1) flight speeds. At 1.2 m s(-1) the measured LEV circulation is 0.012+/-0.001 m(2) s(-1) (mean +/-S.D.) at the centreline and 0.011+/-0.001 m(2) s(-1) halfway along the wing. At 3.5 m s(-1) LEV circulation is 0.011+/-0.001 m(2) s(-1) at the centreline and 0.020+/-0.004 m(2) s(-1) at midwing. The DPIV measurements suggest that if there is any spanwise flow in the LEV towards the end of the downstroke its velocity is less than 1 m s(-1). Estimates of force production show that the LEV contributes significantly to supporting body weight during bouts of flight at both speeds (more than 10% of body weight at 1.2 m s(-1) and 35-65% of body weight at 3.5 m s(-1)).

  1. Effect of spanwise blowing on leading-edge vortex bursting of a highly swept aspect ratio 1.18 delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scantling, W. L.; Gloss, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 1/8-scale V/STOL model tunnel on a semispan delta wing with a leading-edge sweep of 74 deg, to determine the effectiveness of various locations of upper surface and reflection plane blowing on leading-edge vortex bursting. Constant area nozzles were located on the wing upper surface along a ray swept 79 deg, which was beneath the leading-edge vortex core. The bursting and reformation of the leading-edge vortex was viewed by injecting helium into the vortex core, and employing a schlieren system.

  2. Exploratory study of the effects of wing-leading-edge modifications on the stall/spin behavior of a light general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Configurations with full-span and segmented leading-edge flaps and full-span and segmented leading-edge droop were tested. Studies were conducted with wind-tunnel models, with an outdoor radio-controlled model, and with a full-scale airplane. Results show that wing-leading-edge modifications can produce large effects on stall/spin characteristics, particularly on spin resistance. One outboard wing-leading-edge modification tested significantly improved lateral stability at stall, spin resistance, and developed spin characteristics.

  3. Subscale, hydrogen-burning, airframe-integrated-scramjet: Experimental and theoretical evaluation of a water cooled strut airframe-integrated-scramjet: Experimental leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.; Guy, R. W.; Beach, H. L., Jr.; Rogers, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A water-cooled leading-edge design for an engine/airframe integrated scramjet model strut leading edge was evaluated. The cooling design employs a copper cooling tube brazed just downstream of the leading edge of a wedge-shaped strut which is constructed of oxygen-free copper. The survival of the strut leading edge during a series of tests at stagnation point heating rates confirms the practicality of the cooling design. A finite difference thermal model of the strut was also proven valid by the reasonable agreement of calculated and measured values of surface temperature and cooling-water heat transfer.

  4. The Influence of Clocking Angle of the Projectile on the Simulated Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading Edge Wing Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to determine the influence of clocking angle of a foam projectile impacting a space shuttle leading edge wing panel. Four simulations were performed using LS-DYNA. The leading edge panels are fabricated of multiple layers of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. The RCC material was represented using Mat 58, which is a material property that can be used for laminated composite fabrics. Simulations were performed of a rectangular-shaped foam block, weighing 0.23-lb., impacting RCC Panel 9 on the top surface. The material properties of the foam were input using Mat 83. The impact velocity was 1,000 ft/s along the Orbiter X-axis. In two models, the foam impacted on a corner, in one model the foam impacted the panel initially on the 2-in.-long edge, and in the last model the foam impacted the panel on the 7-in.- long edge. The simulation results are presented as contour plots of first principal infinitesimal strain and time history plots of contact force and internal and kinetic energy of the foam and RCC panel.

  5. Thelma and Louise Do Religious Education: A Dialogue from the Edge for Leading with Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Patty; Willhauck, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The 1991 movie Thelma and Louise and its protagonists continue to be cultural icons for many women of all ages. With quotations, song lyrics, the metaphor of the edge from the film, and collected wisdom from pedagogy, two religious educators reflect on their vocations and leadership drawing implications for the teaching ministry. The themes…

  6. Influence of airfoil geometry on delta wing leading-edge vortices and vortex-induced aerodynamics at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Byrd, James E.; Wesselmann, Gary F.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the influence of airfoil geometry on delta wing leading edge vortex flow and vortex induced aerodynamics at supersonic speeds is discussed. A series of delta wing wind tunnel models were tested over a Mach number range from 1.7 to 2.0. The model geometric variables included leading edge sweep and airfoil shape. Surface pressure data, vapor screen, and oil flow photograph data were taken to evaluate the complex structure of the vortices and shocks on the family of wings tested. The data show that airfoil shape has a significant impact on the wing upper surface flow structure and pressure distribution, but has a minimal impact on the integrated upper surface pressure increments.

  7. A Unit-Problem Investigation of Blunt Leading-Edge Separation Motivated by AVT-161 SACCON Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Boelens, Okko J.

    2011-01-01

    A research effort has been initiated to examine in more detail some of the challenging flow fields discovered from analysis of the SACCON configuration aerodynamics. This particular effort is oriented toward a diamond wing investigation specifically designed to isolate blunt leading-edge separation phenomena relevant to the SACCON investigations of the present workshop. The approach taken to design this new effort is reviewed along with the current status of the program.

  8. Wind-Tunnel Tests on Various Types of Dive Brakes Mounted in Proximity of the Leading Edge of the Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattanzi, Bernardino; Bellante, Erno

    1949-01-01

    The present report is concerned with a series of tests on a model airplane fitted with four types of dive flaps of various shapes, positions, and incidence located near the leading edge of the wing (from 5 to 20 percent of the wing chord). Tests were also made on a stub airfoil fitted with a ventral dive (located at 8 percent of the wing chord). The hinge moments of the dive flaps were measured.

  9. Investigation of Porous Gas-Heated Leading-Edge Section for Icing Protection of a Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, Dean T.

    1955-01-01

    A tip section of a delta wing having an NACA 0004-65 airfoil section and a 600 leading-edge sweepback was equipped with a porous leading-edge section through which hot gas was 'bled for anti-icing. Heating rates for anti-icing were determined for a wide range of icing conditions. The effects of gas flow through the porous leading-edge section on airfoil pressure distribution and drag in dry air were investigated. The drag increase caused by an ice formation on the unheated airfoil was measured for several icing conditions. Experimental porous surface- to free-stream convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained in dry air and compared with theory. Adequate icing protection was obtained at all icing conditions investigated. Savings in total gas-flow rate up to 42 percent may be obtained with no loss in anti-icing effectiveness by sealing half the upper-surface porous area. Gas flow through the leading-edge section had no appreciable effect on airfoil pressure distribution. The airfoil section drag increased slightly (5-percent average) with gas flow through the porous surface. A heavy glaze-ice formation produced after 10 minutes of icing caused an increase in section drag coefficient of 240 percent. Experimental convective heat-transfer coefficients obtained with hot-gas flow through the porous area in dry air and turbulent flow were 20 to 30 percent lower than the theoretical values for a solid surface under similar conditions. The transition region from laminar to turbulent flow moved forward as the ratio of gas velocity through the porous surface to air-stream velocity was increased.

  10. Materials, Manufacturing, and Test Development of a Composite Fan Blade Leading Edge Subcomponent for Improved Impact Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Handschuh, Katherine; Sinnott, Matthew J.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Martin, Richard E.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Application of polymer matrix composite materials for jet engine fan blades is becoming attractive as an alternative to metallic blades; particularly for large engines where significant weight savings are recognized on moving to a composite structure. However, the weight benefit of the composite is offset by a reduction of aerodynamic efficiency resulting from a necessary increase in blade thickness; relative to the titanium blades. Blade dimensions are largely driven by resistance to damage on bird strike. Further development of the composite material is necessary to allow composite blade designs to approximate the dimensions of a metallic fan blade. The reduction in thickness over the state of the art composite blades is expected to translate into structural weight reduction, improved aerodynamic efficiency, and therefore reduced fuel consumption. This paper presents test article design, subcomponent blade leading edge fabrication, test method development, and initial results from ballistic impact of a gelatin projectile on the leading edge of composite fan blades. The simplified test article geometry was developed to realistically simulate a blade leading edge while decreasing fabrication complexity. Impact data is presented on baseline composite blades and toughened blades; where a considerable improvement to impact resistance was recorded.

  11. Model for adhesion clutch explains biphasic relationship between actin flow and traction at the cell leading edge

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Erin M.; Stricker, Jonathan; Gardel, Margaret L.; Mogilner, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Cell motility relies on the continuous reorganization of a dynamic actin-myosin-adhesion network at the leading edge of the cell, in order to generate protrusion at the leading edge and traction between the cell and its external environment. We analyze experimentally measured spatial distributions of actin flow, traction force, myosin density, and adhesion density in control and pharmacologically perturbed epithelial cells in order to develop a mechanical model of the actin-adhesion-myosin self-organization at the leading edge. A model in which the F-actin network is treated as a viscous gel, and adhesion clutch engagement is strengthened by myosin but weakened by actin flow, can explain the measured molecular distributions and correctly predict the spatial distributions of the actin flow and traction stress. We test the model by comparing its predictions with measurements of the actin flow and traction stress in cells with fast and slow actin polymerization rates. The model predicts how the location of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary depends on the actin viscosity and adhesion strength. The model further predicts that the location of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary is not very sensitive to the level of myosin contraction. PMID:25969948

  12. Materials, Manufacturing and Test Development of a Composite Fan Blade Leading Edge Subcomponent for Improved Impact Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Katherine M.; Miller, Sandi G.; Sinnott, Matthew J.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Ruggeri, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Application of polymer matrix composite materials for jet engine fan blades is becoming attractive as an alternative to metallic blades; particularly for large engines where significant weight savings are recognized on moving to a composite structure. However, the weight benefit of the composite of is offset by a reduction of aerodynamic efficiency resulting from a necessary increase in blade thickness; relative to the titanium blades. Blade dimensions are largely driven by resistance to damage on bird strike. Further development of the composite material is necessary to allow composite blade designs to approximate the dimensions of a metallic fan blade. The reduction in thickness over the state of the art composite blades is expected to translate into structural weight reduction, improved aerodynamic efficiency, and therefore reduced fuel consumption. This paper presents test article design, subcomponent blade leading edge fabrication, test method development, and initial results from ballistic impact of a gelatin projectile on the leading edge of composite fan blades. The simplified test article geometry was developed to realistically simulate a blade leading edge while decreasing fabrication complexity. Impact data is presented on baseline composite blades and toughened blades; where a considerable improvement to impact resistance was recorded.

  13. Flight test operations using an F-106B research airplane modified with a wing leading-edge vortex flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, Daniel J.; Brown, Philip W.; Hallissy, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Flight tests of an F-106B aircraft equipped with a leading-edge vortex flap, which represented the culmination of a research effort to examine the effectiveness of the flap, were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of the flight tests was to establish a data base on the use of a wing leading-edge vortex flap as a means to validate the design and analysis methods associated with the development of such a vortical flow-control concept. The overall experiment included: refinements of the design codes for vortex flaps; numerous wind tunnel entries to aid in verifying design codes and determining basic aerodynamic characteristics; design and fabrication of the flaps, structural modifications to the wing tip and leading edges of the test aircraft; development and installation of an aircraft research instrumentation system, including wing and flap surface pressure measurements and selected structural loads measurements; ground-based simulation to assess flying qualities; and finally, flight testing. This paper reviews the operational aspects associated with the flight experiment, which includes a description of modifications to the research airplane, the overall flight test procedures, and problems encountered. Selected research results are also presented to illustrate the accomplishments of the research effort.

  14. Modeling Creep-Induced Stress Relaxation at the Leading Edge of SiC/SiC Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Jerry; DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Anticipating the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC composites into internally cooled airfoil components within the turbine section of future aero-propulsion engines, the primary objective of this study was to develop physics-based analytical and finite-element modeling tools to predict the effects of composite creep and stress relaxation at the airfoil leading edges, which will generally experience large thermal gradients at high temperatures. A second objective was to examine how some advanced NASA-developed SiC/SiC systems coated with typical EBC materials would behave as leading edge materials in terms of long-term steady-state operating temperatures. Because of the complexities introduced by mechanical stresses inherent in internally cooled airfoils, a simple cylindrical thin-walled tube model subjected to thermal stresses only is employed for the leading edge, thereby obtaining a best-case scenario for the material behavior. In addition, the SiC/SiC composite materials are assumed to behave as isotropic materials with temperature-dependent viscoelastic creep behavior as measured in-plane on thin-walled panels. Key findings include: (1) without mechanical stresses and for typical airfoil geometries, as heat flux is increased through the leading edge, life-limiting tensile crack formation will occur first in the hoop direction on the inside wall of the leading edge; (2) thermal gradients through all current SiC/SiC systems should be kept below approx.300 F at high temperatures to avoid this cracking; (3) at temperatures near the maximum operating temperatures of advanced SiC/SiC systems, thermal stresses induced by the thermal gradients will beneficially relax with time due to creep; (4) although stress relaxation occurs, the maximum gradient should still not exceed 300oF because of residual tensile stress buildup on the airfoil outer wall during cool-down; and (5) without film cooling and mechanical stresses, the NASA-developed N26 SiC/SiC system with thru

  15. Low-Speed Aerodynamic Data for an 0.18-Scale Model of an F-16XL with Various Leading-Edge Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    Using the F-16XL as a test-bed, two strategies for improving the low-speed flying characteristics that had minimal impact on high-speed performance were evaluated. In addition to the basic F-16XL configuration several modifications to the baseline configuration were tested in the Langley 30- X 60-Foot Tunnel: 1) the notched area at the wing leading edge and fuselage juncture was removed resulting in a continuous 70 deg leading-edge sweep on the inboard portion of the wing; 2) an integral attached-flow leading-edge flap concept was added to the continuous leading edge; and 3) a deployable vortex flap concept was added to the continuous leading edge. The purpose of this report is simply to document the test configurations, test conditions, and data obtained in this investigation for future reference and analysis. No analysis is presented herein and the data only appear in tabulated format.

  16. The tethered satellite system for low density aerothermodynamics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; De Luca, Luigi; Siemers, P. M., III; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of the operation of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) as a continuous open wind tunnel for low-density aerothermodynamic studies (applicable to the design of hypersonic space vehicles including STARFAC, AOTV, and ERV) is considered. The Shuttle Continuous Open Wind Tunnel (SCOWT) program, for the study of the energy and momentum transfer between the tethered satellite and its environmental medium during the TSS/2 mission, is described. Instrumentation and TSS design requirements to meet SCOWT objectives are also considered. SCOWT will provide information on the gasdynamic processes occurring downstream of the bow wave standing in front of the TS, the chemistry and physics of the upper atmosphere related to satellite aerothermodynamics, and TSS's overall experimental envelope of operation.

  17. The definition of the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Wolf, H.; Flanagan, P. F.; Henry, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to define the feasibility and practical limitations of the Shuttle Orbiter Tethered 'wind-tunnel' concept. This concept, referred to as the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC), is proposed to provide researchers access to altitudes above 90 km to accomplish aerothermodynamic research in the rarefied upper atmosphere. Determining the feasibility and limitations of the concept has required the enhancement and/or development of mission simulation analytical techniques and control laws; the accomplishment of candidate mission simulations; the definition of instrumentation requirements, both for science and engineering; and the establishment of tether and satellite design requirements to meet STARFAC objectives. The results of the study, to date, indicate that such a concept is both feasible and practical. Representative results are presented, as are recommendations for continued studies which would result in program implementation.

  18. Saenger: The reference concept and its technological requirements - aerothermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschel, E. H.

    1991-08-01

    The objectives of the technology program 'aerothermodynamics and propulsion integration' are defined. An overview of the special aerothermodynamic phenomena which must be regarded in the design of the Saenger lower stage which presently stands in the center of the technology program is given. The design tools, which must be provided; the components like the inlet, the afterbody, etc., which must be designed and tested; and the special problems like forebody optimization, heat load determination, upper stage integration, etc., which must be treated, are discussed. The general work plan is presented, showing the major activities up to start of the development of the Saenger space transportation system. It includes the development and manufacturing of the experimental vehicle (HYTEXT) as a means for the validation of the design tools and methods which are achieved in the technology program, and for the creation of a freeflight data base.

  19. Aerothermal investigations of mixing flow phenomena in case of radially inclined ejection holes at the leading edge

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, D.E.; Kusterer, K.A.

    2000-04-01

    A leading edge cooling configuration is investigated numerically by application of a three-dimensional conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solver, CHT-flow. The code has been developed at the Institute of Steam and Gas Turbines, Aachen University of Technology. It works on the basis of an implicit finite volume method combined with a multi-block technique. The cooling configuration is an axial turbine blade cascade with leading edge ejection through two rows of cooling holes. The rows are located in the vicinity of the stagnation line, one row on the suction side, the other row is on the pressure side. the cooling holes have a radial ejection angle of 45 degrees. This configuration has been investigated experimentally by other authors and the results have been documented as a test case for numerical calculations of ejection flow phenomena. The numerical investigations focus on the aerothermal mixing process in the cooling jets and the impact on the temperature distribution on the blade surface. The radial ejection angles lead to a fully three-dimensional and asymmetric jet flow field. Within a secondary flow analysis, the cooling fluid jets are investigated in detail. The secondary flow fields include asymmetric kidney vortex systems with one dominating vortex on the back side of the jets. The numerical and experimental data show a respectable agreement concerning the vortex development.

  20. Front-signal-dependent accumulation of the RHOA inhibitor FAM65B at leading edges polarizes neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Tang, Wenwen; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Pingzhao; Wang, Dejie; Yu, Long; Wang, Chenji; Wu, Dianqing

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of neutrophil polarization is the back localization of active RHOA and phosphorylated myosin light chain (pMLC, also known as MYL2). However, the mechanism for the polarization is not entirely clear. Here, we show that FAM65B, a newly identified RHOA inhibitor, is important for the polarization. When FAM65B is phosphorylated, it binds to 14-3-3 family proteins and becomes more stable. In neutrophils, chemoattractants stimulate FAM65B phosphorylation largely depending on the signals from the front of the cells that include those mediated by phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ), leading to FAM65B accumulation at the leading edge. Concordantly, FAM65B deficiency in neutrophils resulted in an increase in RHOA activity and localization of pMLC to the front of cells, as well as defects in chemotaxis directionality and adhesion to endothelial cells under flow. These data together elucidate a mechanism for RHOA and pMLC polarization in stimulated neutrophils through direct inhibition of RHOA by FAM65B at the leading edge. PMID:25588844

  1. Front-signal-dependent accumulation of the RHOA inhibitor FAM65B at leading edges polarizes neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kun; Tang, Wenwen; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Pingzhao; Wang, Dejie; Yu, Long; Wang, Chenji; Wu, Dianqing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hallmark of neutrophil polarization is the back localization of active RHOA and phosphorylated myosin light chain (pMLC, also known as MYL2). However, the mechanism for the polarization is not entirely clear. Here, we show that FAM65B, a newly identified RHOA inhibitor, is important for the polarization. When FAM65B is phosphorylated, it binds to 14-3-3 family proteins and becomes more stable. In neutrophils, chemoattractants stimulate FAM65B phosphorylation largely depending on the signals from the front of the cells that include those mediated by phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ), leading to FAM65B accumulation at the leading edge. Concordantly, FAM65B deficiency in neutrophils resulted in an increase in RHOA activity and localization of pMLC to the front of cells, as well as defects in chemotaxis directionality and adhesion to endothelial cells under flow. These data together elucidate a mechanism for RHOA and pMLC polarization in stimulated neutrophils through direct inhibition of RHOA by FAM65B at the leading edge. PMID:25588844

  2. Thermal/structural analyses of several hydrogen-cooled leading-edge concepts for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.; Mockler, Theodore T.; Tong, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic heating at high flight Mach numbers, when shock interference heating is included, can be extremely high and can exceed the capability of most conventional metallic and potential ceramic materials available. Numerical analyses of the heat transfer and thermal stresses are performed on three actively cooled leading-edge geometries (models) made of three different materials to address the issue of survivability in a hostile environment. These analyses show a mixture of results from one configuration to the next. Results for each configuration are presented and discussed. Combinations of enhanced internal film coefficients and high material thermal conductivity of copper and tungsten are predicted to maintain the maximum wall temperature for each concept within acceptable operating limits. The exception is the TD nickel material which is predicted to melt for most cases. The wide range of internal impingement film coefficients (based on correlations) for these conditions can lead to a significant uncertainty in expected leading-edge wall temperatures. The equivalent plastic strain, inherent in each configuration which results from the high thermal gradients, indicates a need for further cyclic analysis to determine component life.

  3. Experimental study of flow separation control on a low- Re airfoil using leading-edge protuberance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. M.; Wang, G. F.; Xu, J. Z.

    2014-04-01

    An experimental study of flow separation control on a low- Re c airfoil was presently investigated using a newly developed leading-edge protuberance method, motivated by the improvement in the hydrodynamics of the giant humpback whale through its pectoral flippers. Deploying this method, the control effectiveness of the airfoil aerodynamics was fully evaluated using a three-component force balance, leading to an effectively impaired stall phenomenon and great improvement in the performances within the wide post-stall angle range (22°-80°). To understand the flow physics behind, the vorticity field, velocity field and boundary layer flow field over the airfoil suction side were examined using a particle image velocimetry and an oil-flow surface visualization system. It was found that the leading-edge protuberance method, more like low-profile vortex generator, effectively modified the flow pattern of the airfoil boundary layer through the chordwise and spanwise evolutions of the interacting streamwise vortices generated by protuberances, where the separation of the turbulent boundary layer dominated within the stall region and the rather strong attachment of the laminar boundary layer still existed within the post-stall region. The characteristics to manipulate the flow separation mode of the original airfoil indicated the possibility to further optimize the control performance by reasonably designing the layout of the protuberances.

  4. The adverse aerodynamic impact of very small leading-edge ice (roughness) buildups on wings and tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Valarezo, Walter O.; Mcghee, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Systematic experimental studies were performed to establish the aerodynamic impact of very small leading-edge simulated ice (roughness) formations on lifting surfaces. The geometries studied include single element configurations (airfoil and 3-D tail) as well as multi-element high-lift airfoil geometries. Emphasis in these studies was placed on obtaining results at high Reynolds numbers to insure the applicability of the findings to full-scale situations. It was found that the well-known Brumby correlation for the adverse lift impact of discrete roughness elements at the leading edge is not appropriate for cases representative of initial ice build up (i.e., distributed roughness). It was also found that allowing initial ice formations of a size required for removal by presently proposed deicing systems could lead to maximum lift losses of approximately 40 percent for single-element airfoils. Losses in angle-of-attack margin to stall are equally substantial - as high as 6 degrees. Percentage losses for multi-element airfoils are not as severe as for single-element configurations, but degradations of the angle-of-attack-to-stall margin are the same for both.

  5. Effects of Wing Leading Edge Penetration with Venting and Exhaust Flow from Wheel Well at Mach 24 in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    A baseline solution for CFD Point 1 (Mach 24) in the STS-107 accident investigation was modified to include effects of: (1) holes through the leading edge into a vented cavity; and (2) a scarfed, conical nozzle directed toward the centerline of the vehicle from the forward, inboard corner of the landing gear door. The simulations were generated relatively quickly and early in the investigation because simplifications were made to the leading edge cavity geometry and an existing utility to merge scarfed nozzle grid domains with structured baseline external domains was implemented. These simplifications in the breach simulations enabled: (1) a very quick grid generation procedure; and (2) high fidelity corroboration of jet physics with internal surface impingements ensuing from a breach through the leading edge, fully coupled to the external shock layer flow at flight conditions. These simulations provided early evidence that the flow through a two-inch diameter (or larger) breach enters the cavity with significant retention of external flow directionality. A normal jet directed into the cavity was not an appropriate model for these conditions at CFD Point 1 (Mach 24). The breach diameters were of the same order or larger than the local, external boundary-layer thickness. High impingement heating and pressures on the downstream lip of the breach were computed. It is likely that hole shape would evolve as a slot cut in the direction of the external streamlines. In the case of the six-inch diameter breach the boundary layer is fully ingested. The intent of externally directed jet simulations in the second scenario was to approximately model aerodynamic effects of a relatively large internal wing pressure, fueled by combusting aluminum, which deforms the corner of the landing gear door and directs a jet across the windside surface. These jet interactions, in and of themselves, were not sufficiently large to explain observed aerodynamic behavior.

  6. Effects of Mach Number, Leading-Edge Bluntness, and Sweep on Boundary-Layer Transition on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jillie, Don W.; Hopkins, Edward J.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of leading-edge bluntness and sweep on boundary-layer transition on flat plate models were investigated at Mach numbers of 2.00, 2.50, 3.00, and 4.00. The effect of sweep on transition was also determined on a flat plate model equipped with an elliptical nose at a Mach number of 0.27. Models used for the supersonic investigation had leading-edge radii varying from 0.0005 to 0.040 inch. The free-stream unit Reynolds number was held constant at 15 million per foot for the supersonic tests and the angle of attack was 0 deg. Surface flow conditions were determined by visual observation and recorded photographically. The sublimation technique was used to indicate transition, and the fluorescent-oil technique was used to indicate flow separation. Measured Mach number and sweep effects on transition are compared with those predicted from shock-loss considerations as described in NACA Rep. 1312. For the models with the blunter leading edges, the transition Reynolds number (based on free-stream flow conditions) was approximately doubled by an increase in Mach number from 2.50 to 4.00; and nearly the same result was predicted from shock-loss considerations. At all super- sonic Mach numbers, increases in sweep reduced the transition Reynolds number and the amount of reduction increased with increases in bluntness. The shock-loss method considerably underestimated- the sweep effects, possibly because of the existence of crossflow instability associated with swept wings. At a Mach number of 0.27, no reduction in the transition Reynolds number with sweep was measured (as would be expected with no shock loss) until the sweep angle was attained where crossflow instability appeared.

  7. Material Modeling of Space Shuttle Leading Edge and External Tank Materials For Use in the Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly; Melis, Matthew; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Upon the commencement of the analytical effort to characterize the impact dynamics and damage of the Space Shuttle Columbia leading edge due to External Tank insulating foam, the necessity of creating analytical descriptions of these materials became evident. To that end, material models were developed of the leading edge thermal protection system, Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC), and a low density polyurethane foam, BX-250. Challenges in modeling the RCC include its extreme brittleness, the differing behavior in compression and tension, and the anisotropic fabric layup. These effects were successfully included in LS-DYNA Material Model 58, *MAT_LAMINATED_ COMPOSITE_ FABRIC. The differing compression and tension behavior was modeled using the available damage parameters. Each fabric layer was given an integration point in the shell element, and was allowed to fail independently. Comparisons were made to static test data and coupon ballistic impact tests before being utilized in the full scale analysis. The foam's properties were typical of elastic automotive foams; and LS-DYNA Material Model 83, *MAT_FU_CHANG_FOAM, was successfully used to model its behavior. Material parameters defined included strain rate dependent stress-strain curves for both loading and un-loading, and for both compression and tension. This model was formulated with static test data and strain rate dependent test data, and was compared to ballistic impact tests on load-cell instrumented aluminum plates. These models were subsequently utilized in analysis of the Shuttle leading edge full scale ballistic impact tests, and are currently being used in the Return to Flight Space Shuttle re-certification effort.

  8. Downward-deployed tethered platforms for high enthalpy aerothermodynamic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M.; Siemers, Paul M.; Squires, R. Kenneth; Wolf, Henry; Carlomagno, Giovanni M.

    1988-01-01

    The data on aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic interactions at altitudes above 50 km is extremely limited because of the relative inaccessibility of the region to research vehicles of any sort. This paper addresses the practicability of using downward deployed satellites tethered to an orbiting host vehicle in order to obtain steady-state data in the upper reaches of the region above 80 or 90 km.

  9. Phase C aerothermodynamic data base. [for space shuttle program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Summary listings of published documentation of SADSAC processed data arranged chronologically and by shuttle configuration are presented to provide an up-to-date record of all applicable aerothermodynamic data collected, processed, or summarized in the course of the space shuttle program. The various tables or listings are designed to provide survey information to the various space shuttle managerial and technical levels. The various listings of the shuttle test data information, the list contents, and the purpose are described.

  10. A Survey of Factors Affecting Blunt Leading-Edge Separation for Swept and Semi-Slender Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2010-01-01

    A survey is presented of factors affecting blunt leading-edge separation for swept and semi-slender wings. This class of separation often results in the onset and progression of separation-induced vortical flow over a slender or semi-slender wing. The term semi-slender is used to distinguish wings with moderate sweeps and aspect ratios from the more traditional highly-swept, low-aspect-ratio slender wing. Emphasis is divided between a selection of results obtained through literature survey a section of results from some recent research projects primarily being coordinated through NATO s Research and Technology Organization (RTO). An aircraft context to these studies is included.

  11. How much information can be obtained from tracking the position of the leading edge in a scratch assay?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stuart T; Simpson, Matthew J; McElwain, D L Sean

    2014-08-01

    Moving cell fronts are an essential feature of wound healing, development and disease. The rate at which a cell front moves is driven, in part, by the cell motility, quantified in terms of the cell diffusivity D, and the cell proliferation rate λ. Scratch assays are a commonly reported procedure used to investigate the motion of cell fronts where an initial cell monolayer is scratched, and the motion of the front is monitored over a short period of time, often less than 24 h. The simplest way of quantifying a scratch assay is to monitor the progression of the leading edge. Use of leading edge data is very convenient because, unlike other methods, it is non-destructive and does not require labelling, tracking or counting individual cells among the population. In this work, we study short-time leading edge data in a scratch assay using a discrete mathematical model and automated image analysis with the aim of investigating whether such data allow us to reliably identify D and λ. Using a naive calibration approach where we simply scan the relevant region of the (D, λ) parameter space, we show that there are many choices of D and λ for which our model produces indistinguishable short-time leading edge data. Therefore, without due care, it is impossible to estimate D and λ from this kind of data. To address this, we present a modified approach accounting for the fact that cell motility occurs over a much shorter time scale than proliferation. Using this information, we divide the duration of the experiment into two periods, and we estimate D using data from the first period, whereas we estimate λ using data from the second period. We confirm the accuracy of our approach using in silico data and a new set of in vitro data, which shows that our method recovers estimates of D and λ that are consistent with previously reported values except that that our approach is fast, inexpensive, non-destructive and avoids the need for cell labelling and cell counting.

  12. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading- and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, William C.; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The AMELIA Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) configuration concept was developed to meet future requirements of reduced field length, noise, and fuel burn by researchers at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and Georgia Tech Research Institute under sponsorship by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The novel configuration includes leading- and trailing-edge circulation control wing (CCW), over-wing podded turbine propulsion simulation (TPS). Extensive aerodynamic measurements of forces, surfaces pressures, and wing surface skin friction measurements were recently measured over a wide range of test conditions in the Arnold Engineering Development Center(AEDC) National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Ft Wind Tunnel. Acoustic measurements of the model were also acquired for each configuration with 7 fixed microphones on a line under the left wing, and with a 48-element, 40-inch diameter phased microphone array under the right wing. This presentation will discuss acoustic characteristics of the CCW system for a variety of tunnel speeds (0 to 120 kts), model configurations (leading edge(LE) and/or trailing-edge(TE) slot blowing, and orientations (incidence and yaw) based on acoustic measurements acquired concurrently with the aerodynamic measurements. The flow coefficient, Cmu= mVSLOT/qSW varied from 0 to 0.88 at 40 kts, and from 0 to 0.15 at 120 kts. Here m is the slot mass flow rate, VSLOT is the slot exit velocity, q is dynamic pressure, and SW is wing surface area. Directivities at selected 1/3 octave bands will be compared with comparable measurements of a 2-D wing at GTRI, as will as microphone array near-field measurements of the right wing at maximum flow rate. The presentation will include discussion of acoustic sensor calibrations as well as characterization of the wind tunnel background noise environment.

  13. Numerical 3D analysis of cloud cavitation shedding frequency on a circular leading edge hydrofoil with a barotropic cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, M.; Skoda, R.

    2015-12-01

    A compressible density-based time-explicit low Mach number consistent viscous flow solver is utilised in combination with a barotropic cavitation model for the analysis of cloud cavitation on a circular leading edge (CLE) hydrofoil. For 5° angle of attack, cloud structure and shedding frequency for different cavitation numbers are compared to experimental data. A strong grid sensitivity is found in particular for high cavitation numbers. On a fine grid, a very good agreement with validation data is achieved even without explicit turbulence model. The neglect of viscous effects as well as a two-dimensional set-up lead to a less realistic prediction of cloud structures and frequencies. Comparative simulations with the Sauer-Schnerr cavitation model and modified pre-factors of the mass transfer terms underestimate the measured shedding frequency.

  14. A numerical investigation into the effects of Reynolds number on the flow mechanism induced by a tubercled leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamzadeh, Nikan; Kelso, Richard M.; Dally, Bassam

    2016-05-01

    Leading-edge modifications based on designs inspired by the protrusions on the pectoral flippers of the humpback whale (tubercles) have been the subject of research for the past decade primarily due to their flow control potential in ameliorating stall characteristics. Previous studies have demonstrated that, in the transitional flow regime, full-span wings with tubercled leading edges outperform unmodified wings at high attack angles. The flow mechanism associated with such enhanced loading traits is, however, still being investigated. Also, the performance of full-span tubercled wings in the turbulent regime is largely unexplored. The present study aims to investigate Reynolds number effects on the flow mechanism induced by a full-span tubercled wing with the NACA-0021 cross-sectional profile in the transitional and near-turbulent regimes using computational fluid dynamics. The analysis of the flow field suggests that, with the exception of a few different flow features, the same underlying flow mechanism, involving the presence of transverse and streamwise vorticity, is at play in both cases. With regard to lift-generation characteristics, the numerical simulation results indicate that in contrast to the transitional flow regime, where the unmodified NACA-0021 undergoes a sudden loss of lift, in the turbulent regime, the baseline foil experiences gradual stall and produces more lift than the tubercled foil. This observation highlights the importance of considerations regarding the Reynolds number effects and the stall characteristics of the baseline foil, in the industrial applications of tubercled lifting bodies.

  15. The Influence of Projectile Trajectory Angle on the Simulated Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading Edge Wing Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spellman, Regina L.; Jones, Lisa E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2005-01-01

    In support of recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, a team has been studying the effect of debris impacting the reinforced carbon-carbon panels of the shuttle leading edge. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of varying parameters of the debris trajectory on the damage tolerance. Impacts at the upper and lower surface and the apex of the leading edge were examined. For each location, trajectory variances included both the alpha and beta directions. The results of the analysis indicated in all cases the beta sweep decreased the amount of damage to the panel. The increases in alpha resulted in a significant increase in damage to the RCC panel. In particular, for the lower surface, where the alpha can increase by 10 degrees, there was a nearly 40% increase in the impulse. As a result, it is recommended that for future analyses, a 10 degree offset in alpha from the nominal trajectory is included for impacts on the lower surface. It is also recommended to assume a straight aft, or zero beta, trajectory for a more conservative analysis.

  16. Design and longitudinal dynamic stability analysis of a slender delta kite for high altitudes using leading edge suction analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madduri, Bharath

    In this thesis, the longitudinal dynamic stability modes, namely Phugoid and Short-period of delta kite with single tether are examined, for different aspect ratios (A) and flow conditions. The equations of motion, of kite are solved in polar-inertial wind frame and the tether is approximated by straight line elements. The vortex lift and induced drag due to leading edge vortices are calculated using Polhamus leading edge suction analogy. The Polhamus proportionality constants (Kp, Kv) are used to estimate the overall coefficient of lift and drag (C L, CD) and are computed using Multhopp lifting surface theory. The values of total coefficient of lift and drag (CL, CD) are examined for a wide variety of aspect ratio of delta kite and are validated by comparing with the experimental data. Linear stability analysis is performed for the chosen design variables to ensure the nominal design has stable longitudinal dynamics. A plot of the root locus of the system matrix for longitudinal dynamics as a function of geometry and flight conditions, provided an intuitive understanding of the flight modes of the kite, with respect to design parameters of interest.

  17. Feedback regulation between plasma membrane tension and membrane-bending proteins organizes cell polarity during leading edge formation.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Kazuya; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Itoh, Toshiki

    2015-06-01

    Tension applied to the plasma membrane (PM) is a global mechanical parameter involved in cell migration. However, how membrane tension regulates actin assembly is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that FBP17, a membrane-bending protein and an activator of WASP/N-WASP-dependent actin nucleation, is a PM tension sensor involved in leading edge formation. In migrating cells, FBP17 localizes to short membrane invaginations at the leading edge, while diminishing from the cell rear in response to PM tension increase. Conversely, following reduced PM tension, FBP17 dots randomly distribute throughout the cell, correlating with loss of polarized actin assembly on PM tension reduction. Actin protrusive force is required for the polarized accumulation, indicating a role for FBP17-mediated activation of WASP/N-WASP in PM tension generation. In vitro experiments show that FBP17 membrane-bending activity depends on liposomal membrane tension. Thus, FBP17 is the local activator of actin polymerization that is inhibited by PM tension in the feedback loop that regulates cell migration.

  18. DENND2B activates Rab13 at the leading edge of migrating cells and promotes metastatic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Maria S.; Bell, Emily S.; Girard, Martine; Chaineau, Mathilde; Hamlin, Jason N.R.; Daubaras, Mark; Monast, Anie; Park, Morag; Hodgson, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The small guanosine triphosphatase Rab13 functions in exocytic vesicle trafficking in epithelial cells. Alterations in Rab13 activity have been observed in human cancers, yet the mechanism of Rab13 activation and its role in cancer progression remain unclear. In this paper, we identify the DENN domain protein DENND2B as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab13 and develop a novel Förster resonance energy transfer–based Rab biosensor to reveal activation of Rab13 by DENND2B at the leading edge of migrating cells. DENND2B interacts with the Rab13 effector MICAL-L2 at the cell periphery, and this interaction is required for the dynamic remodeling of the cell’s leading edge. Disruption of Rab13-mediated trafficking dramatically limits the invasive behavior of epithelial cells in vitro and the growth and migration of highly invasive cancer cells in vivo. Thus, blocking Rab13 activation by DENND2B may provide a novel target to limit the spread of epithelial cancers. PMID:25713415

  19. Young Children of Immigrants: The Leading Edge of America's Future. Brief No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortuny, Karina; Hernandez, Donald J.; Chaudry, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Children of immigrants have nearly doubled as a share of pre-K to 3rd grade students since 1990. The share of children under age 8 with immigrant parents stood at 24 percent in 2008, up from 13 percent in 1990. Young children of immigrants account for more than 30 percent of children in seven states, with California leading the nation at 50…

  20. Application of digital particle image velocimetry to insect aerodynamics: measurement of the leading-edge vortex and near wake of a Hawkmoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Lawson, Nicholas J.; Taylor, Graham K.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.

    2006-04-01

    Some insects use leading-edge vortices to generate high lift forces, as has been inferred from qualitative smoke visualisations of the flow around their wings. Here we present the first Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) data and quantitative analysis of an insect’s leading-edge vortex and near wake at two flight speeds. This allows us to describe objectively 2D slices through the flow field of a tethered Tobacco Hawkmoth ( Manduca sexta). The near-field vortex wake appears to braodly resemble elliptical vortex loops. The presence of a leading-edge vortex towards the end of the downstroke is found to coincide with peak upward force production measured by a six-component force-moment balance. The topology of Manduca’s leading-edge vortex differs from that previously described because late in the downstroke, the structure extends continuously from wingtip across the thorax to the other wingtip.

  1. Basic science research in pediatric radiology - how to empower the leading edge of our field.

    PubMed

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2014-08-01

    Basic science research aims to explore, understand and predict phenomena in the natural world. It spurs the discovery of fundamentally new principles and leads to new knowledge and new concepts. By comparison, applied research employs basic science knowledge toward practical applications. In the clinical realm, basic science research and applied research should be closely connected. Basic science discoveries can build the foundation for a broad range of practical applications and thereby bring major benefits to human health, education, environment and economy. This article explains how basic science research impacts our field, it describes examples of new research directions in pediatric imaging and it outlines current challenges that we need to overcome in order to enable the next groundbreaking discovery.

  2. Teachers on the Leading Edge: A Place-Based Professional Development Program for K-12 Earth Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Teachers on the Leading Edge (TOTLE) is an Earth Science teacher professional development program featuring Pacific Northwest active continental margin geology. To engage middle-school teachers and students, TOTLE workshops: (1) invite novice learners to geophysical studies of tectonics, earthquakes, and volcanoes; (2) provide access to EarthScope research; and (3) explain geologic hazards as understandable aspects of living on the ``leading edge'' of the North American continent. Fundamental concepts and observations progress from global patterns, to regional context, and then to local applications. For example, earthquakes are concentrated near tectonic plate boundaries such as the Cascadia subduction zone between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. Earthquake hazards include liquefaction and landslides that are affected by regional and local geology. And relative earthquake hazard maps provide comparisons of hazards on county, city, and neighborhood scales. Inquiry-based field investigation of coastal ghost forests and Cascadia tsunami geology stimulates learning about Cascadia great earthquakes and tsunamis and provides a case study of scientific discovery. Field studies of volcanic mudflow (lahar) deposits from Mt Hood and Mt Rainier highlight volcanic hazards to rapidly increasing populations that live near recently active Cascade volcanoes. We emphasize the importance of infrastructure engineering and emergency preparedness in preventing geologic hazards damage, injuries, and deaths in order to: (1) demonstrate how Geoscience research leads to improved engineering designs that mitigate hazards; (2) align lessons with national and state K-12 science education standards that focus on science, technology, and societal connections; and (3) avoid fatalism and develop a culture of geologic hazards awareness among future citizens of the Pacific Northwest.

  3. Equations and charts for the rapid estimation of hinge-moment and effectiveness parameters for trailing-edge controls having leading and trailing edges swept ahead of the Mach lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goin, Kennith L

    1951-01-01

    Existing conical-flow solutions have been used to calculate the hinge-moments and effectiveness parameters of trailing-edge controls having leading and trailing edges swept ahead of the Mach lines and having streamwise root and tip chords. Equations and detailed charts are presented for the rapid estimation of these parameters. Also included is an approximate method by which these parameters may be corrected for airfoil-section thickness.

  4. Predictive process simulation of cryogenic implants for leading edge transistor design

    SciTech Connect

    Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Zographos, Nikolas; Park, Hugh; Colombeau, Benjamin; Parrill, Thomas; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Borges, Ricardo; Gull, Ronald; Erokhin, Yuri

    2012-11-06

    Two cryogenic implant TCAD-modules have been developed: (i) A continuum-based compact model targeted towards a TCAD production environment calibrated against an extensive data-set for all common dopants. Ion-specific calibration parameters related to damage generation and dynamic annealing were used and resulted in excellent fits to the calibration data-set. (ii) A Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model including the full time dependence of ion-exposure that a particular spot on the wafer experiences, as well as the resulting temperature vs. time profile of this spot. It was calibrated by adjusting damage generation and dynamic annealing parameters. The kMC simulations clearly demonstrate the importance of the time-structure of the beam for the amorphization process: Assuming an average dose-rate does not capture all of the physics and may lead to incorrect conclusions. The model enables optimization of the amorphization process through tool parameters such as scan speed or beam height.

  5. The formation mechanism and impact of streamwise vortices on NACA 0021 airfoil's performance with undulating leading edge modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamzadeh, N.; Hansen, K. L.; Kelso, R. M.; Dally, B. B.

    2014-10-01

    Wings with tubercles have been shown to display advantageous loading behavior at high attack angles compared to their unmodified counterparts. In an earlier study by the authors, it was shown that an undulating leading-edge configuration, including but not limited to a tubercled model, induces a cyclic variation in circulation along the span that gives rise to the formation of counter-rotating streamwise vortices. While the aerodynamic benefits of full-span tubercled wings have been associated with the presence of such vortices, their formation mechanism and influence on wing performance are still in question. In the present work, experimental and numerical tests were conducted to further investigate the effect of tubercles on the flow structure over full-span modified wings based on the NACA 0021 profile, in the transitional flow regime. It is found that a skew-induced mechanism accounts for the formation of streamwise vortices whose development is accompanied by flow separation in delta-shaped regions near the trailing edge. The presence of vortices is detrimental to the performance of full-span wings pre-stall, however renders benefits post-stall as demonstrated by wind tunnel pressure measurement tests. Finally, primary and secondary vortices are identified post-stall that produce an enhanced momentum transfer effect that reduces flow separation, thus increasing the generated amount of lift.

  6. An improved panel method for the solution of three-dimensional leading-edge vortex flows. Volume 1: Theory document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.; Lu, P.; Tinoco, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    An improved panel method for the solution of three dimensional flow and wing and wing-body combinations with leading edge vortex separation is presented. The method employs a three dimensional inviscid flow model in which the configuration, the rolled-up vortex sheets, and the wake are represented by quadratic doublet distributions. The strength of the singularity distribution as well as shape and position of the vortex spirals are computed in an iterative fashion starting with an assumed initial sheet geometry. The method calculates forces and moments as well as detail surface pressure distributions. Improvements include the implementation of improved panel numerics for the purpose of elimination the highly nonlinear effects of ring vortices around double panel edges, and the development of a least squares procedure for damping vortex sheet geometry update instabilities. A complete description of the method is included. A variety of cases generated by the computer program implementing the method are presented which verify the mathematical assumptions of the method and which compare computed results with experimental data to verify the underlying physical assumptions made by the method.

  7. Air forces and moments on triangular and related wings with subsonic leading edges oscillating in supersonic potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Charles E; Berman, Julian N

    1952-01-01

    This analysis treats the air forces and moments in supersonic potential flow on oscillating triangular wings and a series of sweptback and arrow wings with subsonic leading edges and supersonic trailing edges. For the wings undergoing sinusoidal torsional oscillations simultaneously with vertical translations, the linearized velocity potential is derived in the form of a power series in terms of a frequency parameter. This method can be useful for treatment of similar problems for other plan forms and for wings undergoing other sinusoidal motions. For triangular wings, as many terms of such a series expansion as may be derived can be determined; however, the terms after the first few become very cumbersome. Closed expressions that include the reduced frequency to the fifth power, an order which is sufficient for a large class of practical application, are given for the velocity potential and for the components of chordwise section force and moment coefficients. These wings are found to exhibit the possibility of undamped torsional oscillations for certain ranges of Mach number and locations of the axis of rotation. The ranges of these parameters are delineated for triangular wings.

  8. Mechanism of Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions, Amorphization, and Absorption-Edge Shift in Photovoltaic Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    PubMed

    Szafrański, Marek; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    Our single-crystal X-ray diffraction study of methylammonium lead triiodide, MAPbI3, provides the first comprehensive structural information on the tetragonal phase II in the pressure range to 0.35 GPa, on the cubic phase IV stable between 0.35 and 2.5 GPa, and on the isostructural cubic phase V observed above 2.5 GPa, which undergoes a gradual amorphization. The optical absorption study confirms that up to 0.35 GPa, the absorption edge of MAPbI3 is red-shifted, allowing an extension of spectral absorption. The transitions to phases IV and V are associated with the abrupt blue shifts of the absorption edge. The strong increase of the energy gap in phase V result in a spectacular color change of the crystal from black to red around 3.5 GPa. The optical changes have been correlated with the pressure-induced strain of the MAPbI3 inorganic framework and its frustration, triggered by methylammonium cations trapped at random orientations in the squeezed voids. PMID:27538989

  9. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading-and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements of the 11 % scale full-span AMELIA CESTOL model with leading- and trailing-edge slot blowing circulation control (CCW) wing were obtained during a recent test in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 40- by 80-Ft. Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, Sound levels and spectra were acquired with seven in-flow microphones and a 48-element phased microphone array for a variety of vehicle configurations, CCW slot flow rates, and forward speeds, Corrections to the measurements and processing are in progress, however the data from selected configurations presented in this report confirm good measurement quality and dynamic range over the test conditions, Array beamform maps at 40 kts tunnel speed show that the trailing edge flap source is dominant for most frequencies at flap angles of 0deg and 60deg, The overall sound level for the 60deg flap was similar to the 0deg flap for most slot blowing rates forward of 90deg incidence, but was louder by up to 6 dB for downstream angles, At 100 kts, the in-flow microphone levels were louder than the sensor self-noise for the higher blowing rates, while passive and active background noise suppression methods for the microphone array revealed source levels as much as 20 dB lower than observed with the in-flow microphones,

  10. ALES, the multi­mission Adaptive Leading Edge Sub­Waveform Retracker, design and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Marcello; Benveniste, Jérôme; Vignudelli, Stefano; Cipollini, Paolo; Quartly, Graham; Snaith, Helen

    Satellite altimetry has revolutionized our understanding of ocean dynamics thanks to high repetition rate and global coverage. Nevertheless, coastal data has been flagged as unreliable due to land and calm water interference in the altimeter and radiometer footprint and high frequency tidal and atmospheric forcing. Our study addresses the first issue, i.e. retracking, presenting ALES, the Adaptive Leading Edge Subwaveform Retracker. ALES is potentially applicable to all the pulse­limited altimetry altimetry missions and its aim is to retrack with the same precision both open ocean and coastal data with the same algorithm. ALES selects part of each returned echo and models it with a classic ‘open ocean’ Brown functional form, by means of least square estimation whose convergence is found through the Nelder­Mead nonlinear optimization technique. By avoiding echoes from bright targets along the trailing edge, it is capable of retrieving the majority of coastal waveform up to 2 to 3 Km from the coasts. By adapting the estimation window to the significant wave height, it aims at preserving the precision of the standard data both in open ocean and in the coastal strip. ALES is validated against tide gauges in the Adriatic Sea and in the Greater Agulhas System for three different missions: Envisat, Jason­1 and Jason­2. Considerations on noise and biases provide a further verification of the strategy.

  11. Effects of wing leading-edge radius and Reynolds number on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of highly swept wing-body configurations at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the effects of wing leading edge radius and Reynolds number on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of highly swept wing-body configurations. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers below 0.30, angles of attack up to 16 deg, and Reynolds numbers per meter from 6.57 million to 43.27 million. The wings under study in this investigation had leading edge sweep angles of 61.7 deg, 64.61 deg, and 67.01 deg in combination with trailing edge sweep angles of 0 deg and 40.6 deg. The leading edge radii of each wing planform could be varied from sharp to nearly round.

  12. CFD Analysis of the Aerodynamics of a Business-Jet Airfoil with Leading-Edge Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, X.; Zhu, B.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Addy, H. E.; Choo, Y. K.

    2004-01-01

    For rime ice - where the ice buildup has only rough and jagged surfaces but no protruding horns - this study shows two dimensional CFD analysis based on the one-equation Spalart-Almaras (S-A) turbulence model to predict accurately the lift, drag, and pressure coefficients up to near the stall angle. For glaze ice - where the ice buildup has two or more protruding horns near the airfoil's leading edge - CFD predictions were much less satisfactory because of the large separated region produced by the horns even at zero angle of attack. This CFD study, based on the WIND and the Fluent codes, assesses the following turbulence models by comparing predictions with available experimental data: S-A, standard k-epsilon, shear-stress transport, v(exp 2)-f, and differential Reynolds stress.

  13. Mesenchymal chemotaxis requires selective inactivation of myosin II at the leading edge via a noncanonical PLCγ/PKCα pathway.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Sreeja B; Johnson, Heath E; Rahman, Anisur; King, Samantha J; Rotty, Jeremy D; Lebedeva, Irina P; Haugh, Jason M; Bear, James E

    2014-12-22

    Chemotaxis, migration toward soluble chemical cues, is critical for processes such as wound healing and immune surveillance and is exhibited by various cell types, from rapidly migrating leukocytes to slow-moving mesenchymal cells. To study mesenchymal chemotaxis, we observed cell migration in microfluidic chambers that generate stable gradients of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Surprisingly, we found that pathways implicated in amoeboid chemotaxis, such as PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, are dispensable for PDGF chemotaxis. Instead, we find that local inactivation of Myosin IIA, through a noncanonical Ser1/2 phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain, is essential. This site is phosphorylated by PKCα, which is activated by an intracellular gradient of diacylglycerol generated by PLCγ. Using a combination of live imaging and gradients of activators/inhibitors in the microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate that this signaling pathway and subsequent inhibition of Myosin II activity at the leading edge are required for mesenchymal chemotaxis.

  14. Turbine vane gas film cooling with injection in the leading edge region from a single row of spanwise angled holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecuyer, M. R.; Hanus, G. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of gas film cooling was conducted on a 3X size model turbine vane. Injection in the leading edge region was from a single row of holes angled in a spanwise direction. Measurements of the local heat flux downstream from the row of coolant holes, both with and without film coolant flow, were used to determine the film cooling performance presented in terms of the Stanton number ratio. Results for a range of coolant blowing ratio, M = 0 to 2.0, indicate a reduction in heat flux of up to 15 to 30 percent at a point 10 to 11 hole diameters downstream from injection. An optimum coolant blowing ratio corresponds to a coolant-to-freestream velocity ratio in the range of 0.5. The shallow injection angle resulted in superior cooling performance for injection closest to stagnation, while the effect of injection angle was insignificant for injection further from stagnation.

  15. The novel RacE-binding protein GflB sharpens Ras activity at the leading edge of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Senoo, Hiroshi; Cai, Huaqing; Wang, Yu; Sesaki, Hiromi; Iijima, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Directional sensing, a process in which cells convert an external chemical gradient into internal signaling events, is essential in chemotaxis. We previously showed that a Rho GTPase, RacE, regulates gradient sensing in Dictyostelium cells. Here, using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify a novel RacE-binding protein, GflB, which contains a Ras GEF domain and a Rho GAP domain. Using biochemical and gene knockout approaches, we show that GflB balances the activation of Ras and Rho GTPases, which enables cells to precisely orient signaling events toward higher concentrations of chemoattractants. Furthermore, we find that GflB is located at the leading edge of migrating cells, and this localization is regulated by the actin cytoskeleton and phosphatidylserine. Our findings provide a new molecular mechanism that connects directional sensing and morphological polarization. PMID:27009206

  16. Icing tunnel tests of a glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system on a general aviation airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Schweikhard, W. G.; Albright, A. E.; Evanich, P.

    1981-01-01

    A glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system was tested. Results show that the system is very effective in preventing ice accretion (anti-ice mode) or removing ice from an airfoil. Minimum glycol flow rates required for anti-icing are a function of velocity, liquid water content in the air, ambient temperature, and droplet size. Large ice caps were removed in only a few minutes using anti-ice flow rates. It was found that the shed time is a function of the type of ice, size of the ice cap, angle of attack, and glycol flow rate. Wake survey measurements show that there is no significant drag penalty for the installation or operation of the system tested.

  17. Sensitivity of F-106B Leading-Edge-Vortex Images to Flight and Vapor-Screen Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Johnson, Thomas D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A flight test was undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center with vapor-screen and image-enhancement techniques to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about near-field vortex flows above the wings of fighter aircraft. In particular, the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on the vortex system over an angle-of-attack range were sought. The relevance of these flows stems from their present and future use at many points in the flight envelope, especially during transonic maneuvers. The aircraft used in this flight program was the F-106B because it was available and had sufficient wing sweep (60 deg) to generate a significant leading-edge vortex system. The sensitivity of the visual results to vapor screen hardware and to onset flow changes is discussed.

  18. Comparison of Theoretical and Experimental Unsteady Aerodynamics of Linear Oscillating Cascade With Supersonic Leading-Edge Locus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.; Erwin, Dan

    2004-01-01

    An experimental influence coefficient technique was used to obtain unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficients and, consequently, unsteady pressures for a cascade of symmetric airfoils oscillating in pitch about mid-chord. Stagger angles of 0 deg and 10 deg were investigated for a cascade with a gap-to-chord ratio of 0.417 operating at an axial Mach number of 1.9, resulting in a supersonic leading-edge locus. Reduced frequencies ranged from 0.056 to 0.2. The influence coefficients obtained determine the unsteady pressures for any interblade phase angle. The unsteady pressures were compared with those predicted by several algorithms for interblade phase angles of 0 deg and 180 deg.

  19. Test-Analysis Correlation for Space Shuttle External Tank Foam Impacting RCC Wing Leading Edge Component Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2008-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommended that NASA develop, validate, and maintain a modeling tool capable of predicting the damage threshold for debris impacts on the Space Shuttle Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) wing leading edge and nosecap assembly. The results presented in this paper are one part of a multi-level approach that supported the development of the predictive tool used to recertify the shuttle for flight following the Columbia Accident. The assessment of predictive capability was largely based on test analysis comparisons for simpler component structures. This paper provides comparisons of finite element simulations with test data for external tank foam debris impacts onto 6-in. square RCC flat panels. Both quantitative displacement and qualitative damage assessment correlations are provided. The comparisons show good agreement and provided the Space Shuttle Program with confidence in the predictive tool.

  20. Influence of wing geometry on leading-edge vortices and vortex-induced aerodynamics at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Byrd, James E.; Mcgrath, Brian E.; Wesselmann, Gary F.

    1989-01-01

    An assessment of the influence of wing geometry on wing leading-edge vortex flows at supersonic speeds is discussed as well as the applicability of various aerodynamic codes for predicting these results. A series of delta-wing wind-tunnel models were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel over a Mach number range from 1.6 to 4.6. The data show that wing airfoil has a significant impact on the localized loading on the wing. The experimental data for the flat wings were compared with results from full-potential, Euler, and Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) computer codes. The theoretical evaluation showed that the full-potential analysis predicted accurate results for the attached-flow (alpha = 0 deg) conditions and that the Euler and PNS analyses made reasonable predictions for both attached and separated flow conditions.

  1. Advanced X-Ray Inspection of Reinforced Carbon Composite Materials on the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Berry, Robert F.; Osborn, Robin; Bueno, Clifford; Osterlitz, Mark; Mills, Richard; Morris, Philip; Phalen, Robert; McNab, Jim; Thibodeaux, Tahanie; Thompson, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    The post return-to-flight (RTF) inspection methodology for the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) is currently being defined. Numerous NDT modalities and techniques are being explored to perform the flight-to-flight inspections of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite material for impact damage, general loss of mass in the bulk layers, or other anomalous conditions that would pose risk to safe return upon re-entry. It is possible to have an impact upon ascent that is not visually observable on the surface, yet causes internal damage. Radiographic testing may be a useful NDT technique for such occurrences. The authors have performed radiographic tests on full-sized mock samples of LESS hardware with embedded image quality phantoms. Digitized radiographic film, computed radiography and flat panel digital real-time radiography was acquired using a GE Eresco 200 x-ray tube, and Se-75 and Yb-169 radioisotopes.

  2. Experimental study of shock wave interference heating on a cylindrical leading edge at Mach 6 and 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the details of an experimental study of shock wave interference heating on a cylindrical leading edge representative of the cowl of a rectangular hypersonic engine inlet. The study was conducted at Mach numbers of 6.3, 6.5 and 8.0. This study has provided the first (1) detailed pressure and heat transfer rate distributions for a two-dimensional shock wave interference on a cylinder and (2) insight into the effects of temperature dependent specific heats on the phenomena. The peak pressure and heat transfer rates were 10 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point levels. The peak levels and their gradients increased with Mach number. Variation in specific heats and hence the ratio of specific heats with temperature manifest in slightly lower loads and amplification factors than for corresponding perfect gas conditions.

  3. Material development aspects of an oxidation protection system for a reinforced carbon-carbon composite. [for Space Shuttle leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Scott, R. O.; Shuford, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the procedures which led to selection of a diffusion-coated siliconized oxidation-resistant reinforced carbon-carbon composite as a candidate for use in the leading edge structure of the Space Shuttle for the purpose of providing thermal protection. Materials were evaluated on the basis of oxidation-inhibitor performance, strength properties, and fabricability. Compounds of titanium, tantalum, zirconium, silicon, hafnium, aluminum, and boron were compounded with the reinforced carbon-carbon material in two different processing techniques to discover an oxidation-inhibited system which provided multicycle protection at temperatures up to 4000 F. Details of the manufacture and testing of the reinforced carbon-carbon composites are provided.

  4. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    PubMed

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff

  5. Rate and topography of peptidoglycan synthesis during cell division in Escherichia coli: Concept of a leading edge

    SciTech Connect

    Wientjes, F.B.; Nanninga, N. )

    1989-06-01

    The rate at which the peptidoglycan of Escherichia coli is synthesized during the division cycle was studied with two methods. One method involved synchronization of E. coli MC4100 lysA cultures by centrifugal elutriation and subsequent pulse-labeling of the synchronously growing cultures with (meso-{sup 3}H)diaminopimelic acid (({sup 3}H)Dap). The second method was autoradiography of cells pulse-labeled with ({sup 3}H)Dap. It was found that the peptidoglycan is synthesized at a more or less exponentially increasing rate during the division cycle with a slight acceleration in this rate as the cells start to constrict. Apparently, polar cap formation requires synthesis of extra surface components, presumably to accommodate for a change in the surface-to-volume ratio. Furthermore, it was found that the pool size of Dap was constant during the division cycle. Close analysis of the topography of ({sup 3}H)Dap incorporation at the constriction site revealed that constriction proceeded by synthesis of peptidoglycan at the leading edge of the invaginating cell envelope. During constriction, no reallocation of incorporation occurred, i.e., the incorporation at the leading edge remained high throughout the process of constriction. Impairment of penicillin-binding protein 3 by mutation or by the specific {beta}-lactam antibiotic furazlocillin did not affect ({sup 3}H)Dap incorporation during initiation of constriction. However, the incorporation at the constriction site was inhibited in later stages of the constriction process. It is concluded that during division at least two peptidoglycan-synthesizing systems are operating sequentially.

  6. An experimental analysis of critical factors involved in the breakdown process of leading edge vortex flows. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visser, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental crosswire measurements of the flowfield above a 70 and 75 degree flat plate delta wing were performed at a Reynolds number of 250,000. Survey grids were taken normal to the platform at a series of chordwise locations for angles of attack of 20 and 30 degrees. Axial and azimuthal vorticity distributions were derived from the velocity fields. The dependence of circulation on distance from the vortex core as well as on chordwise location was examined. The effects of nondimensionalization in comparison with other experimental data was made. The circulation distribution scales with the local semispan and grows approximately linearly in the chordwise direction. For regions of the flow outside of the vortex subcore, the circulation at any chordwise station was observed to vary logarithmically with distance from the vortex axis. The circulation was also found to increase linearly with angle of incidence at a given chordwise station. A reduction in the local circulation about the vortex axis occurred at breakdown. The spanwise distribution of axial vorticity was severely altered through the breakdown region and the spanwise distribution of axial vorticity present appeared to reach a maximum immediately preceding breakdown. The local concentration of axial vorticity about the vortex axis was reduced while the magnitude of the azimuthal vorticity decreased throughout the breakdown zone. The axial vorticity components with a negative sense, found in the secondary vortex, remained unaffected by changes in wing sweep or angle of attack, in direct contrast to the positive components. The inclusion of the local wing geometry into a previously derived correlation parameter indicated that the circulation of growing leading edge vortex flows were similar at corresponding radii from the vortex axis. It was concluded that the flow over a delta wing, upstream of the breakdown regions and away from the apex and trailing edge regions, is conical. In addition, the dominating

  7. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    PubMed

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff.

  8. Effects of wing-leading-edge modifications on a full-scale, low-wing general aviation airplane: Wind-tunnel investigation of high-angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics. [conducted in Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, W. A., Jr.; Satran, D. R.; Johnson, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Wing-leading-edge modifications included leading-edge droop and slat configurations having full-span, partial-span, or segmented arrangements. Other devices included wing-chord extensions, fences, and leading-edge stall strips. Good correlation was apparent between the results of wind-tunnel data and the results of flight tests, on the basis of autorotational stability criterion, for a wide range of wing-leading-edge modifications.

  9. Aerothermodynamics of Blunt Body Entry Vehicles. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Borrelli, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the aerothermodynamic phenomena of blunt body entry vehicles are discussed. Four topics will be considered that present challenges to current computational modeling techniques for blunt body environments: turbulent flow, non-equilibrium flow, rarefied flow, and radiation transport. Examples of comparisons between computational tools to ground and flight-test data will be presented in order to illustrate the challenges existing in the numerical modeling of each of these phenomena and to provide test cases for evaluation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code predictions.

  10. User's Manual for the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1996-01-01

    This user's manual provides detailed instructions for the installation and the application of version 4.1 of the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). Also provides simulation of flow field in thermochemical nonequilibrium around vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities through the atmosphere. Earlier versions of LAURA were predominantly research codes, and they had minimal (or no) documentation. This manual describes UNIX-based utilities for customizing the code for special applications that also minimize system resource requirements. The algorithm is reviewed, and the various program options are related to specific equations and variables in the theoretical development.

  11. Aerothermodynamics and propulsion integration in the Saenger technology programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschel, E. H.

    1991-12-01

    An overview of the special aerothermodynamic phenomena that must be considered in the design of the German Saenger Space Transportation System lower stage is presented. The design tools required, components that must be designed and tested, and certain problem areas (forebody optimization, heat load determination, and upper-stage separation), are discussed. Attention is given to the development and manufacturing of an experimental vehicle, Hytex, as a means for validating the design tools and methods realized in the technology program and for the creation of a free-flight data base.

  12. Planform curvature effects on flutter characteristics of a wing with 56 deg leading-edge sweep and panel aspect ratio of 1.14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Donald F.; Sandford, Maynard C.; Pinkerton, Theresa L.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was initiated to determine the effects of planform curvature (curving the leading and trailing edges of a wing in the X-Y plane) on the transonic flutter characteristics of a series of three moderately swept wing models. Experimental flutter results were obtained in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel for Mach numbers from 0.60-1.00, with air as the test medium. The models were semispan cantilevered wings with a 3 percent biconvex airfoil and a panel aspect ratio of 1.14. The baseline model had straight leading and trailing edges (i.e., no planform curvature). The radii of curvature of the leading edges for these two models were 200 and 80 inches. The radii of curvature of the leading edges of the other two models were determined so that the root and tip chords were identical for all three models. Experimental results showed that flutter-speed index and flutter frequency ratio increased as planform curvature increase (radius of curvature of the leading edge was decreased) over the test range of Mach numbers. Analytical flutter results were calculated with a subsonic flutter-prediction program, and they agreed well with the experimental results.

  13. Development and application of computational aerothermodynamics flowfield computer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1994-01-01

    Research was performed in the area of computational modeling and application of hypersonic, high-enthalpy, thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flow (Aerothermodynamics) problems. A number of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes were developed and applied to simulate high altitude rocket-plume, the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE), hypersonic base flow for planetary probes, the single expansion ramp model (SERN) connected with the National Aerospace Plane, hypersonic drag devices, hypersonic ramp flows, ballistic range models, shock tunnel facility nozzles, transient and steady flows in the shock tunnel facility, arc-jet flows, thermochemical nonequilibrium flows around simple and complex bodies, axisymmetric ionized flows of interest to re-entry, unsteady shock induced combustion phenomena, high enthalpy pulsed facility simulations, and unsteady shock boundary layer interactions in shock tunnels. Computational modeling involved developing appropriate numerical schemes for the flows on interest and developing, applying, and validating appropriate thermochemical processes. As part of improving the accuracy of the numerical predictions, adaptive grid algorithms were explored, and a user-friendly, self-adaptive code (SAGE) was developed. Aerothermodynamic flows of interest included energy transfer due to strong radiation, and a significant level of effort was spent in developing computational codes for calculating radiation and radiation modeling. In addition, computational tools were developed and applied to predict the radiative heat flux and spectra that reach the model surface.

  14. Aerothermodynamic Design of the Mars Science Laboratory Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Wright, Michael J.; Tang, Chun Y.

    2009-01-01

    Aerothermodynamic design environments are presented for the Mars Science Laboratory entry capsule heatshield. The design conditions are based on Navier-Stokes flowfield simulations on shallow (maximum total heat load) and steep (maximum heat flux, shear stress, and pressure) entry trajectories from a 2009 launch. Boundary layer transition is expected prior to peak heat flux, a first for Mars entry, and the heatshield environments were defined for a fully-turbulent heat pulse. The effects of distributed surface roughness on turbulent heat flux and shear stress peaks are included using empirical correlations. Additional biases and uncertainties are based on computational model comparisons with experimental data and sensitivity studies. The peak design conditions are 197 W/sq cm for heat flux, 471 Pa for shear stress, 0.371 Earth atm for pressure, and 5477 J/sq cm for total heat load. Time-varying conditions at fixed heatshield locations were generated for thermal protection system analysis and flight instrumentation development. Finally, the aerothermodynamic effects of delaying launch until 2011 are previewed.

  15. Experimental Stage Separation Tool Development in NASA Langley's Aerothermodynamics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Scallion, William I.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the research effort at NASA in support of the stage separation and ascent aerothermodynamics research program, proximity testing of a generic bimese wing-body configuration was conducted in NASA Langley's Aerothermodynamics Laboratory in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The objective of this work is the development of experimental tools and testing methodologies to apply to hypersonic stage separation problems for future multi-stage launch vehicle systems. Aerodynamic force and moment proximity data were generated at a nominal Mach number of 6 over a small range of angles of attack. The generic bimese configuration was tested in a belly-to-belly and back-to-belly orientation at 86 relative proximity locations. Over 800 aerodynamic proximity data points were taken to serve as a database for code validation. Longitudinal aerodynamic data generated in this test program show very good agreement with viscous computational predictions. Thus a framework has been established to study separation problems in the hypersonic regime using coordinated experimental and computational tools.

  16. ESA Intermediate Experimental Vehicle. Independent Aerothermodynamic Characterization And Aerodatabase Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufolo, Giuseppe C.; Di Benedetto, Sara; Walpot, Louis; Roncioni, Pietro; Marini, Marco

    2011-05-01

    In the frame of the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) project, the European Space Agency (ESA) is coordinating a series of technical assistance activities aimed at verifying and supporting the IXV industrial design and development process. The technical assistance is operated with the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), by means of the Italian Aerospace Research Center (CIRA), and the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) under the super visioning and coordination of ESA IXV team. One of the purposes of the activity is to develop an independent capability for the assessment and verification of the industrial results with respect to the aerothermodynamic characterization of the IXV vehicle. To this aim CIRA is developing and independent AeroThermodynamics DataBase (ATDB), intended as a tool generating in output the time histories of local quantities (heat flux, pressure, skin friction) for each point of the IXV vehicle and for each trajectory (in a pre-defined envelope), together with an uncertainties model. The reference Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions needed for the development of the tool have been provided by ESA-ESTEC (with the CFD code LORE) and CIRA (with the CFD code H3NS).

  17. Aerothermodynamic Environments Definition for the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Wright, Michael J.; Tang, Chun Y.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the aerothermodynamic environments definition status is presented for the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle. The environments are based on Navier-Stokes flowfield simulations on a candidate aeroshell geometry and worst-case entry heating trajectories. Uncertainties for the flowfield predictions are based primarily on available ground data since Mars flight data are scarce. The forebody aerothermodynamics analysis focuses on boundary layer transition and turbulent heating augmentation. Turbulent transition is expected prior to peak heating, a first for Mars entry, resulting in augmented heat flux and shear stress at the same heatshield location. Afterbody computations are also shown with and without interference effects of reaction control system thruster plumes. Including uncertainties, analysis predicts that the heatshield may experience peaks of 225 W/sq cm for turbulent heat flux, 0.32 atm for stagnation pressure, and 400 Pa for turbulent shear stress. The afterbody heat flux without thruster plume interference is predicted to be 7 W/sq cm on the backshell and 10 W/sq cm on the parachute cover. If the reaction control jets are fired near peak dynamic pressure, the heat flux at localized areas could reach as high as 76 W/sq cm on the backshell and 38 W/sq cm on the parachute cover, including uncertainties. The final flight environments used for hardware design will be updated for any changes in the aeroshell configuration, heating design trajectories, or uncertainties.

  18. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 4: Large-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  19. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 2; Small-Radius Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg. delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 84 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  20. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 3: Medium-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6), 60 x 10(exp 6), and 120 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  1. Blunt-Body Entry Vehicle Aerothermodynamics: Transition and Turbulence on the CEV and MSL Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent, current, and planned NASA missions that employ blunt-body entry vehicles pose aerothermodynamic problems that challenge the state-of-the art of experimental and computational methods. The issues of boundary-layer transition and turbulent heating on the heat shield have become important in the designs of both the Mars Science Laboratory and Crew Exploration Vehicle. While considerable experience in these general areas exists, that experience is mainly derived from simple geometries; e.g. sharp-cones and flat-plates, or from lifting bodies such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter. For blunt-body vehicles, application of existing data, correlations, and comparisons is questionable because an all, or mostly, subsonic flow field is produced behind the bow shock, as compared to the supersonic (or even hypersonic) flow of other configurations. Because of the need for design and validation data for projects such as MSL and CEV, many new experimental studies have been conducted in the last decade to obtain detailed boundary-layer transition and turbulent heating data on this class of vehicle. In this paper, details of several of the test programs are reviewed. The laminar and turbulent data from these various test are shown to correlate in terms of edge-based Stanton and Reynolds number functions. Correlations are developed from the data for transition onset and turbulent heating augmentation as functions of momentum thickness Reynolds number. These correlation can be employed as engineering-level design and analysis tools.

  2. Subsonic Investigation of Leading-Edge Flaps Designed for Vortex- and Attached-Flow on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Kjerstad, Kevin J.; Lessard, Victor R.

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of two separate leading-edge flaps, designed for vortex and attached-flow, respectively, were conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.12 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 2.50 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.50 x 10 (sup 6). Variations of the leading-edge flap deflection angle were tested with outboard leading-edge flaps deflected 0 deg. and 26.4 deg. Trailing-edge flaps were deflected 0 deg., 10 deg., 12.9 deg., and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein. The data associated with each deflected leading-edge flap indicate L/D improvements over the undeflected configuration. These improvements may be instrumental in providing the necessary lift augmentation required by an actual HSCT during the climb-out and landing phases of the flight envelope. However, further tests will have to be done to assess their full potential.

  3. A numerical investigation of new film cooling hole configuration at the leading edge of asymmetrical turbine blade: part A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabed, Mustapha

    2013-04-01

    The focus of the first part of this numerical study is to investigate the effects of two new configurations: (1) slot with cylindrical end and (2) slot with median cylindrical hole, generated by the combination between two film cooling configurations: cylindrical hole and uniform slot. Computational results are presented for a row of coolant injection holes on each side of an asymmetrical turbine blade model near the leading edge. For each configuration, three values of the radius are taken: R = 0.4, R = 0.8 and R = 1.2. The six cases simulations, thus obtained, are conducted for the same density ratio of 1.0 and the same inlet plenum pressure. A new parameter, Rc, is defined to measure the rate of blade coverage by the film cooling. Results show that, at the pressure side; for the two new configurations, the six studied cases exceed the case baseline in cooling effectiveness term with the best result obtained for R = 0.8 (case 2). For the suction side, only configurations with R = 0.4 (cases 1 and 4) provide an increase of film effectiveness compared to the case baseline. The following configuration: Cases 1 or 4 at the suction side and case 2 at the pressure side, gets the best thermal protection because of their higher coverage and strong cooling effectiveness.

  4. Leading edge vortices in lesser long-nosed bats occurring at slow but not fast flight speeds.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Christoffer Johansson, L; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Slow and hovering animal flight creates high demands on the lift production of animal wings. Steady state aerodynamics is unable to explain the forces required and the most commonly used mechanism to enhance the lift production is a leading edge vortex (LEV). Although LEVs increase the lift, they come at the cost of high drag. Here we determine the flow above the wing of lesser long-nosed bats at slow and cruising speed using particle image velocimetry (PIV). We find that a prominent LEV is present during the downstroke at slow speed, but not at cruising speed. Comparison with previously published LEV data from a robotic flapper inspired by lesser long-nosed bats suggests that bats should be able to generate LEVs at cruising speeds, but that they avoid doing so, probably to increase flight efficiency. In addition, at slow flight speeds we find LEVs of opposite spin at the inner and outer wing during the upstroke, potentially providing a control challenge to the animal. We also note that the LEV stays attached to the wing throughout the downstoke and does not show the complex structures found in insects. This suggests that bats are able to control the development of the LEV and potential control mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Shuttle Leading Edge Materials with Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites, such as the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) material used on the leading edges of the Space Shuttle. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression deformation behaviors have also been accounted for. State variable viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear response is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). Several sample qualitative calculations have been conducted, which demonstrate the ability of the model to qualitatively capture the features of the deformation response present in woven ceramic matrix composites.

  6. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  7. Smoke visualization of free-flying bumblebees indicates independent leading-edge vortices on each wing pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomphrey, Richard James; Taylor, Graham K.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.

    2009-05-01

    It has been known for a century that quasi-steady attached flows are insufficient to explain aerodynamic force production in bumblebees and many other insects. Most recent studies of the unsteady, separated-flow aerodynamics of insect flight have used physical, analytical or numerical modeling based upon simplified kinematic data treating the wing as a flat plate. However, despite the importance of validating such models against living subjects, few good data are available on what real insects actually do aerodynamically in free flight. Here we apply classical smoke line visualization techniques to analyze the aerodynamic mechanisms of free-flying bumblebees hovering, maneuvering and flying slowly along a windtunnel (advance ratio: -0.2 to 0.2). We find that bumblebees, in common with most other insects, exploit a leading-edge vortex. However, in contrast to most other insects studied to date, bumblebees shed both tip and root vortices, with no evidence for any flow structures linking left and right wings or their near-wakes. These flow topologies will be less efficient than those in which left and right wings are aerodynamically linked and shed only tip vortices. While these topologies might simply result from biological constraint, it is also possible that they might have been specifically evolved to enhance control by allowing left and right wings to operate substantially independently.

  8. Smoke visualization of free-flying bumblebees indicates independent leading-edge vortices on each wing pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomphrey, Richard James; Taylor, Graham K.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.

    It has been known for a century that quasisteady attached flows are insufficient to explain aerodynamic force production in bumblebees and many other insects. Most recent studies of the unsteady, separated-flow aerodynamics of insect flight have used physical, analytical or numerical modeling based upon simplified kinematic data treating the wing as a flat plate. However, despite the importance of validating such models against living subjects, few good data are available on what real insects actually do aerodynamically in free flight. Here we apply classical smoke line visualization techniques to analyze the aerodynamic mechanisms of free-flying bumblebees hovering, maneuvering and flying slowly along a windtunnel (advance ratio: -0.2 to 0.2). We find that bumblebees, in common with most other insects, exploit a leading-edge vortex. However, in contrast to most other insects studied to date, bumblebees shed both tip and root vortices, with no evidence for any flow structures linking left and right wings or their near-wakes. These flow topologies will be less efficient than those in which left and right wings are aerodynamically linked and shed only tip vortices. While these topologies might simply result from biological constraint, it is also possible that they might have been specifically evolved to enhance control by allowing left and right wings to operate substantially independently.

  9. Goertler vortices in growing boundary layers: The leading edge receptivity problem, linear growth and the nonlinear breakdown stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Goertler vortices are thought to be the cause of transition in many fluid flows of practical importance. A review of the different stages of vortex growth is given. In the linear regime, nonparallel effects completely govern this growth, and parallel flow theories do not capture the essential features of the development of the vortices. A detailed comparison between the parallel and nonparallel theories is given and it is shown that at small vortex wavelengths, the parallel flow theories have some validity; otherwise nonparallel effects are dominant. New results for the receptivity problem for Goertler vortices are given; in particular vortices induced by free stream perturbations impinging on the leading edge of the walls are considered. It is found that the most dangerous mode of this type can be isolated and it's neutral curve is determined. This curve agrees very closely with the available experimental data. A discussion of the different regimes of growth of nonlinear vortices is also given. Again it is shown that, unless the vortex wavelength is small, nonparallel effects are dominant. Some new results for nonlinear vortices of 0(1) wavelengths are given and compared to experimental observations.

  10. PI(4,5)P2-dependent microdomain assemblies capture microtubules to promote and control leading edge motility.

    PubMed

    Golub, Tamara; Caroni, Pico

    2005-04-11

    The lipid second messenger PI(4,5)P(2) modulates actin dynamics, and its local accumulation at plasmalemmal microdomains (rafts) might mediate regulation of protrusive motility. However, how PI(4,5)P(2)-rich rafts regulate surface motility is not well understood. Here, we show that upon signals promoting cell surface motility, PI(4,5)P(2) directs the assembly of dynamic raft-rich plasmalemmal patches, which promote and sustain protrusive motility. The accumulation of PI(4,5)P(2) at rafts, together with Cdc42, promotes patch assembly through N-WASP. The patches exhibit locally regulated PI(4,5)P(2) turnover and reduced diffusion-mediated exchange with their environment. Patches capture microtubules (MTs) through patch IQGAP1, to stabilize MTs at the leading edge. Captured MTs in turn deliver PKA to patches to promote patch clustering through further PI(4,5)P(2) accumulation in response to cAMP. Patch clustering restricts, spatially confines, and polarizes protrusive motility. Thus, PI(4,5)P(2)-dependent raft-rich patches enhance local signaling for motility, and their assembly into clusters is regulated through captured MTs and PKA, coupling local regulation of motility to cell polarity, and organization.

  11. Leading edge vortices in lesser long-nosed bats occurring at slow but not fast flight speeds.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Christoffer Johansson, L; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Slow and hovering animal flight creates high demands on the lift production of animal wings. Steady state aerodynamics is unable to explain the forces required and the most commonly used mechanism to enhance the lift production is a leading edge vortex (LEV). Although LEVs increase the lift, they come at the cost of high drag. Here we determine the flow above the wing of lesser long-nosed bats at slow and cruising speed using particle image velocimetry (PIV). We find that a prominent LEV is present during the downstroke at slow speed, but not at cruising speed. Comparison with previously published LEV data from a robotic flapper inspired by lesser long-nosed bats suggests that bats should be able to generate LEVs at cruising speeds, but that they avoid doing so, probably to increase flight efficiency. In addition, at slow flight speeds we find LEVs of opposite spin at the inner and outer wing during the upstroke, potentially providing a control challenge to the animal. We also note that the LEV stays attached to the wing throughout the downstoke and does not show the complex structures found in insects. This suggests that bats are able to control the development of the LEV and potential control mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24855067

  12. Partners in Science: A Model Cooperative Program Introducing High School Teachers and Students to Leading-Edge Pharmaceutical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woska, Joseph R., Jr.; Collins, Danielle M.; Canney, Brian J.; Arcario, Erin L.; Reilly, Patricia L.

    2005-12-01

    Partners in Science is a cooperative program between Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and area high schools in the community surrounding our Connecticut campus. It is a two-phase program that introduces high school students and teachers to the world of drug discovery and leading-edge pharmaceutical research. Phase 1 involves a series of lectures, tours, and demonstrations given by scientists within our research and development division (R&D). Phase 2 involves the selection of a small group of participants to intern for the summer in a research laboratory, working side by side with a scientist within R&D. In this manuscript, the specific aims, goals, and development of the Partners in Science program are described, as well as the syllabus/agenda, the logistics surrounding the operation of the program, and our shared personal experiences with students and teachers who have participated. Some of the pitfalls/problems associated with the program will be presented, and finally, the future direction of the program including areas of improvement and expansion are described.

  13. Endocytic membrane turnover at the leading edge is driven by a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Monika K.; Holst, Mikkel R.; Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Henriksson, Sara; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Sandblad, Linda; Lundmark, Richard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changes in cell morphology require coordination of plasma membrane turnover and cytoskeleton dynamics, processes that are regulated by Rho GTPases. Here, we describe how a direct interaction between the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) GRAF1 (also known as ARHGAP26), facilitates rapid cell surface turnover at the leading edge. Both Cdc42 and GRAF1 were required for fluid-phase uptake and regulated the generation of transient GRAF1-coated endocytic carriers, which were distinct from clathrin-coated vesicles. GRAF1 was found to transiently assemble at discrete Cdc42-enriched punctae at the plasma membrane, resulting in a corresponding decrease in the microdomain association of Cdc42. However, Cdc42 captured in its active state was, through a GAP-domain-mediated interaction, localised together with GRAF1 on accumulated internal structures derived from the cell surface. Correlative fluorescence and electron tomography microscopy revealed that these structures were clusters of small membrane carriers with defective endosomal processing. We conclude that a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1 drives endocytic turnover and controls the transition essential for endosomal maturation of plasma membrane internalised by this mechanism. PMID:26446261

  14. Prediction of leading-edge transition and relaminarization phenomena on a subsonic multi-element high-lift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    Boundary-layer transition and relaminarization may have a critical effect on the flow development about multi-element high-lift systems of subsonic transport jets with swept wings. The purpose of the research is to study these transition phenomena in the leading-edge region of the various elements of a high-lift system. The flow phenomena studied include transition to the attachment-line flow, relaminarization, and crossflow instability, and transition. The calculations are based on pressure distributions measured in flight on the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle (Boeing 737-100) at a wing station where the flow approximated infinite swept wing conditions. The results indicate that significant regions of laminar flow can exist on all flap elements in flight. In future flight experiments (planned for January-February, 1994) the extent of these regions, the transition mechanisms and the effect of laminar flow on the high-lift characteristics of the multi-element system will be further explored.

  15. The Vercors and Chartreuse Massifs at the leading edge of the alpine thrust belt: Tetonic history and petroleum assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deville, E.; Mascle, A.; Philippe, Y.

    1995-08-01

    The Vercors and Chartreuse Massifs are located at the leading edge of the Western Alps Thrust Belt. They developed in late Miocene-Pliocene times above a major decollement hosted in late Triassic evaporites and/or Liassic marls. The uplift of both massifs led to the oblique and partial inversion of the previous Mesozoic margin of the Southeastern Basin, the thickest onshore sedimentary basin in France. Both massifs are unexplored. The regional geology of eastern France and the results of ten wells located in the near foreland suggest that source rocks are present in late Paleozoic and late Liassic strata, and that fractured sandstones and/or limestones of Triassic/Jurassic age could act as reservoirs. A nonexclusive seismic survey has been shot in 1991 by CGG allowing the first well constrained balanced sections to be drawn across both massifs. They have been used inturn to model the forward kinematics of thrust propagation, and the source rock maturation history, using the {open_quotes}Thrustpack{close_quotes} software developed by IFP and partners.

  16. Turbine Vane External Heat Transfer. Volume 1: Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Surface Heat Transfer Distributions with Leading Edge Showerhead Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, E. R.; Wilson, M. D.; Hylton, L. D.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes was summarized. A two dimensional linear cascade (previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils) was used to examine the effect of leading edge shower head film cooling on downstream heat transfer. The data were used to develop and evaluate analytical models. Modifications to the two dimensional boundary layer model are described. The results were used to formulate and test an effective viscosity model capable of predicting heat transfer phenomena downstream of the leading edge film cooling array on both the suction and pressure surfaces, with and without mass injection.

  17. Simulator study of the stall departure characteristics of a light general aviation airplane with and without a wing-leading-edge modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear simulation was developed for a two-place, single-engine, low-wing general aviation airplane for the stall and initial departure regions of flight. Two configurations, one with and one without an outboard wing-leading-edge modification, were modeled. The math models developed are presented simulation predictions and flight-test data for validation purposes and simulation results for the two configurations for various maneuvers and power settings are compared to show the beneficial influence of adding the wing-leading-edge modification.

  18. Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Weston, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Wing leading-edge deflection effects on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing configuration were determined. Static force tests were conducted in a V/STOL tunnel at a Reynolds number of about 2.5 x 1 million for an angle-of-attack range from -10 deg to 17 deg and an angle-of-sideslip range from -5 deg to 5 deg. Limited flow visualization studies were also conducted in order to provide a qualitative assessment of leading-edge upwash characteristics.

  19. Impact of clocking on the aero-thermodynamics of a second stator tested in a one and a half stage HP turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billiard, N.; Paniagua, Guillermo; Dénos, R.

    2008-06-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental investigation of the time-averaged and time-accurate aero-thermodynamics of a second stator tested in a 1.5 stage high-pressure turbine. The effect of clocking on aerodynamic and heat transfer are investigated. Tests are performed under engine representative conditions in the VKI compression tube CT3. The test program includes four different clocking positions, i.e. relative pitch-wise positions between the first and the second stator. Probes located upstream and downstream of the second stator provide the thermodynamic conditions of the flow field. On the second stator airfoil, measurements are taken around the blade profile at 15, 50 and 85% span with pressure sensors and thin-film gauges. Both time-averaged and time-resolved aspects of the flow field are addressed. Regarding the time-averaged results, clocking effects are mainly observed within the leading edge region of the second stator, the largest effects being observed at 15% span. The surface static pressure distribution is changed locally, hence affecting the overall airfoil performance. For one clocking position, the thermal load of the airfoil is noticeably reduced. Pressure fluctuations are attributed to the passage of the upstream transonic rotor and its associated pressure gradients. The pattern of these fluctuations changes noticeably as a function of clocking. The time-resolved variations of heat flux and static pressure are analyzed together showing that the major effect is due to a potential interaction. The time-resolved pressure distribution integrated along the second stator surface yields the unsteady forces on the vane. The magnitude of the unsteady force is very dependent on the clocking position.

  20. Salinization of Freshwater-Dependent Coastal Ecosystems: Understanding Landscapes in Transition Along the Leading Edge of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, R. E.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Ardón, M.; Wright, J. P.; BenDor, T.; Bhattachan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is transforming the outer edge of the Southern US coastal plain. Lower-lying parts of this region, characterized by extensive freshwater-dependent ecosystems, will be largely inundated by gradual sea level rise by the end of this century. In the interim, however, ocean waters are already penetrating and influencing freshwater-dependent coastal landscapes due to a combination of human and natural factors. This landward movement of salinity from the coast onto the coastal plain or "saltwater intrusion" is a critical water resource issue representing the leading edge of climate change for many coastal areas. The salinization of surface waters and adjacent lands has implications for crop and timber yields in managed ecosystems, ecosystem carbon sequestration in unmanaged ecosystems, and degradation of coastal water quality due to extraction of soil nutrients by seasalts. With this in mind, we seek to understand more broadly how vulnerability of coastal landscapes to saltwater intrusion shapes and is shaped by both natural and anthropogenic processes. We present a novel framework that couples intensive, in situ monitoring of hydrological and ecological conditions with a geospatial saltwater intrusion vulnerability index (SIVI). We discuss application of this framework to the Albemarle-Pamlico region of coastal North Carolina, where we are learning how climate, natural landscape structure, and human activities interact to mediate or exacerbate the vulnerability of freshwater-dependent lands to saltwater intrusion. We discuss the involvement of stakeholders and local knowledge in the research process as well. This work advances understanding of vulnerability to climate change in coastal regions by moving beyond simple inundation models to gain a more sophisticated understanding of the human and natural processes influencing salinization of surface waters and adjacent lands. As the Albemarle-Pamlico and similar regions worldwide transform in response to and

  1. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (CDC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is

  2. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is

  3. High-Energy Atmospheric Reentry Test Aerothermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the aerothermodynamic environment around an 8.3 meter High Energy Atmospheric Reentry Test (HEART) vehicle. This study generated twelve nose shape configurations and compared their responses at the peak heating trajectory point against the baseline nose shape. The heat flux sensitivity to the angle of attack variations are also discussed. The possibility of a two-piece Thermal Protection System (TPS) design at the nose is also considered, as are the surface catalytic affects of the aeroheating environment of such configuration. Based on these analyses, an optimum nose shape is proposed to minimize the surface heating. A recommendation is also made for a two-piece TPS design, for which the surface catalytic uncertainty associated with the jump in heating at the nose-IAD juncture is reduced by a minimum of 93%. In this paper, the aeroshell is assumed to be rigid and the inflatable fluid interaction effect is left for future investigations

  4. Numerical methods for aerothermodynamic design of hypersonic space transport vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanie, K. M.; Brenneis, A.; Eberle, A.; Heiss, S.

    1993-04-01

    The requirement of the design process of hypersonic vehicles to predict flow past entire configurations with wings, fins, flaps, and propulsion system represents one of the major challenges for aerothermodynamics. In this context computational fluid dynamics has come up as a powerful tool to support the experimental work. A couple of numerical methods developed at MBB designed to fulfill the needs of the design process are described. The governing equations and fundamental details of the solution methods are shortly reviewed. Results are given for both geometrically simple test cases and realistic hypersonic configurations. Since there is still a considerable lack of experience for hypersonic flow calculations an extensive testing and verification is essential. This verification is done by comparison of results with experimental data and other numerical methods. The results presented prove that the methods used are robust, flexible, and accurate enough to fulfill the strong needs of the design process.

  5. Aerothermodynamic Facilities And Measurement: Flow Characterization in Shock Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This presentation will examine the key performance aspects of shock tunnels as they relate to their use as aerothermodynamic flow simulation facilities. Assessment of shock tube reservoir conditions and flow contaminants generated in the shock tube will be presented along with their limiting impact on viable test envelopes, Facility nozzle performance as it pertains to test time assessment and nozzle exit flow quality (survey of pressure, temperature, and species) will be addressed. Also included will be a discussion of free stream flow diagnostics, both intrusive and nonintrusive, for measurement of critical flow properties not directly inferred from surface mounted transducers. The use of computational fluid dynamics for purposes of validating experimental measurements as well as predicting performance in regimes where measurements are not feasible or possible will be discussed. The use of CFD for facility research and design will also be presented.

  6. Team Software Development for Aerothermodynamic and Aerodynamic Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, N.; Atkins, H. L.; Bibb, K. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Carpenter, M. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Hammond, D. P.; Jones, W. T.; Kleb, W. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative approach to software development is described. The approach employs the agile development techniques: project retrospectives, Scrum status meetings, and elements of Extreme Programming to efficiently develop a cohesive and extensible software suite. The software product under development is a fluid dynamics simulator for performing aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis and design. The functionality of the software product is achieved both through the merging, with substantial rewrite, of separate legacy codes and the authorship of new routines. Examples of rapid implementation of new functionality demonstrate the benefits obtained with this agile software development process. The appendix contains a discussion of coding issues encountered while porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95, software design principles, and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  7. Aerothermodynamic methods for a Mars environmental survey Mars entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics models for the thermodynamics and transport properties used in an equilibrium version of the Langley aerothermodynamics upwind relaxation algorithm (LAURA) for Mars atmospheric entries are described. In addition, the physical models used in a nonequilibrium version of LAURA for Mars-entry flows are described. Uncertainties exist in defining constants used in the transport properties for the equilibrium model and in many of the physical models for the nonequilibrium version. Solutions from the two codes using the best available constants are examined at the Mars-entry conditions characteristics of the Mars environmental survey mission. While the flowfields are near thermal equilibrium, chemical nonequilibrium effects are present in the entry cases examined. Convective heating at the stagnation point for these flows (assuming fully catalytic wall boundary conditions) is approximately 100 W/cm(exp 2). Radiative heating is negligible.

  8. Aerothermodynamic design feasibility of a Mars aerocapture/aeromaneuver vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florence, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    Lifting aerodynamic configurations have been screened and selected for the Mars aerocapture mission that (1) meet the geometric packaging requirements of the various payloads and the Space Shuttle cargo bay and (2) provide the aerodynamic performance characteristics required to obtain the atmospheric exit steering accuracy and the parachute deployment conditions desired. Hypersonic heat transfer and aerodynamic loads to the vehicle in the CO2 atmosphere are evaluated. Contemporary low density ablative thermal protection materials were selected that meet all the atmospheric entry requirements and provide a minimum mass solution. Results are presented of the aerodynamic configuration and thermal protection materials screening and selection. It is concluded that the aerothermodynamic design of this concept is feasible using state-of-the-art technology.

  9. Applications of the ram accelerator to hypervelocity aerothermodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Knowlen, C.; Hertzberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    A ram accelerator used as a hypervelocity launcher for large-scale aeroballistic range applications in hypersonics and aerodynamics research is presented. It is an in-bore ramjet device in which a projectile shaped like the centerbody of a supersonic ramjet is propelled down a stationary tube filled with a tailored combustible gas mixture. Ram accelerator operation has been demonstrated at 39 mm and 90 mm bores, supporting the proposition that this launcher concept can be scaled up to very large bore diameters of the order of 30-60 cm. It is concluded that high quality data obtained from the tube wall and projectile during the aceleration process itself are very useful for understanding aerothermodynamics of hypersonic flow in general, and for providing important CFD validation benchmarks.

  10. Aerothermodynamic Heating Analysis of Aerobraking and Aeromaneuvering Orbital Transfer Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Davies, Carol B.; Wilson, John F.; Brown, Kevin G.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal-protection requirements of two aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVS) are analyzed for return missions between the geosynchronous and Shuttle orbits. One of the designs is a specialized version of a previously proposed generic aerobraking vehicle that Is capable of only delivery-type operations. The other Is a high-lift aeromaneuvering vehicle that is optimized for low Earth orbit sortie missions involving large, multiple plane-inclination changes. The aerothermal environment of the aerobraking vehicle is analyzed using state-of-the-art methods for nonequilibrium-radiative and convective heating that incorporate refinements unique to the configuration. The heating analysis of the aeromaneuvering vehicle required the development of a flowfield model for rarefied-hypersonic flow over a lifting surface at incidence. The predicted aerothermodynamic heating characteristics for both vehicles are correlated with thermal-control

  11. Experimental and Computational Aerothermodynamics of a Mars Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    1996-01-01

    An aerothermodynamic database has been generated through both experimental testing and computational fluid dynamics simulations for a 70 deg sphere-cone configuration based on the NASA Mars Pathfinder entry vehicle. The aerothermodynamics of several related parametric configurations were also investigated. Experimental heat-transfer data were obtained at hypersonic test conditions in both a perfect gas air wind tunnel and in a hypervelocity, high-enthalpy expansion tube in which both air and carbon dioxide were employed as test gases. In these facilities, measurements were made with thin-film temperature-resistance gages on both the entry vehicle models and on the support stings of the models. Computational results for freestream conditions equivalent to those of the test facilities were generated using an axisymmetric/2D laminar Navier-Stokes solver with both perfect-gas and nonequilibrium thermochemical models. Forebody computational and experimental heating distributions agreed to within the experimental uncertainty for both the perfect-gas and high-enthalpy test conditions. In the wake, quantitative differences between experimental and computational heating distributions for the perfect-gas conditions indicated transition of the free shear layer near the reattachment point on the sting. For the high enthalpy cases, agreement to within, or slightly greater than, the experimental uncertainty was achieved in the wake except within the recirculation region, where further grid resolution appeared to be required. Comparisons between the perfect-gas and high-enthalpy results indicated that the wake remained laminar at the high-enthalpy test conditions, for which the Reynolds number was significantly lower than that of the perfect-gas conditions.

  12. Theoretical effect of modifications to the upper surface of two NACA airfoils using smooth polynomial additional thickness distributions which emphasize leading edge profile and which vary quadratically at the trailing edge. [using flow equations and a CDC 7600 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merz, A. W.; Hague, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a CDC 7600 digital computer to determine the effects of additional thickness distributions to the upper surface of the NACA 64-206 and 64 sub 1 - 212 airfoils. The additional thickness distribution had the form of a continuous mathematical function which disappears at both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The function behaves as a polynomial of order epsilon sub 1 at the leading edge, and a polynomial of order epsilon sub 2 at the trailing edge. Epsilon sub 2 is a constant and epsilon sub 1 is varied over a range of practical interest. The magnitude of the additional thickness, y, is a second input parameter, and the effect of varying epsilon sub 1 and y on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil was investigated. Results were obtained at a Mach number of 0.2 with an angle-of-attack of 6 degrees on the basic airfoils, and all calculations employ the full potential flow equations for two dimensional flow. The relaxation method of Jameson was employed for solution of the potential flow equations.

  13. Prediction of STS-107 Hypervelocity Flow Fields about the Shuttle Orbiter with Various Wing Leading Edge Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulsonetti, Maria V.; Thompson, Richard A.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Computations were performed for damaged configurations of the Shuttle Orbiter in support of the STS-107 Columbia accident investigation. Two configurations with missing wing leading-edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels were evaluated at conditions just prior to the peak heating trajectory point. The initial configuration modeled the Orbiter with an approximate missing RCC panel 6 to determine whether this damage could result in anomalous temperatures measured during the STS-107 reentry. This missing RCC panel 6 computation was found to produce heating augmentation factors of 5 times the nominal heating rates on the side fuselage with lesser heat increases on the front of the OMS pod. This is consistent with the thermocouple and resistance temperature detector sensors from the STS-107 re-entry which observed off nominal high early in the re-entry trajectory. A second damaged configuration modeled the Orbiter with missing RCC panel 9 and included ingestion of the flow into the outboard RCC channel. This computation lowered the level (only 2 times nominal) and moved the location of the heating augmentation on the leeside fuselage relative to the missing RCC panel 6 configuration. The lesser heating augmentation for missing RCC panel 9 was confined near the wing fuselage juncture. Near nominal heating was predicted on the remainder of the side fuselage with some lower than nominal heating on the front surface of the OMS pod. These results for missing RCC panel 9 are consistent with data from the STS-107 re-entry where the heating augmentation was observed to move off the side fuselage and OMS pod sensors at later times in the trajectory. As this solution requires supersonic mass ingestion into the RCC channel, it is probably not an appropriate model prior to penetration of the flow through the spar into the wing structure. It may, however, be representative of the conditions at later times and could account for the movement of the heating signature on the side

  14. Human phosphatase CDC14A is recruited to the cell leading edge to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-Peng; Uddin, Borhan; Voit, Renate; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are highly dynamic biological processes that play important roles in organ development and cancer metastasis. Their tight regulation by small GTPases and protein phosphorylation make interrogation of these key processes of great importance. We now show that the conserved dual-specificity phosphatase human cell-division cycle 14A (hCDC14A) associates with the actin cytoskeleton of human cells. To understand hCDC14A function at this location, we manipulated native loci to ablate hCDC14A phosphatase activity (hCDC14APD) in untransformed hTERT-RPE1 and colorectal cancer (HCT116) cell lines and expressed the phosphatase in HeLa FRT T-Rex cells. Ectopic expression of hCDC14A induced stress fiber formation, whereas stress fibers were diminished in hCDC14APD cells. hCDC14APD cells displayed faster cell migration and less adhesion than wild-type controls. hCDC14A colocalized with the hCDC14A substrate kidney- and brain-expressed protein (KIBRA) at the cell leading edge and overexpression of KIBRA was able to reverse the phenotypes of hCDC14APD cells. Finally, we show that ablation of hCDC14A activity increased the aggressive nature of cells in an in vitro tumor formation assay. Consistently, hCDC14A is down-regulated in many tumor tissues and reduced hCDC14A expression is correlated with poorer survival of patients with cancer, to suggest that hCDC14A may directly contribute to the metastatic potential of tumors. Thus, we have uncovered an unanticipated role for hCDC14A in cell migration and adhesion that is clearly distinct from the mitotic and cytokinesis functions of Cdc14/Flp1 in budding and fission yeast. PMID:26747605

  15. Aerothermodynamic Characteristics in the Hypersonic Continuum-Rarefied Transitional Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher, E.; Moss, James N.

    2001-01-01

    Stagnation pressure and heating for cylinders and spheres representative of wing leading edges and nose sections for small-scale space transportation vehicles are presented for various Knudsen numbers at Earth entry conditions that bridge from the free molecular to continuum regimes. CFD, DSMC, and collisionless DSMC are used to span Knudsen numbers from 0.001 to 100 with the CFD/DSMC overlap at a Knudsen number of 0.01 and the DSMC/collisionless DSMC overlap at 10. The present results include density contours, density and temperature along the stagnation streamline for all cases, and stagnation pressure and heat transfer coefficient as a function of Knudsen number.

  16. A method of predicting flow rates required to achieve anti-icing performance with a porous leading edge ice protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    A proposed method of analytically predicting the minimum fluid flow rate required to provide anti-ice protection with a porous leading edge system on a wing under a given set of flight conditions is presented. Results of the proposed method are compared with the actual results of an icing test of a real wing section in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel.

  17. Experimental study of pressure and heating rate on a swept cylindrical leading edge resulting from swept shock wave interference. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cylindrical leading edge sweep on surface pressure and heat transfer rate for swept shock wave interference were investigated. Experimental tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 8, nominal unit Reynolds number of 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power per foot, leading edge and incident shock generator sweep angles of 0, 15, and 30 deg, and incident shock generator angle-of-attack fixed at 12.5 deg. Detailed surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylindircal leading edge of a swept shock wave interference model were measured at the region of the maximum surface pressure and heat transfer rate. Results show that pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylindrical leading edge of the shock wave interference model were reduced as the sweep was increased over the range of tested parameters. Peak surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylinder were about 10 and 30 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point value, respectively, for the 0 deg sweep test. A comparison of the 15 and 30 deg swept results with the 0 deg swept results showed that peak pressure was reduced about 13 percent and 44 percent, respectively, and peak heat transfer rate was reduced about 7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

  18. An improved panel method for the solution of three-dimensional leading edge vortex flows Volume 2: User's guide and programmer's document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinoco, E. N.; Lu, P.; Johnson, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program developed for solving the subsonic, three dimensional flow over wing-body configurations with leading edge vortex separation is presented. Instructions are given for the proper set up and input of a problem into the computer code. Program input formats and output are described, as well as the overlay structure of the program. The program is written in FORTRAN.

  19. The effect of aspect ratio on the leading-edge vortex over an insect-like flapping wing.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nathan; Knowles, Kevin; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Insect wing shapes are diverse and a renowned source of inspiration for the new generation of autonomous flapping vehicles, yet the aerodynamic consequences of varying geometry is not well understood. One of the most defining and aerodynamically significant measures of wing shape is the aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of wing length (R) to mean wing chord (c). We investigated the impact of aspect ratio, AR, on the induced flow field around a flapping wing using a robotic device. Rigid rectangular wings ranging from AR = 1.5 to 7.5 were flapped with insect-like kinematics in air with a constant Reynolds number (Re) of 1400, and a dimensionless stroke amplitude of 6.5c (number of chords traversed by the wingtip). Pseudo-volumetric, ensemble-averaged, flow fields around the wings were captured using particle image velocimetry at 11 instances throughout simulated downstrokes. Results confirmed the presence of a high-lift, separated flow field with a leading-edge vortex (LEV), and revealed that the conical, primary LEV grows in size and strength with increasing AR. In each case, the LEV had an arch-shaped axis with its outboard end originating from a focus-sink singularity on the wing surface near the tip. LEV detachment was observed for AR > 1.5 around mid-stroke at ~70% span, and initiated sooner over higher aspect ratio wings. At AR > 3 the larger, stronger vortex persisted under the wing surface well into the next half-stroke leading to a reduction in lift. Circulatory lift attributable to the LEV increased with AR up to AR = 6. Higher aspect ratios generated proportionally less lift distally because of LEV breakdown, and also less lift closer to the wing root due to the previous LEV's continuing presence under the wing. In nature, insect wings go no higher than AR ~ 5, likely in part due to architectural and physiological constraints but also because of the reducing aerodynamic benefits of high AR wings. PMID:26451802

  20. The effect of aspect ratio on the leading-edge vortex over an insect-like flapping wing.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nathan; Knowles, Kevin; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-10-09

    Insect wing shapes are diverse and a renowned source of inspiration for the new generation of autonomous flapping vehicles, yet the aerodynamic consequences of varying geometry is not well understood. One of the most defining and aerodynamically significant measures of wing shape is the aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of wing length (R) to mean wing chord (c). We investigated the impact of aspect ratio, AR, on the induced flow field around a flapping wing using a robotic device. Rigid rectangular wings ranging from AR = 1.5 to 7.5 were flapped with insect-like kinematics in air with a constant Reynolds number (Re) of 1400, and a dimensionless stroke amplitude of 6.5c (number of chords traversed by the wingtip). Pseudo-volumetric, ensemble-averaged, flow fields around the wings were captured using particle image velocimetry at 11 instances throughout simulated downstrokes. Results confirmed the presence of a high-lift, separated flow field with a leading-edge vortex (LEV), and revealed that the conical, primary LEV grows in size and strength with increasing AR. In each case, the LEV had an arch-shaped axis with its outboard end originating from a focus-sink singularity on the wing surface near the tip. LEV detachment was observed for AR > 1.5 around mid-stroke at ~70% span, and initiated sooner over higher aspect ratio wings. At AR > 3 the larger, stronger vortex persisted under the wing surface well into the next half-stroke leading to a reduction in lift. Circulatory lift attributable to the LEV increased with AR up to AR = 6. Higher aspect ratios generated proportionally less lift distally because of LEV breakdown, and also less lift closer to the wing root due to the previous LEV's continuing presence under the wing. In nature, insect wings go no higher than AR ~ 5, likely in part due to architectural and physiological constraints but also because of the reducing aerodynamic benefits of high AR wings.

  1. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Blowing Boundary-Layer Control on Leading- and Trailing-Edge Flaps of a Large-Scale, Low-Aspect-Ratio, 45 Swept-wing Airplane Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Ralph L.

    1959-01-01

    Blowing boundary-layer control was applied to the leading- and trailing-edge flaps of a 45 deg sweptback-wing complete model in a full-scale low-speed wind-tunnel study. The principal purpose of the study was to determine the effects of leading-edge flap deflection and boundary-layer control on maximum lift and longitudinal stability. Leading-edge flap deflection alone was sufficient to maintain static longitudinal stability without trailing-edge flaps. However, leading-edge flap blowing was required to maintain longitudinal stability by delaying leading-edge flow separation when trailing-edge flaps were deflected either with or without blowing. Partial-span leading-edge flaps deflected 60 deg with moderate blowing gave the major increase in maximum lift, although higher deflection and additional blowing gave some further increase. Inboard of 0.4 semispan leading-edge flap deflection could be reduced to 40 deg and/or blowing could be omitted with only small loss in maximum lift. Trailing-edge flap lift increments were increased by boundary-layer control for deflections greater than 45 deg. Maximum lift was not increased with deflected trailing-edge flaps with blowing.

  2. The FAK–Arp2/3 interaction promotes leading edge advance and haptosensing by coupling nascent adhesions to lamellipodia actin

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Vinay; Fischer, R. S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is initiated in response to biochemical or physical cues in the environment that promote actin-mediated lamellipodial protrusion followed by the formation of nascent integrin adhesions (NAs) within the protrusion to drive leading edge advance. Although FAK is known to be required for cell migration through effects on focal adhesions, its role in NA formation and lamellipodial dynamics is unclear. Live-cell microscopy of FAK−/− cells with expression of phosphorylation deficient or a FERM-domain mutant deficient in Arp2/3 binding revealed a requirement for FAK in promoting the dense formation, transient stabilization, and timely turnover of NA within lamellipodia to couple actin-driven protrusion to adhesion and advance of the leading edge. Phosphorylation on Y397 of FAK promotes dense NA formation but is dispensable for transient NA stabilization and leading edge advance. In contrast, transient NA stabilization and advance of the cell edge requires FAK–Arp2/3 interaction, which promotes Arp2/3 localization to NA and reduces FAK activity. Haptosensing of extracellular matrix (ECM) concentration during migration requires the interaction between FAK and Arp2/3, whereas FAK phosphorylation modulates mechanosensing of ECM stiffness during spreading. Taken together, our results show that mechanistically separable functions of FAK in NA are required for cells to distinguish distinct properties of their environment during migration. PMID:26842895

  3. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Large-Scale Unswept Wing-Body-Tail Configuration with Blowing Applied Over the Flap and Wind Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, H. Clyde; Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the effects of a blowing boundary-layer-control lift-augmentation system on the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale model of a fighter-type airplane. The wing was unswept at the 70-percent- chord station, had an aspect ratio of 2.86, a taper ratio of 0.40, and 4-percent-thick biconvex airfoil sections parallel to the plane of symmetry. The tests were conducted over a range of angles of attack from approximately -4 deg to 23 deg for a Reynolds number of approximately 5.2 x 10(exp 6) which corresponds to a Mach number of 0.08. Blowing rates were normally restricted to values just sufficient to control air-flow separation. The results of this investigation showed that wing leading-edge blowing in combination with large values of wing leading-edge-flap deflection was a very effective leading-edge flow-control device for wings having highly loaded trailing-edge flaps. With leading-edge blowing there was no hysteresis of the lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics upon recovery from stall. End plates were found to improve the lift and drag characteristics of the test configuration in the moderate angle-of-attack range, and blockage to one-quarter of the blowing-slot area was not detrimental to the aerodynamic characteristics. Blowing boundary-layer control resulted in a considerably reduced landing speed and reduced landing and take-off distances. The ailerons were very effective lateral-control devices when used with blowing flaps.

  4. Numerical and experimental study on the ability of dynamic roughness to alter the development of a leading edge vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Christopher D.

    Dynamic stall is an unsteady aerodynamic phenomenon garnering much research interest because it occurs in a variety of applications. For example, dynamic stall is known to occur on helicopter rotor blades, wind turbines, high maneuvering military aircraft, and flapping wings. Dynamic stall occurs when an aerodynamic lifting device, such as an airfoil, wing, or turbomachine blade, undergoes a rapid pitching motion. It also occurs on lifting devices that are impulsively started at high angles of attack. Dynamic stall can "delay" aerodynamic stall to angles of attack that are significantly beyond the static stall angle of attack. During dynamic stall a large leading edge vortex (LEV) is formed, which creates greater fluid acceleration over the wing or airfoil, thus sustaining lift. As this vortex is shed downstream stall eventually occurs and there is an abrupt increase in drag and a large shift in pitching moment. Research has been performed to better understand the mechanisms occurring during dynamic stall in an effort to find ways to best take advantage of the increased lift associated with dynamic stall, but avoid the downfalls that occur once stall is initiated. Few attempts have been made to alter the LEV, and these attempts have used methods associated with laminar boundary layer separation control. Although these methods have shown promise, they suffer from the drawback that they exhaust more energy than is gained by flow control, while also only being effective at certain flight regimes. The research described herein documents the first study on the ability of dynamic roughness to alter the LEV encountered on a rapidly pitching airfoil. Both numerical and experimental studies were performed, including two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as stereo and planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. Evidence for the ability of small scale dynamic roughness to alter the development of the LEV was

  5. Transfer of New Earth Science Understandings to Classroom Teaching: Lessons Learned From Teachers on the Leading Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R.; Ault, C.; Bishop, E.; Southworth-Neumeyer, T.; Magura, B.; Hedeen, C.; Groom, R.; Shay, K.; Wagner, R.

    2006-05-01

    Teachers on the Leading Edge (TOTLE) provided a field-based teacher professional development program that explored the active continental margin geology of the Pacific Northwest during a two-week field workshop that traversed Oregon from the Pacific Coast to the Snake River. The seventeen teachers on this journey of geological discovery experienced regional examples of subduction-margin geology and examined the critical role of geophysics in connecting geologic features with plate tectonic processes. Two examples of successful transfer of science content learning to classroom teaching are: (1) Great Earthquakes and Tsunamis. This topic was addressed through instruction on earthquake seismology; field observations of tsunami geology; examination of tsunami preparedness of a coastal community; and interactive learning activities for children at an Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) Science Camp. Teachers at Sunnyside Environmental School in Portland developed a story line for middle school students called "The Tsunami Hotline" in which inquiries from citizens serve as launch points for studies of tsunamis, earthquakes, and active continental margin geology. OMSI Science Camps is currently developing a new summer science camp program entitled "Tsunami Field Study" for students ages 12-14, based largely on TOTLE's Great Earthquakes and Tsunamis Day. (2) The Grand Cross Section. Connecting regional geologic features with plate tectonic processes was addressed many times during the field workshop. This culminated with teachers drawing cross sections from the Juan de Fuca Ridge across the active continental margin to the accreted terranes of northeast Oregon. Several TOTLE teachers have successfully transferred this activity to their classrooms by having student teams relate earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics through artistic renderings of The Grand Cross Section. Analysis of program learning transfer to classroom teaching (or lack thereof) clearly

  6. Suppression of chemotaxis by SSeCKS via scaffolding of phosphoinositol phosphates and the recruitment of the Cdc42 GEF, Frabin, to the leading edge.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun-Kyung; Guo, Li-wu; Su, Bing; Gao, Lingqiu; Gelman, Irwin H

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxis is controlled by interactions between receptors, Rho-family GTPases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases, and cytoskeleton remodeling proteins. We investigated how the metastasis suppressor, SSeCKS, attenuates chemotaxis. Chemotaxis activity inversely correlated with SSeCKS levels in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), DU145 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. SSeCKS loss induced chemotactic velocity and linear directionality, correlating with replacement of leading edge lamellipodia with fascin-enriched filopodia-like extensions, the formation of thickened longitudinal F-actin stress fibers reaching to filopodial tips, relative enrichments at the leading edge of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), Akt, PKC-ζ, Cdc42-GTP and active Src (SrcpoY416), and a loss of Rac1. Leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition in SSeCKS-null MEF could be restored by full-length SSeCKS or SSeCKS deleted of its Src-binding domain (ΔSrc), but not by SSeCKS deleted of its three MARCKS (myristylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) polybasic domains (ΔPBD), which bind PIP2 and PIP3. The enrichment of activated Cdc42 in SSeCKS-null leading edge filopodia correlated with recruitment of the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Frabin, likely recruited via multiple PIP2/3-binding domains. Frabin knockdown in SSeCKS-null MEF restores leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition. However, SSeCKS failed to co-immunoprecipitate with Rac1, Cdc42 or Frabin. Consistent with the notion that chemotaxis is controlled by SSeCKS-PIP (vs. -Src) scaffolding activity, constitutively-active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase could override the ability of the Src inhibitor, SKI-606, to suppress chemotaxis and filopodial enrichment of Frabin in SSeCKS-null MEF. Our data suggest a role for SSeCKS in controlling Rac1 vs. Cdc42-induced cellular dynamics at the leading chemotactic edge through the scaffolding of phospholipids and signal mediators, and through the reorganization of the

  7. Formulas for the Supersonic Loading, Lift, and Drag of Flat Swept-Back Wings with Leading Edges Behind the Mach Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Doris

    1951-01-01

    The method of superposition of linearized conical flows has been applied to the calculation of the aerodynamic properties, in supersonic flight, of thin flat, swept-back wings at an angle of attack. The wings are assumed to have rectilinear plan forms, with tips parallel to the stream, and to taper in the conventional sense. The investigation covers the moderately supersonic speed range where the Mach lines from the leading-edge apex lie ahead of the wing. The trailing edge may lie ahead of or behind the Mach lines from its apex. The case in which the Mach cone from one tip intersects the other tip is not treated. Formulas are obtained for the load distribution, the total lift, and the drag due to lift. For the cases in which the trailing edge is outside the Mach cone from its apex the formulas are complete. For wings with both leading and trailing edges behind their respective Mach lines, a degree of approximation is necessary. Charts of some of the functions derived are included to facilitate computing, and several examples are worked out in outline.

  8. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The dream of producing an air-breathing, hydrogen fueled, hypervelocity aircraft has been before the aerospace community for decades. However, such a craft has not yet been realized, even in an experimental form. Despite the simplicity and beauty of the concept, many formidable problems must be overcome to make this dream a reality. This paper summarizes the aero/aerothermodynamic issues that must be addressed to make the dream a reality and discusses how aerothermodynamics facilities and their modem companion, real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD), can help solve the problems blocking the way to realizing the dream. The approach of the paper is first to outline the concept of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle and then discuss the nose-to-tail aerothermodynamics issues and special aerodynamic problems that arise with such a craft. Then the utility of aerothermodynamic facilities and companion CFD analysis is illustrated by reviewing results from recent United States publications wherein these problems have been addressed. Papers selected for the discussion have k e n chosen such that the review will serve to survey important U.S. aero/aerothermodynamic real gas and conventional wind tunnel facilities that are useful in the study of hypersonic, hydrogen propelled hypervelocity vehicles.

  9. Applicability of linearized-theory attached-flow methods to design and analysis of flap systems at low speeds for thin swept wings with sharp leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    Low-speed experimental force and data on a series of thin swept wings with sharp leading edges and leading and trailing-edge flaps are compared with predictions made using a linearized-theory method which includes estimates of vortex forces. These comparisons were made to assess the effectiveness of linearized-theory methods for use in the design and analysis of flap systems in subsonic flow. Results demonstrate that linearized-theory, attached-flow methods (with approximate representation of vortex forces) can form the basis of a rational system for flap design and analysis. Even attached-flow methods that do not take vortex forces into account can be used for the selection of optimized flap-system geometry, but design-point performance levels tend to be underestimated unless vortex forces are included. Illustrative examples of the use of these methods in the design of efficient low-speed flap systems are included.

  10. Effects of discontinuous drooped wing leading-edge modifications on the spinning characteristics of a low-wing general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, D. J.; Stough, H. P., III; Patton, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel and flight tests were conducted to determine the effects of several discontinuous drooped wing leading-edge configurations on the spinning characteristics of a light, single-engine, low-wing research airplane. Particular emphasis was placed on the identification of modifications which would improve the spinning characteristics. The spanwise length of a discontinuous outboard droop was varied and several additional inboard segments were added to determine the influence of such leading-edge configurations on the spin behavior. Results of the study indicated that the use of only the discontinuous outboard droop, over a specific spanwise area, was most effective towards improving spin and spin recovery characteristics, whereas the segmented configurations having both inboard and outboard droop exhibited a tendency to enter a flat spin.

  11. Effect of RANS-Type Turbulence Models on Adiabatic Film Cooling Effectiveness over a Scaled Up Gas Turbine Blade Leading Edge Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepuri, Giridhara Babu; Talanki Puttarangasetty, Ashok Babu; Kolke, Deepak Kumar; Jesuraj, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature is one of the key technologies in raising gas turbine engine power output. Film cooling is one of the efficient cooling techniques to cool the hot section components of a gas turbine engines in turn the turbine inlet temperature can be increased. This study aims at investigating the effect of RANS-type turbulence models on adiabatic film cooling effectiveness over a scaled up gas turbine blade leading edge surfaces. For the evaluation, five different two equation RANS-type turbulent models have been taken in consideration, which are available in the ANSYS-Fluent. For this analysis, the gas turbine blade leading edge configuration is generated using Solid Works. The meshing is done using ANSYS-Workbench Mesh and ANSYS-Fluent is used as a solver to solve the flow field. The considered gas turbine blade leading edge model is having five rows of film cooling circular holes, one at stagnation line and the two each on either side of stagnation line at 30° and 60° respectively. Each row has the five holes with the hole diameter of 4 mm, pitch of 21 mm arranged in staggered manner and has the hole injection angle of 30° in span wise direction. The experiments are carried in a subsonic cascade tunnel facility at heat transfer lab of CSIR-National Aerospace Laboratory with a Reynolds number of 1,00,000 based on leading edge diameter. From the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation it is found that K-ɛ Realizable model gives more acceptable results with the experimental values, compared to the other considered turbulence models for this type of geometries. Further the CFD evaluated results, using K-ɛ Realizable model at different blowing ratios are compared with the experimental results.

  12. The dynamic distribution of fluorescent analogues of actin and myosin in protrusions at the leading edge of migrating Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The formation of protrusions at the leading edge of the cell is an essential step in fibroblast locomotion. Using fluorescent analogue cytochemistry, ratio imaging, multiple parameter analysis, and fluorescence photobleaching recovery, the distribution of actin and myosin was examined in the same protrusions at the leading edge of live, locomoting cells during wound-healing in vitro. We have previously defined two temporal stages of the formation of protrusions: (a) initial protrusion and (b) established protrusion (Fisher et al., 1988). Actin was slightly concentrated in initial protrusions, while myosin was either totally absent or present at extremely low levels at the base of the initial protrusions. In contrast, established protrusions contained diffuse actin and actin microspikes, as well as myosin in both diffuse and structured forms. Actin and myosin were also localized along concave transverse fibers near the base of initial and established protrusions. The dynamics of myosin penetration into a relatively stable, established protrusion was demonstrated by recording sequential images over time. Myosin was shown to be absent from an initial protrusion, but diffuse and punctate myosin was detected in the same protrusion within 1-2 min. Fluorescence photobleaching recovery indicated that myosin was 100% immobile in the region behind the leading edge containing transverse fibers, in comparison to the 21% immobile fraction detected in the perinuclear region. Possible explanations of the delayed penetration of myosin into established protrusions and the implications on the mechanism of protrusion are discussed. PMID:3204122

  13. Electroanalytical determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) using an in-situ bismuth film modified edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Kachoosangi, Roohollah Torabi; Banks, Craig E; Ji, Xiaobo; Compton, Richard G

    2007-03-01

    A highly sensitive and simple electroanalytical methodology is presented using an in-situ bismuth film modified edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (BiF-EPPGE) which is exemplified with the simultaneous determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II). Square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry is utilised with the effects of several experimental variables studied. Simultaneous additions of cadmium(II) and lead(II) were investigated where two linear ranges between 0.1-100 and 0.1-300 microg/L and also detection limits of 0.062 and 0.084 microg/L were obtained, respectively. The method was then successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) in spiked river water, where recoveries of 100.5 and 98% were obtained, respectively. This electroanalytical protocol using edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrodes is one of the simplest methodologies to date using non-mercury based electrodes and is simpler and cheaper than alternatives such as carbon nanotube electrode arrays, suggesting the use of edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode for routine sensing.

  14. Effects of leading edge sweep angle and design lift coefficient on performance of a modified arrow wing at a design Mach number of 2.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Wing models were tested in the high-speed section of the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel to study the effects of the leading-edge sweep angle and the design lift coefficient on aerodynamic performance and efficiency. The models had leading-edge sweep angles of 69.44 deg, 72.65 deg, and 75.96 deg which correspond to values of the design Mach-number-sweep-angle parameter (beta cotangent A) sub DES of 0.6, 0.75, and 0.9, respectively. For each sweep angle, camber surfaces having design lift coefficients of 0,0.08, and 0.12 at a design Mach number of 2.6 were generated. The wind-tunnel tests were conducted at Mach numbers of 2.3, 2.6, and 2.96 with a stagnation temperature of 338.7 K (150 F) and a Reynolds number per meter of 9.843 times 10 to the 6th power. The results of the tests showed that only a moderate sweeping of the wing leading edge aft of the Mach line along with a small-to-moderate amount of camber and twist was needed to significantly improve the zero-lift (flat camber surface) wing performance and efficiency.

  15. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  16. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule Aerothermodynamics and Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Hollis, Brian R.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Laub, Bernard; Wright, Michael J.; Rivellini, Tomasso P.; Slimko, Eric M.; Willcockson, William H.

    2007-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft is being designed to carry a large rover (greater than 800 kg) to the surface of Mars using a blunt-body entry capsule as the primary decelerator. The spacecraft is being designed for launch in 2009 and arrival at Mars in 2010. The combination of large mass and diameter with non-zero angle-of-attack for MSL will result in unprecedented convective heating environments caused by turbulence prior to peak heating. Navier-Stokes computations predict a large turbulent heating augmentation for which there are no supporting flight data1 and little ground data for validation. Consequently, an extensive experimental program has been established specifically for MSL to understand the level of turbulent augmentation expected in flight. The experimental data support the prediction of turbulent transition and have also uncovered phenomena that cannot be replicated with available computational methods. The result is that the flight aeroheating environments predictions must include larger uncertainties than are typically used for a Mars entry capsule. Finally, the thermal protection system (TPS) being used for MSL has not been flown at the heat flux, pressure, and shear stress combinations expected in flight, so a test program has been established to obtain conditions relevant to flight. This paper summarizes the aerothermodynamic definition analysis and TPS development, focusing on the challenges that are unique to MSL.

  17. Nonequilibrium effects on the aerothermodynamics of transatmospheric and aerobraking vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Basil; Candler, Graham V.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D CFD algorithm is used to study the effect of thermal and chemical nonequilibrium on slender and blunt body aerothermodynamics. Both perfect gas and reacting gas air models are used to compute the flow over a generic transatmospheric vehicle and a proposed lunar transfer vehicle. The reacting air is characterized by a translational-rotational temperature and a vibrational-electron-electronic temperature and includes eight chemical species. The effects of chemical reaction, vibrational excitation, and ionization on lift-to-drag ratio and trim angle are investigated. Results for the NASA Ames All-body Configuration show a significant difference in center of gravity location for a reacting gas flight case when compared to a perfect gas wind tunnel case at the same Mach number, Reynolds number, and angle of attack. For the same center of gravity location, the wind tunnel model trims at lower angle of attack than the full-scale flight case. Nonionized and ionized results for a proposed lunar transfer vehicle compare well to computational results obtained from a previously validated reacting gas algorithm. Under the conditions investigated, effects of weak ionization on the heat transfer and aerodynamic coefficients were minimal.

  18. Aerothermodynamic Analysis of the Project FIRE II Afterbody Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Micheal J.; Loomis, Mark; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    35 years later, the Project FIRE II ballistic reentry to Earth at a nominal velocity of 11.4 km/s remains one of the best sources of heating data for the design of sample return capsules. The data from this flight experiment encompass both the thermochemical non-equilibrium and equilibrium flow regimes and include measurements of both radiative and total heating on the forebody and afterbody. Because of this, a number of researchers have performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the forebody of the FIRE II entry vehicle, with generally good results. In particular, Olynick et. al. coupled a Navier-Stokes solver (GIANTS) with a radiation code (NOVAR) and showed excellent agreement in surface heat transfer over the FIRE II trajectory between 1634 and 1651 seconds (77 km to 37 km). However, in most cases the primary motivation of the previous work was to understand and model the coupling between shock layer radiation and aerothermodynamics, and thus the simulations concentrated on the forebody flow only. To our knowledge there have been no prior published attempts to reproduce the afterbody heating data. However, an understanding of this data is critical to our efforts to design the next generation of Earth and planetary entry vehicles and to assess our need for additional flight data.

  19. Aerothermodynamic Environment Definition for the Genesis Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Merski, N. Ronald, Jr.; Riley, Christopher J.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Genesis sample return mission will be the first to return material from beyond the Earth-Moon system. NASA Langley Research Center supported this mission with aerothermodynamic analyses of the sample return capsule. This paper provides an overview of that effort. The capsule is attached through its forebody to the spacecraft bus. When the attachment is severed prior to Earth entry, forebody cavities remain. The presence of these cavities could dramatically increase the heating environment in their vicinity and downstream. A combination of computational fluid dynamics calculations and wind tunnel phosphor thermography tests were employed to address this issue. These results quantify the heating environment in and around the cavities, and were a factor in the decision to switch forebody heat shield materials. A transition map is developed which predicts that the flow aft of the penetrations will still be laminar at the peak heating point of the trajectory. As the vehicle continues along the trajectory to the peak dynamic pressure point, fully turbulent flow aft of the penetrations could occur. The integrated heat load calculations show that a heat shield sized to the stagnation point levels will be adequate for the predicted environment aft of the penetrations.

  20. Movement responses of caribou to human-induced habitat edges lead to their aggregation near anthropogenic features.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Daniel; Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Fortin, André; Courbin, Nicolas; Tye Gingras, Christian; Moorcroft, Paul R; Courtois, Réhaume; Dussault, Claude

    2013-06-01

    The assessment of disturbance effects on wildlife and resulting mitigation efforts are founded on edge-effect theory. According to the classical view, the abundance of animals affected by human disturbance should increase monotonically with distance from disturbed areas to reach a maximum at remote locations. Here we show that distance-dependent movement taxis can skew abundance distributions toward disturbed areas. We develop an advection-diffusion model based on basic movement behavior commonly observed in animal populations and parameterize the model from observations on radio-collared caribou in a boreal ecosystem. The model predicts maximum abundance at 3.7 km from cutovers and roads. Consistently, aerial surveys conducted over 161,920 km(2) showed that the relative probability of caribou occurrence displays nonmonotonic changes with the distance to anthropogenic features, with a peak occurring at 4.5 km away from these features. This aggregation near disturbed areas thus provides the predators of this top-down-controlled, threatened herbivore species with specific locations to concentrate their search. The edge-effect theory developed here thus predicts that human activities should alter animal distribution and food web properties differently than anticipated from the current paradigm. Consideration of such nonmonotonic response to habitat edges may become essential to successful wildlife conservation. PMID:23669544

  1. Movement responses of caribou to human-induced habitat edges lead to their aggregation near anthropogenic features.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Daniel; Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Fortin, André; Courbin, Nicolas; Tye Gingras, Christian; Moorcroft, Paul R; Courtois, Réhaume; Dussault, Claude

    2013-06-01

    The assessment of disturbance effects on wildlife and resulting mitigation efforts are founded on edge-effect theory. According to the classical view, the abundance of animals affected by human disturbance should increase monotonically with distance from disturbed areas to reach a maximum at remote locations. Here we show that distance-dependent movement taxis can skew abundance distributions toward disturbed areas. We develop an advection-diffusion model based on basic movement behavior commonly observed in animal populations and parameterize the model from observations on radio-collared caribou in a boreal ecosystem. The model predicts maximum abundance at 3.7 km from cutovers and roads. Consistently, aerial surveys conducted over 161,920 km(2) showed that the relative probability of caribou occurrence displays nonmonotonic changes with the distance to anthropogenic features, with a peak occurring at 4.5 km away from these features. This aggregation near disturbed areas thus provides the predators of this top-down-controlled, threatened herbivore species with specific locations to concentrate their search. The edge-effect theory developed here thus predicts that human activities should alter animal distribution and food web properties differently than anticipated from the current paradigm. Consideration of such nonmonotonic response to habitat edges may become essential to successful wildlife conservation.

  2. Partial oxidation of step-bound water leads to anomalous pH effects on metal electrode step-edges.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Kathleen; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2016-06-28

    The design of better heterogeneous catalysts for applications such as fuel cells and electrolyzers requires a mechanistic understanding of electrocatalytic reactions and the dependence of their activity on operating conditions such as pH. A satisfactory explanation for the unexpected pH dependence of electrochemical properties of platinum surfaces has so far remained elusive, with previous explanations resorting to complex co-adsorption of multiple species and resulting in limited predictive power. This knowledge gap suggests that the fundamental properties of these catalysts are not yet understood, limiting systematic improvement. Here, we analyze the change in charge and free energies upon adsorption using density-functional theory (DFT) to establish that water adsorbs on platinum step edges across a wide voltage range, including the double-layer region, with a loss of approximately 0.2 electrons upon adsorption. We show how this as-yet unreported change in net surface charge due to this water explains the anomalous pH variations of the hydrogen underpotential deposition (Hupd) and the potentials of zero total charge (PZTC) observed in published experimental data. This partial oxidation of water is not limited to platinum metal step edges, and we report the charge of the water on metal step edges of commonly used catalytic metals, including copper, silver, iridium, and palladium, illustrating that this partial oxidation of water broadly influences the reactivity of metal electrodes. PMID:27250359

  3. Survey of aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics efforts carried out in the frame of Mars exploration projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynier, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    This contribution is a survey of aerodynamic and aerothermodynamics data related to Mars entry. The survey includes the studies carried out in the frame of projects aiming at preparing exploration missions involving entry probes into Mars atmosphere and the efforts have been concentrated on the aerothermodynamics developments. Russian (including former Soviet Union), European and NASA aerothermodynamics developments for preparing such missions have been accounted for. If a focus has been dedicated to the flight data gathered during Viking and Mars Pathfinder entries, the experimental and numerical activities carried out for the different projects have been also considered. The emphasis has been put on the post-flight analysis of flight experiments. The objective of the activity has been to develop a database of the developments performed for Mars entry that will be of interest for the preparation of future missions and for testing new models related to radiative transfer, and chemical kinetics schemes based on a state-to-state approach.

  4. The use of the tethered satellite system to perform low density aerothermodynamics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; Deluca, Luigi; Siemers, Paul M.; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is a cooperative space system development activity of the U.S.A. and Italy. It is comprised of the Tether Satellite (TS) and the deployer. Within TSS, the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC) concept has the potential to provide access to vast portions of the upper atmosphere for atmospheric and aerothermodynamic research. The feasibility and capability of the TSS to operate as a continuous open wind tunnel and to perform low density aerothermodynamic studies are investigated. This is accomplished through a modified version of the TS simulation program (SKYHOOK). The results indicate that STARFAC concept is both feasible and practical. The TS can go below 100 km but, if thrust is used, large velocity variation (delta V) maneuvers and an attitude control are required; if a satellite lift is considered, large tether tension is produced and an attitude control is required.

  5. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  6. Influence of optimized leading-edge deflection and geometric anhedral on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing configuration. [langley 7 by 10 foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Huffman, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation conducted in the Langley 7 by 10 foot tunnel to determine the influence of an optimized leading-edge deflection on the low speed aerodynamic performance of a configuration with a low aspect ratio, highly swept wing. The sensitivity of the lateral stability derivative to geometric anhedral was also studied. The optimized leading edge deflection was developed by aligning the leading edge with the incoming flow along the entire span. Owing to spanwise variation of unwash, the resulting optimized leading edge was a smooth, continuously warped surface for which the deflection varied from 16 deg at the side of body to 50 deg at the wing tip. For the particular configuration studied, levels of leading-edge suction on the order of 90 percent were achieved. The results of tests conducted to determine the sensitivity of the lateral stability derivative to geometric anhedral indicate values which are in reasonable agreement with estimates provided by simple vortex-lattice theories.

  7. Properties of whistler mode wave packets at the leading edge of steepened magnetosonic waves - Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Smith, Edward J.; Brinca, Armando L.; Thorne, Richard M.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    The physical characteristics of high-frequency wave packets detected at the steepened edge of magnetosonic waves near Comet Giacobini-Zinner are explored, based on an examination of over 45 well-defined events. The results suggest that the wave packets play an important role in the reorientation and reduction in field magnitude from the steepened magnetosonic waves to the upstream ambient field. The observed properties of the wave packets are shown to be consistent with anomalously Doppler-shifted right-hand polarized waves.

  8. A Method for Computing the Core Flow in Three-Dimensional Leading-Edge Vortices. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theory is presented for calculating the flow in the core of a separation-induced leading-edge vortex. The method is based on matching inner and outer representations of the vortex. The inner model of the vortex is based on the quasicylindrical Navier-Stokes equations; the flow is assumed to be steady, axially symmetric, and incompressible and in addition, gradients in the radial direction are assumed to be much larger then gradients in the axial direction. The outer model is based on the three-dimensional free-vortex-sheet theory, a higher-order panel method which solves the Prandtl-Glauert equation including nonlinear boundary conditions pertinent to the concentrated vorticity representation of the leading edge vortex. The resultant flow is evaluated a posteriori for evidence of incipient vortex breakdown and the critical helix angle concept, in conjunction with an adverse longitudinal pressure gradient, is found to correlate well with the occurrence of vortex breakdown at the trailing edge of delta, arrow, and diamond wings.

  9. Low speed aerodynamic characteristics of a large scale model with a thin, highly swept, 2.67 aspect ratio wing having a cranked leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giulianetti, D. J.; Maki, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The low speed aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale model intended to represent advanced fixed-wing fighters have been investigated in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel. The model possessed positive static longitudinal stability to nearly 28 deg angle of attack, the maximum tested, both with and without leading-edge flaps deflected. Lateral control with differentially deflected ailerons and a right wing spoiler simultaneously deployed as combined controls was only slightly greater than that with the differentially deflected ailerons deployed as a separate control without the spoiler. Measured lift and drag were in close agreement with that predicted by theory to about 14 deg angle of attack, including the prediction of lift due to 30 deg of trailing edge flap deflection. Estimated takeoff performance of an aircraft 4/3 the scale of the test model showed takeoff distances of less than 2000 ft.

  10. Langley Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex: Enhancements and Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Description, capabilities, recent upgrades, and utilization of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex (AFC) are presented. The AFC consists of five hypersonic, blow-down-to-vacuum wind tunnels that collectively provide a range of Mach number from 6 to 20, unit Reynolds number from 0.04 to 22 million per foot and, most importantly for blunt configurations, normal shock density ratio from 4 to 12. These wide ranges of hypersonic simulation parameters are due, in part, to the use of three different test gases (air, helium, and tetrafluoromethane), thereby making several of the facilities unique. The Complex represents nearly three-fourths of the conventional (as opposed to impulse)-type hypersonic wind tunnels operational in this country. AFC facilities are used to assess and optimize the hypersonic aerodynamic performance and aeroheating characteristics of aerospace vehicle concepts and to provide benchmark aerodynamic/aeroheating data fr generating the flight aerodynamic databook and final design of the thermal protection system (TPS) (e.g., establishment of flight limitations not to exceed TPS design limits). Modifications and enhancements of AFC hardware components and instrumentation have been pursued to increase capability, reliability, and productivity in support of programmatic goals. Examples illustrating facility utilization in recent years to generate essentially all of the experimental hypersonic aerodynamic and aeroheating information for high-priority, fast-paced Agency programs are presented. These programs include Phase I of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Advanced Technology Demonstrator, X-33 program, PHase II of the X-33 program, X-34 program, the Hyper-X program ( a Mach 5,7, and 10 airbreathing propulsion flight experiment), and the X-38 program (Experimental Crew Return Vehicle, X-CRV). Current upgrades/enchancements and future plans for the AFC are discussed.

  11. Theoretical Calculations of the Pressures, Forces, and Moments Due to Various Lateral Motions Acting on Tapered Sweptback Vertical Tails with Supersonic Leading and Trailing Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth; Elliott, Miriam H.

    1960-01-01

    Based on expressions for the linearized velocity potentials and pressure distributions given in NACA Technical Report 1268, formulas for the span load distribution, forces, and moments are derived for families of thin isolated vertical tails with arbitrary aspect ratio, taper ratio, and sweepback performing the motions constant sideslip, steady rolling, steady yawing, and constant lateral acceleration. The range of Mach number considered corresponds, in general, to the condition that the tail leading and trailing edges are supersonic. To supplement the analytical results, design-type charts are presented which enable rapid estimation of the forces and moments (expressed as stability derivatives) for given combinations of geometry parameters and Mach number.

  12. Large-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests and Evaluation of the Low-Speed Performance of a 35 deg Sweptback Wing Jet Transport Model Equipped with a Blowing Boundary-Layer-Control Flap and Leading-Edge Slat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, David H.; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

    1960-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the effect of trailing-edge flaps with blowing-type boundary-layer control and leading-edge slats on the low-speed performance of a large-scale jet transport model with four engines and a 35 deg. sweptback wing of aspect ratio 7. Two spanwise extents and several deflections of the trailing-edge flap were tested. Results were obtained with a normal leading-edge and with full-span leading-edge slats. Three-component longitudinal force and moment data and boundary-layer-control flow requirements are presented. The test results are analyzed in terms of possible improvements in low-speed performance. The effect on performance of the source of boundary-layer-control air flow is considered in the analysis.

  13. Computational Aerothermodynamic Assessment of Space Shuttle Orbiter Tile Damage: Open Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulsonetti, Maria; Wood, William

    2005-01-01

    Computational aerothermodynamic simulations of Orbiter windside tile damage in flight were performed in support of the Space Shuttle Return-to-Flight effort. The simulations were performed for both hypervelocity flight and low-enthalpy wind tunnel conditions and contributed to the Return-to-Flight program by providing information to support a variety of damage scenario analyses. Computations at flight conditions were performed at or very near the peak heating trajectory point for multiple damage scenarios involving damage windside acreage reaction cured glass (RCG) coated silica tile(s). The cavities formed by the missing tile examined in this study were relatively short leading to flow features which indicated open cavity behavior. Results of the computations indicated elevated heating bump factor levels predicted for flight over the predictions for wind tunnel conditions. The peak heating bump factors, defined as the local heating to a reference value upstream of the cavity, on the cavity floor for flight simulation were 67% larger than the peak wind tunnel simulation value. On the downstream face of the cavity the flight simulation values were 60% larger than the wind tunnel simulation values. On the outer mold line (OML) downstream of the cavity, the flight values are about 20% larger than the wind tunnel simulation values. The higher heating bump factors observed in the flight simulations were due to the larger driving potential in terms of energy entering the cavity for the flight simulations. This is evidenced by the larger rate of increase in the total enthalpy through the boundary layer prior to the cavity for the flight simulation.

  14. Surface-Pressure and Flow-Visualization Data at Mach Number of 1.60 for Three 65 deg Delta Wings Varying in Leading-Edge Radius and Camber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi; Bryd, James E.; Parmar, Devendra S.; Bezos-OConnor, Gaudy M.; Forrest, Dana K.; Bowen, Susan

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effect of leading-edge radius, camber, Reynolds number, and boundary-layer state on the incipient separation of a delta wing at supersonic speeds was conducted at the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach number of 1.60 over a free-stream Reynolds number range of 1 x 106 to 5 x 106 ft-1. The three delta wing models examined had a 65 deg swept leading edge and varied in cross-sectional shape: a sharp wedge, a 20:1 ellipse, and a 20:1 ellipse with a -9.750 circular camber imposed across the span. The wings were tested with and without transition grit applied. Surface-pressure coefficient data and flow-visualization data indicated that by rounding the wing leading edge or cambering the wing in the spanwise direction, the onset of leading-edge separation on a delta wing can be raised to a higher angle of attack than that observed on a sharp-edged delta wing. The data also showed that the onset of leading-edge separation can be raised to a higher angle of attack by forcing boundary-layer transition to occur closer to the wing leading edge by the application of grit or the increase in free-stream Reynolds number.

  15. Intermediate-affinity LFA-1 binds alpha-actinin-1 to control migration at the leading edge of the T cell.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Paula; Smith, Andrew; McDowall, Alison; Nicol, Alastair; Zicha, Daniel; Hogg, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    T lymphocytes use LFA-1 to migrate into lymph nodes and inflammatory sites. To investigate the mechanisms regulating this migration, we utilize mAbs selective for conformational epitopes as probes for active LFA-1. Expression of the KIM127 epitope, but not the 24 epitope, defines the extended conformation of LFA-1, which has intermediate affinity for ligand ICAM-1. A key finding is that KIM127-positive LFA-1 forms new adhesions at the T lymphocyte leading edge. This LFA-1 links to the cytoskeleton through alpha-actinin-1 and disruption at the level of integrin or actin results in loss of cell spreading and migratory speed due to a failure of attachment at the leading edge. The KIM127 pattern contrasts with high-affinity LFA-1 that expresses both 24 and KIM127 epitopes, is restricted to the mid-cell focal zone and controls ICAM-1 attachment. Identification of distinctive roles for intermediate- and high-affinity LFA-1 in T lymphocyte migration provides a biological function for two active conformations of this integrin for the first time.

  16. Intermediate-affinity LFA-1 binds α-actinin-1 to control migration at the leading edge of the T cell

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Paula; Smith, Andrew; McDowall, Alison; Nicol, Alastair; Zicha, Daniel; Hogg, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    T lymphocytes use LFA-1 to migrate into lymph nodes and inflammatory sites. To investigate the mechanisms regulating this migration, we utilize mAbs selective for conformational epitopes as probes for active LFA-1. Expression of the KIM127 epitope, but not the 24 epitope, defines the extended conformation of LFA-1, which has intermediate affinity for ligand ICAM-1. A key finding is that KIM127-positive LFA-1 forms new adhesions at the T lymphocyte leading edge. This LFA-1 links to the cytoskeleton through α-actinin-1 and disruption at the level of integrin or actin results in loss of cell spreading and migratory speed due to a failure of attachment at the leading edge. The KIM127 pattern contrasts with high-affinity LFA-1 that expresses both 24 and KIM127 epitopes, is restricted to the mid-cell focal zone and controls ICAM-1 attachment. Identification of distinctive roles for intermediate- and high-affinity LFA-1 in T lymphocyte migration provides a biological function for two active conformations of this integrin for the first time. PMID:18079697

  17. Studies Conducted of Sodium Carbonate Contaminant Found on the Wing Leading Edge and the Nose Cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Palou, Jaime J.

    2003-01-01

    In early 2001, three of the space shuttle orbiters were found to have a sodium carbonate contaminant on the wing leading edge and nose cap. These parts are made of a reinforced carbon/carbon material protected by silicon carbide (SiC) and a glass coating. The glass coating is known as Type A and is primarily sodium silicate with particles of SiC. NASA Glenn Research Center's Environmental Durability Branch was asked to determine the chemistry of this deposit formation and assess any possible detrimental effects. At low temperatures, the reverse reaction is favorable. Previous studies of the corrosion of glass show that carbon dioxide in the presence of water does form sodium carbonate on sodium silicate glass (ref. 1). It is quite likely that a similar scenario exists for the orbiter wing leading edge. All three orbiters that formed sodium carbonate were exposed to rain. This formation of sodium carbonate was duplicated in the laboratory. The Type A glass, which coats the wing leading edge and nose cap, was made in a freestanding form and exposed to water in two separate experiments. In one set of experiments, the coating was placed in a petri dish filled with water. As the water evaporated, sodium carbonate formed. In another case, water was slowly dripped on the coating and sodium carbonate formed. The sodium carbonate was detected by chemical analysis and, in some cases, xray diffraction showed a hydrated sodium carbonate. The next step was to examine possible detrimental effects of this sodium carbonate. There are three likely scenarios for the sodium carbonate deposit: (1) it may be removed with a simple rinse, (2) it may remain and flow back into the Type A glass after heating during reentry, or (3) it may remain and flow onto unprotected SiC and/or other parts after heating during reentry. The effect of case 1 is to remove the Na2O constituent from the Type A glass, thus decreasing its effectiveness as a sealant. Even so, overall, it is probably the best

  18. EMA: a developmentally regulated cell-surface glycoprotein of CNS neurons that is concentrated at the leading edge of growth cones.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, N L; Parkinson, D; Wayne, D B; Heuser, J E; Pearlman, A L

    1992-08-01

    To identify cell-surface molecules that mediate interactions between neurons and their environment during neural development, we used monoclonal antibody techniques to define a developmentally regulated antigen in the central nervous system of the mouse. The antibody we produced (2A1) immunolabels cells throughout the central nervous system; we analyzed its distribution in the developing cerebral cortex, where it is expressed on cells very soon after they complete mitosis and leave the periventricular proliferative zone. Expression continues into adult life. The antibody also labels the epithelium of the choroid plexus and the renal proximal tubules, but does not label neurons of the peripheral nervous system in the dorsal root ganglia. In dissociated cell culture of embryonic cerebral cortex, 2A1 labels the surface of neurons but not glia. Immunolabeling of neurons in tissue culture is particularly prominent on the edge of growth cones, including filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia, when observed with either immunofluorescence or freeze-etch immunoelectron microscopy. Immunopurification with 2A1 of a CHAPS-extracted membrane preparation from brains of neonatal mice produces a broad (32-36 kD) electrophoretic band and a less prominent 70 kD band that are sensitive to N-glycosidase but not endoglycosidase H. Thus the 2A1 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated, neuronal cell surface glycoprotein (or glycoproteins) with complex N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. We have termed the glycoprotein antigen EMA because of its prominence on the edge membrane of growth cones. EMA is similar to the M6 antigen (Lagenaur et al: J. Neurobiol. 23:71-88, 1992) in apparent molecular weight, distribution in tissue sections, and immunoreactivity on Western blots, suggesting that the two antigens are similar or identical. Expression of EMA is a very early manifestation of neuronal differentiation; its distribution on growth cones suggests a role in mediating the

  19. Low-Speed Investigation of Upper-Surface Leading-Edge Blowing on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Laflin, Brenda E. Gile; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Campbell, Bryan A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper identifies speed, agility, human interface, generation of sensitivity information, task decomposition, and data transmission (including storage) as important attributes for a computer environment to have in order to support engineering design effectively. It is argued that when examined in terms of these attributes the presently available environment can be shown to be inadequate. A radical improvement is needed, and it may be achieved by combining new methods that have recently emerged from multidisciplinary design optimisation (MDO) with massively parallel processing computer technology. The caveat is that, for successful use of that technology in engineering computing, new paradigms for computing will have to be developed - specifically, innovative algorithms that are intrinsically parallel so that their performance scales up linearly with the number of processors. It may be speculated that the idea of simulating a complex behaviour by interaction of a large number of very simple models may be an inspiration for the above algorithms; the cellular automata are an example. Because of the long lead time needed to develop and mature new paradigms, development should begin now, even though the widespread availability of massively parallel processing is still a few years away.

  20. Development of X-33/X-34 Aerothermodynamic Data Bases: Lessons Learned and Future Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    A synoptic of programmatic and technical lessons learned in the development of aerothermodynamic data bases for the X-33 and X-34 programs is presented in general terms and from the perspective of the NASA Langley Research Center Aerothermodynamics Branch. The format used is that of the "aerothermodynamic chain," the links of which are personnel, facilities, models/test articles, instrumentation, test techniques, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Because the aerodynamic data bases upon which the X-33 and X-34 vehicles will fly are almost exclusively from wind tunnel testing, as opposed to CFD, the primary focus of the lessons learned is on ground-based testing. The period corresponding to the development of X-33 and X-34 aerothermodynamic data bases was challenging, since a number of other such programs (e.g., X-38, X-43) competed for resources at a time of downsizing of personnel, facilities, etc., outsourcing, and role changes as NASA Centers served as subcontractors to industry. The impact of this changing environment is embedded in the lessons learned. From a technical perspective, the relatively long times to design and fabricate metallic force and moment models, delays in delivery of models, and a lack of quality assurance to determine the fidelity of model outer mold lines (OML) prior to wind tunnel testing had a major negative impact on the programs. On the positive side, the application of phosphor thermography to obtain global, quantitative heating distributions on rapidly fabricated ceramic models revolutionized the aerothermodynamic optimization of vehicle OMLs, control surfaces, etc. Vehicle designers were provided with aeroheating information prior to, or in conjunction with, aerodynamic information early in the program, thereby allowing trades to be made with both sets of input; in the past only aerodynamic data were available as input. Programmatically, failure to include transonic aerodynamic wind tunnel tests early in the assessment phase

  1. Crystal growth and characterization studies of novel luminescent 2D coordination polymer of lead-benzilate possessing edge sharing PbO6 polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumya Mol, U. S.; Drisya, R.; Satheesh Chandran, P. R.; Sudarsanakumar, M. R.; Suma, S.; Sudhadevi Antharjanam, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of a new coordination polymer of lead-benzilate, C28H21O6Pb·C2H5OH have been successfully grown by gel diffusion technique at room temperature. The colourless single crystals were obtained within a week. The crystal structure was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The compound possesses a polymeric structure constructed from edge sharing PbO6 polyhedra. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the compound crystallizes in triclinic space group P-1. The grown crystals were further characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Visible and thermogravimetric analysis. The photoluminescent properties of the complex and the ligand were also investigated.

  2. Arp2/3 complex-deficient mouse fibroblasts are viable and have normal leading-edge actin structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Alessia; Cicchetti, Gregor; Falet, Hervé; Hartwig, John H.; Stossel, Thomas P.; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference silencing of up to 90% of Arp3 protein expression, a major subunit of the Arp2/3 complex, proportionately decreases the intracellular motility of Listeria monocytogenes and actin nucleation activity ascribable to the Arp2/3 complex in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. However, the Arp2/3-deficient cells exhibit unimpaired lamellipodial actin network structure, translational locomotion, spreading, actin assembly, and ruffling responses. In addition, Arp3-silenced cells expressing neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-derived peptides that inhibit Arp2/3 complex function in wild-type cells retained normal PDGF-induced ruffling. The Arp2/3 complex can be dispensable for leading-edge actin remodeling. PMID:16254049

  3. Quasi-Static 3-Point Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Bend Test and Analysis for Shuttle Orbiter Wing Leading Edge Impact Damage Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Sotiris, Kellas

    2006-01-01

    Static 3-point bend tests of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) were conducted to failure to provide data for additional validation of an LS-DYNA RCC model suitable for predicting the threshold of impact damage to shuttle orbiter wing leading edges. LS-DYNA predictions correlated well with the average RCC failure load, and were good in matching the load vs. deflection. However, correlating the detectable damage using NDE methods with the cumulative damage parameter in LS-DYNA material model 58 was not readily achievable. The difficulty of finding internal RCC damage with NDE and the high sensitivity of the mat58 damage parameter to the load near failure made the task very challenging. In addition, damage mechanisms for RCC due to dynamic impact of debris such as foam and ice and damage mechanisms due to a static loading were, as expected, not equivalent.

  4. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV Waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. I. Reconciliation of "EIT Waves", Type II Radio Bursts, and Leading Edges of CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Kalashnikov, S. S.; Kubo, Y.

    We show examples of the excitation of coronal waves by flare-related abrupt eruptions of magnetic rope structures. The waves presumably rapidly steepened into shocks and freely propagated afterwards like decelerating blast waves that showed up as Moreton waves and EUV waves. We propose a simple quantitative description for such shock waves to reconcile their observed propagation with drift rates of metric type II bursts and kinematics of leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Taking account of different plasma density falloffs for propagation of a wave up and along the solar surface, we demonstrate a close correspondence between drift rates of type II bursts and speeds of EUV waves, Moreton waves, and CMEs observed in a few previously studied events.

  5. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV Waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. I. Reconciliation of "EIT Waves", Type II Radio Bursts, and Leading Edges of CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Kalashnikov, S. S.; Kubo, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We show examples of the excitation of coronal waves by flare-related abrupt eruptions of magnetic rope structures. The waves presumably rapidly steepened into shocks and freely propagated afterwards like decelerating blast waves that showed up as Moreton waves and EUV waves. We propose a simple quantitative description for such shock waves to reconcile their observed propagation with drift rates of metric type II bursts and kinematics of leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Taking account of different plasma density falloffs for propagation of a wave up and along the solar surface, we demonstrate a close correspondence between drift rates of type II bursts and speeds of EUV waves, Moreton waves, and CMEs observed in a few previously studied events.

  6. Effects of Horizontal-Control Planform and Wing-Leading-Edge Modification on Low-Speed Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Canard Airplane Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Bernard, Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation at low subsonic speeds has been conducted in the Langley 300-MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel. The basic wing had a trapezoidal planform, an aspect ratio of 3.0., a taper ratio of 0.143, and an unswept 80-percent-chord line. Modifications to the basic wing included deflectable full-span and partial-span leading-edge chord-extensions. A trapezoidal horizontal control similar in planform to the basic wing and a 60 deg sweptback delta horizontal control were tested in conjunction with the wing. The total planform area of each horizontal control was 16 percent of the total basic-wing area. Modifications to these horizontal controls included addition of a full-span chord-extension to the trapezoidal planform and a fence to the delta planform.

  7. Actin Filaments at the Leading Edge of Cancer Cells Are Characterized by a High Mobile Fraction and Turnover Regulation by Profilin I

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Gisela; Syriani, Emilio; Morales, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Cellular motility is the basis for cancer cell invasion and metastasis. In the case of breast cancer, the most common type of cancer among women, metastasis represents the most devastating stage of the disease. The central role of cellular motility in cancer development emphasizes the importance of understanding the specific mechanisms involved in this process. In this context, tumor development and metastasis would be the consequence of a loss or defect of the mechanisms that control cytoskeletal remodeling. Profilin I belongs to a family of small actin binding proteins that are thought to assist in actin filament elongation at the leading edge of migrating cells. Traditionally, Profilin I has been considered to be an essential control element for actin polymerization and cell migration. Expression of Profilin I is down-regulated in breast and various other cancer cells. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a breast cancer cell line, further inhibition of Profilin I expression promotes hypermotility and metastatic spread, a finding that contrasts with the proposed role of Profilin in enhancing polymerization. In this report, we have taken advantage of the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-actin to quantify and compare actin dynamics at the leading edge level in both cancer and non-cancer cell models. Our results suggest that (i) a high level of actin dynamics (i.e., a large mobile fraction of actin filaments and a fast turnover) is a common characteristic of some cancer cells; (ii) actin polymerization shows a high degree of independence from the presence of extracellular growth factors; and (iii) our results also corroborate the role of Profilin I in regulating actin polymerization, as raising the intracellular levels of Profilin I decreased the mobile fraction ratio of actin filaments and slowed their polymerization rate; furthermore, increased Profilin levels also led to reduced individual cell velocity and directionality. PMID:24465723

  8. The use of the Tethered Satellite System to perform low density aerothermodynamics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; De Luca, Luigi; Siemers, Paul M.; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is a cooperative space system development activity being carried out by USA and Italy. Within TSS, the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC) concept has the potential to provide access to vast portions of the upper atmosphere for the purpose of atmospheric and aerothermodynamic research. The implementation of this capability will push Tether System (TS) state of the art to its limits; the primary problems being tether/satellite drag, heating, tension control, deployment/retrieval control. In this paper parametric studies are accomplished to assess some of these problems and to delineate the tradeoffs available to missions design to meet the engineering constraints. The utilization of aerodynamic rather than spherical shapes - (TSS) - as well as elementary satellite thrusting and lift are included in the present study.

  9. Numerical Simulations Of High-Altitude Aerothermodynamics Of A Prospective Spacecraft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchenkov, P. V.; Kaskovsky, A. V.; Krylov, A. N.; Ivanov, M. S.

    2011-05-01

    The paper describes the computations of aerothermodynamic characteristics of a promising spacecraft (Prospective Piloted Transport System) along its de- scent trajectory at altitudes from 120 to 60 km. The computations are performed by the DSMC method with the use of the SMILE software system and by the engineering technique (local bridging method) with the use of the RuSat software system. The influence of real gas effects (excitation of rotational and vibrational energy modes and chemical reactions) on aerothermodynamic characteristics of the vehicle is studied. A comparison of results obtained by the approximate engineering method and the DSMC method allow the accuracy of prediction of aerodynamic characteristics by the local bridging method to be estimated.

  10. Real-Gas Flow Properties for NASA Langley Research Center Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    1996-01-01

    A computational algorithm has been developed which can be employed to determine the flow properties of an arbitrary real (virial) gas in a wind tunnel. A multiple-coefficient virial gas equation of state and the assumption of isentropic flow are used to model the gas and to compute flow properties throughout the wind tunnel. This algorithm has been used to calculate flow properties for the wind tunnels of the Aerothermodynamics Facilities Complex at the NASA Langley Research Center, in which air, CF4. He, and N2 are employed as test gases. The algorithm is detailed in this paper and sample results are presented for each of the Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex wind tunnels.

  11. Wind-tunnel based definition of the AFE aerothermodynamic environment. [Aeroassist Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles G.; Wells, W. L.

    1992-01-01

    The Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE), scheduled to be performed in 1994, will serve as a precursor for aeroassisted space transfer vehicles (ASTV's) and is representative of entry concepts being considered for missions to Mars. Rationale for the AFE is reviewed briefly as are the various experiments carried aboard the vehicle. The approach used to determine hypersonic aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic characteristics over a wide range of simulation parameters in ground-based facilities is presented. Facilities, instrumentation and test procedures employed in the establishment of the data base are discussed. Measurements illustrating the effects of hypersonic simulation parameters, particularly normal-shock density ratio (an important parameter for hypersonic blunt bodies), and attitude on aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic characteristics are presented, and predictions from computational fluid dynamic (CFD) computer codes are compared with measurement.

  12. Overview of X-38 Hypersonic Aerothermodynamic Wind Tunnel Data and Comparison with Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C.; Caram, J.; Berry, S.; Horvath, T.; Merski, N.; Loomis, M.; Venkatapathy, E.

    2004-01-01

    A NASA team of engineers has been organized to design a crew return vehicle for returning International Space Station crew members from orbit. The hypersonic aerothermodynamic characteristics of the X-23/X-24A derived X-38 crew return vehicle are being evaluated in various wind tunnels in support of this effort. Aerothermodynamic data from two NASA hypersonic tunnels at Mach 6 and Mach 10 has been obtained with cast ceramic models and a thermographic phosphorus digital imaging system. General windward surface heating features are described based on experimental surface heating images and surface oil flow patterns for the nominal hypersonic aerodynamic orientation. Body flap reattachment heating levels are examined. Computational Fluid Dynamics tools have been applied at the appropriate wind tunnel conditions to make comparisons with this data.

  13. Hypersonic research engine/aerothermodynamic integration model, experimental results. Volume 1: Mach 6 component integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, E. H., Jr.; Mackley, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA Hypersonic Research Engine (HRE) Project was initiated for the purpose of advancing the technology of airbreathing propulsion for hypersonic flight. A large component (inlet, combustor, and nozzle) and structures development program was encompassed by the project. The tests of a full-scale (18 in. diameter cowl and 87 in. long) HRE concept, designated the Aerothermodynamic Integration Model (AIM), at Mach numbers of 5, 6, and 7. Computer program results for Mach 6 component integration tests are presented.

  14. Hypersonic research engine project. Phase 2: Aerothermodynamic Integration Model (AIM) test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, W. L.; Kado, L.

    1975-01-01

    The Hypersonic Research Engine-Aerothermodynamic Integration Model (HRE-AIM) was designed, fabricated, and tested in the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility. The HRE-AIM is described along with its installation in the wind tunnel facility. Test conditions to which the HRE-AIM was subjected and observations made during the tests are discussed. The overall engine performance, component interaction, and ignition limits for the design are evaluated.

  15. Aerothermodynamic flow phenomena of the airframe-integrated supersonic combustion ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.

    1992-01-01

    The unique component flow phenomena is discussed of the airframe-integrated supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) in a format geared towards new players in the arena of hypersonic propulsion. After giving an overview of the scramjet aerothermodynamic cycle, the characteristics are then covered individually of the vehicle forebody, inlet, combustor, and vehicle afterbody/nozzle. Attention is given to phenomena such as inlet speeding, inlet starting, inlet spillage, fuel injection, thermal choking, and combustor-inlet interaction.

  16. Analytical characterization of AOTV perigee aerothermodynamic regime. [Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1984-01-01

    In preliminary design studies of AOTV (Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle) configurations, it is desirable to have a simple analytical method for characterizing the aerothermodynamic regime at skip trajectory perigee as a function of vehicle L/D and m/CDA (ballistic coefficient). The present study derives an approximate perigee solution from the generalized equations of motion. For a prescribed entry velocity vector, the solution determines a Zeta function (proportional to density divided by m/CDA) at perigee as a parametric function of the exit velocity vector and (constant) L/D. The perigee Zeta function then determines perigee density (or altitude) as a parametric function of m/CDA. The solution allows the following classic aerothermodynamic parameters to be determined at perigee as parametric functions of m/CDA, L/D, and the exit velocity vector: Reynolds Number (viscous effects), Mach Number (compressibility effects), Knudsen Number (rarefaction effects), sphere and disk bow shock standoff distance, Damkohler Number (relaxation effects), viscous correlation parameter (viscid-inviscid interactions), and Stanton Number (convective heat transfer). Results of the analysis are given for low L/D and mid L/D AOTV configurations on return from geosynchronous and L5 orbits. It is concluded the method successfully provides preliminary estimates of the aerothermodynamic parameters through the use of simple algebraic equations and plots.

  17. Impact of ETO propellants on the aerothermodynamic analyses of propulsion components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Civinskas, K. C.; Boyle, R. J.; Mcconnaughey, H. V.

    1988-01-01

    The operating conditions and the propellant transport properties used in Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) applications affect the aerothermodynamic design of ETO turbomachinery in a number of ways. Some aerodynamic and heat transfer implications of the low molecular weight fluids and high Reynolds number operating conditions on future ETO turbomachinery are discussed. Using the current SSME high pressure fuel turbine as a baseline, the aerothermodynamic comparisons are made for two alternate fuel turbine geometries. The first is a revised first stage rotor blade designed to reduce peak heat transfer. This alternate design resulted in a 23 percent reduction in peak heat transfer. The second design concept was a single stage rotor to yield the same power output as the baseline two stage rotor. Since the rotor tip speed was held constant, the turbine work factor doubled. In this alternate design, the peak heat transfer remained the same as the baseline. While the efficiency of the single stage design was 3.1 points less than the baseline two stage turbine, the design was aerothermodynamically feasible, and may be structurally desirable.

  18. PRE_X Programme: Aerothermodynamic Objectives and Aeroshape Definition for in Flight Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, O.; Tribot, J.-P.; Saint-Cloud, F.

    2002-01-01

    As the expendable launch vehicles (ELV) are limited in their trend to lower costs, the reusability (Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) could be the way to make drastic step. By the year 2001, CNES proposed through the ANGEL phase 1 programme to preprare the required technical maturity before that RLV's become alternatives to ELV's. In such way, system ,propulsion, ground based demonstrations, aero-thermo-dynamics as well as in flight experimentation are planned. This paper is focused on the aero-thermo-dynamics (ATD) and in flight demonstration activities with emphasis on the better understanding of ATD problems emerging from past programmes among them shock wave transitionnal boundary layer interaction on surface control, boundary layer transition, local aerothermodynamic effects, gas- surface interaction, catalycity, base flow prediction,...In order to minimize as small as possible the management risk a first generation of vehicle dubbed Pre_X is designed to validate technological choices and to have as soon as possible re-entry data to calibrate the various tools involved in the future RLV definition. In addition, the main requirement for PRE_X aeroshape definition and the two different design approaches considered by Dassault Aviation and EADS-LV are discussed. Then, the more promising concept for the PRE_X application is presented. Finally, the current status of the ATD activities is given as well as the perspectives.

  19. Intermediate Experimental Vehicle, ESA Program Aerothermodynamics- Transition And Steps And Gaps Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verand, Jean-Luc; Pelissier, Christian; Sourgen, Frederic; Fontaine, Joelle; Garcon, Francois; Spel, Martin; van Hauwaert, Pierre; Charbonnier, Dominique; Vos, Jan; Vallee, Jean-Jacques; Pibarot, Julien; Tribot, Jean-Pierre; Mareschi, Vincenzo; Ferrarella, Daniella; Rufolo, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) project objectives are the design, development, manufacture and ground and flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system, which is highly flexible and manoeuvrable. The IXV vehicle is a flying test bed for securing the next step of operational space vehicle development by supporting technology demonstration and system concept through the following objectives: a) Aerothermodynamics b) Advanced In Flight Experiments c) Thermal Protection System d) Guidance Navigation and Control e) System design The assessment of the general aerothermodynamic environment of IXV vehicle is mainly performed considering a smooth simplified geometry. However, the thermal protection system of IXV includes a mono-block ceramic matrix composite nose and an assembly of shingles between which steps and gaps are generated. From an aerothermodynamic point of view, such a distributed roughness layout cannot be ignored in terms of modification of the interaction between the flow and the body. To assess this effect, dedicated Mach number 5.5 wind tunnel tests (ONERA, S3MA facility) and numerical simulations (RTECH and CFS Engineering) have been performed during the phase C2 of the project. The paper presents the general logic of the work, with emphasis on the wind tunnel model design, tests involving infrared thermal measurements as well as the CFD rebuilding of the flow in the wind tunnel and the extrapolation from ground-to-flight.

  20. Lack of Association between Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression and Clinically Relevant Molecular or Morphologic Tumor Characteristics at the Leading Edge of Invasive Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Wardelmann, Eva; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the western world, but tumor biology and clinical course show great interindividual variation. Molecular and morphologic tumor characteristics, such as KRAS/BRAF mutation status, mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, tumor growth pattern, and tumor cell budding, have been shown to be of key therapeutic and/or prognostic relevance in CRC. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-anchored zinc-binding endopeptidase that is expressed at the leading edge of various invasive carcinomas and promotes tumor cell invasion through degradation of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between MT1-MMP expression and molecular tumor characteristics as well as morphologic features of tumor aggressiveness in a consecutive series of 79 CRC tissue samples. However, although MT1-MMP was expressed in 41/79 samples (52%), there was no significant association between MT1-MMP expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation status, MMR protein expression, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor growth pattern, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor cell budding in our sample cohort (P > 0.05). Thus, we conclude that although MT1-MMP may play a role in CRC invasion, it is not of key relevance to the current models of CRC invasion and aggressiveness. PMID:26106602