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Sample records for leaf peroxidase isozyme

  1. Comparative analysis of peroxidase profiles in Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra L.): evaluation of leaf growth related isozymes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lei; Wang, Chenchen; Huang, Jiabao; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui; Wang, Haiou

    2013-01-15

    Plant peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) with different isoforms catalyze various reactions in plant growth and development. However, it is difficult to elucidate the function of each isozyme in one plant. Here, we compared profiles of entire isozyme in young seedling and mature leaves of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra L.) on zymogram and ion exchange chromatography in order to investigate leaf growth related peroxidase isozymes. The results showed that four isozymes were constitutively expressed in kale leaves, whereas other two isozymes were induced in the mature leaves. The Mono Q ion exchange chromatography separated the six isozymes into two major groups due to the difference in their isoelectric points. The results suggested that although there were several isozymes in the leaves of Chinese kale, one isozyme functioned mainly through the leaf development. Two anionic isozymes with molecular weights lower than 32 kDa were considered mature related.

  2. Barley peroxidase isozymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laugesen, Sabrina; Bak-Jensen, Kristian Sass; Hägglund, Per; Henriksen, Anette; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Thirteen peroxidase spots on two-dimensional gels were identified by comprehensive proteome analysis of the barley seed. Mass spectrometry tracked multiple forms of three different peroxidase isozymes: barley seed peroxidase 1, barley seed-specific peroxidase BP1 and a not previously identified putative barley peroxidase. The presence of multiple spots for each of the isozymes reflected variations in post-translational glycosylation and protein truncation. Complete sequence coverage was achieved by using a series of proteases and chromatographic resins for sample preparation prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Distinct peroxidase spot patterns divided the 16 cultivars tested into two groups. The distribution of the three isozymes in different seed tissues (endosperm, embryo, and aleurone layer) suggested the peroxidases to play individual albeit partially overlapping roles during germination. In summary, a subset of three peroxidase isozymes was found to occur in the seed, whereas products of four other barley peroxidase genes were not detected. The present analysis documents the selective expression profiles and post-translational modifications of isozymes from a large plant gene family.

  3. Purification and some properties of peroxidase isozymes from pineapple stem.

    PubMed

    Sung, H Y; Yu, R H; Chang, C T

    1993-01-01

    The enzyme peroxidase is widely distributed among the higher plants. Isozymes of peroxidase are known to occur in a variety of tissues in a large number of plant species. In this study, peroxidase isozymes were purified from the extract of pineapple stem through successive steps of ammonium sulfate fractionation, CM-Sepharose CL-6B chromatographies and DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B chromatographies. By these steps, twelve isozymes of peroxidase were obtained. Some properties of the isozymes were studied and compared.

  4. Monosaccharide composition and properties of a deglycosylated turnip peroxidase isozyme.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Vázquez, Miguel A; García-Almendárez, Blanca E; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Whitaker, John R; Arroyave-Hernández, C; Regalado, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    A neutral peroxidase isozyme (TP) purified from turnip (Brassica napus L. var. purple top white globe) was partially deglycosylated, using chemical and enzymatic treatment. A 32% carbohydrate removal was achieved by exposing TP to a mixture of PNGase F, O-glycosidase, NANase, GALase III and HEXase I, while m-periodate treatment removed about 88% of TP carbohydrate moiety. The glycoprotein fraction of the TP contained a relatively high mannose and fucose content (37 and 31%, w/w, respectively), 16% (w/w) galactose, and 15% (w/w) GlcNAc. Thus, the carbohydrate moiety was classified as a hybrid type. Partially deglycosylated TP had reduced activity (by 50-85%), was more susceptible to proteolysis, and showed a slight decrease in thermostability compared to the native enzyme. Circular dichroism studies strongly suggested that although the carbohydrate moiety of TP did not influence the conformation of the polypeptide backbone, its presence considerably enhanced protein conformational stability toward heat. Removal of oligosaccharide chains from TP caused a decrease in K(m) and V(max) for hydrogen peroxide. Native and chemically deglycosylated TP were similarly immunodetected by rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against TP. The results suggest that the carbohydrate moiety of TP is important for peroxidase activity and stability. PMID:12475613

  5. Association of a specific cationic peroxidase isozyme with maize stress and disease resistance responses, genetic identification, and identification of a cDNA coding for the isozyme.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Patrick F; Johnson, Eric T

    2005-06-01

    The presence of a pI 9.0 cationic peroxidase isozyme from milk stage pericarp of six susceptible and five resistant inbreds was correlated significantly with previously reported field data on percentage infection by Aspergillus flavus in the inbreds and their hybrids. The isozyme was constitutively expressed in some additional maize tissues and lines examined, and frequently induced by mechanical damage, heat shock, Fusarium proliferatum, and/or Bacillus subtilis in other lines tested. Native/IEF two-dimensional electrophoresis identified the isozyme as the previously genetically identified px5. A cDNA clone expressed in black Mexican sweet (BMS) maize cell cultures produced the pI 9.0 isozyme. In addition to potential use in marker-assisted breeding, enhanced expression of this cationic peroxidase through breeding or genetic engineering may lead to enhanced disease or insect resistance.

  6. Comparative electron paramagnetic resonance study of radical intermediates in turnip peroxidase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Ivancich, A; Mazza, G; Desbois, A

    2001-06-12

    The occurrence of isozymes in plant peroxidases is poorly understood. Turnip roots contain seven season-dependent isoperoxidases with distinct physicochemical properties. In the work presented here, multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the Compound I intermediate obtained by the reaction of turnip isoperoxidases 1, 3, and 7 with hydrogen peroxide. The broad (2500 G) Compound I EPR spectrum of all three peroxidases was consistent with the formation of an exchange-coupled oxoferryl-porphyrinyl radical species. A dramatic pH dependence of the exchange interaction of the [Fe(IV)=O por(*+)] intermediate was observed for all three isoperoxidases and for a pH range of 4.5-7.7. This result provides substantial experimental evidence for previous proposals concerning the protein effect on the ferro- or antiferromagnetic character of the exchange coupling of Compound I based on model complexes. Turnip isoperoxidase 7 exhibited an unexpected pH effect related to the nature of the Compound I radical. At basic pH, a narrow radical species ( approximately 50 G) was formed together with the porphyrinyl radical. The g anisotropy of the narrow radical Delta(g) = 0.0046, obtained from the high-field (190 and 285 GHz) EPR spectrum, was that expected for tyrosyl radicals. The broad g(x) edge of the Tyr* spectrum centered at a low g(x) value (2.00660) strongly argues for a hydrogen-bonded tyrosyl radical in a heterogeneous microenvironment. The relationship between tyrosyl radical formation and the higher redox potential of turnip isozyme 7, as compared to that of isozyme 1, is discussed. PMID:11389600

  7. Purification and characterization of a peroxidase isozyme from Indian turnip roots.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sohel; Gupta, Munishwar Nath

    2010-05-12

    A peroxidase isozyme (TP I) from Indian turnip roots ( Brassica rapa ) was purified. TP I had a minimum molecular mass of 45 000 Da as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). A far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy study of TP I revealed the presence of 44% alpha-helix, 16% beta-sheet, and 40% random structure. The N-terminal sequence of TP I was found to be Gln-Phe-Val-Ile-Pro-Thr-Tyr-Ala-Trp-Gln. Pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA)-modified TP I showed enhanced thermal stability and p-chlorophenol removal efficiency. In the absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), PMDA-modified TP I (dose of 50 units mL(-1)) converted 100% p-chlorophenol, while at the same time, native TP I could convert only 85%. In the presence of PEG, PMDA-modified TP I (dose of 0.05 units mL(-1)) converted p-chlorophenol completely in 45 min, while native TP I required 60 min for complete conversion. The K(M) value toward the substrates p-chlorophenol and o-cresol decreased after PMDA modification of TP I, which indicated increased affinity for these substrates.

  8. Purification and characterization of a peroxidase isozyme from Indian turnip roots.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sohel; Gupta, Munishwar Nath

    2010-05-12

    A peroxidase isozyme (TP I) from Indian turnip roots ( Brassica rapa ) was purified. TP I had a minimum molecular mass of 45 000 Da as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). A far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy study of TP I revealed the presence of 44% alpha-helix, 16% beta-sheet, and 40% random structure. The N-terminal sequence of TP I was found to be Gln-Phe-Val-Ile-Pro-Thr-Tyr-Ala-Trp-Gln. Pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA)-modified TP I showed enhanced thermal stability and p-chlorophenol removal efficiency. In the absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), PMDA-modified TP I (dose of 50 units mL(-1)) converted 100% p-chlorophenol, while at the same time, native TP I could convert only 85%. In the presence of PEG, PMDA-modified TP I (dose of 0.05 units mL(-1)) converted p-chlorophenol completely in 45 min, while native TP I required 60 min for complete conversion. The K(M) value toward the substrates p-chlorophenol and o-cresol decreased after PMDA modification of TP I, which indicated increased affinity for these substrates. PMID:20405843

  9. Involvement of peroxidase activity in developing somatic embryos of Medicago arborea L. Identification of an isozyme peroxidase as biochemical marker of somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Piedad; Martin, Luisa; Blazquez, Antonio; Guerra, Hilario; Villalobos, Nieves

    2014-01-15

    The legume Medicago arborea L. is very interesting as regards the regeneration of marginal arid soils. The problem is that it does not have a good germinative yield. It was therefore decided to regenerate via somatic embryogenesis and find a marker of embryogenic potential. In this study, peroxidase activity was evaluated in non-embryogenic and embryogenic calli from M. arborea L. A decrease in soluble peroxidase activity is observed in its embryonic calli at the time at which the somatic embryos begin to appear. This activity is always lower in embryonic calli than in non-embryonic ones (unlike what happens in the case of wall-bound peroxidases). These results suggest that peroxidases can be considered to be enzymes involved in somatic embryogenesis in M. arborea. In addition, isozyme analyses were carried out on protein extracts using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The band called P5 was detected only in embryogenic cultures at very early stages of development. This band was digested with trypsin and analyzed using linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometer. In P5 isoform a peroxidase-L-ascorbate peroxidase was identified. It can be used as a marker that allows the identification of embryological potential.

  10. Purification and properties of a neutral peroxidase isozyme from turnip (Brassica napus L. Var. Purple Top White Globe) roots.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendárez, B E; Regalado, C; Whitaker, J R

    2001-09-01

    A neutral peroxidase isozyme (pI 7.2) from turnip roots (TNP) was purified to homogeneity and partially characterized. TNP is a monomeric glycoprotein with 9.1% carbohydrate content and a molecular weight of 36 kDa. Optimum pH values for activity using 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and guaiacol as H donors were 4.5 and 5.5, whereas the K(m) values were 0.7 and 3.7 mM, respectively. The ABTS K(m) was approximately 7 times higher than that reported for basic commercial horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C). TNP retained approximately 70% activity after 11 min of heating at 65 degrees C, whereas the activation energy for inactivation (132 kJ/mol) was higher than or comparable to that of other peroxidases. The low ABTS K(m) and high specific activity (1930 units/mg) gave a high catalytic efficiency (500 M(-1) s(-1)). These properties make TNP an enzyme with a high potential as an alternative to HRP in various applications. PMID:11559153

  11. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing. Images PMID:1851991

  12. [Effect of stress conditions on the activity and isozyme composition of peroxidase of vacuoles and tissue extract of red beet roots].

    PubMed

    Pradedova, E V; Nimaeva, O D; Saliaev, R K

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the enzymatic activity of phenol-dependent peroxidase (PO) of vacuoles and tissue extract of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots in different phases of plant development and in hyperosmotic stress and pathogen infection were found. The highest activity was observed during root growth and the lowest PO activity occurred in dormancy, respectively. Activation of the enzyme was observed in infected roots. The isozyme composition of PO was characterized by lability, and the number of cationic isoforms varied significantly. The optimum pH of the enzyme changed depending on the growth phase and stressor, tending to shift towards low values at rest and in hyperosmotic stress. The shift in the optimum pH coincided with the appearance of additional cationic PO isoforms. PMID:25731036

  13. Assessment of peroxidase isozyme marker-based model for cross identifications in hybrids (F(1)) of urdbean [ Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper].

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, R.; Shukla, A.; Gaur, K.

    2002-12-01

    Four hybrids (4 F(1)s) were chosen out of crosses in the urdbean [ Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper, 2n = 22] having contrasting morphological characters. Zymograms for isozyme peroxidase were drawn from the patterns obtained from parents and their respective F(1) hybrids on the basis of relative similarities to parental bands. The selfed or crossed nature of hybrid pods was determined from the zymograms and their analysis. The number of bands and their intensities gave an idea about the extent of crossing in F(1) populations. Genetic identity (I) values were indicative of their selfed nature. Dendrograms were constructed on the basis of genetic identity values to display the relative similarities between the populations. Analysis was based on individual pods to confirm their hybrid or selfed nature. Possible use of this technique for identification of F(1) pods and elimination of selfed pods might be implemented to shorten the breeding operations during crossing.

  14. Manganese peroxidase h4 isozyme mediated degradation and detoxification of triarylmethane dye malachite green: optimization of decolorization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Saravanakumar, Thiyagarajan; Palvannan, Thayumanavan; Kim, Dae-Hyuk; Park, Seung-Moon

    2013-11-01

    A cDNA encoding for manganese peroxidase isozyme H4 (MnPH4), isolated from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was expressed in Pichia pastoris, under the control of alcohol oxidase I promoter. The recombinant MnPH4 was efficiently secreted onto media supplemented with hemin at a maximum concentration of 500 U/L, after which purified rMnPH4 was used to decolorize the triarylmethane dye malachite green (MG). Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize three different operational parameters for the decolorization of MG. RSM showed that the optimized variables of enzyme (0.662 U), MnSO4 (448 μM), and hydrogen peroxide (159 μM) decolorized 100 mg/L of MG completely at 3 h. Additionally, UV-VIS spectra, high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the degradation of MG by the formation of main metabolites 4-dimethylamino-benzophenone hydrate, N, N-dimethylaniline (N,N-dimethyl-benzenamine), and methylbenzaldehyde. Interestingly, it was found that rMnPH4 mediates hydroxyl radical attack on the central carbon of MG. Finally, rMnPH4 degraded MG resulted in the complete removal of its toxicity, which was checked under in vitro conditions.

  15. Differential leaf resistance to insects of transgenic sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) expressing tobacco anionic peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Dowd, P F; Lagrimini, L M; Herms, D A

    1998-07-01

    Leaves of transgenic sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) trees that expressed tobacco anionic peroxidase were compared with leaves of L. styraciflua trees that did not express the tobacco enzyme. Leaves of the transgenic trees were generally more resistant to feeding by caterpillars and beetles than wild-type leaves. However, as for past studies with transgenic tobacco and tomato expressing the tobacco anionic peroxidase, the degree of relative resistance depended on the size of insect used and the maturity of the leaf. Decreased growth of gypsy moth larvae appeared mainly due to decreased consumption, and not changes in the nutritional quality of the foliage. Transgenic leaves were more susceptible to feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea. Thus, it appears the tobacco anionic peroxidase can contribute to insect resistance, but its effects are more predictable when it is expressed in plant species more closely related to the original gene source.

  16. Morphology and isozyme band-profile as sexual determinant of nutmeg plant (Myristica fragrants Houttj).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmanah; Maslahat, M.; Nurhayati, dan L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex information in nutmeg plant is important to distinguish between male and female species. The recommendation of optimum sex-ratio for a nutmeg plantation is 1:10. This research is aimed to discover the morphological characteristic of nutmeg plant and the difference of leaf pattern as sexual determinant between male and female plant with the comparison of isozyme analysis. The result of morphological identification provided from 3 research farm location indicated that female nutmeg was higher, with longer and wider leaf, more vein, bigger diameter of stem and branching angle as compared to male nutmeg. Two parameters which were widht of leaf and branching angle showed significant differences, where female nutmeg plants have wider leaves and branching angle. Isozyme analysis suggested that the analysis of peroxidase enzyme (PER) was better and able to provide more information than aspartarte amino transferase (AAT) and acid phospatase (ACP) Enzymes.

  17. Purification and characterization of a thermostable soluble peroxidase from Citrus medica leaf.

    PubMed

    Mall, Ruckminee; Naik, Gaurav; Mina, Usha; Mishra, Sarad Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A soluble and thermostable peroxidase enzyme (POD) was extracted from the leaf of Citrus medica. The enzyme was purified 15.10-fold with a total yield of 28.6% by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme came as a single band on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) as well as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) PAGE. The molecular mass of the enzyme was about 32 kD as determined by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 6.0 and 50°C temperature. The enzyme was active in wide range of pH (5.0-8.0) and temperature (30-80°C). From the thermal inactivation studies in the range of 60-75°C, the half-life (t(1/2)) values of the enzyme ranged from 8 to 173 min. The inactivation energy (Ea) value of POD was estimated to be 21.7 kcal mol(-1). The Km values for guaiacol and H(2)O(2) were 8 mM and 1.8 mM, respectively. This enzyme was activated by some metals and reagents such as Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+), ferulic acid, and indole acetic acid (IAA), while it was inhibited by Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and Mn(2+), L-cysteine, L-proline, and protocatechuic acid.

  18. Thermal inactivation kinetics of Rabdosia serra (Maxim.) Hara leaf peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase and comparative evaluation of drying methods on leaf phenolic profile and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lianzhu; Lei, Fenfen; Sun, Da-Wen; Dong, Yi; Yang, Bao; Zhao, Mouming

    2012-10-15

    Inactivation kinetics of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase in fresh Rabdosia serra leaf were determined by hot water and steam blanching. Activation energy (52.30 kJ mol(-1)) of polyphenol oxidase inactivation was higher than that (20.15 kJ mol(-1)) of peroxidase. Water blanching at 90 °C or steam blanching at 100 °C for 90 s was recommended as the preliminary treatment for the retention of phenolics. Moreover, comparative evaluation of drying methods on the phenolics profiles and bioactivities of R. serra leaf were conducted. The results indicated that only intact leaf after freeze drying retained the initial quality. The sun- and air-dried leaves possessed identical phenolic profiles. The homogenised leaf (after freeze-drying) possessed a lower level of phenolics due to enzymatic degradation. Good antioxidant activities were detected for the sun- and air-dried leaves. There was insignificant difference in anti-tyrosinase and anti-α-glucosidase activities among sun-, air-, and freeze-dried leaves.

  19. Thermal inactivation kinetics of Rabdosia serra (Maxim.) Hara leaf peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase and comparative evaluation of drying methods on leaf phenolic profile and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lianzhu; Lei, Fenfen; Sun, Da-Wen; Dong, Yi; Yang, Bao; Zhao, Mouming

    2012-10-15

    Inactivation kinetics of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase in fresh Rabdosia serra leaf were determined by hot water and steam blanching. Activation energy (52.30 kJ mol(-1)) of polyphenol oxidase inactivation was higher than that (20.15 kJ mol(-1)) of peroxidase. Water blanching at 90 °C or steam blanching at 100 °C for 90 s was recommended as the preliminary treatment for the retention of phenolics. Moreover, comparative evaluation of drying methods on the phenolics profiles and bioactivities of R. serra leaf were conducted. The results indicated that only intact leaf after freeze drying retained the initial quality. The sun- and air-dried leaves possessed identical phenolic profiles. The homogenised leaf (after freeze-drying) possessed a lower level of phenolics due to enzymatic degradation. Good antioxidant activities were detected for the sun- and air-dried leaves. There was insignificant difference in anti-tyrosinase and anti-α-glucosidase activities among sun-, air-, and freeze-dried leaves. PMID:23442652

  20. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  1. Influence of heat stress on leaf ultrastructure, photosynthetic performance, and ascorbate peroxidase gene expression of two pear cultivars (Pyrus pyrifolia)*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-feng; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Guo-qin; Hussain, Sayed; Teng, Yuan-wen

    2013-01-01

    Plants encounter a variety of stresses in natural environments. One-year-old pot-grown trees of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai cv. Cuiguan and Wonhwang) were exposed to two heat stress regimes. Under constant short-term heat stress, chloroplasts and mitochondria were visibly damaged. Relative chlorophyll content and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II were significantly decreased, which indicated that the leaf photosynthetic capability declined. Under chronic heat stress, mesophyll cell ultrastructure was not obviously damaged, but leaf photosynthetic capability was still restrained. As chronic heat stress was a simulation of the natural environment in summer, further study of the responses under this stress regime was undertaken. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was increased in ‘Cuiguan’, but not in ‘Wonhwang’. Inducible expression of PpAPX genes in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts and peroxisomes was consistent with increased APX activity in ‘Cuiguan’, whereas only weak induction of PpAPX genes was observed in ‘Wonhwang’. The isoenzymes cytosolic APX1 (cAPX1) and stromal APX (sAPX) were confirmed to be localized in the cytoplasm and chloroplasts, respectively. PMID:24302708

  2. Influence of heat stress on leaf ultrastructure, photosynthetic performance, and ascorbate peroxidase gene expression of two pear cultivars (Pyrus pyrifolia).

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-feng; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Guo-qin; Hussain, Sayed; Teng, Yuan-wen

    2013-12-01

    Plants encounter a variety of stresses in natural environments. One-year-old pot-grown trees of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai cv. Cuiguan and Wonhwang) were exposed to two heat stress regimes. Under constant short-term heat stress, chloroplasts and mitochondria were visibly damaged. Relative chlorophyll content and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II were significantly decreased, which indicated that the leaf photosynthetic capability declined. Under chronic heat stress, mesophyll cell ultrastructure was not obviously damaged, but leaf photosynthetic capability was still restrained. As chronic heat stress was a simulation of the natural environment in summer, further study of the responses under this stress regime was undertaken. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was increased in 'Cuiguan', but not in 'Wonhwang'. Inducible expression of PpAPX genes in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts and peroxisomes was consistent with increased APX activity in 'Cuiguan', whereas only weak induction of PpAPX genes was observed in 'Wonhwang'. The isoenzymes cytosolic APX1 (cAPX1) and stromal APX (sAPX) were confirmed to be localized in the cytoplasm and chloroplasts, respectively.

  3. Gel Separation of Isozymes To Study Relatedness of Common Bean Cultivars from ARound the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Paul; Oxley, Mary; Ealing, Ben

    2002-01-01

    Explains a three week laboratory experiment on the gel separation of peroxidase, which is the most well-known isozyme, from beans. Includes suggestions on the laboratory management. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  4. Preventive (myoglobin, transferrin) and scavenging (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) anti-oxidative properties of raw liquid extract of Morinda lucida leaf in the traditional treatment of Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Olaniyan, Mathew Folaranmi; Babatunde, Elizabeth Moyinoluwa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liquid extract of Morinda lucida leaf has been demonstrated to have antiplasmodial activities. Some phytochemicals act as preventive and or scavenging antioxidants. This study aimed to investigate the preventative and scavenging properties of the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf using plasma myoglobin, transferrin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) peroxidase. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight Plasmodium-infected patients aged 29-47 years that have not been treated with any antimalaria medication but have decided to be treated traditionally using M. lucida leaf extract were recruited from 15 traditional homes in ATISBO, Saki-East, and Saki-West local government areas of Oke-Ogun — the Northern part of Oyo State-Nigeria. Identification of Plasmodium in the blood of the test and normal control subjects were carried out by Giemsha thick film technique. Packed cell volume, total bile acids, blood glucose, blood pressure, plasma myoglobin, transferrin, SOD, and GSH peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in the normal control subjects and in the Plasmodium-infected patients before and after the treatment with raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf. Results: A significant (P < 0.05) biochemical alterations were observed in the plasma values of transferrin, SOD, and GPx in the Plasmodium-infected patients when compared with the normal control subjects and after treatment with the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf. Conclusion: Our study supports the possible preventative and scavenging antioxidative effect of the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf in the traditional treatment of Plasmodium infection. PMID:27003969

  5. Poria weirii as a Possible Commercial Source of Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Koenigs, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Poria weirii produced peroxidase in yields amounting to 35% of those obtained from the same weight of horseradish roots. The three isozymes detected were distinct from those of horseradish. PMID:5018622

  6. Phenol-Oxidizing Peroxidases Contribute to the Protection of Plants from Ultraviolet Radiation Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Marcel A.K.; van den Noort, Ria E.; Tan, M.Y. Adillah; Prinsen, Els; Lagrimini, L. Mark; Thorneley, Roger N.F.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism of UV protection in two duckweed species (Lemnaceae) by exploiting the UV sensitivity of photosystem II as an in situ sensor for radiation stress. A UV-tolerant Spirodela punctata G.F.W. Meyer ecotype had significantly higher indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels than a UV-sensitive ecotype. Parallel work on Lemna gibba mutants suggested that UV tolerance is linked to IAA degradation rather than to levels of free or conjugated IAA. This linkage is consistent with a role for class III phenolic peroxidases, which have been implicated both in the degradation of IAA and the cross-linking of various UV-absorbing phenolics. Biochemical analysis revealed increased activity of a specific peroxidase isozyme in both UV-tolerant duckweed lines. The hypothesis that peroxidases play a role in UV protection was tested in a direct manner using genetically modified tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris). It was found that increased activity of the anionic peroxidase correlated with increased tolerance to UV radiation as well as decreased levels of free auxin. We conclude that phenol-oxidizing peroxidases concurrently contribute to UV protection as well as the control of leaf and plant architecture. PMID:11457952

  7. Higher peroxidase activity, leaf nutrient contents and carbon isotope composition changes in Arabidopsis thaliana are related to rutin stress.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2014-09-15

    Rutin, a plant secondary metabolite that is used in cosmetics and food additive and has known medicinal properties, protects plants from UV-B radiation and diseases. Rutin has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its mode of action at physiological level is unknown. Here, we report the biochemical, physiological and oxidative response of Arabidopsis thaliana to rutin at micromolar concentrations. It was found that fresh weight; leaf mineral contents (nitrogen, sodium, potassium, copper and aluminum) were decreased following 1 week exposure to rutin. Arabidopsis roots generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species after rutin treatment, consequently increasing membrane lipid peroxidation, decreasing leaf Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) contents and losing root viability. Carbon isotope composition in A. thaliana leaves was less negative after rutin application than the control. Carbon isotope discrimination values were decreased following rutin treatment, with the highest reduction compared to the control at 750μM rutin. Rutin also inhibited the ratio of CO2 from leaf to air (ci/ca) at all concentrations. Total protein contents in A. thaliana leaves were decreased following rutin treatment. It was concluded carbon isotope discrimination coincided with protein degradation, increase lipid peroxidation and a decrease in ci/ca values may be the primary action site of rutin. The present results suggest that rutin possesses allelopathic potential and could be used as a candidate to develop environment friendly natural herbicide.

  8. Isozymes of antioxidative enzymes during ripening and storage of ber ( Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Yadav, Praduman; Jain, Veena; Malhotra, Sarla P

    2014-02-01

    Isozyme profile of antioxidative enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was studied during ripening and storage of two cultivars of ber fruit (Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.) differing in their shelf-lives viz. Umran (shelf-life, 8-9 d) and Kaithali (shelf-life, 4-5 d). The profile revealed that Umran variety exhibited three bands each of SOD and POX while in Kaithali, these enzymes had two isoenzymes throughout ripening. CAT and APX, however, showed two isozymes each during ripening of both the varieties and the pattern remained the same at all the stages of ripening except at the initial stage i.e immature green stage where single CAT isozyme was visible. During storage, one extra band each of SOD and POX present only in Umran got disappeared at later stages of storage, whereas in Kaithali, the pattern remained unchanged. Also, there was no change in the pattern of CAT and APX isozymes during storage of both the varieties. One isozyme of CAT could be considered as ripening related while one isozyme each of SOD and POX could be related to higher shelf life of fruits. PMID:24493891

  9. Biliverdin reductase isozymes in metabolism.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Luke; Hosick, Peter A; John, Kezia; Stec, David E; Hinds, Terry D

    2015-04-01

    The biliverdin reductase (BVR) isozymes BVRA and BVRB are cell surface membrane receptors with pleiotropic functions. This review compares, for the first time, the structural and functional differences between the isozymes. They reduce biliverdin, a byproduct of heme catabolism, to bilirubin, display kinase activity, and BVRA, but not BVRB, can act as a transcription factor. The binding motifs present in the BVR isozymes allow a wide range of interactions with components of metabolically important signaling pathways such as the insulin receptor kinase cascades, protein kinases (PKs), and inflammatory mediators. In addition, serum bilirubin levels have been negatively associated with abdominal obesity and hypertriglyceridemia. We discuss the roles of the BVR isozymes in metabolism and their potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:25726384

  10. Phytotoxicity of Phytolacca americana leaf extracts on the growth, and physiological response of Cassia mimosoides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Ok; Johnson, Jon D; Lee, Eun Ju

    2005-12-01

    We examined the allelochemical effects of control soil, native soil (treated soil), and leaf extracts of Phytolacca americana (pokeweed) on the germination rate and seedling growth of Cassia mimosoides var. nomame. We also studied the resulting changes in root-tip ultrastructure and peroxidase isozyme biochemistry. P. americana leaf extract inhibited seed germination, seedling growth, and biomass when compared to control and treated soil. Root and shoot growth in treated soil was stimulated relative to control soil, but root growth was inhibited by 50% in the leaf extract treatment. Biomass of C. mimosoides seedlings grown on leaf extract was reduced sevenfold when compared to the control seedlings. The amounts of total phenolic compounds in the leaf extract, treated soil, and control soil were 0.77, 0.14, and 0.03 mg l(-1), respectively. The root tips of C. mimsoides treated with leaf extracts of P. americana showed amyloplasts and large central vacuoles with electron-dense deposits inside them when compared to control root tips. The activity of guaiacol peroxidase (GuPOX) in whole plant, roots, and shoots of C. mimosoides increased as leaf extract increased; maximum activity was observed in extract concentrations of 75% and higher. Root GuPOX activity was three times higher than in shoots. Therefore, we conclude that inhibition of C. mimosoides growth is related to the phenolic compounds in the P. americana leaf extract and the ultrastructure changes in root-tip cells and increased GuPOX activity is a response to these allelochemicals.

  11. Dependence of Guaiacol Peroxidase Activity and Lipid Peroxidation Rate in Drooping Birch (Betula pendula Roth) and Tillet (Tilia cordata Mill) Leaf on Motor Traffic Pollution Intensity.

    PubMed

    Erofeeva, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis and paradoxical effects are frequently found for different plant parameters. These phenomena were also observed for lipid peroxidation (LP) rate at environmental pollution. However, the role of antioxidant enzymes, particularly guaiacol peroxidases (GPX), in a nonmonotonic variation in the LP rate remains insufficiently explored. Therefore, dependence of GPX activity and LP rate in Betula pendula and Tilia cordata leaf on motor traffic pollution intensity was studied. Regression analysis revealed dependences of LP rate and GPX activity on traffic intensity. In B pendula, GPX activity enhanced significantly (up to 2.8 times relatively control) under increased traffic that induced biphasic paradoxical effect for LP rate. In the first phase, LP level increased in comparison with the control, and in the second phase, it was normalized by enhanced GPX activity. In T cordata, dependences of GPX activity and LP rate on traffic pollution were paradoxical effects. However, there was no connection between change of GPX activity and LP rate under middle- and high-level pollution: LP level reduced relatively the control or normalized even if GPX activity was lower than the control. This indicates that in T cordata, other regulatory mechanisms instead of GPX were activated which could control LP rate under middle- and high-level pollution.

  12. Participation of chitin-binding peroxidase isoforms in the wilt pathogenesis of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific chitin-binding isozymes of peroxidase (POX) play an important role in pathogenesis of plant diseases caused with fungi. We studied the dynamics of peroxidase activity in two varieties of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.); one was a susceptible and the other resistant to the plant pathogen Vert...

  13. Plant Triose Phosphate Isomerase Isozymes 1

    PubMed Central

    Pichersky, Eran; Gottlieb, Leslie D.

    1984-01-01

    We report the first complete purifications of the cytosolic and plastid isozymes of triose phosphate isomerase (TPI; EC 5.3.1.1) from higher plants including spinach (Spinacia oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), and celery (Apium graveolens). Both isozymes are composed of two isosubunits with approximate molecular weight of 27,000; in spinach and lettuce the plastid isozyme is 200 to 400 larger than the cytosolic isozyme. The two isozymes, purified from lettuce, had closely similar amino acid compositions with the exception of methionine which was four times more prevalent in the cytosolic isozyme. Partial amino acid sequences from the N-terminus were also obtained for both lettuce TPIs. Nine of the 13 positions sequenced in the two proteins had identical amino acid residues. The partial sequences of the plant proteins showed high similarity to previously sequenced animal TPIs. Immunological studies, using antisera prepared independently against the purified plastid and cytosolic isozymes from spinach, revealed that the cytosolic isozymes from a variety of species formed an immunologically distinct group as did the plastid isozymes. However, both plastid and cytosolic TPIs shared some antigenic determinants. The overall similarity of the two isozymes and the high similarity of their partial amino acid sequences to those of several animals indicate that TPI is a very highly conserved protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16663420

  14. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized (veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)), we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  15. Widespread occurrence of expressed fungal secretory peroxidases in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation.

  16. Widespread Occurrence of Expressed Fungal Secretory Peroxidases in Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J.; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R.; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation. PMID:24763280

  17. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized [veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)], we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  18. Isozyme variation in wild and cultivated pineapple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isozyme variation was studied in 161 accessions of pineapple including four species of Ananas and one of Pseudananas. Six enzyme systems (ADH, GPI, PGM, SKDH, TPI, UGPP) involving seven putative loci revealed 35 electromorphs . Considerable variation exists within and between species of Ananas. Sixt...

  19. Manganese peroxidases of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete sordida.

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann-Johnson, C; Cullen, D; Lamar, R T

    1994-01-01

    The ligninolytic enzymes produced by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete sordida in liquid culture were studied. Only manganese peroxidase (MnP) activity could be detected in the supernatant liquid of the cultures. Lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase activities were not detected under a variety of different culture conditions. The highest MnP activity levels were obtained in nitrogen-limited cultures grown under an oxygen atmosphere. The enzyme was induced by Mn(II). The initial pH of the culture medium did not significantly affect the MnP production. Three MnP isozymes were identified (MnPI, MnPII, and MnPIII) and purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography followed by hydrophobic chromatography. The isozymes are glycoproteins with approximately the same molecular mass (around 45 kDa) but have different pIs. The pIs are 5.3, 4.2, and 3.3 for MnPI, MnPII, and MnPIII, respectively. The three isozymes are active in the same range of pHs (pHs 3.0 to 6.0) and have optimal pHs between 4.5 and 5.0. Their amino-terminal sequences, although highly similar, were distinct, suggesting that each is the product of a separate gene. Images PMID:8135519

  20. Kynurenine Aminotransferase Isozyme Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Alireza; Sun, Guanchen; Jayawickrama, Gayan S.; Church, W. Bret

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase isozymes (KATs 1–4) are members of the pyridoxal-5’-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme family, which catalyse the permanent conversion of l-kynurenine (l-KYN) to kynurenic acid (KYNA), a known neuroactive agent. As KATs are found in the mammalian brain and have key roles in the kynurenine pathway, involved in different categories of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, the KATs are prominent targets in the quest to treat neurodegenerative and cognitive impairment disorders. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting these enzymes would produce effects beneficial to patients with these conditions, as abnormally high levels of KYNA are observed. KAT-1 and KAT-3 share the highest sequence similarity of the isozymes in this family, and their active site pockets are also similar. Importantly, KAT-2 has the major role of kynurenic acid production (70%) in the human brain, and it is considered therefore that suitable inhibition of this isozyme would be most effective in managing major aspects of CNS diseases. Human KAT-2 inhibitors have been developed, but the most potent of them, chosen for further investigations, did not proceed in clinical studies due to the cross toxicity caused by their irreversible interaction with PLP, the required cofactor of the KAT isozymes, and any other PLP-dependent enzymes. As a consequence of the possibility of extensive undesirable adverse effects, it is also important to pursue KAT inhibitors that reversibly inhibit KATs and to include a strategy that seeks compounds likely to achieve substantial interaction with regions of the active site other than the PLP. The main purpose of this treatise is to review the recent developments with the inhibitors of KAT isozymes. This treatise also includes analyses of their crystallographic structures in complex with this enzyme family, which provides further insight for researchers in this and related studies. PMID:27314340

  1. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  2. Biochemical and molecular characterization of an atypical manganese peroxidase of the litter-decomposing fungus Agrocybe praecox.

    PubMed

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Steffen, Kari T; Hofrichter, Martin; Hatakka, Annele; Archer, David B; Lundell, Taina K

    2014-11-01

    Agrocybe praecox is a litter-decomposing Basidiomycota species of the order Agaricales, and is frequently found in forests and open woodlands. A. praecox grows in leaf-litter and the upper soil and is able to colonize bark mulch and wood chips. It produces extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) activities and mineralizes synthetic lignin. In this study, the A. praecox MnP1 isozyme was purified, cloned and enzymatically characterized. The enzyme catalysed the oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), which is the specific reaction for manganese-dependent class II heme-peroxidases, in the presence of malonate as chelator with an activity maximum at pH 4.5; detectable activity was observed even at pH 7.0. The coding sequence of the mnp1 gene demonstrates a short-type of MnP protein with a slightly modified Mn(2+) binding site. Thus, A. praecox MnP1 may represent a novel group of atypical short-MnP enzymes. In lignocellulose-containing cultures composed of cereal bran or forest litter, transcription of mnp1 gene was followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. On spruce needle litter, mnp1 expression was more abundant than on leaf litter after three weeks cultivation. However, the expression was constitutive in wheat and rye bran cultures. Our data show that the atypical MnP of A. praecox is able to catalyse Mn(2+) oxidation, which suggests its involvement in lignocellulose decay by this litter-decomposer. PMID:24657475

  3. Biochemical and molecular characterization of an atypical manganese peroxidase of the litter-decomposing fungus Agrocybe praecox.

    PubMed

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Steffen, Kari T; Hofrichter, Martin; Hatakka, Annele; Archer, David B; Lundell, Taina K

    2014-11-01

    Agrocybe praecox is a litter-decomposing Basidiomycota species of the order Agaricales, and is frequently found in forests and open woodlands. A. praecox grows in leaf-litter and the upper soil and is able to colonize bark mulch and wood chips. It produces extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) activities and mineralizes synthetic lignin. In this study, the A. praecox MnP1 isozyme was purified, cloned and enzymatically characterized. The enzyme catalysed the oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), which is the specific reaction for manganese-dependent class II heme-peroxidases, in the presence of malonate as chelator with an activity maximum at pH 4.5; detectable activity was observed even at pH 7.0. The coding sequence of the mnp1 gene demonstrates a short-type of MnP protein with a slightly modified Mn(2+) binding site. Thus, A. praecox MnP1 may represent a novel group of atypical short-MnP enzymes. In lignocellulose-containing cultures composed of cereal bran or forest litter, transcription of mnp1 gene was followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. On spruce needle litter, mnp1 expression was more abundant than on leaf litter after three weeks cultivation. However, the expression was constitutive in wheat and rye bran cultures. Our data show that the atypical MnP of A. praecox is able to catalyse Mn(2+) oxidation, which suggests its involvement in lignocellulose decay by this litter-decomposer.

  4. Apoplastic Peroxidases and Lignification in Needles of Norway Spruce (Picea abies L.).

    PubMed Central

    Polle, A.; Otter, T.; Seifert, F.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the correlation of soluble apoplastic peroxidase activity with lignification in needles of field-grown Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) trees. Apoplastic peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) were obtained by vacuum infiltration of needles. The lignin content of isolated cell walls was determined by the acetyl bromide method. Accumulation of lignin and seasonal variations of apoplastic peroxidase activities were studied in the first year of needle development. The major phase of lignification started after bud break and was terminated about 4 weeks later. This phase correlated with a transient increase in apoplastic guaiacol and coniferyl alcohol peroxidase activity. NADH oxidase activity, which is thought to sustain peroxidase activity by production of H2O2, peaked sharply after bud break and decreased during the lignification period. Histochemical localization of peroxidase with guaiacol indicated that high activities were present in lignifying cell walls. In mature needles, lignin was localized in walls of most needle tissues including mesophyll cells, and corresponded to 80 to 130 [mu]mol lignin monomers/g needle dry weight. Isoelectric focusing of apoplastic washing fluids and activity staining with guaiacol showed the presence of strongly alkaline peroxidases (isoelectric point [greater than or equal to] 9) in all developmental stages investigated. New isozymes with isoelectric points of 7.1 and 8.1 appeared during the major phase of lignification. These isozymes disappeared after lignification was terminated. A strong increase in peroxidase activity in autumn was associated with the appearance of acidic peroxidases (isoelectric point [less than or equal to] 3). These results suggest that soluble alkaline apoplastic peroxidases participate in lignin formation. Soluble acidic apoplastic peroxidases were apparently unrelated to developmentally regulated lignification in spruce needles. PMID:12232302

  5. Antigenic relationships between petunia peroxidase a and specific peroxidase isoenzymes in other Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, T; de Jong, A; Wijsman, H J; van Loon, L C

    1990-07-01

    A highly specific rabbit antiserum raised against peroxidase (PRXa) from petunia (Petunia hybrida) was used to investigate the antigenic relatedness of peroxidases in the Solanaceae. After SDS-PAGE of crude leaf extracts from a large number of species of this family, immunoblotting revealed that cross-reacting protein bands were present in all species tested. In order to determine whether these protein bands represent peroxidases, the peroxidase isoenzymes in thorn apple (Datura stramonium L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were further analyzed. Immunoblots obtained after native PAGE revealed that the antiserum only recognized fast-moving peroxidase isoenzymes that are localized in the apoplast. Despite their serological relatedness, these peroxidases differed with respect to heat stability and apparent molecular weight. Differences in avidity for the petunia PRXa antiserum were suggested by immunoprecipitation with antibodies bound to protein A-Sepharose. The antiserum did not react with peroxidases from horseradish (Armoracea rusticana Gaertn., Mey and Scherb), turnip (Brassica napus L.), African marigold (Tagetes cresta L.), maize (Zea mays L.), and oats (Avena sativa L.). Apparently, the Solanaceae contain orthologous genes encoding the fast-moving anionic peroxidases homologous to petunia PRXa. PMID:24220819

  6. Antigenic relationships between petunia peroxidase a and specific peroxidase isoenzymes in other Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, T; de Jong, A; Wijsman, H J; van Loon, L C

    1990-07-01

    A highly specific rabbit antiserum raised against peroxidase (PRXa) from petunia (Petunia hybrida) was used to investigate the antigenic relatedness of peroxidases in the Solanaceae. After SDS-PAGE of crude leaf extracts from a large number of species of this family, immunoblotting revealed that cross-reacting protein bands were present in all species tested. In order to determine whether these protein bands represent peroxidases, the peroxidase isoenzymes in thorn apple (Datura stramonium L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were further analyzed. Immunoblots obtained after native PAGE revealed that the antiserum only recognized fast-moving peroxidase isoenzymes that are localized in the apoplast. Despite their serological relatedness, these peroxidases differed with respect to heat stability and apparent molecular weight. Differences in avidity for the petunia PRXa antiserum were suggested by immunoprecipitation with antibodies bound to protein A-Sepharose. The antiserum did not react with peroxidases from horseradish (Armoracea rusticana Gaertn., Mey and Scherb), turnip (Brassica napus L.), African marigold (Tagetes cresta L.), maize (Zea mays L.), and oats (Avena sativa L.). Apparently, the Solanaceae contain orthologous genes encoding the fast-moving anionic peroxidases homologous to petunia PRXa.

  7. Malate dehydrogenase isozymes in the longnose dace, Rhinichthys cataractae.

    PubMed

    Starzyk, R M; Merritt, R B

    1980-08-01

    The interspecies homology of dace supernatant (A2,AB,B2) and mitochondrial (C2) malate dehydrogenase isozymes has been established through cell fractionation and tissue distribution studies. Isolated supernatant malate dehydrogenase (s-MDH) isozymes show significant differences in Michaelis constants for oxaloacetate and in pH optima. Shifts in s-MDH isozyme pH optima with temperature may result in immediate compensation for increase in ectotherm body pH with decrease in temperature, but duplicate s-MDH isozymes are probably maintained through selection for tissue specific regulation of metabolism.

  8. Influence of rare earth elements on metabolism and related enzyme activity and isozyme expression in Tetrastigma hemsleyanum cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Xin, Peng; Shuang-Lin, Zhou; Jun-Yao, He; Li, Ding

    2013-04-01

    The effects of rare earth elements (REEs) not only on cell growth and flavonoid accumulation of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum suspension cells but also on the isoenzyme patterns and activities of related enzymes were studied in this paper. There were no significant differences in enhancement of flavonoid accumulation in T. hemsleyanum suspension cells among La(3+), Ce(3+), and Nd(3+). Whereas their inductive effects on cell proliferation varied greatly. The most significant effects were achieved with 100 μM Ce(3+)and Nd(3+). Under treatment over a 25-day culture period, the maximal biomass levels reached 1.92- and 1.74-fold and the total flavonoid contents are 1.45- and 1.49-fold, than that of control, respectively. Catalase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (POD) activity was activated significantly when the REE concentration range from 0 to 300 μM, whereas no significant changes were found in superoxide dismutase activity. Differences of esterase isozymes under REE treatment only laid in expression level, and there were no specific bands. The expression level of some POD isozymes strengthened with increasing concentration of REEs within the range of 50-200 μM. When REE concentration was higher than 300 μM, the expression of some POD isozymes was inhibited; meanwhile, some other new POD isozymes were induced. Our results also showed REEs did not directly influence PAL activity. So, we speculated that 50-200 μM REEs could activate some of antioxidant enzymes, adjust some isozymes expression, trigger the defense responses of T. hemsleyanum suspension cells, and stimulate flavonoid accumulation by inducing PAL activity.

  9. Molecular evolutionary genetics of isozymes: pattern, theory, and application.

    PubMed

    Nevo, E

    1990-01-01

    Isozyme studies at the population genetics-ecology interface conducted at the Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, during 15 years, 1974-1989, are reviewed in terms of the evidence, theoretical, and practical implications. These studies involve numerous individuals, populations, species, and higher taxa in nature of plants, animals, and humans tested for variation at 15 to 50 primary isozyme loci. The isozyme studies have been conducted mainly in individuals sampled in natural populations at the local, regional, and global levels. Two of the species studied were wild cereals, the progenitors of wheat and barley in the Near East Fertile Crescent. These studies have been complemented by laboratory controlled a priori experimentation of inorganic and organic pollution biology. The human genetics laboratory compared isozyme structure of Jewish and non-Jewish populations. Our results indicate that: (i) isozyme diversity in nature in abundant, at least partly adaptive, and is oriented and maintained primarily by ecological factors. (ii) Natural selection in action is highlighted by stresses involving among others thermal, chemical, and climatic factors. (iii) Speciation can occur with little change in isozyme diversity. (iv) Jews from diverse countries, and in spite of 2,000 years of Diaspora, retain in the frequencies of some isozymes their Near Eastern origins. (v) Wild cereals harbor rich genetic resources exploitable in breeding either directly as adaptive structures, or indirectly as genetic markers for genotypic production of elite agronomic traits. (vi) Isozymes have been utilized as genetic monitors of marine pollution thereby contributing to environmental quality and conservation. (vii) Isozymes can substantially contribute to conservation biology. (viii) Isozymes have been successfully utilized in constructing molecular phylogenies and in revealing new sibling species. (ix) Future theoretical and practical directions of isozyme studies at the protein

  10. Molecular evolutionary genetics of isozymes: pattern, theory, and application.

    PubMed

    Nevo, E

    1990-01-01

    Isozyme studies at the population genetics-ecology interface conducted at the Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, during 15 years, 1974-1989, are reviewed in terms of the evidence, theoretical, and practical implications. These studies involve numerous individuals, populations, species, and higher taxa in nature of plants, animals, and humans tested for variation at 15 to 50 primary isozyme loci. The isozyme studies have been conducted mainly in individuals sampled in natural populations at the local, regional, and global levels. Two of the species studied were wild cereals, the progenitors of wheat and barley in the Near East Fertile Crescent. These studies have been complemented by laboratory controlled a priori experimentation of inorganic and organic pollution biology. The human genetics laboratory compared isozyme structure of Jewish and non-Jewish populations. Our results indicate that: (i) isozyme diversity in nature in abundant, at least partly adaptive, and is oriented and maintained primarily by ecological factors. (ii) Natural selection in action is highlighted by stresses involving among others thermal, chemical, and climatic factors. (iii) Speciation can occur with little change in isozyme diversity. (iv) Jews from diverse countries, and in spite of 2,000 years of Diaspora, retain in the frequencies of some isozymes their Near Eastern origins. (v) Wild cereals harbor rich genetic resources exploitable in breeding either directly as adaptive structures, or indirectly as genetic markers for genotypic production of elite agronomic traits. (vi) Isozymes have been utilized as genetic monitors of marine pollution thereby contributing to environmental quality and conservation. (vii) Isozymes can substantially contribute to conservation biology. (viii) Isozymes have been successfully utilized in constructing molecular phylogenies and in revealing new sibling species. (ix) Future theoretical and practical directions of isozyme studies at the protein

  11. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  12. Purification and characterization of windmill palm tree (Trachycarpus fortunei) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Caramyshev, Alexei V; Firsova, Yuliya N; Slastya, Evgen A; Tagaev, Andrei A; Potapenko, Nataly V; Lobakova, Elena S; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2006-12-27

    High peroxidase activity was demonstrated to be present in the leaf of several species of cold-resistant palms. Histochemical studies of the leaf of windmill palm tree (Trachycarpus fortunei) showed the peroxidase activity to be localized in hypoderma, epidermis, cell walls, and conducting bundles. However, chlorophyll-containing mesophyll cells had no peroxidase at all. The leaf windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP) was purified to homogeneity and had a specific activity of 6230 units/mg, RZ = 3.0, a molecular mass of 50 kDa, and an isoelectric point of pI 3.5. The electronic spectrum of WPTP with a Soret band at 403 nm was typical of plant peroxidases. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of WPTP was determined. The substrate specificity of WPTP was distinct from that of other palm peroxidases, and the best substrate for WPTP was 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). The palm peroxidase showed an unusually high stability at elevated temperatures and high concentrations of guanidine.

  13. Peroxidase(s) in Environment Protection

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment. PMID:24453894

  14. Comparison of structure and activities of peroxidases from Coprinus cinereus, Coprinus macrorhizus and Arthromyces ramosus.

    PubMed

    Kjalke, M; Andersen, M B; Schneider, P; Christensen, B; Schülein, M; Welinder, K G

    1992-04-17

    Initial structural and kinetic data suggested that peroxidases from Coprinus cinereus, Coprinus macrorhizus and Arthromyces ramosus were similar. Therefore they were characterized more fully. The three peroxidases were purified to RZ 2.5 and showed immunochemical identity as well as an identical M(r) of 38,000, pI about 3.5 and similar amino acid compositions. The N-termini were blocked for amino acid sequencing. The peroxidases had similar retention volumes by anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. All peroxidases showed multiple peaks by Concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatography. The Concanavalin A-Sepharose profiles were different and depended furthermore on a fermentation batch. Tryptic peptide maps were very similar except for one peptide. This peptide contained an N-linked glycan composed of varying ratios of glucosamine and mannose for the three peroxidases. Rate constants and their pH dependence were the same for the three peroxidases using guaiacol or iodide as reducing substrates. We conclude that peroxidases from Coprinus cinereus, Coprinus macrorhizus and Arthromyces ramosus are most likely identical in their amino acid sequences, but deviate in glycosylation which, apparently, has no influence on the reaction rates of the enzyme. We suggest, that the Coprinus fungi express one peroxidase only in contrast to the lignin-degrading white-rot Basidiomycetes, which produce multiple peroxidase isozymes.

  15. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  16. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  17. Peroxidase-induced wilting in transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S. ); Rothstein, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases are a family of isoenzymes found in all higher plants. However, little is known concerning their role in growth, development or response to stress. Plant peroxidases are heme-containing monomeric glycoproteins that utilize either H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} to oxidize a wide variety of molecules. To obtain more information on possible in planta functions of peroxidases, the authors have used a cDNA clone for the primary isoenzyme form of peroxidase to synthesize high levels of this enzyme in transgenic plants. They were able to obtain Nicotiana tabacum and N. sylvestris transformed plants with peroxidase activity that is 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA. The elevated peroxidase activity was a result of increased levels of two anionic peroxidases in N. tabacum, which apparently differ in post-translational modification. Transformed plants of both species have the unique phenotype of chronic severe wilting through loss of turgor in leaves, which was initiated a the time of flowering. The peroxidase-induced wilting was shown not to be an effect of diminished water uptake through the roots, decreased conductance of water through the xylem, or increased water loss through the leaf surface of stomata. Possible explanations for the loss of turgor, and the significance of these types of experiments in studying isoenzyme families, are discussed.

  18. Resolution of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase into two isozymes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Dikdan, G; Jordan, F

    1986-03-01

    A novel purification method was developed for brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) that for the first time resolved the enzyme into two isozymes on DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. The isozymes were found to be distinct according to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: the first one to be eluted gave rise to one band, the second to two bands. The isozymes were virtually the same so far as specific activity, KM, inhibition kinetics and irreversible binding properties by the mechanism-based inhibitor (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid are concerned. This finding resolves a longstanding controversy concerning the quaternary structure of this enzyme.

  19. General and Versatile Autoinhibition of PLC Isozymes

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Stephanie N.; Jezyk, Mark R.; Gershburg, Svetlana; Seifert, Jason P.; Harden, T. Kendall; Sondek, John

    2008-10-31

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are directly activated by heterotrimeric G proteins and Ras-like GTPases to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate into the second messengers diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Although PLCs play central roles in myriad signaling cascades, the molecular details of their activation remain poorly understood. As described here, the crystal structure of PLC-{beta}2 illustrates occlusion of the active site by a loop separating the two halves of the catalytic TIM barrel. Removal of this insertion constitutively activates PLC-{beta}2 without ablating its capacity to be further stimulated by classical G protein modulators. Similar regulation occurs in other PLC members, and a general mechanism of interfacial activation at membranes is presented that provides a unifying framework for PLC activation by diverse stimuli.

  20. Role of isozyme group-specific sequence 4 in the isozyme-specific properties of human aldolase C.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, T; Motoki, K; Sugimoto, Y; Hori, K

    1998-08-01

    To assess which regions of the aldolase C molecule are required for exhibiting isozyme-specific kinetic properties, we have constructed nine chimeric enzymes of human aldolases A and C. Kinetic studies of these chimeric enzymes revealed that aldolase C absolutely required its own isozyme group-specific sequences (IGS), particularly IGS-4, for exhibiting the characteristics of aldolase C which differ significantly from those of isozymes A and B (Kusakabe T, Motoki K, Hori K. Human aldolase C: characterization of the recombinant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli. J Biochem (Tokyo) 1994;115:1172-7). Whereas human aldolases A and B required their own isozyme group-specific sequences-1 and -4 (IGS-1 and -4) as the main determinants of isozyme-specific kinetic properties (Motoki K, Kitajima Y, Hori K. Isozyme-specific modules on human aldolase A molecule. J Biol Chem 1993;268:1677-83; Kusakabe T, Motoki K, Sugimoto Y, Takasaki Y, Hori K. Human aldolase B: liver-specific properties of the isoenzyme depend on type B isozyme group-specific sequence. Prot. Eng. 1994;7:1387-93), the present studies indicate that the IGS-1 is principally substitutable between aldolases A and C. The kinetic data also suggests that the connector-2 (amino acid residues 243-306) may modulate the interaction of IGS units with the alpha/beta barrel of the aldolase molecule.

  1. [Subcellular localization of isozymes of NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase in sugar beet Beta vulgaris L].

    PubMed

    Iudina, R S; Levites, E V

    2008-12-01

    Subcellular localization of isozymes of NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in sugar beet was studied. Isozymes ss and 11 controlled by loci Mdh2 and Mdh3, respectively, were shown to locate in mitochondria, whereas isozyme pp controlled by locus Mdh1, in microbodies. All examined samples lack hybrid MDH isozymes, which could testify to the interaction between products of nonallelic Mdh genes. This can be explained by the localization of nonallelic isozymes in various compartments of the cell and organelles.

  2. Structural diversity and transcription of class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Karen G; Justesen, Annemarie F; Kjaersgård, Inger V H; Jensen, Rikke B; Rasmussen, Søren K; Jespersen, Hans M; Duroux, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Understanding peroxidase function in plants is complicated by the lack of substrate specificity, the high number of genes, their diversity in structure and our limited knowledge of peroxidase gene transcription and translation. In the present study we sequenced expressed sequence tags (ESTs) encoding novel heme-containing class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana and annotated 73 full-length genes identified in the genome. In total, transcripts of 58 of these genes have now been observed. The expression of individual peroxidase genes was assessed in organ-specific EST libraries and compared to the expression of 33 peroxidase genes which we analyzed in whole plants 3, 6, 15, 35 and 59 days after sowing. Expression was assessed in root, rosette leaf, stem, cauline leaf, flower bud and cell culture tissues using the gene-specific and highly sensitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We predicted that 71 genes could yield stable proteins folded similarly to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The putative mature peroxidases derived from these genes showed 28-94% amino acid sequence identity and were all targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum by N-terminal signal peptides. In 20 peroxidases these signal peptides were followed by various N-terminal extensions of unknown function which are not present in HRP. Ten peroxidases showed a C-terminal extension indicating vacuolar targeting. We found that the majority of peroxidase genes were expressed in root. In total, class III peroxidases accounted for an impressive 2.2% of root ESTs. Rather few peroxidases showed organ specificity. Most importantly, genes expressed constitutively in all organs and genes with a preference for root represented structurally diverse peroxidases (< 70% sequence identity). Furthermore, genes appearing in tandem showed distinct expression profiles. The alignment of 73 Arabidopsis peroxidase sequences provides an easy access to the identification of orthologous peroxidases

  3. Soybean roots retain the seed urease isozyme synthesized during embryo development. [Glycine max (L. ) Merr

    SciTech Connect

    Torisky, R.S.; Polacco, J.C. )

    1990-10-01

    Roots of young soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) plants (up to 25 days old) contain two distinct urease isozymes, which are separable by hydroxyapatite chromatography. These two urease species (URE1 and URE2) differ in: (a) electrophoretic mobility in native gels, (b) pH dependence, and (c) recognition by a monoclonal antibody specific for the seed (embryo-specific) urease. By these parameters root URE1 urease is similar to the abundant embryo-specific urease isozyme, while root URE2 resembles the ubiquitous urease which has previously been found in all soybean tissues examined (leaf, embryo, seed coat, and cultured cells). The embryo-specific and ubiquitous urease isozymes are products of the Eu1 and Eu4 structural genes, respectively. Roots of the eu1-sun/eu1-sun genotype, which lacks the embryo-specific urease (i.e. seed urease-null), contain no URE1 urease activity. Roots of eu4/eu4, which lacks ubiquitous urease, lack the URE2 (leaflike) urease activity. From these genetic and biochemical criteria, then, we conclude that URE1 and URE2 are the embryo-specific and ubiquitous ureases, respectively. Adventitious roots generated from cuttings of any urease genotype lack URE1 activity. In seedling roots the seedlike (URE1) activity declines during development. Roots of 3-week-old plants contain 5% of the total URE1 activity of the radicle of 4-day-old seedlings, which, in turn, has approximately the same urease activity level as the dormant embryonic axis. The embryo-specific urease incorporates label from ({sup 35}S)methionine during embryo development but not during germination, indicating that there is no de novo synthesis of the embryo-specific (URE1) urease in the germinating root.

  4. Phylogeny congruence analysis and isozyme classification: the pyruvate kinase system.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Fournier, P; Auclair, J C

    1989-09-22

    As the isozymes of pyruvate kinase (PK) are best known in rats, the characteristics of the rat isozymes are generally used to classify the PK isozymes in other species. Given the discrepancies generated by this classification by analogy, we evaluated a classification using a phylogeny congruence analysis of the compositional relatedness of vertebrate PK's. While our phylogenetic analysis confirmed the well established separation of the L and R isozymes from the K and M isozymes, its power became most evident in the identification of non-orthologous (or variant) forms of PK. Our analysis emphasized the uniqueness of chicken liver PK which cannot be classified either as a K or an L isozyme, confirmed that tumors express a variety of forms of PK, and indicated that lungs systematically express PK's which are not orthologous with PK's from other tissues. The determination of orthology by the phylogeny congruence analysis assumes that the structural data from different sources are subject to similar methodological error. However, we cannot reject the possibility that an apparent lack of orthology be due to artifacts during purification and analysis. PMID:2615396

  5. Glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase isozymes from rat liver. Purification and physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Q K; Sakakibara, R; Watanabe, T; Wada, H

    1980-07-01

    Glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase isozymes were purified simultaneously to homogeneity from rat liver with high yields. Three subforms of mitochondrial isozyme and three subforms of cytosolic isozyme were separated by chromatography on CM-Sephadex and electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel. The general enzymatic properties of the purified isozymes such as their kinetic parameters, isoelectric points, molecular weights, amino acid compositions, NH2-terminal amino acid sequences and COOH-terminal amino acids were determined. Most of these properties of the isozymes are similar to those of the corresponding isozymes from other sources, such as rat brain and pig and human heart. In amino acid compositions, cytosolic isozyme from rat liver has more proline and glycine and less arginine, threonine and leucine than pig heart cytosolic isozyme; the mitochondrial isozyme has more glutamic acid and glycine and less serine than the corresponding pig heart isozyme. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of GOT isozymes from rat liver were identical with those of the GOT isozymes from pig heart up to the 10th residues except for the 5th residues. The subforms of mitochondrial isozyme from rat liver were generated on storage at 4 degrees C for 4-8 weeks.

  6. Novel Applications of Peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Abdul; Ball, Andrew S.; Tuncer, Munir; Wilson, Michael T.

    1997-02-01

    The article entitled "Novel Biocatalysts Will Work Even Better for Industry" published recently in this Journal (1) was informative and interesting. However it touched only briefly on the application of peroxidase as catalyst. Here, we would like to mention in more detail the novel applications of peroxidase in agricultural, paper pulp, water treatment, pharmaceutical, and medical situations. Firstly, the peroxidase isolated from Phanerochaete chyrosporium has been shown to detoxify herbicides such as atrazine to less toxic compounds and would certainly find potential application in agriculture (2). Secondly, the peroxidase produced by Streptomyces thermoviolaceus may find application in the paper pulp industry as a delignifying agent (3). Thirdly, it has been shown that extracellular peroxidase produced by Streptomyces avermitilis can remove the intense color from paper-mill effluent obtained after semichemical alkaline pulping of wheat straw (4), and thus this enzyme might find application as a catalyst in water treatment plants. Fourthly, the heme-containing horseradish peroxidase enzyme has been exploited in several diagnostic applications in pharmaceutics and medicine, such as the detection of human immunodeficiency virus and cystic fibrosis (5-10). Finally, recent work from our laboratory has suggested that thermophilic nonheme peroxidase produced by Thermomonospora fusca BD25 may find medical use in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (11, 12). Literature Cited 1. Wiseman, A. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 55-58. 2. Mougin, C. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 705-708. 3. McCarthy A. J.; Peace, W.; Broda, P. Appl. Microbiol. Technol. 1985, 23, 238-244. 4. Hernandez, M; Rodriguez J; Soliveri, J; Copa, J. L; Perez, M. I; Arias, M. E. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 3909-3913. 5. Hopfer, S. M.; Aslanzadeh, J. Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 1995, 25, 475-480. 6. Suzuki, K; Iman, M. J. Virol. Methods 1995, 55, 347-356. 7. Nielsen, K. J. Immunoassay 1995, 16, 183-197. 8

  7. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-06-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity.

  8. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-01-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity. Images PMID:6286971

  9. An Electrophoretic Analysis of the Isozymes of Malate Dehydrogenase in Several Different Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Weimberg, Ralph

    1968-01-01

    The particulate and soluble fractions of cell-free extracts from seeds, roots, and leaves of 10 different plants were examined electrophoretically for isozymes of malate dehydrogenase. Distinct isozyme patterns were observed for each plant and even for the individual tissues of each species. There were some isozymes in several different plant extracts with equal electrophoretic mobilities, but there was no isozyme band that was common to all tissues or to all plants. Images PMID:16656816

  10. Developmental changes in the pyruvate kinase isozymes of coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H E; Cardenas, J M

    1979-04-01

    Pyruvate kinase exists as two major isozymes in coho salmon. As in mammals and birds, one form is present in the early embryo and maintains a wide tissue distribution in adults. This salmonid type K shows anodal migration during electrophoresis at pH 7.5. The appearence of functional musculature in the developing embryos. In adult animals this second form is the only pyruvate kinase in muscle. Brain, kidney, liver and gill contain primarily the type K pyruvate kinase while heart contains both major forms along with three intermediate forms which presumably constitute a hybrid set. Since there is no additional isozyme restricted to gluconeogenic tissues, we conclude that a type L isozyme has not developed in these animals. The two major isozymes are immunologically distincy. Both forms are dubject to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate activation of phosphoenolpyruvate binding, but the magnitude of the effect is small. The affinities for phosphoenolpyruvate are similar, but salmon type K has hyperbolic saturation curves with this substrate and type M has sigmoidal saturation curves. While the immunological data indicates considerable divergence in structure, the kinetic parameters of the two forms have remained relatively similar. PMID:469475

  11. Subunit structure and isozymic forms of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Tate, S S; Meister, A

    1976-08-01

    gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase is associated with the membranes of a number of epithelial and lymphoid cells. When the enzyme is isolated from rat kidney by a method involving detergent extraction and affinity chromatography, an aggregate of molecular weight greater than 200,000 (heavy form) is obtained. Treatment of the heavy form with bromelain yields a light form of the enzyme (molecular weight of approximately 68,000), which is separable by isoelectric focusing into 12 enzymatically active isozymes which are very similar with respect to catalytic behavior, content of amino acids, hexoses, and aminohexoses, but which differ significantly in sialic acid content. Treatment with neuraminidase converts the acidic isozymes to more basic forms. Each isozyme dissociates in sodium dodecyl sulfate into two nonidentical glycopeptides (molecular weights of 46,000 and 22,000) which can be cross-linked with dimethylsuberimidate to yield a species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000, which indicates that the isozymes are dimers. Physical and immunological studies indicate that the heavy form of the enzyme contains the dimeric light form as well as other membrane proteins.

  12. Molecular Phylogeny of Heme Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Obinger, Christian

    All currently available gene sequences of heme peroxidases can be phylogenetically divided in two superfamilies and three families. In this chapter, the phylogenetics and genomic distribution of each group are presented. Within the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, the main evolutionary direction developed peroxidatic heme proteins involved in the innate immune defense system and in biosynthesis of (iodinated) hormones. The peroxidase-catalase superfamily is widely spread mainly among bacteria, fungi, and plants, and particularly in Class I led to the evolution of bifunctional catalase-peroxidases. Its numerous fungal representatives of Class II are involved in carbon recycling via lignin degradation, whereas Class III secretory peroxidases from algae and plants are included in various forms of secondary metabolism. The family of di-heme peroxidases are predominantly bacteria-inducible enzymes; however, a few corresponding genes were also detected in archaeal genomes. Four subfamilies of dyp-type peroxidases capable of degradation of various xenobiotics are abundant mainly among bacteria and fungi. Heme-haloperoxidase genes are widely spread among sac and club fungi, but corresponding genes were recently found also among oomycetes. All described families herein represent heme peroxidases of broad diversity in structure and function. Our accumulating knowledge about the evolution of various enzymatic functions and physiological roles can be exploited in future directed evolution approaches for engineering peroxidase genes de novo for various demands.

  13. Ca2+ activation of wheat peroxidase: a possible physiological mechanism of control.

    PubMed

    Converso, D A; Fernández, M E

    1996-09-01

    Peroxidation of substrates such as ascorbic acid, pyrogallol, or ferulic acid, as well as indole acetic acid oxidation catalyzed by wheat germ peroxidase (WGP)2 C2, were found to be activated by Ca2+. This activation is independent of the stabilizing effect of structural Ca2+ reported for peroxidases. Steady state kinetics of ferulic acid oxidation catalyzed by WGP C2 showed an increase in the rate of compound I formation and of compound II decomposition in the presence of the ion, evidenced as an increase in rate constants k1, from 8.9 x 10(5) to 4.5 x 10(5) M-1 cm-1, and k3, from 4.4 x 10(5) to 1.1 x 10(6) M-1 cm-1. The dissociation constant Kd, for the cyanide derivative of the enzyme showed a marked decrease from 220 to 34 microM in the presence of Ca2+, thus implying an effect of the ion in the H2O2 binding step. In the presence of Ca2+, a conformational change in the protein was revealed by tryptophan fluorescence, providing a basis for the activation mechanism. Other peroxidases such as horseradish peroxidase and WGP C3 were not activated by Ca2+. The results suggest the existence of a physiological mechanism of control of peroxidase isozymes activity mediated by Ca2+.

  14. Evidence for an unusual electronic structure of wheat germ peroxidase compound I.

    PubMed

    Converso, D A; Fernández, M E

    1998-09-01

    Oxidized states of wheat germ peroxidase isozyme C2 (WGP C2) were investigated by means of electronic absorption spectroscopy. Addition of one molar equivalent of H2O2 to ferric WGP C2 led to the formation of an oxidized species with an absorption spectrum very similar to that of peroxidase compound II, with a Soret maximum at 411 nm and visible maxima at 523 and 553 nm. The transformation took place with an isosbestic point at 409 nm. Stopped flow spectroscopy showed no inflection points for the formation of this species when it was registered at 420 nm, and we could verify the persistence of the isosbestic point from 20 ms to 10 s. The oxidized species decays spontaneously to ferric enzyme in a double-exponential manner. By adding excess H2O2 to the system we obtained an inactive derivative identical to horseradish peroxidase P-670. In the presence of one equivalent of reducing substrate and excess H2O2 compound III was formed. The results so indicate that the species obtained in the reaction of WGP C2 with equimolecular amounts of H2O2 is compound I. The resulting compound I spectrum was identical to that of cytochrome c peroxidase, suggesting the formation of a protein radical rather than the typical pi cation radical, a feature which had not been described before for a plant peroxidase.

  15. Different Functions of Phylogenetically Distinct Bacterial Complex I Isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Brickner, Joshua R.; Mollet, Jordan T.; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a bioenergetic enzyme that transfers electrons from NADH to quinone, conserving the energy of this reaction by contributing to the proton motive force. While the importance of NADH oxidation to mitochondrial aerobic respiration is well documented, the contribution of complex I to bacterial electron transport chains has been tested in only a few species. Here, we analyze the function of two phylogenetically distinct complex I isozymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an alphaproteobacterium that contains well-characterized electron transport chains. We found that R. sphaeroides complex I activity is important for aerobic respiration and required for anaerobic dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) respiration (in the absence of light), photoautotrophic growth, and photoheterotrophic growth (in the absence of an external electron acceptor). Our data also provide insight into the functions of the phylogenetically distinct R. sphaeroides complex I enzymes (complex IA and complex IE) in maintaining a cellular redox state during photoheterotrophic growth. We propose that the function of each isozyme during photoheterotrophic growth is either NADH synthesis (complex IA) or NADH oxidation (complex IE). The canonical alphaproteobacterial complex I isozyme (complex IA) was also shown to be important for routing electrons to nitrogenase-mediated H2 production, while the horizontally acquired enzyme (complex IE) was dispensable in this process. Unlike the singular role of complex I in mitochondria, we predict that the phylogenetically distinct complex I enzymes found across bacterial species have evolved to enhance the functions of their respective electron transport chains. IMPORTANCE Cells use a proton motive force (PMF), NADH, and ATP to support numerous processes. In mitochondria, complex I uses NADH oxidation to generate a PMF, which can drive ATP synthesis. This study analyzed the function of complex I in bacteria, which contain more

  16. Pyruvate kinases of salmon: purification and comparison with the isozymes from birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Cardenas, J M

    1980-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase occurs as two major forms in coho salmon; the type M isozyme occurs primarily in muscle and heart, but type K has a more generalized tissue distribution, in parallel with the type K isozyme in other vertebrate systems. In order to assess the evolutionary relationships among the fish, avian, and mammalian isozymes of pyruvate kinase, we have purified the two isozymes from fish, have examined some of their physical properties, and have studied their immunological relationships to the avian and mammalian isozymes. Salmon type K is at least partially inactivated by antibody to bivine type L pyruvate kinase as well as by antibodies produced against chicken, bovine, and salmon type M isozymes. Salmon type M pyruvate kinase, on the other hand, is not significantly corss-reactive with the bovine type L isozyme, but is at least partially inactivated by antibodies produced against bovine or chicken type M isozymes. Mammalian type L pyruvate kinase is immunologically distinct from either mammalian type K or type M, but salmon type K has some structural features in common with all three mammalian isozymes. Thus, salmon fish type K pyruvate kinase could be similar to a primordial form that was antecedent to the three major differentiated isozymes of higher vertebrates. PMID:7373271

  17. Isozyme gene expression in potato tumors incited by Agrobacterium.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J L

    1986-06-01

    Two plant tumors (crown galls and hairy roots) were experimentally provoked on potato cv. 'Désirée' by oncogenic strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes. A marked shift in the expression of some organ-specific genes occurred in crown galls derived from the central zone of tubers: two novel isozyme genes (Est-B and Pox-E) were expressed, two others (Est-C and Pox-F) were suppressed and the remaining ones were maintained in the original state. When the starting tissue was the stem segment, a smaller shift occurred, namely the activation of Adh-A and the suppression of Pox-F. In all cases, the isozyme profiles characterizing all crown galls, whatever their origin, were identical. Under normal aeration conditions, Adh-A was not expressed in either tumoral or non-tumoral roots. However, under the relative anaerobic conditions of in vitro cultures, a difference existed between both types of roots: Adh-A was expressed in normal but not in tumoral roots. This means that hairy roots can tolerate higher levels of anaerobiosis without giving rise to an anaerobic response. For the remaining isozymes, no alteration occurred in either organized (hairy root) or unorganized (crown gall) tumors, as compared to the corresponding non-tumoral tissues (normal root and callus, respectively). PMID:24247945

  18. Demonstration of glutamate dehydrogenase isozymes in beef heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, H; Bosing-Schneider, R; Jenkins, R; Rasched, I; Sund, H

    1986-01-15

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been purified from beef heart mitochondria and compared with crystalline beef liver GDH. The specific activity of heart GDH was 127 units and of liver GDH 80 units. Heart GDH subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis had a protein corresponding to liver GDH and a smaller molecular weight protein. On agarose gel electrophoresis heart GDH activity was resolved into two fractions (with or without protease inhibitors) while liver had only one fraction. One of the heart fractions moved with liver GDH on electrophoresis. Thermal stability studies showed heart and liver GDH activity differed. Mouse antibodies to liver GDH precipitated both liver and heart GDH on double immunodiffusion. Mouse antibodies to liver GDH identified on nitrocellulose paper the polypeptide band of liver and heart GDH that were the same molecular weight but did not cross-react with the smaller molecular weight polypeptide present in heart GDH. Trypsin digestion of the two major protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified GDH from beef heart mitochondria did not show any overlapping peptides. We conclude beef heart GDH activity is composed of two isozymes. One is the same as beef liver GDH, and the other is a smaller molecular weight protein. We propose the terms GDH-LM for the liver GDH isozyme and GDH-HM for the smaller molecular weight isozyme present in heart mitochondria but not liver.

  19. An isozyme of earthworm serine proteases acts on hydrolysis of triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Sugimoto, Manabu; Tsuboi, Sadao; Tsuji, Hideaki; Ishihara, Kohji

    2005-10-01

    An enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol was purified from an earthworm. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and the catalytic function of the purified enzyme were identical to those of Isozyme C, an isozyme of the earthworm-serine proteases. No other lipase proteins were found in the earthworm cells. The isozyme might act on the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol as well as the protein decomposition.

  20. Haem iron-containing peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Isaac, I S; Dawson, J H

    1999-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes that utilize hydrogen peroxide to oxidize substrates. A histidine residue on the proximal side of the haem iron ligates most peroxidases. The various oxidation states and ligand complexes have been spectroscopically characterized. HRP-I is two oxidation states above ferric HRP. It contains an oxoferryl (= oxyferryl) iron with a pi-radical cation that resides on the haem. HRP-II is one oxidation state above ferric HRP and contains an oxoferryl iron. HRP-III is equivalent to the oxyferrous state. Only compounds I and II are part of the peroxidase reaction cycle. CCP-ES contains an oxoferryl iron but the radical cation resides on the Trp-191 residue and not on the haem. CPO is the only known peroxidase that is ligated by a cysteine residue rather than a histidine residue, on the proximal side of the haem iron. CPO is a more versatile enzyme, catalysing numerous types of reaction: peroxidase, catalase and halogenation reactions. The various CPO species are less stable than other peroxidase species and more elusive, thus needing further characterization. The roles of the amino acid residues on the proximal and distal sides of the haem need more investigation to further decipher their specific roles. Haem proteins, especially peroxidases, are structure-function-specific. PMID:10730188

  1. Isozymes of Ipomoea batatas catechol oxidase differ in catalase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, C; Eicken, C; Magrini, A; Meyer, H E; Rompel, A; Spener, F; Krebs, B

    2001-07-01

    The amino acid sequences of two isozymes of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) were determined by Edman degradation of BrCN cleavage fragments of the native protein and by sequencing of amplified cDNA fragments. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of plant catechol oxidases revealed about 80% equidistance between the two I. batatas catechol oxidases and approximately 40--60% to catechol oxidases of other plants. When H(2)O(2) was applied as substrate the 39 kDa isozyme, but not the 40 kDa isozyme, showed catalase-like activity. The structure of the 40 kDa isozyme was modeled on the basis of the published crystal structure of the 39 kDa isozyme [T. Klabunde et al., Nat. Struct. Biol. 5 (1998) 1084]. The active site model closely resembled that of the 39 kDa isozyme determined by crystallography, except for a mutation of Thr243 (40 kDa isozyme) to Ile241 (39 kDa isozyme) close to the dimetal center. This residue difference affects the orientation of the Glu238/236 residue, which is thought to be responsible for the catalase-like activity of the 39 kDa isozyme for which a catalytic mechanism is proposed. PMID:11451442

  2. Isozymes of Ipomoea batatas catechol oxidase differ in catalase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, C; Eicken, C; Magrini, A; Meyer, H E; Rompel, A; Spener, F; Krebs, B

    2001-07-01

    The amino acid sequences of two isozymes of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) were determined by Edman degradation of BrCN cleavage fragments of the native protein and by sequencing of amplified cDNA fragments. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of plant catechol oxidases revealed about 80% equidistance between the two I. batatas catechol oxidases and approximately 40--60% to catechol oxidases of other plants. When H(2)O(2) was applied as substrate the 39 kDa isozyme, but not the 40 kDa isozyme, showed catalase-like activity. The structure of the 40 kDa isozyme was modeled on the basis of the published crystal structure of the 39 kDa isozyme [T. Klabunde et al., Nat. Struct. Biol. 5 (1998) 1084]. The active site model closely resembled that of the 39 kDa isozyme determined by crystallography, except for a mutation of Thr243 (40 kDa isozyme) to Ile241 (39 kDa isozyme) close to the dimetal center. This residue difference affects the orientation of the Glu238/236 residue, which is thought to be responsible for the catalase-like activity of the 39 kDa isozyme for which a catalytic mechanism is proposed.

  3. Photocontrol of Sorghum Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Martine; Crétin, Claude; Keryer, Eliane; Vidal, Jean; Gadal, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the light effect on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the C4 plant sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers., var Tamaran) leaves was investigated. Following exposure to light a new isozyme of PEPC, specific for the green leaf and responsible for primary CO2 fixation in photosynthesis, was established. Northern blot experiments revealed the presence of PEPC mRNA showing a molecular weight of 3.4 kilobases. During the greening process, concomitant to enzyme activity, PEPC protein and PEPC messenger RNA amounts increased considerably. This photoresponse was shown to be under phytochrome control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665664

  4. Catalysis of acetoin formation by brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Stivers, J T; Washabaugh, M W

    1993-12-14

    Catalysis of C(alpha)-proton transfer from 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)thiamin diphosphate (HETDP) by pyruvate decarboxylase isozymes (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was investigated by determining the steady-state kinetics of the reaction of [1-L]acetaldehyde (L = H, D, or T) to form acetoin and the primary kinetic isotope effects on the reaction. The PDC isozyme mixture and alpha 4 isozyme (alpha 4-PDC) have different steady-state kinetic parameters and isotope effects for acetoin formation in the presence and absence of the nonsubstrate allosteric effector pyruvamide: pyruvamide activation occurs by stabilization of the acetaldehyde/PDC ternary complex. The magnitudes of primary L(V/K)-type (L = D or T) isotope effects on C(alpha)-proton transfer from alpha 4-PDC-bound HETDP provide no evidence for significant breakdown of the Swain-Schaad relationship that would indicate partitioning of the putative C(alpha)-carbanion/enamine intermediate between HETDP and products. The substrate concentration dependence of the deuterium primary kinetic isotope effects provides evidence for an intrinsic isotope effect of 4.1 for C(alpha)-proton transfer from alpha 4-PDC-bound HETDP. A 1.10 +/- 0.02-fold 14C isotope discrimination against [1,2-14C]acetaldehyde in acetoin formation is inconsistent with a stepwise mechanism, in which the addition step occurs after rate-limiting formation of the C(alpha)-carbanion/enamine as a discrete enzyme-bound intermediate, and provides evidence for a concerted reaction mechanism with an important component of carbon-carbon bond formation in the transition state.

  5. Structure and function of adenylate kinase isozymes in normal humans and muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Takenaka, H; Fukumoto, K; Fukamachi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Sumida, M; Shiosaka, T; Kurokawa, Y; Okuda, H; Kuby, S A

    1987-01-01

    Two isozymes of adenylate kinase from human Duchenne muscular dystrophy serum, one of which was an aberrant form specific to DMD patients, were separated by Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity chromatography. The separated aberrant form possessed a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 1,500, whereas the normal serum isozyme had a weight of 87,000 +/- 1,600, as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and sedimentation equilibrium. The sedimentation coefficients were 5.8 S and 5.6 S for the aberrant form and the normal form, respectively. Both serum isozymes are tetramers. The subunit size of the aberrant isozyme (Mr = 24,700) was very similar to that of the normal human liver isozyme, and the subunit size of the normal isozyme (Mr = 21,700) was very similar to that of the normal human muscle enzyme. The amino acid composition of the normal serum isozyme was similar to that of the muscle-type enzyme, and that of the aberrant isozyme was similar to that of the liver enzyme, with some exceptions in both cases.

  6. Comparative biochemical characterization of peroxidases (class III) tightly bound to the maize root cell walls and modulation of the enzyme properties as a result of covalent binding.

    PubMed

    Hadži-Tašković Šukalović, Vesna; Vuletić, Mirjana; Marković, Ksenija; Cvetić Antić, Tijana; Vučinić, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Comparative biochemical characterization of class III peroxidase activity tightly bound to the cell walls of maize roots was performed. Ionically bound proteins were solubilized from isolated walls by salt washing, and the remaining covalently bound peroxidases were released, either by enzymatic digestion or by a novel alkaline extraction procedure that released covalently bound alkali-resistant peroxidase enzyme. Solubilized fractions, as well as the salt-washed cell wall fragments containing covalently bound proteins, were analyzed for peroxidase activity. Peroxidative and oxidative activities indicated that peroxidase enzymes were predominately associated with walls by ionic interactions, and this fraction differs from the covalently bound one according to molecular weight, isozyme patterns, and biochemical parameters. The effect of covalent binding was evaluated by comparison of the catalytic properties of the enzyme bound to the salt-washed cell wall fragments with the corresponding solubilized and released enzyme. Higher thermal stability, improved resistance to KCN, increased susceptibility to H2O2, stimulated capacity of wall-bound enzyme to oxidize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as well as the difference in kinetic parameters between free and bound enzymes point to conformational changes due to covalent binding. Differences in biochemical properties of ionically and covalently bound peroxidases, as well as the modulation of the enzyme properties as a result of covalent binding to the walls, indicate that these two fractions of apoplastic peroxidases play different roles.

  7. Oxidative stress response of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of black leaf streak disease in banana plants, to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J; Manzo-Sanchez, Gilberto; Guzmán-González, Salvador; Arias-Castro, Carlos; Rodríguez-Mendiola, Martha; Avila-Miranda, Martin; Ogura, Tetsuya

    2009-07-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis causes black leaf streak disease in banana and plantain. This fungus is usually attacked by reactive oxygen species secreted by the plant or during exposure to fungicide, however, little is known about the antioxidant response of the fungus. In this study, mycelia were observed to totally decompose 30 mmol/L of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) within 120 min, liberating oxygen bubbles, and also to survive in concentrations as high as 100 mmol/L H2O2. The oxidative stress responses to H2O2, paraquat, and hydroquinone were characterized in terms of the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Two active catalase bands were seen in native PAGE induced by H2O2. Band I had monofunctional activity and band II had bifunctional catalase-peroxidase activity. Two isozymes of SOD, distinguishable by their cyanide sensitivity, were found; CuZnSOD was the main one. The combination of H2O2 and 3-aminotriazole reduced the accumulation of biomass up to 40% compared with exposure to H2O2 alone, suggesting that catalase is important for the rapid decomposition of H2O2 and has a direct bearing on cell viability. The results also suggest that the superoxide anion formed through the redox of paraquat and hydroquinone has a greater effect than H2O2 on the cellular viability of M. fijiensis. PMID:19767862

  8. Oxidative stress response of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of black leaf streak disease in banana plants, to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J; Manzo-Sanchez, Gilberto; Guzmán-González, Salvador; Arias-Castro, Carlos; Rodríguez-Mendiola, Martha; Avila-Miranda, Martin; Ogura, Tetsuya

    2009-07-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis causes black leaf streak disease in banana and plantain. This fungus is usually attacked by reactive oxygen species secreted by the plant or during exposure to fungicide, however, little is known about the antioxidant response of the fungus. In this study, mycelia were observed to totally decompose 30 mmol/L of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) within 120 min, liberating oxygen bubbles, and also to survive in concentrations as high as 100 mmol/L H2O2. The oxidative stress responses to H2O2, paraquat, and hydroquinone were characterized in terms of the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Two active catalase bands were seen in native PAGE induced by H2O2. Band I had monofunctional activity and band II had bifunctional catalase-peroxidase activity. Two isozymes of SOD, distinguishable by their cyanide sensitivity, were found; CuZnSOD was the main one. The combination of H2O2 and 3-aminotriazole reduced the accumulation of biomass up to 40% compared with exposure to H2O2 alone, suggesting that catalase is important for the rapid decomposition of H2O2 and has a direct bearing on cell viability. The results also suggest that the superoxide anion formed through the redox of paraquat and hydroquinone has a greater effect than H2O2 on the cellular viability of M. fijiensis.

  9. Tissue distribution and ontogeny of steroid 5 alpha-reductase isozyme expression.

    PubMed Central

    Thigpen, A E; Silver, R I; Guileyardo, J M; Casey, M L; McConnell, J D; Russell, D W

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis of dihydrotestosterone is catalyzed by steroid 5 alpha-reductase isozymes, designated types 1 and 2. Mutation of type 2 results in male pseudohermaphroditism, in which the external genitalia are phenotypically female at birth. Two striking and unexplained features of this disorder are that external genitalia of affected males undergo virilization during puberty and that these individuals have less temporal hair regression. The tissue-specific and developmental expression patterns of the 5 alpha-reductase isozymes were investigated by immunoblotting. The type 1 isozyme is not detectable in the fetus, is transiently expressed in newborn skin and scalp, and permanently expressed in skin from the time of puberty. There was no qualitative difference in 5 alpha-reductase type 1 expression between adult balding vs. nonbalding scalp. The type 2 isozyme is transiently expressed in skin and scalp of newborns. Type 2 is the predominant isozyme detectable in fetal genital skin, male accessory sex glands, and in the prostate, including benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate adenocarcinoma tissues. Both isozymes are expressed in the liver, but only after birth. These results are consistent with 5 alpha-reductase type 1 being responsible for virilization in type 2-deficient subjects during puberty, and suggest that the type 2 isozyme may be an initiating factor in development of male pattern baldness. Images PMID:7688765

  10. Antifungal Properties of Haem Peroxidase from Acorus calamus

    PubMed Central

    GHOSH, MODHUMITA

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plants have evolved a number of inducible defence mechanisms against pathogen attack, including synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins. The aim of the study was to purify and characterize antifungal protein from leaves of Acorus calamus. • Methods Leaf proteins from A. calamus were fractionated by cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration and the fraction inhibiting the hyphal extension of phytopathogens was characterized. The temperature stability and pH optima of the protein were determined and its presence was localized in the leaf tissues. • Key Results The purified protein was identified as a class III haem peroxidase with a molecular weight of approx. 32 kDa and pI of 7·93. The temperature stability of the enzyme was observed from 5 °C to 60 °C with a temperature optimum of 36 °C. Maximum enzyme activity was registered at pH 5·5. The pH and temperature optima were corroborated with the antifungal activity of the enzyme. The enzyme was localized in the leaf epidermal cells and lumen tissues of xylem, characteristic of class III peroxidases. The toxic nature of the enzyme which inhibited hyphal growth was demonstrated against phytopathogens such as Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium moniliforme and Trichosporium vesiculosum. Microscopic observations revealed distortion in the hyphal structure with stunted growth, increased volume and extensive hyphal branching. • Conclusions This study indicates that peroxidases may have a role to play in host defence by inhibiting the hyphal extension of invading pathogens. PMID:17056613

  11. Induction of Barley Leaf Urease 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuguang; Ching, Te May

    1988-01-01

    Foliar urea application on barley plants increased leaf urease activity for 5 hours with a peak of 20-fold at 2 hours. To discern the mode of urease induction, urea with or without inhibitors and [35S]methionine were incubated with leaf sections for different lengths of time. Urease was extracted, partially purified, electrophoresed, and then quantified by fluorogram. Five urease (U) isozymes were separated by PAGE. Ua and Ub might be polymers or complexes that occurred only at the peak of induced activity. U1 and U2 appeared at 0.5 and 0.75 hour, respectively, after urea induction, peaked at 2 hours, and persisted only in treated leaves for several additional hours indicating that they are transient inducible forms. U3 was the constitutive form present in control and treated leaves. Induction with cordycepin or cycloheximide completely prevented urea stimulated activity and nullified the existence of isozymes Ua, Ub, U1, and U2. 35S-U1, which was labeled in the last hour of induction, appeared on fluorogram 1 hour after induction, peaked at 2 hours, and declined at 3 hours. Results indicated that de novo synthesis of urease is activated by the influx of urea. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16666013

  12. Diacylglycerol kinase η1 is a high affinity isozyme for diacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Komenoi, Suguru; Takemura, Fumika; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) η plays important roles in various patho-physiological events such as oncogenesis. In this study, we performed an enzymological characterization of DGKη splice variant 1 (DGKη1). The Km value for diacylglycerol was 0.14 mol%. Intriguingly, the Km value of DGKη1 for diacylglycerol was at least 9-fold lower than those of other DGK isozymes including DGKα, indicating that DGKη1 is a high affinity isozyme for diacylglycerol. Therefore, DGKη1 is a unique DGK isozyme, which may function at particular membrane sites where only low concentrations of diacylglycerol are supplied.

  13. Serum amylase isozymes in patients with chronic pancreatitis with hyperamylasemia.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, A; Saeki, M; Mori, R; Oshiba, S

    1977-01-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between hyperamylasemia and clinical states in chronic pancreatitis, serum amylase isozymes were studied in 39 cases of chronic pancreatitis including 13 cases of alcoholic pancreatitis. Hyperamylasemia in chronic pancreatitis is generally due to high pancreatic type isoamylase (P-amylase) activity in acute exacerbation, sometimes accompanied by a transient elevation in salivary type isoamylase (S-amylase). On remission, however, hyperamylasemia due to high S-amylase activity has been found. These were cases of advanced alcoholic pancreatitis, which exhibited a characteristic pattern of low serum P-amylase and high serum S-amylase activities while the clearance ratio (Cam/Ccr) was normal despite high S-amylase activity. It should be noted that hyperamylasemia in chronic pancreatitis may be caused by high S-amylase activity in addition to high P-amylase activity, especially in alcoholic pancreatitis.

  14. Towards isozyme-selective HDAC inhibitors for interrogating disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C; Iyer, Abishek; Sweet, Matthew J; Fairlie, David P

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes have emerged as promising targets for the treatment of a wide range of human diseases, including cancers, inflammatory and metabolic disorders, immunological, cardiovascular, and infectious diseases. At present, such applications are limited by the lack of selective inhibitors available for each of the eighteen HDAC enzymes, with most currently available HDAC inhibitors having broad-spectrum activity against multiple HDAC enzymes. Such broad-spectrum activity maybe useful in treating some diseases like cancers, but can be detrimental due to cytotoxic side effects that accompany prolonged treatment of chronic diseased states. Here we summarize progress towards the design and discovery of HDAC inhibitors that are selective for some of the eleven zinc-containing classical HDAC enzymes, and identify opportunities to use such isozyme-selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogating the biological roles of individual HDAC enzymes in diseases.

  15. Electron Transfer between Cytochrome C and Cytochome C Peroxidase in Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Seong A.; Marjavaara, Pieti J.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-11-10

    Cytochrome c (Cc) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) form an important redox pair for understanding interprotein electron transfer (ET). Measurements of ET rates from photoexcited CcP substituted with Zn porphyrin to either yeast Fe(III)Cc or horse Fe(III)Cc in crystals reveal that the molecular associations found in the respective crystal structures determine solution reactivity. Similar forward rates for yeast isozyme-1 Cc (yCc) and yCc homologue horse Cc (hCc), despite different orientations relative to CcP, suggest small-amplitude conformational gating of ET even in the crystalline state; faster back ET in the yCc compared to the hCc complex agrees with the relative coupling between redox sites predicted by the structures.

  16. Oscillations in the peroxidase-oxidase reaction: a comparison of different peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kummer, U; Valeur, K R; Baier, G; Wegmann, K; Olsen, L F

    1996-04-17

    The nonlinear behavior of the peroxidase-oxidase reaction was studied using structurally different peroxidases. For the first time sustained oscillations with peroxidases other than horseradish peroxidase in a single-enzyme system were observed. All peroxidases that showed significant oxidase activity were able to generate sustained oscillations. When adjusting the overall reaction rate, either of the two modifiers 2,4-dichlorophenol or Methylene blue could be omitted from the reaction. Due to the observation of different enzyme intermediates when using different peroxidases, we conclude that the mechanisms responsible for oscillatory kinetics may vary from one peroxidase to the other.

  17. Identification and expression of a novel carbonic anhydrase isozyme in the pufferfish Takifugu vermicularis.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Kanij Rukshana; Nou, Ill-Sup; Kho, Kang Hee

    2016-08-22

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a key element for maintaining acid base balance in fish. In our present experiment, novel CA isozymes were identified from the pear puffer (Takifugu vermicularis). Based on the high homology of two predicted CA sequences of the tiger puffer (Takifugu rubripes), a 1715bp novel cDNA was obtained from T. vermicularis. The open reading frame showed a complete coding sequence of 552bp with a deduced peptide sequence of 183 amino acids that exhibited highest (97%) identity with pufferfish putative CA III and CA IV-like sequences. In addition, this translated protein sequence showed 36-37% identity with zebrafish CA IV-like, CA XVa, CA XVb, and CA XVc proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the pufferfish novel protein (pCAn) was a membrane-bound CA protein. Alignment of multiple CA sequences illustrated that most of the putative active site residues of the pCAn isozyme were situated at highly conserved regions of the CA sequences. Examination of motif distribution suggested that the pCAn isozyme was very similar to the puffer predicted CA IV-like isozyme. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed highly differential expression in the brain, gills, kidney, and muscle, whereas CA mRNA expression was almost absent in heart, liver, and intestine. Quantitative PCR expression of CA mRNA abundance suggested several-fold higher expression of pCAn isozymes in the gills compared to other tissues tested. Our results suggest that the pCAn isozyme might be related to CA IV-like isozymes. Further functional studies are needed to investigate the function of the pCAn isozyme in T. vermicularis. PMID:27188255

  18. Homology of Plant Peroxidases: AN IMMUNOCHEMICAL APPROACH.

    PubMed

    Conroy, J M; Borzelleca, D C; McDonell, L A

    1982-01-01

    Antisera specific for the basic peroxidase from horseradish (Amoracea rusticana) were used to examine homology among horseradish peroxidase isoenzymes and among basic peroxidases from root plants. The antisera cross-reacted with all tested isoperoxidases when measured by both agar diffusion and quantitative precipitin reactions. Precipitin analyses provided quantitative measurements of homology among these plant peroxidases. The basic radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Belle) peroxidase had a high degree of homology (73 to 81%) with the basic peroxidase from horseradish. Turnip (Brassica rapa L. cv. Purple White Top Globe) and carrot (Daucus carota L. cv. Danvers) basic peroxidases showed less cross-reaction (49 to 54% and 41 to 46%, respectively). However, the cross-reactions of antisera with basic peroxidases from different plants were greater than were those observed with acidic horseradish isoenzymes (30 to 35%). These experiments suggest that basic peroxidase isoenzymes are strongly conserved during evolution and may indicate that the basic peroxidases catalyze reactions involved in specialized cellular functions. Anticatalytic assays were poor indicators of homology. Even though homology among isoperoxidases was detected by other immunological methods, antibodies inhibited only the catalytic activity of the basic peroxidase from radish.

  19. First comparative phenetic studies of Argentinean species of Acacia (Fabaceae), using morphometric, isozymal, and RAPD approaches.

    PubMed

    Casiva, Paola V; Saidman, Beatriz O; Vilardi, Juan C; Cialdella, Ana M

    2002-05-01

    Morphological and genetic diversity among Acacia aroma, A. macracantha, A. caven, and A. furcatispina were studied with morphometric, isozymal, and RAPD approaches. The analysis of seven isozyme systems revealed 21 loci, and RAPD analysis showed 34 loci. Most of these loci allowed us to differentiate the species, with the exception of A. aroma and A. macracantha, the two most similar species. The levels of genetic variability estimated by isozymes were higher than those obtained from RAPD analyses. Morphometric characters showed highly significant differences among the species, although A. aroma and A. macracantha are differentiated only by thorn length. The phenogram obtained from isozyme data is consistent with morphological data. The RAPD phenogram based on allelic frequencies showed agreement with morphological and isozymal approaches only at the intraspecific levels, while the RAPD phenogram based on Nei and Li's similarity measures agreed with the phenograms constructed from isozyme and morphological data. High similarities and high indirect gene flow were found between A. aroma and A. macracantha, results that call the relationship between them into question. PMID:21665685

  20. HIV-1 production is specifically associated with human NMT1 long form in human NMT isozymes.

    PubMed

    Takamune, Nobutoki; Gota, Kayoko; Misumi, Shogo; Tanaka, Kenzo; Okinaka, Shigetaka; Shoji, Shozo

    2008-02-01

    The N-myristoylation of the N-terminal of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Pr55(gag) by human N-myristoyltransferase (hNMT) is a prerequisite modification for HIV-1 production. hNMT consists of multiple isozymes encoded by hNMT1 and hNMT2. The hNMT1 isozyme consists of long, medium, and short forms. Here, we investigated which isozyme is crucial for HIV-1 production. Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells transfected with infectious HIV-1 vectors were used as models of HIV-1-infected cells in this study. The significant reduction in HIV-1 production and the failure of the specific localization of Pr55(gag) in a detergent-resistant membrane fraction were dependent on the knockdown of the different forms of the hNMT1 isozyme but not of the hNMT2 isozyme. Additionally, the coexpression of an inactive mutant hNMT1 isozyme, namely the hNMT1 long form (hNMT1(L)), but not that of other hNMT mutants resulted in a significant reduction in HIV-1 production. These results strongly suggest that HIV-1 production is specifically associated with hNMT1, particularly hNMT1(L), but not with hNMT2 in vivo, contributing to the understanding of a step in HIV-1 replication.

  1. Evolution of the functional properties of pyruvate kinase isozymes: pyruvate kinase L from Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Guderley, H

    1986-01-01

    The regulatory properties of type L pyruvate kinase from Rana pipiens are intermediate between those of the mammalian K and L isozymes. As with mammalian type L, the levels of the frog isozyme are affected by the animal's nutritional state. The mammalian and amphibian isozymes show similar sensitivities to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate activation and amino acid inhibition. By contrast, the frog L isozyme shares several properties of the K class: i.e. irreversible inactivation by oxidized glutathione and lack of response to a cyclic AMP stimulated phosphorylation. Furthermore, as for some mammalian K isozymes, frog type L shows a high PEP affinity and a low cooperativity of PEP binding. Insofar as the properties of this present day enzyme reflect those of its counterpart in the amphibian ancestor of higher vertebrates, our results suggest that at its first expression, the type L resembled the type K. Many important regulatory properties of the L isozyme, especially the sensitivity to phosphorylation, were acquired more recently perhaps in association with an increased importance of constant blood glucose. PMID:3489743

  2. Early diagnosis of radiodermatitis using lactate dehydrogenase isozymes in hairless mice (SKH1-hr)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Dong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate a method for the early diagnosis of radiodermatitis for use in the prevention and therapy of this condition. Hairless mice (SKH1-hr) were used to study the early diagnosis of radiodermatitis. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) isozymes were analyzed using native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting of blood serum and tissues collected from SKH1-hr mice. Radiodermatitis developed 24 days after the first X-irradiation. Reduced spleen weight was observed after the last X-irradiation (P<0.05). Thereafter the weight increased until 24 days after the first irradiation, finally reaching levels comparable to those in the sham-irradiated control group. LDH activity was the highest in skeletal muscle and lowest in blood serum. LDH C4, A4, A3B, A2B2, AB3, and B4 isozymes were detected, in the mentioned order, from the cathode. This result was similar in other mouse strains. In the irradiated group, LDH A4 isozyme levels were reduced in the serum until inflammation occurred, whereas those of B4 isozyme were elevated. The subunits A and B followed a similar trend to that of LDH A4 and B4 isozyme, respectively. Importantly, antibodies against LDH B4 isozyme could prove useful in the early diagnosis of radiodermatitis. PMID:23326284

  3. Evolutionary Divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana Classical Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, E V; Mamoshina, P O; Ezhova, T A

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms of 62 peroxidase genes derived from Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated to evaluate evolutionary dynamics and divergence of peroxidase proteins. By comparing divergence of duplicated genes AtPrx53-AtPrx54 and AtPrx36-AtPrx72 and their products, nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were identified that were apparently targets of positive selection. These substitutions were detected among paralogs of 461 ecotypes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these substitutions are conservative and matched paralogous peroxidases in other Brassicaceae species. These results suggest that after duplication, peroxidase genes evolved under the pressure of positive selection, and amino acid substitutions identified during our study provided divergence of properties and physiological functions in peroxidases. Our predictions regarding functional significance for amino acid residues identified in variable sites of peroxidases may allow further experimental assessment of evolution of peroxidases after gene duplication.

  4. Leaf Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    Leaf activities can provide a means of using basic concepts of outdoor education to learn in elementary level subject areas. Equipment needed includes leaves, a clipboard with paper, and a pencil. A bag of leaves may be brought into the classroom if weather conditions or time do not permit going outdoors. Each student should pick a leaf, examine…

  5. PeroxiBase: the peroxidase database.

    PubMed

    Passardi, Filippo; Theiler, Grégory; Zamocky, Marcel; Cosio, Claudia; Rouhier, Nicolas; Teixera, Felipe; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Ioannidis, Vassilios; Penel, Claude; Falquet, Laurent; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-06-01

    Peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.x), which are encoded by small or large multigenic families, are involved in several important physiological and developmental processes. Analyzing their evolution and their distribution among various phyla could certainly help to elucidate the mystery of their extremely widespread and diversified presence in almost all living organisms. PeroxiBase was originally created for the exhaustive collection of class III peroxidase sequences from plants (Bakalovic, N., Passardi, F., et al., 2006. PeroxiBase: a class III plant peroxidase database. Phytochemistry 67, 534-539). The extension of the class III peroxidase database to all proteins capable to reduce peroxide molecules appears as a necessity. Our database contains haem and non-haem peroxidase sequences originated from annotated or not correctly annotated sequences deposited in the main repositories such as GenBank or UniProt KnowledgeBase. This new database will allow obtaining a global overview of the evolution the protein families and superfamilies capable of peroxidase reaction. In this rapidly growing field, there is a need for continual updates and corrections of the peroxidase protein sequences. Following the lack of unified nomenclature, we also introduced a unique abbreviation for each different family of peroxidases. This paper thus aims to report the evolution of the PeroxiBase database, which is freely accessible through a web server (http://peroxibase.isb-sib.ch). In addition to new categories of peroxidases, new specific tools have been created to facilitate query, classification and submission of peroxidase sequences.

  6. Superoxide-Dismutase Deficient Mutants in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): Genetic Control, Differential Expressions of Isozymes, and Sensitivity to Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2013-01-01

    Two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) mutants, sodPv 1 and sodPv 2, exhibiting foliar superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of only 25% and 40% of their mother control (MC) cv. VL 63 were isolated in EMS-mutagenized (0.15%, 8 h) M2 progeny. Native-PAGE analysis revealed occurrence of Mn SOD, Fe SOD, Cu/Zn SOD I and Cu/Zn SOD II isozymes in MC, while Fe SOD, and Mn SOD were not formed in sodPv 1 and sodPv 2 leaves, respectively. In-gel activity of individual isozymes differed significantly among the parents. SOD deficiency is inherited as recessive mutations, controlled by two different nonallelic loci. Gene expressions using qRT PCR confirmed higher expressions of Cu/Zn SOD transcripts in both mutants and the absence of Fe SOD in sodPv 1 and Mn SOD in sodPv 2. In 50 μM arsenic, Cu/Zn SODs genes were further upregulated but other isoforms downregulated in the two mutants, maintaining SOD activity in its control level. In an F2 double mutants of sodPv 1 × sodPv 2, no Fe SOD, and Mn SOD expressions were detectable, while both Cu/Zn SODs are down-regulated and arsenic-induced leaf necrosis appeared. In contrast to both mutants, ROS-imaging study revealed overaccumulation of both superoxides and H2O2 in leaves of double mutant. PMID:24078924

  7. Superoxide-dismutase deficient mutants in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): genetic control, differential expressions of isozymes, and sensitivity to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2013-01-01

    Two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) mutants, sodPv 1 and sodPv 2, exhibiting foliar superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of only 25% and 40% of their mother control (MC) cv. VL 63 were isolated in EMS-mutagenized (0.15%, 8 h) M2 progeny. Native-PAGE analysis revealed occurrence of Mn SOD, Fe SOD, Cu/Zn SOD I and Cu/Zn SOD II isozymes in MC, while Fe SOD, and Mn SOD were not formed in sodPv 1 and sodPv 2 leaves, respectively. In-gel activity of individual isozymes differed significantly among the parents. SOD deficiency is inherited as recessive mutations, controlled by two different nonallelic loci. Gene expressions using qRT PCR confirmed higher expressions of Cu/Zn SOD transcripts in both mutants and the absence of Fe SOD in sodPv 1 and Mn SOD in sodPv 2. In 50 μM arsenic, Cu/Zn SODs genes were further upregulated but other isoforms downregulated in the two mutants, maintaining SOD activity in its control level. In an F2 double mutants of sodPv 1 × sodPv 2, no Fe SOD, and Mn SOD expressions were detectable, while both Cu/Zn SODs are down-regulated and arsenic-induced leaf necrosis appeared. In contrast to both mutants, ROS-imaging study revealed overaccumulation of both superoxides and H2O2 in leaves of double mutant.

  8. Engineering Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity Into Cytochrome C Peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Meharenna, Y.T.; Oertel, P.; Bhaskar, B.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) have very similar structures, and yet neither CCP nor APX exhibits each others activities with respect to reducing substrates. APX has a unique substrate binding site near the heme propionates where ascorbate H-bonds with a surface Arg and one heme propionate (Sharp et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 303--307). The corresponding region in CCP has a much longer surface loop, and the critical Arg residue that is required for ascorbate binding in APX is Asn in CCP. In order to convert CCP into an APX, the ascorbate-binding loop and critical arginine were engineered into CCP to give the CCP2APX mutant. The mutant crystal structure shows that the engineered site is nearly identical to that found in APX. While wild-type CCP shows no APX activity, CCP2APX catalyzes the peroxidation of ascorbate at a rate of {approx}12 min{sup -1}, indicating that the engineered ascorbate-binding loop can bind ascorbate.

  9. Purification and characterization of the dog hepatic cytochrome P-450 isozyme(s) responsible for the metabolism of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, D.B.; Sipes, I.G.; Leonard, T.B.; Halpert, J.R.

    1986-03-01

    Pretreatment of dogs and rats with phenobarbital (PB) enhances the in vitro metabolism of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (245-HCB); however, in control dog microsomes there is an approximately 5-fold greater rate of metabolism than that observed in PB-induced rat microsomes. At least two PB-induced isozymes of cytochrome P-450 are detected in dog microsomes, and by use of Octylamino-Sepharose. Hydroxylapatite, and DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography, one of these isozymes (which the authors call PBD-2) has been purified to >95%, as determined by SDS-PAGE. In a reconstituted system, PBD-2 can metabolize 245-HCB at a rate similar to that seen for PB-B, the major PB-induced isozyme in the rat. In addition, antibodies raised against PB-B cross-react with PBD-2, and the NH/sub 2/-terminal amino acid sequence of PBD-2 is nearly 70% homologous to that of PB-B. These results suggest that a cytochrome P-450 isozyme capable of metabolizing 245-HCB in the dog (PBD-2) is similar to PB-B. The importance of PBD-2 will be further elucidated by conducting inhibition studies with anti-PBD-2 antibodies in control and PB-induced dog microsomes.

  10. Reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2010-06-01

    By employing a pharmacological approach, we have shown that phospholipase C (PLC) activity is involved in the regulation of gene expression of transcription factors such as c-Fos and c-Jun in cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine (NE). However, there is no information available regarding the identity of specific PLC isozymes involved in the regulation of c-Fos and c-Jun or on the involvement of these transcription factors in PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes. In this study, transfection of cardiomyocytes with PLC isozyme specific siRNA was found to prevent the NE-mediated increases in the corresponding PLC isozyme gene expression, protein content and activity. Unlike PLC gamma(1) gene, silencing of PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) genes with si RNA prevented the increases in c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression in response to NE. On the other hand, transfection with c-Jun si RNA suppressed the NE-induced increase in c-Jun as well as PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) gene expression, but had no effect on PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Although transfection of cardiomyocytes with c-Fos si RNA prevented NE-induced expression of c-Fos, PLC beta(1) and PLC beta(3) genes, it did not affect the increases in PLC delta(1) and PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Silencing of either c-Fos or c-Jun also depressed the NE-mediated increases in PLC beta(1), beta(3) and gamma(1) protein content and activity in an isozyme specific manner. Furthermore, silencing of all PLC isozymes as well as of c-Fos and c-Jun resulted in prevention of the NE-mediated increase in atrial natriuretic factor gene expression. These findings, by employing gene silencing techniques, demonstrate that there occurs a reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and specific PLC isozyme gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

  11. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase mimics

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Overproduction of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are increasingly implicated in human disease and aging. ROS are also being explored as important modulating agents in a number of cell signaling pathways. Earlier work has focused on development of small catalytic scavengers of O2−, commonly referred to as superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics. Many of these compounds also have substantial abilities to catalytically scavenge H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Peroxides have been increasingly shown to disrupt cell signaling cascades associated with excessive inflammation associated with a wide variety of human diseases. Early studies with enzymatic scavengers like SOD frequently reported little or no beneficial effect in biologic models unless SOD was combined with catalase or a peroxidase. Increasing attention has been devoted to developing catalase or peroxidase mimetics as a way to treat overt inflammation associated with the pathophysiology of many human disorders. This review will focus on recent development of catalytic scavengers of peroxides and their potential use as therapeutic agents for pulmonary, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. PMID:18948086

  12. Evidence for peroxidase activity in Caralluma umbellata.

    PubMed

    Achar, Raghu Ram; Venkatesh, B K; Sharanappa, P; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2014-08-01

    Vast applications of peroxidases create an increasing demand to characterize peroxidases from new sources with more applicability potential. The aim of the present study was to check the presence of peroxidase activity from Caralluma umbellata. This is the first report on the C. umbellata peroxidase (CUP). The presence of peroxidase was revealed by the histochemical analysis of the stem sections, zymographic studies, and in vitro peroxidase activity assay using various reducing substrates viz., 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), guaiacol, o-dianisidine, and ferulic acid. The band pattern in zymogram confirms that CUP has a molecular weight less than that of horseradish peroxidase (44 kDa). Comparative evaluation of peroxidase activity of CUP with respect to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) indicates that CUP catalyzes ABTS and ferulic acid in a similar pattern as HRP but with guaiacol, the extent of catalysis shown by CUP over HRP is high. The standard inhibitors sodium azide and sodium meta bisulphite inhibited CUP activity in a dose dependent manner.

  13. Screening Actinomycetes for Extracellular Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, D. K.; Iqbal, M.; Miller, P.; McCarthy, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A diverse collection of actinomycete strains were screened for production of extracellular peroxidase activity by adapting a chemiluminescence analysis system developed for horseradish peroxidase-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Extracellular peroxidase activity was found to be common but quantitatively variable, and this rapid and sensitive screening system permitted identification of a small group of high-producing strains. A range of spectrophotometric assays were compared for the measurement of peroxidase activity in concentrated culture supernatants of two selected thermophilic streptomycetes. Of these, the peroxide-dependent oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol was identified as the most robust and reproducible assay for quantitative studies. PMID:16535344

  14. AMP deaminase histochemical activity and immunofluorescent isozyme localization in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Sabina, R. L.; Ogasawara, N.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular distribution of AMP deaminase (AMPda) isozymes was documented for rat soleus and plantaris muscles, utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoprecipitation methods. AMPda is a ubiquitous enzyme existing as three distinct isozymes, A, B and C, which were initially purified from skeletal muscle, liver (and kidney), and heart, respectively. AMPda-A is primarily concentrated subsarcolemmally and intermyofibrillarly within muscle cells, while isozymes B and C are concentrated within non-myofiber elements of muscle tissue. AMPda-B is principally associated with connective tissues surrounding neural elements and the muscle spindle capsule, and AMPda-C is predominantly associated with circulatory elements, such as arterial and venous walls, capillary endothelium, and red blood cells. These specific localizations, combined with documented differences in kinetic properties, suggest multiple functional roles for the AMPda isozymes or temporal segregation of similar AMPda functions. Linkage of the AMPda substrate with adenosine production pathways at the AMP level and the localization of isozyme-C in vascular tissue suggest a regulatory role in the microcirculation.

  15. The human liver glycogen synthase isozyme gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, F.Q.; Gannon, M.C. ); Kubic, V.L.; Hoyt, K.J. )

    1994-01-15

    Glycogen synthase catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycogen synthesis. Its activity is regulated by a complex phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism and by allosteric stimulators and inhibitors. Two isozymes of synthase, a skeletal muscle type and liver type, have been identified in rabbit and rat tissues using specific polyclonal antibodies. The skeletal muscle type isozyme is present in several organs in addition to skeletal muscle; the liver isozyme has been identified only in liver. Recently, we have purified and characterized the human liver synthase isozyme. We also have cloned and sequenced the gene from a human liver cDNA library. Using the entire cDNA coding sequence as a probe, we report here the localization of the liver synthase isozyme gene to the short arm of chromosome 12. These studies revealed a centromeric signal on chromosome 12 together with signal to glycogen synthase on the short arm of this chromosome in the p11.2-p12.2 region. Measurements of the relative distance from the midpoint of the centromere to the signal corresponding to glycogen synthase suggests that the locus is in the p12.2 band rather than in the more centromeric location.

  16. Na,K-ATPase Isozymes in Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Baker Bechmann, Marc; Rotoli, Deborah; Morales, Manuel; Maeso, María del Carmen; García, María del Pino; Ávila, Julio; Mobasheri, Ali; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to define Na,K-ATPase α and β subunit isoform expression and isozyme composition in colorectal cancer cells and liver metastases. The α1, α3, and β1 isoforms were the most highly expressed in tumor cells and metastases; in the plasma membrane of non-neoplastic cells and mainly in a cytoplasmic location in tumor cells. α1β1 and α3β1 isozymes found in tumor and metastatic cells exhibit the highest and lowest Na+ affinity respectively and the highest K+ affinity. Mesenchymal cell isozymes possess an intermediate Na+ affinity and a low K+ affinity. In cancer, these ions are likely to favor optimal conditions for the function of nuclear enzymes involved in mitosis, especially a high intra-nuclear K+ concentration. A major and striking finding of this study was that in liver, metastasized CRC cells express the α3β1 isozyme. Thus, the α3β1 isozyme could potentially serve as a novel exploratory biomarker of CRC metastatic cells in liver. PMID:26858653

  17. Maize cytokinin dehydrogenase isozymes are localized predominantly to the vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Zalabák, David; Johnová, Patricie; Plíhal, Ondřej; Šenková, Karolina; Šamajová, Olga; Jiskrová, Eva; Novák, Ondřej; Jackson, David; Mohanty, Amitabh; Galuszka, Petr

    2016-07-01

    The maize genome encompasses 13 genes encoding for cytokinin dehydrogenase isozymes (CKXs). These enzymes are responsible for irreversible degradation of cytokinin plant hormones and thus, contribute regulating their levels. Here, we focus on the unique aspect of CKXs: their diverse subcellular distribution, important in regulating cytokinin homeostasis. Maize CKXs were tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transiently expressed in maize protoplasts. Most of the isoforms, namely ZmCKX1, ZmCKX2, ZmCKX4a, ZmCKX5, ZmCKX6, ZmCKX8, ZmCKX9, and ZmCKX12, were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) several hours after transformation. GFP-fused CKXs were observed to accumulate in putative prevacuolar compartments. To gain more information about the spatiotemporal localization of the above isoforms, we prepared stable expression lines of all ZmCKX-GFP fusions in Arabidopsis thaliana Ler suspension culture. All the ER-associated isoforms except ZmCKX1 and ZmCKX9 were found to be targeted primarily to vacuoles, suggesting that ER-localization is a transition point in the intracellular secretory pathway and vacuoles serve as these isoforms' final destination. ZmCKX9 showed an ER-like localization pattern similar to those observed in the transient maize assay. Apoplastic localization of ZmCKX1 was further confirmed and ZmCKX10 showed cytosolic/nuclear localization due to the absence of the signal peptide sequence as previously reported. Additionally, we prepared GFP-fused N-terminal signal deletion mutants of ZmCKX2 and ZmCKX9 and clearly demonstrated that the localization pattern of these mutant forms was cytosolic/nuclear. This study provides the first complex model for spatiotemporal localization of the key enzymes of the cytokinin degradation/catabolism in monocotyledonous plants. PMID:27031423

  18. Turning points in the evolution of peroxidase-catalase superfamily: molecular phylogeny of hybrid heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heme peroxidases and catalases are key enzymes of hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling. Here, the reconstruction of the molecular evolution of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily (annotated in pfam as PF00141) based on experimentally verified as well as numerous newly available genomic sequences is presented. The robust phylogenetic tree of this large enzyme superfamily was obtained from 490 full-length protein sequences. Besides already well-known families of heme b peroxidases arranged in three main structural classes, completely new (hybrid type) peroxidase families are described being located at the border of these classes as well as forming (so far missing) links between them. Hybrid-type A peroxidases represent a minor eukaryotic subfamily from Excavates, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria sharing enzymatic and structural features of ascorbate and cytochrome c peroxidases. Hybrid-type B peroxidases are shown to be spread exclusively among various fungi and evolved in parallel with peroxidases in land plants. In some ascomycetous hybrid-type B peroxidases, the peroxidase domain is fused to a carbohydrate binding (WSC) domain. Both here described hybrid-type peroxidase families represent important turning points in the complex evolution of the whole peroxidase-catalase superfamily. We present and discuss their phylogeny, sequence signatures and putative biological function.

  19. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Conversion of crude Jatropha curcas seed oil into biodiesel using liquid recombinant Candida rugosa lipase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ting-Chun; Shaw, Jei-Fu; Lee, Guan-Chiun

    2015-09-01

    The versatile Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) has been widely used in biotechnological applications. However, there have not been feasibility reports on the transesterification of non-edible oils to produce biodiesel using the commercial CRL preparations, mixtures of isozymes. In the present study, four liquid recombinant CRL isozymes (CRL1-CRL4) were investigated to convert various non-edible oils into biodiesel. The results showed that recombinant CRL2 and CRL4 exhibited superior catalytic efficiencies for producing fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from Jatropha curcas seed oil. A maximum 95.3% FAME yield was achieved using CRL2 under the optimal conditions (50 wt% water, an initial 1 equivalent of methanol feeding, and an additional 0.5 equivalents of methanol feeding at 24h for a total reaction time of 48 h at 37 °C). We concluded that specific recombinant CRL isozymes could be excellent biocatalysts for the biodiesel production from low-cost crude Jatropha oil.

  1. Isozyme expression of Chinese and Japanese populations of Chlamys farreri and their reciprocal hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Taiwu; Liu, Yan; Song, Linsheng; Sun, Xiuqin

    2005-06-01

    Chinese and Japanese population of Chlamys farreri and their reciprocal hybrids were surveyed in isozyme variability at 13 loci by polyacrytamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Isozyme banding patterns indicated these hybrids were diploid. Loci that were observed as being monomorphic in inbred populations of C. farreri were also found to be monomorphic in filial progeny; loci that observed to be polymorphic in parental type generations were also polymorphic in hybrid generations. Differences existed among allelic frequency of the four types of cross. Within the reciprocal hybrids the expression of malic enzyme (ME) isozyme was sufficient to distinguishing individual hybrids because of the band, Rf=0.38. However, there were no noticeable variations among all the samples to differentiate one from another. Inbreeding was likely to be the main problem in aquaculture. The introduction of new broodstock can improve the genetic diversity. Hybrid vigor has manifested to a certain extent in the present study.

  2. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions.

  3. (Characterization of lignin peroxidases from Phanerochaete)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-14

    Work has continued on characterizing the kinetics of lignin peroxidases and has now expanded to include the chemistry of Mn peroxidases. Progress in these two area in addition to the authors work on the molecular biology of lignin biodegradation is briefly described below. Copies of two reprints and one preprint which have resulted from the work are attached.

  4. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases.

  5. Isozyme Variation among Biological Species in the Gibberella fujikuroi Species Complex (Fusarium Section Liseola)

    PubMed Central

    Huss, M. J.; Campbell, C. L.; Jennings, D. B.; Leslie, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Isozyme phenotypes were determined for 101 strains of Gibberella fujikuroi and 2 strains of Gibberella nygamai that represent seven biological species (mating populations) isolated from a variety of plant hosts in dispersed geographic locations. Fourteen enzymes were resolved in one or more of three buffer systems. Two of the enzymes, arylesterase and acid phosphatase, were polymorphic within two or more biological species and are suitable for intraspecific studies of population variation. Six enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, mannitol dehydrogenase, phosphoglucomutase, and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, were monomorphic in all of the isolates examined. The remaining six enzymes, fumarase, glucose phosphate isomerase, glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP), isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP), malate dehydrogenase, and triose-phosphate isomerase, could potentially be used to distinguish the different biological species. Mating populations C and D are the most similar, since the mating population C isolates examined had the same isozyme phenotype as did a subset of the isolates in mating population D. Mating population E is the least similar to the other taxa examined. Unique isozyme phenotypes are present but are composed of banding patterns shared among the biological species. This finding supports the hypothesis that these biological species, with the possible exception of mating populations C and D, are reproductively isolated from one another and that no significant gene flow is occurring between them. Isozyme analysis is a useful method to distinguish these closely related biological species. Examination of isozyme phenotypes is more rapid than the present technique, which is based on sexual crosses; can be applied to strains that are not sexually fertile; and is more sensitive than traditional morphological characters, which cannot distinguish more than three or four morphological groups among the seven

  6. Differential expression of 5-alpha reductase isozymes in the prostate and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Fan, Dong-Dong; Jin, Song; Xing, Nian-Zeng; Niu, Yi-Nong

    2014-01-01

    The development of human benign or malignant prostatic diseases is closely associated with androgens, primarily testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). T is converted to DHT by 5-alpha reductase (5-AR) isozymes. Differential expression of 5-AR isozymes is observed in both human benign and malignant prostatic tissues. 5-AR inhibitors (5-ARI) are commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and were once promoted as chemopreventive agents for prostate cancer (PCa). This review discusses the role of the differential expression of 5-AR in the normal development of the human prostate and in the pathogenesis and progression of BPH and PCa. PMID:24457841

  7. Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leaves are the most important organs for plants. Without leaves, plants cannot capture light energy or synthesize organic compounds via photosynthesis. Without leaves, plants would be unable perceive diverse environmental conditions, particularly those relating to light quality/quantity. Without leaves, plants would not be able to flower because all floral organs are modified leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana is a good model system for analyzing mechanisms of eudicotyledonous, simple-leaf development. The first section of this review provides a brief history of studies on development in Arabidopsis leaves. This history largely coincides with a general history of advancement in understanding of the genetic mechanisms operating during simple-leaf development in angiosperms. In the second section, I outline events in Arabidopsis leaf development, with emphasis on genetic controls. Current knowledge of six important components in these developmental events is summarized in detail, followed by concluding remarks and perspectives. PMID:23864837

  8. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  9. Soybean peroxidase as an industrial catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pokora, A.R.

    1995-12-01

    Peroxidases are a large class of enzymes which are very efficient at catalysing oxidation reactions. Horseradish peroxidase, the most abundant and commercially available peroxidase, has been utilized for many years in medical diagnostic test kits but has never been used successfully in an industrial application. One of the major drawbacks associated with the peroxidases cost and has been their lack of the thermal stability required in an industrial process. Recently, we isolated has been their lack of the peroxidase from soybean seed coats. Soybean seed coats are a commodity product available year round in very large volumes. The useful operational temperature for the soy peroxidase is 40{degrees}C higher than for horseradish peroxidase resulting in shorter reaction times and greater reactor efficiency. This process can be used to produce formaldehyde-free polyphenols as well as numerous phenolic dimers used in the manufacture of anti-oxidants, U-V absorbers, epoxies as well as other materials. The process to manufacture resins and dimers will be discussed.

  10. Thiol-Based Peroxidases and Ascorbate Peroxidases: Why Plants Rely on Multiple Peroxidase Systems in the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast?

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly robust process allowing for rapid adjustment to changing environmental conditions. The efficient acclimation depends on balanced redox metabolism and control of reactive oxygen species release which triggers signaling cascades and potentially detrimental oxidation reactions. Thiol peroxidases of the peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase type, and ascorbate peroxidases are the main peroxide detoxifying enzymes of the chloroplast. They use different electron donors and are linked to distinct redox networks. In addition, the peroxiredoxins serve functions in redox regulation and retrograde signaling. The complexity of plastid peroxidases is discussed in context of suborganellar localization, substrate preference, metabolic coupling, protein abundance, activity regulation, interactions, signaling functions, and the conditional requirement for high antioxidant capacity. Thus the review provides an opinion on the advantage of linking detoxification of peroxides to different enzymatic systems and implementing mechanisms for their inactivation to enforce signal propagation within and from the chloroplast.

  11. Marker-exchange mutagenesis of a pectate lyase isozyme gene in Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, D L; Collmer, A

    1985-01-01

    The phytopathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi contains pel genes encoding several different isozymes of the plant-tissue-disintegrating enzyme pectate lyase (PL). The pelC gene, encoding an isozyme with an approximate isoelectric point of 8.0, was mutagenized by a three-step procedure involving (i) insertional inactivation of the cloned gene by ligation of a kan-containing BamHI fragment from pUC4K with a partial Sau3A digest of E. chrysanthemi pelC DNA in pBR322; (ii) mobilization of the pBR322 derivative from Escherichia coli to E. chrysanthemi by the helper plasmids R64drd11 and pLVC9; and (iii) exchange recombination of the pelC::kan mutation into the E. chrysanthemi chromosome by selection for kanamycin resistance in transconjugants cultured in phosphate-limited medium (which renders pBR322 unstable). The resulting E. chrysanthemi mutant was Kanr Amps, lacked pBR322 sequences, and was deficient in only one of the four major PL isozymes, PLc, as determined by activity-stained isoelectric-focusing polyacrylamide gels. The rates of PL induction and cell growth in a medium containing polygalacturonic acid as the sole carbon source were not significantly reduced in the mutant. No difference was detected in the ability of the mutant to macerate potato tuber tissue. The evidence suggests that this isozyme is not necessary for soft-rot pathogenesis. Images PMID:2995324

  12. Identification of Distinct Internal and External Isozymes of Carbonic Anhydrase in Chlorella saccharophila.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T. G.; Colman, B.

    1993-01-01

    External carbonic anhydrase (CA) was detected in whole cells of alkaline-grown Chlorella saccharophila but was suppressed by growth at acid pH or growth on elevated levels of CO2. Internal CA activity was measured potentiometrically as an increase in activity in cell extracts over that of intact cells. Cells grown under all conditions had equal levels of internal CA activity. Two isozymes were identified after electrophoretic separation of soluble proteins on cellulose acetate plates. The fast isozyme was found in cells grown under all conditions, whereas the slow isozyme was found only in cells grown at alkaline pH. Western blot analysis following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using antibodies produced against the periplasmic form of CA from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed a single band at 39 kD, which did not change in intensity between growth conditions and was associated only with proteins eluted from the fast band. The slow isozyme was inactivated by incubation of cell extract at 30[deg]C and by incubation in 10 mM dithiothreitol, whereas the internal form was unaffected. These results indicate that external and internal forms of CA differ in structure and their activities respond differently to environmental conditions. PMID:12231991

  13. Redesign of cytochrome c peroxidase into a manganese peroxidase: role of tryptophans in peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Gengenbach, A; Syn, S; Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-08-31

    Trp191Phe and Trp51Phe mutations have been introduced into an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) containing a Mn(II)-binding site reported previously (MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K.-S., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 5, 215-221). The goal of the present study is to elucidate the role of tryptophans in peroxidase activity since CcP contains both Trp51 and Trp191 while manganese peroxidase (MnP) contains phenylalanine residues at the corresponding positions. The presence of Trp191 in CcP allows formation of a unique high-valent intermediate containing a ferryl oxo and tryptophan radical called compound I'. The absence of a tryptophan residue at this position in MnP is the main reason for the formation of an intermediate called compound I which contains a ferryl oxo and porphyrin pi-cation radical. In this study, we showed that introduction of the Trp191Phe mutation to MnCcP did not improve MnP activity (specific activity: MnCcP, 0.750 micromol min-1 mg-1; MnCcP(W191F), 0.560 micromol min-1 mg-1. k(cat)/K(m): MnCcP, 0.0517 s-1 mM-1; MnCcP(W191F), 0.0568 s-1 mM-1) despite the fact that introduction of the same mutation to WTCcP caused the formation of a transient compound I (decay rate, 60 s-1). However, introducing both the Trp191Phe and Trp51Phe mutations not only resulted in a longer lived compound I in WTCcP (decay rate, 18 s-1), but also significantly improved MnP activity in MnCcP (MnCcP(W51F, W191F): specific activity, 8.0 micromol min-1 mg-1; k(cat)/K(m), 0. 599 s-1 mM-1). The increase in activity can be attributed to the Trp51Phe mutation since MnCcP(W51F) showed significantly increased MnP activity relative to MnCcP (specific activity, 3.2 micromol min-1 mg-1; k(cat)/K(m), 0.325 s-1 mM-1). As with MnP, the activity of MnCcP(W51F, W191F) was found to increase with decreasing pH. Our results demonstrate that, while the Trp191Phe and Trp51Phe mutations both play important roles in stabilizing compound I, only the Trp51Phe mutation contributes significantly to

  14. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases.

  15. Isozyme variation in germplasm accessions of the wild oat Avena sterilis L.

    PubMed

    Phillips, T D; Murphy, J P; Goodman, M M

    1993-03-01

    Optimal exploitation of crop genetic resources requires a knowledge of the range and structure of the variation present in the gene pool of interest. Avena sterilis L., the cultivated oat progenitor, contains a store of genetic diversity that is readily accessible to the oat breeder. The objectives of the present paper were: (1) to evaluate isozyme polymorphisms in a sample of A. sterilis accessions from the U.S. National Small Grains Collection, (2) to analyze the distribution of isozyme diversity across the geographic range of the accessions, (3) to classify the accessions into groups based on isozyme variation, and (4) to suggest strategies for efficient sampling of this germplasm collection. One thousand and five accessions from 23 countries and 679 collection sites were screened for variation using 23 enzyme systems. Due to limited information about the genetic relationship among individual members of families of isozymes in hexaploid oat species, data were recorded solely for band presence. The frequencies of bands in accessions from the various countries were used to calculate the probability of genotypic identity (Ix.y), the probability of a unique genotype (Ux.y), and an adjusted polymorphic index (Hx). Accessions from Turkey and Lebanon had the largest polymorphic index values, Turkish and Moroccan accessions displayed the greatest numbers of bands. Accessions from Iran, Turkey, Iraq, and Lebanon had the largest mean probabilities of containing unique genotypes. Based on isozyme data, Turkey appeared to represent the center of diversity in this germplasm collection. Band frequencies calculated among countries were used in a principal component analysis. Accessions from Israel and Morocco clustered together; accessions from Iran, Iraq, Turkey, and Ethiopia formed another group; and Algerian accessions formed an outlying group. Several isozyme bands had a regional distribution. These results suggested that choosing accessions from countries based on their

  16. Degradation of lignite (low-rank coal) by ligninolytic basidiomycetes and their manganese peroxidase system

    PubMed

    Hofrichter; Ziegenhagen; Sorge; Ullrich; Bublitz; Fritsche

    1999-07-01

    Ligninolytic basidiomycetes (wood and leaf-litter-decaying fungi) have the ability to degrade low-rank coal (lignite). Extracellular manganese peroxidase is the crucial enzyme in the depolymerization process of both coal-derived humic substances and native coal. The depolymerization of coal by Mn peroxidase is catalysed via chelated Mn(III) acting as a diffusible mediator with a high redox potential and can be enhanced in the presence of additional mediating agents (e.g. glutathione). The depolymerization process results in the formation of a complex mixture of lower-molecular-mass fulvic-acid-like compounds. Experiments using a synthetic 14C-labeled humic acid demonstrated that the Mn peroxidase-catalyzed depolymerization of humic substances was accompanied by a substantial release of carbon dioxide (17%-50% of the initially added radio-activity was released as 14CO2). Mn peroxidase was found to be a highly stable enzyme that remained active for several weeks under reaction conditions in a liquid reaction mixture and even persisted in sterile and native soil from an opencast mining area for some days.

  17. (Molecular characteristics of the lignin forming peroxidase)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Since this manuscript was submitted we have conducted a more thorough physiological analysis of water relations in wild-type and peroxidase overproducing plants. These experiments include pressure bomb, plasmolysis, and membrane integrity analysis. We are also in the process of analyzing other phenotypes in peroxidase overproducer plants such as excessive browning of tissue, the rapid death of tissue in culture, and poor germination of seed. Transformed plants of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris were obtained which have peroxidase activity 3--7 fold lower than wild-type plants. This was done by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the CaMV 35S promoter and the 5' half of the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA in the antisense RNA configuration. A manuscript which describes this work is being written, and will be submitted for publication in January 1990. The anionic peroxidase gene has been cloned by hybridization to the cloned cDNA. The entire gene is contained on an 8.7kb fragment within a lambda phage clone. Several smaller DNA fragments have been subcloned, and some have been sequenced. One exon within the coding sequence has been sequenced, along with the partial sequence of two introns. Further sequencing is being carried-out to identify the promoter, which will be later joined to a reporter gene. 6 figs.

  18. Localized Changes in Peroxidase Activity Accompany Hydrogen Peroxide Generation during the Development of a Nonhost Hypersensitive Reaction in Lettuce1

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, Charles S.; Brown, Ian R.; Mansfield, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Peroxidase activity was characterized in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) leaf tissue. Changes in the activity and distribution of the enzyme were examined during the development of a nonhost hypersensitive reaction (HR) induced by Pseudomonas syringae (P. s.) pv phaseolicola and in response to an hrp mutant of the bacterium. Assays of activity in tissue extracts revealed pH optima of 4.5, 6.0, 5.5 to 6.0, and 6.0 to 6.5 for the substrates tetramethylbenzidine, guaiacol, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid, respectively. Inoculation with water or with wild-type or hrp mutant strains of P. s. pv phaseolicola caused an initial decline in total peroxidase activity; subsequent increases depended on the hydrogen donor used in the assay. Guaiacol peroxidase recovered more rapidly in tissues undergoing the HR, whereas changes in tetramethylbenzidine peroxidase were generally similar in the two interactions. In contrast, increases in chlorogenic acid peroxidase were significantly higher in tissues inoculated with the hrp mutant. During the HR, increased levels of Mn2+/2,4-dichlorophenol-stimulated NADH and NADPH oxidase activities, characteristic of certain peroxidases, were found in intercellular fluids and closely matched the accumulation of H2O2 in the apoplast. Histochemical analysis of peroxidase distribution by electron microscopy revealed a striking, highly localized increase in activity within the endomembrane system and cell wall at the sites of bacterial attachment. However, no clear differences in peroxidase location were observed in tissue challenged by the wild-type strain or the hrp mutant. Our results highlight the significance of the subcellular control of oxidative reactions leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species, cell wall alterations, and the HR. PMID:9808752

  19. Modulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isozymes by organ development and high long-term salinity in the halophyte Cakile maritima.

    PubMed

    Houmani, Hayet; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Palma, José M; Abdelly, Chedly; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. This enzyme is considered to be a first line of defense for controlling the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the number and type of SOD isozymes were identified in the principal organs (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) of Cakile maritima. We also analyzed the way in which the activity of these SOD isozymes is modulated during development and under high long-term salinity (400 mM NaCl) stress conditions. The data indicate that this plant contains a total of ten SOD isozymes: two Mn-SODs, one Fe-SOD, and seven CuZn-SODs, with the Fe-SOD being the most prominent isozyme in the different organs analyzed. Moreover, the modulation of SOD isozymes, particularly CuZn-SODs, was only detected during development and under severe salinity stress conditions. These data suggest that, in C. maritima, the occurrence of these CuZn-SODs in roots and leaves plays an adaptive role since this CuZn-SOD isozyme might replace the diminished Fe-SOD activity under salinity stress to overcome this adverse environmental condition. PMID:26159565

  20. Application of repeated aspartate tags to improving extracellular production of Escherichia coli L-asparaginase isozyme II.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ki; Min, Won-Ki; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Asparaginase isozyme II from Escherichia coli is a popular enzyme that has been used as a therapeutic agent against acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, fusion tag systems consisting of the pelB signal sequence and various lengths of repeated aspartate tags were devised to highly express and to release active asparaginase isozyme II extracellularly in E. coli. Among several constructs, recombinant asparaginase isozyme II fused with the pelB signal sequence and five aspartate tag was secreted efficiently into culture medium at 34.6 U/mg cell of specific activity. By batch fermentation, recombinant E. coli produced 40.8 U/ml asparaginase isozyme II in the medium. In addition, deletion of the gspDE gene reduced extracellular production of asparaginase isozyme II, indicating that secretion of recombinant asparaginase isozyme II was partially ascribed to the recognition by the general secretion machinery. This tag system composed of the pelB signal peptide, and repeated aspartates can be applied to extracellular production of other recombinant proteins.

  1. Application of repeated aspartate tags to improving extracellular production of Escherichia coli L-asparaginase isozyme II.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ki; Min, Won-Ki; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Asparaginase isozyme II from Escherichia coli is a popular enzyme that has been used as a therapeutic agent against acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, fusion tag systems consisting of the pelB signal sequence and various lengths of repeated aspartate tags were devised to highly express and to release active asparaginase isozyme II extracellularly in E. coli. Among several constructs, recombinant asparaginase isozyme II fused with the pelB signal sequence and five aspartate tag was secreted efficiently into culture medium at 34.6 U/mg cell of specific activity. By batch fermentation, recombinant E. coli produced 40.8 U/ml asparaginase isozyme II in the medium. In addition, deletion of the gspDE gene reduced extracellular production of asparaginase isozyme II, indicating that secretion of recombinant asparaginase isozyme II was partially ascribed to the recognition by the general secretion machinery. This tag system composed of the pelB signal peptide, and repeated aspartates can be applied to extracellular production of other recombinant proteins. PMID:26320714

  2. Cloning and comparative protein modeling of two purple acid phosphatase isozymes from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Durmus, A; Eicken, C; Spener, F; Krebs, B

    1999-09-14

    The sequence of cDNA fragments of two isozymes of the purple acid phosphatase from sweet potato (spPAP1 and spPAP2) has been determined by 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends protocols using oligonucleotide primers based on amino acid information. The encoded amino acid sequences of these two isozymes show an equidistance of 72-77% not only to each other, but also to the primary structure of the purple acid phosphatase from red kidney bean (kbPAP). A three-dimensional model of the active site has been constructed for spPAP2 on the basis of the kbPAP crystallographic structure that helps to explain the reported differences in the visible and EPR spectra of spPAP2 and kbPAP.

  3. Cloning and comparative protein modeling of two purple acid phosphatase isozymes from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Durmus, A; Eicken, C; Spener, F; Krebs, B

    1999-09-14

    The sequence of cDNA fragments of two isozymes of the purple acid phosphatase from sweet potato (spPAP1 and spPAP2) has been determined by 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends protocols using oligonucleotide primers based on amino acid information. The encoded amino acid sequences of these two isozymes show an equidistance of 72-77% not only to each other, but also to the primary structure of the purple acid phosphatase from red kidney bean (kbPAP). A three-dimensional model of the active site has been constructed for spPAP2 on the basis of the kbPAP crystallographic structure that helps to explain the reported differences in the visible and EPR spectra of spPAP2 and kbPAP. PMID:10556574

  4. Cedar leaf oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Cedar leaf oil is made from some types of cedar trees. Cedar leaf oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... The substance in cedar leaf oil that can be harmful is thujone (a hydrocarbon).

  5. Comparative characterization of pulmonary surfactant aggregates and alkaline phosphatase isozymes in human lung carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Iino, Nozomi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Harada, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Seiji; Koyama, Iwao; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2007-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) isozymes are surfactant-associated proteins (SPs). Since several different AP isozymes have been detected in the pneumocytes of lung cancer patients, we attempted to identify the relationship between pulmonary surfactant aggregate subtypes and AP isozymes. Pulmonary surfactant aggregates were isolated from carcinoma and non-carcinoma tissues of patients with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. Upon analysis, ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates were detected in the non-carcinoma tissues, but no ultraheavy surfactant aggregates were found in the carcinoma tissues. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) was detected as two bands (a 27-kDa band and a 54-kDa band) in the ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates found in the non-carcinoma tissues. Although both SP-A bands were detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues, the 54-kDa band was not detected in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. Liver AP (LAP) was detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from both non-carcinoma and squamous carcinoma tissues, but not in heavy surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues. A larger amount of bone type AP (BAP) was found in light surfactant aggregate fractions from squamous cell carcinomas than those from adenocarcinoma tissues or non-carcinoma tissues from patients with either type of cancer. LAP, BAP, and SP-A were identified immunohistochemically in type II pneumocytes from non-carcinoma tissues and adenocarcinoma cells, but no distinct SP-A staining was observed in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. The present study has thus revealed several differences in pulmonary surfactant aggregates and AP isozymes between adenocarcinoma tissue and squamous cell carcinoma tissue.

  6. Shifts in the myosin heavy chain isozymes in the mouse heart result in increased energy efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Kirsten; Krenz, Maike; Robbins, Jeffrey; Ingwall, Joanne S.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac-specific transgenesis in the mouse is widely used to study the basic biology and chemistry of the heart and to model human cardiovascular disease. A fundamental difference between mouse and human hearts is the background motor protein: mouse hearts contain predominantly the αα-myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isozyme while human hearts contain predominantly the ββ-MyHC isozyme. Although the intrinsic differences in mechanical and enzymatic properties of the αα- and ββ-MyHC molecules are well known, the consequences of isozyme shifts on energetic of the intact beating heart remain unknown. Therefore, we compared the free energy of ATP hydrolysis (|ΔG~ATP|) determined by 31P NMR spectroscopy in isolated perfused littermate mouse hearts containing the same amount of myosin comprised of either >95% αα-MyHC or ~83% ββ-MyHC. |ΔG~ATP| was ~2 kJ mol−1 higher in the ββ-MyHC hearts at all workloads. Furthermore, upon inotropic challenge, hearts containing predominantly ββ-MyHC hearts increased developed pressure more than αα-MyHC hearts whereas heart rate increased more in αα-MyHC hearts. Thus, hearts containing predominantly the ββ-MyHC isozyme are more energy efficient than αα-MyHC hearts. We suggest that these fundamental differences in the motor protein energy efficiency at the whole heart level should be considered when interpreting results using mouse-based cardiovascular modeling of normal and diseased human heart. PMID:17054980

  7. Distinct 1-monoacylglycerol and 2-monoacylglycerol kinase activities of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuriko; Murakami, Chiaki; Yamaki, Atsumi; Mizuno, Satoru; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) consists of ten isozymes and is involved in a wide variety of patho-physiological events. However, the enzymological properties of DGKs have not been fully understood. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis on the 1-monoacylglycerol kinase (MGK) and 2-MGK activities of ten DGK isozymes. We revealed that type I (α, β and γ), type II (δ, η and κ) and type III (ε) DGKs have 7.9-19.2% 2-MGK activity compared to their DGK activities, whereas their 1-MGK activities were <3.0%. Both the 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities of the type IV DGKs (ζ and ι) were <1% relative to their DGK activities. Intriguingly, type V DGKθ has approximately 6% 1-MGK activity and <2% 2-MGK activity compared to its DGK activity. Purified DGKθ exhibited the same results, indicating that its 1-MGK activity is intrinsic. Therefore, DGK isozymes are categorized into three types with respect to their 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities: those having (1) 2-MGK activity relatively stronger than their 1-MGK activity (types I-III), (2) only negligible 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities (type IV), and (3) 1-MGK activity stronger than its 2-MGK activity (type V). The 1-MGK activity of DGKθ and the 2-MGK activity of DGKα were stronger than those of the acylglycerol kinase reported as 1-MGK and 2-MGK to date. The presence or absence of 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities may be essential to the patho-physiological functions of each DGK isozyme.

  8. Examination of the biological effects of high anionic peroxidase production in tobacco plants grown under field conditions. I. Insect pest damage.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Patrick F; Lagrimini, L Mark

    2006-04-01

    At least 25 wild type and high peroxidase tobacco Nicotiana tabacum L. plants were examined semiweekly over several weeks for pest insect distribution and damage in a 2 year field study. Incidence and/or severity of naturally occurring caterpillar damage (dingy cutworm (Feltia ducens Walker), black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel), tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta L.), and false tobacco budworm (= corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)) was significantly reduced at several sample dates for high peroxidase vs. wild type plants. These results parallel those of prior laboratory studies with caterpillars. The number of adult whiteflies (Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) per plant was significantly reduced on high peroxidase compared to wild type plants on most sample dates in both years. The number of plants with leaves containing >100 aphids (primarily Myzus persicae Sulzer) per leaf on high peroxidase plants was significantly lower that on wild type plants after an equivalent invasion period in both years. A significantly higher proportion of aphids were found dead on leaf five of high peroxidase compared to wild type plants at most sample dates in both years. These results indicate that high peroxidase plants have resistance to a wide range of insects, implicating this enzyme as a broad range resistance mechanism.

  9. Conversion of crude Jatropha curcas seed oil into biodiesel using liquid recombinant Candida rugosa lipase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ting-Chun; Shaw, Jei-Fu; Lee, Guan-Chiun

    2015-09-01

    The versatile Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) has been widely used in biotechnological applications. However, there have not been feasibility reports on the transesterification of non-edible oils to produce biodiesel using the commercial CRL preparations, mixtures of isozymes. In the present study, four liquid recombinant CRL isozymes (CRL1-CRL4) were investigated to convert various non-edible oils into biodiesel. The results showed that recombinant CRL2 and CRL4 exhibited superior catalytic efficiencies for producing fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from Jatropha curcas seed oil. A maximum 95.3% FAME yield was achieved using CRL2 under the optimal conditions (50 wt% water, an initial 1 equivalent of methanol feeding, and an additional 0.5 equivalents of methanol feeding at 24h for a total reaction time of 48 h at 37 °C). We concluded that specific recombinant CRL isozymes could be excellent biocatalysts for the biodiesel production from low-cost crude Jatropha oil. PMID:26011691

  10. Crystal Structures of Two Isozymes of Citrate Synthase from Sulfolobus tokodaii Strain 7

    PubMed Central

    Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 has two citrate synthase genes (ST1805-CS and ST0587-CS) in the genome with 45% sequence identity. Because they exhibit similar optimal temperatures of catalytic activity and thermal inactivation profiles, we performed structural comparisons between these isozymes to elucidate adaptation mechanisms to high temperatures in thermophilic CSs. The crystal structures of ST1805-CS and ST0587-CS were determined at 2.0 Å and 2.7 Å resolutions, respectively. Structural comparison reveals that both of them are dimeric enzymes composed of two identical subunits, and these dimeric structures are quite similar to those of citrate synthases from archaea and eubacteria. ST0587-CS has, however, 55 ion pairs within whole dimer structure, while having only 36 in ST1805-CS. Although the number and distributions of ion pairs are distinct from each other, intersubunit ion pairs between two domains of each isozyme are identical especially in interterminal region. Because the location and number of ion pairs are in a trend with other CSs from thermophilic microorganisms, the factors responsible for thermal adaptation of ST-CS isozymes are characterized by ion pairs in interterminal region.

  11. Carbonic anhydrase isozymes of osteoclasts and erythrocytes of osteopetrotic microphthalmic mice.

    PubMed

    Jilka, R L; Rogers, J I; Khalifah, R G; Vaananen, H K

    1985-01-01

    The content of carbonic anhydrase isozymes I (CA I) and II (CA II) in red blood cells and bone of osteopetrotic microphthalmic (mi/mi) mice was analyzed. Monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibodies against purified rat carbonic anhydrase I or II detected both isozymes in hemolysates of both normal and mi/mi mice. Total carbonic anhydrase activity measurements of hemolysates from normal or mi/mi mice were identical. A procedure based on bromopyruvate inactivation was devised to measure the relative contributions of CA I and II isozymes to the carbon dioxide hydration activity of hemolyzates. CA II dominates the observed activity of hemolysates of normal and mi/mi mice. Immunohistochemical studies showed that CA II was present in osteoclasts of tibial and calvarial bones of both normal and mi/mi mice. Thus, in contrast to the several cases of inherited osteopetrosis in humans, there is no lack of active CA II in erythrocytes of mi/mi mice. The absence of CA II, therefore, does not appear to play a role in the etiology of osteopetrosis in the mi/mi mouse.

  12. Crystal Structures of Two Isozymes of Citrate Synthase from Sulfolobus tokodaii Strain 7.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Midori; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 has two citrate synthase genes (ST1805-CS and ST0587-CS) in the genome with 45% sequence identity. Because they exhibit similar optimal temperatures of catalytic activity and thermal inactivation profiles, we performed structural comparisons between these isozymes to elucidate adaptation mechanisms to high temperatures in thermophilic CSs. The crystal structures of ST1805-CS and ST0587-CS were determined at 2.0 Å and 2.7 Å resolutions, respectively. Structural comparison reveals that both of them are dimeric enzymes composed of two identical subunits, and these dimeric structures are quite similar to those of citrate synthases from archaea and eubacteria. ST0587-CS has, however, 55 ion pairs within whole dimer structure, while having only 36 in ST1805-CS. Although the number and distributions of ion pairs are distinct from each other, intersubunit ion pairs between two domains of each isozyme are identical especially in interterminal region. Because the location and number of ion pairs are in a trend with other CSs from thermophilic microorganisms, the factors responsible for thermal adaptation of ST-CS isozymes are characterized by ion pairs in interterminal region. PMID:27656296

  13. Crystal Structures of Two Isozymes of Citrate Synthase from Sulfolobus tokodaii Strain 7

    PubMed Central

    Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 has two citrate synthase genes (ST1805-CS and ST0587-CS) in the genome with 45% sequence identity. Because they exhibit similar optimal temperatures of catalytic activity and thermal inactivation profiles, we performed structural comparisons between these isozymes to elucidate adaptation mechanisms to high temperatures in thermophilic CSs. The crystal structures of ST1805-CS and ST0587-CS were determined at 2.0 Å and 2.7 Å resolutions, respectively. Structural comparison reveals that both of them are dimeric enzymes composed of two identical subunits, and these dimeric structures are quite similar to those of citrate synthases from archaea and eubacteria. ST0587-CS has, however, 55 ion pairs within whole dimer structure, while having only 36 in ST1805-CS. Although the number and distributions of ion pairs are distinct from each other, intersubunit ion pairs between two domains of each isozyme are identical especially in interterminal region. Because the location and number of ion pairs are in a trend with other CSs from thermophilic microorganisms, the factors responsible for thermal adaptation of ST-CS isozymes are characterized by ion pairs in interterminal region. PMID:27656296

  14. Isozyme analysis of progeny derived from (Allium fistulosum ×Allium cepa) ×Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Cryder, C M; Corgan, J N; Urquhart, N S; Clason, D

    1991-09-01

    Relatively large quantities of seed were obtained from the interspecific backcross (A. fistulosum xA. cepa) ×A. cepa allowing, for the first time, an extensive study of the heritable traits exhibited by backcross progeny. Two backcross populations, BC1034 and BC1040, distinguished by differentA. fistulosum parents, were characterized for the isozyme markersIdh-1, Adh-1, andPgi-1. Statistical methods are described to calculate cell probabilities for a mixed population of F2 and BC1 progeny, using an estimate of the fraction of F2 progeny in the population derived from the isozyme data. Cell probability distributions were calculated for a mixed population with independent pairs of loci and a mixed population with nonindependent pairs of loci. The isozyme lociIdh-1 andPgi-1 appear to be linked, with a map distance estimated at 33 centimorgans (cM) in BC1034 and 42 cM in BC1040. The probability distribution model for linked loci did not account for all of the distorted segregation ratios inIdh-1 ×Adh-1 orPgi-1 ×Adh-1. The cytological literature does not support linkage betweenIdh-1 ×Adh-1 orPgi-1 ×Adh-1. The distorted segregation ratios for these pairs of loci are likely the result of genetic incompatibilities between the two species.

  15. Guaiacol peroxidase zymography for the undergraduate laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically detect peroxidase activity and furthermore, to analyze the total protein profile. After the assay, students may estimate the apparent molecular mass of the enzyme and discuss its structure. After the 4-h experiment, students gain knowledge concerning biological sample preparation, gel preparation, electrophoresis, and the importance of specific staining procedures for the detection of enzymatic activity.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNAs for anionic and neutral peroxidases from suspension-cultured-cells of sweet potato and their differential expression in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Huh, G H; Lee, S J; Bae, Y S; Liu, J R; Kwak, S S

    1997-07-01

    Two peroxidase (POD) cDNAs, swpal and swpn1, were isolated and characterized from suspension-cultured cells of sweet potato in order to understand the physiological function of POD isozymes. Sequence analysis showed that swpa1 encoded an anionic POD and swpn1 encoded a neutral POD. The swpa1 and swpn1 genes were both highly expressed in suspension-cultured cells in accordance with the high POD activity of these cells. Although both gene transcripts were detected in the stems of intact plants, their transcription levels were much lower than in suspension-cultured cells. During cell growth the pattern of mRNA accumulation of swpa1 differed from that of swpn1, suggesting that expression of these genes is differentially regulated by cell growth stage. In addition, the swpa1 and swpn1 genes responded differently to oxidative stress induced by chilling. The expression of swpa1 was weakly induced by 15 degrees C acclimation and strongly induced by 4 degrees C chilling, whereas the mRNA level of swpn1 was increased by 15 degrees C acclimation and reduced by 4 degrees chilling. This indicates that the two isozymes encoded by swpa1 and swpn1 might contribute to protection against cold-induced oxidative stress through different signaling pathways. In leaves, both genes were induced by wounding with broadly similar expression. patterns. Genomic analysis suggests that the two isozymes are encoded by different loci in the sweet potato genome.

  17. Peroxidase-benzhydroxamic acid complexes: spectroscopic evidence that a Fe-H2O distance of 2.6 A can correspond to hexa-coordinate high-spin heme.

    PubMed

    Smulevich, G; Feis, A; Indiani, C; Becucci, M; Marzocchi, M P

    1999-02-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra have been obtained for single-crystal horseradish peroxidase isozyme C complexed with benzhydroxamic acid (BHA). The data are compared with those obtained in solution by both RR and electronic absorption spectroscopies at room and low (12-80 K) temperatures. Moreover, the analysis has been extended to Coprinus cinereus peroxidase complexed with BHA. The results obtained for the two complexes are very similar and are consistent with the presence of an aqua six-coordinate high-spin heme. Therefore it can be concluded that despite the rather long Fe-H2O distance of 2.6-2.7 A found by X-ray crystallography in both complexes, the distal water molecule can still coordinate to the heme iron.

  18. Selection of allelic isozyme polymorphisms in marine organisms: pattern, theory, and application.

    PubMed

    Nevo, E; Lavie, E; Ben-Shlomo, R

    1983-01-01

    The evolutionary significance of allelic isozyme polymorphisms in several Mediterranean marine organisms was tested initially by post-hoc gene frequency analyses at 11-15 gene loci in natural populations of barnacles, Balanus amphitrite, under thermal [Nevo et al, 1977] and chemical [Nevo et al, 1978] pollutions. We next carried out pre-hoc controlled laboratory experiments to test the effects of heavy metal pollution (Hg, Zn, Cd) on genotypic frequencies of 15 phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genotypes in thousands of individuals of the shrimp Palaemon elegans [Nevo et al, 1980, 1981a, and the present study]. Similarly, we tested the effects of Hg, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu pollutions on the genotypic and allelic frequencies of five phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) genotypes in the two close species of marine gastropods, Monodonta turbinata and M turbiformis [Lavie and Nevo, 1982, and the present study]. In both the thermal and chemical pollution studies, we established in repeated experiments statistically significant differences of allele frequencies at 8 out of 11 (73%) and 10 out of 15 (67%) gene loci, respectively, between the contrasting environments in each. While no specific function could be singled out in the post-hoc chemical study due to the complex nature of polluted marine water, temperature could be specified as the primary selective agent in the thermal study. The strongest direct and specific evidence for significant differential survivorship among allelic isozyme genotypes was obtained in the pre-hoc studies in Palaemon and Monodonta. Their differential viability was probably associated with the different degree of heavy metal inhibition uniquely related to each specific pollutant. Furthermore, we demonstrated in the two closely related Monodonta species parallel genotypic differentiation as a response to pollution. Our results are inconsistent with the neutral theory of allelic isozyme polymorphisms and appear to reflect the adaptive nature of the allelic isozyme

  19. Identification and analysis of drug-responsive expression of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase family 1 (UGT1) isozyme in rat hepatic microsomes using anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ikushiro, S; Emi, Y; Iyanagi, T

    1995-12-20

    Expression of rat hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase family 1 (UGT1) isozymes has been examined using anti-peptide antibodies raised against a conserved carboxyl-terminal portion of all isozymes and variable amino-terminal portions of each isozyme of the phenol cluster (UGT1A) and bilirubin cluster (UGT1B). Among the isozymes expressed in rat hepatic microsomes, UGT1B1 (54 kDa) of bilirubin cluster was found to be a major form and minor forms were identified as UGT1A1 (53 kDa), UGT1B2 (56 kDa), and UGT1B5 (57 kDa). Using a combination of 2D sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting, all the isozymes were found to be simultaneously lacked in Gunn rat hepatic microsomes. The effects of various drugs as inducer on the expression of each UGT1 isozyme were analyzed. The UGT1A1 and UGT1A2 of the phenol cluster isozymes were significantly induced in 3-methylcholanthrene-treated rats. The expression of UGT1B1 and the glucuronidation activity toward bilirubin in rat hepatic microsomes were induced two- to threefold by clofibrate and dexamethasone administration. On the other hand, the regulation of UGT1B2 and UGT1B5 expression was different from that of UGT1B1. These results clearly show the drug-responsive expression of each UGT1 isozyme using isozyme-specific antibodies for the first time. PMID:8554318

  20. Stability properties of an ancient plant peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Loughran, N B; O'Connell, M J; O'Connor, B; O'Fágáin, C

    2014-09-01

    Plant (Class III) peroxidases have numerous applications throughout biotechnology but their thermal and oxidative stabilities may limit their usefulness. Horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRPC) has good catalytic turnover and is moderately resistant to heat and to excess (oxidizing) concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, HRP isoenzyme A2 (HRP A2) has better oxidative but poorer thermal stability, while soybean peroxidase (SBP) displays enhanced thermal stability. Intrigued by these variations amongst closely related enzymes, we previously used maximum likelihood methods (with application of Bayesian statistics) to infer an amino acid sequence consistent with their most recent common ancestor, the 'Grandparent' (GP). Here, we report the cloning and expression of active recombinant GP protein in Escherichia coli. GP's half-inactivation temperature was 45 °C, notably less than HRP C's, but its resistance to excess H2O2 was 2-fold greater. This resurrected GP protein enables a greater understanding of plant peroxidase evolution and serves as a test-bed to explore their ancestral properties.

  1. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  2. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  3. Stability properties of an ancient plant peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Loughran, N B; O'Connell, M J; O'Connor, B; O'Fágáin, C

    2014-09-01

    Plant (Class III) peroxidases have numerous applications throughout biotechnology but their thermal and oxidative stabilities may limit their usefulness. Horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRPC) has good catalytic turnover and is moderately resistant to heat and to excess (oxidizing) concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, HRP isoenzyme A2 (HRP A2) has better oxidative but poorer thermal stability, while soybean peroxidase (SBP) displays enhanced thermal stability. Intrigued by these variations amongst closely related enzymes, we previously used maximum likelihood methods (with application of Bayesian statistics) to infer an amino acid sequence consistent with their most recent common ancestor, the 'Grandparent' (GP). Here, we report the cloning and expression of active recombinant GP protein in Escherichia coli. GP's half-inactivation temperature was 45 °C, notably less than HRP C's, but its resistance to excess H2O2 was 2-fold greater. This resurrected GP protein enables a greater understanding of plant peroxidase evolution and serves as a test-bed to explore their ancestral properties. PMID:24919139

  4. Creation of a Thermally Tolerant Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Nakajima, H

    2016-01-01

    An artificial peroxidase with thermal tolerance and high catalytic activity has been successfully prepared by mutagenesis of an electron transfer protein, cytochrome c552 from Thermus thermophilus. The mutant enzymes were rationally designed based on the general peroxidase mechanism and spectroscopic analyses of an active intermediate formed in the catalytic reaction. Stopped flow UV-vis spectroscopy and EPR spectroscopy with a rapid freezing sample technique revealed that the initial double mutant, V49D/M69A, which was designed to reproduce the peroxidase mechanism, formed an active oxo-ferryl heme intermediate with a protein radical predominantly localized on Tyr45 during the catalytic reaction. The magnetic power saturation measurement obtained from EPR studies showed little interaction between the oxo-ferryl heme and the tyrosyl radical. Kinetics studies indicated that the isolated oxo-ferryl heme component in the active intermediate was a possible cause of heme degradation during the reaction with H2O2. Strong interaction between the oxo-ferryl heme and the radical was achieved by replacing Tyr45 with tryptophan (resulting in the Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant), which was similar to a tryptophanyl radical found in active intermediates of some catalase-peroxidases. Compared to the protein radical intermediates of V49D/M69A mutant, those of the Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant showed higher reactivity to an organic substrate than to H2O2. The Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant exhibited improved peroxidase activity and thermal tolerance. PMID:27586345

  5. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  6. Saline-Dependent Regulation of Manganese Peroxidase Genes in the Hypersaline-Tolerant White Rot Fungus Phlebia sp. Strain MG-60▿

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Ichiro; Daikoku, Chieko; Tsutsumi, Yuji; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2008-01-01

    The expression pattern of manganese peroxidases (MnPs) in nitrogen-limited cultures of the saline-tolerant fungus Phlebia sp. strain MG-60 is differentially regulated under hypersaline conditions at the mRNA level. When MG-60 was cultured in nitrogen-limited medium (LNM) containing 3% (wt/vol) sea salts (LN-SSM), higher activity of MnPs was observed than that observed in normal medium (LNM). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that two MnP isoenzymes were de novo synthesized in the culture of LN-SSM. Three MnP-encoding genes (MGmnp1, MGmnp2, and MGmnp3) were isolated by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR techniques. The corresponding isozymes were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. MnP isozymes encoded by MGmnp2 and MGmnp3 were observed mainly in LN-SSM. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed high levels of MGmnp2 and MGmnp3 transcripts in LN-SSM 48 h after the addition of 2% NaCl. The induction of MnP production and the accumulation of gene transcripts by saline were well correlated in the presence of Mn2+. However, in the absence of Mn2+, there was no clear correlation between mnp transcripts levels and MnP activity, suggesting posttranscriptional regulation by Mn2+. PMID:18310430

  7. Characterization of two 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase isozymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, A S; Appling, D R

    2000-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADE16 and ADE17 genes encode 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase isozymes that catalyze the penultimate step of the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway. Disruption of these two chromosomal genes results in adenine auxotrophy, whereas expression of either gene alone is sufficient to support growth without adenine. In this work, we show that an ade16 ade17 double disruption also leads to histidine auxotrophy, similar to the adenine/histidine auxotrophy of ade3 mutant yeast strains. We also report the purification and characterization of the ADE16 and ADE17 gene products (Ade16p and Ade17p). Like their counterparts in other organisms, the yeast isozymes are bifunctional, containing both 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase and inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase activities, and exist as homodimers based on cross-linking studies. Both isozymes are localized to the cytosol, as shown by subcellular fractionation experiments and immunofluorescent staining. Epitope-tagged constructs were used to study expression of the two isozymes. The expression of Ade17p is repressed by the addition of adenine to the media, whereas Ade16p expression is not affected by adenine. Ade16p was observed to be more abundant in cells grown on nonfermentable carbon sources than in glucose-grown cells, suggesting a role for this isozyme in respiration or sporulation.

  8. Amino acid sequence of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase and cDNA sequence encoding Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. A new family of fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Baunsgaard, L; Dalbøge, H; Houen, G; Rasmussen, E M; Welinder, K G

    1993-04-01

    Sequence analysis and cDNA cloning of Coprinus peroxidase (CIP) were undertaken to expand the understanding of the relationships of structure, function and molecular genetics of the secretory heme peroxidases from fungi and plants. Amino acid sequencing of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, and cDNA sequencing of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase showed that the mature proteins are identical in amino acid sequence, 343 residues in size and preceded by a 20-residue signal peptide. Their likely identity to peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus is discussed. CIP has an 8-residue, glycine-rich N-terminal extension blocked with a pyroglutamate residue which is absent in other fungal peroxidases. The presence of pyroglutamate, formed by cyclization of glutamine, and the finding of a minor fraction of a variant form lacking the N-terminal residue, indicate that signal peptidase cleavage is followed by further enzymic processing. CIP is 40-45% identical in amino-acid sequence to 11 lignin peroxidases from four fungal species, and 42-43% identical to the two known Mn-peroxidases. Like these white-rot fungal peroxidases, CIP has an additional segment of approximately 40 residues at the C-terminus which is absent in plant peroxidases. Although CIP is much more similar to horseradish peroxidase (HRP C) in substrate specificity, specific activity and pH optimum than to white-rot fungal peroxidases, the sequences of CIP and HRP C showed only 18% identity. Hence, CIP qualifies as the first member of a new family of fungal peroxidases. The nine invariant residues present in all plant, fungal and bacterial heme peroxidases are also found in CIP. The present data support the hypothesis that only one chromosomal CIP gene exists. In contrast, a large number of secretory plant and fungal peroxidases are expressed from several peroxidase gene clusters. Analyses of three batches of CIP protein and of 49 CIP clones revealed the existence of only two highly similar alleles indicating less

  9. Reducing Isozyme Competition Increases Target Fatty Acid Accumulation in Seed Triacylglycerols of Transgenic Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    van Erp, Harrie; Shockey, Jay; Zhang, Meng; Adhikari, Neil D.; Browse, John

    2015-01-01

    One goal of green chemistry is the production of industrially useful fatty acids (FAs) in crop plants. We focus on hydroxy fatty acids (HFAs) and conjugated polyenoic FAs (α-eleostearic acids [ESAs]) using Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model. These FAs are found naturally in seed oils of castor (Ricinus communis) and tung tree (Vernicia fordii), respectively, and used for the production of lubricants, nylon, and paints. Transgenic oils typically contain less target FA than that produced in the source species. We hypothesized that competition between endogenous and transgenic isozymes for substrates limits accumulation of unique FAs in Arabidopsis seeds. This hypothesis was tested by introducing a mutation in Arabidopsis diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (AtDGAT1) in a line expressing castor FA hydroxylase and acyl-Coenzyme A:RcDGAT2 in its seeds. This led to a 17% increase in the proportion of HFA in seed oil. Expression of castor phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1A in this line increased the proportion of HFA by an additional 12%. To determine if our observations are more widely applicable, we investigated if isozyme competition influenced production of ESA. Expression of tung tree FA conjugase/desaturase in Arabidopsis produced approximately 7.5% ESA in seed lipids. Coexpression of VfDGAT2 increased ESA levels to approximately 11%. Overexpression of VfDGAT2 combined with suppression of AtDGAT1 increased ESA accumulation to 14% to 15%. Our results indicate that isozyme competition is a limiting factor in the engineering of unusual FAs in heterologous plant systems and that reduction of competition through mutation and RNA suppression may be a useful component of seed metabolic engineering strategies. PMID:25739701

  10. [Effect of Fuzheng Huayu recipe on CYP450 isozymes in normal and liver fibrosis rats].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tian-hui; Liu, Wei; Li, Shu-ping; Yang, Tao; Wang, Chang-hong; Liu, Cheng-hai

    2015-03-01

    To study the effect of Fuzheng Huayu recipe (FZHY) on five types of isozymes of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) of normal and liver fibrosis rats by using the cocktail probe method. Dimethylnitrosamine ( DMN) was injected to induce the liver fibrosis model. After the tail vein injection with Cocktail probe solutions prepared with five CYP450s probe substrates (phenacetin-CYP1A2, omeprazole-CYP2C9, tolbutamide-CYP2C19, dextromethorphan-CYP2D6, midazolam-CYP3A4), the plasma concentrations of the five probe substrates were determined by LC-MS/MS, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by PK solutions 2. After the oral administration with FZHY, normal rats given phenacetin, omeprazole, tolbutamide and dextromethorphan showed increase in AUC(0-t) and decrease in CL to varying degrees, indicating that FZHY obviously inhibited the activities of CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 in normal rats, but with no obvious effect on the activity of CYP3A4. After the oral administration with FZHY, liver fibrosis rats treated with CYP2C9 showed the significant increase in AUC(0-t) and significant decrease in Vd, hut with no obvious changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters of other four types of prove substances, suggesting that FZHY could significantly inhibit the activity of CYP2C9 in rats but had no effect on the activities of CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4. The changes in the activity of CYP450 isozymes in liver fibrosis rats may be the reason for FZHY's different effects on CYP450 isozymes in normal and liver fibrosis rats. PMID:26226765

  11. Transcriptomic Assessment of Isozymes in the Biphenyl Pathway of Rhodococcus sp. Strain RHA1†

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Edmilson R.; Hara, Hirofumi; Miyazawa, Daisuke; Davies, Julian E.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Mohn, William W.

    2006-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 grows on a broad range of aromatic compounds and vigorously degrades polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Previous work identified RHA1 genes encoding multiple isozymes for most of the seven steps of the biphenyl (BPH) pathway, provided evidence for coexpression of some of these isozymes, and indicated the involvement of some of these enzymes in the degradation of BPH, ethylbenzene (ETB), and PCBs. To investigate the expression of these isozymes and better understand how they contribute to the robust degradative capacity of RHA1, we comprehensively analyzed the 9.7-Mb genome of RHA1 for BPH pathway genes and characterized the transcriptome of RHA1 growing on benzoate (BEN), BPH, and ETB. Sequence analyses revealed 54 potential BPH pathway genes, including 28 not previously reported. Transcriptomic analysis with a DNA microarray containing 70-mer probes for 8,213 RHA1 genes revealed a suite of 320 genes of diverse functions that were upregulated during growth both on BPH and on ETB, relative to growth on the control substrate, pyruvate. By contrast, only 65 genes were upregulated during growth on BEN. Quantitative PCR assays confirmed microarray results for selected genes and indicated that some of the catabolic genes were upregulated over 10,000-fold. Our analysis suggests that up to 22 enzymes, including 8 newly identified ones, may function in the BPH pathway of RHA1. The relative expression levels of catabolic genes did not differ for BPH and ETB, suggesting a common regulatory mechanism. This study delineated a suite of catabolic enzymes for biphenyl and alkyl-benzenes in RHA1, which is larger than previously recognized and which may serve as a model for catabolism in other environmentally important bacteria having large genomes. PMID:16957245

  12. Differential substrate recognition by isozymes of plant protein-only Ribonuclease P.

    PubMed

    Howard, Michael J; Karasik, Agnes; Klemm, Bradley P; Mei, Christine; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Fierke, Carol A; Koutmos, Markos

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the cleavage of leader sequences from precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA). Typically, these enzymes are ribonucleic protein complexes that are found in all domains of life. However, a new class of RNase P has been discovered that is composed entirely of protein, termed protein-only RNase P (PRORP). To investigate the molecular determinants of PRORP substrate recognition, we measured the binding affinities and cleavage kinetics of Arabidopsis PRORP1 for varied pre-tRNA substrates. This analysis revealed that PRORP1 does not make significant contacts within the trailer or beyond N-1of the leader, indicating that this enzyme recognizes primarily the tRNA body. To determine the extent to which sequence variation within the tRNA body modulates substrate selectivity and to provide insight into the evolution and function of PRORP enzymes, we measured the reactivity of the three Arabidopsis PRORP isozymes (PRORP1-3) with four pre-tRNA substrates. A 13-fold range in catalytic efficiencies (10(4)-10(5)M(-1)s(-1)) was observed, demonstrating moderate selectivity for pre-tRNA substrates. Although PRORPs bind the different pre-tRNA species with affinities varying by as much as 100-fold, the three isozymes have similar affinities for a given pre-tRNA, suggesting similar binding modes. However, PRORP isozymes have varying degrees of cleavage fidelity, which is dependent on the pre-tRNA species and the presence of a 3'-discriminator base. This work defines molecular determinants of PRORP substrate recognition that provides insight into this new class of RNA processing enzymes. PMID:26966150

  13. Revisiting the Non-Animal Peroxidase Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto, Fernanda; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia Carina; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia

    2015-12-01

    Peroxidases reduce peroxide through substrate oxidation in order to alleviate oxidative stress in aerobic organisms. Since the initial description of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily, great effort has been made to characterize this large and heterogeneous group of proteins. Next generation sequencing data have permitted an in-depth study of the molecular evolution of this superfamily and allowed us to perform a phylogenetic reconstruction. Through this analysis, we identified two additional class I members and, here, we discuss the similarities and differences among members of this class. Our results provide new insights into the organization of these antioxidant enzymes, allowing us to propose a new model for the emergence and evolution of this superfamily.

  14. Conversion of aminonitrotoluenes by fungal manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Scheibner, K; Hofrichter, M

    1998-01-01

    Preparations of extracellular manganese peroxidase from the white-rot fungus Nematoloma frowardii and the litter decaying fungus Stropharia rugosoannulata converted rapidly the main intermediates of the explosive 2,4,-trinitrotoluene--the aminonitrotoluenes. In a cell-free system, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene were degraded without formation of identifiable metabolites. Radioactive experiments using a complex mixture of uniform ring-labeled 14C-TNT reduction products demonstrated the partial direct mineralization of these compounds by manganese peroxidase. The extent of aminonitrotoluene conversion as well as the release of 14CO2 from TNT reduction products were considerably enhanced in the presence of thiols like reduced glutathione or the amino acid L-cystein, which probably act as secondary mediators.

  15. Beta-hexosaminidase isozymes and replacement therapy in Gm2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Rattazzi, M C

    1983-01-01

    The problem of cell targeting of lysosomal enzymes is a critical one in the development of strategies for therapeutic enzyme replacement in lysosomal storage diseases. In principle, posttranscriptional isozymes with different carbohydrate-chain composition may be helpful in exploiting existing glycosyl-specific receptors on target cells, if the receptor specificities are known and match the glycosyl composition of available isozymes. In practice, however, the choice is limited to isozymes that can be obtained from tissues available in abundance, such as placenta or blood plasma. Our early experiments show that one can interfere with the interaction between hepatic (RES) receptor and enzyme glycosyl chain, to obtain extrahepatic targeting of beta-hexosaminidase, with catabolic effects. This approach, of course, does not have an immediate therapeutic application, as it involves injection of large amounts of foreign material in order to inhibit hepatic uptake. Modification of the glycosyl chain may be the method of choice in selected instances [Furbish et al. 1981], but is applicability again depends on the knowledge of receptor specificity on target cells and on composition of the glycosyl chain of the enzyme in question. Our recent experiments are a first step toward obtaining enzyme forms that can be endocytosed efficiently by mechanisms that are independent of glycosyl-specific receptors. Charge-mediated, absorptive endocytosis can be obtained by covalent coupling of cationic PLL to beta-hexosaminidase. Given the abundance of negative surface charges on most cell types [Weiss, 1969], this approach may be applicable to different target cells and organs, and possibly also to lysosomal enzymes other than beta-hexosaminidase. The existence of glycosyl recognition signals on beta-hexosaminidase can be obviated by simple chemical manipulations, such as Na-metaperiodate oxidation, which effectively prevents hepatic RES uptake [Rattazzi et al, 1982]. In combination with

  16. RS-Predictor models augmented with SMARTCyp reactivities: Robust metabolic regioselectivity predictions for nine CYP isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Zaretzki, Jed; Rydberg, Patrik; Bergeron, Charles; Bennett, Kristin P.; Olsen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    RS-Predictor is a tool for creating pathway-independent, isozyme-specific site of metabolism (SOM) prediction models using any set of known cytochrome P450 substrates and metabolites. Until now, the RS-Predictor method was only trained and validated on CYP 3A4 data, but in the present study we report on the versatility the RS-Predictor modeling paradigm by creating and testing regioselectivity models for substrates of the nine most important CYP isozymes. Through curation of source literature, we have assembled 680 substrates distributed among CYPs 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C19, 2C8, 2C9, 2D6, 2E1 and 3A4, which we believe is the largest publicly accessible collection of P450 ligands and metabolites ever released. A comprehensive investigation into the importance of different descriptor classes for predicting the regioselectivity of each isozyme is made through the generation of multiple independent RS-Predictor models for each set of isozyme substrates. Two of these models include a DFT reactivity descriptor derived from SMARTCyp. Optimal combinations of RS-Predictor and SMARTCyp are shown to have stronger performance than either method alone, while also exceeding the accuracy of the commercial regioselectivity prediction methods distributed by StarDrop and Schrödinger, correctly identifying a large proportion of the metabolites in each substrate set within the top two rank-positions: 1A2(83.0%), 2A6(85.7%), 2B6(82.1%), 2C19(86.2%), 2C8(83.8%), 2C9(84.5%), 2D6(85.9%), 2E1(82.8%), 3A4(82.3%) and merged(86.0%). Comprehensive datamining of each substrate set and careful statistical analyses of the predictions made by the different models revealed new insights into molecular features that control metabolic regioselectivity and enable accurate prospective prediction of likely SOMs. PMID:22524152

  17. Selectivity of pyripyropene derivatives in inhibition toward acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 isozyme.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Taichi; Ohte, Satoshi; Matsuda, Daisuke; Ohtawa, Masaki; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Harigaya, Yoshihiro; Rudel, Lawrence L; Omura, Satoshi; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Selectivity of 96 semisynthetic derivatives prepared from fungal pyripyropene A, originally isolated as a potent inhibitor of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), toward ACAT1 and ACAT2 isozymes was investigated in the cell-based assay using ACAT1- and ACAT2-expressing CHO cells. Eighteen derivatives including PR-71 (7-O-isocaproyl derivative) showed much more potent ACAT2 inhibition (IC50: 6.0 to 62 nM) than pyripyropene A (IC50: 70 nM). Among them, however, natural pyripyropene A showed the highest selectivity toward ACAT2 with a selectivity index (SI) of >1000, followed by PR-71 (SI, 667). PMID:18997389

  18. Kinetic and docking studies of cytosolic/tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isozymes I, II and IX with some hydroxylic compounds.

    PubMed

    Durdagi, Serdar; Korkmaz, Neslihan; Işık, Semra; Vullo, Daniela; Astley, Demet; Ekinci, Deniz; Salmas, Ramin E; Senturk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    A series of hydroxylic compounds (1-10, NK-154 and NK-168) have been assayed for the inhibition of three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase isozymes, the cytosolic isozymes I, II and tumor-associated isozyme IX. The investigated compounds showed inhibition constants in the range of 0.068-4003, 0.012-9.9 and 0.025-115 μm at the hCA I, hCA II and hCA IX enzymes, respectively. In order to investigate the binding mechanisms of these inhibitors, in silico studies were also applied. Molecular docking scores of the studied compounds are calculated using scoring algorithms, namely Glide/induced fit docking. The inhibitory potencies of the novel compounds were analyzed at the human isoforms hCA I, hCA II and hCA IX as targets and the KI values were calculated.

  19. Plastid Localization of the Key Carotenoid Enzyme Phytoene Synthase Is Altered by Isozyme, Allelic Variation, and Activity[W

    PubMed Central

    Shumskaya, Maria; Bradbury, Louis M.T.; Monaco, Regina R.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids have unique physiological roles related to specific plastid suborganellar locations. Carotenoid metabolic engineering could enhance plant adaptation to climate change and improve food security and nutritional value. However, lack of fundamental knowledge on carotenoid pathway localization limits targeted engineering. Phytoene synthase (PSY), a major rate-controlling carotenoid enzyme, is represented by multiple isozymes residing at unknown plastid sites. In maize (Zea mays), the three isozymes were transiently expressed and found either in plastoglobuli or in stroma and thylakoid membranes. PSY1, with one to two residue modifications of naturally occurring functional variants, exhibited altered localization, associated with distorted plastid shape and formation of a fibril phenotype. Mutating the active site of the enzyme reversed this phenotype. Discovery of differential PSY locations, linked with activity and isozyme type, advances the engineering potential for modifying carotenoid biosynthesis. PMID:23023170

  20. Kinetic and docking studies of cytosolic/tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isozymes I, II and IX with some hydroxylic compounds.

    PubMed

    Durdagi, Serdar; Korkmaz, Neslihan; Işık, Semra; Vullo, Daniela; Astley, Demet; Ekinci, Deniz; Salmas, Ramin E; Senturk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    A series of hydroxylic compounds (1-10, NK-154 and NK-168) have been assayed for the inhibition of three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase isozymes, the cytosolic isozymes I, II and tumor-associated isozyme IX. The investigated compounds showed inhibition constants in the range of 0.068-4003, 0.012-9.9 and 0.025-115 μm at the hCA I, hCA II and hCA IX enzymes, respectively. In order to investigate the binding mechanisms of these inhibitors, in silico studies were also applied. Molecular docking scores of the studied compounds are calculated using scoring algorithms, namely Glide/induced fit docking. The inhibitory potencies of the novel compounds were analyzed at the human isoforms hCA I, hCA II and hCA IX as targets and the KI values were calculated. PMID:26634620

  1. Genetics of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Isozymes in the Mouse: Evidence for Multiple Loci and Localization of Ahd-2 on Chromosome 19

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Glenn P.; Holmes, Roger S.

    1981-01-01

    Electrophoretic and activity variation of the cytoplasmic isozyme of aldehyde dehydrogenase (designated AHD-B4) was observed among inbred strains and Harwell linkage-testing stocks of Mus musculus. The phenotypes are inherited in a normal Mendelian fashion, with two alleles showing co-dominant expression at a single locus (Ahd-2). The locus was shown to segregate independently of Ahd-1 (encoding the mitochondrial AHD-A2 isozymes on chromosome 4; Holmes 1978). Linkage data of Ahd-2 with ep (pale ears), ru (ruby eyes) and bm (brachymorphic) suggest that it is localized near the centromeric end of chromosome 19. Electrophoretic evidence for a third AHD isozyme (designated AHD-Cy), which is predominantly localized in the liver microsomal fraction, is also presented. PMID:7274657

  2. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  3. Redox thermodynamics of lactoperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bellei, Marzia; Vlasits, Jutta; Banerjee, Srijib; Furtmüller, Paul G; Sola, Marco; Obinger, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are important constituents of the innate immune system of mammals. These heme enzymes belong to the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily and catalyze the oxidation of thiocyanate, bromide and nitrite to hypothiocyanate, hypobromous acid and nitrogen dioxide that are toxic for invading pathogens. In order to gain a better understanding of the observed differences in substrate specificity and oxidation capacity in relation to heme and protein structure, a comprehensive spectro-electrochemical investigation was performed. The reduction potential (E degrees ') of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of EPO and LPO was determined to be -126mV and -176mV, respectively (25 degrees C, pH 7.0). Variable temperature experiments show that EPO and LPO feature different reduction thermodynamics. In particular, reduction of ferric EPO is enthalpically and entropically disfavored, whereas in LPO the entropic term, which selectively stabilizes the oxidized form, prevails on the enthalpic term that favors reduction of Fe(III). The data are discussed with respect to the architecture of the heme cavity and the substrate channel. Comparison with published data for myeloperoxidase demonstrates the effect of heme to protein linkages and heme distortion on the redox chemistry of mammalian peroxidases and in consequence on the enzymatic properties of these physiologically important oxidoreductases.

  4. Directed evolution of a fungal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Cherry, J R; Lamsa, M H; Schneider, P; Vind, J; Svendsen, A; Jones, A; Pedersen, A H

    1999-04-01

    The Coprinus cinereus (CiP) heme peroxidase was subjected to multiple rounds of directed evolution in an effort to produce a mutant suitable for use as a dye-transfer inhibitor in laundry detergent. The wild-type peroxidase is rapidly inactivated under laundry conditions due to the high pH (10.5), high temperature (50 degrees C), and high peroxide concentration (5-10 mM). Peroxidase mutants were initially generated using two parallel approaches: site-directed mutagenesis based on structure-function considerations, and error-prone PCR to create random mutations. Mutants were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and screened for improved stability by measuring residual activity after incubation under conditions mimicking those in a washing machine. Manually combining mutations from the site-directed and random approaches led to a mutant with 110 times the thermal stability and 2.8 times the oxidative stability of wild-type CiP. In the final two rounds, mutants were randomly recombined by using the efficient yeast homologous recombination system to shuffle point mutations among a large number of parents. This in vivo shuffling led to the most dramatic improvements in oxidative stability, yielding a mutant with 174 times the thermal stability and 100 times the oxidative stability of wild-type CiP.

  5. Biochemical and pathological studies on peroxidases -an updated review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad A; Rahmani, Arshad H; Aldebasi, Yousef H; Aly, Salah M

    2014-09-01

    Peroxidases represent a family of isoenzymes actively involved in oxidizing reactive oxygen species, innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis and pathogenesis of several diseases. Different types of peroxidases have organ, tissues, cellular and sub-cellular level of specificities in their function. Different diseases lead to varied expressions of peroxidases based on several mechanisms proposed. Several researches are going on to understand its deficiency, over-expression and malfunction in relation with different diseases. Some common diseases of mankind like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes directly or indirectly involve the role of peroxidases. So the status of peroxidase levels may also function as a marker of different diseases. Although many types of diseases in human beings have a strong correlation with tissue specific peroxidases, the clear role of these oxido-reductases is not yet fully understood. Here we are focusing on the role of peroxidases in relations with different diseases occurring due to oxidative stress.

  6. Enzyme Technology of Peroxidases: Immobilization, Chemical and Genetic Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoria, Adriana; Tinoco, Raunel; Torres, Eduardo

    An overview of enzyme technology applied to peroxidases is made. Immobilization on organic, inorganic, and hybrid supports; chemical modification of amino acids and heme group; and genetic modification by site-directed and random mutagenesis are included. Different strategies that were carried out to improve peroxidase performance in terms of stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity are analyzed. Immobilization of peroxidases on inorganic and organic materials enhances the tolerance of peroxidases toward the conditions normally found in many industrial processes, such as the presence of an organic solvent and high temperature. In addition, it is shown that immobilization helps to increase the Total Turnover Number at levels high enough to justify the use of a peroxidase-based biocatalyst in a synthesis process. Chemical modification of peroxidases produces modified enzymes with higher thermostability and wider substrate variability. Finally, through mutagenesis approaches, it is possible to produce modified peroxidases capable of oxidizing nonnatural substrates with high catalytic activity and affinity.

  7. Involvement of multiple protein kinase C isozymes in the ACTH secretory pathway of AtT-20 cells.

    PubMed Central

    McFerran, B. W.; MacEwan, D. J.; Guild, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    1. The mouse AtT-20/D16-16 anterior pituitary tumour cell line was used as a model system for the study of protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated enhancement of calcium- and guanine nucleotide-evoked adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) secretion. 2. A profile of the PKC isozymes present in AtT-20 cells was obtained by Western blotting analysis and it was found that AtT-20 cells express the alpha, beta, epsilon and zeta isoforms of PKC. 3. PKC isozymes were activated by the use of substances reported to activate particular isoforms of the enzyme. The effects of these substances were investigated in both intact and electrically-permeabilized cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, EC50 = 1 +/- 0.05 nM, which activates all isozymes of PKC, except the zeta isozyme), thymeleatoxin (TMX, EC50 = 10 +/- 0.5 nM, which activates the alpha, beta and gamma isozymes) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate 20-acetate (dPPA, EC50 = 3 +/- 0.5 nM, a beta 1-selective isozyme activator) all stimulated ACTH secretion from intact cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximal TMX stimulated ACTH secretion was of a similar degree to that obtained in response to PMA but maximal dPPA-stimulated ACTH secretion was only 60-70% of that obtained in response to PMA or TMX. 4. Calcium stimulated ACTH secretion from electrically-permeabilized cells over the concentration-range of 100 nM to 10 microM. PMA (100 nM), TMX (100 nM) but not dPPA (100 nM) enhanced the amount of ACTH secreted at every concentration of calcium investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:7670732

  8. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  9. Protein kinase C in the wood frog, Rana sylvatica: reassessing the tissue-specific regulation of PKC isozymes during freezing

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Kenneth B.

    2014-01-01

    The wood frog, Rana sylvatica, survives whole-body freezing and thawing each winter. The extensive adaptations required at the biochemical level are facilitated by alterations to signaling pathways, including the insulin/Akt and AMPK pathways. Past studies investigating changing tissue-specific patterns of the second messenger IP3 in adapted frogs have suggested important roles for protein kinase C (PKC) in response to stress. In addition to their dependence on second messengers, phosphorylation of three PKC sites by upstream kinases (most notably PDK1) is needed for full PKC activation, according to widely-accepted models. The present study uses phospho-specific immunoblotting to investigate phosphorylation states of PKC—as they relate to distinct tissues, PKC isozymes, and phosphorylation sites—in control and frozen frogs. In contrast to past studies where second messengers of PKC increased during the freezing process, phosphorylation of PKC tended to generally decline in most tissues of frozen frogs. All PKC isozymes and specific phosphorylation sites detected by immunoblotting decreased in phosphorylation levels in hind leg skeletal muscle and hearts of frozen frogs. Most PKC isozymes and specific phosphorylation sites detected in livers and kidneys also declined; the only exceptions were the levels of isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected by the phospho-PKCα/βII (Thr638/641) antibody, which remained unchanged from control to frozen frogs. Changes in brains of frozen frogs were unique; no decreases were observed in the phosphorylation levels of any of the PKC isozymes and/or specific phosphorylation sites detected by immunoblotting. Rather, increases were observed for the levels of isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected by the phospho-PKCα/βII (Thr638/641), phospho-PKCδ (Thr505), and phospho-PKCθ (Thr538) antibodies; all other isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected in brain remained unchanged from control to frozen frogs. The results of this study

  10. Gibberellic acid controls specific acid-phosphatase isozymes in aleurone cells and protoplasts of Avena fatua L.

    PubMed

    Hooley, R

    1984-06-01

    In the presence of gibberellic acid (GA3) aleurone layers and isolated aleurone protoplasts of Avena fatua accumulate specific isozymes of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2). Some of these may be involved in mobilizing aleurone-grain phosphate reserves during germination. The hormone also controls secretion of other specific molecular forms of the enzyme that probably assist in endosperm hydrolysis. The accumulation and secretion of putative cell-wall-associated isozymes are stimulated by the action of GA3 in isolated protoplasts. This effect however, is apparently over-ridden in the intact tissue, possibly by a cell-wall-based feedback mechanism.

  11. Elevated ROS-scavenging enzymes contribute to acclimation to UV-B exposure in transplastomic tobacco plants, reducing the role of plastid peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Czégény, Gyula; Le Martret, Bénédicte; Pávkovics, Dóra; Dix, Philip J; Hideg, Éva

    2016-08-20

    Leaf peroxidases play a key role in the successful acclimation of plants to low UV-B doses. The aim of the present study was to examine whether selective enhancement of alternative chloroplast antioxidant pathways achieved by chloroplast transformation affected the need for peroxidase defense. Transplastomic tobacco lines expressing glutathione reductase in combination with either dehydroascorbate reductase or glutathione-S-transferase in their plastids exhibited better tolerance to supplemental UV-B than wild type plants. After 10days UV treatment, both the maximum and effective quantum yields of PSII decreased in the wild type by 10% but were unaffected in either of the transformed lines. Activities of total peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase, in addition to dehydroascorbate reductase and gluthatione-S-transferase, were increased by UV in all lines. Gluthatione reductase activity was unaffected by UV in the transplastomic line engineered to have a higher constitutive level of this enzyme, but increased in the two other genotypes. However, the observed more successful acclimation required less activation of peroxidases in the doubly transformed plants than in the wild type and less increase in non-enzymatic hydroxyl radical neutralization in the dehydroascorbate reductase plus glutathione reductase fortified plants than in either of the other lines. These results highlight the fundamental role of efficient glutathione, and especially ascorbate, recycling in the chloroplast in response to exposure of plants to UV-B. They also identify chloroplast localized peroxidases among the large variety of leaf peroxidases as essential elements of defense, supporting our earlier hypothesis on hydrogen peroxide UV-B photo-cleavage as the primary mechanism behind damage.

  12. Elevated ROS-scavenging enzymes contribute to acclimation to UV-B exposure in transplastomic tobacco plants, reducing the role of plastid peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Czégény, Gyula; Le Martret, Bénédicte; Pávkovics, Dóra; Dix, Philip J; Hideg, Éva

    2016-08-20

    Leaf peroxidases play a key role in the successful acclimation of plants to low UV-B doses. The aim of the present study was to examine whether selective enhancement of alternative chloroplast antioxidant pathways achieved by chloroplast transformation affected the need for peroxidase defense. Transplastomic tobacco lines expressing glutathione reductase in combination with either dehydroascorbate reductase or glutathione-S-transferase in their plastids exhibited better tolerance to supplemental UV-B than wild type plants. After 10days UV treatment, both the maximum and effective quantum yields of PSII decreased in the wild type by 10% but were unaffected in either of the transformed lines. Activities of total peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase, in addition to dehydroascorbate reductase and gluthatione-S-transferase, were increased by UV in all lines. Gluthatione reductase activity was unaffected by UV in the transplastomic line engineered to have a higher constitutive level of this enzyme, but increased in the two other genotypes. However, the observed more successful acclimation required less activation of peroxidases in the doubly transformed plants than in the wild type and less increase in non-enzymatic hydroxyl radical neutralization in the dehydroascorbate reductase plus glutathione reductase fortified plants than in either of the other lines. These results highlight the fundamental role of efficient glutathione, and especially ascorbate, recycling in the chloroplast in response to exposure of plants to UV-B. They also identify chloroplast localized peroxidases among the large variety of leaf peroxidases as essential elements of defense, supporting our earlier hypothesis on hydrogen peroxide UV-B photo-cleavage as the primary mechanism behind damage. PMID:27448725

  13. Archaeal Mo-Containing Glyceraldehyde Oxidoreductase Isozymes Exhibit Diverse Substrate Specificities through Unique Subunit Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Masayuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Archaea use glycolytic pathways distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes, where unique enzymes catalyze each reaction step. In this study, we isolated three isozymes of glyceraldehyde oxidoreductase (GAOR1, GAOR2 and GAOR3) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. GAOR1–3 belong to the xanthine oxidoreductase superfamily, and are composed of a molybdo-pyranopterin subunit (L), a flavin subunit (M), and an iron-sulfur subunit (S), forming an LMS hetero-trimer unit. We found that GAOR1 is a tetramer of the STK17810/STK17830/STK17820 hetero-trimer, GAOR2 is a dimer of the STK23390/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer, and GAOR3 is the STK24840/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer. GAOR1–3 exhibited diverse substrate specificities for their electron donors and acceptors, due to their different L-subunits, and probably participate in the non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway. We determined the crystal structure of GAOR2, as the first three-dimensional structure of an archaeal molybdenum-containing hydroxylase, to obtain structural insights into their substrate specificities and subunit assemblies. The gene arrangement and the crystal structure suggested that the M/S-complex serves as a structural scaffold for the binding of the L-subunit, to construct the three enzymes with different specificities. Collectively, our findings illustrate a novel principle of a prokaryotic multicomponent isozyme system. PMID:26808202

  14. Inhibitory effect of Aristolochia fruit on Cytochrome P450 isozymes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuzhen; Gao, Jingwen; Shi, Zhan; QLi, George; Chen, Zuanguang; Yao, Meicun

    2015-05-01

    The mature fruits of Aristolochia debilis, known in China by the name, "Madouling" has been popularly prescribed in Asia, particularly in China, to treat a range of conditions including gynaecological problems, arthritis and wound healing. This study was aimed to evaluate the potential effect of Madouling on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes in vitro in microsomal fractions and in vivo in rats. The influence of Madouling on CYPs activity was first explored by an in vitro method of estimating levels of four respective metabolites in rat liver microsomes. The results were re-examined in vivo in rats by using a cocktail approach involving the probe drugs theophylline, tolbutamide, chlorzoxazone and dapsone. Pharmacokinetics of the four substrates was used to analyze the activities of the targeting isozymes. In vitro study revealed that Madouling decreased the activity of CYP1A2, 3A1 and 2E1. However, no significant influence on CYP2C6 was found. These results coincided with those of in vivo study to a great degree except that in vivo estimation the herb didn't inhibit CYP1A2 significantly. From the data obtained, Madouling is suggested as a candidate for clinically significant CYP interactions. Drug co-administrated with Madouling may need dose adjustment.

  15. Expression of rapeseed microsomal lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase isozymes enhances seed oil content in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Sylvie; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Lessire, René; Delseny, Michel; Roscoe, Thomas J

    2010-02-01

    In higher plants, lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT), located in the cytoplasmic endomembrane compartment, plays an essential role in the synthesis of phosphatidic acid, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids in all tissues and storage lipids in developing seeds. In order to assess the contribution of LPAATs to the synthesis of storage lipids, we have characterized two microsomal LPAAT isozymes, the products of homoeologous genes that are expressed in rapeseed (Brassica napus). DNA sequence homologies, complementation of a bacterial LPAAT-deficient mutant, and enzymatic properties confirmed that each of two cDNAs isolated from a Brassica napus immature embryo library encoded a functional LPAAT possessing the properties of a eukaryotic pathway enzyme. Analyses in planta revealed differences in the expression of the two genes, one of which was detected in all rapeseed tissues and during silique and seed development, whereas the expression of the second gene was restricted predominantly to siliques and developing seeds. Expression of each rapeseed LPAAT isozyme in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) resulted in the production of seeds characterized by a greater lipid content and seed mass. These results support the hypothesis that increasing the expression of glycerolipid acyltransferases in seeds leads to a greater flux of intermediates through the Kennedy pathway and results in enhanced triacylglycerol accumulation.

  16. Applications of β-gal-III isozyme from Bacillus coagulans RCS3, in lactose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Navneet; Singh, Jagtar; Joshi, Amit; Bhatia, Sonu

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus coagulans RCS3 isolated from hot water springs secreted five isozymes i.e. β-gal I-V of β-galactosidase. β-gal III isozyme was purified using DEAE cellulose and Sephadex G 100 column chromatography. Its molecular weight characterization showed a single band at 315kD in Native PAGE, while two subunits of 50.1 and 53.7 kD in SDS PAGE. β-Gal III had pH optima in the range of 6-7 and temperature optima at 65°C. It preferred nitro-aryl-β-d-galactoside as substrate having K(m) of 4.16 mM with ONPG. More than 85% and 80% hydrolysis of lactose (1-5%, w/v) was recorded within 48 h of incubation at 55°C and 50°C respectively and pH range of 6-7. About 78-86% hydrolysis of lactose in various brands of standardized milk was recorded at incubation temperature of 50°C. These results marked the applications of β-gal III in processing of milk/whey industry. PMID:21855568

  17. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Atack, John M.; Beacham, Ifor R.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Escherichia coli contains two L-asparaginase isozymes with distinct localization, kinetics and regulation. •Mutant strains were used to examine the roles of these enzymes in L-asparagine utilization. •We report that L-asparaginase II permits growth on asparagine and glycerol under anaerobic conditions. •We propose that this enzyme is the first step in a co-regulated pathway leading to fumarate. •The pathway is regulated by anaerobiosis and cAMP and provides a terminal elector acceptor. -- Abstract: Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen.

  18. On the distribution and characteristics of isozyme expression in Mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, and Ureaplasma species.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S. J.; Simonson, J. M.; Razin, S.; Barile, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    A summary of a survey of three genera of mycoplasmatales (Mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, and Ureaplasma) for isozyme expression is presented. Isozyme analysis of mycoplasmas has been employed in at least three distinct areas: (1) as genetic markers for identification, individualization, and taxonomic classification; (2) as markers for cell culture contamination; and (3) as a qualitative measure of the operative metabolic pathways in the diverse species. We have found five ubiquitous enzymes: purine nucleoside phosphorylase, adenylate kinase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, dipeptidase, and esterase. Three enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase, were restricted to Acholeplasma species and were not detected in Mycoplasma or Ureaplasma. Four glycolytic enzymes, glucose phosphate isomerase, triose phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and lactate dehydrogenase, were restricted to those species of Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma capable of glucose fermentation. Two of these glycolytic enzymes, glucose phosphate isomerase and lactate dehydrogenase, were detected in serovars I and II of U. urealyticum, which is inconsistent with the non-glycolytic activity in this genus. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6679151

  19. Role of PKC isozymes in low-power light-stimulated proliferation of cultured skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Nili; Kleitman, Vered; Meller, Julia; Kaufmann, Roland; Akgun, Nermin; Ruck, Angelika; Livneh, Etta; Lubart, Rachel

    2000-11-01

    Exposure of cultured skin cells to low power visible light leads to a transiently stimulated proliferation. Facilitation of this response requires the presence of active PKC, elevation of intracellular calcium, and involves reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the role of PKC(alpha) and PCK(eta) was examined using paired murine fibroblasts, differing in the level of these isozymes expression. The ability of the cells to respond to low power UVA light or HeNe laser by stimulated proliferation was correlated with an active state or overexpression of PKC(alpha) , but not PKC(eta) . A parallel response was obtained in cells that were loaded with A1PcS4 before photosensitization. Whenever this latter treatment caused a light-stimulated inhibition, it was accompanied by the intracellular calcium and photosensitizer dynamics typical of the effect of PDT on rate epithelial cells. Accordingly, added antioxidants that suppressed light-stimulated proliferation also suppressed this light-stimulated inhibition. The model systems employed in this study are the first to demonstrate the specific effect of PKC isozymes on light-stimulated proliferation, in relation to oxidative stress, and indicate their dual role in light-tissue interaction.

  20. Soybean roots retain the seed urease isozyme synthesized during embryo development

    SciTech Connect

    Torisky, R.S.; Polacco, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Roots of young soybean plants contain two urease isozymes which are separable by hydroxyapatite chromatography. These two urease species (HAP1 and HAP2) differ in: (1) native gel electrophoretic mobility, (2) pH optima, and (3) recognition by a monoclonal antibody specific for the embryo-specific urease. By these parameters HAP1 is similar to the abundant embryo-specific urease isozyme while HAP2 resembles the ubiquitous urease, found in all soybean tissues previously examined (embryo, seed coat, cultured cells). Roots of mutant soybean plants lacking the seed urease contain no HAP1 urease activity, whereas roots of mutants lacking the ubiquitous urease contain no HAP2 urease activity. However, adventitious roots generated from cuttings of any urease genotype lack HAP1 urease activity. Furthermore, ({sup 35}S) methionine labelling shows no {und de novo} synthesis of the HAP1 urease in the root, and total root HAP1 urease activity decreases sharply following germination. We conclude: (1) HAP1 is a remnant of the seed urease accumulated in the embryonic root axis during seed development, and (2) HAP2 is ubiquitous urease synthesized de novo in the root.

  1. A PI 4. 6 peroxidase that specifically crosslinks extensin precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Upham, B.L; Alizadeh, H.; Ryan, K.J.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The primary cell wall is a microcomposite of cellulose, pectin, hemicellulose and protein. The warp-weft model of the primary cell wall hypothesize that extensin monomers are intermolecularly crosslinked orthogonal to the cellulose microfibril thus mechanically coupling the major load-bearing polymer: cellulose. Media of tomato cell cultures contains heat labile, peroxide dependent crosslinking activity, as determined by the rate of decrease in monomer concentration analyzed via Superose-6. Isoelectric focusing of tomato cell culture media indicated crosslinking was predominantly in the acidic peroxidase fraction (pI4.6). This peroxidase was partially purified by ultracentrifugation, DEAE-Trisacryl and HPLC-DEAE chromatography techniques resulting in a 90 fold purification and 45% yield. A second acidic peroxidase eluted from the HPLC-DEAE column had 25% of the crosslinking activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. Purified basic peroxidase had only 0.7% of the activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. The specific activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase was 5,473 mg extensin crosslinked/min/mg peroxidase. The pI 4.6 peroxidase crosslinked the following extensins: tomato I and II, carrot, Ginkgo II and did not crosslink Ginkgo I, Douglas Fir, Maize, Asparagus I and II, and sugarbeet extensins as well as bovine serum albumin. Comparison of motifs common to extensins that are crosslinked by the pI 4.6 peroxidase may help identify the crosslink domain(s) of extension.

  2. Two cationic peroxidases from cell walls of Araucaria araucana seeds.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, A; Cardemil, L

    1995-05-01

    We have previously reported the purification and partial characterization of two cationic peroxidases from the cell walls of seeds and seedlings of the South American conifer, Araucaria araucana. In this work, we have studied the amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequences of both enzymes. We also compare the data obtained from these analyses with those reported for other plant peroxidases. The two peroxidases are similar in their amino acid compositions. Both are particularly rich in glycine, which comprises more than 30% of the amino acid residues. The content of serine is also high, ca 17%. The two enzymes are different in their content of arginine, alanine, valine, phenylalanine and threonine. Both peroxidases have identical NH2-terminal sequences, indicating that the two proteins are genetically related and probably are isoforms of the same kind of peroxidase. The amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequence analyses showed marked differences from the cationic peroxidases from turnip and horseradish. PMID:7786490

  3. Characterization of a new liver- and kidney-specific pfkfb3 isozyme that is downregulated by cell proliferation and dedifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, Joan; Gomez, Marta; Navarro-Sabate, Aurea; Riera-Sans, Lluis; Obach, Merce; Manzano, Anna; Perales, Jose C.; Bartrons, Ramon

    2008-03-21

    The bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose 2,6-bisphosphatase (PFK-2) catalyzes the synthesis and degradation of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P{sub 2}), a signalling molecule that controls the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in several cell types. Four genes, designated Pfkfb1-4, code several PFK-2 isozymes that differ in their kinetic properties, molecular masses, and regulation by protein kinases. In rat tissues, Pfkfb3 gene accounts for eight splice variants and two of them, ubiquitous and inducible PFK-2 isozymes, have been extensively studied and related to cell proliferation and tumour metabolism. Here, we characterize a new kidney- and liver-specific Pfkfb3 isozyme, a product of the RB2K3 splice variant, and demonstrate that its expression, in primary cultured hepatocytes, depends on hepatic cell proliferation and dedifferentiation. In parallel, our results provide further evidence that ubiquitous PFK-2 is a crucial isozyme in supporting growing and proliferant cell metabolism.

  4. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity.

  5. Immunohistochemical study of temporal variations in cytochrome P-450 isozymes in rat testis and their modifications by the inductive effects of cadinenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Motohashi, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Yatagai, Mitsuyoshi; Takano, Takehito

    1991-12-01

    Temporal variations in cytochrome P-450 isozymes of rat testis, PB-P-450 (forms of cytochrome P-450 strongly induced by phenobarbital) and MC-P-448 (forms of cytochrome P-450 strongly induced by 3-methylcholanthrene), were investigated immunohistochemically by the avidin-biotin-complex method using specific antibodies against PB-P-450 and MC-P-448 isozymes. Immunoreactivity to both PB-P-450 and MC-P-448 isozymes was observed in Leydig cells. The number of PB-P-450 positive Leydig cells was found to undergo significant time-of-day variation with a peak time of 0000 hours (light phase from 0800 to 2000 hours). Injection of cadinenes (300 mg/kg per day intraperitoneally at 48 and 96 h before sacrifice) induced PB-P-450 isozyme but did not induce MC-P-448 isozyme. The induction of PB-P-450 isozyme by cadinenes was time dependent, and the early dark phase (2000 and 0000 hours) was most sensitive. These results suggest that temporal variation of cytochrome P-450 isozymes is one of the important physiological variations in detoxification and activation of various xenobiotics and chemicals in the testis.

  6. Inhibitory effects of flavonoids on phosphodiesterase isozymes from guinea pig and their structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wun-Chang; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Lai, Ya-Hsin; Chen, Jun-Hao; Huang, Hui-Lin

    2004-11-15

    The structure-activity relationships of flavonoids with regard to their inhibitory effects on phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes are little known. The activities of PDE1-5 were measured by a two-step procedure using cAMP with [(3)H]-cAMP or cGMP with [(3)H]-cGMP as substrates. In the present results, PDE1, 5, 2, and 4 isozymes were partially purified from guinea pig lungs in that order, and PDE3 was from the heart. The IC(50) values of PDE1-5 were greater than those reported previously for the reference drugs, vinpocetin, EHNA, milrinone, Ro 20-1724, and zaprinast, by 5-, 5-, 7-, 5-, and 3-fold, respectively. As shown in Table 2, luteolin revealed non-selective inhibition of PDE1-5 with IC(50) values in a range of 10-20 microM, as did genistein except with a low potency on PDE5. Daidzein, an inactive analogue of genistein in tyrosine kinase inhibition, showed selective inhibition of PDE3 with an IC(50) value of around 30 microM, as did eriodictyol with an IC(50) value of around 50 microM. Hesperetin and prunetin exhibited more-selective inhibition of PDE4 with IC(50) values of around 30 and 60 microM, respectively. Luteolin-7-glucoside exhibited dual inhibition of PDE2/PDE4 with an IC(50) value of around 40 microM. Diosmetin more-selectively inhibited PDE2 (IC(50) of 4.8 microM) than PDE1, PDE4, or PDE5. However, biochanin A more-selectively inhibited PDE4 (IC(50) of 8.5 microM) than PDE1 or PDE2. Apigenin inhibited PDE1-3 with IC(50) values of around 10-25 microM. Myricetin inhibited PDE1-4 with IC(50) values of around 10-40 microM. The same was true for quercetin, but we rather consider that it more-selectively inhibited PDE3 and PDE4 (IC(50) of < 10 microM). In conclusion, it is possible to synthesize useful drugs through elucidating the structure-activity relationships of flavonoids with respect to inhibition of PDE isozymes at concentrations used in this in vitro study.

  7. Inhibitory effects of flavonoids on phosphodiesterase isozymes from guinea pig and their structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wun-Chang; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Lai, Ya-Hsin; Chen, Jun-Hao; Huang, Hui-Lin

    2004-11-15

    The structure-activity relationships of flavonoids with regard to their inhibitory effects on phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes are little known. The activities of PDE1-5 were measured by a two-step procedure using cAMP with [(3)H]-cAMP or cGMP with [(3)H]-cGMP as substrates. In the present results, PDE1, 5, 2, and 4 isozymes were partially purified from guinea pig lungs in that order, and PDE3 was from the heart. The IC(50) values of PDE1-5 were greater than those reported previously for the reference drugs, vinpocetin, EHNA, milrinone, Ro 20-1724, and zaprinast, by 5-, 5-, 7-, 5-, and 3-fold, respectively. As shown in Table 2, luteolin revealed non-selective inhibition of PDE1-5 with IC(50) values in a range of 10-20 microM, as did genistein except with a low potency on PDE5. Daidzein, an inactive analogue of genistein in tyrosine kinase inhibition, showed selective inhibition of PDE3 with an IC(50) value of around 30 microM, as did eriodictyol with an IC(50) value of around 50 microM. Hesperetin and prunetin exhibited more-selective inhibition of PDE4 with IC(50) values of around 30 and 60 microM, respectively. Luteolin-7-glucoside exhibited dual inhibition of PDE2/PDE4 with an IC(50) value of around 40 microM. Diosmetin more-selectively inhibited PDE2 (IC(50) of 4.8 microM) than PDE1, PDE4, or PDE5. However, biochanin A more-selectively inhibited PDE4 (IC(50) of 8.5 microM) than PDE1 or PDE2. Apigenin inhibited PDE1-3 with IC(50) values of around 10-25 microM. Myricetin inhibited PDE1-4 with IC(50) values of around 10-40 microM. The same was true for quercetin, but we rather consider that it more-selectively inhibited PDE3 and PDE4 (IC(50) of < 10 microM). In conclusion, it is possible to synthesize useful drugs through elucidating the structure-activity relationships of flavonoids with respect to inhibition of PDE isozymes at concentrations used in this in vitro study. PMID:15476679

  8. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed hydroxylations: mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Dordick, J S; Klibanov, A M; Marletta, M A

    1986-05-20

    The hydroxylation of phenol to hydroquinone and catechol in the presence of dihydroxyfumaric acid and oxygen catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase was studied under conditions where the product yield was high and the side reactions were minimal. The reaction is partially uncoupled with a molar ratio of dihydroxyfumaric acid consumed to hydroxylated products of 12:1. Hydrogen peroxide does not participate in the reaction as evidenced by the lack of effect of catalase and by the direct addition of hydrogen peroxide. Conversely, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are involved as their scavengers are potent inhibitors. Experiments were all consistent with the involvement of compound III (oxygenated ferrous complex) of peroxidase in the reaction. Compound III is stable in the presence of phenol alone but decomposes rapidly in the presence of both phenol and dihydroxyfumaric acid with the concomitant formation of product. Therefore, phenol and dihydroxyfumaric acid must be present with compound III in order for the hydroxylation reaction to occur. A mechanism consistent with the experimental results is proposed. PMID:3718931

  9. Roles of apoplastic peroxidases in plant response to wounding.

    PubMed

    Minibayeva, Farida; Beckett, Richard Peter; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Apoplastic class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) play key roles in the response of plants to pathogen infection and abiotic stresses, including wounding. Wounding is a common stress for plants that can be caused by insect or animal grazing or trampling, or result from agricultural practices. Typically, mechanical damage to a plant immediately induces a rapid release and activation of apoplastic peroxidases, and an oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS), followed by the upregulation of peroxidase genes. We discuss how plants control the expression of peroxidases genes upon wounding, and also the sparse information on peroxidase-mediated signal transduction pathways. Evidence reviewed here suggests that in many plants production of the ROS that comprise the initial oxidative burst results from a complex interplay of peroxidases with other apoplastic enzymes. Later responses following wounding include various forms of tissue healing, for example through peroxidase-dependent suberinization, or cell death. Limited data suggest that ROS-mediated death signalling during the wound response may involve the peroxidase network, together with other redox molecules. In conclusion, the ability of peroxidases to both generate and scavenge ROS plays a key role in the involvement of these enigmatic enzymes in plant stress tolerance.

  10. Inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isozymes type-III and type-IV suppress mitogenesis of rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matousovic, K; Grande, J P; Chini, C C; Chini, E N; Dousa, T P

    1995-01-01

    We studied interactions between the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway and cAMP-protein kinase (PKA) signaling pathway in regulation of mitogenesis of mesangial cells (MC) determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation, with or without added EGF. Forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP strongly (by 60-70%) inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into MC. Cilostamide, lixazinone or cilostazol selective inhibitors of cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozyme PDE-III, inhibited mitogenesis to similar extent as forskolin and DBcAMP and activated in situ PKA, but without detectable increase in cAMP levels. Cilostamide and cilostazol were more than three times more effective at inhibiting mesangial mitogenesis than rolipram and denbufylline, inhibitors of isozyme PDE-IV, even though PDE-IV was two times more abundant in MC than was PDE-III. On the other hand, when incubated with forskolin, rolipram-enhanced cAMP accumulation was far greater (10-100x) than with cilostamide. EGF increased MAPK activity (+300%); PDE isozyme inhibitors which suppressed mitogenesis also inhibited MAPK. PDE isozyme inhibitors also suppressed PDGF-stimulated MC proliferation. We conclude that cAMP inhibits the mitogen-dependent MAPK-signaling pathway probably by decreasing the activity of Raf-1 due to PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation. Further, we surmise that minor increase in the cAMP pool metabolized by PDE-III is intimately related to regulation of mesangial proliferation. Thus, PDE isozyme inhibitors have the potential to suppress MC proliferation by a focused effect upon signaling pathways. Images PMID:7615811

  11. Effect of NaCl on leaf salt secretion and antioxidative enzyme level in roots of a mangrove, Aegiceras corniculatum.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sujatarani; Das, A B

    2003-02-01

    Short-term salt (NaCl) treatment on Aegiceras corniculatum in roots and leaves showed no change in fresh and dry weight of leaves, roots and leaf area. There was no significant change in total soluble root protein, photosynthetic pigments of leaves and spectral characteristics of thylakoids. However, the activity of antioxidative enzymes (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase) in roots decreased by 72, 58 and 80% respectively after 96 hr of treatment (300 mM of NaCl). Secretion of salts from the leaf salt glands and salt accumulation on upper surface of the leaves were quantified that revealed linear increase of salt secretion of leaf with increase in period of salt treatment. It was concluded that loss of activities of antioxidative enzymes at high salt treatment, caused leaf senescence in spite of high rates of salt secretion by Aegiceras corniculatum. PMID:15255609

  12. Molecular characterization of the basidiomycete isolate Nematoloma frowardii b19 and its manganese peroxidase places the fungus in the corticioid genus Phlebia.

    PubMed

    Hildén, Kristiina S; Bortfeldt, Ralf; Hofrichter, Martin; Hatakka, Annele; Lundell, Taina K

    2008-08-01

    The basidiomycete isolate b19, originally identified by morphological characteristics of the fruiting body as Nematoloma frowardii, efficiently produces manganese peroxidase (MNP) and is used for degradation of natural, persistent aromatic polymers (lignin, humic acids and brown coal components). The N. frowardii MNP has shown good activity in conversion of xenobiotic compounds such as polycyclic hydrocarbons and trinitrotoluene. However, this biotechnologically promising fungus has not previously been studied at the molecular biology level. We show here that according to the molecular characterization of its main MNP isozyme, Nf b19 MNP2, and partial sequencing of its MNP3-, three lignin peroxidase- and two laccase-encoding genes, and the gene encoding the ribosomal SSU 18S RNA, that the fungus has a close phylogenetic relationship to the white-rot basidiomycete Phlebia radiata (Fr.). Ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence (ITS1+5.8S+ITS2) phylogeny reclassifies Nf b19 as a possible representative of a new species of the genus Phlebia, nearest to the Phlebia acerina clade. The genus Phlebia belongs to a completely different family (Corticiaceae) and order (Aphyllophorales) within the phylum Basidiomycota than the genus Nematoloma, which is classified in the order Agaricales, family Strophariaceae. Our results thus indicate a need for systematic re-identification of the previously named N. frowardii isolate b19.

  13. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  14. Purification of peroxidase isoenzymes from turnip roots.

    PubMed

    Hamed, R R; Maharem, T M; Abel Fatah, M M; Ataya, F S

    1998-08-01

    Simple reproducible procedures for purification of the main soluble (S) and ionically bound (IB) cationic peroxidase isoenzymes from turnip roots were established. The procedures included ammonium sulfate precipitation of the isoenzymes, chromatographic separation of the main isoenzymes using cellulose phosphate columns and purification to homogeneity by hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl Sepharose columns. The specific activity of the phenyl Sepharose purified S and IB isoenzymes were 2760 and 896 units/mg protein with 140 and 4.8 fold increase over the crude extract and 38 and 13% recovery. The pH maxima and K(m) for phenol and H2O2 of purified S and IB were determined. PMID:9720311

  15. Accelerating peroxidase mimicking nanozymes using DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-08-01

    DNA-capped iron oxide nanoparticles are nearly 10-fold more active as a peroxidase mimic for TMB oxidation than naked nanoparticles. To understand the mechanism, the effect of DNA length and sequence is systematically studied, and other types of polymers are also compared. This rate enhancement is more obvious with longer DNA and, in particular, poly-cytosine. Among the various polymer coatings tested, DNA offers the highest rate enhancement. A similar acceleration is also observed for nanoceria. On the other hand, when the positively charged TMB substrate is replaced by the negatively charged ABTS, DNA inhibits oxidation. Therefore, the negatively charged phosphate backbone and bases of DNA can increase TMB binding by the iron oxide nanoparticles, thus facilitating the oxidation reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide.DNA-capped iron oxide nanoparticles are nearly 10-fold more active as a peroxidase mimic for TMB oxidation than naked nanoparticles. To understand the mechanism, the effect of DNA length and sequence is systematically studied, and other types of polymers are also compared. This rate enhancement is more obvious with longer DNA and, in particular, poly-cytosine. Among the various polymer coatings tested, DNA offers the highest rate enhancement. A similar acceleration is also observed for nanoceria. On the other hand, when the positively charged TMB substrate is replaced by the negatively charged ABTS, DNA inhibits oxidation. Therefore, the negatively charged phosphate backbone and bases of DNA can increase TMB binding by the iron oxide nanoparticles, thus facilitating the oxidation reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04176g

  16. ATP-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Juhi; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known to possess intrinsic biological peroxidase-like activity that has applications in development of numerous biosensors. The reactivity of the Au atoms at the surface of AuNPs is critical to the performance of such biosensors, yet little is known about the effect of biomolecules and ions on the peroxidase-like activity. In this work, the effect of ATP and other biologically relevant molecules and ions over peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs are described. Contrary to the expectation that nanoparticles exposed to biomolecules may lose the catalytic property, ATP and ADP addition enhanced the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs. The catalytic activity was unaltered by the addition of free phosphate, sulphate and carbonate anions however, addition of ascorbic acid to the reaction mixture diminished the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs, even in the presence of ATP and ADP. In contrast to AuNPs, ATP did not synergize and improve the peroxidase activity of the natural peroxidase enzyme, horseradish peroxidase.

  17. PeroxiBase: a class III plant peroxidase database.

    PubMed

    Bakalovic, Nenad; Passardi, Filippo; Ioannidis, Vassilios; Cosio, Claudia; Penel, Claude; Falquet, Laurent; Dunand, Christophe

    2006-03-01

    Class III plant peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7), which are encoded by multigenic families in land plants, are involved in several important physiological and developmental processes. Their varied functions are not yet clearly determined, but their characterization will certainly lead to a better understanding of plant growth, differentiation and interaction with the environment, and hence to many exciting applications. Since there is currently no central database for plant peroxidase sequences and many plant sequences are not deposited in the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ repository or the UniProt KnowledgeBase, this prevents researchers from easily accessing all peroxidase sequences. Furthermore, gene expression data are poorly covered and annotations are inconsistent. In this rapidly moving field, there is a need for continual updating and correction of the peroxidase superfamily in plants. Moreover, consolidating information about peroxidases will allow for comparison of peroxidases between species and thus significantly help making correlations of function, structure or phylogeny. We report a new database (PeroxiBase) accessible through a web server with specific tools dedicated to facilitate query, classification and submission of peroxidase sequences. Recent developments in the field of plant peroxidase are also mentioned.

  18. Tissue-specific expression and post-translational modifications of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis L.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Brendan; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Hill, Allyson T; Bettridge, James; Park, Joonho; Rao, Srinath K; Leach, Craig A; Plaxton, William C

    2011-11-01

    This study employs transcript profiling together with immunoblotting and co-immunopurification to assess the tissue-specific expression, protein:protein interactions, and post-translational modifications (PTMs) of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) isozymes (PTPC and BTPC, respectively) in the castor plant, Ricinus communis. Previous studies established that the Class-1 PEPC (PTPC homotetramer) of castor oil seeds (COS) is activated by phosphorylation at Ser-11 and inhibited by monoubiquitination at Lys-628 during endosperm development and germination, respectively. Elimination of photosynthate supply to developing COS by depodding caused the PTPC of the endosperm and cotyledon to be dephosphorylated, and then subsequently monoubiquitinated in vivo. PTPC monoubiquitination rather than phosphorylation is widespread throughout the castor plant and appears to be the predominant PTM of Class-1 PEPC that occurs in planta. The distinctive developmental patterns of PTPC phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination indicates that these two PTMs are mutually exclusive. By contrast, the BTPC: (i) is abundant in the inner integument, cotyledon, and endosperm of developing COS, but occurs at low levels in roots and cotyledons of germinated COS, (ii) shows a unique developmental pattern in leaves such that it is present in leaf buds and young expanding leaves, but undetectable in fully expanded leaves, and (iii) tightly interacts with co-expressed PTPC to form the novel and allosterically-desensitized Class-2 PEPC heteromeric complex. BTPC and thus Class-2 PEPC up-regulation appears to be a distinctive feature of rapidly growing and/or biosynthetically active tissues that require a large anaplerotic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons being withdrawn for anabolism.

  19. Effects of microwaves (900 MHz) on peroxidase systems: A comparison between lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barteri, Mario; De Carolis, Roberta; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Tomassetti, Goliardo; Montemiglio, Linda Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the effects of exposure to an electromagnetic field at 900 MHz on the catalytic activity of the enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Experimental evidence that irradiation causes conformational changes of the active sites and influences the formation and stability of the intermediate free radicals is documented by measurements of enzyme kinetics, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and cyclic voltammetry. PMID:25577980

  20. Effects of microwaves (900 MHz) on peroxidase systems: A comparison between lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barteri, Mario; De Carolis, Roberta; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Tomassetti, Goliardo; Montemiglio, Linda Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the effects of exposure to an electromagnetic field at 900 MHz on the catalytic activity of the enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Experimental evidence that irradiation causes conformational changes of the active sites and influences the formation and stability of the intermediate free radicals is documented by measurements of enzyme kinetics, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and cyclic voltammetry.

  1. Biosynthesis of ascaridole: iodide peroxidase-catalyzed synthesis of a monoterpene endoperoxide in soluble extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides fruit.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M A; Croteau, R

    1984-11-15

    Ascaridole, an asymmetric monoterpene endoperoxide with anthelmintic properties, occurs as a major constituent (60-80%) in the volatile oil of American wormseed fruit (Chenopodium ambrosioides: Chenopodiaceae), and as a lesser component in the leaf pocket oil of the boldo tree (Peumus boldus: Monimiaceae). Determination of optical activity and chromatographic resolution of naturally occurring ascaridole, and several synthetic derivatives, showed that both wormseed and boldo produce ascaridole in racemic form. The biosynthesis of ascaridole from the conjugated, symmetrical diene alpha-terpinene (a major component of the oil from wormseed) was shown to be catalyzed by a soluble iodide peroxidase isolated from homogenates of C. ambrosioides fruit and leaves. The enzymatic synthesis of ascaridole was confirmed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of the product, which was also shown to be racemic. Optimal enzymatic activity occurred at pH 4.0 in the presence of 2.5 mM H2O2 and 1 mM NaI. Soluble enzyme extracts were fractionated by gel filtration on both Sephacryl S-300 and Sephadex G-100, and were shown to consist of a high-molecular-weight peroxidase component (Mr greater than 1,000,000, 30% of total activity) and two other peroxidase species having apparent molecular weights of 62,000 and 45,000 (major component). Peroxidase activity was susceptible to proteolytic destruction only after periodate treatment, suggesting an association of the enzyme(s) with polysaccharide material. Ascaridole biosynthesis from alpha-terpinene was inhibited by cyanide, catalase, and reducing agents, but not by compounds that trap superoxide or quench singlet oxygen. A peroxide transfer reaction initiated by peroxidase-generated I+ is proposed for the conversion of alpha-terpinene to ascaridole. PMID:6497393

  2. Biosynthesis of ascaridole: iodide peroxidase-catalyzed synthesis of a monoterpene endoperoxide in soluble extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides fruit.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M A; Croteau, R

    1984-11-15

    Ascaridole, an asymmetric monoterpene endoperoxide with anthelmintic properties, occurs as a major constituent (60-80%) in the volatile oil of American wormseed fruit (Chenopodium ambrosioides: Chenopodiaceae), and as a lesser component in the leaf pocket oil of the boldo tree (Peumus boldus: Monimiaceae). Determination of optical activity and chromatographic resolution of naturally occurring ascaridole, and several synthetic derivatives, showed that both wormseed and boldo produce ascaridole in racemic form. The biosynthesis of ascaridole from the conjugated, symmetrical diene alpha-terpinene (a major component of the oil from wormseed) was shown to be catalyzed by a soluble iodide peroxidase isolated from homogenates of C. ambrosioides fruit and leaves. The enzymatic synthesis of ascaridole was confirmed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of the product, which was also shown to be racemic. Optimal enzymatic activity occurred at pH 4.0 in the presence of 2.5 mM H2O2 and 1 mM NaI. Soluble enzyme extracts were fractionated by gel filtration on both Sephacryl S-300 and Sephadex G-100, and were shown to consist of a high-molecular-weight peroxidase component (Mr greater than 1,000,000, 30% of total activity) and two other peroxidase species having apparent molecular weights of 62,000 and 45,000 (major component). Peroxidase activity was susceptible to proteolytic destruction only after periodate treatment, suggesting an association of the enzyme(s) with polysaccharide material. Ascaridole biosynthesis from alpha-terpinene was inhibited by cyanide, catalase, and reducing agents, but not by compounds that trap superoxide or quench singlet oxygen. A peroxide transfer reaction initiated by peroxidase-generated I+ is proposed for the conversion of alpha-terpinene to ascaridole.

  3. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  4. The quantum mixed-spin heme state of barley peroxidase: A paradigm for class III peroxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Howes, B D; Schiodt, C B; Welinder, K G; Marzocchi, M P; Ma, J G; Zhang, J; Shelnutt, J A; Smulevich, G

    1999-01-01

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values, at both room temperature and 20 K, are reported, together with electron paramagnetic resonance spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species coexists with 6- and 5-cHS hemes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the currently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling may be necessary for the QS state. PMID:10388773

  5. Polysaccharide fraction from higher plants which strongly interacts with the cytosolic phosphorylase isozyme. I. Isolation and characterization. [Spinacia oleracea L. ; Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yi; Steup, M. )

    1990-11-01

    From leaves of Spinacia oleracea L. or from Pisum sativum L. and from cotyledons of germinating pea seeds a high molecular weight polysaccharide fraction was isolated. The apparent size of the fraction, as determined by gel filtration, was similar to that of dextran blue. Following acid hydrolysis the monomer content of the polysaccharide preparation was studied using high pressure liquid and thin layer chromatography. Glucose, galactose, arabinose, and ribose were the main monosaccharide compounds. The native polysaccharide preparation interacted strongly with the cytosolic isozyme of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1). Interaction with the plastidic phosphorylase isozyme(s) was by far weaker. Interaction with the cytosolic isozyme was demonstrated by affinity electrophoresis, kinetic measurements, and by {sup 14}C-labeling experiments in which the glucosyl transfer from ({sup 14}C)glucose 1-phosphate to the polysaccharide preparation was monitored.

  6. Applications and Prospective of Peroxidase Biocatalysis in the Environmental Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    Environmental protection is, doubtless, one of the most important challenges for the human kind. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, endocrine disruptive chemicals, pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. A large variety of these xenobiotics are substrates for peroxidases and thus susceptible to enzymatic transformation. The literature reports mainly the use of horseradish peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and chloroperoxidase on the transformation of these pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, giving oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to a biological activity loss, a reduction in the bioavailability or due to the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. In addition, when the pollutants are present in soil, peroxidases catalyze a covalent binding to soil organic matter. In most of cases, oxidized products are less toxic and easily biodegradable than the parent compounds. In spite of their versatility and potential use in environmental processes, peroxidases are not applied at large scale yet. Diverse challenges, such as stability, redox potential, and the production of large amounts, should be solved in order to apply peroxidases in the pollutant transformation. In this chapter, we critically review the transformation of different xenobiotics by peroxidases, with special attention on the identified transformation products, the probable reaction mechanisms, and the toxicity reports. Finally, the design and development of an environmental biocatalyst is discussed. The design challenges are

  7. Special Issue: Proceedings From the 9th International Congress on Isozymes, Genes, and Gene Families, San Antonio, TX, April 14-19, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrey, John R.; VandeBerg, John L.

    1998-10-01

    This volume includes 27 peer-reviewed papers, plus an overview of the International Congress on Genes, Gene Families, and Isozymes. These proceedings provide a representative portion of the outstanding scientific program compiled for the Congress. Presented is a volume that documents the vigorous state of this field, and the manner in which is has progressed to include a wide range of approaches, from classic isozyme analysis to modern molecular biology.

  8. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid by peroxidase: involvement of reduced peroxidase and compound III with superoxide as a product.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M; Morrison, W L; Milham, P J

    1982-08-31

    Kinetic and spectral data establish that peroxidase may oxidize indole-3-acetic acid by either of two pathways depending on the enzyme/substrate ratio. When relatively low enzyme/substrate ratios are employed, the oxidation proceeds through a reduced peroxidase in equilibrium compound III shuttle. Conversely, peroxidase operates through the conventionally accepted pathway involving native enzyme and compounds I and II only when high enzyme/substrate ratios are used. Compound III, a specific oxidase, constitutes the dominant steady-state form of peroxidase when the reduced peroxidase in equilibrium compound III shuttle is operational. Activation of this shuttle also produces a flux of superoxide anion radical at the expense of molecular oxygen. Thus, important biological consequences may follow activation of this shuttle under physiological conditions.

  9. Frog lysozyme. I. Its identification, occurrence as isozymes, and quantitative distribution in tissues of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, D S; Snyder, J A; Iwata, T; Izaka, K I; Maglott, D S; Nace, G W

    1976-02-01

    In the course of examining the etiology of the Lucké renal adenocarcinoma of the frog, Rana pipiens, it was found that organs of the normal adult contain bacteriolytic enzymes. These enzymes all satisfied the six criteria for the identification of lysozymes and at least eight forms were separable by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Their qualitative and quantitative distribution was organ-specific. All eight isozymes were found in normal kidney, while liver and spleen contained seven forms; skin, six; ovarian egg, five; and serum, two. In quantitative assays using a radial diffusion test, spleen had the greatest lysozyme concentration, followed in descending order by kidney, liver, skin, and ovary. Serum contained very low amounts. In terms of enzyme activity per animal, ovary was the highest ranking organ. As such a large number of lysozyme isozymes has not been reported in any other organism, their origins and functions are considered in the context of their presence in an ectotherm.

  10. Peroxidase is involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Diz, M S S; Robaina, R R; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Carvalho, A O; Gomes, V M

    2013-04-26

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) are among the defense mechanisms of plants that work as an important barrier to the development of pathogens. These proteins are classified into 17 families according to their amino acid sequences, serology, and/or biological or enzyme activity. The present study aimed to identify PRs associated with the pathosystem of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum: Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV). Forty-five-day-old plants from accession UENF 1624, previously identified as resistant to PepYMV, were inoculated with the virus. Control and infected leaves were collected for analysis after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. The inoculated and control plants were grown in cages covered with anti-aphid screens. Proteins were extracted from leaf tissue and the presence of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, peroxidase, and lipid transport protein was verified. No difference was observed between the protein pattern of control and infected plants when β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and lipid transport protein were compared. However, increased peroxidase expression was observed in infected plants at 48 and 72 h after inoculation, indicating that this PR is involved in the response of resistance to PepYMV in C. baccatum var. pendulum.

  11. Peroxidase is involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Diz, M S S; Robaina, R R; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Carvalho, A O; Gomes, V M

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) are among the defense mechanisms of plants that work as an important barrier to the development of pathogens. These proteins are classified into 17 families according to their amino acid sequences, serology, and/or biological or enzyme activity. The present study aimed to identify PRs associated with the pathosystem of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum: Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV). Forty-five-day-old plants from accession UENF 1624, previously identified as resistant to PepYMV, were inoculated with the virus. Control and infected leaves were collected for analysis after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. The inoculated and control plants were grown in cages covered with anti-aphid screens. Proteins were extracted from leaf tissue and the presence of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, peroxidase, and lipid transport protein was verified. No difference was observed between the protein pattern of control and infected plants when β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and lipid transport protein were compared. However, increased peroxidase expression was observed in infected plants at 48 and 72 h after inoculation, indicating that this PR is involved in the response of resistance to PepYMV in C. baccatum var. pendulum. PMID:23661464

  12. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to [Beta]-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  13. Discovery of Small Molecule Isozyme Non-specific Inhibitors of Mammalian Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Freeman-Cook, K; Elliott, R; Vajdos, F; Rajamohan, F; Kohls, D; Marr, E; Harwood Jr., H; Esler, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  14. Discovery of small molecule isozyme non-specific inhibitors of mammalian acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Jeffrey W; Freeman-Cook, Kevin D; Elliott, Richard; Vajdos, Felix; Rajamohan, Francis; Kohls, Darcy; Marr, Eric; Zhang, Hailong; Tong, Liang; Tu, Meihua; Murdande, Sharad; Doran, Shawn D; Houser, Janet A; Song, Wei; Jones, Christopher J; Coffey, Steven B; Buzon, Leanne; Minich, Martha L; Dirico, Kenneth J; Tapley, Susan; McPherson, R Kirk; Sugarman, Eliot; Harwood, H James; Esler, William

    2010-04-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  15. Stomach Chitinase from Japanese Sardine Sardinops melanostictus: Purification, Characterization, and Molecular Cloning of Chitinase Isozymes with a Long Linker

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Satoshi; Ikehata, Hiroki; Tada, Chihiro; Ogino, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Hiromi; Ikeda, Mana; Fukushima, Hideto; Matsumiya, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Fish express two different chitinases, acidic fish chitinase-1 (AFCase-1) and acidic fish chitinase-2 (AFCase-2), in the stomach. AFCase-1 and AFCase-2 have different degradation patterns, as fish efficiently degrade chitin ingested as food. For a comparison with the enzymatic properties and the primary structures of chitinase isozymes obtained previously from the stomach of demersal fish, in this study, we purified chitinase isozymes from the stomach of Japanese sardine Sardinops melanostictus, a surface fish that feeds on plankton, characterized the properties of these isozymes, and cloned the cDNAs encoding chitinases. We also predicted 3D structure models using the primary structures of S. melanostictus stomach chitinases. Two chitinase isozymes, SmeChiA (45 kDa) and SmeChiB (56 kDa), were purified from the stomach of S. melanostictus. Moreover, two cDNAs, SmeChi-1 encoding SmeChiA, and SmeChi-2 encoding SmeChiB were cloned. The linker regions of the deduced amino acid sequences of SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 (SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2) are the longest among the fish stomach chitinases. In the cleavage pattern groups toward short substrates and the phylogenetic tree analysis, SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 were classified into AFCase-1 and AFCase-2, respectively. SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 had catalytic domains that consisted of a TIM-barrel (β/α)8–fold structure and a deep substrate-binding cleft. This is the first study showing the 3D structure models of fish stomach chitinases. PMID:26805857

  16. Genetic structure and diversity in the Dioscorea cayenensis/D. rotundata complex revealed by morphological and isozyme markers.

    PubMed

    Bressan, E A; Briner Neto, T; Zucchi, M I; Rabello, R J; Veasey, E A

    2014-01-21

    Of the 600 known yam species, only 10 are utilized as food, and the Dioscorea cayenensis/D. rotundata species complex is among the most cultivated. In Brazil, these species are commercially cultivated in the northeast region and are cultivated in the south and southeast regions as subsistence crops by traditional agriculturists. This study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity of 21 local varieties of D. cayenensis and 2 D. rotundata accessions using 7 isozymic loci and 24 morphological markers, and to investigate the diversity distribution in different levels of organization, such as swidden fields and communities of Vale do Ribeira. Cluster analyses for both the isozymic and morphological data separated the 2 D. rotundata accessions from the D. cayenensis accessions from Vale do Ribeira. The analysis with morphological characteristics showed the presence of 2 subgroups (Iguape and Cananéia) within group I, which included all of the local varieties from Vale do Ribeira; this result may indicate the influence of the cultural units on the morphological variation. Molecular analysis of variance indicated that most of the isozymic variability was concentrated among swiddens within communities (42.5%) and within communities (40.3%). Most of the morphological variability was also concentrated among swidden fields within communities (44.8%). The correlation between geographic and genetic distances indicated that neither morphological (r = 0.17) nor isozymic diversity (r = -0.15) is structured in space. Thus, the traditional agriculturists of Vale do Ribeira maintain and manage a great diversity of D. cayenensis varieties in their communities.

  17. Stomach Chitinase from Japanese Sardine Sardinops melanostictus: Purification, Characterization, and Molecular Cloning of Chitinase Isozymes with a Long Linker.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Satoshi; Ikehata, Hiroki; Tada, Chihiro; Ogino, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Hiromi; Ikeda, Mana; Fukushima, Hideto; Matsumiya, Masahiro

    2016-01-20

    Fish express two different chitinases, acidic fish chitinase-1 (AFCase-1) and acidic fish chitinase-2 (AFCase-2), in the stomach. AFCase-1 and AFCase-2 have different degradation patterns, as fish efficiently degrade chitin ingested as food. For a comparison with the enzymatic properties and the primary structures of chitinase isozymes obtained previously from the stomach of demersal fish, in this study, we purified chitinase isozymes from the stomach of Japanese sardine Sardinops melanostictus, a surface fish that feeds on plankton, characterized the properties of these isozymes, and cloned the cDNAs encoding chitinases. We also predicted 3D structure models using the primary structures of S. melanostictus stomach chitinases. Two chitinase isozymes, SmeChiA (45 kDa) and SmeChiB (56 kDa), were purified from the stomach of S. melanostictus. Moreover, two cDNAs, SmeChi-1 encoding SmeChiA, and SmeChi-2 encoding SmeChiB were cloned. The linker regions of the deduced amino acid sequences of SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 (SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2) are the longest among the fish stomach chitinases. In the cleavage pattern groups toward short substrates and the phylogenetic tree analysis, SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 were classified into AFCase-1 and AFCase-2, respectively. SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 had catalytic domains that consisted of a TIM-barrel (β/α)₈-fold structure and a deep substrate-binding cleft. This is the first study showing the 3D structure models of fish stomach chitinases.

  18. Separate physiological roles for two isozymes of pyridine nucleotide-linked glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in chicken.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, H. B., III; Kaplan, N. O.

    1972-01-01

    The isozymes considered are designated 'liver type' and 'muscle type' based on the tissue of highest concentration. Electrophoretic analysis shows that the liver type is found in small amounts or is undetectable in all tissues studied except liver. The muscle type is found in skeletal muscles and kidney. Presumptive hybrid enzymes occur at low levels in chicken liver and kidney. The tissue distribution of glyceron-3-P dehydrogenase in several birds capable of sustained flight is different than in chicken.

  19. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  20. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from papaya (Carica papaya) fruit.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Veda P; Singh, Swati; Singh, Rupinder; Dwivedi, Upendra N

    2012-05-01

    Ripening of papaya fruit was found to be characterized with a decrease in peroxidase activity and its transcript. This peroxidase was purified to homogeneity through successive steps of ammonium sulfate fractionation, ion exchange and molecular exclusion chromatography. The peroxidase was purified 30.22-folds with overall recovery of 44.37% and specific activity of 68.59. Purified peroxidase was found to be a heterotrimer of ~240 kDa, containing two subunits each of 85 and one of 70 kDa. Purified enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima of 7.0 and 40 °C, respectively. K(m) values for substrates o-dianicidin, guaiacol and ascorbic acid were found to be 0.125, 0.8 and 5.2 mM, respectively. K(m) for H(2)O(2) was found to be 0.25 mM. Salicylic acid was found to activate peroxidase up to 50 μM concentration, beyond which it acted as inhibitor. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) activated peroxidase while sodium azide, SDS, and Triton X-100 were found to inhibit peroxidase.

  1. Penicillium solitum produces a polygalacturonase isozyme in decayed Anjou pear fruit capable of macerating host tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jurick, Wayne M; Vico, Ivana; Gaskins, Verneta L; Whitaker, Bruce D; Garrett, Wesley M; Janisiewicz, Wojciech J; Conway, William S

    2012-01-01

    A polygalacturonase (PG) isozyme was isolated from Penicillium solitum-decayed Anjou pear fruit and purified to homogeneity with a multistep process. Both gel filtration and cation exchange chromatography revealed a single PG activity peak, and analysis of the purified protein showed a single band with a molecular mass of 43 kDa, which is of fungal origin. The purified enzyme was active from pH 3.5-6, with an optimum at pH 4.5. PG activity was detectable 0-70 C with 50 C maximum. The purified isozyme was inhibited by the divalent cations Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) and analysis of enzymatic hydrolysis products revealed polygalacturonic acid monomers and oligomers. The purified enzyme has an isoelectric point of 5.3 and is not associated with a glycosylated protein. The PG isozyme macerated fruit tissue plugs in vitro and produced ~1.2-fold more soluble polyuronides from pear than from apple tissue, which further substantiates the role of PG in postharvest decay. Data from this study show for the first time that the purified PG produced in decayed Anjou pear by P. solitum, a weakly virulent fungus, is different from that PG produced by the same fungus in decayed apple.

  2. Changes of serum amylase, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio in dogs with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Akuzawa, M; Morizono, M; Nagata, K; Hayano, S; Sakamoto, H; Yasuda, N; Okamoto, K; Kawasaki, Y; Deguchi, E

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the diagnostic application of amylase to canine pancreatic diseases, serum amylase activities, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) were analyzed in normal intact dogs and dogs experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. There was no statistic difference between normal male and female dogs. Amylase specific activities in pancreatic tissue extracts were more than 2,300 times higher than that in serum, and were also higher than those in other tissues; parotid and mandibular salivary glands, lung, heart, liver, spleen, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and kidney. Following the chloroform injection into the pancreatic tissue, WBC increased from 6 to 240 hr and serum glucose significantly increased at 72 and 96 hr, and no urine glucose was detected. BUN as well as serum and urine creatinine showed normal levels. ACCR increased until 96 hr without statistic significance. Serum amylase activities increased significantly after 3 hr and its isozyme was separated into 4 fractions (Amy1-Amy4) in contrast to 3 fractions (Amy2-Amy4) in intact dogs. Since this extra Amy1 seen from 1 hr increasing after 6 hr similarly to other 3 fractions, the evaluation of serum amylase and its isozyme fractions was indicated to be useful for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs.

  3. A comparison of isozyme and quantitative genetic variation in Pinus contorta ssp. latifolia by F{sub ST}

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rong-Cai; Yeh, F.C.; Yanchuk, A.D.

    1996-03-01

    We employed F-statistics to analyze quantitative and isozyme variation among five populations of Pinus contorta ssp. latifolia, a wind-pollinated outcrossing conifer with wide and continuous distribution in west North America. Estimates of population differentiation (F{sub ST}) for six quantitative traits were compared with the overall estimate of the differentiation (F*{sub ST}) from 19 isozymes that tested neutral to examine whether similar evolutionary processes were involved in morphological and isozyme differentiation. While the F{sub ST} estimates for specific gravity, stem diameter, stem height and branch length were significantly greater than the F*{sub ST} estimate, as judged from the 95% confidence intervals by bootstrapping, the F{sub ST} estimates for branch angle and branch diameter were indistinguishable from the F*{sub ST} estimate. Differentiation in stem height and stem diameter might reflect the inherent adaptation of the populations for rapid growth to escape suppression by neighboring plants during establishment and to regional differences in photoperiod, precipitation and temperature. In contrast, divergences in wood specific gravity and branch length might be correlated responses to population differentiation in stem growth. Possible bias in the estimation of F{sub ST} due to Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (F{sub IS} {ne} 0), linkage disequilibrium, maternal effects and nonadditive genetic effects was discussed with special reference to P. contorta ssp. latifolia. 48 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Arabidopsis GERANYLGERANYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 11 is a hub isozyme required for the production of most photosynthesis-related isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sola, M Águila; Coman, Diana; Beck, Gilles; Barja, M Victoria; Colinas, Maite; Graf, Alexander; Welsch, Ralf; Rütimann, Philipp; Bühlmann, Peter; Bigler, Laurent; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Vranová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Most plastid isoprenoids, including photosynthesis-related metabolites such as carotenoids and the side chain of chlorophylls, tocopherols (vitamin E), phylloquinones (vitamin K), and plastoquinones, derive from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthesized by GGPP synthase (GGPPS) enzymes. Seven out of 10 functional GGPPS isozymes in Arabidopsis thaliana reside in plastids. We aimed to address the function of different GGPPS paralogues for plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis. We constructed a gene co-expression network (GCN) using GGPPS paralogues as guide genes and genes from the upstream and downstream pathways as query genes. Furthermore, knock-out and/or knock-down ggpps mutants were generated and their growth and metabolic phenotypes were analyzed. Also, interacting protein partners of GGPPS11 were searched for. Our data showed that GGPPS11, encoding the only plastid isozyme essential for plant development, functions as a hub gene among GGPPS paralogues and is required for the production of all major groups of plastid isoprenoids. Furthermore, we showed that the GGPPS11 protein physically interacts with enzymes that use GGPP for the production of carotenoids, chlorophylls, tocopherols, phylloquinone, and plastoquinone. GGPPS11 is a hub isozyme required for the production of most photosynthesis-related isoprenoids. Both gene co-expression and protein-protein interaction likely contribute to the channeling of GGPP by GGPPS11.

  5. Changes of serum amylase, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio in dogs with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Akuzawa, M; Morizono, M; Nagata, K; Hayano, S; Sakamoto, H; Yasuda, N; Okamoto, K; Kawasaki, Y; Deguchi, E

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the diagnostic application of amylase to canine pancreatic diseases, serum amylase activities, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) were analyzed in normal intact dogs and dogs experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. There was no statistic difference between normal male and female dogs. Amylase specific activities in pancreatic tissue extracts were more than 2,300 times higher than that in serum, and were also higher than those in other tissues; parotid and mandibular salivary glands, lung, heart, liver, spleen, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and kidney. Following the chloroform injection into the pancreatic tissue, WBC increased from 6 to 240 hr and serum glucose significantly increased at 72 and 96 hr, and no urine glucose was detected. BUN as well as serum and urine creatinine showed normal levels. ACCR increased until 96 hr without statistic significance. Serum amylase activities increased significantly after 3 hr and its isozyme was separated into 4 fractions (Amy1-Amy4) in contrast to 3 fractions (Amy2-Amy4) in intact dogs. Since this extra Amy1 seen from 1 hr increasing after 6 hr similarly to other 3 fractions, the evaluation of serum amylase and its isozyme fractions was indicated to be useful for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs. PMID:7521216

  6. Redundancy among manganese peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-04-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn(2+) amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn(2+)-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn(2+)-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn(2+)-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  7. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A)/sup +/ RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L-/sup 35/S-methionine. The /sup 35/S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues.

  8. Antioxidant and isozyme features of two strains of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi; Li, Yongqi; Yu, Zhiming

    2007-01-01

    Healthy sporophytes of two gametophyte mutants of Laminaria japonica with different heat resistances: kelp 901 ( 901, with comparatively stronger heat-resistance) and Rongcheng No.1 ( RC, sensitive to heat stress), were respectively collected during October to December 2002 from Yantai and Rongcheng Sea Farm in the Shandong Peninsula of China. The contents of some biochemical materials and antioxidant capacity were analyzed under controlled laboratory conditions to identify if there is any relation between the overall antioxidant capacity and the heat-resistance in L. japonica and to understand possible mechanism of heat-resistance. Results show that: (1) the overall antioxidant capacity in healthy sporophyte of 901, such as vitamin E, polyphenol, and ascorbic acid contents and the enzymatic activity of SOD, POD, CAT, Gpx, PPO, and PAL, were not always higher than that of RC under controlled laboratory conditions, and no significance ( P>0.05) was shown in total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in 901 and RC. Result suggested that the difference in antioxidant capacity was not a decisive factor for different heat-resistances in L. japonica; (2) the simultaneous assay on isozymes was carried out using vertical polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Considerable differences in peroxide (PRX), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), malic enzyme (ME), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were obtained in 901 and RC from either the band number, relative mobility ( R f ), or staining intensity, and ME could be used as an indicator to distinguish healthy sporophyte of 901 and RC under controlled laboratory conditions.

  9. [Development of a new type soybean germplasm with null lipoxygenase isozymes].

    PubMed

    Han, Fen-Xia; Ding, An-Lin; Sun, Jun-Ming; Li, Gui-Ying

    2005-02-01

    Soybean protein is a kind of high-quality protein composed of balanced amino acids. It contains all kinds of amino acids, especially eight amino acids necessary for human, but also contains some components that are not good for human and affect food quality, such as Lipoxygenase (Lox) and Trypsin inhibitor (Ti). Nutritional value and processing quality of soybean can be improved by means of development of new variety with null Lox and Ti. In this paper, a new type soybean germplasm with null lipoxygenase isozymes was developed by Institute of Crop Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences through years of biochemical marker assistant selection for null lipoxygenase by means of isoelectric focusing-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (IEF-PAGE) in the hybrid progenies of "96P17" (Female parent, a null lipoxygenase 2.3 line) and "93704" (Male parent, a null lipoxygenase 1.3 line). It is the first new soybean germplasm with null Lox1.2.3 genes in our country, which will contribute to soybean breeding for high quality, soybean production and utilization. In this paper, the development process of new type soybean germplasm is described. PMID:15759868

  10. Purification and properties of two isozymes of pyruvate kinase from Mucor racemosus.

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, T M; Paznokas, J L

    1987-01-01

    The dimorphic phycomycete Mucor racemosus was found to contain up to five electrophoretic forms of pyruvate kinase (ATP: pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.40) depending on growth conditions. M. racemosus hyphal cells grown on glutamic acid as the carbon source contained only the fastest electrophoretic form, designated PK1, while yeast cells grown on glucose contained only the slowest electrophoretic form, PK5. Intermediate electrophoretic forms PK2, PK3, and PK4 as well as PK1 and PK5 were found in hyphal cells grown on media containing fructose or cellibiose. All five electrophoretic forms had molecular weights of ca. 230,000 as determined from plots of log Rm versus acrylamide gel concentration. Both PK1 and PK5 were purified to homogeneity and determined to be homotetramers, with subunit molecular weights of 54,000 and 58,100, respectively. The amino acid content of PK1 and PK5 was determined and found to be similar but not identical. Analysis of limited tryptic digests and cyanogen bromide cleavage fragments of PK1 and PK5 indicate that the subunits of the two isozymes are significantly different. Images PMID:3611022

  11. Increased cytogenetic damage in smokers deficient in glutathione S-transferase isozyme mu.

    PubMed

    van Poppel, G; de Vogel, N; van Balderen, P J; Kok, F J

    1992-02-01

    Reduced expression of the mu-isozyme of glutathione S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) has been associated with increased lung cancer risk. We studied the association between GST-mu expression and DNA damage as measured by sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in healthy male smokers. SCE levels were higher in the 71 GST-mu-deficient smokers compared to the 83 non-deficient smokers (5.24 versus 4.97 SCE/lymphocyte; P = 0.09). In smokers having high plasma cotinine levels (greater than median of 315 ng/ml), this mu-related difference was more pronounced (5.50 versus 4.97; P = 0.01), whereas it was absent in smokers having low cotinine levels (4.95 versus 4.97; P = 0.92). Increased cytogenetic damage in GST-mu-deficient heavy smokers may thus explain the association between GST-mu expression and lung cancer. PMID:1740022

  12. Formation of functional heterodimers by isozymes 1 and 2 of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Boulatnikov, Igor; Popov, Kirill M

    2003-02-21

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and, consequently, aerobic oxidation of carbohydrate fuels in general. In mammals, there are four genetically and biochemically distinct forms of PDK that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner (PDK1, PDK2, PDK3, and PDK4). These protein kinases have been shown to function as dimers, but the possibility of heterodimerization between various isozyme subunits has not yet been investigated. Here, we demonstrate that two members of the PDK family, PDK1 and PDK2, form heterodimeric species when coexpressed in the same Escherichia coli cell. The heterodimeric kinase produced in vivo was purified to near homogeneity by affinity chromatography. The purified kinase was stable and was not subjected to reassortment of the subunits. The heterodimeric kinase was catalytically active and was clearly distinct from homodimeric PDK1 or PDK2 with respect to kinetic parameters, site specificity and regulation. These data strongly suggest that heterodimerization between PDK1 and PDK2 adds another level of diversity to this protein family in addition to that which arises from gene multiplicity. PMID:12573248

  13. Distribution of cardiac myosin isozymes in human conduction system. Immunohistochemical study using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kuro-o, M; Tsuchimochi, H; Ueda, S; Takaku, F; Yazaki, Y

    1986-01-01

    To determine the presence and distribution of cardiac myosin isozymes in the human conduction system, we performed an immunohistochemical study using monoclonal antibodies CMA19 and HMC14, which are specific for myosin heavy chains of human atrial type (alpha-type) and ventricular type (beta-type), respectively. Serial frozen sections of human hearts were obtained from autopsy samples and examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Alpha-type was found in all myofibers of sinus node and atrio-ventricular node, and in 55.2 +/- 10.2% (mean +/- SD, n = 5) of the myofibers of ventricular conduction tissue, which consists of the bundle of His, bundle branches, and the Purkinje network. In contrast, beta-type was found in all myofibers of the atrio-ventricular node and ventricular conduction tissue, whereas almost all myofibers of the sinus node were unlabeled by HMC14. Although the number of ventricular myofibers labeled by CMA19 was small, the labeled myofibers were more numerous in the subepicardial region than in the subendocardial region. These findings show that the gene coding for alpha-type is expressed predominantly in specialized myocardium compared with the adjacent ordinary working myocardium. Images PMID:3511096

  14. Selectivity of microbial acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitors toward isozymes.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Taichi; Rudel, Lawrence L; Omura, Satoshi; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The selectivity of microbial inhibitors of acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) toward the two isozymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, was assessed in cell-based assays. Purpactin A (IC50 values of ACAT1 vs. IC50 values of ACAT2; 2.5 microM vs. 1.5 microM), terpendole C (10 microM vs. 10 microM), glisoprenin A (4.3 microM vs. 10 microM), spylidone (25 microM vs. 5.0 microM) and synthetic CL-283,546 (0.1 microM vs. 0.09 microM) inhibited ACAT1 and ACAT2 to similar extents. Beauveriolides I (0.6 microM vs. 20 microM) and III (0.9 microM vs. >20 microM) inhibited ACAT1 rather selectively, while pyripyropenes A (>80 microM vs. 0.07 microM), B (48 microM vs. 2.0 microM), C (32 microM vs. 0.36 microM) and D (38 microM vs. 1.5 microM) showed selective inhibition against ACAT2. In particular, pyripyropene A was found to be the most selective ACAT2 inhibitor with a selective index of more than 1,000. PMID:17390588

  15. Cloning of human calcineurin A: Evidence for two isozymes and identification of a polyproline structural domain

    SciTech Connect

    Guerini, D.; Klee, C.B. )

    1989-12-01

    Two types (I and II) of cDNAs encoding the large (A) subunit of calcineurin, a calmodulin-regulated protein phosphatase, were isolated from human basal ganglia and brainstem mRNA. The complete sequences of the two calcineurin clones are identical except for a 54-base-pair insert in the type I clone and different 3{prime} ends including part of the coding sequence for the C termini of the two proteins. These findings suggest that calcineurin A consists of at least two isozymes that may result from alternative splicing events. The two forms of the enzyme differ in the C terminus, which contains an inhibitory domain rapidly severed by limited proteolysis. With the exception of an 18-amino acid insert, the central parts of the molecules, which harbor the catalytic domains, are identical and show extended similarities with the entire catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, defining a distinct family of protein phosphatases. The 40-residue N-terminal fragment, specific for calcineurin, contains a sequence of 11 successive prolines that is also found to bovine brain calcineurin by peptide sequencing. A role in the calmodulin activation of calcineurin is proposed for this novel structural element.

  16. Zymogen Activation and Subcellular Activity of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease*

    PubMed Central

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique Julien; Oppliger, Joël; Salamina, Marco; Cendron, Laura; de Laureto, Patrizia Polverino; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) plays crucial roles in cellular homeostatic functions and is hijacked by pathogenic viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P involves sequential autocatalytic processing of its N-terminal prodomain at sites B′/B followed by the herein newly identified C′/C sites. We found that SKI-1/S1P autoprocessing results in intermediates whose catalytic domain remains associated with prodomain fragments of different lengths. In contrast to other zymogen proprotein convertases, all incompletely matured intermediates of SKI-1/S1P showed full catalytic activity toward cellular substrates, whereas optimal cleavage of viral glycoproteins depended on B′/B processing. Incompletely matured forms of SKI-1/S1P further process cellular and viral substrates in distinct subcellular compartments. Using a cell-based sensor for SKI-1/S1P activity, we found that 9 amino acid residues at the cleavage site (P1–P8) and P1′ are necessary and sufficient to define the subcellular location of processing and to determine to what extent processing of a substrate depends on SKI-1/S1P maturation. In sum, our study reveals novel and unexpected features of SKI-1/S1P zymogen activation and subcellular specificity of activity toward cellular and pathogen-derived substrates. PMID:25378398

  17. Leaf growth is conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  18. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  19. Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Gene Encoding for Ascorbate Peroxidase and Responsive to Salt Stress in Beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dunajska-Ordak, Kamila; Skorupa-Kłaput, Monika; Kurnik, Katarzyna; Tretyn, Andrzej; Tyburski, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    BvpAPX is a full-length cDNA-encoding peroxisomal ascorbate peroxidase isolated from leaves of salt-stressed beet (Beta vulgaris) plants. A high level of identity has been reported between the deduced amino acid sequence of BvpAPX and other known ascorbate peroxidases. The genomic sequence of BvpAPX revealed a gene composed of 5 exons and 4 introns. Several sequence motifs revealed in the 5'UTR region of the gene confer to BvpAPX a putative responsiveness to various abiotic stresses. We determined the effect of salt stress on BvpAPX expression in leaves of the cultivated beet varieties, Huzar and Janosik, and their wild salt-tolerant relative B. vulgaris ssp. maritima. Plants were subjected to salt stress during a 32-day culture period (long-term salt treatment). An alternative salinization protocol consisted of an 18-h incubation of detached beet leaves in media supplemented with toxic salt concentrations (short-term salt treatment). RT-Q-PCR analysis revealed that BvpAPX expression markedly increased in leaves of plants subjected to conditions of long-term treatment with salinity, whereas BvpAPX transcript levels remained unaffected in detached leaves during short-term salt treatment. In addition, several leaf redox system parameters, such as ascorbate peroxidase activity or ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and lipid hydroperoxide concentration, were determined in the leaves of beet plants subjected to salt stress conditions. PMID:24465083

  20. Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Gene Encoding for Ascorbate Peroxidase and Responsive to Salt Stress in Beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dunajska-Ordak, Kamila; Skorupa-Kłaput, Monika; Kurnik, Katarzyna; Tretyn, Andrzej; Tyburski, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    BvpAPX is a full-length cDNA-encoding peroxisomal ascorbate peroxidase isolated from leaves of salt-stressed beet (Beta vulgaris) plants. A high level of identity has been reported between the deduced amino acid sequence of BvpAPX and other known ascorbate peroxidases. The genomic sequence of BvpAPX revealed a gene composed of 5 exons and 4 introns. Several sequence motifs revealed in the 5'UTR region of the gene confer to BvpAPX a putative responsiveness to various abiotic stresses. We determined the effect of salt stress on BvpAPX expression in leaves of the cultivated beet varieties, Huzar and Janosik, and their wild salt-tolerant relative B. vulgaris ssp. maritima. Plants were subjected to salt stress during a 32-day culture period (long-term salt treatment). An alternative salinization protocol consisted of an 18-h incubation of detached beet leaves in media supplemented with toxic salt concentrations (short-term salt treatment). RT-Q-PCR analysis revealed that BvpAPX expression markedly increased in leaves of plants subjected to conditions of long-term treatment with salinity, whereas BvpAPX transcript levels remained unaffected in detached leaves during short-term salt treatment. In addition, several leaf redox system parameters, such as ascorbate peroxidase activity or ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and lipid hydroperoxide concentration, were determined in the leaves of beet plants subjected to salt stress conditions.

  1. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  2. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-01

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  3. Improved operational stability of peroxidases by coimmobilization with glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    van de Velde, F; Lourenço, N D; Bakker, M; van Rantwijk, F; Sheldon, R A

    2000-08-01

    The operational stability of peroxidases was considerably enhanced by generating hydrogen peroxide in situ from glucose and oxygen. For example, the total turnover number of microperoxidase-11 in the oxidation of thioanisole was increased sevenfold compared with that obtained with continuous addition of H(2)O(2). Coimmobilization of peroxidases with glucose oxidase into polyurethane foams afforded heterogeneous biocatalysts in which the hydrogen peroxide is formed inside the polymeric matrix from glucose and oxygen. The total turnover number of chloroperoxidase in the oxidation of thioanisole and cis-2-heptene was increased to new maxima of 250. 10(3) and 10. 10(3), respectively, upon coimmobilization with glucose oxidase. Soybean peroxidase, which normally shows only classical peroxidase activity, was transformed into an oxygen-transfer catalyst when coimmobilized with glucose oxidase. The combination catalyst mediated the enantioselective oxidation of thioanisole [50% ee (S)] with 210 catalyst turnovers. PMID:10861408

  4. CYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF ENDOGENOUS PEROXIDASE IN THYROID FOLLICULAR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Strum, Judy M.; Karnovsky, Morris J.

    1970-01-01

    Endogenous peroxidase activity in rat thyroid follicular cells is demonstrated cytochemically. Following perfusion fixation of the thyroid gland, small blocks of tissue are incubated in a medium containing substrate for peroxidase, before being postfixed in osmium tetroxide, and processed for electron microscopy. Peroxidase activity is found in thyroid follicular cells in the following sites: (a) the perinuclear cisternae, (b) the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum, (c) the inner few lamellae of the Golgi complex, (d) within vesicles, particularly those found apically, and (e) associated with the external surfaces of the microvilli that project apically from the cell into the colloid. In keeping with the radioautographic evidence of others and the postulated role of thyroid peroxidase in iodination, it is suggested that the microvillous apical cell border is the major site where iodination occurs. However, that apical vesicles also play a role in iodination cannot be excluded. The in vitro effect of cyanide, aminotriazole, and thiourea is also discussed. PMID:4190069

  5. Stimuli-responsive peroxidase mimicking at a smart graphene interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Zhao, Huimin; Chen, Shuo; Yu, Hongtao; Quan, Xie

    2012-07-18

    A synergistic graphene-based catalyst was engineered by the in situ growth of "naked" Au-nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene sheets. The catalyst exhibits excellent switchable peroxidase-like activity in response to specific DNA. PMID:22673613

  6. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  7. Grafting of Functional Molecules: Insights into Peroxidase-Derived Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyanhongo, Gibson S.; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Kudanga, Tukayi; Guebitz, Georg

    An insight into the progress made in applying heme peroxidases in grafting processes, starting from the production of simple resins to more complex polymers, is presented. The refinement of the different reaction conditions (solvents, concentrations of the reactants) and careful study of the reaction mechanisms have been instrumental in advancing enzymatic grafting processes. A number of processes described here show how peroxidase mediated catalysis could provide a new strategy as an alternative to conventional energy intensive procedures mediated by chemical catalysts.

  8. Roles of horseradish peroxidase in response to terbium stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing

    2014-10-01

    The pollution of the environment by rare earth elements (REEs) causes deleterious effects on plants. Peroxidase plays important roles in plant response to various environmental stresses. Here, to further understand the overall roles of peroxidase in response to REE stress, the effects of the REE terbium ion (Tb(3+)) on the peroxidase activity and H2O2 and lignin contents in the leaves and roots of horseradish during different growth stages were simultaneously investigated. The results showed that after 24 and 48 h of Tb(3+) treatment, the peroxidase activity in horseradish leaves decreased, while the H2O2 and lignin contents increased. After a long-term (8 and 16 days) treatment with Tb(3+), these effects were also observed in the roots. The analysis of the changes in peroxidase activity and H2O2 and lignin contents revealed that peroxidase plays important roles in not only reactive oxygen species scavenging but also cell wall lignification in horseradish under Tb(3+) stress. These roles were closely related to the dose of Tb(3+), duration of stress, and growth stages of horseradish.

  9. Iron deficiency differently affects peroxidase isoforms in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, A; Castagna, A; Baldan, B; Soldatini, G F

    2001-01-01

    The response of both specific (ascorbate peroxidase, APX) and unspecific (POD) peroxidases and H(2)O(2) content of sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Hor) grown hydroponically with (C) or without (-Fe) iron in the nutrient solution were analysed to verify whether iron deficiency led to cell oxidative status. In -Fe leaves a significant increase of H(2)O(2) content was detected, a result confirmed by electron microscopy analysis. As regards extracellular peroxidases, while APX activity significantly decreased, no change was observed in either soluble guaiacol or syringaldazine-dependent POD activity following iron starvation. Moreover, guaiacol-dependent POD activity was found to decrease in both ionically and covalently-cell-wall bound fractions, while syringaldazine-POD activity decreased only in the covalently-bound fraction. At the intracellular level both guaiacol-POD and APX activities underwent a significant decrease. The overall reduction of peroxidase activity was confirmed by the electrophoretic separation of POD isoforms and, at the extracellular level, by cytochemical localization of peroxidases by diaminobenzidine staining. The electrophoretic separation, besides quantitative differences, also revealed quantitative changes, particularly evident for ionically and covalently-bound fractions. Therefore, in sunflower plants, iron deficiency seems to affect the different peroxidase isoenzymes to different extents and to induce a secondary oxidative stress, as indicated by the increased levels of H(2)O(2). However, owing to the almost completely lack of catalytic iron capable of triggering the Fenton reaction, iron-deficient sunflower plants are probably still sufficiently protected against oxidative stress.

  10. Serine incorporation into the selenocysteine moiety of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sunde, R.A.; Evenson, J.K.

    1987-01-15

    The selenium in mammalian glutathione peroxidase is present as a selenocysteine ((Se)Cys) moiety incorporated into the peptide backbone 41-47 residues from the N-terminal end. To study the origin of the skeleton of the (Se)Cys moiety, we perfused isolated rat liver with /sup 14/C- or /sup 3/H-labeled amino acids for 4 h, purified the GSH peroxidase, derivatized the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase to carboxymethylselenocysteine ((Se)Cys(Cm)), and determined the amino acid specific activity. Perfusion with (/sup 14/C)cystine resulted in (/sup 14/C)cystine incorporation into GSH peroxidase without labeling (Se)Cys(Cm), indicating that cysteine is not a direct precursor for (Se)Cys. (/sup 14/C)Serine perfusion labeled serine, glycine (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase product), and (Se)Cys(Cm) in purified GSH peroxidase, whereas (3-3H)serine perfusion only labeled serine and (Se)Cys(Cm), thus demonstrating that the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase is derived from serine. The similar specific activities of serine and (Se)Cys(Cm) strongly suggest that the precursor pool of serine used for (Se) Cys synthesis is the same or similar to the serine pool used for acylation of seryl-tRNAs.

  11. Mouse Splenic Peroxidase and Its Role in Bactericidal Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, R. R.; Paul, B. B.; Jacobs, A. A.; Sbarra, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Spleen cell suspensions from AKR and CD-1 mice contain peroxidase activity as determined by guaiacol oxidation. This activity is found predominately in the 20,000 × g pellet fraction of spleen cell homogenates. In the presence of H2O2 and chloride ion at acidic pH, splenic peroxidase mediates the oxidation of d- or l-alanine to CO2, NH3, and acetaldehyde. The same reaction mixture without added amino acid can kill both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The conditions for both reactions are similar. Both have an absolute requirement for H2O2 and chloride ion, neither is active at neutral or alkaline pH, and both are inhibited by the sulfonic amino acid taurine. In these aspects, splenic peroxidase is qualitatively similar in its activity to myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is quantitatively different from MPO in that the latter is more potent on a per guaiacol unit basis with respect to both amino acid oxidation and bactericidal activity. Still another quantitative difference is that splenic peroxidase requires 0.1 m NaCl for activity, whereas MPO functions with as little as 0.005 m NaCl. Splenic peroxidase and MPO both appear to differ qualitatively from horseradish peroxidase in that the latter enzyme does not mediate amino acid oxidation. PMID:4632463

  12. Peroxidase-catalyzed color removal from bleach plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Paice, M G; Jurasek, L

    1984-05-01

    Effluent from the caustic extraction stage of a bleach plant is highly colored due to the presence of dissolved products from lignin chlorination and oxidation. Color removal from the effluent by hydrogen peroxide at neutral pH was catalyzed by addition of horseradish peroxidase. The catalysis with peroxidase (20 mg/L) was observed over a wide range of peroxide concentrations (0.1mM-500mM), but the largest effect was between 1mM and 100mM. The pH optimum for catalysis was around 5.0, while the basal rate of noncatalyzed peroxide color removal simply increased with pH within the range tested (3-10). Peroxidase catalysis at pH 7.6 reached a maximum at 40 degrees C in 4 h assays with 10mM peroxide, and disappeared above 60 degrees C. Compared with mycelial color removal by Coriolus versicolor, the rate of color removal by peroxide plus peroxidase was initially faster (first 4 h), but the extent of color removal after 48 h was higher with the fungal treatment. Further addition of peroxidase to the enzyme-treated effluent did not produce additional catalysis. Thus, the peroxide/peroxidase system did not fully represent the metabolic route used by the fungus.

  13. NMR studies of recombinant Coprinus peroxidase and three site-directed mutants. Implications for peroxidase substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Veitch, N C; Tams, J W; Vind, J; Dalbøge, H; Welinder, K G

    1994-06-15

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to characterise and compare wild-type fungal and recombinant Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and three mutants in which Gly156 and/or Asn157 was replaced by Phe. Analysis of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of recombinant CIP was undertaken for comparison with the fungal enzyme and in order to establish a meaningful basis for solution studies of CIP mutants. Proton resonance assignments of haem and haem-linked residues obtained for the cyanide-ligated form of recombinant CIP revealed a high degree of spectral similarity with those of lignin and manganese-dependent peroxidases and extend previously reported NMR data for fungal CIP. The three mutants examined by NMR spectroscopy comprised site-specific substitutions made to a region of the structure believed to form part of the peroxidase haem group access channel for substrate and ligand molecules. Proton resonances of the aromatic side-chains of Phe156 and Phe157 were found to have similar spectral characteristics to those of two phenylalanine residues known to be involved in the binding of aromatic donor molecules to the plant peroxidase, horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C. The results are discussed in the context of complementary reactivity studies on the mutants in order to develop a more detailed understanding of aromatic donor molecule binding to fungal and plant peroxidases.

  14. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer ( Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  15. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase modulate the genotoxicity of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Wang, T S; Shu, Y F; Liu, Y C; Jan, K Y; Huang, H

    1997-09-01

    The X-ray hypersensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, xrs-5, are also more sensitive to sodium arsenite in terms of cell growth and micronucleus induction than CHO-K1 cells. Since reactive oxygen species are suggested to be involved in arsenic toxicity, we have measured antioxidant mechanisms in xrs-5 as well as CHO-K1 cells. There were no apparent differences in the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase, and the levels of glutathione between xrs-5 and CHO-K1 cells. However, the activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase were 5.4- and 5.8-fold lower, respectively, in xrs-5 cells. The addition of catalase or glutathione peroxidase to cultures reduced the arsenite-induced micronuclei in xrs-5 cells. Whereas, simultaneous treatment with mercaptosuccinate, an inhibitor of glutathione peroxidase, and 3-aminotriazole, an inhibitor of catalase, synergistically increased the arsenite-induced micronuclei. These results suggest that both catalase and glutathione peroxidase are involved in defense against arsenite genotoxicity. The xrs-6 cells, another line of x-ray hypersensitive CHO cells, which had 1.6-fold higher catalase activity and 2.5-fold higher glutathione peroxidase activity than xrs-5 cells, were also more sensitive than CHO-K1 cells but were less sensitive than xrs-5 cells to cell growth inhibition of arsenite. Moreover, a 1.6-fold increase of glutathione peroxidase activity by selenite adaptation effectively removed the arsenite-induced micronuclei in CHO-K1 cells. These results suggest that glutathione peroxidase is more important than catalase in defending against arsenite toxicity. Our results also suggest that increasing the intracellular antioxidant level may have preventive or therapeutic effects in arsenic poisoning.

  16. Looking for Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Joaquín; Esteban-Carrasco, Alberto; Zapata, José Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Monolignol polymerization into lignin is catalyzed by peroxidases or laccases. Recently, a Zinnia elegans peroxidase (ZePrx) that is considered responsible for monolignol polymerization in this plant has been molecularly and functionally characterized. Nevertheless, Arabidopsis thaliana has become an alternative model plant for studies of lignification, filling the gaps that may occur with Z. elegans. The arabidopsis genome offers the possibility of performing bioinformatic analyses and data mining that are not yet feasible with other plant species, in order to obtain preliminary evidence on the role of genes and proteins. In our search for arabidopsis homologs to the ZePrx, we performed an exhaustive in silico characterization of everything from the protein to the transcript of Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases (AtPrxs) homologous to ZePrx, with the aim of identifying one or more peroxidases that may be involved in monolignol polymerization. Nine peroxidases (AtPrx 4, 5, 52, 68, 67, 36, 14, 49 and 72) with an E-value greater than 1e-80 with ZePrx were selected for this study. The results demonstrate that a high level of 1D, 2D and 3D homology between these AtPrxs and ZePrx are not always accompanied by the presence of the same electrostatic and mRNA properties that indicate a peroxidase is involved in lignin biosynthesis. In summary, we can confirm that the peroxidases involved in lignification are among AtPrx 4, 52, 49 and 72. Their structural and mRNA features indicate that exert their action in the cell wall similar to ZePrx.

  17. Sliding velocity of isolated rabbit cardiac myosin correlates with isozyme distribution.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, H; Sugiura, S; Serizawa, T; Sugimoto, T; Iizuka, M; Katayama, E; Shimmen, T

    1992-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between the mechanical and biochemical properties of cardiac myosin, the sliding velocity of isolated cardiac myosin obtained from both euthyroid and hyperthyroid rabbits on actin cables was measured with an in vitro motility assay system. Ten rabbits (T) were treated with L-thyroxine to induce hyperthyroidism, and eight nontreated animals (N) were used as controls. Myosin was purified from the left ventricles of anesthetized animals. Myosin isozyme content was analyzed by the pyrophosphate gel electrophoresis method, and myosin adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was determined on the same sample. Long well-organized actin cables of green algae, Nitellopsis, were used in the in vitro motility assay. Small latex beads were coated with purified cardiac myosin and introduced onto the Nitellopsis actin cables. Active unidirectional movement of the beads on the actin cables was observed under a photomicroscope, and the velocity was measured. The velocity was dependent on ATP concentrations, and the optimal pH for bead movement was approximately 7.0-7.5. The mean velocity was higher in T than in N (0.66 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.32 +/- 0.09 micron/s, P less than 0.01). Both Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity and the percentage of alpha-myosin heavy chain were also higher in T than in N (0.691 +/- 0.072 vs. 0.335 +/- 0.072 microM Pi.mg-1.min-1, P less than 0.01, and 79 +/- 12 vs. 26 +/- 7%, P less than 0.01, respectively). The velocity of myosin closely correlated with both Ca(+2)-activated myosin ATPase activity (r = 0.87, P less than 0.01) and the percentage of alpha-myosin heavy chain (r = 0.87, P less than 0.01).

  18. In vitro inhibition of salicylic acid derivatives on human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Esra; Senturk, Murat; Kufrevioglu, O Irfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2008-10-15

    The inhibition of two human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes, hCA I and II, with a series of salicylic acid derivatives was investigated by using the esterase method with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. IC(50) values for sulfasalazine, diflunisal, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, dinitrosalicylic acid, 4-aminosalicylic acid, 4-sulfosalicylic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid, salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and 3-metylsalicylic acid were of 3.04 microM, 3.38 microM, 4.07 microM, 7.64 microM, 0.13 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.42 mM, 0.56 mM, 2.71 mM and 3.07 mM for hCA I and of 4.49 microM, 2.70 microM, 0.72 microM, 2.80 microM, 0.75 mM, 0.72 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.68 mM, 1.16 mM and 4.70 mM for hCA II, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots were also used for the determination of the inhibition mechanism of these substituted phenols, most of which were noncompetitive inhibitors with this substrate. Some salicylic acid derivatives investigated here showed effective hCA I and II inhibitory activity, and might be used as leads for generating enzyme inhibitors eventually targeting other isoforms which have not been assayed yet for their interactions with such agents.

  19. Peroxisomal membrane manganese superoxide dismutase: characterization of the isozyme from watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Schrad.) cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Romero-Puertas, María C; Pastori, Gabriela M; Corpas, Francisco J; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M

    2007-01-01

    In this work the manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) bound to peroxisomal membranes of watermelon cotyledons (Citrullus lanatus Schrad.) was purified to homogeneity and some of its molecular properties were determined. The stepwise purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulphate fractionation, batch anion-exchange chromatography, and anion-exchange and gel-filtration column chromatography using a fast protein liquid chromatography system. Peroxisomal membrane Mn-SOD (perMn-SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) was purified 5600-fold with a yield of 2.6 mug of enzyme g(-1) of cotyledons, and had a specific activity of 480 U mg(-1) of protein. The native molecular mass determined for perMn-SOD was 108 000 Da, and it was composed of four equal subunits of 27 kDa, which indicates that perMn-SOD is a homotetramer. Ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of the enzyme showed a shoulder at 275 nm and two absorption maxima at 448 nm and 555 nm, respectively. By isoelectric focusing, a pI of 5.75 was determined for perMn-SOD. In immunoblot assays, purified perMn-SOD was recognized by a polyclonal antibody against Mn-SOD from pea leaves, and the peroxisomal enzyme rapidly dissociated in the presence of dithiothreitol and SDS. The potential binding of the Mn-SOD isozyme to the peroxisomal membrane was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy analysis. The properties of perMn-SOD and the mitMn-SOD are compared and the possible function in peroxisomal membranes of the peripheral protein Mn-SOD is discussed.

  20. The In Situ Tryptophan Analogue Probes the Conformational Dynamics in Asparaginase Isozymes.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Shen, Jiun-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Han; Lan, Yi-Kang; Yuan, Jui-Hung; Lin, Li-Ju; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Wee, Kevin; Chen, You-Hua; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-04-26

    Dynamic water solvation is crucial to protein conformational reorganization and hence to protein structure and functionality. We report here the characterization of water dynamics on the L-asparaginase structural homology isozymes L-asparaginases I (AnsA) and II (AnsB), which are shown via fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamics in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to have distinct catalytic activity. By use of the tryptophan (Trp) analog probe 2,7-diaza-tryptophan ((2,7-aza)Trp), which exhibits unique water-catalyzed proton-transfer properties, AnsA and AnsB are shown to have drastically different local water environments surrounding the single Trp. In AnsA, (2,7-aza)Trp exhibits prominent green N(7)-H emission resulting from water-catalyzed excited-state proton transfer. In stark contrast, the N(7)-H emission is virtually absent in AnsB, which supports a water-accessible and a water-scant environment in the proximity of Trp for AnsA and AnsB, respectively. In addition, careful analysis of the emission spectra and corresponding relaxation dynamics, together with the results of molecular dynamics simulations, led us to propose two structural states associated with the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network in the vicinity of Trp for the two Ans. The water molecules revealed in the proximity of the Trp residue have semiquantitative correlation with the observed emission spectral variations of (2,7-aza)Trp between AnsA and AnsB. Titration of aspartate, a competitive inhibitor of Ans, revealed an increase in N(7)-H emission intensity in AnsA but no obvious spectral changes in AnsB. The changes in the emission profiles reflect the modulation of structural states by locally confined environment and trapped-water collective motions. PMID:27119634

  1. Glutathione peroxidase and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in tissues of Balb/C mice

    SciTech Connect

    Spallholz, J.E.; Roveri, A.; Yan, L.; Boylan, L.M.; Kang, C.R.; Ursini, F. Univ. of Padua )

    1991-03-11

    The two selenium (Se) enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxide (PHGPx) were assayed in tissues and organ homogenates of female Balb/C mice fed torula yeast diets containing 0.008, 0.2 and 1.0 ug/g Se as selenite for nine months. GPx activity was detected in all tissues and organs whereas PHGPx activity was not detectable in lung, large intestine, eye or thymus tissue. GPx activity nearly always exceeded PHGPx activity when tissues or organs contained both enzymes irrespective of dietary Se treatment. GPx activity in tissues was generally more susceptible to the dietary Se deficiency than was PHGPx activity when expressed as a percentage of the activity found in tissues and organs of mice fed supplemented Se diets. This limited study suggests that dietary Se may be more valued in supporting PHGPx activity than GPx activity in the course of a protracted dietary Se deficiency.

  2. Structural and functional analysis of two glutamate racemase isozymes from Bacillus anthracis and implications for inhibitor design†‡

    PubMed Central

    May, Melissa; Mehboob, Shahila; Mulhearn, Debbie C.; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Huidong; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate racemase (RacE) is responsible for converting L-glutamate to D-glutamate, which is an essential component of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, and the primary constituent of the poly-γ-D-glutamate capsule of the pathogen Bacillus anthracis. RacE enzymes are essential for bacterial growth and lack a human homolog, making them attractive targets for the design and development of antibacterial therapeutics. We have cloned, expressed and purified the two glutamate racemase isozymes, RacE1 and RacE2, from the B. anthracis genome. Through a series of steady-state kinetic studies, and based upon the ability of both RacE1 and RacE2 to catalyze the rapid formation of D-glutamate, we have determined that RacE1 and RacE2 are bona fide isozymes. The x-ray structures of B. anthracis RacE1 and RacE2, in complex with D-glutamate, were determined to resolutions of 1.75 Å and 2.0 Å. Both enzymes are dimers with monomers arranged in a “tail-to-tail” orientation, similar to the B. subtilis RacE structure, but differing substantially from the A. pyrophilus RacE structure. The differences in quaternary structures produce differences in the active sites of racemases among the various species, which has important implications for structure-based, inhibitor design efforts within this class of enzymes. We found a Val to Ala variance at the entrance of the active site between RacE1 and RacE2 which results in the active site entrance being less sterically hindered for RacE1. Using a series of inhibitors, we show that this variance results in differences in the inhibitory activity against the two isozymes and suggest a strategy for structure-based inhibitor design to obtain broad-spectrum inhibitors for glutamate racemases. PMID:17610893

  3. Sulforaphane induces glutathione S-transferase isozymes which detoxify aflatoxin B(1)-8,9-epoxide in AML 12 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang Shang; Chen, Xiao Yan; Zhu, Ri Zhe; Choi, Byung-Min; Kim, Bok-Ryang

    2010-01-01

    The aflatoxin B(1)-8,9-epoxide (AFBO) is hepatocarcinogenic intermediate of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) and is detoxified by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). In this study, we investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN) could increase the rate of conjugation between AFBO and glutathione (GSH) as well as which of the GST isozymes were involved in the conjugation reaction. The conjugation potential was inhibited dose dependently with curcumin, an inhibitor of GSTs. SFN induced the expression of GST A3, GST A4, GST M1, GST P1, and GST T1 in alpha mouse line (AML) 12 cells. The cells treated with SFN (10 microM) for 12 h showed a 35-fold increase in conjugation potential of AFBO with GSH compared with the vehicle-treated cell. The conjugation potential was blocked partially by transfection of cells with siRNAs against each of the GST isozymes. The activity of GST A3 had the strongest effect on the conjugation potential. SFN treatment also increased total GST activity detected with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) up to 4.3-fold. The induction fold was much lower than that detected with AFBO. These results suggest that the chemopreventive effect of SFN on the decomposition of AFBO is related to the upregulation of several GST isozymes genes. The increase of GST activity by SFN was extremely specific toward the conjugation reaction of AFBO compared with CDNB. Therefore, this system for detecting GST activity seems to be an excellent method for screening chemopreventive compounds toward AFB(1) toxicity. PMID:20818711

  4. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  5. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  6. Cantaloupe melon peroxidase: characterization and effects of additives on activity.

    PubMed

    Lamikanra, O; Watson, M A

    2000-06-01

    Peroxidase in cantaloupe melon (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Naud.), a fruit commonly fresh cut processed, was characterized to determine reaction pathway, optimal conditions for activity and effect of some additives on enzymatic action. Mn2+, CaCl2, NaNO2 and kinetin had partial inhibitory effects on enzyme activity. Activity was effectively inhibited by compounds capable of chelating peroxidase heme iron such as diethyldithiocarbamate and tiron, but unaffected by EDTA. Free radical scavenger, superoxide dismutase, also had no effect on reaction velocity. Enzymatic action was consistent with that of ascorbate peroxidase based on the relatively higher affinity for ascorbate over guaiacol. Optimum activity temperature was 50-55 degrees C. The enzyme was stable at temperatures below 40 degrees C and at 50 degrees C for up to 10 min. Over 90% of total activity was lost at 80 degrees C within 5 min. Broad pH optima, 5.5-7.5 at 50 degrees C and 6-7 at 30 degrees C, were obtained. Peroxidase activity in cantaloupe was higher than those in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), suggesting a relatively high oxidative stress in fresh cut cantaloupe. The potential use of ascorbate as an additive in fresh cut cantaloupe melon was demonstrated by its ability to preserve color in minimally processed fruits for 25 days at 4 degrees C, possibly as a result of an enhanced antioxidative action of the ascorbate-peroxidase complex and trace metal ion cofactors.

  7. Peroxidase activation of cytoglobin by anionic phospholipids: Mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E; Anthonymutu, Tamil S; Vlasova, Irina I; Camacho, Carlos J; Gladwin, Mark T; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a hexa-coordinated hemoprotein with yet to be defined physiological functions. The iron coordination and spin state of the Cygb heme group are sensitive to oxidation of two cysteine residues (Cys38/Cys83) and/or the binding of free fatty acids. However, the roles of redox vs lipid regulators of Cygb's structural rearrangements in the context of the protein peroxidase competence are not known. Searching for physiologically relevant lipid regulators of Cygb, here we report that anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositolphosphates, affect structural organization of the protein and modulate its iron state and peroxidase activity both conjointly and/or independently of cysteine oxidation. Thus, different anionic lipids can operate in cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent ways as inducers of the peroxidase activity. We establish that Cygb's peroxidase activity can be utilized for the catalysis of peroxidation of anionic phospholipids (including phosphatidylinositolphosphates) yielding mono-oxygenated molecular species. Combined with the computational simulations we propose a bipartite lipid binding model that rationalizes the modes of interactions with phospholipids, the effects on structural re-arrangements and the peroxidase activity of the hemoprotein.

  8. Peroxidase extraction from jicama skin peels for phenol removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiong, T.; Lau, S. Y.; Khor, E. H.; Danquah, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives exist in various types of industrial effluents, and are known to be harmful to aquatic lives even at low concentrations. Conventional treatment technologies for phenol removal are challenged with long retention time, high energy consumption and process cost. Enzymatic treatment has emerged as an alternative technology for phenol removal from wastewater. These enzymes interact with aromatic compounds including phenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, forming free radicals which polymerize spontaneously to produce insoluble phenolic polymers. This work aims to extract peroxidase from agricultural wastes materials and establish its application for phenol removal. Peroxidase was extracted from jicama skin peels under varying extraction conditions of pH, sample-to-buffer ratio (w/v %) and temperature. Experimental results showed that extraction process conducted at pH 10, 40% w/v and 25oC demonstrated a peroxidase activity of 0.79 U/mL. Elevated temperatures slightly enhanced the peroxidase activities. Jicama peroxidase extracted at optimum extraction conditions demonstrated a phenol removal efficiency of 87.5% at pH 7. Phenol removal efficiency was ∼ 97% in the range of 30 - 40oC, and H2O2 dosage has to be kept below 100 mM for maximum removal under phenol concentration tested.

  9. Peroxidases from cell suspension cultures of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Agostini, E; de Forchetti, S M; Tigier, H A

    2000-08-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Brassica napus were obtained under different hormonal conditions, using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and kinetin as growth regulators. They were analyzed as a culture system for peroxidase production in vitro to avoid many of the problems that affect the production from field-grown roots. Total peroxidase specific activities reached a maximum at the end of exponential growth phase of the cultures. Cultures obtained with 4 mg/l of 2,4-D an without kinetin or with 1 mg/l of 2,4-D and the same amount of kinetin produced twice the total activity of root extracts and, in addition, they released peroxidases to the culture medium, which would be advantageous for the commercial production of the enzyme. Peroxidase patterns, obtained by isoelectric focusing of cell extracts and of culture medium of cell suspension cultures, differed from those of root crude extracts from field-grown plants with additional bands of higher isoelectric points. These cultures showed interesting properties and could be considered an alternative source of peroxidases for commercial production and/or to be applied as a model for physiological research. PMID:10979611

  10. Purification, crystallization, and characterization of peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus.

    PubMed

    Morita, Y; Yamashita, H; Mikami, B; Iwamoto, H; Aibara, S; Terada, M; Minami, J

    1988-04-01

    Peroxidase (donor: H2O2 oxidoreductase [EC 1.11.1.7]) was purified from a culture broth of an inkcap Basidiomycete, Coprinus cinereus S.F. Gray. A single component containing a low amount of carbohydrate was isolated by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose and crystallized from ammonium sulfate solution. The enzyme is an acidic protein (pI 3.5) and consists of a single polypeptide chain having the molecular weight of 41,600 daltons. The enzyme contains one protohemin per molecule and exhibits the characteristic absorption, circular dichroism, and magnetic circular dichroism spectra of a heme-protein. The Coprinus peroxidase forms two characteristic intermediate compounds, I and II, and the rate constants for hydrogen peroxide and guaiacol had similar values to those for higher plant peroxidases. The ferric enzyme formed a cyanide compound with a dissociation constant similar to those for higher plant enzyme, but the dissociation constant of the ferrous enzyme-cyanide was large. The chemical composition of Coprinus peroxidase showed 381 amino acid residues, 1 glucosamine, 3 true sugars, 3 calcium, and 1 non-heme iron other than 1 protohemin. The secondary structure of the fungal enzyme was very similar to that of horseradish peroxidase.

  11. Horseradish peroxidase: a modern view of a classic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Nigel C

    2004-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase is an important heme-containing enzyme that has been studied for more than a century. In recent years new information has become available on the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme and its catalytic intermediates, mechanisms of catalysis and the function of specific amino acid residues. Site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution techniques are now used routinely to investigate the structure and function of horseradish peroxidase and offer the opportunity to develop engineered enzymes for practical applications in natural product and fine chemicals synthesis, medical diagnostics and bioremediation. A combination of horseradish peroxidase and indole-3-acetic acid or its derivatives is currently being evaluated as an agent for use in targeted cancer therapies. Physiological roles traditionally associated with the enzyme that include indole-3-acetic acid metabolism, cross-linking of biological polymers and lignification are becoming better understood at the molecular level, but the involvement of specific horseradish peroxidase isoenzymes in these processes is not yet clearly defined. Progress in this area should result from the identification of the entire peroxidase gene family of Arabidopsis thaliana, which has now been completed. PMID:14751298

  12. Vanadate as an inhibitor of plant and mammalian peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Serra, M A; Sabbioni, E; Marchesini, A; Pintar, A; Valoti, M

    Vanadate ions are shown to inhibit horseradish, squash, and rat intestinal peroxidases by following the reaction spectrophotometrically in a wide range of vanadate concentrations. I50 in phosphate buffer were 43, 9.4, and 535 microM, respectively. No inhibitory effect was found on cow milk lactoperoxidase and beef liver catalase. Gel filtration of peroxidases in the presence of vanadate, as carried out by radioactive 48V for horseradish peroxidases (either in aerobic or anoxic conditions) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) for squash peroxidase, demonstrated a binding of vanadium to these enzymes in stoichiometric amounts. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the eluted peaks for the former peroxidase indicated that vanadium is in the +5 oxidation state, but an equilibrium between V (V) and V (IV) in the assay conditions cannot be discarded. Although the inhibitory mechanism remains obscure, some hypotheses are considered. The potential implications that the inhibitory effect of vanadium might have on plant and animal metabolism are also discussed. PMID:2484422

  13. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus

    SciTech Connect

    Mliki, A.; Zimmermann, W. )

    1992-03-01

    Peroxidases play an important role in the oxidation of a large number of aromatic compounds, including recalcitrant substances. An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a K{sub m} of 17.8 {mu}M and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a K{sub m} of 2.07 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C{alpha}-C{beta} bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydroxy-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl) propane, a nonphenolic dimeric lignin model compound. The spectrum of te peroxidase showed a soret band at 405 nm, which disappeared after reduction with sodium dithionite, indicating that the enzyme is a hemoprotein. Testing the effects of various inhibitors on the enzyme activity showed that it is a bifunctional enzyme having catalase and peroxidase activities.

  14. Differential fitness of allelic isozymes in the marine gastropods Littorina punctata and Littorina neritoides, exposed to the environmental stress of the combined effects of cadmium and mercury pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavie, Batia; Nevo, Eviatar

    1987-07-01

    The present study tested the separate and the interactive pollution effects of cadmium and mercury on the electrophoretically detected allelic isozyme frequencies of the enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase for two species of littoral marine gastropods — Littorina punctata and L. neritoides — and the enzyme amino peptidase for L. neritoides. Our results indicate differential survivorship of allelic isozyme genotypes specific for each type of pollutant and for their interaction, as well as trends common to all pollutants. Theoretically the results reflect the adaptive nature of at least some allozymic genotypes in these marine gastropods and seem inconsistent with the neutral theory of allozyme polymorphisms. Practically, the results reinforce earlier conclusions that changes in the frequency of allelic isozymes may be used as a genetic monitor of pollution.

  15. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 551 Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2-Sulfonamide Derivatives: In Vitro Inhibition Studies With Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio; Ilies, Marc A.; Jitianu, Andrei

    1998-01-01

    Coordination compounds of 5-chloroacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide (Hcaz) with V(IV), Cr(lll), Fe(ll), Co(ll), Ni(ll) and Cu(ll) have been prepared and characterized by standard procedures (spectroscopic, magnetic, EPR, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). Some of these compounds showed very good in vitro inhibitory properties against three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA)isozymes, i.e., CA I, II, and IV. The differences between these isozymes in susceptibility to inhibition by these metal complexes is discussed in relationship to the characteristic features of their active sites, and is rationalized in terms useful for developing isozyme-specific CA inhibitors. PMID:18475829

  16. Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia is mediated by phospholipase D isozymes in human astroglioma cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Park, Mi Hee; Lee, Young Han; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Min, Do Sik

    2007-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an isoform of prostaglandin H synthase induced by hypoxia and has been implicated in the growth and progression of a variety of human cancers. In the present study, we investigated the role of phospholipase D (PLD) isozymes in cobalt chloride (CoCl(2))-induced hypoxia-driven COX-2 expression in U87 MG human astroglioma cells. CoCl(2) stimulated PLD activity and synthesis of COX-2 protein in a dose and time-dependent manner. Moreover, elevated expression of PLD1 and PLD2 increased hypoxia-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production. Pretreatment of cells with 1-butanol, but not 3-butanol, suppressed CoCl(2)-induced COX-2 expression and PGE(2) formation. In addition, evidence that PLD activity was involved in the stimulation of COX-2 expression was provided by the observations that overexpression of wild type PLD isozymes, but not catalytically inactive PLD isozymes, stimulated CoCl(2)-induced COX-2 expression and PGE(2) production. PLD1 enhanced COX-2 expression by CoCl(2) via reactive oxygen species (ROS), p38 MAPK kinase, PKC-delta, and PKA, but not ERK, whereas PLD2 enhanced CoCl(2)-induced COX-2 expression via ROS and p38 MAPK, but not ERK, PKC-delta, and PKA. Differential regulation of COX-2 expression mediated through PLD isozymes was comparable with that of CoCl(2)-induced PLD activity in these two PLD isozymes. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that PLD1 and PLD2 isozymes enhance CoCl(2)-induced COX-2 expression through differential signaling pathways in astroglioma cells.

  17. Optimization of extracellular fungal peroxidase production by 2 Coprinus species.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Keisuke; Pickard, Michael A; Buchanan, Ian D; Smith, Daniel W

    2004-12-01

    Optimum culture conditions for the batch production of extracellular peroxidase by Coprinus cinereus UAMH 4103 and Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067 were explored using 2 statistical experimental designs, including 2-level, 7-factor fractional factorial design and 2-factor central composite design. Of the 7 factors examined in the screening study, the concentrations of carbon (glucose) and nitrogen (peptone or casitone) sources showed significant effects on the peroxidase production by Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067. The optimum glucose and peptone concentrations were determined as 2.7% and 0.8% for Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067, and 2.9% and 1.4% for C. cinereus UAMH 4103, respectively. Under the optimized culture condition the maximum peroxidase activity achieved in this study was 34.5 U x mL(-1) for Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067 and 68.0 U x mL(-1) for C. cinereus UAMH 4103, more than 2-fold higher than the results of previous studies.

  18. Structure of soybean seed coat peroxidase: A plant peroxidase with unusual stability and haem-apoprotein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Anette; Mirza, Osman; Indiani, Chiara; Teilum, Kaare; Smulevich, Giulietta; Welinder, Karen G.; Gajhede, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Soybean seed coat peroxidase (SBP) is a peroxidase with extraordinary stability and catalytic properties. It belongs to the family of class III plant peroxidases that can oxidize a wide variety of organic and inorganic substrates using hydrogen peroxide. Because the plant enzyme is a heterogeneous glycoprotein, SBP was produced recombinant in Escherichia coli for the present crystallographic study. The three-dimensional structure of SBP shows a bound tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane molecule (TRIS). This TRIS molecule has hydrogen bonds to active site residues corresponding to the residues that interact with the small phenolic substrate ferulic acid in the horseradish peroxidase C (HRPC):ferulic acid complex. TRIS is positioned in what has been described as a secondary substrate-binding site in HRPC, and the structure of the SBP:TRIS complex indicates that this secondary substrate-binding site could be of functional importance. SBP has one of the most solvent accessible δ-meso haem edge (the site of electron transfer from reducing substrates to the enzymatic intermediates compound I and II) so far described for a plant peroxidase and structural alignment suggests that the volume of Ile74 is a factor that influences the solvent accessibility of this important site. A contact between haem C8 vinyl and the sulphur atom of Met37 is observed in the SBP structure. This interaction might affect the stability of the haem group by stabilisation/delocalisation of the porphyrin π-cation of compound I. PMID:11266599

  19. Targeting the active site of the placental isozyme of alkaline phosphatase by phage-displayed scFv antibodies selected by a specific uncompetitive inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Deepti; Kala, Mrinalini; Jain, Vishal; Sinha, Subrata

    2005-01-01

    Background The isozymes of alkaline phosphatase, the tissue non-specific, intestinal and placental, have similar properties and a high degree of identity. The placental isozyme (PLAP) is an oncofetal antigen expressed in several malignancies including choriocarcinoma, seminoma and ovarian carcinoma. We had earlier attempted to isolate PLAP-specific scFv from a synthetic human immunoglobulin library but were unable to do so, presumably because of the similarity between the isozymes. In this work, we have employed a PLAP-specific uncompetitive inhibitor, L-Phe-Gly-Gly, to select isozyme specific scFvs. An uncompetitive inhibitor binds to the enzyme in the presence of substrate and stabilizes the enzyme-substrate complex. Several uncompetitive inhibitors have varying degrees of isozyme specificity for human alkaline phosphatase isozymes. A specific uncompetitive inhibitor would be able to unmask conformational differences between the otherwise very similar molecules. Also, such inhibitors would be directed to regions at/close to the active site of the enzyme. In this work, the library was first incubated with PLAP and the bound clones then eluted by incubation with L-Phe-Gly-Gly along with the substrate, para-nitro phenyl phosphate (pNPP). The scFvs were then studied with regard to the biochemical modulation of their binding, isozyme specificity and effect on enzyme activity. Results Of 13 clones studied initially, the binding of 9 was inhibited by L-Phe-Gly-Gly (with pNPP) and 2 clones were inhibited by pNPP alone. Two clones had absolute and 2 clones had partial specificity to PLAP. Two clones were cross-reactive with only one other isozyme. Three scFv clones, having an accessible His6-tag, were purified and studied for their modulation of enzyme activity. All the three scFvs inhibited PLAP activity with the kinetics of competitive inhibition. Cell ELISA could demonstrate binding of the specific scFvs to the cell surface expressed PLAP. Conclusion The results

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) anionic peroxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-De-Leon, F.; Klotz, K.L.; Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in numerous physiological processes including lignification (Grisebach, 1981), wound-healing (Espelie et al., 1986), phenol oxidation (Lagrimini, 1991), pathogen defense (Ye et al., 1990), and the regulation of cell elongation through the formation of interchain covalent bonds between various cell wall polymers (Fry, 1986; Goldberg et al., 1986; Bradley et al., 1992). However, a complete description of peroxidase action in vivo is not available because of the vast number of potential substrates and the existence of multiple isoenzymes. The tobacco anionic peroxidase is one of the better-characterized isoenzymes. This enzyme has been shown to oxidize a number of significant plant secondary compounds in vitro including cinnamyl alcohols, phenolic acids, and indole-3-acetic acid (Maeder, 1980; Lagrimini, 1991). A cDNA encoding the enzyme has been obtained, and this enzyme was shown to be expressed at the highest levels in lignifying tissues (xylem and tracheary elements) and also in epidermal tissue (Lagrimini et al., 1987). It was shown at this time that there were four distinct copies of the anionic peroxidase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). A tobacco genomic DNA library was constructed in the [lambda]-phase EMBL3, from which two unique peroxidase genes were sequenced. One of these clones, [lambda]POD1, was designated as a pseudogene when the exonic sequences were found to differ from the cDNA sequences by 1%, and several frame shifts in the coding sequences indicated a dysfunctional gene (the authors' unpublished results). The other clone, [lambda]POD3, described in this manuscript, was designated as the functional tobacco anionic peroxidase gene because of 100% homology with the cDNA. Significant structural elements include an AS-2 box indicated in shoot-specific expression (Lam and Chua, 1989), a TATA box, and two intervening sequences. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Properties of a cationic peroxidase from Citrus jambhiri cv. Adalia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; El-Badry, Mohamed O; Drees, Ehab A; Fahmy, Afaf S

    2008-08-01

    The major pool of peroxidase activity is present in the peel of some Egyptian citrus species and cultivars compared to the juice and pulp. Citrus jambhiri cv. Adalia had the highest peroxidase activity among the examined species. Four anionic and one cationic peroxidase isoenzymes from C. jambhiri were detected using the purification procedure including ammonium sulfate precipitation, chromatography on diethylaminoethanol-cellulose, carboxymethyl-cellulose, and Sephacryl S-200 columns. Cationic peroxidase POII is proved to be pure, and its molecular weight was 56 kDa. A study of substrate specificity identified the physiological role of POII, which catalyzed the oxidation of some phenolic substrates in the order of o-phenylenediamine > guaiacol > o-dianisidine > pyrogallol > catechol. The kinetic parameters (K (m), V (max), and V (max)/K (m)) of POII for hydrolysis toward H2O2 and electron donor substrates were studied. The enzyme had pH and temperature optima at 5.5 and 40 degrees C, respectively. POII was stable at 10-40 degrees C and unstable above 50 degrees C. The thermal inactivation profile of POII is biphasic and characterized by a rapid decline in activity on exposure to heat. The most of POII activity (70-80%) was lost at 50, 60, and 70 degrees C after 15, 10, and 5 min of incubation, respectively. Most of the examined metal ions had a very slight effect on POII except of Li+, Zn2+, and Hg2+, which had partial inhibitory effects. In the present study, the instability of peroxidase above 50 degrees C makes the high temperature short time treatment very efficient for the inactivation of peel peroxidase contaminated in orange juice to avoid the formation of off-flavors. PMID:18633734

  2. Defense Responses in Rice Induced by Silicon Amendment against Infestation by the Leaf Folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yongqiang; Li, Pei; Gong, Shaolong; Yang, Lang; Wen, Lizhang; Hou, Maolin

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) amendment to plants can confer enhanced resistance to herbivores. In the present study, the physiological and cytological mechanisms underlying the enhanced resistance of plants with Si addition were investigated for one of the most destructive rice pests in Asian countries, the rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée). Activities of defense-related enzymes, superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and polyphenol oxidase, and concentrations of malondialdehyde and soluble protein in leaves were measured in rice plants with or without leaf folder infestation and with or without Si amendment at 0.32 g Si/kg soil. Silicon amendment significantly reduced leaf folder larval survival. Silicon addition alone did not change activities of defense-related enzymes and malondialdehyde concentration in rice leaves. With leaf folder infestation, activities of the defense-related enzymes increased and malondialdehyde concentration decreased in plants amended with Si. Soluble protein content increased with Si addition when the plants were not infested, but was reduced more in the infested plants with Si amendment than in those without Si addition. Regardless of leaf folder infestation, Si amendment significantly increased leaf Si content through increases in the number and width of silica cells. Our results show that Si addition enhances rice resistance to the leaf folder through priming the feeding stress defense system, reduction in soluble protein content and cell silicification of rice leaves. PMID:27124300

  3. Improved avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) staining.

    PubMed

    Cattoretti, G; Berti, E; Schiró, R; D'Amato, L; Valeggio, C; Rilke, F

    1988-02-01

    A considerable intensification of the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining system (ABC) was obtained by sequentially overlaying the sections to be immunostained with an avidin-rich and a biotin-rich complex. Each sequential addition contributed to the deposition of horseradish peroxidase on the immunostained site and allowed the subsequent binding of a complementary complex. With this technique a higher dilution of the antisera could be used and minute amounts of antigen masked by the fixative could be demonstrated on paraffin sections.

  4. Suicide inactivation of peroxidase from Chamaerops excelsa palm tree leaves.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Zhadan, Galina G; Roig, Manuel G; Shnyrov, Valery L

    2011-12-01

    The concentration and time-dependences and the mechanism of the inactivation of Chamaerops excelsa peroxidase (CEP) by hydrogen peroxide were studied kinetically with four co-substrates (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), guaiacol, o-dianisidine and o-phenylenediamine). The turnover number (r) of H(2)O(2) required to complete the inactivation of the enzyme varied for the different substrates, the enzyme most resistant to inactivation (r=4844) with ABTS being the most useful substrate for biotechnological applications, opening a new avenue of enquiry with this peroxidase.

  5. [Purification and characterization of peroxidase from Phellinus igniarius (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Krüger, G; Pfeil, E

    1976-08-01

    A Peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) of the basidiomycet Phellinus igniarius was derived from mycel and a medium containing glucose and extract of yeast by using various methods of preparation. The enzyme resists extreme conditions (pH, temperature salt concentration). Its optimum pH for activities is in the acid range. Two isoenzymes were found. The molecular weight, isoelectric point, Michaelis-Menten constant, indolacetic acid oxidase activity and spectral and analytical properties of this peroxidase were determined. It is assumed that the enzyme has an intracellular as well as an extracellular field of activity. PMID:962469

  6. Glutathione peroxidase and iron-thiol dependent lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Punekar, N S; Lardy, H A

    1989-12-01

    Role of glutathione peroxidase in iron-thiol-mediated lipid peroxidation was examined. The enzyme was unable to prevent peroxidation of extracted rat liver microsomal lipids. In contrast, when arachidonic acid was the substrate, glutathione peroxidase did decrease the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material. Superoxide dismutase produced a consistent but partial inhibition of peroxidation and catalase was without effect. Our results suggest that iron-thiol-dependent lipid peroxidation cannot be completely blocked by protective enzymes that are effective in other systems. PMID:2635868

  7. Effect of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for urolithiasis on concentrations of creatine kinase isozymes in patient serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Kato, K; Takashi, M; Zhu, Y; Yokoi, K; Kobayashi, H; Ando, T; Obata, K; Kondo, A; Miyake, K

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) for urolithiasis causes renal injury, we immunoassayed creatine kinase isozymes (CK-B and CK-M) in serum and urine from patients with renal stone (n = 21) and ureteral stone (n = 18) before and after (0, 2, and 24 h) ESWL. CK-B is generally present in renal tissue at relatively high concentrations, whereas CK-M is found at low concentrations. CK-B and CK-M levels were enhanced both in the serum and urine samples after ESWL in both groups of patients but CK-B levels return to almost normal very rapidly. Because CK-M, which is mainly localized in muscle tissue, also increased in both groups, the increased CK-B in serum after ESWL might be derived not only from kidney but also from muscle tissues which also contain a significant level of CK-B. These results suggest that significant tissue injury, including kidney and muscles, might be caused by ESWL treatment for urolithiasis but there is no long-term renal adverse effect, and that creatine kinase isozymes in serum and urine might be useful markers of tissue injury by such treatment.

  8. Expression of phospholipase D isozymes in scar and viable tissue in congestive heart failure due to myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dent, Melissa R; Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2004-01-01

    The phospholipase D (PLD) associated with the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) membrane hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid, an important phospholipid signaling molecule known to influence cardiac function. The present study was undertaken to examine PLD isozyme mRNA expression, protein contents and activities in congestive heart failure (CHF) subsequent to myocardial infarction (MI). MI was induced in rats by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. At 8 weeks after the surgical procedure, hemodynamic assessment revealed that these experimental rats were at a moderate stage of CHF. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that PLD1 and PLD2 mRNA amounts were unchanged in viable left ventricular (LV) tissue of the failing heart. Furthermore, this technique demonstrated the presence of PLD1 and PLD2 mRNA in the scar tissue. While SL PLD1 and PLD2 protein contents were elevated in the viable LV tissue of the failing heart, SL PLD1 activity was significantly decreased, whereas SL PLD2 activity was significantly increased. On the other hand, although PLD1 protein was undetectable, PLD2 protein and activity were detected in the scar tissue. Our findings suggest that differential changes in PLD isozymes may contribute to the pathophysiology of CHF and may also be involved in the processes of scar remodeling. PMID:15601581

  9. Immunoblot analyses of the elicited Sanguinaria canadensis enzyme, dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase: evidence for resolution from a polyphenol oxidase isozyme.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, A; Neuman, M C; Barg, R; Krueger, R J; Coscia, C J

    1997-11-15

    In our initial purification of dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase from Sanguinaria canadensis plant cell cultures, we reported that our most purified preparations contained a major band at 77 kDa and minor lower Mr bands. Here we present evidence on highly purified dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase from elicited S. canadensis cultures to indicate that this enzyme is the 77-kDa protein and that lower Mr bands include an isozyme(s) of the polyphenol oxidase family that copurifies with it. An antibody raised against the 77-kDa protein and an anti-polyphenol oxidase antibody that recognizes a 70-kDa band were used to monitor chromatographic fractions by immunoblot analysis of the oxidases. Oxidase-containing eluates from DEAE-Sephadex, CM, and HiTrap blue were compared to corresponding flow-through fractions. Bands at 77 and 88 kDa were detected with anti-dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase antibody in eluates displaying high dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase activity. Polyphenol oxidase specific activity and immunoreactivity partitioned both in flow-through and eluate fractions of the CM and HiTrap columns. Estimation of the dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase and polyphenol oxidase specific activities for each step showed increasing enrichment of alkaloidal enzyme accompanied by variable dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase/polyphenol oxidase activity ratios. Taken together these observations indicate that the dihydrobenzophenanthridine and polyphenol oxidases have Mr values of 77 and 70 kDa, respectively, and the two enzymes are different entities.

  10. Expression and localization of type II diacylglycerol kinase isozymes δ and η in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Takako; Sakai, Hiromichi; Shionoya, Takao; Sato, Naruki; Sakane, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The functions of type II diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) δ and -η in the brain are still unclear. As a first step, we investigated the spatial and temporal expression of DGKδ and -η in the brains of mice. DGKδ2, but not DGKδ1, was highly expressed in layers II-VI of the cerebral cortex; CA-CA3 regions and dentate gyrus of hippocampus; mitral cell, glomerular and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb; and the granule cell layer in the cerebellum in 1- to 32-week-old mice. DGKδ2 was expressed just after birth, and its expression levels dramatically increased from weeks 1 to 4. A substantial amount of DGKη (η1/η2) was detected in layers II-VI of the cerebral cortex, CA1 and CA2 regions and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, mitral cell and glomerular layers of the olfactory bulb, and Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of 1- to 32-week-old mice. DGKη2 expression reached maximum levels at P5 and decreased by 4 weeks, whereas DGKη1 increased over the same time frame. These results indicate that the expression patterns of DGK isozymes differ from each other and also from other isozymes, and this suggests that DGKδ and -η play distinct and specific roles in the brain.

  11. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  12. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  13. Comparative leaf development in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2014-02-01

    Recent accumulation of our knowledge on basic leaf development mechanisms in model angiosperm species has allowed us to pursue evolutionary development (evo/devo) studies of various kinds of leaf development. As a result, unexpected findings and clues have been unearthed aiding our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the diversity of leaf morphology, although the covered remain limited. In this review, we highlight recent findings of diversified leaf development in angiosperms.

  14. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  19. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification.

  20. Interference of peptone and tyrosine with the lignin peroxidase assay.

    PubMed Central

    ten Have, R; Hartmans, S; Field, J A

    1997-01-01

    The N-unregulated white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultured in 1 liter of peptone-yeast extract medium to produce lignin peroxidase (LiP). During the LiP assay, the oxidation of veratryl alcohol to veratraldehyde was inhibited due to tyrosine present in the peptone and the yeast extract. PMID:9251220

  1. Towards uncovering the roles of switchgrass peroxidases in plant processes

    PubMed Central

    Saathoff, Aaron J.; Donze, Teresa; Palmer, Nathan A.; Bradshaw, Jeff; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Twigg, Paul; Tobias, Christian M.; Lagrimini, Mark; Sarath, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Herbaceous perennial plants selected as potential biofuel feedstocks had been understudied at the genomic and functional genomic levels. Recent investments, primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy, have led to the development of a number of molecular resources for bioenergy grasses, such as the partially annotated genome for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), and some related diploid species. In its current version, the switchgrass genome contains 65,878 gene models arising from the A and B genomes of this tetraploid grass. The availability of these gene sequences provides a framework to exploit transcriptomic data obtained from next-generation sequencing platforms to address questions of biological importance. One such question pertains to discovery of genes and proteins important for biotic and abiotic stress responses, and how these components might affect biomass quality and stress response in plants engineered for a specific end purpose. It can be expected that production of switchgrass on marginal lands will expose plants to diverse stresses, including herbivory by insects. Class III plant peroxidases have been implicated in many developmental responses such as lignification and in the adaptive responses of plants to insect feeding. Here, we have analyzed the class III peroxidases encoded by the switchgrass genome, and have mined available transcriptomic datasets to develop a first understanding of the expression profiles of the class III peroxidases in different plant tissues. Lastly, we have identified switchgrass peroxidases that appear to be orthologs of enzymes shown to play key roles in lignification and plant defense responses to hemipterans. PMID:23802005

  2. Structural and spectroscopic characterisation of a heme peroxidase from sorghum.

    PubMed

    Nnamchi, Chukwudi I; Parkin, Gary; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Kwon, Hanna; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Agirre, Jon; Okolo, Bartholomew N; Moneke, Anene; Nwanguma, Bennett C; Moody, Peter C E; Raven, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    A cationic class III peroxidase from Sorghum bicolor was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme contains a high-spin heme, as evidenced by UV-visible spectroscopy and EPR. Steady state oxidation of guaiacol was demonstrated and the enzyme was shown to have higher activity in the presence of calcium ions. A Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential of -266 mV vs NHE was determined. Stopped-flow experiments with H2O2 showed formation of a typical peroxidase Compound I species, which converts to Compound II in the presence of calcium. A crystal structure of the enzyme is reported, the first for a sorghum peroxidase. The structure reveals an active site that is analogous to those for other class I heme peroxidase, and a substrate binding site (assigned as arising from binding of indole-3-acetic acid) at the γ-heme edge. Metal binding sites are observed in the structure on the distal (assigned as a Na(+) ion) and proximal (assigned as a Ca(2+)) sides of the heme, which is consistent with the Ca(2+)-dependence of the steady state and pre-steady state kinetics. It is probably the case that the structural integrity (and, thus, the catalytic activity) of the sorghum enzyme is dependent on metal ion incorporation at these positions.

  3. Removal of phenolic compounds from wastewaters using soybean peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.; Nicell, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Toxic and odiferous phenolic compounds are present in wastewaters generated by a variety of industries including petroleum refining, plastics, resins, textiles, and iron and steel manufacturing among others. Due to its commercial availability in purified form, its useful presence in raw plant material, and its proven ability to remove a variety of phenolic contaminants from wastewaters over a wide range of pH and temperature, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) appears to be the peroxidase enzyme of choice in enzymatic wastewater treatment studies. Problems with HRP catalyzed phenol removal, however, include the formation of toxic soluble reaction by-products, the cost of the enzyme, and costs associated with disposal of the phenolic precipitate generated. Enzyme costs are incurred because the enzyme is inactivated during the phenol removal process by various side reactions. While recent work has shown that enzyme inactivation can be reduced using chemical additives, the problem of enzyme cost could be circumvented by using a less expensive source of enzyme. In 1991, the seed coat of the soybean was identified as a very rich source of peroxidase enzyme. Since the seed coat of the soybean is a waste product of the soybean food industry, soybean peroxidase (SBP) has the potential of being a cost effective alternative to HRP in wastewater treatment. In this study, SBP is characterized in terms of its catalytic activity, its stability, and its ability to promote removal of phenolic compounds from synthetic wastewaters. Results obtained are discussed and compared to similar investigations using HRP.

  4. Immobilization of peroxidase on SPEU film via radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongfei, Ha; Guanghui, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    The acrylic acid or acrylamide were grafted via radiation onto segmented polyetherurethane (SPEU) film which is a kind of biocompatible material. Then the Horse radish peroxidase was immobilized on the grafted SPEU film through chemical binding. Some quantitative relationships between the percent graft and the activity, amount of immobilized enzyme were given. The properties and application of obtained biomaterial was studied as well.

  5. Removal of chlorophenols from wastewater by immobilized horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumi, Kenji; Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu

    1996-07-05

    Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on magnetite and removal of chlorophenols using immobilized enzyme were investigated. Immobilization by physical adsorption on magnetite was much more effective than that by the crosslinking method, and the enzyme was found to be immobilized at 100% of retained activity. In addition, it was discovered that horseradish peroxidase was selectively adsorbed on magnetite, and the immobilization resulted in a 20-fold purification rate for crude enzyme. When immobilized peroxidase was used to treat a solution containing various chlorophenols, p-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, each chlorophenol was almost 100% removed, and also the removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) reached more than 90%, respectively. However, in the case of soluble peroxidase, complete removal of each chlorophenol could not be attained, and in particular, the removal of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol was the lowest, with a removal rate of only 36%.

  6. Phenol removal by peroxidases extracted from Chinese cabbage root

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, H.I.; Jeong, Y.H.

    1995-12-31

    More than four million tons of Chinese cabbages are produced in Korea. Most of them are used as raw materials for Kimchi, but root parts of them are discarded as agricultural wastes. A trial for the application of agricultural waste to industrial waste water treatment was made as an effort to the efficient use of natural resources and to reduce water pollution problem simultaneously. Peroxidases of both solid and liquid phases were obtained from Chinese cabbage roots by using commercial juicer. The differences in peroxidase activity among the various cultivars of Chinese cabbages in Korea were little and electrophoretic patterns of various peroxidases will be discussed. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity will be discussed also. Since peroxidases are distributed into 66% in liquid (juice) and 34% in solid phase (pulp), enzymes from both phases were applied to investigate the enzymatic removal of phenol from waste water. After phenol solution at 150 ppm being reacted with liquid phase enzyme (1,800 unit/1) for 3 hours in a batch stirred reactor, 96% of phenol could be removed through polymerization and precipitation. Also, phenol could be removed from initial 120 ppm to final 5 ppm by applying solid phase enzyme in an air lift reactor (600 unit/1). Almost equivalent efficiencies of phenol removal were observed between two systems, even though only one third of the enzymes in batch stirred reactor was applied in air lift reactor. The possible reason for this phenomenon is because peroxidases exist as immobilized forms in solid phase.

  7. Alterations in rat cardiac myosin isozymes induced by whole-body irradiation are prevented by 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine

    SciTech Connect

    Litten, R.Z.; Fein, H.G.; Gainey, G.T.; Walden, T.L.; Smallridge, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cardiac myosin isozymes and serum thyroid hormone levels were investigated in rats following 10 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The percent beta-myosin heavy chain increased from 21.3 {plus minus} 1.8 to 28.1 {plus minus} 6.8 (NS) at 3-day postirradiation, 37.7 {plus minus} 1.9 (P less than .001) at 6-day postirradiation, and 43.8 {plus minus} 3.3 (P less than .001) at 9-day postirradiation. Along with the change in myosin isozymes was a significant 53% decrease (P less than .001) in the serum thyroxine (T4) level by day 3 postirradiation, remaining depressed through day 9 postirradiation. The serum 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) level, however, was normal until day 9, when significant depression was also observed. In contrast, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level was significantly increased by fourfold at day 3, returning to near normal values by day 9 postirradiation. Daily injections of physiological doses of T3 (0.3 microgram/100 g body weight) prevented the change in the myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation. Daily pharmacological injections of T3 (3.0 micrograms/100 g body weight) to the irradiated rats produced a further decrease in the percent beta-myosin heavy chain (below control values) indicating tissue hyperthyroidism. Thus, this study suggests that the change in myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation is caused by an alteration in thyroid hormone activity.

  8. New Ideas for an Old Enzyme: A Short, Question-Based Laboratory Project for the Purification and Identification of an Unknown LDH Isozyme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Aaron B.

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme purification projects are an excellent way to introduce many aspects of protein biochemistry, but can be difficult to carry out under the constraints of a typical undergraduate laboratory course. We have designed a short laboratory project for the purification and identification of an "unknown" lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozyme that can…

  9. Use of isozyme patterns in the identification of Biomphalaria tenagophila (D'Orbigny, 1835) and B. occidentalis (Paraense, 1981) (Gastropoda: Planorbidae).

    PubMed

    Mascara, D; Morgante, J S

    1995-01-01

    Two sibling species of Biomphalaria, B. tenagophila and B. occidentalis were identified using isozyme patterns obtained by horizontal gel electrophoresis. Six diagnostic enzymatic loci were identified in digestive gland homogenates. The results enable us to distinguish the species, calculate the Nei's coefficient of genetic similarity, and provide a basis for making inferences about the pattern of these two planorbid species colonization and distribution.

  10. Association of Neuroantibodies(NAB) with Glutathione-S-Tranferase(GST) Isozyme Polymorphisms(SNP) in African-American Children with Heavy Metal Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polymorphisms in GST isozymes have implications in heavy metal accumulation, neurodegeneration, and immune-mediated disease. Blood cell DNA and sera from 131 African-American children were used to determine GST Pi [rs947895 (C>A), rs17593068 (G>T), rs6591256 (A>G), rs187...

  11. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  12. Suppression of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis development in rats by inhibitors of cAMP phosphodiesterase isozymes types III and IV.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Y; Shankland, S J; Grande, J P; Walker, H J; Johnson, R J; Dousa, T P

    1996-01-01

    Excessive mesangial cell (MC) proliferation is a hallmark of many glomerulopathies. In our recent study on cultured rat MC (Matousovic, K., J.P. Grande, C.C.S. Chini, E.N. Chini, and T.P. Dousa. 1995. J. Clin. Invest. 96:401-410) we found that inhibition of isozyme cyclic-3',5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) type III (PDE-III) suppressed MC mitogenesis by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and by decreasing activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also found that inhibition of another PDE isozyme, PDE-IV, suppresses superoxide generation in glomeruli (Chini, C.C.S., E.N. Chini, J.M. Williams, K. Matousovic, and T.P. Dousa. 1994. Kidney Int. 46:28-36). We thus explored whether administration in vivo of the selective PDE-III antagonist, lixazinone (LX), together with the specific PDE-IV antagonist, rolipram (RP), can attenuate development of mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (MSGN) induced in rats by anti-rat thymocyte serum (ATS). Unlike the vehicle-treated MSGN rats, rats with MSGN treated with LX and RP did not develop proteinuria and maintained normal renal function when examined 5 d after injection of ATS. In PAS-stained kidneys from PDE-antagonists-treated MSGN-rats the morphology of glomeruli showed a reduction in cellularity compared with control rats with ATS. Compared with MSGN rats receiving vehicle, the MSGN rats receiving PDE-antagonists had less glomerular cell proliferation (PCNA delta -65%), a significantly lesser macrophage infiltration (delta -36% ED-1) and a significant reduction of alpha-smooth muscle actin expression by activated MC; in contrast, immunostaining for platelet antigens and laminin were not different. The beneficial effect of PDE inhibitors was not due to a moderate decrease (approximately -20%) in systolic blood pressure (SBP); as a similar decrease in SBP due to administration of hydralazine, a drug devoid of PDE inhibitory effect, did not reduce severity of MSGN in ATS-injected rats. We

  13. Amino acid changes within antenna helix are responsible for different regulatory preferences of human glutamate dehydrogenase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Min; Kim, Eun-A; Yang, Seung-Ju; Choi, Soo Young; Cho, Sung-Woo; Huh, Jae-Wan

    2007-07-01

    Human glutamate dehydrogenase (hGDH) exists in hGDH1 (housekeeping isozyme) and in hGDH2 (nerve-specific isozyme), which differ markedly in their allosteric regulation. Because they differ in only 16 of their 505 amino acids, the regulatory preferences must arise from amino acid residues that are not common between hGDH1 and hGDH2. To our knowledge none of the mutagenesis studies on the hGDH isozymes to date have identified the amino acid residues fully responsible for the different regulatory preferences between hGDH1 and hGDH2. In this study we constructed hGDH1(hGDH2(390-448))hGDH1 (amino acid segment 390-448 of hGDH1 replaced by the corresponding hGDH2 segment) and hGDH2(hGDH1(390-448))hGDH2 (amino acid segment 390-448 of hGDH2 replaced by the corresponding hGDH1 segment) by swapping the corresponding amino acid segments in hGDH1 and hGDH2. The chimeric enzymes by reciprocal swapping resulted in double mutations in amino acid sequences at 415 and 443 residues that are not common between hGDH1 and hGDH2 and are located in the C-terminal 48-residue "antenna" helix, which is thought to be part of the regulatory domain of mammalian GDHs. Functional analyses revealed that the doubly mutated chimeric enzymes almost completely acquired most of the different regulatory preferences between hGDH1 and hGDH2 for electrophoretic mobility, heat-stability, ADP activation, palmitoyl-CoA inhibition, and l-leucine activation, except for GTP inhibition. Our results indicate that substitutions of the residues in the antenna region may be important evolutionary changes that led to the adaptation of hGDH2 to the unique metabolic needs of the nerve tissue.

  14. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  15. Lignin-degrading Peroxidases from Genome of Selective Ligninolytic Fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Hammel, Kenneth E.; Martínez, Angel T.

    2012-01-01

    The white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies lignocellulose with high selectivity, but until now it has appeared to lack the specialized peroxidases, termed lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs), that are generally thought important for ligninolysis. We screened the recently sequenced C. subvermispora genome for genes that encode peroxidases with a potential ligninolytic role. A total of 26 peroxidase genes was apparent after a structural-functional classification based on homology modeling and a search for diagnostic catalytic amino acid residues. In addition to revealing the presence of nine heme-thiolate peroxidase superfamily members and the unexpected absence of the dye-decolorizing peroxidase superfamily, the search showed that the C. subvermispora genome encodes 16 class II enzymes in the plant-fungal-bacterial peroxidase superfamily, where LiPs and VPs are classified. The 16 encoded enzymes include 13 putative manganese peroxidases and one generic peroxidase but most notably two peroxidases containing the catalytic tryptophan characteristic of LiPs and VPs. We expressed these two enzymes in Escherichia coli and determined their substrate specificities on typical LiP/VP substrates, including nonphenolic lignin model monomers and dimers, as well as synthetic lignin. The results show that the two newly discovered C. subvermispora peroxidases are functionally competent LiPs and also suggest that they are phylogenetically and catalytically intermediate between classical LiPs and VPs. These results offer new insight into selective lignin degradation by C. subvermispora. PMID:22437835

  16. Agaricus bisporus and related Agaricus species on lignocellulose: production of manganese peroxidase and multicopper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Lankinen, Pauliina; Lundell, Taina

    2013-06-01

    Biotechnological, microbiological, and genetic studies of Agaricus species other than A. bisporus, the white button mushroom, have been limited so far. To expand the knowledge in the genus Agaricus, six novel wild-type isolates of Agaricus spp. were studied on their nutritional demands for enzyme production and mycelial growth. All the selected Agaricus species produced extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase activities in semi-solid rye bran cultures. Moderate MnP activities were measured for A. bisporus, A. bernardii and A. campestris. The highest laccase activities were obtained for A. bisporus and A. campestris. On soy medium, the highest mycelial tyrosinase activity was determined for A. bernardii. For A. bisporus, addition of copper caused no increase in laccase or tyrosinase activities on soy or malt extract media. Hyphal growth rate of the isolates was studied on lignocellulose amended agar plates. Fastest growth was obtained for A. bisporus on wheat bran and birch leaf litter agar. Except for A. bernardii, hyphal growth rates correlated well with MnP and laccase production levels between Agaricus species. Molecular taxonomy of the novel Agaricus spp. positioned them to distinct phylogenetic clusters with species-level identity. In conclusion, our data point to the importance of both MnP and multicopper enzymes in Agaricus spp. while growing on lignocelluloses.

  17. Purification of turnip peroxidase and its kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naresh; Gade, W N; Singh, Jai

    2002-02-01

    Peroxidase from turnip roots was purified using metal affinity chromatography up to a specific activity of 337 units/mg protein with 3.02 RZ and 63.5% recovery. After purification, the enzyme showed 2-3 bands on sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was found to be 37-39 kD with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometer (MALDI-MS). The enzyme showed maximum activity in phosphate buffer, pH 6.0, and lowest activity in borate buffer at the same pH. The Km of the enzyme was found to be 7.07 x 104 mM. Turnip peroxidase also contains an iron moiety which is found to be about 0.28%. The enzyme showed 50% inhibition of its specific activity with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). PMID:11934076

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lignin Peroxidase in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Francesca Gerini, M.; Roccatano, Danilo; Baciocchi, Enrico; Nola, Alfredo Di

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical and structural properties of lignin peroxidase and its Trp171Ala mutant have been investigated in aqueous solution using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In both cases, the enzyme retained its overall backbone structure and all its noncovalent interactions in the course of the MD simulations. Very interestingly, the analysis of the MD trajectories showed the presence of large fluctuations in correspondence of the residues forming the heme access channel; these movements enlarge the opening and facilitate the access of substrates to the enzyme active site. Moreover, steered molecular dynamics docking simulations have shown that lignin peroxidase natural substrate (veratryl alcohol) can easily approach the heme edge through the access channel. PMID:12770894

  19. Proteomic identification of a basic peroxidase stabilized within acetylated polymannan polysaccharide of Aloe barbadensis.

    PubMed

    Vittori, Natale; Martín, Mercedes; Sabater, Bartolomé

    2012-01-01

    Acetylated polymannan polysaccharide (ApmP) isolated from Aloe barbadensis Miller contains a stable peroxidase that was solubilized to investigate its biochemical, electrophoretic, immunological, and proteomic properties. In the electrophoretic band corresponding to the solubilized peroxidase, proteomic analysis detected seven tryptic peptides that matched homologous peptides covering one third of the ATP22a peroxidase of Arabidopsis thaliana. All the characteristics tested indicated that the activity stabilized within the ApmP pertains to the basic secretory peroxidase family, which includes members that have several biotechnological uses. Hence ApmP might yield a widely used peroxidase in stabilized form.

  20. Polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Vámos-Vigyázó, L

    1981-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidases and peroxidases are among the most studied enzymes in fruits and vegetables. Owing to the deleterious effects of discoloration and off-flavor formation induced by their actions, these enzymes have not ceased to be a matter of concern to food technologists, while their versatility as catalyst and their diversity as protein present a challenge to the biochemist. This article gives an account on the present state of knowledge in this field. The occurrence of polyphenol oxidases and peroxidases in food and food raw materials, and their role and importance in food processing are briefly outlined. Results of biochemical research including catalytic properties, substrate specificity, susceptibility towards pH and temperature, action of inhibitors, isolation, purification, and characteristics of the enzymes are given, with special emphasis on recent achievements based on high resolution separation and isoenzyme techniques. Finally, the behavior of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in selected major groups of fruits and vegetables is discussed. Some contradictions found in the literature are pointed out and some questions that have not been given the necessary attention by researchers so far are mentioned.

  1. Multifunctional catalytic platform for peroxidase mimicking, enzyme immobilization and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Maroneze, Camila Marchetti; Dos Santos, Glauco P; de Moraes, Vitoria B; da Costa, Luiz P; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo

    2016-03-15

    A hybrid platform based on ionic liquid-based alkoxysilane functionalized mesoporous silica was applied for the synthesis of supported Pt nanoparticles with peroxidase-like catalytic activity. The positively charged groups (imidazolium) chemically bonded to the surface provide dual-functionality as ion-exchangers to the hybrid material, firstly used for the in situ synthesis of the highly dispersed Pt nanostructures and, secondly, for the immobilization of biological species aiming biosensing purposes. The peroxidase-like catalytic activity of the SiO2/Imi/Pt material was evaluated towards the H2O2-mediated oxidation of a chromogenic peroxidase substrate (TMB), allowing the colorimetric detection of H2O2. Finally, to further explore the practical application of this nanomaterial-based artificial system, glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized on the catalytic porous platform and a bioassay for the colorimetric determination of glucose was successfully conducted as a model system. The enzyme-like catalytic properties of the SiO2/Imi/Pt as well as its ability to immobilize and keep active biological entities on the porous structure indicate that this hybrid porous platform is potentially useful for the development of biosensing devices. PMID:26499871

  2. Mechanistic study of a diazo dye degradation by Soybean Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enzyme based remediation of wastewater is emerging as a novel, efficient and environmentally-friendlier approach. However, studies showing detailed mechanisms of enzyme mediated degradation of organic pollutants are not widely published. Results The present report describes a detailed study on the use of Soybean Peroxidase to efficiently degrade Trypan Blue, a diazo dye. In addition to examining various parameters that can affect the dye degradation ability of the enzyme, such as enzyme and H2O2 concentration, reaction pH and temperature, we carried out a detailed mechanistic study of Trypan Blue degradation. HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS studies were carried out to confirm dye degradation and analyze the intermediate metabolites and develop a detailed mechanistic dye degradation pathway. Conclusion We report that Soybean peroxidase causes Trypan Blue degradation via symmetrical azo bond cleavage and subsequent radical-initiated ring opening of the metabolites. Interestingly, our results also show that no high molecular weight polymers were produced during the peroxidase-H2O2 mediated degradation of the phenolic Trypan Blue. PMID:23711110

  3. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group andmore » a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.« less

  4. Relative Binding Affinities of Monolignols to Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-08-11

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic -OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic -OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate. PMID:27447548

  5. Prokaryotic origins of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily and organelle-mediated transmission to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Passardi, Filippo; Bakalovic, Nenad; Teixeira, Felipe Karam; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Penel, Claude; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-05-01

    Members of the superfamily of plant, fungal, and bacterial peroxidases are known to be present in a wide variety of living organisms. Extensive searching within sequencing projects identified organisms containing sequences of this superfamily. Class I peroxidases, cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), ascorbate peroxidase (APx), and catalase peroxidase (CP), are known to be present in bacteria, fungi, and plants, but have now been found in various protists. CcP sequences were detected in most mitochondria-possessing organisms except for green plants, which possess only ascorbate peroxidases. APx sequences had previously been observed only in green plants but were also found in chloroplastic protists, which acquired chloroplasts by secondary endosymbiosis. CP sequences that are known to be present in prokaryotes and in Ascomycetes were also detected in some Basidiomycetes and occasionally in some protists. Class II peroxidases are involved in lignin biodegradation and are found only in the Homobasidiomycetes. In fact class II peroxidases were identified in only three orders, although degenerate forms were found in different Pezizomycota orders. Class III peroxidases are specific for higher plants, and their evolution is thought to be related to the emergence of the land plants. We have found, however, that class III peroxidases are present in some green algae, which predate land colonization. The presence of peroxidases in all major phyla (except vertebrates) makes them powerful marker genes for understanding the early evolutionary events that led to the appearance of the ancestors of each eukaryotic group. PMID:17355904

  6. Prokaryotic origins of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily and organelle-mediated transmission to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Passardi, Filippo; Bakalovic, Nenad; Teixeira, Felipe Karam; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Penel, Claude; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-05-01

    Members of the superfamily of plant, fungal, and bacterial peroxidases are known to be present in a wide variety of living organisms. Extensive searching within sequencing projects identified organisms containing sequences of this superfamily. Class I peroxidases, cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), ascorbate peroxidase (APx), and catalase peroxidase (CP), are known to be present in bacteria, fungi, and plants, but have now been found in various protists. CcP sequences were detected in most mitochondria-possessing organisms except for green plants, which possess only ascorbate peroxidases. APx sequences had previously been observed only in green plants but were also found in chloroplastic protists, which acquired chloroplasts by secondary endosymbiosis. CP sequences that are known to be present in prokaryotes and in Ascomycetes were also detected in some Basidiomycetes and occasionally in some protists. Class II peroxidases are involved in lignin biodegradation and are found only in the Homobasidiomycetes. In fact class II peroxidases were identified in only three orders, although degenerate forms were found in different Pezizomycota orders. Class III peroxidases are specific for higher plants, and their evolution is thought to be related to the emergence of the land plants. We have found, however, that class III peroxidases are present in some green algae, which predate land colonization. The presence of peroxidases in all major phyla (except vertebrates) makes them powerful marker genes for understanding the early evolutionary events that led to the appearance of the ancestors of each eukaryotic group.

  7. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Wall-Localized Peroxidases from Corn Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Ha; Terry, Maurice E.; Hoops, Pepper; Dauwalder, Marianne; Roux, Stanley J.

    1988-01-01

    A library of 22 hybridomas, which make antibodies to soluble wall antigens from the coleoptiles and primary leaves of etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings, was raised and cloned three times by limit dilution to assure monoclonal growth and stability. Two of these hybridomas made immunoglobulin G antibodies, designated mWP3 and mWP19, which both effectively immunoprecipitated peroxidase activity from crude and partially purified preparations of wall peroxidases. Direct peroxidase-binding assays revealed that both antibodies bound enzymes with peroxidase activity. As judged by immunoblot analyses, mWP3 recognized a Mr 98,000 wall peroxidase with an isoelectric point near 4.2, and mWP19 recognized a Mr 58,000 wall peroxidase. Immunogold localization studies showed both peroxidases are predominately in cell walls. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:11537437

  8. Proton NMR investigation into the basis for the relatively high redox potential of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Turano, P. ); Ming Tien ); Kirk, T.K. )

    1991-08-15

    Lignin peroxidase shares several structural features with the well-studied horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase but carries a higher redox potential. Here the heme domain of lignin peroxidase and the lignin peroxidase cyanide adduct was examined by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, including nuclear Overhauser effect and two-dimensional measurements, and the findings were compared with those for horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase. Structural information was obtained on the orientation of the heme vinyl and propionate groups and the proximal and distal histidines. The shifts of the {var epsilon}1 proton of the proximal histidine were found to be empirically related to the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox potentials.

  9. Effect of reaction conditions on phenol removal by polymerization and precipitation using Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M; Sakurai, A; Sakakibara, M

    2001-03-01

    The quantitative relationships between removal efficiency of phenol and reaction conditions were investigated using Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. The most effective ratio of hydrogen peroxide to phenol was nearly 1/1 (mol/mol) at an adequate enzyme dose. 12.2 U of the enzyme was needed to remove 1 mg of phenol when our peroxidase preparation was used. At an insufficient peroxidase dose, the optimum pH value was 9.0, and lowering the reaction temperature led to the improvement of removal efficiency. At an excess peroxidase dose, almost 100% removal of phenol was obtained over a wide range of pH (5-9) and temperature (0-60 degrees C). Despite the presence of culture medium components, it was shown that Coprinus cinereus peroxidase had the same phenol polymerization performance as horseradish peroxidase or Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase.

  10. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to wall-localized peroxidases from corn seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Terry, M. E.; Hoops, P.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A library of 22 hybridomas, which make antibodies to soluble wall antigens from the coleoptiles and primary leaves of etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings, was raised and cloned three times by limit dilution to assure monoclonal growth and stability. Two of these hybridomas made immunoglobulin G antibodies, designated mWP3 and mWP19, which both effectively immunoprecipitated peroxidase activity from crude and partially purified preparations of wall peroxidases. Direct peroxidase-binding assays revealed that both antibodies bound enzymes with peroxidase activity. As judged by immunoblot analyses, mWP3 recognized a Mr 98,000 wall peroxidase with an isoelectric point near 4.2, and mWP19 recognized a Mr 58,000 wall peroxidase. Immunogold localization studies showed both peroxidases are predominately in cell walls.

  11. Biochemical and Pathological Studies on Peroxidases –An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amjad A.; Rahmani, Arshad H.; Aldebasi, Yousef H.; Aly, Salah M.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidases represent a family of isoenzymes actively involved in oxidizing reactive oxygen species, innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis and pathogenesis of several diseases. Different types of peroxidases have organ, tissues, cellular and sub-cellular level of specificities in their function. Different diseases lead to varied expressions of peroxidases based on several mechanisms proposed. Several researches are going on to understand its deficiency, over-expression and malfunction in relation with different diseases. Some common diseases of mankind like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes directly or indirectly involve the role of peroxidases. So the status of peroxidase levels may also function as a marker of different diseases. Although many types of diseases in human beings have a strong correlation with tissue specific peroxidases, the clear role of these oxido-reductases is not yet fully understood. Here we are focusing on the role of peroxidases in relations with different diseases occurring due to oxidative stress. PMID:25168993

  12. Effect of culture temperature on the heterologous expression of Pleurotus eryngii versatile peroxidase in Aspergillus hosts.

    PubMed

    Eibes, G M; Lú-Chau, T A; Ruiz-Dueñas, F J; Feijoo, G; Martínez, M J; Martínez, A T; Lema, J M

    2009-01-01

    Production of recombinant versatile peroxidase in Aspergillus hosts was optimized through the modification of temperature during bioreactor cultivations. To further this purpose, the cDNA encoding a versatile peroxidase of Pleurotus eryngii was expressed under control of the alcohol dehydrogenase (alcA) promoter of Aspergillus nidulans. A dependence of recombinant peroxidase production on cultivation temperature was found. Lowering the culture temperature from 28 to 19 degrees C enhanced the level of active peroxidase 5.8-fold and reduced the effective proteolytic activity twofold. Thus, a maximum peroxidase activity of 466 U L(-1) was reached. The same optimization scheme was applied to a recombinant Aspergillus niger that bore the alcohol dehydrogenase regulator (alcR), enabling transformation with the peroxidase cDNA under the same alcA promoter. However, with this strain, the peroxidase activity was not improved, while the effective proteolytic activity was increased between 3- and 11-fold compared to that obtained with A. nidulans.

  13. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture Regulations...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  14. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  15. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  16. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  17. The role of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polysaccharides in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots under postharvest physiological deterioration.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the role of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), polysaccharides, and protein contents associated with the early events of postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava roots. Increases in APX and GPX activity, as well as total protein contents occurred from 3 to 5 days of storage and were correlated with the delay of PPD. Cassava samples stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) highlighted the presence of starch and cellulose. Degradation of starch granules during PPD was also detected. Slight metachromatic reaction with toluidine blue is indicative of increasing of acidic polysaccharides and may play an important role in PPD delay. Principal component analysis (PCA) classified samples according to their levels of enzymatic activity based on the decision tree model which showed GPX and total protein amounts to be correlated with PPD. The Oriental (ORI) cultivar was more susceptible to PPD.

  18. Comparative analysis of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase activity on coniferous and deciduous wood using ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Goacher, Robyn E; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Master, Emma R

    2016-09-01

    White-rot fungi are distinguished by their ability to efficiently degrade lignin via lignin-modifying type II peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). In the present study, time-of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to evaluate lignin modification in three coniferous and three deciduous wood preparations following treatment with commercial preparations of LiP and MnP from two different white-rot fungi. Percent modification of lignin was calculated as a loss of intact methoxylated lignin over nonfunctionalized aromatic rings, which is consistent with oxidative cleavage of methoxy moieties within the lignin structure. Exposure to MnP resulted in greater modification of lignin in coniferous compared to deciduous wood (28 vs. 18 % modification of lignin); and greater modification of G-lignin compared to S-lignin within the deciduous wood samples (21 vs. 12 %). In contrast, exposure to LiP resulted in similar percent modification of lignin in all wood samples (21 vs 22 %), and of G- and S-lignin within the deciduous wood (22 vs. 23 %). These findings suggest that the selected MnP and LiP may particularly benefit delignification of coniferous and deciduous wood, respectively. Moreover, the current analysis further demonstrates the utility of ToF-SIMS for characterizing enzymatic modification of lignin in wood fibre along with potential advantages over UV and HPCL-MS detection of solubilized delignification products.

  19. Mn(II) regulation of lignin peroxidases and manganese-dependent peroxidases from lignin-degrading white rot fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnarme, P.; Jeffries, T.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Two families of peroxidases-lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (MnP)-are formed by the lignin-degrading white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium and other white rot fungi. Isoenzymes of these enzyme families carry out reactions important to the biodegradation of lignin. This research investigated the regulation of LiP and MnP production by Mn(II). In liquid culture, LiP titers varied as an inverse function of and MnP titers varied as a direct function of the Mn(II) concentration. The extracellular isoenzyme profiles differed radically at low and high Mn(II) levels, whereas other fermentation parameters, including extracellular protein concentrations, the glucose consumption rate, and the accumulation of cell dry weight, did not change significantly with the Mn(II) concentration. In the absence of Mn(II), extracellular LiP isoenzymes predominated, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), MnP isoenzymes were dominant. The release of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from {sup 14}C-labeled dehydrogenative polymerizate lignin was likewise affected by Mn(II). The rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release increased at low Mn(II) and decreased at high Mn(II) concentrations. This regulatory effect of Mn(II) occurred with five strains of P. chrysosporium, two other species of Phanerochaete, three species of Phlebia, Lentinula edodes, and Phellinus pini.

  20. Thyroid microsomal/thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies show discrete patterns of cross-reactivity to myeloperoxidase, lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Banga, J P; Tomlinson, R W; Doble, N; Odell, E; McGregor, A M

    1989-01-01

    The recent cloning of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) has shown that it is identical to the thyroid microsomal antigen (TMA), a potent antigen involved in autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), which shares significant sequence homology with myeloperoxidase. The present study shows that autoantibodies (aAb) to the TMA/TPO antigen cross-react with human leucocyte myeloperoxidase, bovine lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Cross-reactivity to myeloperoxidase was only apparent by ELISA using reduced and alkylated antigen preparations or by immunoblotting following denaturation with SDS. Sequential absorption of sera on SDS-denatured thyroid microsomes immobilized on Sepharose-4B followed by absorption on native microsomes removed all aAb specificities to TMA/TPO and the three peroxidase preparations, giving compelling evidence on the genuine cross-reactive nature of these aAbs. Sera from different patients contain different qualitative and quantitative specificities of aAb to the TMA/TPO antigen, confirming the polyclonal nature of this autoimmune response. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2546881

  1. Involvement of plasma membrane peroxidases and oxylipin pathway in the recovery from phytoplasma disease in apple (Malus domestica).

    PubMed

    Patui, Sonia; Bertolini, Alberto; Clincon, Luisa; Ermacora, Paolo; Braidot, Enrico; Vianello, Angelo; Zancani, Marco

    2013-06-01

    Apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) may be affected by apple proliferation (AP), caused by 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali'. Some plants can spontaneously recover from the disease, which implies the disappearance of symptoms through a phenomenon known as recovery. In this article it is shown that NAD(P)H peroxidases of leaf plasma membrane-enriched fractions exhibited a higher activity in samples from both AP-diseased and recovered plants. In addition, an increase in endogenous SA was characteristic of the symptomatic plants, since its content increased in samples obtained from diseased apple trees. In agreement, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway, was increased too. Jasmonic acid (JA) increased only during recovery, in a phase subsequent to the pathological state, and in concomitance to a decline of salicylic acid (SA). Oxylipin pathway, responsible for JA synthesis, was not induced during the development of AP-disease, but it appeared to be stimulated when the recovery occurred. Accordingly, lipoxygenase (LOX) activity, detected in plasma membrane-enriched fractions, showed an increase in apple leaves obtained from recovered plants. This enhancement was paralleled by an increase of hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) activity, detected in leaf microsomes, albeit the latter enzyme was activated in either the disease or recovery conditions. Hence, a reciprocal antagonism between SA- and JA-pathways could be suggested as an effective mechanism by which apple plants react to phytoplasma invasions, thereby providing a suitable defense response leading to the establishment of the recovery phenomenon.

  2. Peroxidase synthesis and activity in the interaction of soybean with Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg)

    SciTech Connect

    Chibbar, R.N.; Esnault, R.; Lee, D.; van Huystee, R.B.; Ward, E.W.B.

    1986-04-01

    Changes, in peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7) have been reported following infection. However, determinations of biosynthesis of quantities of the peroxidase protein molecule have not been madeexclamation In this study hypocotyl of soybean seedlings (Glycine max; cv Harosoy, susceptible; cv Harosoy 63, resistant) were inoculated with zoospores of Pmg. Incorporation of /sup 35/S-methionine (supplied with inoculum) in TCA precipitates was measured. Peroxidase synthesis was measured by immuno precipitation using antibodies against a cationic and an anionic peroxidase derived from peanut cells. Specific peroxidase activity increased rapidly from 5 to 9 h following infection in the resistant reaction but not in the susceptible reaction or the water controls. There was increased synthesis of the anionic peroxidase but not of the cationic peroxidase in the resistant reaction. The anionic peroxidase did not increase in the susceptible until 15 h. The ratio of peroxidase synthesis to total protein synthesis decreased in inoculated tissues compared to control. Peroxidase synthesis is, therefore, a relative minor host response to infection.

  3. Antioxidative effect of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Chen, Y; Zhai, L; Zhang, L; Xu, Y; Wang, S; Hu, S

    2015-05-01

    Previous investigation demonstrated that oral administration of ginseng stem-leaf saponins in chickens could enhance the immune response. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens. One hundred and twenty chickens were randomly divided into 5 groups. Groups 1 to 4 received intramuscular injection of cyclophosphamide to induce oxidative stress while group 5 was injected with saline solution and served as control. Following administration of cyclophosphamide, groups 1 to 3 were orally administered ginseng stem-leaf saponins at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg BW in drinking water for 7 d, respectively. After that, the spleen, thymus, bursa, and serum were collected to measure the indices of the organs and oxidative parameters. The results showed that ginseng stem-leaf saponins significantly inhibited cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress by increasing the organ indices, total antioxidant capacity, and the levels of glutathione, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, while elevating the activity of total superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as decreasing the protein carbonyl content and malondialdehyde. Therefore, ginseng stem-leaf saponins could be a promising agent against oxidative stress in the poultry industry. PMID:25713395

  4. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the subunits of human phosphofructokinase: new tools for the immunochemical and genetic analyses of isozymes.

    PubMed

    Vora, S; Wims, L A; Durham, S; Morrison, S L

    1981-10-01

    Recently we have demonstrated that human phosphofructokinase (PFK; ATP: D-fructose-6-P, 1-phosphotransferase; EC.2.7.1.11) is under the control of three structural loci that code for M (muscle-type), L (liver-type), and P (platelet-type) subunits: random tetramerization of these subunits produces various isozymes. In this study, we have produced and characterized BALB/c hybridoma antibodies to the M- and L-type subunits of human PFK. The specific antibodies were detected by an enzyme-immunoprecipitation assay using Staphylococci-bearing protein A as an immunoadsorbent. Of the wells tested using red blood cell (RBC) PFK (M + L), 61% were positive. Only one M-specific hybridoma was identified. The one anti-M and 4 anti-L antibodies were characterized for their biochemical and immunochemical specificities. To define the combining specificities of these antibodies, we compared their reactivity and that of monospecific rabbit anti-M antiserum with muscle and liver PFKs from 15 different vertebrate species. The rabbit anti-M shows strong cross-reactivity with the muscle PFKs from all the species studied. In contrast, the monoclonal anti-M reacts exclusively with muscle PFKs from primates. Two of four anti-L antibodies react only with human L-PFK, whereas the other two react with that from a few other vertebrate species as well. Taken together, these data suggest that primate-specific antibodies recognize evolutionarily, recently acquired antigenic determinants, whereas the antibodies reactive with PFKs from distantly related species recognize conserved determinants. The differential immunoreactivities of muscle and liver PFKs strongly suggest the presence of distinct isozymes in all the vertebrate species studied. These studies demonstrate that it is feasible to produce and characterize monoclonal antibodies that distinguish among isozymes with structural and functional similarities. These antibodies provide sensitive tools in the analyses of isozyme structure, genetics

  5. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the human HSD11K gene encoding the kidney (type 2) isozyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Rogerson, F.M.; Mune, T.; White, P.C.

    1995-09-01

    11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD) converts glucocorticoids to inactive products and is thus thought to confer specificity for aldosterone on the type I mineralocorticoid receptor in the kidney. Recent studies indicate the presence of at least two isozymes of 11{beta}HSD. In vitro, the NAD{sup +}-dependent kidney (type 2) isozyme catalyzes 11{beta}-dehydrogenase but not reductase reactions, whereas the NADP{sup +}-dependent liver (type 1) isozyme catalyzes both reactions. We have now characterized the human gene encoding kidney 11{beta}HSD (HSD11K). A bacteriophage P1 clone was isolated after screening a human genomic library by hybridization with sheep HSD11K cDNA. The gene consists of 5 exons spread over 6 kb. The nucleotide binding domain lies in the first exon are GC-rich (80%), suggesting that the gene may be transcriptionally regulated by factors that recognize GC-rich sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes with a positive P1 clone localized the gene to chromosome 16q22. In contrast, the HSD11L (liver isozyme) gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains 6 exons; the coding sequences of these genes are only 21% identical. HSD11K is expressed at high levels in the placenta and kidney of midgestation human fetuses and at lower levels in lung and testes. Different transcriptional start sites are utilized in kidney and placenta. These data should be applicable to genetic analysis of the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess, which may represent a deficiency of 11{beta}HSD. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  7. Changes in fungal population of fly ash and vinasse mixture during vermicomposting by Eudrilus eugeniae and Eisenia fetida: documentation of cellulase isozymes in vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Prabhat; Chung, Young Ryun

    2011-06-01

    Fly ash (FA) and vinasse (VN), two industrial wastes, are generated in huge amounts and cause serious hazards to the environment. In this experiment, different proportions of these two wastes were used as food for two epigeic earthworms (Eisenia fetida and Eudrilus eugeniae) to standardize the recycling technique of these two wastes and to study their effect on fungal especially cellulolytic fungal population, cellulase activity and their isozyme pattern, chitin content and microbial biomass of waste mixture during vermicomposting. Increasing VN proportion from 25% to 50% or even higher, counts of both fungi and cellulolytic fungi in waste mixtures were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased during vermicomposting. Higher cellulase activity in treatments having 50% or more vinasse might be attributed to the significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher concentration of group I isozyme while concentrations of other isozymes (group II and III) of cellulase were statistically at par. Higher chitin content in vinasse-enriched treatments suggested that fungal biomass and fungi-to-microbial biomass ratio in these treatments were also increased due to vermicomposting. Results revealed that Eudrilus eugeniae and Eisenia fetida had comparable effect on FA and VN mixture during vermicomposting. Periodical analysis of above-mentioned biochemical and microbial properties and nutrient content of final vermicompost samples indicated that equal proportion (1:1, w/w) of FA and VN is probably the optimum composition to obtain best quality vermicompost. PMID:21277188

  8. Changes in fungal population of fly ash and vinasse mixture during vermicomposting by Eudrilus eugeniae and Eisenia fetida: documentation of cellulase isozymes in vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Prabhat; Chung, Young Ryun

    2011-06-01

    Fly ash (FA) and vinasse (VN), two industrial wastes, are generated in huge amounts and cause serious hazards to the environment. In this experiment, different proportions of these two wastes were used as food for two epigeic earthworms (Eisenia fetida and Eudrilus eugeniae) to standardize the recycling technique of these two wastes and to study their effect on fungal especially cellulolytic fungal population, cellulase activity and their isozyme pattern, chitin content and microbial biomass of waste mixture during vermicomposting. Increasing VN proportion from 25% to 50% or even higher, counts of both fungi and cellulolytic fungi in waste mixtures were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased during vermicomposting. Higher cellulase activity in treatments having 50% or more vinasse might be attributed to the significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher concentration of group I isozyme while concentrations of other isozymes (group II and III) of cellulase were statistically at par. Higher chitin content in vinasse-enriched treatments suggested that fungal biomass and fungi-to-microbial biomass ratio in these treatments were also increased due to vermicomposting. Results revealed that Eudrilus eugeniae and Eisenia fetida had comparable effect on FA and VN mixture during vermicomposting. Periodical analysis of above-mentioned biochemical and microbial properties and nutrient content of final vermicompost samples indicated that equal proportion (1:1, w/w) of FA and VN is probably the optimum composition to obtain best quality vermicompost.

  9. Alteration of Wax Ester Content and Composition in Euglena gracilis with Gene Silencing of 3-ketoacyl-CoA Thiolase Isozymes.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masami; Andoh, Hiroko; Koyama, Keiichiro; Watanabe, Yomi; Nakai, Takeo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2015-05-01

    Euglena gracilis produces wax ester under hypoxic and anaerobic culture conditions with a net synthesis of ATP. In wax ester fermentation, fatty acids are synthesized by reversing beta-oxidation in mitochondria. A major species of wax ester produced by E. gracilis is myristyl myristate (14:0-14:0Alc). Because of its shorter carbon chain length with saturated compounds, biodiesel produced from E. gracilis wax ester may have good cold flow properties with high oxidative stability. We reasoned that a slight metabolic modification would enable E. gracilis to produce a biofuel of ideal composition. In order to produce wax ester with shorter acyl chain length, we focused on isozymes of the enzyme 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase (KAT), a condensing enzyme of the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis pathway in E. gracilis. We performed a gene silencing study of KAT isozymes in E. gracilis. Six KAT isozymes were identified in the E. gracilis EST database, and silencing any three of them (EgKAT1-3) altered the wax ester amount and composition. In particular, silencing EgKAT1 induced a significant compositional shift to shorter carbon chain lengths in wax ester. A model fuel mixture inferred from the composition of wax ester in EgKAT1-silenced cells showed a significant decrease in melting point compared to that of the control cells.

  10. Measurement of malondialdehyde, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase in SLE patients.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to chronic inflammation of tissues and plays a central role in immunomodulation, which may lead to autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome. Markers of oxidative damage include malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant scavengers as glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px), which all correlate well with SLE disease activity. Amelioration of some clinical manifestations of SLE may be expected by targeting lipid peroxidation with dietary or pharmacological antioxidants. Here, we describe the detection of the key players of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in SLE.

  11. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements.

  12. Synthesis and properties of lignin peroxidase from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A

    SciTech Connect

    Lodha, S.J.; Korus, R.A.; Crawford, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    The production of lignin peroxidase by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A was studied in shake flasks and under aerobic conditions in a 7.5-L batch fermentor. Lignin peroxidase synthesis was found to be strongly affected by catabolite repression. Lignin peroxidase was a non-growth-associated, secondary metabolite. The maximum lignin peroxidase activity was 0.064 U/mL at 36 h. In order to maximize lignin peroxidase activity, optimal conditions were determined. The optimal incubation temperature, pH, and substrate (2,4-dichlorophenol) concentration for the enzyme assays were 45{degrees}C, 6, and 3 m-M, respectively. Stability of lignin peroxidase was determined at 37, 45, and 60{degrees}C, and over the pH range 4-9.

  13. Characterization of Laccases and Peroxidases from Wood-Rotting Fungi (Family Coprinaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Heinzkill, Marion; Bech, Lisbeth; Halkier, Torben; Schneider, Palle; Anke, Timm

    1998-01-01

    Panaeolus sphinctrinus, Panaeolus papilionaceus, and Coprinus friesii are described as producers of ligninolytic enzymes. P. papilionaceus and P. sphinctrinus both produced a laccase. In addition, P. sphinctrinus produced a manganese peroxidase. C. friesii secreted a laccase and two peroxidases similar to the peroxidase of Coprinus cinereus. The purified laccases and peroxidases were characterized by broad substrate specificities, significant enzyme activities at alkaline pH values, and remarkably high pH optima. The two peroxidases of C. friesii remained active at pH 7.0 and 60°C for up to 60 min of incubation. The peroxidases were inhibited by sodium azide and ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), whereas the laccases were inhibited by sodium azide and N,N-diethyldithiocarbamic acid. As determined by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing, all three fungi produced laccase isoenzymes. PMID:9572923

  14. Characterization of laccases and peroxidases from wood-rotting fungi (family Coprinaceae).

    PubMed

    Heinzkill, M; Bech, L; Halkier, T; Schneider, P; Anke, T

    1998-05-01

    Panaeolus sphinctrinus, Panaeolus papilionaceus, and Coprinus friesii are described as producers of ligninolytic enzymes. P. papilionaceus and P. sphinctrinus both produced a laccase. In addition, P. sphinctrinus produced a manganese peroxidase. C. friesii secreted a laccase and two peroxidases similar to the peroxidase of Coprinus cinereus. The purified laccases and peroxidases were characterized by broad substrate specificities, significant enzyme activities at alkaline pH values, and remarkably high pH optima. The two peroxidases of C. friesii remained active at pH 7.0 and 60 degrees C for up to 60 min of incubation. The peroxidases were inhibited by sodium azide and ethylene glycol-bis (beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), whereas the laccases were inhibited by sodium azide and N,N-diethyldithiocarbamic acid. As determined by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing, all three fungi produced laccase isoenzymes.

  15. The nop gene from Phanerochaete chrysosporium encodes a peroxidase with novel structural features.

    PubMed

    Larrondo, Luisf; Gonzalez, Angel; Perez Acle, Tomas; Cullen, Dan; Vicuña, Rafael

    2005-07-01

    Inspection of the genome of the ligninolytic basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium revealed an unusual peroxidase_like sequence. The corresponding full length cDNA was sequenced and an archetypal secretion signal predicted. The deduced mature protein (NoP, novel peroxidase) contains 295 aa residues and is therefore considerably shorter than other Class II (fungal) peroxidases, such as lignin peroxidases and manganese peroxidases. Comparative modeling of NoP was conducted using the crystal structures of Coprinus cinereus and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidases as templates. The model was validated by molecular dynamics and showed several novel structural features. In particular, NoP has only three disulfide bridges and tryptophan replaces the distal phenylalanine within the heme pocket.

  16. [Initiation and inhibition of free-radical processes in biochemical peroxidase systems: a review].

    PubMed

    Metelitsa, D I; Karaseva, E I

    2007-01-01

    The role of complexes containing oxygen or peroxide in monooxygenase systems and models thereof, as well as in peroxidase- and quasi-peroxidase-catalyzed processes, has been reviewed. Pathways of conversion of these intermediate complexes involving single-electron (radical) and two-electron (heterolytic) mechanisms are dealt with. Coupled peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of aromatic amines and phenols is analyzed; inhibition and activation of peroxidase-catalyzed reactions are characterized quantitatively. Oxidation of chromogenic substrates (ABTS, OPD, and TMB) in the presence of phenolic inhibitors or polydisulfides of substituted phenols is characterized by inhibition constants (Ki, micromol). Activation of peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of the same substrates is characterized by the degree (coefficient) of activation (alpha, M(-1)), which was determined for 2-aminothiazole, melamine, tetrazole, and its 5-substituted derivatives. Examples of applied use of peroxidase-catalyzed enzyme and model systems are given (oxidation of organic compounds, chemical analysis, enzyme immunoassay, tests for antioxidant activity of biological fluids).

  17. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  18. Regulation of Compound Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Rujin

    2013-01-01

    Leaf morphology is one of the most variable, yet inheritable, traits in the plant kingdom. How plants develop a variety of forms and shapes is a major biological question. Here, we discuss some recent progress in understanding the development of compound or dissected leaves in model species, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), Cardamine hirsuta and Medicago truncatula, with an emphasis on recent discoveries in legumes. We also discuss progress in gene regulations and hormonal actions in compound leaf development. These studies facilitate our understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms and put forward a prospective in compound leaf studies. PMID:27135488

  19. Three differentially expressed basic peroxidases from wound-lignifying Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Holm, Kirsten B; Andreasen, Per H; Eckloff, Reinhard M G; Kristensen, Brian K; Rasmussen, Søren K

    2003-10-01

    The activity of ionically bound peroxidases from an asparagus spear increased from 5-24 h post-harvest. Isoelectric focusing showed that the post-harvest increase of the total peroxidase activity was due to the increase of several distinct isoperoxidases. Concomitantly, a decrease in the activity of two anionic peroxidases was observed. Peroxidases with pI 5.9, 6.4 and 9.2 were detected only at 24 h post-harvest, whereas four peroxidases, with pI 8.7, 8.1, 7.4, and 6.7, detected throughout the time-course, increased in their activity. Histochemical staining demonstrated that lignin and peroxidase activity were located in the vascular bundles throughout the period of measurement. Lignin was detected in the cell walls of the protoxylem in the vascular bundles of the asparagus stem. A cDNA library of mRNA isolated from asparagus spears 24 h post-harvest was screened for peroxidases using homologous and heterologous probes. Three clones were isolated and the corresponding mature asparagus peroxidases displayed 70%, 76% and 81% amino acid sequence identity to each other. These new asparagus peroxidases are typical class III plant peroxidases in terms of conserved regions with a calculated pI >9.2, which is consistent with most basic peroxidases. One of the genes was shown to be a constitutively expressed single-copy gene, whereas the others showed an increased expression at post-harvest. The highest similarity in the amino acid sequence (71-77%) was found in peroxidases from roots of winter grown turnip TP7, to Arabidopsis AtP49, to an EST sequence from cotton fibres and to TMV-infected tobacco. PMID:12947050

  20. Oxidation of chlorophenols catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase with in situ production of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Fabio; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Therisod, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) was accomplished by oxidation catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. Immobilization of the enzyme in a polyacrylamide matrix enhanced DCP oxidation. Hydrogen peroxide, peroxidase's natural substrate, was produced enzymatically in situ to avoid peroxidase inactivation by its too high concentration. In the case of larger scale utilization, the method would also avoid direct handling of this hazardous reagent.

  1. Accumulation of peroxidase in the cap rays of Acetabularia during the development of gametangia.

    PubMed

    Menzel, D

    1979-06-01

    Accumulation of peroxidase was demonstrated by light and electron microscopy to occur in Acetabularia in certain regions of the cap rays in relation to the development of the gametangia (cysts). Peroxidase was found to be incorporated into special, cell wall-like obstructions that separate the cap rays from the stalk when the secondary nuclei have settled in the cap rays. It is assumed that peroxidase acts as an anti-microbial protectant of the gametangia.

  2. Investigating the European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) leaf characteristics along the vertical canopy profile: leaf structure, photosynthetic capacity, light energy dissipation and photoprotection mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scartazza, Andrea; Di Baccio, Daniela; Bertolotto, Pierangelo; Gavrichkova, Olga; Matteucci, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    Forest functionality and productivity are directly related to canopy light interception and can be affected by potential damage from high irradiance. However, the mechanisms by which leaves adapt to the variable light environments along the multilayer canopy profile are still poorly known. We explored the leaf morphophysiological and metabolic responses to the natural light gradient in a pure European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest at three different canopy heights (top, middle and bottom). Structural adjustment through light-dependent modifications in leaf mass per area was the reason for most of the variations in photosynthetic capacity. The different leaf morphology along the canopy influenced nitrogen (N) partitioning, water- and photosynthetic N-use efficiency, chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and quali-quantitative contents of photosynthetic pigments. The Chl a to Chl b ratio and the pool of xanthophyll-cycle pigments (VAZ) increased at the highest irradiance, as well as lutein and β-carotene. The total pool of ascorbate and phenols was higher in leaves of the top and middle canopy layers when compared with the bottom layer, where the ascorbate peroxidase was relatively more activated. The non-photochemical quenching was strongly and positively related to the VAZ/(Chl a + b) ratio, while Chl a/Chl b was related to the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II. Along the multilayer canopy profile, the high energy dissipation capacity of leaves was correlated to an elevated redox potential of antioxidants. The middle layer gave the most relevant contribution to leaf area index and carboxylation capacity of the canopy. In conclusion, a complex interplay among structural, physiological and biochemical traits drives the dynamic leaf acclimation to the natural gradients of variable light environments along the tree canopy profile. The relevant differences observed in leaf traits within the canopy positions of the beech forest should be considered for

  3. Investigating the European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) leaf characteristics along the vertical canopy profile: leaf structure, photosynthetic capacity, light energy dissipation and photoprotection mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scartazza, Andrea; Di Baccio, Daniela; Bertolotto, Pierangelo; Gavrichkova, Olga; Matteucci, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    Forest functionality and productivity are directly related to canopy light interception and can be affected by potential damage from high irradiance. However, the mechanisms by which leaves adapt to the variable light environments along the multilayer canopy profile are still poorly known. We explored the leaf morphophysiological and metabolic responses to the natural light gradient in a pure European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest at three different canopy heights (top, middle and bottom). Structural adjustment through light-dependent modifications in leaf mass per area was the reason for most of the variations in photosynthetic capacity. The different leaf morphology along the canopy influenced nitrogen (N) partitioning, water- and photosynthetic N-use efficiency, chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and quali-quantitative contents of photosynthetic pigments. The Chl a to Chl b ratio and the pool of xanthophyll-cycle pigments (VAZ) increased at the highest irradiance, as well as lutein and β-carotene. The total pool of ascorbate and phenols was higher in leaves of the top and middle canopy layers when compared with the bottom layer, where the ascorbate peroxidase was relatively more activated. The non-photochemical quenching was strongly and positively related to the VAZ/(Chl a + b) ratio, while Chl a/Chl b was related to the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II. Along the multilayer canopy profile, the high energy dissipation capacity of leaves was correlated to an elevated redox potential of antioxidants. The middle layer gave the most relevant contribution to leaf area index and carboxylation capacity of the canopy. In conclusion, a complex interplay among structural, physiological and biochemical traits drives the dynamic leaf acclimation to the natural gradients of variable light environments along the tree canopy profile. The relevant differences observed in leaf traits within the canopy positions of the beech forest should be considered for

  4. Ethanol oxidation and the inhibition by drugs in human liver, stomach and small intestine: Quantitative assessment with numerical organ modeling of alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Chou; Lee, Shou-Lun; Lai, Ching-Long; Lee, Yung-Pin; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2016-10-25

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is the principal enzyme responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Human ADH constitutes a complex isozyme family with striking variations in kinetic function and tissue distribution. Liver and gastrointestinal tract are the major sites for first-pass metabolism (FPM). Their relative contributions to alcohol FPM and degrees of the inhibitions by aspirin and its metabolite salicylate, acetaminophen and cimetidine remain controversial. To address this issue, mathematical organ modeling of ethanol-oxidizing activities in target tissues and that of the ethanol-drug interactions were constructed by linear combination of the corresponding numerical rate equations of tissue constituent ADH isozymes with the documented isozyme protein contents, kinetic parameters for ethanol oxidation and the drug inhibitions of ADH isozymes/allozymes that were determined in 0.1 M sodium phosphate at pH 7.5 and 25 °C containing 0.5 mM NAD(+). The organ simulations reveal that the ADH activities in mucosae of the stomach, duodenum and jejunum with ADH1C*1/*1 genotype are less than 1%, respectively, that of the ADH1B*1/*1-ADH1C*1/*1 liver at 1-200 mM ethanol, indicating that liver is major site of the FPM. The apparent hepatic KM and Vmax for ethanol oxidation are simulated to be 0.093 ± 0.019 mM and 4.0 ± 0.1 mmol/min, respectively. At 95% clearance in liver, the logarithmic average sinusoidal ethanol concentration is determined to be 0.80 mM in accordance with the flow-limited gradient perfusion model. The organ simulations indicate that higher therapeutic acetaminophen (0.5 mM) inhibits 16% of ADH1B*1/*1 hepatic ADH activity at 2-20 mM ethanol and that therapeutic salicylate (1.5 mM) inhibits 30-31% of the ADH1B*2/*2 activity, suggesting potential significant inhibitions of ethanol FPM in these allelotypes. The result provides systematic evaluations and predictions by computer simulation on potential ethanol FPM in target tissues and hepatic

  5. Ethanol oxidation and the inhibition by drugs in human liver, stomach and small intestine: Quantitative assessment with numerical organ modeling of alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Chou; Lee, Shou-Lun; Lai, Ching-Long; Lee, Yung-Pin; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2016-10-25

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is the principal enzyme responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Human ADH constitutes a complex isozyme family with striking variations in kinetic function and tissue distribution. Liver and gastrointestinal tract are the major sites for first-pass metabolism (FPM). Their relative contributions to alcohol FPM and degrees of the inhibitions by aspirin and its metabolite salicylate, acetaminophen and cimetidine remain controversial. To address this issue, mathematical organ modeling of ethanol-oxidizing activities in target tissues and that of the ethanol-drug interactions were constructed by linear combination of the corresponding numerical rate equations of tissue constituent ADH isozymes with the documented isozyme protein contents, kinetic parameters for ethanol oxidation and the drug inhibitions of ADH isozymes/allozymes that were determined in 0.1 M sodium phosphate at pH 7.5 and 25 °C containing 0.5 mM NAD(+). The organ simulations reveal that the ADH activities in mucosae of the stomach, duodenum and jejunum with ADH1C*1/*1 genotype are less than 1%, respectively, that of the ADH1B*1/*1-ADH1C*1/*1 liver at 1-200 mM ethanol, indicating that liver is major site of the FPM. The apparent hepatic KM and Vmax for ethanol oxidation are simulated to be 0.093 ± 0.019 mM and 4.0 ± 0.1 mmol/min, respectively. At 95% clearance in liver, the logarithmic average sinusoidal ethanol concentration is determined to be 0.80 mM in accordance with the flow-limited gradient perfusion model. The organ simulations indicate that higher therapeutic acetaminophen (0.5 mM) inhibits 16% of ADH1B*1/*1 hepatic ADH activity at 2-20 mM ethanol and that therapeutic salicylate (1.5 mM) inhibits 30-31% of the ADH1B*2/*2 activity, suggesting potential significant inhibitions of ethanol FPM in these allelotypes. The result provides systematic evaluations and predictions by computer simulation on potential ethanol FPM in target tissues and hepatic

  6. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved.

  7. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved. PMID:26496708

  8. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved. PMID:26496708

  9. Intraspecific isozyme polymorphism of Anopheles gambiae in relation to environment, behavior, and malaria transmission in southwestern Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Coosemans, M; Smits, A; Roelants, P

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose acetate electrophoresis system was used to study the isozyme polymorphism of the Anopheles gambiae complex in a rural village and a city in southwestern Burkina Faso. In both areas A. gambiae Giles was the dominant species (95%) whereas A. arabiensis Patton represented only 5%. Both species were separated readily by octanol dehydrogenase Odh and mannose phosphate isomerase (Mpi) even if they shared some alleles at these two loci. Polymorphism analysis (13 loci) at the intraspecific level of A. gambiae showed a significant difference between the specimens collected in the city from those collected in the village in their allelic and genotypic frequencies of isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 and malate dehydrogenase-1 and in their allelic frequencies for Mpi. No genetic difference was observed between the human biting A. gambiae collected inside or outside the houses in either the village or the city. The Plasmodium falciparum-infected A. gambiae differed from the noninfected ones in their allelic and genotypic frequencies at Mpi and acid phosphatase (Acp). A two-fold difference in infection rate was found for the genotype Mpi130/130 and Acp110/100 compared with other genotypes. However, infected anophelines were found in all genotypes that belonged to these two enzyme systems. Consequently, no refractory mechanism occurs in these natural populations.

  10. N-methylcarbazole metabolism by a purified isozyme of rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450: membrane effects and autocatalytic inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Gurka, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The catalytic properties of purified cytochrome P-450b, the major isozyme found in hepatic microsomes from phenobarbital-pretreated rats, for the metabolism of N-methylcarbazole (NMC) were analyzed in two membranous systems in order to investigate membrane bilayer-dependent parameters. Incorporation of the enzymes of the monoxygenase system into bilayer liposomal vesicles composed of total microsomal lipid had no effect on the rates or regioselectivity of the mono-hydroxylation of the substrate when compared to the same enzymes reconstituted in a soluble system with small amounts of dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). The membranous system exhibited K/sub m/ values of NMC which were 4-5 times higher than the non-vesicular system. The rapid decline in the rates of NMC metabolism by cytochrome P-450b during catalysis suggested enzyme inactivation during substrate processing. Radiolabel from (methyl-/sup 14/C)NMC was incorporated into the P-450b apoprotein as a result of enzyme turnover co-incident with the loss of enzyme activity. NMC-stimulated NADPH oxidation by the reconstituted enzyme system containing DLPC was biophasic, with a slow rate preceding a two-fold higher rate. Carbazole and some N-substituted derivatives were unique in stimulating this unusual oxidation.

  11. Mammalian subtilisin/kexin isozyme SKI-1: A widely expressed proprotein convertase with a unique cleavage specificity and cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, Nabil G.; Mowla, Seyed J.; Hamelin, Josée; Mamarbachi, Aida M.; Benjannet, Suzanne; Touré, Barry B.; Basak, Ajoy; Munzer, Jon Scott; Marcinkiewicz, Jadwiga; Zhong, Mei; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Lazure, Claude; Murphy, Richard A.; Chrétien, Michel; Marcinkiewicz, Mieczyslaw

    1999-01-01

    Using reverse transcriptase–PCR and degenerate oligonucleotides derived from the active-site residues of subtilisin/kexin-like serine proteinases, we have identified a highly conserved and phylogenetically ancestral human, rat, and mouse type I membrane-bound proteinase called subtilisin/kexin-isozyme-1 (SKI-1). Computer databank searches reveal that human SKI-1 was cloned previously but with no identified function. In situ hybridization demonstrates that SKI-1 mRNA is present in most tissues and cells. Cleavage specificity studies show that SKI-1 generates a 28-kDa product from the 32-kDa brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor, cleaving at an RGLT↓SL bond. In the endoplasmic reticulum of either LoVo or HK293 cells, proSKI-1 is processed into two membrane-bound forms of SKI-1 (120 and 106 kDa) differing by the nature of their N-glycosylation. Late along the secretory pathway some of the membrane-bound enzyme is shed into the medium as a 98-kDa form. Immunocytochemical analysis of stably transfected HK293 cells shows that SKI-1 is present in the Golgi apparatus and within small punctate structures reminiscent of endosomes. In vitro studies suggest that SKI-1 is a Ca2+-dependent serine proteinase exhibiting a wide pH optimum for cleavage of pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor. PMID:9990022

  12. Preparation of horseradish peroxidase hydrazide and its use in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G

    2003-01-01

    Preparation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) hydrazide that is HRP linked to adipic acid dihydrazide (HRP-ADH) and its use in enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is described. In this new strategy, horseradish peroxidase was conjugated to adipic acid dihydrazide using a carbodiimide coupling method. The resulting HRP-ADH was then coupled to cortisol-21-hemisuccinate (Cortisol-21-HS) to prepare enzyme conjugate. The prepared cortisol-21-HS coupled ADH-HRP (Cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP) enzyme conjugate was used for the development of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for direct estimation of cortisol. To the cortisol antibody coated microtiter wells, standard or serum samples (50 microL), along with cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP enzyme conjugate (100 microL) were incubated for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Bound enzyme activity was measured by using tetramethyl benzidine/hydrogen peroxide (TMB/H2O2) as substrate. The sensitivity of the assay was 0.05 microg/dL and the analytical recovery ranged from 92.9 to 101.7%. PMID:12953974

  13. Enzymatic degradation of Congo Red by turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ahmedi, Afaf; Abouseoud, Mahmoud; Couvert, Annabelle; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme peroxidase is known for its capacity to remove phenolic compounds and aromatic amines from aqueous solutions and also to decolourize textile effluents. This study aims at evaluating the potential of a turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase (TP) preparation in the discolouration of textile azo dyes and effluents. An azo dye, Congo Red (CR), was used as a model pollutant for treatment by the enzyme. The effects of various operating conditions like pH value, temperature, initial dye and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, contact time, and enzyme concentration were evaluated. The optimal conditions for maximal colour removal were at pH 2.0, 40 degrees C, 50 mM hydrogen peroxide, 50 mg/l CR dye, and TP activity of 0.45 U/ml within 10 min of incubation time. Analysis of the by-products from the enzymatic treatment by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy showed no residual compounds in the aqueous phase and a precipitate of polymeric nature.

  14. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  15. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaonan; Corgié, Stéphane C; Aneshansley, Daniel J; Wang, Peng; Walker, Larry P; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2014-04-01

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2 O2 , producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes.

  16. Enzymatic degradation of Congo Red by turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ahmedi, Afaf; Abouseoud, Mahmoud; Couvert, Annabelle; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme peroxidase is known for its capacity to remove phenolic compounds and aromatic amines from aqueous solutions and also to decolourize textile effluents. This study aims at evaluating the potential of a turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase (TP) preparation in the discolouration of textile azo dyes and effluents. An azo dye, Congo Red (CR), was used as a model pollutant for treatment by the enzyme. The effects of various operating conditions like pH value, temperature, initial dye and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, contact time, and enzyme concentration were evaluated. The optimal conditions for maximal colour removal were at pH 2.0, 40 degrees C, 50 mM hydrogen peroxide, 50 mg/l CR dye, and TP activity of 0.45 U/ml within 10 min of incubation time. Analysis of the by-products from the enzymatic treatment by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy showed no residual compounds in the aqueous phase and a precipitate of polymeric nature. PMID:23016283

  17. Polyethylene glycol improves phenol removal by immobilized turnip peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-Guerrero, F; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendarez, B E; Tinoco, R; Vazquez-Duhalt, R; Regalado, C

    2008-12-01

    Purified peroxidase from turnip (Brassica napus L. var. esculenta D.C.) was immobilized by entrapment in spheres of calcium alginate and by covalent binding to Affi-Gel 10. Both immobilized Turnip peroxidase (TP) preparations were assayed for the detoxification of a synthetic phenolic solution and a real wastewater effluent from a local paints factory. The effectiveness of phenolic compounds (PC's) removal by oxidative polymerization was evaluated using batch and recycling processes, and in the presence and in the absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The presence of PEG enhances the operative TP stability. In addition, reaction times were reduced from 3h to 10 min, and more effective phenol removals were achieved when PEG was added. TP was able to perform 15 reaction cycles with a real industrial effluent showing PC's removals >90% PC's during the first 10 reaction cycles. High PC's removal efficiencies (>95%) were obtained using both immobilized preparations at PC's concentrations <1.2mM. Higher PC's concentrations decreased the removal efficiency to 90% with both preparations after the first reaction cycle, probably due to substrate inhibition. On the other hand, immobilized TP showed increased thermal stability when compared with free TP. A large-scale enzymatic process for industrial effluent treatment is expected to be developed with immobilized TP that could be stable enough to make the process economically feasible. PMID:18502120

  18. Peroxidase-catalysed interfacial adhesion of aquatic caddisworm silk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Pan, Huaizhong; Weerasekare, G Mahika; Stewart, Russell J

    2015-11-01

    Casemaker caddisfly (Hesperophylax occidentalis) larvae use adhesive silk fibres to construct protective shelters under water. The silk comprises a distinct peripheral coating on a viscoelastic fibre core. Caddisworm silk peroxinectin (csPxt), a haem-peroxidase, was shown to be glycosylated by lectin affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Using high-resolution H2O2 and peroxidase-dependent silver ion reduction and nanoparticle deposition, imaged by electron microscopy, csPxt activity was shown to be localized in the peripheral layer of drawn silk fibres. CsPxt catalyses dityrosine cross-linking within the adhesive peripheral layer post-draw, initiated perhaps by H2O2 generated by a silk gland-specific superoxide dismutase 3 (csSOD3) from environmental reactive oxygen species present in natural water. CsSOD3 was also shown to be a glycoprotein and is likely localized in the peripheral layer. Using a synthetic fluorescent phenolic copolymer and confocal microscopy, it was shown that csPxt catalyses oxidative cross-linking to external polyphenolic compounds capable of diffusive interpenetration into the fuzzy peripheral coating, including humic acid, a natural surface-active polyphenol. The results provide evidence of enzyme-mediated covalent cross-linking of a natural bioadhesive to polyphenol conditioned interfaces as a mechanism of permanent adhesion underwater. PMID:26490632

  19. A structural and functional perspective of DyP-type peroxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toru; Sugano, Yasushi

    2015-05-15

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta Dec 1 (DyP) is a heme peroxidase. This name reflects its ability to degrade several anthraquinone dyes. The substrate specificity, the amino acid sequence, and the tertiary structure of DyP are different from those of the other heme peroxidase (super)families. Therefore, many proteins showing the similar amino acid sequences to that of DyP are called DyP-type peroxidase which is a new family of heme peroxidase identified in 2007. In fact, all structures of this family show a similar structure fold. However, this family includes many proteins whose amino acid sequence identity to DyP is lower than 15% and/or whose catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) is a few orders of magnitude less than that of DyP. A protein showing an activity different from peroxidase activity (dechelatase activity) has been also reported. In addition, the precise physiological roles of DyP-type peroxidases are unknown. These facts raise a question of whether calling this family DyP-type peroxidase is suitable. Here, we review the differences and similarities of structure and function among this family and propose the reasonable new classification of DyP-type peroxidase family, that is, class P, I and V. In this contribution, we discuss the adequacy of this family name.

  20. Wound-induced deposition of polyphenols in transgenic plants overexpressing peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants transformed with a chimeric tobacco anionic peroxidase gene have previously been shown to synthesize high levels of peroxidase in all tissues throughout the plant. One of several distinguishable phenotypes of transformed plants is the rapid browning of pith tissue upon wounding. Pith tissue from plants expressing high levels of peroxidase browned within 24 hours of wounding, while tissue from control plants did not brown as late as 7 days after wounding. A correlation between peroxidase activity and wound-induced browning was observed, whereas no relationship between polyphenol oxidase activity and browning was found. The purified tobacco anionic peroxidase was subjected to kinetic analysis with substrates which resemble the precursors of lignin or polyphenolic acid. The purified enzyme was found to readily polymerize phenolic acids in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} via a modified ping-pong mechanism. The percentage of lignin and lignin-related polymers in cell walls was nearly twofold greater in pith tissue isolated from peroxidase-overproducer plants compared to control plants. Lignin deposition in wounded pith tissue from control plants closely followed the induction of peroxidase activity. However, wound-induced lignification occurred 24 to 48 hours sooner in plants overexpressing the anionic peroxidase. This suggests that the availability of peroxidase rather than substrate may delay polyphenol deposition in wounded tissue.

  1. Purification and characterization of a cationic peroxidase Cs in Raphanus sativus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Soo; Lee, Dong Ju

    2005-06-01

    A short distance migrating cationic peroxidase from Korean radish seeds (Raphanus sativus) was detected. Cationic peroxidase Cs was purified to apparent homogeneity and characterized. The molecular mass of the purified cationic peroxidase Cs was estimated to be about 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE. After reconstitution of apoperoxidase Cs with protohemin, the absorption spectra revealed a new peak in the Soret region around 400 nm, which is typical in a classical type III peroxidase family. The optimum pH of peroxidase activity for o-dianisidine oxidation was observed at pH 7.0. Kinetic studies revealed that the reconstituted cationic peroxidase Cs has Km values of 1.18 mM and of 1.27 mM for o-dianisidine and H2O2, respectively. The cationic peroxidase Cs showed the peroxidase activities for native substrates, such as coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and scopoletin. This result suggested that cationic peroxidase Cs plays an important role in plant cell wall formation during seed germination.

  2. Systematic characterization of the peroxidase gene family provides new insights into fungal pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Mir, Albely Afifa; Park, Sook-Young; Abu Sadat, Md; Kim, Seongbeom; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-07-02

    Fungal pathogens have evolved antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species produced as a part of host innate immunity. Recent studies proposed peroxidases as components of antioxidant defense system. However, the role of fungal peroxidases during interaction with host plants has not been explored at the genomic level. Here, we systematically identified peroxidase genes and analyzed their impact on fungal pathogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Phylogeny reconstruction placed 27 putative peroxidase genes into 15 clades. Expression profiles showed that majority of them are responsive to in planta condition and in vitro H2O2. Our analysis of individual deletion mutants for seven selected genes including MoPRX1 revealed that these genes contribute to fungal development and/or pathogenesis. We identified significant and positive correlations among sensitivity to H2O2, peroxidase activity and fungal pathogenicity. In-depth analysis of MoPRX1 demonstrated that it is a functional ortholog of thioredoxin peroxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for detoxification of the oxidative burst within host cells. Transcriptional profiling of other peroxidases in ΔMoprx1 suggested interwoven nature of the peroxidase-mediated antioxidant defense system. The results from this study provide insight into the infection strategy built on evolutionarily conserved peroxidases in the rice blast fungus.

  3. Mechanism of decrease in levels of hepatic P450 isozymes induced by intracerebral endotoxin: independence from sympathetic nervous and adrenocortical systems.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Y; Kitamura, H; Iwai, M; Saito, M; Kazusaka, A; Fujita, S

    1999-02-01

    We previously reported that lipoplysaccharide (LPS) injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) at an ineffective dose (0.1 microgram/rat) decreased the drug metabolizing activities and related cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes in rat liver microsomes when injected intraperitoneally (i.p.). The dose study (doses < 0.1 microgram intracerebrally and > 0.1 microgram i.p.), which was carried out to examine how much more effective is i.c.v.-LPS than i.p.-LPS, showed that the pattern of alteration of expression of CYP isozymes induced by i.c.v.-LPS was different from that caused by i.p.-LPS at an effective dose (10 micrograms/rat). These results indicate that the decrease in hepatic CYP isozymes caused by i.c.v.-LPS could not be explained by the LPS leaked from the brain, suggesting that the decrease in hepatic CYP isozymes by i.c.v.-LPS may be caused by a central action of LPS. In this study, the possible involvement of sympathetic nervous and adrenocortical systems in the down-regulation of CYP isozymes by i.c.v.-LPS was investigated using surgical or chemical sympathetecomized or adrenalectomized rats. The norepinephrine (NE) content in the liver in rats with surgical hepatic sympathetectomy was reduced by 88% compared with that of sham-operated rats that received i.c.v.-saline and 85% compared with that of sham-operated rats that received i.c.v.-LPS, indicating that hepatic denervation was successful. The NE content in the liver in rats chemically sympathetectomized by two i.p. injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (40 mg/kg each time) 1 and 2 days before i.c.v. injection was reduced by 82% in i.c.v.-saline-treated and by 74% in i.c.v.-LPS-treated groups compared with that in rats pretreated with i.p.-saline. These results indicate that sympathetic NE terminals were effectively removed. Intracerebroventricular LPS decreased the total P450 content and the activities of CYP dependent drug metabolizing enzymes, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), pentoxyresorufin O

  4. Hormonal Regulation of Leaf Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William P.

    1968-01-01

    A review is given of the progress made during the last 6 years in elucidating the nature, locus of action, and transport properties of the endogenous hormones that control leaf abscission. PMID:16657014

  5. Experiments in Whole Leaf Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, J. C.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Described is a simple experimental system, which uses radioactive carbon dioxide to study whole leaf photosynthesis under a variety of conditions. Other experiments and simple apparatus for the experiments are also described. (Author/RH)

  6. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  9. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  11. Effect of nitrogen and water treatment on leaf chemistry in horsenettle (Solanum carolinense), and relationship to herbivory by flea beetles (Epitrix spp.) and tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta).

    PubMed

    Cipollini, Martin L; Paulk, Eric; Cipollini, Donald F

    2002-12-01

    We studied the interaction between plants (horsenettle; Solanum carolinense) and herbivorous insects (flea beetles; Epitrix spp., and tobacco hornworm; Manduca sexta) by focusing on three questions: (1) Does variation in nitrogen availability affect leaf chemistry as predicted by the carbon-nutrient balance (CNB) hypothesis? (2) Does variation in plant treatment and leaf chemistry affect insect feeding? (3) Is there an interaction between the insect herbivores that is mediated by variation in leaf chemistry? For three successive years (1998-2001), we grew a set of clones of 10 maternal plants under two nitrogen treatments and two water treatments. For each plant in the summer of 2000, we assayed herbivory by hornworms in both indoor (detached leaf) and outdoor (attached leaf) assays, as well as ambient flea beetle damage. Estimates of leaf material consumed were made via analysis of digitized leaf images. We also assayed leaves for total protein, phenolic, and glycoalkaloid content, and for trypsin inhibitor, polyphenol oxidase, and peroxidase activity. Despite strong effects of nitrogen treatment on growth and reproduction, only total protein responded as predicted by CNB. Leaf phenolic levels were increased by nitrogen treatment, polyphenol oxidase activity was decreased, and other leaf parameters were unaffected. Neither hornworm nor flea beetle herbivory could be related to plant treatment or genotype or to variation in any of the six leaf chemical parameters. A negative relationship between flea beetle and hornworm herbivory was found, but was not apparently mediated by any of the measured leaf chemicals. Because leaf resistance was maintained in low nitrogen plants at the apparent expense of growth and reproduction, our results support the concept of a fitness cost of defense, as predicted by the optimal defense hypothesis.

  12. Why do leaf-tying caterpillars abandon their leaf ties?

    PubMed

    Sliwinski, Michelle; Sigmon, Elisha

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-tying caterpillars act as ecosystem engineers by building shelters between overlapping leaves, which are inhabited by other arthropods. Leaf-tiers have been observed to leave their ties and create new shelters (and thus additional microhabitats), but the ecological factors affecting shelter fidelity are poorly known. For this study, we explored the effects of resource limitation and occupant density on shelter fidelity and assessed the consequences of shelter abandonment. We first quantified the area of leaf material required for a caterpillar to fully develop for two of the most common leaf-tiers that feed on white oak, Quercus alba. On average, Psilocorsis spp. caterpillars consumed 21.65 ± 0.67 cm(2) leaf material to complete development. We also measured the area of natural leaf ties found in a Maryland forest, to determine the distribution of resources available to caterpillars in situ. Of 158 natural leaf ties examined, 47% were too small to sustain an average Psilocorsis spp. caterpillar for the entirety of its development. We also manipulated caterpillar densities within experimental ties on potted trees to determine the effects of cohabitants on the likelihood of a caterpillar to leave its tie. We placed 1, 2, or 4 caterpillars in ties of a standard size and monitored the caterpillars twice daily to track their movement. In ties with more than one occupant, caterpillars showed a significantly greater propensity to leave their tie, and left sooner and at a faster rate than those in ties as single occupants. To understand the consequences of leaf tie abandonment, we observed caterpillars searching a tree for a site to build a shelter in the field. This is a risky behavior, as 17% of the caterpillars observed died while searching for a shelter site. Caterpillars that successfully built a shelter traveled 110 ± 20 cm and took 28 ± 7 min to find a suitable site to build a shelter. In conclusion, leaf-tying caterpillars must frequently abandon their leaf

  13. What determines a leaf's shape?

    PubMed

    Dkhar, Jeremy; Pareek, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    The independent origin and evolution of leaves as small, simple microphylls or larger, more complex megaphylls in plants has shaped and influenced the natural composition of the environment. Significant contributions have come from megaphyllous leaves, characterized usually as flat, thin lamina entrenched with photosynthetic organelles and stomata, which serve as the basis of primary productivity. During the course of evolution, the megaphylls have attained complexity not only in size or venation patterns but also in shape. This has fascinated scientists worldwide, and research has progressed tremendously in understanding the concept of leaf shape determination. Here, we review these studies and discuss the various factors that contributed towards shaping the leaf; initiated as a small bulge on the periphery of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) followed by asymmetric outgrowth, expansion and maturation until final shape is achieved. We found that the underlying factors governing these processes are inherently genetic: PIN1 and KNOX1 are indicators of leaf initiation, HD-ZIPIII, KANADI, and YABBY specify leaf outgrowth while ANGUSTIFOLIA3 and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR5 control leaf expansion and maturation; besides, recent research has identified new players such as APUM23, known to specify leaf polarity. In addition to genetic control, environmental factors also play an important role during the final adjustment of leaf shape. This immense amount of information available will serve as the basis for studying and understanding innovative leaf morphologies viz. the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes which have evolved to provide additional support to the plant survival in its nutrient-deficient habitat. In hindsight, formation of the pitcher tube in Nepenthes might involve the recruitment of similar genetic mechanisms that occur during sympetaly in Petunia. PMID:25584185

  14. What determines a leaf's shape?

    PubMed

    Dkhar, Jeremy; Pareek, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    The independent origin and evolution of leaves as small, simple microphylls or larger, more complex megaphylls in plants has shaped and influenced the natural composition of the environment. Significant contributions have come from megaphyllous leaves, characterized usually as flat, thin lamina entrenched with photosynthetic organelles and stomata, which serve as the basis of primary productivity. During the course of evolution, the megaphylls have attained complexity not only in size or venation patterns but also in shape. This has fascinated scientists worldwide, and research has progressed tremendously in understanding the concept of leaf shape determination. Here, we review these studies and discuss the various factors that contributed towards shaping the leaf; initiated as a small bulge on the periphery of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) followed by asymmetric outgrowth, expansion and maturation until final shape is achieved. We found that the underlying factors governing these processes are inherently genetic: PIN1 and KNOX1 are indicators of leaf initiation, HD-ZIPIII, KANADI, and YABBY specify leaf outgrowth while ANGUSTIFOLIA3 and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR5 control leaf expansion and maturation; besides, recent research has identified new players such as APUM23, known to specify leaf polarity. In addition to genetic control, environmental factors also play an important role during the final adjustment of leaf shape. This immense amount of information available will serve as the basis for studying and understanding innovative leaf morphologies viz. the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes which have evolved to provide additional support to the plant survival in its nutrient-deficient habitat. In hindsight, formation of the pitcher tube in Nepenthes might involve the recruitment of similar genetic mechanisms that occur during sympetaly in Petunia.

  15. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand.

  16. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  17. Photosystem II functionality and antioxidant system changes during leaf rolling in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabiye; Saruhan, Neslihan; Sağlam, A; Nar, Hatice; Kadioğlu, A

    2009-12-01

    We studied the changes in antioxidant system and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) plants (PSE plants) having reduced leaf area under drought stress causing leaf rolling and re-watering. PSE plants were compared to primary stressed plants (PS) in previous studies. The parameters were measured at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others is intermediate form). Water potentials and stomatal conductance of leaves were gradually decreased during leaf rolling. Similarly, maximum quantum efficiency of open PS II center and quantum yield of PS II decreased during the rolling period. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence decreased at score 2 then increased while photochemical quenching did not change during leaf rolling. Electron transport rate decreased only at score 4 but approximately reached to score 1 level after re-watering. Superoxide dismutase activity was not constant at all leaf rolling scores. Ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities generally tended to increase during leaf rolling. Lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content increased at score 2 but decreased at the later scores. On the other hand, O 2 .- production increased during the rolling period. After re-watering of the plants having score 4 of leaf rolling, antioxidant enzyme activities were lower than those of score 1. Other physiological parameters also tended to reach the value of score 1. The results indicated that PSE plants gained drought tolerance by reducing leaf area effectively induced their antioxidant systems and protected the photosynthesis under drought stress similar to PS plants. PMID:20015833

  18. Photosystem II functionality and antioxidant system changes during leaf rolling in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabiye; Saruhan, Neslihan; Sağlam, A; Nar, Hatice; Kadioğlu, A

    2009-12-01

    We studied the changes in antioxidant system and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) plants (PSE plants) having reduced leaf area under drought stress causing leaf rolling and re-watering. PSE plants were compared to primary stressed plants (PS) in previous studies. The parameters were measured at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others is intermediate form). Water potentials and stomatal conductance of leaves were gradually decreased during leaf rolling. Similarly, maximum quantum efficiency of open PS II center and quantum yield of PS II decreased during the rolling period. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence decreased at score 2 then increased while photochemical quenching did not change during leaf rolling. Electron transport rate decreased only at score 4 but approximately reached to score 1 level after re-watering. Superoxide dismutase activity was not constant at all leaf rolling scores. Ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities generally tended to increase during leaf rolling. Lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content increased at score 2 but decreased at the later scores. On the other hand, O 2 .- production increased during the rolling period. After re-watering of the plants having score 4 of leaf rolling, antioxidant enzyme activities were lower than those of score 1. Other physiological parameters also tended to reach the value of score 1. The results indicated that PSE plants gained drought tolerance by reducing leaf area effectively induced their antioxidant systems and protected the photosynthesis under drought stress similar to PS plants.

  19. The developmental transition to flowering in Arabidopsis is associated with an increase in leaf chloroplastic lipoxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Gloria Rodriguez; Argumedo, Ruby; Patel, Komal; Ng, Vicky; Zhou, Feimeng; Vellanoweth, Robert Luis

    2008-03-01

    The developmental transition from vegetative growth to flowering in Arabidopsis is associated with a precipitous decline in the activity of leaf ascorbate peroxidase (APx), an enzymatic scavenger of hydrogen peroxide, and an increase in specific lipid peroxidation leading to the accumulation of 13-hydroperoxy-9,11,15 (Z,E,Z) octadecatrienoic acid (13 HOO-FA). The appearance of this specific isomer suggests that it is of enzymatic origin and may represent the activation of an oxylipin signaling pathway. We thus hypothesized that leaf 13-lipoxygenase (LOX) activity increases at the floral transition and leads to the observed elevation of 13-HOO-FA levels. Leaf protein extracts were prepared from seven distinct life stages of Arabidopsis plants and used to assay for LOX activity. We report that leaf 13-LOX enzymatic activity increases two- to three-fold from the vegetative stage to the immediate post-floral transition stage. We found two forms of LOX activity in cell extracts and show that the higher pH optimum form is the isoenzyme activated. This increase is correlated with a small increase in H(2)O(2), perhaps resulting from the previously reported decline in leaf APx activity. Very low levels of exogenous H(2)O(2) activate the induced form in vegetative leaf extracts in vitro, suggesting that the floral transition-dependent APx decline and subsequent H(2)O(2) elevation are involved in activating plastid 13-LOX and thus a second messenger oxylipin pathway.

  20. Leaf exsertion, leaf elongation, and leaf senescence in Eriophorum vaginatum and Carex Bigelowii

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, G.R.; Yandow, T.; Laundre, J.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the common sedges of arctic vegetation show a pattern of leaf production in which the exsertion and elongation of new leaves is more or less simultaneous with the senescence of old leaves. The present study was designed to increase our understanding of the variability sequential leaf production by arctic sedges, and to determine some of the controls on that variability. We did this in two ways: first, we compared the sequential patterns of leaf growth and senescence in E. vaginatum with those of Carex Bigelowii Torr. at two tussock tundra sites near Toolik Lake on the North Slope of Alaska. Second, we compared the responses of leaf growth in these species in control and fertilized plots and in two microenvironments thought to differ sharply in nutrient availability and total productivity. 29 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Effect of enzyme impurities on phenol removal by the method of polymerization and precipitation catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M; Sakurai, A; Sakakibara, M

    2001-11-01

    The removal of phenol by peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization was examined using the Coprinus cinereus peroxidases at different levels of impurity with respect to contamination. The phenol removal efficiency was improved by lowering the peroxidase purity. Acidic and high molecular weight proteins present as impurities in the peroxidase solution had some positive effect on the phenol-polymerizing reaction. The residual enzyme activity, either only in the solution or both in the solution and on the precipitate during the polymerizing reaction, was measured. The results indicate that the main effect of impurities in the peroxidase solution was the suppression of the adsorption of peroxidase molecules on the polymerized precipitate.

  2. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. PMID:24534439

  3. Horseradish peroxidase. Complex formation with anions and hydrocyanic acid.

    PubMed

    Araiso, T; Dunford, H B

    1981-10-10

    Equilibrium binding experiments have been performed with perchlorate, chloride, and acetate in the presence of horseradish peroxidase. The binding of perchlorate and acetate appears to be like that of nitrate, at a site other than the sixth coordination position of the heme iron. Competitive experiments using both nitrate and cyanide demonstrate that two different binding sites are present on the enzyme. Chloride appears to bind at the sixth coordination position as do both fluoride and cyanide. Temperature jump experiments indicate that it is likely the nitrate anion and not undissociated nitric acid which is the binding species. Competitive stopped flow experiments indicate that the bound nitrate slows both the association rate and dissociation rate of cyanide, indicating that nitrate binds close to the sixth coordination position.

  4. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lizeng; Zhuang, Jie; Nie, Leng; Zhang, Jinbin; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning; Wang, Taihong; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Perrett, Sarah; Yan, Xiyun

    2007-09-01

    Nanoparticles containing magnetic materials, such as magnetite (Fe3O4), are particularly useful for imaging and separation techniques. As these nanoparticles are generally considered to be biologically and chemically inert, they are typically coated with metal catalysts, antibodies or enzymes to increase their functionality as separation agents. Here, we report that magnetite nanoparticles in fact possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in natural peroxidases, which are widely used to oxidize organic substrates in the treatment of wastewater or as detection tools. Based on this finding, we have developed a novel immunoassay in which antibody-modified magnetite nanoparticles provide three functions: capture, separation and detection. The stability, ease of production and versatility of these nanoparticles makes them a powerful tool for a wide range of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  5. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction.

  6. Cytochrome c peroxidase activity of heme bound amyloid β peptides.

    PubMed

    Seal, Manas; Ghosh, Chandradeep; Basu, Olivia; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2016-09-01

    Heme bound amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), can catalytically oxidize ferrocytochrome c (Cyt c(II)) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The rate of catalytic oxidation of Cyt(II) c has been found to be dependent on several factors, such as concentration of heme(III)-Aβ, Cyt(II) c, H2O2, pH, ionic strength of the solution, and peptide chain length of Aβ. The above features resemble the naturally occurring enzyme cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) which is known to catalytically oxidize Cyt(II) c in the presence of H2O2. In the absence of heme(III)-Aβ, the oxidation of Cyt(II) c is not catalytic. Thus, heme-Aβ complex behaves as CCP.

  7. Horseradish Peroxidase Inactivation: Heme Destruction and Influence of Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediates efficient conversion of many phenolic contaminants and thus has potential applications for pollution control. Such potentially important applications suffer however from the fact that the enzyme becomes quickly inactivated during phenol oxidation and polymerization. The work here provides the first experimental data of heme consumption and iron releases to support the hypothesis that HRP is inactivated by heme destruction. Product of heme destruction is identified using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The heme macrocycle destruction involving deprivation of the heme iron and oxidation of the 4-vinyl group in heme occurs as a result of the reaction. We also demonstrated that heme consumption and iron releases resulting from HRP destruction are largely reduced in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), providing the first evidence to indicate that heme destruction is effectively suppressed by co-dissolved PEG. These findings advance a better understanding of the mechanisms of HRP inactivation. PMID:24185130

  8. Asparagus byproducts as a new source of peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Lopez, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-07-01

    Soluble peroxidase (POD) from asparagus byproducts was purified by ion exchange chromatographies, and its kinetic and catalytic properties were studied. The isoelectric point of the purified isoperoxidases was 9.1, and the optimum pH and temperature values were 4.0 and 25 °C, respectively. The cationic asparagus POD (CAP) midpoint inactivation temperature was 57 °C, which favors its use in industrial processes. The Km values of cationic asparagus POD for H₂O₂ and ABTS were 0.318 and 0.634 mM, respectively. The purified CAP is economically obtained from raw materials using a simple protocol and possesses features that make it advantageous for the potential use of this enzyme in a large number of processes with demonstrated requirements of thermostable POD. The results indicate that CAP can be used as a potential candidate for removing phenolic contaminants.

  9. Peroxidase activity and superficial scald development in apple fruit.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Trujillo, J Pablo; Nock, Jacqueline F; Kupferman, Eugene M; Brown, Susan K; Watkins, Christopher B

    2003-11-19

    The relationship between soluble peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7; POX) activity and the development of a chilling-related disorder, superficial scald, was studied in three apple fruit (Malus x domestica Borkh.) systems: a White Angel x Rome Beauty population with progeny with different scald susceptibilities; Delicious from three harvests with progressively declining scald susceptibility; and the scald-resistant Idared and the scald-susceptible Law Rome. Differences in incidence and severity of scald in progeny from White Angel x Rome Beauty progeny tended to show relationships with POX activity at harvest, but, overall, associations were not consistent. However, greater scald incidence and lower POX activity were found in less mature Delicious fruit than in later harvested fruit. Also, the scald-resistant Iotadared had a much higher POX activity compared with the scald-susceptible Law Rome. A general hypothesis that POX activity is related to scald susceptibility was generally supported, but exceptions were observed.

  10. Insights into the catalytic mechanism of synthetic glutathione peroxidase mimetics.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Debasish; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) is a key selenoenzyme that protects biomolecules from oxidative damage. Extensive research has been carried out to design and synthesize small organoselenium compounds as functional mimics of GPx. While the catalytic mechanism of the native enzyme itself is poorly understood, the synthetic mimics follow different catalytic pathways depending upon the structures and reactivities of various intermediates formed in the catalytic cycle. The steric as well as electronic environments around the selenium atom not only modulate the reactivity of these synthetic mimics towards peroxides and thiols, but also the catalytic mechanisms. The catalytic cycle of small GPx mimics is also dependent on the nature of peroxides and thiols used in the study. In this review, we discuss how the catalytic mechanism varies with the substituents attached to the selenium atom.

  11. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  12. Cytochrome c peroxidase activity of heme bound amyloid β peptides.

    PubMed

    Seal, Manas; Ghosh, Chandradeep; Basu, Olivia; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2016-09-01

    Heme bound amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), can catalytically oxidize ferrocytochrome c (Cyt c(II)) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The rate of catalytic oxidation of Cyt(II) c has been found to be dependent on several factors, such as concentration of heme(III)-Aβ, Cyt(II) c, H2O2, pH, ionic strength of the solution, and peptide chain length of Aβ. The above features resemble the naturally occurring enzyme cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) which is known to catalytically oxidize Cyt(II) c in the presence of H2O2. In the absence of heme(III)-Aβ, the oxidation of Cyt(II) c is not catalytic. Thus, heme-Aβ complex behaves as CCP. PMID:27270708

  13. Electrostatic control of the tryptophan radical in cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Tiffany P; Bhaskar, B; Poulos, Thomas L

    2004-07-13

    Previously a K(+)-binding site, analogous to that found in ascorbate peroxidase (APX), was engineered into cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) to test the hypothesis that the bound K(+) influences the stability of the Trp191 cation radical formed during the CcP catalytic cycle (Bonagura et al., (1996) Biochemistry 35, 6107 and Bonagura et al., (1999) Biochemistry 38, 5528). Characterization of this mutant, designated CcPK2, showed that the stability of the Trp191 cation radical is dependent on the occupancy of the engineered K(+) site and that the Trp191 radical was much less stable in this mutant than in wild-type CcP. The mutations Met230Leu, Met231Gln, and Met172Ser have now been constructed on the CcPK2 mutant template to test if the Met residues also contribute to the stabilization of the Trp191 cation radical. Crystal structures show that the mutations affect only the local structure near the sites of mutation. Removal of these electronegative residues located less than 8 A from the Trp radical results in a further destabilization of the Trp radical. The characteristic EPR signal associated with the Trp radical is significantly narrowed and is characteristic of a tyrosine radical signal. Double-mixing stopped-flow experiments, where the delay time between the formation of CcP compound I and its mixing with horse heart ferrocytochrome c is varied, show that the stability of the Trp radical decreases as the Met residues are removed from the proximal cavity. When taken together, these results demonstrate a strong correlation between the experimentally determined stability of the Trp191 radical, the enzyme activity, and the calculated electrostatic stabilization of the Trp191 radical. PMID:15236591

  14. The Roles of Glutathione Peroxidases during Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Embryo development relies on the complex interplay of the basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. Precise regulation of these events is the basis for the establishment of embryonic structures and the organ development. Beginning with fertilization of the oocyte until delivery the developing embryo encounters changing environmental conditions such as varying levels of oxygen, which can give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These challenges are met by the embryo with metabolic adaptations and by an array of anti-oxidative mechanisms. ROS can be deleterious by modifying biological molecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and may induce abnormal development or even embryonic lethality. On the other hand ROS are vital players of various signaling cascades that affect the balance between cell growth, differentiation, and death. An imbalance or dysregulation of these biological processes may generate cells with abnormal growth and is therefore potentially teratogenic and tumorigenic. Thus, a precise balance between processes generating ROS and those decomposing ROS is critical for normal embryo development. One tier of the cellular protective system against ROS constitutes the family of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx). These enzymes reduce hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols at the expense of reduced glutathione. Of special interest within this protein family is the moonlighting enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4). This enzyme is a scavenger of lipophilic hydroperoxides on one hand, but on the other hand can be transformed into an enzymatically inactive cellular structural component. GPx4 deficiency - in contrast to all other GPx family members - leads to abnormal embryo development and finally produces a lethal phenotype in mice. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on GPx isoforms during embryo development and tumor development with an emphasis on

  15. Characterization of a catalase-peroxidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    PubMed

    Kengen, S W; Bikker, F J; Hagen, W R; de Vos, W M; van der Oost, J

    2001-10-01

    A putative perA gene from Archaeoglobus fulgidus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), and the recombinant catalase-peroxidase was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 85 kDa. UV-visible spectroscopic analysis indicated the presence of protoheme IX as a prosthetic group (ferric heme), in a stoichiometry of 0.25 heme per subunit. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis confirmed the presence of ferric heme and identified the proximal axial ligand as a histidine. The enzyme showed both catalase and peroxidase activity with pH optima of 6.0 and 4.5, respectively. Optimal temperatures of 70 degrees C and 80 degrees C were found for the catalase and peroxidase activity, respectively. The catalase activity strongly exceeded the peroxidase activity, with Vmax values of 9600 and 36 U mg(-1), respectively. Km values for H2O2 of 8.6 and 0.85 mM were found for catalase and peroxidase, respectively. Common heme inhibitors such as cyanide, azide, and hydroxylamine inhibited peroxidase activity. However, unlike all other catalase-peroxidases, the enzyme was also inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Although the enzyme exhibited a high thermostability, rapid inactivation occurred in the presence of H2O2, with half-life values of less than 1 min. This is the first catalase-peroxidase characterized from a hyperthermophilic microorganism. PMID:11699646

  16. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  17. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M. )

    1989-04-18

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum.

  18. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Lukat, G S; Rodgers, K R; Jabro, M N; Goff, H M

    1989-04-18

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, we characterize the H2O2-oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Coprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum.

  19. Purification, characterization and evaluation of extracellular peroxidase from two Coprinus species for aqueous phenol treatment.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Keisuke; Buchanan, Ian D; Pickard, Michael A; Smith, Daniel W

    2005-11-01

    Non-ligninolytic fungal peroxidases produced by Coprinus cinereus UAMH 4103 and Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067 were purified, characterized and evaluated as cost-effective alternatives to horseradish peroxidase for aqueous phenol treatment. Purified Coprinus peroxidases exhibited a molecular weight of 36 kDa on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Although the catalytic properties of the two Coprinus peroxidases were nearly identical in both crude and purified forms, the stabilities were substantially different. The peroxidase from Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067 was more stable at 50 degrees C and under basic conditions (up to pH 10) than the enzyme from C. cinereus UAMH 4103. The former enzyme also performed better at pH 9 than the latter one in aqueous phenol treatment. The phenol removal efficiency of the Coprinus peroxidase was comparable to those of previously studied plant peroxidases. The broader working pH and higher thermal and alkaline stability of the peroxidase from Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067 may be advantageous for its application to industrial wastewater treatment.

  20. Selective oxidation of enzyme extracts for improved quantification of peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu; Penner, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    Natural components endogenous to plant material extracts often interfere with traditional peroxidase assays by reducing the oxidized product generated as a result of the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. This leads to an underestimation of peroxidase activity when the oxidized product provides the signal for enzyme activity quantification. This article describes a relatively simple way to alleviate complications arising due to the presence of such confounding compounds. The method is based on using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as the reducing substrate. The oxidized product of the reaction is ABTS(+), the accumulation of which can be followed spectrophotometrically. It is shown here that one can selectively inactivate the endogenous compounds that confound the peroxidase assay by treating the enzyme preparation with the oxidized product itself, ABTS(+), prior to initiating the quantification assay. This approach is selective for those compounds likely to interfere with peroxidase quantification. The presented method is shown to alleviate the complications associated with lag phases typical of plant extract peroxidase assays and, thus, to more accurately reflect total peroxidase activity. The presented assay is expected to be applicable to the wide range of biological systems for which the determination of peroxidase activity is desired. PMID:25640588

  1. Identification and characterization of VPO1, a new animal heme-containing peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guangjie; Salerno, John C; Cao, Zehong; Pagano, Patrick J; Lambeth, J David

    2008-12-15

    Animal heme-containing peroxidases play roles in innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis, and the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Using the peroxidase-like domain of Duox1 as a query, we carried out homology searching of the National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Two novel heme-containing peroxidases were identified in humans and mice. One, termed VPO1 for vascular peroxidase 1, exhibits its highest tissue expression in heart and vascular wall. A second, VPO2, present in humans but not in mice, is 63% identical to VPO1 and is highly expressed in heart. The peroxidase homology region of VPO1 shows 42% identity to myeloperoxidase and 57% identity to the insect peroxidase peroxidasin. A molecular model of the VPO1 peroxidase region reveals a structure very similar to that of known peroxidases, including a conserved heme binding cavity, critical catalytic residues, and a calcium binding site. The absorbance spectra of VPO1 are similar to those of lactoperoxidase, and covalent attachment of the heme to VPO1 protein was demonstrated by chemiluminescent heme staining. VPO1 purified from heart or expressed in HEK cells is catalytically active, with a K(m) for H(2)O(2) of 1.5 mM. When co-expressed in cells, VPO1 can use H(2)O(2) produced by NADPH oxidase enzymes. VPO1 is likely to carry out peroxidative reactions previously attributed exclusively to myeloperoxidase in the vascular system.

  2. Bioremediation of phenolic compounds from water with plant root surface peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, P.R.; Arora, R.; El Ghaouth, A.

    1994-09-01

    Peroxidases have been shown to polymerize phenolic compounds, thereby removing them from solution by precipitation. Others have studied the role of root surface associated peroxidases as a defense against fungal root pathogens; however, their use in detoxification of organic pollutants in vivo at the root surface has not been studied. Two plant species, waterhyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (C. Mart) Solms-Laub.] and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.), were tested for both in vitro and in vivo peroxidase activity on the root surface. In vitro studies indicated that root surface peroxidase activities were 181 and 78 nmol tetraguaiacol formed min{sup -1} g{sup -1} root fresh wt., for tomato and waterhyacinth, respectively. Light microscope studies revealed that guaiacol was polymerized in vivo at the root surface. Although peroxidase was evenly distributed on tomato roots, it was distributed patchily on waterhyacinth roots. In vitro studies using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the efficiency of peroxidase to polymerize phenols vary with phenolic compound. We suggest that plants may be utilized as a source of peroxidases for removal of phenolic compounds that are on the EPA priority pollutant list and that root surface peroxidases may minimize the absorption of phenolic compounds into plants by precipitating them at the root surface. In this study we have identified a new use for root-associated proteins in ecologically engineering plant systems for bioremediation of phenolic compounds in the soil and water environment. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. A Molecular Sensor To Characterize Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Cleavage by Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Oppliger, Joel; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique J.; Khatib, Abdel-Majid; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses are emerging viruses including several causative agents of severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans. The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has greatly accelerated the discovery of novel arenavirus species. However, for many of these viruses, only genetic information is available, and their zoonotic disease potential remains unknown. During the arenavirus life cycle, processing of the viral envelope glycoprotein precursor (GPC) by the cellular subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) is crucial for productive infection. The ability of newly emerging arenaviruses to hijack human SKI-1/S1P appears, therefore, to be a requirement for efficient zoonotic transmission and human disease potential. Here we implement a newly developed cell-based molecular sensor for SKI-1/S1P to characterize the processing of arenavirus GPC-derived target sequences by human SKI-1/S1P in a quantitative manner. We show that only nine amino acids flanking the putative cleavage site are necessary and sufficient to accurately recapitulate the efficiency and subcellular location of arenavirus GPC processing. In a proof of concept, our sensor correctly predicts efficient processing of the GPC of the newly emergent pathogenic Lujo virus by human SKI-1/S1P and defines the exact cleavage site. Lastly, we employed our sensor to show efficient GPC processing of a panel of pathogenic and nonpathogenic New World arenaviruses, suggesting that GPC cleavage represents no barrier for zoonotic transmission of these pathogens. Our SKI-1/S1P sensor thus represents a rapid and robust test system for assessment of the processing of putative cleavage sites derived from the GPCs of newly discovered arenavirus by the SKI-1/S1P of humans or any other species, based solely on sequence information. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens that can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality in humans. A crucial step in productive arenavirus

  4. Characterisation of antioxidants in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic leaf tissues of variegated Pelargonium zonale plants.

    PubMed

    Vidović, M; Morina, F; Milić-Komić, S; Vuleta, A; Zechmann, B; Prokić, Lj; Veljović Jovanović, S

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important signalling molecule, involved in regulation of numerous metabolic processes in plants. The most important sources of H2 O2 in photosynthetically active cells are chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Here we employed variegated Pelargonium zonale to characterise and compare enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidative system in autotrophic and heterotrophic leaf tissues at (sub)cellular level under optimal growth conditions. The results revealed that both leaf tissues had specific strategies to regulate H2 O2 levels. In photosynthetic cells, the redox regulatory system was based on ascorbate, and on the activities of thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) and catalase. In this leaf tissue, ascorbate was predominantly localised in the nucleus, peroxisomes, plastids and mitochondria. On the other hand, non-photosynthetic cells contained higher glutathione content, mostly located in mitochondria. The enzymatic antioxidative system in non-photosynthetic cells relied on the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and both Mn and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. Interestingly, higher content of ascorbate and glutathione, and higher activities of APX in the cytosol of non-photosynthetic leaf cells compared to the photosynthetic ones, suggest the importance of this compartment in H2 O2 regulation. Together, these results imply different regulation of processes linked with H2 O2 signalling at subcellular level. Thus, we propose green-white variegated leaves as an excellent system for examination of redox signal transduction and redox communication between two cell types, autotrophic and heterotrophic, within the same organ.

  5. Dextromethorphan and debrisoquine metabolism and polymorphism of the gene for cytochrome P450 isozyme 2D50 in Thoroughbreds.

    PubMed

    Corado, Carley R; McKemie, Daniel S; Knych, Heather K

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize polymorphisms of the gene for cytochrome P450 isozyme 2D50 (CYP2D50) and the disposition of 2 CYP2D50 probe drugs, dextromethorphan and debrisoquine, in horses. ANIMALS 23 healthy horses (22 Thoroughbreds and 1 Standardbred). PROCEDURES Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP2D50 were identified. Disposition of dextromethorphan (2 mg/kg) and debrisoquine (0.2 mg/kg) were determined after oral (dextromethorphan) or nasogastric (debrisoquine) administration to the horses. Metabolic ratios of plasma dextromethorphan and total dextrorphan (dextrorphan plus dextrorphan-O-β-glucuronide) and 4-hydroxydebrisoquine concentrations were calculated on the basis of the area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve extrapolated to infinity for the parent drug divided by that for the corresponding metabolite. Pharmacokinetic data were used to categorize horses into the phenotypic drug-metabolism categories poor, extensive, and ultrarapid. Disposition patterns were compared among categories, and relationships between SNPs and metabolism categories were explored. RESULTS Gene sequencing identified 51 SNPs, including 27 nonsynonymous SNPs. Debrisoquine was minimally detected after oral administration. Disposition of dextromethorphan varied markedly among horses. Metabolic ratios for dextromethorphan ranged from 0.03 to 0.46 (mean, 0.12). On the basis of these data, 1 horse was characterized as a poor metabolizer, 18 were characterized as extensive metabolizers, and 3 were characterized as ultrarapid metabolizers. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that CYP2D50 is polymorphic and that the disposition of the probe drug varies markedly in horses. The polymorphisms may be related to rates of drug metabolism. Additional research involving more horses of various breeds is needed to fully explore the functional implication of polymorphisms in CYP2D50. PMID:27580115

  6. Salicylic acid is a modulator of catalase isozymes in chickpea plants infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri.

    PubMed

    Gayatridevi, S; Jayalakshmi, S K; Sreeramulu, K

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between salicylic acid level catalases isoforms chickpea cv. ICCV-10 infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri was investigated. Pathogen-treated chickpea plants showed high levels of SA compared with the control. Two isoforms of catalases in shoot extract (CAT-IS and CAT-IIS) and single isoform in root extract (CAT-R) were detected in chickpea. CAT-IS and CAT-R activities were inhibited in respective extracts treated with pathogen whereas, CAT-IIS activity was not inhibited. These isoforms were purified and their kinetic properties studied in the presence or absence of SA. The molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE of CAT-IS, CAT-IIS and CAT-R was found to be 97, 40 and 66 kDa respectively. Kinetic studies indicated that Km and V(max) of CAT-IS were 0.2 mM and 300 U/mg, 0.53 mM and 180 U/mg for CAT-IIS and 0.25 mM and 280 U/mg for CAT-R, respectively. CAT-IS and CAT-R were found to be more sensitive to SA and 50% of their activities were inhibited at 6 and 4 μM respectively, whereas CAT-IIS was insensitive to SA up to 100 μM. Quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of purified catalases were used to quantitate SA binding; the estimated K(d) value for CAT-IS, CAT-IIS and CAT-R found to be 2.3 μM, 3.1 mM and 2.8 μM respectively. SA is a modulator of catalase isozymes activity, supports its role in establishment of SAR in chickpea plants infected with the pathogen.

  7. Enzymatic properties and primary structures of two α-amylase isozymes from the Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yuya; Satoh, Takuya; Inoue, Akira; Ojima, Takao

    2013-02-01

    Two α-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) isozymes, HdAmy58 and HdAmy82, with approximate molecular masses of 58 kDa and 82 kDa, respectively, were isolated from the digestive fluid of the Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai. Optimal temperatures and pHs for HdAmy58 and HdAmy82 were at 30 °C and 6.7, and 30 °C and 6.1, respectively. Both enzymes similarly degraded starch, glycogen, and maltooligosaccharides larger than maltotriose producing maltose and maltotriose as the major degradation products. However, the activity toward maltotetraose was appreciably higher in HdAmy82 than HdAmy58. cDNAs encoding HdAmy58 and HdAmy82 were cloned and the amino-acid sequences of 511 and 694 residues for HdAmy58 and HdAmy82, respectively, were deduced. The putative catalytic domains of HdAmy58 and HdAmy82 were located in the 17-511th and 19-500th amino-acid regions, respectively, and they showed approximately 50% amino-acid identity to each other. These sequences also showed 62-99% amino-acid identity to the catalytic domains of known α-amylases that belong to glycoside-hydrolase-family 13. The difference in the molecular masses between HdAmy58 and HdAmy82 was ascribed to the extension of approximately 190 residues in the C-terminus of HdAmy82. This extended region showed 41-63% amino-acid identity with the ancillary domains of several α-amylases previously reported.

  8. Preparation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies recognizing unique epitopes on sexually differentiated rat liver cytochrome P-450 isozymes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, E T; Rönnholm, M; Gustafsson, J A

    1987-07-14

    Cytochrome P-450 isozymes P-450(16 alpha), P-450(15 beta), and P-450DEa are immunochemically related, as indicated by mutual cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibody preparations. We have isolated five monoclonal antibodies to P-450(15 beta) and one antibody to P-450(16 alpha) that show selectivity for the respective antigens. High frequencies of cross-reactivity were observed, indicating a high degree of homology among P-450(16 alpha), P-450(15 beta), and P-450DEa. All of the P-450(15 beta-specific antibodies bound to the same epitope, or closely grouped epitopes, supporting this conclusion. The specificity of each monoclonal antibody was characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western immunoblotting, and antibody-Sepharose immunoadsorption of solubilized rat liver microsomes. Antibodies F22 and F23, which were apparently identical, were specific for P-450(15 beta) by these criteria. However, the apparent specificities of antibodies F3 and F20 for P-450(15 beta), and of M16 for P-450(16 alpha), were highly dependent on the analytical technique used. The five anti-P-450(15 beta) antibodies all inhibited the catalytic activity of microsomal P-450(15 beta), by a maximum of 70%. However, they also produced a similar inhibition of microsomal P-450(16 alpha-specific antibody M16 and F23 have a low-affinity interaction with an epitope on P-450(16 alpha). The P-450(16 alpha)-specific antibody M16 was not inhibitory. The results indicate that the apparent specificity of a monoclonal antibody for an antigen determined by, e.g., Western blotting does not allow the conclusive identification of a protein in another system, e.g., immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation reaction products.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Mechanism of Folding and Activation of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P).

    PubMed

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Cendron, Laura; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2016-01-29

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site-1 protease (S1P) is implicated in lipid homeostasis, the unfolded protein response, and lysosome biogenesis. The protease is further hijacked by highly pathogenic emerging viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P requires removal of an N-terminal prodomain, by a multistep process, generating the mature enzyme. Here, we uncover a modular structure of the human SKI-1/S1P prodomain and define its function in folding and activation. We provide evidence that the N-terminal AB fragment of the prodomain represents an autonomous structural and functional unit that is necessary and sufficient for folding and partial activation. In contrast, the C-terminal BC fragment lacks a defined structure but is crucial for autoprocessing and full catalytic activity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sequence of the AB domain is highly conserved, whereas the BC fragment shows considerable variation and seems even absent in some species. Notably, SKI-1/S1P of arthropods, like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, contains a shorter prodomain comprised of full-length AB and truncated BC regions. Swapping the prodomain fragments between fly and human resulted in a fully mature and active SKI-1/S1P chimera. Our study suggests that primordial SKI-1/S1P likely contained a simpler prodomain consisting of the highly conserved AB fragment that represents an independent folding unit. The BC region appears as a later evolutionary acquisition, possibly allowing more subtle fine-tuning of the maturation process.

  10. Sequence and tissue-specific expression of a putative peroxidase gene from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Hertig, C; Rebmann, G; Bull, J; Mauch, F; Dudler, R

    1991-01-01

    We have used a cDNA clone encoding a pathogen-induced putative wheat peroxidase to screen a genomic library of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Cheyenne) and isolated one positive clone, lambda POX1. Sequence analysis revealed that this clone contains a gene encoding a putative peroxidase with a calculated pI of 8.1 which exhibits 58% and 83% sequence identity to the amino acid sequence of the turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase and a pathogen-induced putative wheat peroxidase, respectively. The two introns in the wheat gene are at the same positions as introns in the peroxidase genes of tomato and horseradish. Results of S1-mapping experiments suggest that this gene is neither pathogen- nor wound-induced in leaves but is constitutively expressed in roots.

  11. Suppression of Arabidopsis peroxidase 72 alters cell wall and phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María A; Novo-Uzal, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Class III peroxidases are glycoproteins with a major role in cell wall maturation such as lignin formation. Peroxidases are usually present in a high number of isoenzymes, which complicates to assign specific functions to individual peroxidase isoenzymes. Arabidopsis genome encodes for 73 peroxidases, among which AtPrx72 has been shown to participate in lignification. Here, we report by using knock out peroxidase mutants how the disruption of AtPrx72 causes thinner secondary walls in interfascicular fibres but not in the xylem of the stem. This effect is also age-dependent, and AtPrx72 function seems to be particularly important when lignification prevails over elongation processes. Finally, the suppression AtPrx72 leads to the down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis pathway, as well as genes and transcription factors involved in secondary wall thickening.

  12. Silymarin synthesis and degradation by peroxidases of cell suspension cultures of Silybum marianum.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sampedro, María Angeles; Fernández-Tárrago, Jorge; Corchete, Purificación

    2007-05-01

    Treatment of Silybum marianum cell cultures with methyl jasmonate elicits the production of the antihepatotoxic drug silymarin and its release into the culture medium. In this work, we investigated the involvement of peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; donor hydrogen peroxidase oxido-reductase) in silymarin turnover in cell cultures as well as the influence of elicitation on the activity towards several substrates. Peroxidases from cell extracts and, to a higher degree from the spent medium, used the silymarin precursors taxifolin and coniferyl alcohol as substrates. Silymarin compounds were also degraded by suspension culture peroxidases; however, the oxidation efficiency was not modified by elicitation. S. marianum peroxidases were able to catalyse the oxidative coupling of taxifolin and coniferyl alcohol to silybinins. The synthetic activity was mainly associated with the extracellular compartment and as before, methyl jasmonate did not modify oxidative coupling activity. Changes in the isoenzyme profiles were not observed in elicited cultures.

  13. A Stable Bacterial Peroxidase with Novel Halogenating Activity and an Autocatalytically Linked Heme Prosthetic Group*

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Markus; Gruber, Clemens; Bellei, Marzia; Pirker, Katharina F.; Zamocky, Marcel; Kroiss, Daniela; Teufer, Stefan A.; Hofbauer, Stefan; Soudi, Monika; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships of the main evolutionary lines of the mammalian peroxidases lactoperoxidase and myeloperoxidase revealed the presence of novel bacterial heme peroxidase subfamilies. Here, for the first time, an ancestral bacterial heme peroxidase is shown to possess a very high bromide oxidation activity (besides conventional peroxidase activity). The recombinant protein allowed monitoring of the autocatalytic peroxide-driven formation of covalent heme to protein bonds. Thereby, the high spin ferric rhombic heme spectrum became similar to lactoperoxidase, the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple shifted to more positive values (−145 ± 10 mV at pH 7), and the conformational and thermal stability of the protein increased significantly. We discuss structure-function relationships of this new peroxidase in relation to its mammalian counterparts and ask for its putative physiological role. PMID:23918925

  14. Effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Y.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver was studied in vivo. A daily dose of 10mg methylmercuric chloride/kg body weight was administered subcutaneously to 15 male Wistar rats for 10 days, and the glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver was measured to compare with the control activity. A marked decrease was observed in the glutathione peroxidase activity in the experimental animals, which measured as low as 40% in comparison to that in the control animals. It can be speculated that the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase activity plays a significant role in the development of mercury toxicity and that the protective effect of selenium and vitamin E on the mercury intoxication might be partly due to preserving the glutathione peroxidase activity in the antioxidative defense mechanisms.

  15. Iron triggers a rapid induction of ascorbate peroxidase gene expression in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Vansuyt, G; Lopez, F; Inzé, D; Briat, J F; Fourcroy, P

    1997-06-30

    In plants, only ferritin gene expression has been reported to be iron-dependent. Here it is demonstrated that an iron overload of Brassica napus seedlings causes a large and rapid accumulation of ascorbate peroxidase transcripts, a plant-specific hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme. This result documents a novel link between iron metabolism and oxidative stress. The ascorbate peroxidase mRNA abundance was not modified by reducing agents like N-acetyl cysteine, glutathione and ascorbate or by pro-oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide or diamide. Furthermore, the iron-induced ascorbate peroxidase mRNA accumulation was not antagonized by N-acetyl cysteine. Abscisic acid had no effect on the ascorbate peroxidase gene expression. Taken together these results suggest that iron-mediated expression of ascorbate peroxidase gene occurs through a signal transduction pathway apparently different from those already described for plant genes responsive to oxidative stress. PMID:9237628

  16. Sequence and tissue-specific expression of a putative peroxidase gene from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Hertig, C; Rebmann, G; Bull, J; Mauch, F; Dudler, R

    1991-01-01

    We have used a cDNA clone encoding a pathogen-induced putative wheat peroxidase to screen a genomic library of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Cheyenne) and isolated one positive clone, lambda POX1. Sequence analysis revealed that this clone contains a gene encoding a putative peroxidase with a calculated pI of 8.1 which exhibits 58% and 83% sequence identity to the amino acid sequence of the turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase and a pathogen-induced putative wheat peroxidase, respectively. The two introns in the wheat gene are at the same positions as introns in the peroxidase genes of tomato and horseradish. Results of S1-mapping experiments suggest that this gene is neither pathogen- nor wound-induced in leaves but is constitutively expressed in roots. PMID:1653627

  17. A comparison of horseradish peroxidase and manganese ions as catalysts for the oxidation of dihydroxyfumaric acid

    PubMed Central

    Hartree, E. F.

    1968-01-01

    With horseradish peroxidase as catalyst the main product was dihydroxytartrate, but small amounts of glycolaldehyde, mesoxalic semialdehyde, mesoxalate and possibly glyoxal were also formed. Mn2+ catalysis gave rise only to mesoxalate and oxalate. When oxygen uptake was followed by a manometric method the rate of the peroxidase-catalysed reaction was proportional to oxygen concentration and marked inhibition by cyanide was obtained only at low buffer concentration. The catalytic effects of peroxidase and Mn2+ were almost always additive. Chelating agents inhibited the Mn2+-catalysed reaction, but had either no effect or a slight accelerating effect on the peroxidase-catalysed reaction. It is concluded that Mn2+ does not function as cofactor in the peroxidase-catalysed oxidation. PMID:5660638

  18. Storage of Heparinised Canine Whole Blood for the Measurement of Glutathione Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Janssens, Geert P J

    2016-08-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity is used as a biomarker of selenium status in dogs. Freshly collected blood samples are usually measured, due to the lack of knowledge on the effect of storing the samples. This study investigated if the analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity in whole blood collected from dogs was affected by storage of between 5 and 164 days. Results indicated that glutathione peroxidase activity was more variable in the freshly analysed samples compared to the stored samples. Although the mean differences between fresh and stored samples were not always equal to zero, this is thought to be caused by the variability of reagent preparation rather than by storage, as no consistent increase or decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity was found. Therefore, it can be concluded that heparinised dog blood samples can be successfully stored up to 164 days before analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity. PMID:26701335

  19. How to pattern a leaf.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, N; O'Connor, D; Moon, J; Lewis, M; Hake, S

    2012-01-01

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, and function, all leaves initiate in the same manner: from the flanks of a meristem. The maize leaf is useful for analysis of patterning due to the wealth of mutants and the distinct tissues along the proximal distal axis. The blade is distal, the sheath is proximal, and the ligule forms at the blade/sheath boundary. Establishment of this boundary involves the transcription factors LIGULELESS1 and LIGULELESS2 and the kinase LIGULELESS NARROW. The meristem-specific protein KNOTTED1 (KN1) binds and modulates the lg2 gene. Given the localization of KN1 at the proximal end of the leaf from the time of inception, we hypothesize that KN1 has a role in establishing the very proximal end of the leaf, whereas an auxin maximum guides the growing distal tip. PMID:23174765

  20. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  1. Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase 1 Is a Central Component of the Reactive Oxygen Gene Network of ArabidopsisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Davletova, Sholpan; Rizhsky, Ludmila; Liang, Hongjian; Shengqiang, Zhong; Oliver, David J.; Coutu, Jesse; Shulaev, Vladimir; Schlauch, Karen; Mittler, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as O2− and H2O2, play a key role in plant metabolism, cellular signaling, and defense. In leaf cells, the chloroplast is considered to be a focal point of ROS metabolism. It is a major producer of O2− and H2O2 during photosynthesis, and it contains a large array of ROS-scavenging mechanisms that have been extensively studied. By contrast, the function of the cytosolic ROS-scavenging mechanisms of leaf cells is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that in the absence of the cytosolic H2O2-scavenging enzyme ascorbate peroxidase 1 (APX1), the entire chloroplastic H2O2-scavenging system of Arabidopsis thaliana collapses, H2O2 levels increase, and protein oxidation occurs. We further identify specific proteins oxidized in APX1-deficient plants and characterize the signaling events that ensue in knockout-Apx1 plants in response to a moderate level of light stress. Using a dominant-negative approach, we demonstrate that heat shock transcription factors play a central role in the early sensing of H2O2 stress in plants. Using knockout plants for the NADPH oxidase D protein (knockout-RbohD), we demonstrate that RbohD might be required for ROS signal amplification during light stress. Our study points to a key role for the cytosol in protecting the chloroplast during light stress and provides evidence for cross-compartment protection of thylakoid and stromal/mitochondrial APXs by cytosolic APX1. PMID:15608336

  2. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 isozymes and ornithine decarboxylase activities by polysaccharides from soybeans fermented with Phellinus igniarius or Agrocybe cylindracea.

    PubMed

    Shon, Yun-Hee; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2004-01-01

    Polysaccharides (5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 microg ml(-1)) from soybeans and soybeans fermented with Phellinus igniarius or Agrocybe cylindracea inhibited cytochrome P450 1A1, cytochrome P450 1A2 and cytochrome P450 2B1 activities in rat liver microsomes. The polysaccharides (5, 10 and 25 microg ml(-1)) also suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced ornithine decarboxylase activity. The most potent inhibitors of cytochrome P450 isozymes and ornithine decarboxylase activities were the polysaccharides from soybeans fermented with Agrocybe cylindracea. PMID:15000485

  3. A regulatory approach on low temperature induced enzymatic and anti oxidative status in leaf of Pui vegetable (Basella alba)

    PubMed Central

    Shahidul Haque, Md.; Monirul Islam, Md.; Abdur Rakib, Md.; Asraful Haque, Md.

    2013-01-01

    Basella alba is a soft green vegetable, survives in adverse environmental circumstances, for example, very cold temperature although the mechanism and the temperature sensitivity in this species are not clarified. Pot experiment for cultivation of B. alba was carried out to examine the effects of low temperature on the synthesis of two enzymes, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) in leaf of this plant. They were exposed to 8 °C for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h periods and the respective controls were kept in ambient room temperature for the above mentioned time. Low temperature causes the higher activity of PPO and the threshold level was found after 48 h period when compared to the respective controls. The activity was higher at 10 mM catechol, substrate for this enzyme, than 100 mM and 200 mM concentration, however, the three doses yielded the gradual increase in activity. Similar stimulatory effects on peroxidase (POD) activity in leaf were observed whenever the plants were exposed to cold for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h periods and maximal after 48 h period. Our findings demonstrate that the higher activity of these enzymes in leaf might be an index for the regulatory mechanism of the survival of these species in such adverse environment. PMID:25183947

  4. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in Polyporales: an evolutionary survey based on 10 sequenced genomes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Lundell, Taina; Floudas, Dimitrios; Nagy, Laszlo G; Barrasa, José M; Hibbett, David S; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity of ligninolytic and related peroxidase genes in this Basidiomycota order that includes most wood-rotting fungi. The survey was completed by analyzing the heme-peroxidase genes in the already available genomes of seven more Polyporales species representing the antrodia, gelatoporia, core polyporoid and phlebioid clades. The study confirms the absence of ligninolytic peroxidase genes from the manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) families, in the brown-rot fungal genomes (all of them from the antrodia clade), which include only a limited number of predicted low redox-potential generic peroxidase (GP) genes. When members of the heme-thiolate peroxidase (HTP) and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) superfamilies (up to a total of 64 genes) also are considered, the newly sequenced B. adusta appears as the Polyporales species with the highest number of peroxidase genes due to the high expansion of both the ligninolytic peroxidase and DyP (super)families. The evolutionary relationships of the 111 genes for class-II peroxidases (from the GP, MnP, VP, LiP families) in the 10 Polyporales genomes is discussed including the existence of different MnP subfamilies and of a large and homogeneous LiP cluster, while different VPs mainly cluster with short MnPs. Finally, ancestral state reconstructions showed that a putative MnP gene, derived from a primitive GP that incorporated the Mn(II)-oxidation site, is the precursor of all the class-II ligninolytic peroxidases. Incorporation of an exposed tryptophan residue involved in oxidative degradation of lignin in a short MnP apparently resulted in evolution of the first VP. One of these ancient VPs might have lost the Mn(II)-oxidation site being at the origin of all the LiP enzymes, which are found only in

  5. Genes Encoding Plant-Specific Class III Peroxidases Are Responsible for Increased Cold Tolerance of the brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beg Hab; Kim, Sun Young; Nam, Kyoung Hee

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that one of the brassinosteroid-insensitive mutants, bri1-9, showed increased cold tolerance compared with both wild type and BRI1-overexpressing transgenic plants, despite its severe growth retardation. This increased tolerance in bri1-9 resulted from the constitutively high expression of stress-inducible genes under normal conditions. In this report, we focused on the genes encoding class III plant peroxidases (AtPrxs) because we found that, compared with wild type, bri1-9 plants contain higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are not involved with the activation of NADPH oxidase and show an increased level of expression of a subset of genes encoding class III plant peroxidases. Treatment with a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), led to the reduction of cold resistance in bri1-9. Among 73 genes that encode AtPrxs in Arabidopsis, we selected four (AtPrx1, AtPrx22, AtPrx39, and AtPrx69) for further functional analyses in response to cold temperatures. T-DNA insertional knockout mutants showed increased sensitivity to cold stress as measured by leaf damage and ion leakage. In contrast, the overexpression of AtPrx22, AtPrx39, and AtPrx69 increased cold tolerance in the BRI1-GFP plants. Taken together, these results indicate that the appropriate expression of a particular subset of AtPrx genes and the resulting higher levels of ROS production are required for the cold tolerance. PMID:23180292

  6. Biophysical control of leaf temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, N.; Prentice, I. C.; Wright, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In principle sunlit leaves can maintain their temperatures within a narrower range than ambient temperatures. This is an important and long-known (but now overlooked) prediction of energy balance theory. Net radiation at leaf surface in steady state (which is reached rapidly) must be equal to the combination of sensible and latent heat exchanges with surrounding air, the former being proportional to leaf-to-air temperature difference (ΔT), the latter to the transpiration rate. We present field measurements of ΔT which confirm the existence of a 'crossover temperature' in the 25-30˚C range for species in a tropical savanna and a tropical rainforest environment. This finding is consistent with a simple representation of transpiration as a function of net radiation and temperature (Priestley-Taylor relationship) assuming an entrainment factor (ω) somewhat greater than the canonical value of 0.26. The fact that leaves in tropical forests are typically cooler than surrounding air, often already by solar noon, is consistent with a recently published comparison of MODIS day-time land-surface temperatures with air temperatures. Theory further predicts a strong dependence of leaf size (which is inversely related to leaf boundary-layer conductance, and therefore to absolute magnitude of ΔT) on moisture availability. Theoretically, leaf size should be determined by either night-time constraints (risk of frost damage to active leaves) or day-time constraints (risk of heat stress damage),with the former likely to predominate - thereby restricting the occurrence of large leaves - at high latitudes. In low latitudes, daytime maximum leaf size is predicted to increase with temperature, provided that water is plentiful. If water is restricted, however, transpiration cannot proceed at the Priestley-Taylor rate, and it quickly becomes advantageous for plants to have small leaves, which do not heat up much above the temperature of their surroundings. The difference between leaf

  7. Fluctuations in peroxidase and catalase activities of resistant and susceptible black gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) genotypes elicited by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) feeding

    PubMed Central

    Taggar, Gaurav Kumar; Gill, Ranjit Singh; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Sandhu, Jeet Singh

    2012-01-01

    Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleryrodidae), is a serious pest of black gram, (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper), an important legume pulse crop grown in north India. This research investigated the potential role of selected plant oxidative enzymes in resistance/susceptibility to whitefly in nine black gram genotypes. Oxidative enzyme activity was estimated spectrophotometrically from leaf samples collected at 30 and 50 d after sowing (DAS) from whitefly infested and uninfested plants. The enzymes showed different activity levels at different times after the infestation. The results indicated that in general, whitefly infestation increased the activities of peroxidase and decreased the catalase activity. Resistant genotypes NDU 5-7 and KU 99-20 recorded higher peroxidase and catalase activities at 30 and 50 DAS under whitefly-stress conditions as compared with non-stressed plants. The results suggest that the enhanced activities of the enzymes may contribute to bioprotection of black gram plants against B. tabaci infestation. The potential mechanisms to explain the correlation of resistance to whitefly in black gram genotypes with higher activities of oxidative enzymes are also discussed. PMID:22902801

  8. Fluctuations in peroxidase and catalase activities of resistant and susceptible black gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) genotypes elicited by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) feeding.

    PubMed

    Taggar, Gaurav Kumar; Gill, Ranjit Singh; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Sandhu, Jeet Singh

    2012-10-01

    Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleryrodidae), is a serious pest of black gram, (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper), an important legume pulse crop grown in north India. This research investigated the potential role of selected plant oxidative enzymes in resistance/susceptibility to whitefly in nine black gram genotypes. Oxidative enzyme activity was estimated spectrophotometrically from leaf samples collected at 30 and 50 d after sowing (DAS) from whitefly infested and uninfested plants. The enzymes showed different activity levels at different times after the infestation. The results indicated that in general, whitefly infestation increased the activities of peroxidase and decreased the catalase activity. Resistant genotypes NDU 5-7 and KU 99-20 recorded higher peroxidase and catalase activities at 30 and 50 DAS under whitefly-stress conditions as compared with non-stressed plants. The results suggest that the enhanced activities of the enzymes may contribute to bioprotection of black gram plants against B. tabaci infestation. The potential mechanisms to explain the correlation of resistance to whitefly in black gram genotypes with higher activities of oxidative enzymes are also discussed.

  9. Is Peroxiredoxin II's peroxidase activity strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    H2O2 elimination in human erythrocytes is mainly carried out by catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and the more recently discovered peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). However, the contribution of Prx2 to H2O2 consumption is still unclear. Prx2's high reactivity with H2O2 (kPrx2=10×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kCat =7×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kGPx1 =4×10(7) M(-1)s(-1)) and high abundance ([Prx2]= 570µM, [Cat]= 32µM, [GPx1]= 1µM) suggest that under low H2O2 supply rates it should consume >99% of the H2O2. However, extensive evidence indicates that in intact erythrocytes Prx2 contributes no more than Cat to H2O2 consumption. In order for this to be attained, Prx2's effective rate constant with H2O2would have to be just ~10(5) M(-1)s(-1), much lower than that determined in multiple experiments with the purified proteins. Nevertheless, nearly all Prx2 is oxidized within 1min of exposing erythrocytes to a H2O2 bolus, which is inconsistent with an irreversible inhibition. A mathematical model of the H2O2 metabolism in human erythrocytes [Benfeitas et al. (2014) Free Radic. Biol. Med.] where Prx2 either has a low kPrx2 or is subject to a strong (>99%) but readily reversible inhibition achieves quantitative agreement with detailed experimental observations of the responses of the redox status of Prx2 in human erythrocytes and suggests functional advantages of this design (see companion abstract). By contrast, a variant where Prx2 is fully active with kPrx2=10(8) M(-1)s(-1) shows important qualitative discrepancies. Altogether, these results suggest that Prx2's peroxidase activity is strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes. We acknowledge fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT.

  10. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress. Progress summary report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-03-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to {Beta}-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  11. Crystal structure analysis of peroxidase from the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Amanda; Textor, Larissa C; Santos, Jademilson C; Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Roig, Manuel G; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Muniz, João R C; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Palm tree peroxidases are known to be very stable enzymes and the peroxidase from the Chamaerops excelsa (CEP), which has a high pH and thermal stability, is no exception. To date, the structural and molecular events underscoring such biochemical behavior have not been explored in depth. In order to identify the structural characteristics accounting for the high stability of palm tree peroxidases, we solved and refined the X-ray structure of native CEP at a resolution of 2.6 Å. The CEP structure has an overall fold typical of plant peroxidases and confirmed the conservation of characteristic structural elements such as the heme group and calcium ions. At the same time the structure revealed important modifications in the amino acid residues in the vicinity of the exposed heme edge region, involved in substrate binding, that could account for the morphological variations among palm tree peroxidases through the disruption of molecular interactions at the second binding site. These modifications could alleviate the inhibition of enzymatic activity caused by molecular interactions at the latter binding site. Comparing the CEP crystallographic model described here with other publicly available peroxidase structures allowed the identification of a noncovalent homodimer assembly held together by a number of ionic and hydrophobic interactions. We demonstrate, that this dimeric arrangement results in a more stable protein quaternary structure through stabilization of the regions that are highly dynamic in other peroxidases. In addition, we resolved five N-glycosylation sites, which might also contribute to enzyme stability and resistance against proteolytic cleavage.

  12. Uncovering a new role for peroxidase enzymes as drivers of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Zinonos, Irene; Leach, Damien A; Hay, Shelley J; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Ingman, Wendy V; DeNichilo, Mark O; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Peroxidases are heme-containing enzymes released by activated immune cells at sites of inflammation. To-date their functional role in human health has mainly been limited to providing a mechanism for oxidative defence against invading bacteria and other pathogenic microorganisms. Our laboratory has recently identified a new functional role for peroxidase enzymes in stimulating fibroblast migration and collagen biosynthesis, offering a new insight into the causative association between inflammation and the pro-fibrogenic events that mediate tissue repair and regeneration. Peroxidases are found at elevated levels within and near blood vessels however, their direct involvement in angiogenesis has never been reported. Here we report for the first time that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are readily internalised by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) where they promote cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and stimulate angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These pro-angiogenic effects were attenuated using the specific peroxidase inhibitor 4-ABAH, indicating the enzyme's catalytic activity is essential in mediating this response. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that MPO and EPO regulate endothelial FAK, Akt, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and stabilisation of HIF-2α, culminating in transcriptional regulation of key angiogenesis pathways. These findings uncover for the first time an important and previously unsuspected role for peroxidases as drivers of angiogenesis, and suggest that peroxidase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of angiogenesis related diseases driven by inflammation.

  13. Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension peroxidase: purification, characterization and application for dye decolorization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductase enzymes produced by most organisms. In this study, a peroxidase was purified from Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension by using anion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose), affinity chromatography (Con A-agarose) and preparative SDS-PAGE. The obtained enzyme appeared as a single band on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass of 70 kDa. Surprisingly, this purified peroxidase also had polyphenol oxidase activity. However, the biochemical characteristics were only studied in term of peroxidase because similar experiments in term of polyphenol oxidase have been reported in our pervious publication. The optimal pH of the purified peroxidase was 5.0 and its activity was retained at pH values between 5.0–10.0. The enzyme was heat stable over a wide range of temperatures (0–60°C), and less than 50% of its activity was lost at 70°C after incubation for 30 min. The enzyme was completely inhibited by β-mercaptoethanol and strongly inhibited by NaN3; in addition, its properties indicated that it was a heme containing glycoprotein. This peroxidase could decolorize many dyes; aniline blue, bromocresol purple, brilliant green, crystal violet, fuchsin, malachite green, methyl green, methyl violet and water blue. The stability against high temperature and extreme pH supported that the enzyme could be a potential peroxidase source for special industrial applications. PMID:23402438

  14. Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension peroxidase: purification, characterization and application for dye decolorization.

    PubMed

    Chanwun, Thitikorn; Muhamad, Nisaporn; Chirapongsatonkul, Nion; Churngchow, Nunta

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductase enzymes produced by most organisms. In this study, a peroxidase was purified from Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension by using anion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose), affinity chromatography (Con A-agarose) and preparative SDS-PAGE. The obtained enzyme appeared as a single band on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass of 70 kDa. Surprisingly, this purified peroxidase also had polyphenol oxidase activity. However, the biochemical characteristics were only studied in term of peroxidase because similar experiments in term of polyphenol oxidase have been reported in our pervious publication. The optimal pH of the purified peroxidase was 5.0 and its activity was retained at pH values between 5.0-10.0. The enzyme was heat stable over a wide range of temperatures (0-60°C), and less than 50% of its activity was lost at 70°C after incubation for 30 min. The enzyme was completely inhibited by β-mercaptoethanol and strongly inhibited by NaN3; in addition, its properties indicated that it was a heme containing glycoprotein. This peroxidase could decolorize many dyes; aniline blue, bromocresol purple, brilliant green, crystal violet, fuchsin, malachite green, methyl green, methyl violet and water blue. The stability against high temperature and extreme pH supported that the enzyme could be a potential peroxidase source for special industrial applications. PMID:23402438

  15. A Tomato Peroxidase Involved in the Synthesis of Lignin and Suberin1

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Mónica; Guerrero, Consuelo; Botella, Miguel A.; Barceló, Araceli; Amaya, Iraida; Medina, María I.; Alonso, Francisco J.; de Forchetti, Silvia Milrad; Tigier, Horacio; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2000-01-01

    The last step in the synthesis of lignin and suberin has been proposed to be catalyzed by peroxidases, although other proteins may also be involved. To determine which peroxidases are involved in the synthesis of lignin and suberin, five peroxidases from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) roots, representing the majority of the peroxidase activity in this organ, have been partially purified and characterized kinetically. The purified peroxidases with isoelectric point (pI) values of 3.6 and 9.6 showed the highest catalytic efficiency when the substrate used was syringaldazine, an analog of lignin monomer. Using a combination of transgenic expression and antibody recognition, we now show that the peroxidase pI 9.6 is probably encoded by TPX1, a tomato peroxidase gene we have previously isolated. In situ RNA hybridization revealed that TPX1 expression is restricted to cells undergoing synthesis of lignin and suberin. Salt stress has been reported to induce the synthesis of lignin and/or suberin. This stress applied to tomato caused changes in the expression pattern of TPX1 and induced the TPX1 protein. We propose that the TPX1 product is involved in the synthesis of lignin and suberin. PMID:10759507

  16. Characterization of Plant Peroxidases and Their Potential for Degradation of Dyes: a Review.

    PubMed

    Kalsoom, Umme; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Asgher, Muhammad

    2015-07-01

    Peroxidases are ubiquitously found in all vascular plants and are promising biocatalysts for oxidization of wide range of aromatic substrates including various industrial dyes. Peroxidases can catalyze degradation of chemical structure of aromatic dyes either by precipitation or by opening the aromatic ring structure. Both soluble and immobilized peroxidases have been successfully used in batches as well as in continuous processes for the treatment of aromatic dyes present in industrial effluents. Plant peroxidases are stable catalysts that retain their activities over a broad range of pH and temperatures. The performance of an enzyme for degradation process depends upon the structure of dyes and the operational parameters like concentration of enzyme, H2O2 and dye, incubation time, pH, and temperature. Recalcitrant dyes can also be mineralized by plant peroxidases in the presence of redox mediators. Thus, plant peroxidases are easily available, inexpensive, and ecofriendly biocatalysts for the treatment of wastewaters containing a wide spectrum of textile and non-textile synthetic dyes. This article reviews the recent developments in isolation and characterization of plant peroxidases and their applications for bioremediation of synthetic dyes.

  17. Cloning, sequencing, and heterologous expression of a gene coding for Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sawai-Hatanaka, H; Ashikari, T; Tanaka, Y; Asada, Y; Nakayama, T; Minakata, H; Kunishima, N; Fukuyama, K; Yamada, H; Shibano, Y

    1995-07-01

    To understand the relationship between the structure and functions of the peroxidase of Arthromyces ramosus, a novel taxon of hyphomycete, and the evolutionary relationship of the A.ramosus peroxidase (ARP) with the other peroxidases, we isolated complementary and genomic DNA clones encoding ARP and characterized them. The sequence analyses of the ARP and cDNA coding for ARP showed that a mature ARP consists of 344 amino acids with a N-terminal pyroglutamic acid preceded by a signal peptide of 20 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequence of ARP was 99% identical to that of the peroxidase of Coprinus cinereus, a basidiomycete, and also had very high similarities (41-43% identity) to those of basidiomycetous lignin peroxidases, although we could find no lignin peroxidase activities for ARP when assayed with lignin model compounds. We could identified His184 and His56 as proximal and distal ligands to heme, respectively, and Arg52 as an essential Arg. Comparison of the sequences of complementary and genomic DNAs found that protein-encoding DNA is interrupted by 14 intervening sequences. The ARP cDNA was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the promoter of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, yielding 0.02 units/ml of a secreted active peroxidase.

  18. Over-expression of ascorbate peroxidase in tobacco chloroplasts enhances the tolerance to salt stress and water deficit.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Ghazi Hamid; Kawano, Naoyoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Shimada, Emi; Sasaki, Ryozo; Kubo, Akihiro; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2004-06-01

    The role of APX (ascorbate peroxidase) in protection against oxidative stress was examined using transgenic tobacco plants. The full length cDNA, coding Arabidopsis thaliana L. APX fused downstream to the chloroplast transit sequence from A. thaliana glutathione reductase, was cloned into appropriate binary vector and mobilized into Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C2. Leaf discs were infected with the Agrobacterium and cultured on medium supplied with kanamycin. The incorporation of the gene in tobacco genome was confirmed by Southern dot blot hybridization. Transgenic lines were generated, and the line Chl-APX5 shown to have 3.8-fold the level of APX activity in the wild-type plants. The isolated chloroplasts from this line showed higher APX activity. During early investigation, this line showed enhanced tolerance to the active oxygen-generating paraquat and sodium sulphite. The first generation of this line, also, showed enhanced tolerance to salt, PEG and water stresses, as determined by net photosynthesis. The present data indicate that overproducing the cytosolic APX in tobacco chloroplasts reduces the toxicity of H(2)O(2). PMID:15153190

  19. The rice thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase OsAPX8 functions in tolerance to bacterial blight

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guanghuai; Yin, Dedong; Zhao, Jiying; Chen, Honglin; Guo, Lequn; Zhu, Lihuang; Zhai, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) is a major H2O2-scavenging enzyme. To clarify its functions in tolerance to rice bacterial blight, we produced rice lines overexpressing and suppressing tAPX (OsAPX8). The overexpressing lines exhibited increased tolerance to bacterial pathogen. The RNA interference (RNAi) lines were considerably more sensitive than the control plant. Further analysis of the H2O2 content in these transgenic plants indicated that the H2O2 accumulation of OsAPX8-overexpressing plants was considerably less than that of wild-type and RNAi plants upon challenge with bacterial pathogen. Interestingly, H2O2 was the most important factor for the serious leaf dehydration and withering of rice without major resistance genes and was not the cause of hypersensitivity. It addition, wall tightening or loosening can occur according to the level of H2O2. In addition, OsAPX8 interacted with the susceptibility protein Os8N3/Xa13, and their binding repressed the reaction of OsAPX8 in tolerance to bacterial blight. PMID:27185545

  20. The rice thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase OsAPX8 functions in tolerance to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guanghuai; Yin, Dedong; Zhao, Jiying; Chen, Honglin; Guo, Lequn; Zhu, Lihuang; Zhai, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) is a major H2O2-scavenging enzyme. To clarify its functions in tolerance to rice bacterial blight, we produced rice lines overexpressing and suppressing tAPX (OsAPX8). The overexpressing lines exhibited increased tolerance to bacterial pathogen. The RNA interference (RNAi) lines were considerably more sensitive than the control plant. Further analysis of the H2O2 content in these transgenic plants indicated that the H2O2 accumulation of OsAPX8-overexpressing plants was considerably less than that of wild-type and RNAi plants upon challenge with bacterial pathogen. Interestingly, H2O2 was the most important factor for the serious leaf dehydration and withering of rice without major resistance genes and was not the cause of hypersensitivity. It addition, wall tightening or loosening can occur according to the level of H2O2. In addition, OsAPX8 interacted with the susceptibility protein Os8N3/Xa13, and their binding repressed the reaction of OsAPX8 in tolerance to bacterial blight. PMID:27185545

  1. Behavior of Leaf Meristems and Their Modification

    PubMed Central

    Ichihashi, Yasunori; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A major source of diversity in flowering plant form is the extensive variability of leaf shape and size. Leaf formation is initiated by recruitment of a handful of cells flanking the shoot apical meristem (SAM) to develop into a complex three-dimensional structure. Leaf organogenesis depends on activities of several distinct meristems that are established and spatiotemporally differentiated after the initiation of leaf primordia. Here, we review recent findings in the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate leaf meristem activities in a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We then discuss recent key studies investigating the natural variation in leaf morphology to understand how the gene regulatory networks modulate leaf meristems to yield a substantial diversity of leaf forms during the course of evolution. PMID:26648955

  2. Spectral reflectance relationships to leaf water stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data were collected from detached snapbean leaves in the laboratory with a multiband radiometer. Four experiments were designed to study the spectral response resulting from changes in leaf cover, relative water content of leaves, and leaf water potential. Spectral regions included in the analysis were red (630-690 nm), NIR (760-900 nm), and mid-IR (2.08-2.35 microns). The red and mid-IR bands showed sensitivity to changes in both leaf cover and relative water content of leaves. The NIR was only highly sensitive to changes in leaf cover. Results provided evidence that mid-IR reflectance was governed primarily by leaf moisture content, although soil reflectance was an important factor when leaf cover was less than 100 percent. High correlations between leaf water potentials and reflectance were attributed to covariances with relative water content of leaves and leaf cover.

  3. An Innovative Way to Monitor Leaf Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnello, A.; Paredes, K.; Trinh, U.; Saleska, S. R.; Wu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Anthony John Garnello, Karina Paredes, Uyen Khanh Ho Trinh, Jin Wu, Scott Saleska Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Leaf age is an important characteristic for controlling plant functional performance and is associated with the changes of leaf physical, chemical, and physiological properties. Understanding how plant physiology changes over time will allow more accurate predictions of growth patterns, and a more comprehensive understanding of vegetative life histories. There still lacks an efficient technique in monitoring leaf age, tagging leaves is still the only way to accurately monitor leaf age. The goal of this study is to develop a multi-metric, accurate technique for better monitoring of leaf age. In order to acquire true leaf age records, 10 individual plant species were selected at the University of Arizona campus, and newly flushing leaves were tagged and monitored during the Monsoon season (from early June, 2013, to mid October, 2013). Every 2 weeks, 10 to 15 leaves in relative age order were harvested from each 1-meter branch to measure multiple key leaf metrics, including leaf thickness (via micrometer), fresh and dry weight, fresh and dry area (via ImageJ software), and leaf hyperspectral reflectance (via a handheld ASD Field Pro). Other leaf traits were also derived from our measurements, such as specific leaf area (SLA), leaf density (fresh weight/leaf volume), water percentage, and shrinkage ratio (1-dry area/fresh area). The hyperspectral version of vegetation index (a ratio derived from two spectral channels) was generated for each branch sample, by randomly selecting two channels from within the spectral domain of 350 nm to 2500 nm. The preliminary result documents three types of hyperspectral vegetation index (VI) which are highly related with leaf relative age order (R2>0.9). These include the sensitive spectral domains correlated with (a) leaf pigments (~550nm) and leaf physical

  4. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR.

  5. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR. PMID

  6. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  7. Physicochemical peculiarities of iron porphyrin-containing electrodes in catalase- and peroxidase-type biomimetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardarly, N. A.; Nagiev, T. M.

    2009-08-01

    New catalase- and peroxidase-type iron porphyrin biomimetic electrodes have been developed for determining ultralow concentrations of H2O2 and C2H5OH in aqueous solutions. Their physicochemical features have been studied. A mechanism of catalase and peroxidase reactions was suggested. Biomimetic electrodes did not lose their activity for a long time under the action of the oxidant, intermediates, and the final products of the decomposition of H2O2. Potentiometric biomimetic sensors of catalase and peroxidase types have been designed and studied.

  8. Dual strategies to improve oral bioavailability of oleanolic acid: Enhancing water-solubility, permeability and inhibiting cytochrome P450 isozymes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qikun; Yang, Xiaoxu; Du, Ping; Zhang, Huifen; Zhang, Tianhong

    2016-02-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a typical BCS IV drug with low water-solubility and poor permeability, metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes in the intestinal tract, such as CYP3A. These are the reasons for the low oral bioavailability of OA which have restricted its wide application. In this study, a solidified phospholipid complex (OPCH) composed of OA-phospholipid complex (OPC) and hydroxyapatite (HA) was prepared by simple solvent evaporation. OPC was used to improve the liposolubility of OA, and HA was used to improve the flowability of OPC. Ketoconazole (KCZ, inhibitor of CYP3A) was co-administrated with OPCH to inhibit the metabolism of OA by CYP3A in the intestine. DSC, PXRD, SEM and IR analysis confirmed the formation of OPC and OPCH. Compared with the water-solubility and n-octanol solubility of OA, that of OPCH was increased nearly 15.3-fold and 3.19-fold, respectively. An in vitro dissolution study showed that the cumulative dissolution rate of OPCH was nearly 2.23-fold and 4.57-fold higher than that of OA and OPC at 2h. Single-pass intestinal perfusion studies showed that the absorption of OA from OPCH was increased nearly 1.6-2.6-fold compared with that of pure OA and this was mainly due to the improved permeability and was further increased by OPCH with KCZ 1.2-2.4-fold compared with that of OPCH because KCZ inhibited metabolism of OA by CYP3A. A pharmacokinetic study of OPCH in rats following co-administration of KCZ was investigated. The Cmax was increased markedly from 59.5 to 78.7 and 131.3ng/mL in case of OA alone, OPCH alone and OPCH with KCZ. In parallel with the Cmax, the AUC0-24h was increased from 259.6 to 306.6 and 707.7ngh/mL, respectively. All the results obtained demonstrated that formulation of OPCH and co-administration of KCZ significantly improved the bioavailability of OA by increasing the solubility and permeability in combination with inhibiting the metabolism of OA.

  9. LEAF: A Microcomputer Program for Constructing the Tukey Stem and Leaf Graph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascale, Pietro J.; Smith, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a BASIC microcomputer program that constructs the Tukey (1977) stem and leaf graph. Options within the LEAF program include a modified stem and leaf where the stem is split and a parallel stem and leaf graph where two separate sets of data are displayed from a common stem. (Author)

  10. Roles of cell wall peroxidases in plant development.

    PubMed

    Francoz, Edith; Ranocha, Philippe; Nguyen-Kim, Huan; Jamet, Elisabeth; Burlat, Vincent; Dunand, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Class III peroxidases (CIII Prxs) are plant specific proteins. Based on in silico prediction and experimental evidence, they are mainly considered as cell wall localized proteins. Thanks to their dual hydroxylic and peroxidative cycles, they can produce ROS as well as oxidize cell wall aromatic compounds within proteins and phenolics that are either free or linked to polysaccharides. Thus, they are tightly associated to cell wall loosening and stiffening. They are members of large multigenic families, mostly due to an elevated rate of gene duplication in higher plants, resulting in a high risk of functional redundancy between them. However, proteomic and (micro)transcriptomic analyses have shown that CIII Prx expression profiles are highly specific. Based on these omic analyses, several reverse genetic studies have demonstrated the importance of the spatio-temporal regulation of their expression and ability to interact with cell wall microdomains in order to achieve specific activity in vivo. Each CIII Prx isoform could have specific functions in muro and this could explain the conservation of a high number of genes in plant genomes.

  11. Biotechnological advances towards an enhanced peroxidase production in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Florian W; Gerstmann, Michaela A; Darnhofer, Barbara; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Glieder, Anton

    2016-09-10

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is a high-demand enzyme for applications in diagnostics, bioremediation, biocatalysis and medicine. Current HRP preparations are isolated from horseradish roots as mixtures of biochemically diverse isoenzymes. Thus, there is a strong need for a recombinant production process enabling a steady supply with enzyme preparations of consistent high quality. However, most current recombinant production systems are limited at titers in the low mg/L range. In this study, we used the well-known yeast Pichia pastoris as host for recombinant HRP production. To enhance recombinant enzyme titers we systematically evaluated engineering approaches on the secretion process, coproduction of helper proteins, and compared expression from the strong methanol-inducible PAOX1 promoter, the strong constitutive PGAP promoter, and a novel bidirectional promoter PHTX1. Ultimately, coproduction of HRP and active Hac1 under PHTX1 control yielded a recombinant HRP titer of 132mg/L after 56h of cultivation in a methanol-independent and easy-to-do bioreactor cultivation process. With regard to the many versatile applications for HRP, the establishment of a microbial host system suitable for efficient recombinant HRP production was highly overdue. The novel HRP production platform in P. pastoris presented in this study sets a new benchmark for this medically relevant enzyme. PMID:27432633

  12. Glutathione peroxidase mimics as novel antioxidants from vegetables.

    PubMed

    Terao, Junji; Hiwada, Mio; Taguchi, Keiko; Takahara, Keigo; Mohri, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Vegetables are generally recognized as rich sources of dietary antioxidants for inhibiting lipid peroxidation. Here we investigated lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH)-reducing activity of several vegetables to estimate their role on the prevention of lipid peroxidation in food and the digestive tract. By using HPLC analysis, we screened vegetables possessing the ability to convert 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) to its reduced derivative, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE). Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) was found to be highly active in the reduction of 13-HPODE among tested vegetables. There was no relationship between 13-HPODE reducing activity and GSH peroxidase (GPX) activity in the tested vegetables. 13-HPODE-reducing activity of welsh onion was enhanced by the addition of sulfhydryl compounds including glutathione (GSH). Neither GPX inhibitor nor heat treatment suppressed 13-HPODE-reducing activity effectively. These results suggest that welsh onion and other vegetables contain GPX mimics responsible for the reduction of LOOH. GPX mimics may be helpful in the attenuation of harmful effect of LOOH from food. PMID:15817993

  13. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL−1, specific activity 78 U mg−1 with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4–5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn2+, Cu2+, Ca2+ and K+ and inhibited by Hg+2 and Cd+2. H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL−1 enzyme activities. PMID:24948923

  14. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL(-1), specific activity 78 U mg(-1) with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4-5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Ca(2+) and K(+) and inhibited by Hg(+2) and Cd(+2). H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL(-1) enzyme activities.

  15. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  16. Kinetic modelling of phenol co-oxidation using horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, R H; Lemos, F; Lemos, M A N D A; Vojinović, V; Fonseca, L P; Cabral, J M S

    2006-07-01

    Phenol is an industrial pollutant and its removal from industrial wastewaters is of great importance. In order to design optimised phenol removal procedures by using horseradish peroxidase-based systems, there are some points that have to be dealt with. One of the most important issues is the need for reliable kinetics as this is one of the difficulties found during process scale-up. Although simplified kinetics can be used for limited ranges of operating conditions, they are not usually reliable for the description of varying process conditions. The present work describes the implementation of a kinetic model, based on a mechanism, for the co-oxidation of phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine (Am-NH2), which is used as a chromogen agent, with hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The model covers not only the variation of the concentrations of all the species involved, but also the effect of temperature in the reaction. The estimation of kinetic rate constants and activation energies for the various steps in the mechanism is performed with a single optimisation procedure, and all the experimental results are described using a unique set of parameters, which, thus, is valid over an extended range of operating conditions. The mechanism allowed the determination of a reliable kinetic model which is appropriate for the range of experimental conditions used. The computational model was also tested with an independent set of experiments with different conditions from the ones for which the parameters were estimated. PMID:16612606

  17. Biodegradation and decolorization of melanoidin solutions by manganese peroxidase yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mahgoub, Samir; Tsioptsias, Costas; Samaras, Petros

    2016-01-01

    The ability of selected manganese peroxidase (MnP) yeast strains, isolated from the mixed liquor of an activated sludge bioreactor treating melanoidins wastewater, was investigated in this work, aiming to examine the degradation potential of melanoidins, in the presence or absence of nutrients. Ten yeast strains were initially isolated from the mixed liquor; four yeast strains (Y1, Y2, Y3 and Y4) were selected for further studies, based on their tolerance towards synthetic melanoidins (SMs) degradation and MnP activity onto solid agar medium. The Y1 strain exhibited almost 98% homology to Candida glabrata yeast, based on 28S rRNA identification studies. During experiments carried out using SM at 30 °C, the four isolated yeast cultures showed a noticeable organic matter reduction and decolorization capacity reaching up to 70% within 2-5 days. However, the corresponding yeast cultures grown in glucose peptone yeast extract medium using real melanoidin wastewater at 30°C showed lower organic matter and color removal capacity, reaching about 60% within 2-5 days. Nevertheless, it was found that the removal of real and synthetic melanoidins could be carried out by these strains under non-aseptic conditions, without requiring further addition of nutrients. PMID:27191565

  18. Oxidation of pharmaceutically active compounds by a ligninolytic fungal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Eibes, Gemma; Debernardi, Gianfranco; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, M Teresa; Lema, Juan M

    2011-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals are an important group of emerging pollutants with increasing interest due to their rising consumption and the evidence for ecotoxicological effects associated to trace amounts in aquatic environments. In this paper, we assessed the potential degradation of a series of pharmaceuticals: antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole), antidepressives (citalopram hydrobromide and fluoxetine hydrochloride), antiepileptics (carbamazepine), anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and naproxen) and estrogen hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol) by means of a versatile peroxidase (VP) from the ligninolytic fungus Bjerkandera adusta. The effects of the reaction conditions: VP activity, organic acid concentration and H(2)O(2) addition rate, on the kinetics of the VP based oxidation system were evaluated. Diclofenac and estrogens were completely degraded after only 5-25 min even with a very low VP activity (10 U l(-1)). High degradation percentages (80%) were achieved for sulfamethoxazole and naproxen. Low or undetectable removal yields were observed for citalopram (up to 18%), fluoxetine (lower than 10%) and carbamazepine (not degraded). PMID:20972884

  19. A single amino acid substitution in isozyme GST mu in Triclabendazole resistant Fasciola hepatica (Sligo strain) can substantially influence the manifestation of anthelmintic resistance.

    PubMed

    Fernández, V; Estein, S; Ortiz, P; Luchessi, P; Solana, V; Solana, H

    2015-12-01

    The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica causes fascioliasis in human and domestic ruminants. Economic losses due to this infection are estimated in U$S 2000-3000 million yearly. The most common method of control is the use of anthelmintic drugs. However, there is an increased concern about the growing appearance of F. hepatica resistance to Triclabendazole (TCBZ), an anthelmintic with activity over adult and young flukes. F. hepatica has eight Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) isozymes, which are enzymes involved in the detoxification of a wide range of substrates through chemical conjugation with glutathione. In the present work we identified and characterized the GST mu gene isolated from the TCBZ-susceptible and TCBZ-resistant F. hepatica strains. Total RNA was transcribed into cDNA by reverse transcription and a 657 bp amplicon corresponding to the GST mu gene was obtained. The comparative genetic analysis of the GST mu gene of the TCBZ susceptible strain (Cullompton) and TCBZ resistant strain (Sligo) showed three nucleotide changes and one amino acid change at position 143 in the GST mu isozyme of the TCBZ-resistant strain. These results have potential relevance as they contribute better understand the mechanisms that generate resistance to anthelmintics. PMID:26542261

  20. A single amino acid substitution in isozyme GST mu in Triclabendazole resistant Fasciola hepatica (Sligo strain) can substantially influence the manifestation of anthelmintic resistance.

    PubMed

    Fernández, V; Estein, S; Ortiz, P; Luchessi, P; Solana, V; Solana, H

    2015-12-01

    The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica causes fascioliasis in human and domestic ruminants. Economic losses due to this infection are estimated in U$S 2000-3000 million yearly. The most common method of control is the use of anthelmintic drugs. However, there is an increased concern about the growing appearance of F. hepatica resistance to Triclabendazole (TCBZ), an anthelmintic with activity over adult and young flukes. F. hepatica has eight Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) isozymes, which are enzymes involved in the detoxification of a wide range of substrates through chemical conjugation with glutathione. In the present work we identified and characterized the GST mu gene isolated from the TCBZ-susceptible and TCBZ-resistant F. hepatica strains. Total RNA was transcribed into cDNA by reverse transcription and a 657 bp amplicon corresponding to the GST mu gene was obtained. The comparative genetic analysis of the GST mu gene of the TCBZ susceptible strain (Cullompton) and TCBZ resistant strain (Sligo) showed three nucleotide changes and one amino acid change at position 143 in the GST mu isozyme of the TCBZ-resistant strain. These results have potential relevance as they contribute better understand the mechanisms that generate resistance to anthelmintics.