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Sample records for leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase

  1. Nitric oxide regulation of leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase activity: implication in sorghum responses to salinity.

    PubMed

    Monreal, José A; Arias-Baldrich, Cirenia; Tossi, Vanesa; Feria, Ana B; Rubio-Casal, Alfredo; García-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2013-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule that mediates many plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salt stress. Interestingly, salinity increases NO production selectively in mesophyll cells of sorghum leaves, where photosynthetic C₄ phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C₄ PEPCase) is located. PEPCase is regulated by a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase (PEPCase-k), which levels are greatly enhanced by salinity in sorghum. This work investigated whether NO is involved in this effect. NO donors (SNP, SNAP), the inhibitor of NO synthesis NNA, and the NO scavenger cPTIO were used for long- and short-term treatments. Long-term treatments had multifaceted consequences on both PPCK gene expression and PEPCase-k activity, and they also decreased photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters and plant growth. Nonetheless, it could be observed that SNP increased PEPCase-k activity, resembling salinity effect. Short-term treatments with NO donors, which did not change photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters and PPCK gene expression, increased PEPCase-k activity both in illuminated leaves and in leaves kept at dark. At least in part, these effects were independent on protein synthesis. PEPCase-k activity was not decreased by short-term treatment with cycloheximide in NaCl-treated plants; on the contrary, it was decreased by cPTIO. In summary, NO donors mimicked salt effect on PEPCase-k activity, and scavenging of NO abolished it. Collectively, these results indicate that NO is involved in the complex control of PEPCase-k activity, and it may mediate some of the plant responses to salinity.

  2. Light Modulation of Maize Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Steven C.; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Akazawa, Takashi

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was extracted from maize (Zea mays L. cv Golden Cross Bantam T51) leaves harvested in the dark or light and was partially purified by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and gel filtration to yield preparations that were 80% homogeneous. Malate sensitivity, PEPC activity, and PEPC protein (measured immunochemically) were monitored during purification. As reported previously, PEPC from dark leaves was more sensitive to malate inhibition compared to enzyme extracted from light leaves. Extraction and purification in the presence of malate stabilized the characteristics of the two forms. During gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300, all of the PEPC activity and PEPC protein emerged in a single high molecular weight peak, indicating that no inactive dissociated forms (dimers, monomers) were present. However, there was a slight difference between the light and dark enzymes in elution volume during gel filtration. In addition, specific activity (units at pH 7/milligram PEPC protein) decreased through the peak for both enzyme samples; because the dark enzyme emerged at a slightly higher elution volume, it contained enzyme with a relatively lower specific activity. The variation in specific activity of the dark enzyme corresponded with changes in malate sensitivity. Immunoblotting of samples with different specific activity and malate sensitivity, obtained from gel filtration, revealed only a single polypeptide with a relative molecular mass of 100,000. When the enzyme was extracted and purified in the absence of malate, characteristic differences of the light and dark enzymes were lost, the enzymes eluted at the same volume during gel filtration, and specific activity was constant through the peak. We conclude that maize leaf PEPC exists in situ as a tetramer of a single polypeptide and that subtle conformation changes can affect both enzymic activity and sensitivity to malate inhibition. Images Fig. 6 PMID:16665065

  3. Effect of Light and NO3− on Wheat Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Le Van Quy; Foyer, Christine; Champigny, Marie-Louise

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPcase) activity was studied in excised leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the dark and in the light, in presence of either N-free (low-NO3− leaves) or 40 millimolar KNO3 (high-NO3− leaves) nutrient solutions. PEPcase activity increased to 2.7-fold higher than that measured in dark-adapted tissue (control) during the first 60 minutes and continued to increase more slowly to 3.8-fold that of the control. This level was reached after 200 minutes exposure of the leaves to light and high NO3−. In contrast, the lower rate of increase recorded for low-NO3− leaves ceased after 60 minutes of exposure to light at 2.3-fold the control level. The short-term NO3− effect increased linearly with the level of NO3− uptake. In immunoprecipitation experiments, the antibody concentration for PEPcase precipitation increased with the protein extracts from the different treatments in the order: control, illuminated low-NO3− leaves, illuminated high-NO3− leaves. This order also applied with regard to a decreasing sensitivity to malate and an increasing stimulation by okadaic acid (an inhibitor of P-protein phosphatases). Following these studies, 32P labeling experiments were carried out in vivo. These showed that the light-induced change in the properties of the PEPcase was due to an alteration in the phosphorylation state of the protein and that this effect was enhanced in high-NO3− conditions. Based on the responses of PEPcase and sucrose phosphate synthase in wheat leaves to light and NO3−, an interpretation of the role of NO3− as either an inhibitor of P-protein phosphatase(s) or activator of protein kinase(s) is inferred. In the presence of NO3−, the phosphorylation state of both PEPcase and sucrose phosphate synthase is increased. This causes activation of the former enzyme and inhibition of the latter. We suggest that NO3− modulates the relative protein kinase/protein phosphatase ratio to favor increased

  4. The Importance of the Strictly Conserved, C-terminal Glycine Residue in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase for Overall Catalysis: Mutagenesis and Truncation of GLY-961 in the Sorghum C4 Leaf Isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,W.; Ahmed, S.; Moriyama, H.; Chollet, R.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a 'multifaceted', allosteric enzyme involved in C4 acid metabolism in green plants/microalgae and prokaryotes. Before the elucidation of the three-dimensional structures of maize C4 leaf and Escherichia coli PEPC, our truncation analysis of the sorghum C4 homologue revealed important roles for the enzyme's C-terminal {alpha}-helix and its appended QNTG{sup 961} tetrapeptide in polypeptide stability and overall catalysis, respectively. Collectively, these functional and structural observations implicate the importance of the PEPC C-terminal tetrapeptide for both catalysis and negative allosteric regulation. We have now more finely dissected this element of PEPC structure-function by modification of the absolutely conserved C-terminal glycine of the sorghum C4 isoform by site-specific mutagenesis (G961(A/V/D)) and truncation ({Delta}C1/C4). Although the C4 polypeptide failed to accumulate in a PEPC{sup -} strain (XH11) of E. coli transformed with the Asp mutant, the other variants were produced at wild-type levels. Although neither of these four mutants displayed an apparent destabilization of the purified PEPC homotetramer, all were compromised catalytically in vivo and in vitro. Functional complementation of XH11 cells under selective growth conditions was restricted progressively by the Ala, {Delta}C1 and Val, and {Delta}C4 modifications. Likewise, steady-state kinetic analysis of the purified mutant enzymes revealed corresponding negative trends in k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K0.5 (phosphoenolpyruvate) but not in K{sub 0.5} or the Hill coefficient. Homology modeling of these sorghum C-terminal variants against the structure of the closely related maize C4 isoform predicted perturbations in active-site molecular cavities and/or ion-pairing with essential, invariant Arg-638. These collective observations reveal that even a modest, neutral alteration of the PEPC C-terminal hydrogen atom side chain is detrimental to enzyme

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase regulation in C4-PEPC-expressing transgenic rice during early responses to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Xia; Zhang, Chen; Dai, Chuanchao; Zhou, Jiayu; Ren, Chenggang; Zhang, Jinfei

    2017-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) has important functions in C4 photosynthesis and biosynthesis of intermediate metabolites. In this study, the drought resistance of C4-PEPC-expressing transgenic rice (Oryza sativa, line PC) plants was assessed using simulated drought conditions [i.e. polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6000 treatment]. The dry weight of PC plants was higher than that of wild-type (WT) plants following treatment with 15% PEG-6000 for 16 days. Furthermore, the water use efficiency, relative water content and proline content in PC plants were higher than those of WT plants, as were C4-PEPC activity and transcript levels following treatment with 5% PEG-6000 for 2 h. The protein kinase activities and transcript levels of sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinases (SnRKs) genes, such as SnRK1a, OsK24 and OsK35 were also higher in PC plants than in WT plants following treatment with 5% PEG-6000 for 2 h. Additionally, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK, EC 4.1.1.32) activities and transcript levels (e.g. PPCK1 and PPCK2) increased following drought treatment. These changes were regulated by signaling molecules, such as calcium, nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the -1095 to -416 region of the C4-PEPC promoter in PC plants was demethylated following exposure to drought conditions for 1 h. The demethylation coincided with an increase in C4-PEPC expression. Our data suggest that the demethylation of the C4-PEPC promoter and the phosphorylation catalyzed by PPCK have key roles in conferring drought tolerance to the transgenic rice plants.

  6. Identification and expression of a soybean nodule-enhanced PEP-carboxylase kinase gene (NE-PpcK) that shows striking up-/down-regulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxin; Zhou, You; Chollet, Raymond

    2003-05-01

    Various isoforms of plant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC (Ppc)) are controlled post-translationally by an intricate interaction between allosteric regulation and reversible protein phosphorylation. In leaves and root nodules of legumes, these changes in PEPC phosphorylation state are governed primarily by PEPC-kinase (PpcK), a novel, 'minimal but functional' Ser/Thr kinase. To date, this plant-specific kinase has been investigated in molecular terms exclusively in non-leguminous plants, such as Crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) species and Arabidopsis. As an important extension of our earlier biochemical studies on this dedicated kinase and PEPC phosphorylation in soybean (Glycine max) nodules, we now report the molecular cloning of the first legume PpcK from a soybean nodule cDNA library, which encodes a functional, 31.0 kDa PpcK polypeptide. Besides displaying organ, developmental, and spatial expression properties that are strikingly up-regulated in mature nodules, the expression pattern of this transcript is distinct from that of a second soybean PpcK isogene (GmPpcK). The steady-state abundance of this former, nodule-enhanced transcript (NE-PpcK) is markedly influenced by photosynthate supply from the shoots. This latter up-/down-regulation of NE-PpcK transcript level occurs in vivo in concert with the corresponding changes in the nodule PpcK activity, the phosphorylation-state of PEPC, and the abundance of a previously identified, nodule-enhanced transcript (GmPEPC7) that encodes the target enzyme (NE-Ppc). Furthermore, genomic Southern analysis and inspection of the public database indicate that there are at least three distinct PpcK and Ppc isogenes in soybean. Collectively, these and recent findings with Arabidopsis implicate the existence of multiple PpcK-Ppc'expression-partners' in plants, exemplified by NE-PpcK and NE-Ppc in the soybean nodule.

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, P.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has been found in significant activities in a number of plants exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thirty-five species were surveyed for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and malate dehydrogenase (NAD). Plants which showed high activities of malic enzyme contained no detectable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, while plants with high activities of the latter enzyme contained little malic enzyme. It is proposed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase acts as a decarboxylase during the light period, furnishing CO2 for the pentose cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate for gluconeogenesis. Some properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in crude extracts of pineapple leaves were investigated. The enzyme required Mn2+, Mg2+, and ATP for maximum activity. About 60% of the activity could be pelleted, along with chloroplasts and mitochondria, in extracts from leaves kept in the dark overnight. PMID:16658562

  8. Effects of heterologous expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase on organic acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius has a potential as a cell factory for production of various organic acids. In this study, the organic acid profile of A. carbonarius was investigated under different cultivation conditions. Moreover, two heterologous genes, pepck and ppc, which encode phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in Actinobacillus succinogenes and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Escherichia coli, were inserted individually and in combination in A. carbonarius to enhance the carbon flux toward the reductive TCA branch. Results of transcription analysis and measurement of enzyme activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the corresponding single and double transformants demonstrated that the two heterologous genes were successfully expressed in A. carbonarius. The production of citric acid increased in all the transformants in both glucose- and xylose-based media at pH higher than 3 but did not increase in the pH non-buffered cultivation compared with the wild type.

  9. Limited proteolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L; Encinas, M V; Jabalquinto, A M; Cardemil, E

    1993-08-01

    Incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with trypsin under native conditions cases a time-dependent loss of activity and the production of protein fragments. Cleavage sites determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses identified protease-sensitive peptide bonds between amino acid residues at positions 9-10 and 76-77. Additional fragmentation sites were also detected in a region approximately 70-80 amino acids before the carboxyl end of the protein. These results suggest that the enzyme is formed by a central compact domain comprising more than two thirds of the whole protein structure. From proteolysis experiments carried out in the presence of substrates, it could be inferred that CO2 binding specifically protects position 76-77 from trypsin action. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements demonstrated that CO2 binding induces a protein conformational change, and a dissociation constant for the enzyme CO2 complex of 8.2 +/- 0.6 mM was determined.

  10. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  11. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  12. Activating Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Combination for Improvement of Succinate Production

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zaigao; Zhu, Xinna; Chen, Jing; Li, Qingyan

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation is an important step in the production of succinate by Escherichia coli. Two enzymes, PEP carboxylase (PPC) and PEP carboxykinase (PCK), are responsible for PEP carboxylation. PPC has high substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but wastes the high energy of PEP. PCK has low substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but can conserve the high energy of PEP for ATP formation. In this work, the expression of both the ppc and pck genes was modulated, with multiple regulatory parts of different strengths, in order to investigate the relationship between PPC or PCK activity and succinate production. There was a positive correlation between PCK activity and succinate production. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between PPC activity and succinate production only when PPC activity was within a certain range; excessive PPC activity decreased the rates of both cell growth and succinate formation. These two enzymes were also activated in combination in order to recruit the advantages of each for the improvement of succinate production. It was demonstrated that PPC and PCK had a synergistic effect in improving succinate production. PMID:23747698

  13. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit during development.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert P; Battistelli, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Leegood, Richard C; Famiani, Franco

    2011-11-01

    In this study the abundance and location of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was determined in the flesh and skin of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivar Durone Nero II during development. PEPCK was not present in young fruit but appeared in both tissues as the fruit increased in size. In these there was no net dissimilation of malic acid, which accounts for the bulk of their organic acid contents when PEPCK was present. To assist in understanding the function of PEPCK, the abundance of a number of other enzymes was determined. These enzymes were aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco). A potential role for PEPCK in the regulation of pH and the utilization of malate in gluconeogenesis in the flesh and skin of cherries is presented.

  14. Structural and functional studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machová, Iva; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Singh, Mahavir; Tarábek, Ján; Vaněk, Ondřej; Bednárová, Lucie; Pichová, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, the second leading infectious disease killer after HIV, remains a top public health priority. The causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which can cause both acute and clinically latent infections, reprograms metabolism in response to the host niche. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck) is the enzyme at the center of the phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate-oxaloacetate node, which is involved in regulating the carbon flow distribution to catabolism, anabolism, or respiration in different states of Mtb infection. Under standard growth conditions, Mtb Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis and catalyzes the metal-dependent formation of phosphoenolpyruvate. In non-replicating Mtb, Pck can catalyze anaplerotic biosynthesis of oxaloacetate. Here, we present insights into the regulation of Mtb Pck activity by divalent cations. Through analysis of the X-ray structure of Pck-GDP and Pck-GDP-Mn2+ complexes, mutational analysis of the GDP binding site, and quantum mechanical (QM)-based analysis, we explored the structural determinants of efficient Mtb Pck catalysis. We demonstrate that Mtb Pck requires presence of Mn2+ and Mg2+ cations for efficient catalysis of gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. The anaplerotic reaction, which preferably functions in reducing conditions that are characteristic for slowed or stopped Mtb replication, is also effectively activated by Fe2+ in the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+ cations. In contrast, simultaneous presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+ or Mg2+ inhibits the gluconeogenic reaction. These results suggest that inorganic ions can contribute to regulation of central carbon metabolism by influencing the activity of Pck. Furthermore, the X-ray structure determination, biochemical characterization, and QM analysis of Pck mutants confirmed the important role of the Phe triad for proper binding of the GDP-Mn2+ complex in the nucleotide binding site and efficient catalysis of the anaplerotic reaction.

  15. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in mistletoe leaves: Regulation of gene expression, protein content, and covalent modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuemei; Wanek, Wolfgang; Nehls, U.; Popp, Marianne; Hampp, Rüdiger; Rennenberg, Heinz; Einig, Werner

    2001-07-01

    Seasonal changes in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase, EC 4.1.1.31), a key enzyme in the interaction of carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism, were studied in leaves of the C3 semiparasitic mistletoe, Viscum album, growing on different host trees. Maximum extractable PEPCase activities were higher in leaves of mistletoes growing on Betula pendula and Alnus glutinosa hosts compared with those on the conifers, Abies alba and Larix decidua. Independent of host, maximum extractable PEPCase activities were high in spring and autumn while low in summer. Samples with higher PEPCase activities showed higher amounts of PEPCase protein and higher PEPCase mRNA levels. A curvilinear correlation between leaf total nitrogen content and the maximum extractable PEPCase activity as well as PEPCase mRNA level suggested that nitrogen might affect the activity of PEPCase of mistletoe by up-regulating gene expression. In addition to extractable activity, seasonal changes of the PEPCase activation state, the ratio of activities resulting from limited:non-limited assays, were found, which was correlated to the variation of malate content in leaves of mistletoe. ATP-dependent activation of PEPCase was characterized by an increase in I0.5(L-malate), indicating that PEPCase of leaves of mistletoes is probably regulated via phosphorylation.

  16. Octameric structure of Staphylococcus aureus enolase in complex with phosphoenolpyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yunfei; Wang, Chengliang; Lin, Shenglong; Wu, Minhao; Han, Lu; Tian, Changlin; Zhang, Xuan; Zang, Jianye

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium with strong pathogenicity that causes a wide range of infections and diseases. Enolase is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme that plays a key role in energy production through glycolysis. Additionally, enolase is located on the surface of S. aureus and is involved in processes leading to infection. Here, crystal structures of Sa_enolase with and without bound phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) are presented at 1.6 and 2.45 Å resolution, respectively. The structure reveals an octameric arrangement; however, both dimeric and octameric conformations were observed in solution. Furthermore, enzyme-activity assays show that only the octameric variant is catalytically active. Biochemical and structural studies indicate that the octameric form of Sa_enolase is enzymatically active in vitro and likely also in vivo, while the dimeric form is catalytically inactive and may be involved in other biological processes. PMID:26627653

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase as the Sole Anaplerotic Enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Rintze M.; Trueheart, Josh; Harrison, Jacob C.; Pronk, Jack T.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase is the sole anaplerotic enzyme in glucose-grown cultures of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pyruvate carboxylase-negative (Pyc−) S. cerevisiae strains cannot grow on glucose unless media are supplemented with C4 compounds, such as aspartic acid. In several succinate-producing prokaryotes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) fulfills this anaplerotic role. However, the S. cerevisiae PEPCK encoded by PCK1 is repressed by glucose and is considered to have a purely decarboxylating and gluconeogenic function. This study investigates whether and under which conditions PEPCK can replace the anaplerotic function of pyruvate carboxylase in S. cerevisiae. Pyc− S. cerevisiae strains constitutively overexpressing the PEPCK either from S. cerevisiae or from Actinobacillus succinogenes did not grow on glucose as the sole carbon source. However, evolutionary engineering yielded mutants able to grow on glucose as the sole carbon source at a maximum specific growth rate of ca. 0.14 h−1, one-half that of the (pyruvate carboxylase-positive) reference strain grown under the same conditions. Growth was dependent on high carbon dioxide concentrations, indicating that the reaction catalyzed by PEPCK operates near thermodynamic equilibrium. Analysis and reverse engineering of two independently evolved strains showed that single point mutations in pyruvate kinase, which competes with PEPCK for phosphoenolpyruvate, were sufficient to enable the use of PEPCK as the sole anaplerotic enzyme. The PEPCK reaction produces one ATP per carboxylation event, whereas the original route through pyruvate kinase and pyruvate carboxylase is ATP neutral. This increased ATP yield may prove crucial for engineering of efficient and low-cost anaerobic production of C4 dicarboxylic acids in S. cerevisiae. PMID:20581175

  18. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  19. Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinases coexist in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant Ananas comosus. Isolation and characterization of the smaller 65 kDa form.

    PubMed

    Martín, Mariana; Rius, Sebastián Pablo; Podestá, Florencio Esteban

    2011-06-01

    Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, EC 4.1.1.49) isoforms of 74 and 65 kDa were found to coexist in vivo in pineapple leaves, a constitutive Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant. The 65 kDa form was not the result of proteolytic cleavage of the larger form since extraction methods reported to prevent PEPCK proteolysis in other plant tissues failed to yield a single immunoreactive PEPCK polypeptide in leaf extracts. In this work, the smaller form of 65 kDa was purified to homogeneity and physically and kinetically characterized and showed parameters compatible with a fully active enzyme. The specific activity was nearly twice higher for decarboxylation of oxaloacetate when compared to carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. Kinetic parameters fell within the range of those estimated for other plant PEPCKs. Its activity was affected by several metabolites, as shown by inhibition by 3-phosphoglycerate, citrate, malate, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, l-asparagine and activation of the decarboxylating activity by succinate. A break in the Arrhenius plot at about 30°C indicates that PEPCK structure is responsive to changes in temperature. The results indicate that pineapple leaves contain two PEPCK forms. The biochemical characterization of the smaller isoform performed in this work suggests that it could participate in both carbon and nitrogen metabolism in vivo by acting as a decarboxylase.

  20. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L; Cushman, John C

    2014-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins.

  1. Photosynthetic and Other Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Isoforms in the Single-Cell, Facultative C4 System of Hydrilla verticillata1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Srinath K.; Magnin, Noël C.; Reiskind, Julia B.; Bowes, George

    2002-01-01

    The submersed monocot Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle is a facultative C4 plant. It typically exhibits C3 photosynthetic characteristics, but exposure to low [CO2] induces a C4 system in which the C4 and Calvin cycles co-exist in the same cell and the initial fixation in the light is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Three full-length cDNAs encoding PEPC were isolated from H. verticillata, two from leaves and one from root. The sequences were 95% to 99% identical and shared a 75% to 85% similarity with other plant PEPCs. Transcript studies revealed that one isoform, Hvpepc4, was exclusively expressed in leaves during C4 induction. This and enzyme kinetic data were consistent with it being the C4 photosynthesis isoform. However, the C4 signature serine of terrestrial plant C4 isoforms was absent in this and the other H. verticillata sequences. Instead, alanine, typical of C3 sequences, was present. Western analyses of C3 and C4 leaf extracts after anion-exchange chromatography showed similar dominant PEPC-specific bands at 110 kD. In phylogenetic analyses, the sequences grouped with C3, non-graminaceous C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism PEPCs but not with the graminaceous C4, and formed a clade with a gymnosperm, which is consistent with H. verticillata PEPC predating that of other C4 angiosperms. PMID:12376652

  2. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B. Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L.; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins. PMID:24913627

  3. Carbon Dioxide Metabolism in Leaf Epidermal Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Willmer, C. M.; Pallas, J. E.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A number of plant species were surveyed to obtain pure leaf epidermal tissue in quantity. Commelina communis L. and Tulipa gesnariana L. (tulip) were chosen for further work. Chlorophyll a/b ratios of epidermal tissues were 2.41 and 2.45 for C. communis and tulip, respectively. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and NAD+ and NADP+ malate dehydrogenases were assayed with epidermal tissue and leaf tissue minus epidermal tissue. In both species, there was less ribulose 1,5-diphosphate than phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity in epidermal tissue whether expressed on a protein or chlorophyll basis whereas the reverse was true for leaf tissue minus epidermal tissue. In both species, malic enzyme activities were higher in epidermal tissue than in the remaining leaf tissue when expressed on a protein or chlorophyll basis. In both species, NAD+ and NADP+ malate dehydrogenase activities were higher in the epidermal tissue when expressed on a chlorophyll basis; however, on a protein basis, the converse was true. Microautoradiography of C. communis epidermis and histochemical tests for keto acids suggested that CO2 fixation occurred predominantly in the guard cells. The significance and possible location of the enzymes are discussed in relation to guard cell metabolism. Images PMID:16658581

  4. Tissue-specific expression and post-translational modifications of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis L.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Brendan; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Hill, Allyson T; Bettridge, James; Park, Joonho; Rao, Srinath K; Leach, Craig A; Plaxton, William C

    2011-11-01

    This study employs transcript profiling together with immunoblotting and co-immunopurification to assess the tissue-specific expression, protein:protein interactions, and post-translational modifications (PTMs) of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) isozymes (PTPC and BTPC, respectively) in the castor plant, Ricinus communis. Previous studies established that the Class-1 PEPC (PTPC homotetramer) of castor oil seeds (COS) is activated by phosphorylation at Ser-11 and inhibited by monoubiquitination at Lys-628 during endosperm development and germination, respectively. Elimination of photosynthate supply to developing COS by depodding caused the PTPC of the endosperm and cotyledon to be dephosphorylated, and then subsequently monoubiquitinated in vivo. PTPC monoubiquitination rather than phosphorylation is widespread throughout the castor plant and appears to be the predominant PTM of Class-1 PEPC that occurs in planta. The distinctive developmental patterns of PTPC phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination indicates that these two PTMs are mutually exclusive. By contrast, the BTPC: (i) is abundant in the inner integument, cotyledon, and endosperm of developing COS, but occurs at low levels in roots and cotyledons of germinated COS, (ii) shows a unique developmental pattern in leaves such that it is present in leaf buds and young expanding leaves, but undetectable in fully expanded leaves, and (iii) tightly interacts with co-expressed PTPC to form the novel and allosterically-desensitized Class-2 PEPC heteromeric complex. BTPC and thus Class-2 PEPC up-regulation appears to be a distinctive feature of rapidly growing and/or biosynthetically active tissues that require a large anaplerotic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons being withdrawn for anabolism.

  5. [Functions of plant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and its applications for genetic engineering].

    PubMed

    Wei, Shaowei; Li, Yin

    2011-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) is an important ubiquitous cytosol enzyme that fixes HCO3 together with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and yields oxaloacetate that can be converted to intermediates of the citric acid cycle. In plant cells, PEPC participates in CO2 assimilation and other important metabolic pathways, and it has broad functions in different plant tissues. PEPC is also involved in the regulation of storage product synthesis and metabolism in seeds, such as affecting the metabolic fluxes from sugars/starch towards the synthesis of fatty acids or amino acids and proteins. In this review, we introduced the progress in classification, structure and regulation of PEPC in plant tissues. We discussed the potential applications of plant PEPCs in genetic engineering. The researches in functions and regulation mechanism of plant PEPCs will provide beneficial approaches to applications of plant PEPCs in high-yield crops breeding, energy crop and microbe genetic engineering.

  6. Enzyme I facilitates reverse flux from pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Long, Christopher P.; Au, Jennifer; Sandoval, Nicholas R.; Gebreselassie, Nikodimos A.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) consists of cascading phosphotransferases that couple the simultaneous import and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars to the glycolytic conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate. As the primary route of glucose uptake in E. coli, the PTS plays a key role in regulating central carbon metabolism and carbon catabolite repression, and is a frequent target of metabolic engineering interventions. Here we show that Enzyme I, the terminal phosphotransferase responsible for the conversion of PEP to pyruvate, is responsible for a significant in vivo flux in the reverse direction (pyruvate to PEP) during both gluconeogenic and glycolytic growth. We use 13C alanine tracers to quantify this back-flux in single and double knockouts of genes relating to PEP synthetase and PTS components. Our findings are relevant to metabolic engineering design and add to our understanding of gene-reaction connectivity in E. coli. PMID:28128209

  7. Identification of a phosphoenolpyruvate:fructose 1-phosphotransferase system in Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, K D; Ghosh, S

    1984-01-01

    An inducible phosphoenolpyruvate:fructose phosphotransferase system has been detected in Azospirillum brasilense, which requires a minimum of two components of the crude extracts for activity: (i) a soluble fraction (enzyme I) and (ii) a membrane fraction (enzyme II). The uninduced cells neither show any uptake of fructose nor express activity of either of these two enzyme fractions. C-1 of fructose is the site of phosphorylation. This phosphotransferase system does not accept glucose as a substrate for phosphorylation. PMID:6501230

  8. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphomutase Activity in an l-Phosphonoalanine-Mineralizing Strain of Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Ternan, Nigel G.; McGrath, John W.; Quinn, John P.

    1998-01-01

    A strain of Burkholderia cepacia isolated by enrichment culture utilized l-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (phosphonoalanine) at concentrations up to 20 mM as a carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus source in a phosphate-insensitive manner. Cells contained phosphoenolpyruvate phosphomutase activity, presumed to be responsible for cleavage of the C—P bond of phosphonopyruvate, the transamination product of l-phosphonoalanine; this was inducible in the presence of phosphonoalanine. PMID:9603854

  9. CO2-fixing enzymes and phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Ascaridoidea, Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Benítez, Rocio; Valero, Adela; Adroher, Francisco Javier

    2009-07-23

    CO2 stimulates the development of many of the intestinal helminths that are able to fix CO2 by means of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), such as Hysterothylacium aduncum. We determined the activity of CO2-fixing enzymes such as PEPCK and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), although no significant activity was detected for pyruvate carboxylase or carboxylating-malic enzyme. The former act on phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to yield oxalacetate. In the helminths studied, PEP has a vital role in glucidic metabolism. Consequently, we determined the activity of other enzymes involved in the crossroad of PEP, such as pyruvate kinase (PK), lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase. All enzymes detected showed significant variations in activity during the in vitro development of the parasite from the third larval stage to mature adult. Fixing of CO2 by PEPCK decreased during development (from 228 to 115 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), while that by PEPC increased (from 19 to 46 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein). This enzyme, which is rare in animals, could play a part in detecting levels of free phosphate, releasing it from PEP when required for processes such as glycogenolysis, glycolysis and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. PK, which showed increasing activity during development up to immature adult (from 56 to 82 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), could act in combination with PEPC to obtain energy in the cytosol (in the form of ATP) and in the mitochondria (possible destination of the pyruvate formed), compensating for the decrease in activity of PEPCK.

  10. Stimulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (guanosine triphosphate) activity by low concentrations of circulating glucose in perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, F J; Sánchez-Urrutia, L; Medina, J M; Sánchez-Medina, F; Mayor, F

    1975-01-01

    1. After nicotinic acid treatment, rat liver glycogen is depleted and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity increased, to about twice the initial value. 2. The increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity promoted by nicotinic acid is prevented by cycloheximide or actinomycin D, suggesting that this effect is produced by synthesis of the enzyme de novo. 3. Despite the enhancement of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity and glycogen depletion, which occurs 5h after the injection of nicotinic acid, the gluconeogenic capacity of liver is low and considerably less than the values found in rats starved for 48h. 4. When the livers of well-fed rats are perfused in the presence of low concentrations of glucose, the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase significantly increases compared with the control. 5. This increase is not related to the glycogen content, but seems to be also the result of synthesis of the enzyme de novo, since this effect is counteracted by previous treatment with cycloheximide or actinomycin D. 6. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity is not increased in the presence of low concentrations of circulating glucose when 40 mM-imidazole (an activator of phosphodiesterase) is added to the perfusion medium. 7. Addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP to the perfusion medium results in an increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity, in spite of the presence of normal concentrations of circulating glucose. On the other hand, the concentration of cyclic AMP in the liver increases when that of glucose in the medium is low. 8. These results suggest that, in the absence of hormonal factors, the regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase can be accomplished by glucose itself, inadequate concentrations of it resulting in the induction of the enzyme. The mediator in this regulation, as in hormonal regulation, seems to be cyclic AMP. PMID:173301

  11. Leaf Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    Leaf activities can provide a means of using basic concepts of outdoor education to learn in elementary level subject areas. Equipment needed includes leaves, a clipboard with paper, and a pencil. A bag of leaves may be brought into the classroom if weather conditions or time do not permit going outdoors. Each student should pick a leaf, examine…

  12. High-Throughput Phenotyping of Maize Leaf Physiological and Biochemical Traits Using Hyperspectral Reflectance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yendrek, Craig R.; Tomaz, Tiago; Montes, Christopher M.; Cao, Youyuan; Morse, Alison M.; Brown, Patrick J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput, noninvasive field phenotyping has revealed genetic variation in crop morphological, developmental, and agronomic traits, but rapid measurements of the underlying physiological and biochemical traits are needed to fully understand genetic variation in plant-environment interactions. This study tested the application of leaf hyperspectral reflectance (λ = 500–2,400 nm) as a high-throughput phenotyping approach for rapid and accurate assessment of leaf photosynthetic and biochemical traits in maize (Zea mays). Leaf traits were measured with standard wet-laboratory and gas-exchange approaches alongside measurements of leaf reflectance. Partial least-squares regression was used to develop a measure of leaf chlorophyll content, nitrogen content, sucrose content, specific leaf area, maximum rate of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation, [CO2]-saturated rate of photosynthesis, and leaf oxygen radical absorbance capacity from leaf reflectance spectra. Partial least-squares regression models accurately predicted five out of seven traits and were more accurate than previously used simple spectral indices for leaf chlorophyll, nitrogen content, and specific leaf area. Correlations among leaf traits and statistical inferences about differences among genotypes and treatments were similar for measured and modeled data. The hyperspectral reflectance approach to phenotyping was dramatically faster than traditional measurements, enabling over 1,000 rows to be phenotyped during midday hours over just 2 to 4 d, and offers a nondestructive method to accurately assess physiological and biochemical trait responses to environmental stress. PMID:28049858

  13. Project LEAF

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project LEAF has a goal of educating farmworkers about how to reduce pesticide exposure to their families from pesticide residues they may be inadvertently taking home on their clothing, etc. Find outreach materials.

  14. Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2002-01-01

    The shoot system is the basic unit of development of seed plants and is composed of a leaf, a stem, and a lateral bud that differentiates into a lateral shoot. The most specialized organ in angiosperms, the flower, can be considered to be part of the same shoot system since floral organs, such as the sepal, petal, stamen, and carpel, are all modified leaves. Scales, bracts, and certain kinds of needle are also derived from leaves. Thus, an understanding of leaf development is critical to an understanding of shoot development. Moreover, leaves play important roles in photosynthesis, respiration and photoperception. Thus, a full understanding of leaves is directly related to a full understanding of seed plants. The details of leaf development remain unclear. The difficulties encountered in studies of leaf development, in particular in dicotyledonous plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Henyn., are derived from the complex process of leaf development, during which the division and elongation of cells occur at the same time and in the same region of the leaf primordium (Maksymowych, 1963; Poethig and Sussex, 1985). Thus, we cannot divide the entire process into unit processes in accordance with the tenets of classical anatomy. Genetic approaches in Arabidopsis, a model plant (Meyerowitz and Pruitt, 1985), have provided a powerful tool for studies of mechanisms of leaf development in dicotyledonous plants, and various aspects of the mechanisms that control leaf development have been revealed in recent developmental and molecular genetic studies of Arabidopsis (for reviews, see Tsukaya, 1995 and 1998; Van Lijsebettens and Clarke, 1998; Sinha, 1999; Van Volkenburgh, 1999; Tsukaya, 2000; Byrne et al., 2001; Dengler and Kang, 2001; Dengler and Tsukaya, 2001; Tsukaya, 2001). In this review, we shall examine the information that is currently available about various mechanisms of leaf development in Arabidopsis. Vascular patterning is also an important factor in the

  15. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C.

  16. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C. PMID:27391465

  17. Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leaves are the most important organs for plants. Without leaves, plants cannot capture light energy or synthesize organic compounds via photosynthesis. Without leaves, plants would be unable perceive diverse environmental conditions, particularly those relating to light quality/quantity. Without leaves, plants would not be able to flower because all floral organs are modified leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana is a good model system for analyzing mechanisms of eudicotyledonous, simple-leaf development. The first section of this review provides a brief history of studies on development in Arabidopsis leaves. This history largely coincides with a general history of advancement in understanding of the genetic mechanisms operating during simple-leaf development in angiosperms. In the second section, I outline events in Arabidopsis leaf development, with emphasis on genetic controls. Current knowledge of six important components in these developmental events is summarized in detail, followed by concluding remarks and perspectives. PMID:23864837

  18. The Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System Is Involved in Sensitivity to the Glucosylated Bacteriocin Sublancin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia De Gonzalo, C. V.; Denham, E. L.; Mars, R. A. T.; Stülke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The mode of action of a group of glycosylated antimicrobial peptides known as glycocins remains to be elucidated. In the current study of one glycocin, sublancin, we identified the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Bacillus species as a key player in bacterial sensitivity. Sublancin kills several Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus species and Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Unlike other classes of bacteriocins for which the PTS is involved in their mechanism of action, we show that the addition of PTS-requiring sugars leads to increased resistance rather than increased sensitivity, suggesting that sublancin has a distinct mechanism of action. Collectively, our present mutagenesis and genomic studies demonstrate that the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) and domain A of enzyme II (PtsG) in particular are critical determinants for bacterial sensitivity to sublancin. PMID:26282429

  19. Location and characterization of two widely separated glucocorticoid response elements in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, D.D.; Magnuson, M.A.; Granner, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Chimeric genes were constructed by fusion of various regions of the 5'-flanking sequence from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) gene to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-coding sequence and to simian virus 40 splice and polyadenylation sequences. These were used to demonstrate that two glucocorticoid regulatory elements (GREs) combine to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness upon the PEPCK gene in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Both elements, distal one whose 5' boundary is located between -1264 and -1111 base pairs and a proximal one located between -468 and -420 base pairs relative to the transcription initiation site, act independently, in various positions and orientations, and upon the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. Each element accounts for half of the maximal response of the chimeric genes. Therefore, two widely separated enhancerlike elements contribute equally to the response of the PEPCK gene to glucocorticoid hormones. Neither of the PEPCK GREs contains the TGTTCT consensus sequence associated with most other GREs.

  20. Cloning, sequencing, and overexpression of the Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pckA) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Laivenieks, M; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase-encoding gene from the anaerobic, CO2-fixing, succinate-producing bacterium Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a 532-residue polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 58.7 kDa. The sequence of the A. succiniciproducens PEP carboxykinase was similar to those of all known ATP/ADP-dependent PEP carboxykinases. In particular, the A. succiniciproducens enzyme was 67.3% identical and 79.2% similar to the E. coli enzyme. The A. succiniciproducens pckA transcription start site was determined, and putative promoter regions were identified. The recombinant enzyme was overexpressed in E. coli. The purified enzyme was indiscernible from the native enzyme by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had the same activity as the native enzyme. PMID:9172347

  1. Location and characterization of two widely separated glucocorticoid response elements in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, D D; Magnuson, M A; Granner, D K

    1988-01-01

    Chimeric genes were constructed by fusion of various regions of the 5'-flanking sequence from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) gene to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-coding sequence and to simian virus 40 splice and polyadenylation sequences. These were used to demonstrate that two glucocorticoid regulatory elements (GREs) combine to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness upon the PEPCK gene in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Both elements, a distal one whose 5' boundary is located between -1264 and -1111 base pairs and a proximal one located between -468 and -420 base pairs relative to the transcription initiation site, act independently, in various positions and orientations, and upon the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. Each element accounts for half of the maximal response of the chimeric genes. Therefore, two widely separated enhancerlike elements contribute equally to the response of the PEPCK gene to glucocorticoid hormones. Neither of the PEPCK GREs contains the TGTTCT consensus sequence associated with most other GREs. Images PMID:3422101

  2. Reticulate leaves and stunted roots are independent phenotypes pointing at opposite roles of the phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator defective in cue1 in the plastids of both organs

    PubMed Central

    Staehr, Pia; Löttgert, Tanja; Christmann, Alexander; Krueger, Stephan; Rosar, Christian; Rolčík, Jakub; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Bell, Kirsten; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Häusler, Rainer E.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) serves not only as a high energy carbon compound in glycolysis, but it acts also as precursor for plastidial anabolic sequences like the shikimate pathway, which produces aromatic amino acids (AAA) and subsequently secondary plant products. After conversion to pyruvate, PEP can also enter de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, and the non-mevalonate way of isoprenoid production. As PEP cannot be generated by glycolysis in chloroplasts and a variety of non-green plastids, it has to be imported from the cytosol by a phosphate translocator (PT) specific for PEP (PPT). A loss of function of PPT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the chlorophyll a/b binding protein underexpressed1 (cue1) mutant, which is characterized by reticulate leaves and stunted roots. Here we dissect the shoot- and root phenotypes, and also address the question whether or not long distance signaling by metabolites is involved in the perturbed mesophyll development of cue1. Reverse grafting experiments showed that the shoot- and root phenotypes develop independently from each other, ruling out long distance metabolite signaling. The leaf phenotype could be transiently modified even in mature leaves, e.g. by an inducible PPT1RNAi approach or by feeding AAA, the cytokinin trans-zeatin (tZ), or the putative signaling molecule dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucoside (DCG). Hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid, ethylene, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid did not rescue the cue1 leaf phenotype. The low cell density1 (lcd1) mutant shares the reticulate leaf-, but not the stunted root phenotype with cue1. It could neither be rescued by AAA nor by tZ. In contrast, tZ and AAA further inhibited root growth both in cue1 and wild-type plants. Based on our results, we propose a model that PPT1 acts as a net importer of PEP into chloroplast, but as an overflow valve and hence exporter in root plastids. PMID:24782872

  3. Discrimination in the dark. Resolving the interplay between metabolic and physical constraints to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity during the crassulacean acid metabolism cycle.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Howard; Cousins, Asaph B; Badger, Murray R; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-02-01

    A model defining carbon isotope discrimination (delta13C) for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants was experimentally validated using Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and instantaneous CO2 discrimination (for 13C and 18O) were made from late photoperiod (phase IV of CAM), throughout the dark period (phase I), and into the light (phase II). Measurements of CO2 response curves throughout the dark period revealed changing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) capacity. These systematic changes in PEPC capacity were tracked by net CO2 uptake, stomatal conductance, and online delta13C signal; all declined at the start of the dark period, then increased to a maximum 2 h before dawn. Measurements of delta13C were higher than predicted from the ratio of intercellular to external CO2 (p(i)/p(a)) and fractionation associated with CO2 hydration and PEPC carboxylations alone, such that the dark period mesophyll conductance, g(i), was 0.044 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1). A higher estimate of g(i) (0.085 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1)) was needed to account for the modeled and measured delta18O discrimination throughout the dark period. The differences in estimates of g(i) from the two isotope measurements, and an offset of -5.5 per thousand between the 18O content of source and transpired water, suggest spatial variations in either CO2 diffusion path length and/or carbonic anhydrase activity, either within individual cells or across a succulent leaf. Our measurements support the model predictions to show that internal CO2 diffusion limitations within CAM leaves increase delta13C discrimination during nighttime CO2 fixation while reducing delta13C during phase IV. When evaluating the phylogenetic distribution of CAM, carbon isotope composition will reflect these diffusive limitations as well as relative contributions from C3 and C4 biochemistry.

  4. Species having C4 single-cell-type photosynthesis in the Chenopodiaceae family evolved a photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase like that of Kranz-type C4 species.

    PubMed

    Lara, María Valeria; Chuong, Simon D X; Akhani, Hossein; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Edwards, Gerald E

    2006-10-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is critical to the function of C(4) photosynthesis. The photosynthetic isoform of PEPC in the cytosol of mesophyll cells in Kranz-type C(4) photosynthesis has distinctive kinetic and regulatory properties. Some species in the Chenopodiaceae family perform C(4) photosynthesis without Kranz anatomy by spatial separation of initial fixation of atmospheric CO(2) via PEPC from C(4) acid decarboxylation and CO(2) donation to Rubisco within individual chlorenchyma cells. We studied molecular and functional features of PEPC in two single-cell functioning C(4) species (Bienertia sinuspersici, Suaeda aralocaspica) as compared to Kranz type (Haloxylon persicum, Salsola richteri, Suaeda eltonica) and C(3) (Suaeda linifolia) chenopods. It was found that PEPC from both types of C(4) chenopods displays higher specific activity than that of the C(3) species and shows kinetic and regulatory characteristics similar to those of C(4) species in other families in that they are subject to light/dark regulation by phosphorylation and display differential malate sensitivity. Also, the deduced amino acid sequence from leaf cDNA indicates that the single-cell functioning C(4) species possesses a Kranz-type C(4) isoform with a Ser in the amino terminal. A phylogeny of PEPC shows that isoforms in the two single-cell functioning C(4) species are in a clade with the C(3) and Kranz C(4) Suaeda spp. with high sequence homology. Overall, this study indicates that B. sinuspersici and S. aralocaspica have a C(4)-type PEPC similar to that in Kranz C(4) plants, which likely is required for effective function of C(4) photosynthesis.

  5. A Metabolic Widget Adjusts the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Fructose Influx in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; Goñi-Moreno, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructose uptake in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida occurs through a canonical phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar transport system (PTSFru). The logic of the genetic circuit that rules its functioning is puzzling: the transcription of the fruBKA operon, encoding all the components of PTSFru, can escape the repression exerted by the catabolite repressor/activator protein Cra solely in the presence of intracellular fructose-1-P, an agonist formed only when fructose has been already transported. To study this apparently incongruous regulatory architecture, the changes in the transcriptome brought about by a seamless Δcra deletion in P. putida strain KT2440 were inspected under different culture conditions. The few genes found to be upregulated in the cra mutant unexpectedly included PP_3443, encoding a bona fide glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase. An in silico model was developed to explore emergent properties that could result from such connections between sugar uptake with Cra and PEP. Simulation of fructose transport revealed that sugar uptake called for an extra supply of PEP (obtained through the activity of PP_3443) that was kept (i.e., memorized) even when the carbohydrate disappeared from the medium. This feature was traced to the action of two sequential inverters that connect the availability of exogenous fructose to intracellular PEP levels via Cra/PP_3443. The loss of such memory caused a much longer lag phase in cells shifted from one growth condition to another. The term “metabolic widget” is proposed to describe a merged biochemical and regulatory patch that tailors a given node of the cell molecular network to suit species-specific physiological needs. IMPORTANCE The regulatory nodes that govern metabolic traffic in bacteria often show connectivities that could be deemed unnecessarily complex at a first glance. Being a soil dweller and plant colonizer, Pseudomonas putida frequently encounters fructose in the niches that it

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hubert, A; Husson, A; Chédeville, A; Lavoinne, A

    2000-09-22

    The effect of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene expression was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. Activation of AMPK by AICAR counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the PEPCK gene expression, both at the mRNA and the transcriptional levels. It is proposed that a target for AMPK is involved in the inhibitory effect of glucose on PEPCK gene transcription.

  7. Nur77 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via switching glucose metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through attenuating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Li; Chen, Hang-Zi; Yang, Peng-Bo; Li, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Fen-Na; Zhang, Jia-Yuan; Wang, Wei-Jia; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Qi-Tao; Zheng, Yu; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Qiao

    2017-02-27

    Gluconeogenesis, an essential metabolic process for hepatocytes, is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that the nuclear receptor Nur77 is a tumour suppressor for HCC that regulates gluconeogenesis. Low Nur77 expression in clinical HCC samples correlates with poor prognosis, and a Nur77 deficiency in mice promotes HCC development. Nur77 interacts with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, to increase gluconeogenesis and suppress glycolysis, resulting in ATP depletion and cell growth arrest. However, PEPCK1 becomes labile after sumoylation and is degraded via ubiquitination, which is augmented by the p300 acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9). Although Nur77 attenuates sumoylation and stabilizes PEPCK1 via impairing p300 activity and preventing the Ubc9-PEPCK1 interaction, Nur77 is silenced in HCC samples due to Snail-mediated DNA methylation of the Nur77 promoter. Our study reveals a unique mechanism to suppress HCC by switching from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis through Nur77 antagonism of PEPCK1 degradation.

  8. Inflammation inhibits the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in liver and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Kenneth R; Moser, Arthur; Shigenaga, Judy K; Grunfeld, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Inhibition of adipocyte triglyceride biosynthesis is required for fatty acid mobilization during inflammation. Triglyceride biosynthesis requires glycerol 3-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) plays a key role. We demonstrate that LPS, zymosan, and TNF-α decrease PEPCK in liver and fat. Turpentine decreases PEPCK in liver, but not in fat. The LPS-induced decrease in PEPCK does not occur in TLR4 deficient animals, indicating that this receptor is required. The LPS-induced decrease in hepatic PEPCK does not occur in TNF receptor/IL-1 receptor knockout mice, but occurs in fat, indicating that TNF-α/IL-1 is essential for the decrease in liver but not fat. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IFNγ inhibit PEPCK indicating that there are multiple pathways by which PEPCK is decreased in adipocytes. The binding of PPARγ and RXRα to the PPARγ response element in the PEPCK promoter is markedly decreased in adipose tissue nuclear extracts from LPS treated animals. Lipopolysaccharide and zymosan reduce PPARγ and RXRα expression in fat, suggesting that a decrease in PPARγ and RXRα accounts for the decrease in PEPCK. Thus, there are multiple cytokine pathways by which inflammation inhibits PEPCK expression in adipose tissue which could contribute to the increased mobilization of fatty acids during inflammation.

  9. Cell volume regulates liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase genes.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, S

    1998-03-01

    Hypertonic-induced cell shrinkage increases glucose release in H-4-II-E rat hepatoma cells. This is paralleled by a concomitant increase in the mRNA levels of the rate-limiting enzymes of the pathway of gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP), of seven- and fivefold, respectively. In contrast, hypotonic-induced swelling of the cells results in a transient decrease in PCK and FBP mRNAs to 15% and 39% of control levels. The antagonistic effects of hyper- and hypotonicity mimic the counteracting effects of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and insulin on PCK and FBP mRNA levels. The hypertonic-induced increase in mRNA levels is due to an enhanced transcriptional rate, whereas the decrease in mRNAs caused by hypotonicity results from a decrease in transcription as well as mRNA stability. The inductive effect of hypertonicity does not require ongoing protein synthesis and acts independently of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C pathways. These results suggest that cell volume changes in liver cells may play an important role in regulating hepatic glucose metabolism by altered gene expression.

  10. Nur77 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via switching glucose metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through attenuating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xue-li; Chen, Hang-zi; Yang, Peng-bo; Li, Ying-ping; Zhang, Fen-na; Zhang, Jia-yuan; Wang, Wei-jia; Zhao, Wen-xiu; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Qi-tao; Zheng, Yu; Sun, Xiao-yu; Wang, Xiao-min; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Gluconeogenesis, an essential metabolic process for hepatocytes, is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that the nuclear receptor Nur77 is a tumour suppressor for HCC that regulates gluconeogenesis. Low Nur77 expression in clinical HCC samples correlates with poor prognosis, and a Nur77 deficiency in mice promotes HCC development. Nur77 interacts with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, to increase gluconeogenesis and suppress glycolysis, resulting in ATP depletion and cell growth arrest. However, PEPCK1 becomes labile after sumoylation and is degraded via ubiquitination, which is augmented by the p300 acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9). Although Nur77 attenuates sumoylation and stabilizes PEPCK1 via impairing p300 activity and preventing the Ubc9-PEPCK1 interaction, Nur77 is silenced in HCC samples due to Snail-mediated DNA methylation of the Nur77 promoter. Our study reveals a unique mechanism to suppress HCC by switching from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis through Nur77 antagonism of PEPCK1 degradation. PMID:28240261

  11. Ketogenic diet-fed rats have increased fat mass and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Letícia C; Chittó, Ana L; Müller, Alexandre P; Rocha, Juliana K; Castro da Silva, Mariane; Quincozes-Santos, André; Nardin, Patrícia; Rotta, Liane N; Ziegler, Denize R; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Da Silva, Roselis S M; Perry, Marcos L S; Gottfried, Carmem

    2008-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD), characterized by high fat and low carbohydrate and protein contents, has been proposed to be beneficial in children with epilepsy disorders not helped by conventional anti-epileptic drug treatment. Weight loss and inadequate growth is an important drawback of this diet and metabolic causes are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine body weight variation during KD feeding for 6 wk of Wistar rats; fat mass and adipocyte cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were also observed. PEPCK activity was determined based on the [H(14)CO(3) (-)]-oxaloacetate exchange reaction. KD-fed rats gained weight at a less rapid rate than normal-fed rats, but with a significant increment in fat mass. The fat mass/body weight ratio already differed between ketogenic and control rats after the first week of treatment, and was 2.4 x higher in ketogenic rats. The visceral lipogenesis was supported by an increment in adipocyte PEPCK, aiming to provide glycerol 3-phosphate to triacylglycerol synthesis and this fat accumulation was accompanied by glucose intolerance. These data contribute to our understanding of the metabolic effects of the KD in adipose tissue and liver and suggest some potential risks of this diet, particularly visceral fat accumulation.

  12. Epigenetic modification of fetal baboon hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase following exposure to moderately reduced nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Mark J; Mitsuya, Kozoh; Li, Cun; Ford, Stephen; McDonald, Thomas J; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Cox, Laura A

    2010-04-15

    Decreased maternal nutrient availability during pregnancy induces compensatory fetal metabolic and endocrine responses. Knowledge of cellular changes involved is critical to understanding normal and abnormal development. Several studies in rodents and sheep report increased fetal plasma cortisol and associated increased gluconeogenesis in response to maternal nutrient reduction (MNR) but observations in primates are lacking. We determined MNR effects on fetal liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (protein, PEPCK1; gene, PCK1 orthologous/homologous human chromosomal region 20q13.31) at 0.9 gestation (G). Female baboon social groups were fed ad libitum (control, CTR) or 70% CTR (MNR) from 0.16 to 0.9G when fetuses were delivered by caesarean section under general anaesthesia. Plasma cortisol was elevated in fetuses of MNR mothers (P < 0.05). Immunoreactive PEPCK1 protein was located around the liver lobule central vein and was low in CTR fetuses but rose to 63% of adult levels in MNR fetuses. PCK1 mRNA measured by QRT-PCR increased in MNR (2.3-fold; P < 0.05) while the 25% rise in protein by Western blot analysis was not significant. PCK1 promoter methylation analysis using bisulfite sequencing was significantly reduced in six out of nine CpG-dinucleotides evaluated in MNR compared with CTR liver samples. In conclusion, these are the first data from a fetal non-human primate indicating hypomethylation of the PCK1 promoter in the liver following moderate maternal nutrient reduction.

  13. Influence of endotoxin treatment on dexamethasone induction of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, R E; Seale, T W; Stith, R D

    1983-01-01

    Decreased glucocorticoid binding has been observed at a time after endotoxin (3 to 6 h) when imparied liver enzyme induction is known to occur. This study was undertaken to characterize the early time course of hypoglycemia and decreased liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity in intact and adrenalectomized mice given endotoxin. In addition, altered steroid induction of hepatic PEPCK was examined in adrenalectomized mice given dexamethasone at intervals before and after a median lethal dose of endotoxin. Intact mice demonstrated a dramatic hyperglycemia at 1 h after endotoxin treatment, a response absent in adrenalectomized mice. Plasma glucose levels were significantly reduced from control values at 3 and 6 h posttreatment, with the most pronounced endotoxin-induced hypoglycemia seen in adrenalectomized mice. Hepatic PEPCK activity in intact mice given endotoxin was decreased at 3 and 6 h after treatment, although no change from basal, noninduced levels was seen in poisoned adrenalectomized mice. The increased increment in hepatic PEPCK activity due to fasting of intact control mice was reproduced in adrenalectomized control mice by the administration of dexamethasone. Furthermore, the induction of hepatic PEPCK by dexamethasone was inhibited by 1 h after endotoxin treatment, with enzyme activity falling to basal, noninduced levels by 6 h posttreatment. At these same time intervals after endotoxin treatment, no evidence of histopathology in the liver or adrenal glands was seen. These results coincide with changes in steroid binding seen previously and indicate that endotoxin treatment produces significant alterations in glucocorticoid action at the subcellular or molecular level. PMID:6822414

  14. An assessment of the capacity for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to contribute to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E

    2015-06-01

    Three C4 acid decarboxylases, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) were recruited from C3 plants to support C4 photosynthesis. In Poaceae, there are established lineages having PEPCK type species, and some NADP-ME lineages in which PEPCK contributes to C4. Besides family Poaceae, recently PEPCK has been reported to function in C4 photosynthesis in eudicot species including Cleome gynandra (Cleomaceae), Trianthema portulacastrum and Zaleya pentandra (Aizoaceae). We evaluated PEPCK by enzyme assay and western blots in representatives of Poaceae, Aizoaceae, Cleomaceae, and Chenopodiaceae compared to that in the PEPCK type C4 grass Spartina anglica. Eragrostis nutans was identified as the first NAD-ME type C4 grass having substantial amounts of PEPCK. In the eudicots, including C. gynandra, Cleome angustifolia, T. portulacastrum, Z. pentandra, and nine C4 members of family Chenopodiaceae (which has the most C4 species and diversity in forms among eudicot families), amounts of PEPCK were generally very low (barely detectable up to 4% of that in S. anglica). Based on these results, C4 species can be classified biochemically according to the dominant decarboxylase recruited for C4 function; and, Poaceae remains the only family in which PEPCK is known to have a significant role in C4 photosynthesis.

  15. Control of Transposon-mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances, it also regulates mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutation have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of Insertion Sequence-5 (IS5) hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing growth of wild type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of non-metabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated. PMID:26159081

  16. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Machová, Iva; Hubálek, Martin; Lepšík, Martin; Bednárová, Lucie; Pazderková, Markéta; Kopecký, Vladimír; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Pichová, Iva

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, can persist in macrophages for decades, maintaining its basic metabolic activities. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck; EC 4.1.1.32) is a key player in central carbon metabolism regulation. In replicating MTb, Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis, but in non-replicating MTb, it also catalyzes the reverse anaplerotic reaction. Here, we explored the role of selected cysteine residues in function of MTb Pck under different redox conditions. Using mass spectrometry analysis we confirmed formation of S–S bridge between cysteines C391 and C397 localized in the C-terminal subdomain. Molecular dynamics simulations of C391-C397 bridged model indicated local conformation changes needed for formation of the disulfide. Further, we used circular dichroism and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the influence of C391 and C397 mutations on Pck secondary and tertiary structures, and on enzyme activity and specificity. We demonstrate the regulatory role of C391 and C397 that form the S–S bridge and in the reduced form stabilize Pck tertiary structure and conformation for gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. PMID:28135343

  17. Improvement of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity of Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 through protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwang Suk; Jeon, Hancheol; Seo, Seungbeom; Lee, Yew; Jin, EonSeon

    2014-06-10

    In order to mitigate CO2 accumulation and decrease the rate of global warming and climate change, we previously presented a strategy for the development of an efficient CO2 capture and utilization system. The system employs two recombinant enzymes, carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which were originated from microalgae. Although utilization of this integrated system would require a large quantity of high quality PEPCase protein, such quantities could be produced by increasing the solubility of the Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 (PtPEPCase 1) protein in the Escherichia coli heterologous expression system. We first expressed the putative mitochondria targeting peptide- and chloroplast transit peptide-truncated proteins of PtPEPCase 1, mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1, respectively, in E. coli. After affinity chromatography, the amount of purified PEPCase protein from 500mL of E. coli culture was greatest for cPtPEPCase 1 (1.99mg), followed by mPtPEPCase 1 (0.82mg) and PtPEPCase 1 (0.61mg). Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1 showed approximately 1.6-fold (32.19 units/mg) and 3-fold (59.48 units/mg) increases, respectively. Therefore, cPtPEPCase 1 purified using the E. coli heterogeneous expression system could be a strong candidate for a platform technology to capture CO2 and produce value-added four-carbon platform chemicals.

  18. Characterization of lysine acetylation of a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase involved in glutamate overproduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Hamamoto, Yuma; Mizuno, Yuta; Yamada, Ayuka; Kikuchi, Masaki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Umehara, Takashi; Yoshida, Minoru; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kosono, Saori

    2017-03-03

    Protein Nε-acylation is emerging as a ubiquitous post-translational modification. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is utilized for industrial production of L-glutamate, the levels of protein acetylation and succinylation change drastically under the conditions that induce glutamate overproduction. Here, we characterized the acylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), an anaplerotic enzyme that supplies oxaloacetate for glutamate overproduction. We showed that acetylation of PEPC at lysine 653 decreased enzymatic activity, leading to reduced glutamate production. An acetylation-mimic (KQ) mutant of K653 showed severely reduced glutamate production, while the corresponding KR mutant showed normal production levels. Using an acetyllysine-incorporated PEPC protein, we verified that K653-acetylation negatively regulates PEPC activity. In addition, NCgl0616, a sirtuin-type deacetylase, deacetylated K653-acetylated PEPC in vitro. Interestingly, the specific activity of PEPC was increased during glutamate overproduction, which was blocked by the K653R mutation or deletion of sirtuin-type deacetylase homologues. These findings suggested that deacetylation of K653 by NCgl0616 likely plays a role in the activation of PEPC, which maintains carbon flux under glutamate-producing conditions. PEPC deletion increased protein acetylation levels in cells under glutamate-producing conditions, supporting our hypothesis that PEPC is responsible for a large carbon flux change under glutamate-producing conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase and Glucose-6-phosphatase Are Required for Steroidogenesis in Testicular Leydig Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Gang, Gil-Tae; Tadi, Surendar; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Kim, Yong Deuk; Park, Ji Hoon; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Lee, Keesook; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) induces steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and stimulates testosterone production in Leydig cells. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is expressed in Leydig cells, but its role has not been defined. In this study, we found that PEPCK and glucose-6-phosphatase (Glc-6-Pase) are increased significantly following cAMP treatment of mouse Leydig cells. Moreover, cAMP treatment increased recruitment of the cAMP-response element-binding transcription factor and decreased recruitment of the corepressor DAX-1 on the pepck promoter. Furthermore, cAMP induced an increase in ATP that correlated with a decrease in phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In contrast, knockdown or inhibition of PEPCK decreased ATP and increased phospho-AMPK. Treatment with an AMPK activator or overexpression of the constitutively active form of AMPK inhibited cAMP-induced steroidogenic enzyme promoter activities and gene expression. Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) was involved in cAMP-induced steroidogenic enzyme gene expression but was inhibited by AMPK activation in Leydig cells. Additionally, inhibition or knockdown of PEPCK and Glc-6-Pase decreased cAMP-mediated induction of steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and steroidogenesis. Finally, pubertal mouse (8-week-old) testes and human chorionic gonadotropin-induced prepubertal mouse testes showed increased PEPCK and Glc-6-Pase gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest that induction of PEPCK and Glc-6-Pase by cAMP plays an important role in Leydig cell steroidogenesis. PMID:23074219

  20. Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylases is Determined by a Single Amino Acid Residue in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Takeya, Masahiro; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is an important enzyme for CO2 fixation and primary metabolism in photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria. The kinetics and allosteric regulation of PEPCs have been studied in many organisms, but the biochemical properties of PEPC in the unicellular, non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have not been clarified. In this study, biochemical analysis revealed that the optimum pH and temperature of Synechocystis 6803 PEPC proteins were 7.3 and 30 °C, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 PEPC was found to be tolerant to allosteric inhibition by several metabolic effectors such as malate, aspartate, and fumarate compared with other cyanobacterial PEPCs. Comparative sequence and biochemical analysis showed that substitution of the glutamate residue at position 954 with lysine altered the enzyme so that it was inhibited by malate, aspartate, and fumarate. PEPC of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was purified, and its activity was inhibited in the presence of malate. Substitution of the lysine at position 946 (equivalent to position 954 in Synechocystis 6803) with glutamate made Anabaena 7120 PEPC tolerant to malate. These results demonstrate that the allosteric regulation of PEPC in cyanobacteria is determined by a single amino acid residue, a characteristic that is conserved in different orders. PMID:28117365

  1. Control of Transposon-Mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System.

    PubMed

    Saier, Milton H; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances it also regulates the mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutations have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of insertion sequence-5 hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing the growth of wild-type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of nonmetabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar-transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic (c)AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cAMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated.

  2. Sophisticated Regulation of Transcriptional Factors by the Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar Phosphotransferase System.

    PubMed

    Galinier, Anne; Deutscher, Josef

    2017-03-24

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) is a carbohydrate transport and phosphorylation system present in bacteria of all different phyla and in archaea. It is usually composed of three proteins or protein complexes, enzyme I, HPr, and enzyme II, which are phosphorylated at histidine or cysteine residues. However, in many bacteria, HPr can also be phosphorylated at a serine residue. The PTS not only functions as a carbohydrate transporter but also regulates numerous cellular processes either by phosphorylating its target proteins or by interacting with them in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The target proteins can be catabolic enzymes, transporters, and signal transduction proteins but are most frequently transcriptional regulators. In this review, we will describe how PTS components interact with or phosphorylate proteins to regulate directly or indirectly the activity of transcriptional repressors, activators, or antiterminators. We will briefly summarize the well-studied mechanism of carbon catabolite repression in firmicutes, where the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A needs to interact with seryl-phosphorylated HPr in order to be functional. We will present new results related to transcriptional activators and antiterminators containing specific PTS regulation domains, which are the phosphorylation targets for three different types of PTS components. Moreover, we will discuss how the phosphorylation level of the PTS components precisely regulates the activity of target transcriptional regulators or antiterminators, with or without PTS regulation domain, and how the availability of PTS substrates and thus the metabolic status of the cell are connected with various cellular processes, such as biofilm formation or virulence of certain pathogens.

  3. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum.

  4. Characterization of a complex glucocorticoid response unit in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, E; Stromstedt, P E; Quinn, P G; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Granner, D K

    1990-01-01

    The minimal DNA sequence required for glucocorticoid induction of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells was defined. This novel glucocorticoid response unit (GRU) spans about 110 base pairs (bp) and includes two receptor-binding elements plus two accessory factor-binding elements. Purified glucocorticoid receptor bound to two regions (GR1 and GR2) between -395 and -349 bp relative to the transcription start site. Factors in crude rat liver nuclear extract bound to DNA in the regions -455 to -431 and -420 to -403 bp, which are designated accessory factor 1 (AF1) and accessory factor 2 (AF2) elements, respectively. Gel retardation analysis revealed that at least two proteins bound to AF1 and that they were distinct from the protein(s) that bound to AF2. Various combinations of GR1, GR2, AF1, and AF2 were fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene and cotransfected with a glucocorticoid receptor expression plasmid (pSVGR1) into H4IIE cells to identify the functional GRU. Neither the glucocorticoid receptor binding region nor the accessory factor binding region alone was sufficient to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness. The two components of the glucocorticoid receptor binding region functioned independently, and each accounted for half of the maximal response, provided the accessory factor elements were present. Similarly, deletion of either AF1 or AF2 diminished glucocorticoid induction of the PEPCK gene to approximately half of the maximum. We propose that the complex PEPCK gene GRU provides the stringent regulation required of this critical enzyme in liver. Images PMID:2388623

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Components Modulate Gene Transcription and Virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Evelyn; Gao, Lihui; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.; Lin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) IV (encoded by BB0723 [cyaB]) are well conserved in different species of Borrelia. However, the functional roles of PEP-PTS and AC in the infectious cycle of Borrelia have not been characterized previously. We examined 12 PEP-PTS transporter component mutants by needle inoculation of mice to assess their ability to cause mouse infection. Transposon mutants with mutations in the EIIBC components (ptsG) (BB0645, thought to be involved in glucose-specific transport) were unable to cause infection in mice, while all other tested PEP-PTS mutants retained infectivity. Infectivity was partially restored in an in trans-complemented strain of the ptsG mutant. While the ptsG mutant survived normally in unfed as well as fed ticks, it was unable to cause infection in mice by tick transmission, suggesting that the function of ptsG is essential to establish infection by either needle inoculation or tick transmission. In Gram-negative organisms, the regulatory effects of the PEP-PTS are mediated by adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. A recombinant protein encoded by B. burgdorferi BB0723 (a putative cyaB homolog) was shown to have adenylate cyclase activity in vitro; however, mutants with mutations in this gene were fully infectious in the tick-mouse infection cycle, indicating that its function is not required in this process. By transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that the ptsG gene may directly or indirectly modulate gene expression of Borrelia burgdorferi. Overall, the PEP-PTS glucose transporter PtsG appears to play important roles in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi that extend beyond its transport functions. PMID:26712207

  6. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110kDa and 107kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme’s feedback inhibition by l-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell’s immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  7. Multiple Inter-Kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers in the Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  8. Key role of hydrazine to the interaction between oxaloacetic against phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK): ONIOM calculations.

    PubMed

    Prajongtat, Pongthep; Phromyothin, Darinee Sae-Tang; Hannongbua, Supa

    2013-08-01

    The interactions between oxaloacetic (OAA) and phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK) binding pocket in the presence and absence of hydrazine were carried out using quantum chemical calculations, based on the two-layered ONIOM (ONIOM2) approach. The complexes were partially optimized by ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) method while the interaction energies between OAA and individual residues surrounding the pocket were performed at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated interaction energies (INT) indicated that Arg87, Gly237, Ser286, and Arg405 are key residues for binding to OAA with the INT values of -1.93, -2.06, -2.47, and -3.16 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The interactions are mainly due to the formation of hydrogen bonding interactions with OAA. Moreover, using ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) applied on the PEPCKHS complex, two proton transfers were observed; first, the proton was transferred from the carboxylic group of OAA to hydrazine while the second one was from Asp311 to Lys244. Such reactions cause the generation of binding strength of OAA to the pocket via electrostatic interaction. The orientations of Lys243, Lys244, His264, Asp311, Phe333, and Arg405 were greatly deviated after hydrazine incorporation. These indicate that hydrazine plays an important role in terms of not only changing the conformation of the binding pocket, but is also tightly bound to OAA resulting in its conformation change in the pocket. The understanding of such interaction can be useful for the design of hydrazine-based inhibitor for antichachexia agents.

  9. Phosphoenolpyruvate- and ATP-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinases: covalent substrate-binding and kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alles, Luis F; Siebold, Christian; Nyffeler, Therese Lüthi; Flükiger-Brühwiler, Karin; Schneider, Philipp; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Baumann, Ulrich; Erni, Bernhard

    2004-10-19

    Dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinases are a sequence-conserved family of enzymes, which utilize two different phosphoryldonors, ATP in animals, plants, and some bacteria, and a multiphosphoprotein of the phosphoenolpyruvate carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) in most bacteria. Here, we compare the PTS-dependent kinase of Escherichia coli and the ATP-dependent kinase of Citrobacter freundii. They display 30% sequence identity. The binding constants of the E. coli kinase for eleven short-chain carbonyl compounds were determined by acetone precipitation of the enzyme-substrate complexes. They are 3.4 microM for Dha, 780 microM for Dha-phosphate (DhaP), 50 microM for D,L-glyceraldehyde (GA), and 90 microM for D,L-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. The k(cat) for Dha of the PTS-dependent kinase is 290 min(-1), and that of the ATP-dependent kinase is 1050 min(-1). The Km for Dha of both kinases is <6 microM. The X-ray structures of the enzyme-GA and the enzyme-DhaP complex show that substrates as well as products are bound in hemiaminal linkage to an active-site histidine. Quantum-mechanical calculations offer no indication for activation of the reacting hydroxyl group by the formation of the hemiaminal. However, the formation of the hemiaminal bond allows selection for short-chain carbonyl compounds and discrimination against structurally similar polyols. The Dha kinase remains fully active in the presence of 2 M glycerol, and phosphorylates trace impurities of carbonyl compounds present in glycerol.

  10. Towards efficient photosynthesis: overexpression of Zea mays phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kandoi, Deepika; Mohanty, Sasmita; Govindjee; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-12-01

    Plants with C4 photosynthesis are efficient in carbon assimilation and have an advantage over C3 photosynthesis. In C4 photosynthesis, the primary CO2 fixation is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Here, we show that overexpression of Zea mays PEPC cDNA, under the control of (35)S promoter, in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in ~7-10 fold higher protein abundance and ~7-10 fold increase in PEPC activity in the transgenic lines than that in the vector control. We suggest that overexpression of PEPC played an anaplerotic role to increase the supply of 4-carbon carboxylic acids, which provided carbon skeletons for increased amino acid and protein synthesis. Higher protein content must have been responsible for increased metabolic processes including chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis, and respiration. Consequently, the PEPC-overexpressed transgenic plants had higher chlorophyll content, enhanced electron transport rate (ETR), lower non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll a fluorescence, and a higher performance index (PI) than the vector control. Consistent with these observations, the rate of CO2 assimilation, the starch content, and the dry weight of PEPC-overexpressed plants increased by 14-18 %, 10-18 %, and 6.5-16 %, respectively. Significantly, transgenics were tolerant to salt stress as they had increased ability to synthesize amino acids, including the osmolyte proline. NaCl (150 mM)-treated transgenic plants had higher variable to maximum Chl a fluorescence (F v/F m) ratio, higher PI, higher ETR, and lower NPQ than the salt-treated vector controls. These results suggest that expression of C4 photosynthesis enzyme(s) in a C3 plant can improve its photosynthetic capacity with enhanced tolerance to salinity stress.

  11. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Components Modulate Gene Transcription and Virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Khajanchi, Bijay K; Odeh, Evelyn; Gao, Lihui; Jacobs, Mary B; Philipp, Mario T; Lin, Tao; Norris, Steven J

    2015-12-28

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) IV (encoded by BB0723 [cyaB]) are well conserved in different species of Borrelia. However, the functional roles of PEP-PTS and AC in the infectious cycle of Borrelia have not been characterized previously. We examined 12 PEP-PTS transporter component mutants by needle inoculation of mice to assess their ability to cause mouse infection. Transposon mutants with mutations in the EIIBC components (ptsG) (BB0645, thought to be involved in glucose-specific transport) were unable to cause infection in mice, while all other tested PEP-PTS mutants retained infectivity. Infectivity was partially restored in an in trans-complemented strain of the ptsG mutant. While the ptsG mutant survived normally in unfed as well as fed ticks, it was unable to cause infection in mice by tick transmission, suggesting that the function of ptsG is essential to establish infection by either needle inoculation or tick transmission. In Gram-negative organisms, the regulatory effects of the PEP-PTS are mediated by adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. A recombinant protein encoded by B. burgdorferi BB0723 (a putative cyaB homolog) was shown to have adenylate cyclase activity in vitro; however, mutants with mutations in this gene were fully infectious in the tick-mouse infection cycle, indicating that its function is not required in this process. By transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that the ptsG gene may directly or indirectly modulate gene expression of Borrelia burgdorferi. Overall, the PEP-PTS glucose transporter PtsG appears to play important roles in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi that extend beyond its transport functions.

  12. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi.

  13. The Ω-loop lid domain of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is essential for catalytic function.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Holyoak, Todd

    2012-11-27

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is an essential metabolic enzyme operating in the gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated that the enzyme contains a mobile active site lid domain that undergoes a transition between an open, disorded conformation and a closed, ordered conformation as the enzyme progresses through the catalytic cycle. The understanding of how this mobile domain functions in catalysis is incomplete. Previous studies showed that the closure of the lid domain stabilizes the reaction intermediate and protects the reactive intermediate from spurious protonation and thus contributes to the fidelity of the enzyme. To more fully investigate the roles of the lid domain in PEPCK function, we introduced three mutations that replaced the 11-residue lid domain with one, two, and three glycine residues. Kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes demonstrates that none of the enzyme constructs exhibit any measurable kinetic activity, resulting in a decrease in the catalytic parameters of at least 10(6). Structural characterization of the mutants in complexes representing the catalytic cycle suggests that the inactivity is due to a role for the lid domain in the formation of the fully closed state of the enzyme that is required for catalytic function. In the absence of the lid domain, the enzyme is unable to achieve the fully closed state and is rendered inactive despite possessing all of the residues and substrates required for catalytic function. This work demonstrates how enzyme catalytic function can be abolished through the alteration of conformational equilibria despite all the elements required for chemical conversion of substrates to products remaining intact.

  14. Physiological studies on regulation of glycerol utilization by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, A H; Saier, M H; Harriott, O T; Reizer, J

    1990-01-01

    In vitro studies with purified glycerol kinase from Enterococcus faecalis have established that this enzyme is activated by phosphorylation of a histidyl residue in the protein, catalyzed by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS), but the physiological significance of this observation is not known. In the present study, the regulation of glycerol uptake was examined in a wild-type strain of E. faecalis as well as in tight and leaky ptsI mutants, altered with respect to their levels of enzyme I of the PTS. Glycerol kinase was shown to be weakly repressible by lactose and strongly repressible by glucose in the wild-type strain. Greatly reduced levels of glycerol kinase activity were also observed in the ptsI mutants. Uptake of glycerol into intact wild-type and mutant cells paralleled the glycerol kinase activities in extracts. Glycerol uptake in the leaky ptsI mutant was hypersensitive to inhibition by low concentrations of 2-deoxyglucose or glucose even though the rates and extent of 2-deoxyglucose uptake were greatly reduced. These observations provide strong support for the involvement of reversible PTS-mediated phosphorylation of glycerol kinase in the regulation of glycerol uptake in response to the presence or absence of a sugar substrate of the PTS in the medium. Glucose and 2-deoxyglucose were shown to elicit rapid efflux of cytoplasmic [14C]lactate derived from [14C]glycerol. This phenomenon was distinct from the inhibition of glycerol uptake and was due to phosphorylation of the incoming sugar by cytoplasmic phosphoenolpyruvate. Lactate appeared to be generated by sequential dephosphorylation and reduction of cytoplasmic phosphoenolpyruvate present in high concentrations in resting cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2123855

  15. Novel phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent futile cycle in Streptococcus lactis: 2-deoxy-D-glucose uncouples energy production from growth.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Chassy, B M

    1982-01-01

    The addition of 2-deoxy-D-glucose to cultures of Streptococcus lactis 133 that were growing exponentially on sucrose or lactose reduced the growth rate by ca. 95%. Inhibition did not occur with glucose or mannose as the growth sugar. The reduction in growth rate was concomitant with rapid accumulation of the analog in phosphorylated form (2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate) via the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose:phosphotransferase system. Within 5 min the intracellular 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate concentration reached a steady-state level of greater than 100 mM. After maximum accumulation of the sugar phosphate, the rate of sucrose metabolism (glycolysis) decreased by only 30%, but the cells were depleted of fructose-1,6-diphosphate. The addition of glucose to 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate preloaded cells caused expulsion of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and a resumption of normal growth. S. lactis 133 contained an intracellular Mg2+-dependent, fluoride-sensitive phosphatase which hydrolyzed 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (and glucose 6-phosphate) to free sugar and inorganic phosphate. Because of continued dephosphorylation and efflux of the non-metabolizable analog, the maintenance of the intracellular 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate pool during growth stasis was dependent upon continued glycolysis. This steady-state condition represented a dynamic equilibrium of: (i) phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent accumulation of 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate, (ii) intracellular dephosphorylation, and (iii) efflux of free 2-deoxy-D-glucose. This sequence of events constitutes a futile cycle which promotes the dissipation of phosphoenolpyruvate. We conclude that 2-deoxy-D-glucose functions as an uncoupler by dissociating energy production from growth in S. lactis 133. Images PMID:6286601

  16. Studies on the degradative mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Morandi, S; Pellegrini, R; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1989-11-20

    Previous work carried out in our laboratory (Burlini, N., Lamponi S., Radrizzani, M., Monti, E. and Tortora P. (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 930, 220-229) led to the immunological identification of a yeast 65-kDa phosphoprotein as a modified form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase; moreover the appearance of this phospho form was proven to be independent of cAMP, whereas the glucose-induced inactivation of the native enzyme is cAMP-dependent. Here, we report further investigations on the mechanism of the glucose-triggered degradation of the enzyme which led to the following results: (a) the aforementioned phospho form displayed a binding pattern to 5 AMP-Sepharose 4B quite similar to that of native enzyme, although it did not retain its oligomeric structure, nor was it catalytically active; (b) its phosphate content was of about two residues per monomer; (c) its isoelectric point was slightly higher than that of native enzyme, this shows that the enzyme undergoes additional modifications besides phosphorylation; (d) it represented about 4% of the native enzyme in glucose-depressed cells; (e) other forms immunologically cross-reactive with the native enzyme were also isolated, whose molecular mass was in the range of 60-62 kDa, and they are probable candidates as degradation products of the phospho form; (f) time courses of the native and phospho forms in the presence and the absence of glucose provided data consistent with a kinetic model involving a strong stimulation of the decay of both forms effected by the sugar; (g) in the mutant ABYS1 (Achstetter, T., Emter, O., Ehmann, C. and Wolf, D.H. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13334-13343) which is devoid of the four major vacuolar proteinases, the decay pattern was essentially the same as in wild-type; (h) effectors lowering intracellular ATP also retarded the first step of enzyme degradation; this points to an ATP-dependence of this step. Based on these results we propose a degradation mechanism consisting of an

  17. Increased Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Gene Expression and Steatosis during Hepatitis C Virus Subgenome Replication

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Ishtiaq; Choudhury, Mahua; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Knotts, Trina A.; Janssen, Rachel C.; Schaack, Jerome; Iwahashi, Mieko; Puljak, Livia; Simon, Francis R.; Kilic, Gordan; Fitz, J. Gregory; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated transcription factors are dramatically up-regulated in Huh.8 cells, which stably express an HCV subgenome replicon. HCV increased activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and involved activation of the cAMP response element in the PEPCK promoter. Infection with dominant-negative CREB or C/EBPβ-shRNA significantly reduced or normalized PEPCK expression, with no change in PGC-1α or FOXO1 levels. Notably, expression of HCV nonstructural component NS5A in Huh7 or primary hepatocytes stimulated PEPCK gene expression and glucose output in HepG2 cells, whereas a deletion in NS5A reduced PEPCK expression and lowered cellular lipids but was without effect on insulin resistance, as demonstrated by the inability of insulin to stimulate mobilization of a pool of insulin-responsive vesicles to the plasma membrane. HCV-replicating cells demonstrated increases in cellular lipids with insulin resistance at the level of the insulin receptor, increased insulin receptor substrate 1 (Ser-312), and decreased Akt (Ser-473) activation in response to insulin. C/EBPβ-RNAi normalized lipogenic genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and liver X receptor α but was unable to reduce accumulation of triglycerides in Huh.8 cells or reverse the increase in ApoB expression, suggesting a role for increased lipid retention in steatotic hepatocytes. Collectively, these data reveal an important role of NS5A, C/EBPβ, and pCREB in promoting HCV-induced gluconeogenic gene expression

  18. Hepatic Subcellular Compartmentation of Cytoplasmic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Determined by Immunogold Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kuixiong; Cardell, Emma Lou; Morris, Randal E.; Giffin, Bruce F.; Cardell, Robert R.

    1995-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is the rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzyme and in liver occurs in a lobular gradient from periportal to pericentral regions. The subcellular distribution of cytoplasmic PEPCK molecules within hepatocytes and its relationship to organelles have not been determined previously. In this study, we have used immunogold electron microscopy to evaluate the subcellar distribution of the enzyme, in addition to brightfield and epipolarized light microscopy. Cryosections (10 [mu]m) of perfusion-fixed rat liver were collected on silanated slides and immunostained using goat anti-rat PEPCK followed by 5-nm gold-labeled secondary and tertiary antibodies. Additionally, free-floating vibratome sections (25, 50, and 100 [mu]m) of perfusion-immersion-fixed rat liver were immunogold stained using goat anti-rat PEPCK and 5-nm gold-labeled secondary antibody, with and without silver enhancement. The immunogold labeled sections from both procedures were embedded in epoxy resin for the preparation of thin sections for electron microscopy. The results showed that the gold-labeled antibodies penetrated the entire thickness of cryosections, resulting in a high signal for PEPCK, but membranes in general, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in particular, were not identifiable as electron dense unit membranes. On the other hand, the vibratome sections of well-fixed tissue allowed good visualization of the ultrastructure of cellular organelles, with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum appearing as vesicles and tubules with electron dense unit membranes; however, the penetration of the gold-labeled antibody was limited to cells at the surface of the vibratome sections. In both procedures, PEPCK, as indicated by gold particles, is predominantly in the glycogen areas of the cytosome and not in mitochondria, nuclei, Golgi apparatus, or other cell organelles. Hepatocytes in periportal regions have a compact subcellular distribution of PEPCK shown by gold particles

  19. The activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in rat tissues. Assay techniques and effects of dietary and hormonal changes

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, Christopher I.; Smith, Stephen A.

    1975-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was assayed by three methods: (i) incorporation of H14CO3− into oxaloacetate: (ii) conversion of oxaloacetate into phosphoenolpyruvate, subsequently assayed enzymically; and (iii) transfer of 32P from [γ-32P]GTP to oxaloacetate. 2. Enzyme activity is increased in liver and epididymal adipose tissue in alloxan-diabetes and starvation, and in kidney in starved, acidotic and steroid-treated animals. 3. The ratios of the `back' to the `forward' reactions in liver, kidney and epididymal adipose tissue are different and characteristic of each tissue; they differ markedly from values reported for the purified mitochondrial enzyme. 4. The ratio of the `back' to `forward' reaction in any one tissue is constant in adrenalectomized, diabetic, acidotic and steroid-treated animals. 5. In starved animals, the ratio is increased in liver and kidney, but decreased in epididymal adipose tissue. 6. Administration of l-tryptophan results in an acute (1h) increase in activity measured in the `forward' direction alone in liver and epididymal adipose tissue, but not in kidney. PMID:1220693

  20. Re-examination of the roles of PEP and Mg2+ in the reaction catalysed by the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from leaves of Zea mays. Effects of the activators glucose 6-phosphate and glycine.

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Méndez, A; Rodríguez-Sotres, R; López-Valentín, D M; Muñoz-Clares, R A

    1998-01-01

    To study the effects of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and Mg2+ on the activity of the non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Zea mays leaves, steady-state measurements have been carried out with the free forms of PEP (fPEP) and Mg2+ (fMg2+), both in a near-physiological concentration range. At pH 7.3, in the absence of activators, the initial velocity data obtained with both forms of the enzyme are consistent with the exclusive binding of MgPEP to the active site and of fPEP to an activating allosteric site. At pH 8.3, and in the presence of saturating concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) or Gly, the free species also combined with the active site in the free enzyme, but with dissociation constants at least 35-fold that estimated for MgPEP. The latter dissociation constant was lowered to the same extent by saturating Glc6P and Gly, to approx. one-tenth and one-sixteenth in the non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated enzymes respectively. When Glc6P is present, fPEP binds to the active site in the free enzyme better than fMg2+, whereas the metal ion binds better in the presence of Gly. Saturation of the enzyme with Glc6P abolished the activation by fPEP, consistent with a common binding site, whereas saturation with Gly increased the affinity of the allosteric site for fPEP. Under all the conditions tested, our results suggest that fPEP is not able to combine with the allosteric site in the free enzyme, i.e. it cannot combine until after MgPEP, fPEP or fMg2+ are bound at the active site. The physiological role of Mg2+ in the regulation of the enzyme is only that of a substrate, mainly as part of the MgPEP complex. The kinetic properties of maize leaf PEPC reported here are consistent with the enzyme being well below saturation under the physiological concentrations of fMg2+ and PEP, particularly during the dark period; it is therefore suggested that the basal PEPC activity in vivo is very low, but highly

  1. Activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol represses transcription of the gene for the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) by deacetylating hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cytosolic isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK-C) is a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. While this enzyme is often over-expressed in diabetes and obesity, studies showed that decrease in its expression results in lessening the diseases condition in animal...

  2. Purification and comparison of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from the liver and kidney of the Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, A K; Al-Husayni, H; Power, D M

    1988-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was partially purified from camel liver and kidney by ammonium sulphate fractionation, gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. 2. The specific activity of the purified preparation from liver was 39.2 mumol/min per mg protein. 3. When isolated from the kidney the specific activity of the enzyme was very much higher 155.5 mumol/min per mg protein. 4. The enzyme from the two sources were similar in their pH optimum which was approx. 7.2 and their relative stability to thermal inactivation at 60 degrees C. 5. The mol. wt of the enzyme from both organs was estimated at 80,000 +/- 5000.

  3. Enhancement of porcine intramuscular fat content by overexpression of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zijian; Wang, Ying; Ren, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhengwei; Gu, Weiwang; Wu, Zhaoting; Chen, Lingyi; Mou, Lisha; Li, Rongfeng; Yang, Haiyuan; Dai, Yifan

    2017-03-02

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content has been generally recognized as a desirable trait in pork meat because of its positive effect on eating quality. An effective approach to enhance IMF content in pork is the generation of transgenic pigs. In this study, we used somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to generate cloned pigs exhibiting ectopic expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) driven by an α-skeletal-actin gene promoter, which was specifically expressed in skeletal muscle. Using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that PEPCK-C was functionally expressed and had a significant effect on total fatty acid content in the skeletal muscle of the transgenic pigs, while the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio showed no difference between transgenic and control pigs. Thus, genetically engineered PEPCK-C(mus) pigs may be an effective solution for the production of IMF-enriched pork.

  4. Cytosolic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Does Not Solely Control the Rate of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in the Intact Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Shawn C.; He, Tian Teng; Yan, Zheng; Lindner, Jill; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY When dietary carbohydrate is unavailable, glucose required to support metabolism in vital tissues is generated via gluconeogenesis in the liver. Expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), commonly considered the control point for liver gluconeogenesis, is normally regulated by circulating hormones to match systemic glucose demand. However, this regulation fails in diabetes. Because other molecular and metabolic factors can also influence gluconeogenesis, the explicit role of PEPCK protein content in the control of gluconeogenesis was unclear. In this study, metabolic control of liver gluconeogenesis was quantified in groups of mice with varying PEPCK protein content. Surprisingly, livers with a 90% reduction in PEPCK content showed only a ~40% reduction in gluconeogenic flux, indicating a lower than expected capacity for PEPCK protein content to control gluconeogenesis. However, PEPCK flux correlated tightly with TCA cycle activity, suggesting that under some conditions in mice, PEPCK expression must coordinate with hepatic energy metabolism to control gluconeogenesis. PMID:17403375

  5. Enhancement of porcine intramuscular fat content by overexpression of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zijian; Wang, Ying; Ren, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhengwei; Gu, Weiwang; Wu, Zhaoting; Chen, Lingyi; Mou, Lisha; Li, Rongfeng; Yang, Haiyuan; Dai, Yifan

    2017-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content has been generally recognized as a desirable trait in pork meat because of its positive effect on eating quality. An effective approach to enhance IMF content in pork is the generation of transgenic pigs. In this study, we used somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to generate cloned pigs exhibiting ectopic expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) driven by an α-skeletal-actin gene promoter, which was specifically expressed in skeletal muscle. Using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that PEPCK-C was functionally expressed and had a significant effect on total fatty acid content in the skeletal muscle of the transgenic pigs, while the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio showed no difference between transgenic and control pigs. Thus, genetically engineered PEPCK-Cmus pigs may be an effective solution for the production of IMF-enriched pork. PMID:28252054

  6. Control of phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase-mediated sugar transport in Escherichia coli by energization of the cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Reider, E; Wagner, E F; Schweiger, M

    1979-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase-mediated sugar transport in Escherichia coli is inhibited by the energized of the membrane. This was shown in intact cells as well as in membrane vesicles. Relaxation of the proton gradient by uncouplers stimulated the uptake of sugars via the phosphotransferase system in aerobically cultured cells. No such effect was seen in anaerobic cells, apparently because the cell membrane of these cells is poorly energized. Energization by respiration of D-lactate or ascorbate inhibited the phosphotransferase uptake system in membrane vesicles. This inhibition was reversed by the addition of cyanide. Oxamate, a specific inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase, prevented the inhibitory effect of D-lactate. Membrane vesicles prepared from a cytochrome-less mutant were not energized by D-lactate oxidation and the phosphotransferase uptake system was not inhibited. PMID:392504

  7. Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase Family in C3 and C4 Flaveria spp.1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Sophia H.; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Stühler, Kai; Mallmann, Julia; Groth, Georg; Gowik, Udo; Westhoff, Peter; Arsova, Borjana

    2014-01-01

    The key enzyme for C4 photosynthesis, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC), evolved from nonphotosynthetic PEPC found in C3 ancestors. In all plants, PEPC is phosphorylated by Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase (PPCK). However, differences in the phosphorylation pattern exist among plants with these photosynthetic types, and it is still not clear if they are due to interspecies differences or depend on photosynthetic type. The genus Flaveria contains closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, which are evolutionarily young and thus well suited for comparative analysis. To characterize the evolutionary differences in PPCK between plants with C3 and C4 photosynthesis, transcriptome libraries from nine Flaveria spp. were used, and a two-member PPCK family (PPCKA and PPCKB) was identified. Sequence analysis identified a number of C3- and C4-specific residues with various occurrences in the intermediates. Quantitative analysis of transcriptome data revealed that PPCKA and PPCKB exhibit inverse diel expression patterns and that C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. differ in the expression levels of these genes. PPCKA has maximal expression levels during the day, whereas PPCKB has maximal expression during the night. Phosphorylation patterns of PEPC varied among C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. too, with PEPC from the C4 species being predominantly phosphorylated throughout the day, while in the C3 species the phosphorylation level was maintained during the entire 24 h. Since C4 Flaveria spp. evolved from C3 ancestors, this work links the evolutionary changes in sequence, PPCK expression, and phosphorylation pattern to an evolutionary phase shift of kinase activity from a C3 to a C4 mode. PMID:24850859

  8. Increased Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) Gene Expression and Steatosis During Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Subgenome Replication: Role of Nonstructural Component-5A (NS5A) and CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein ß (C/EBPß)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated tra...

  9. A kinetic study of the effects of phosphate and organic phosphates on the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Crassula argentea.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C R; Rustin, P; Wedding, R T

    1989-05-15

    The effects of phosphate and several phosphate-containing compounds on the activity of purified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the crassulacean acid metabolism plant, Crassula argentea, were investigated. When assayed at subsaturating phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) concentrations, low concentrations of most of the compounds tested were found to stimulate PEPC activity. This activation, variable in extent, was found in all cases to be competitive with glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) stimulation, suggesting that these effectors bind to the Glc-6-P site. At higher concentrations, depending upon the effector molecule studied, deactivation, inhibition, or no response was observed. More detailed studies were performed with Glc-6-P, AMP, phosphoglycolate, and phosphate. AMP had previously been shown to be a specific ligand for the Glc-6-P site. The main effect of Glc-6-P and AMP on the kinetic parameters was to decrease the apparent Km and increase Vmax/Km. AMP also caused a decrease in the Vmax of the reaction. In contrast, phosphoglycolate acted essentially as a competitive inhibitor increasing the apparent Km for PEP and decreasing Vmax/Km. Inorganic phosphate had a biphasic effect on the kinetic parameters, resulting in a transient decrease in Km followed by an increase of the apparent Km for PEP with increasing concentration of phosphate. The Vmax also was decreased with increasing phosphate concentrations. Further, the enzyme appeared to respond to the complex of phosphate with magnesium. In the presence of a saturating concentration of AMP, no activation but rather inhibition was observed with increasing phosphate concentration. This is consistent with the binding of phosphate to two separate sites--the Glc-6-P activation site and an inhibitory site, a phenomenon that may be occurring with other phosphate containing compounds. High concentrations of phosphate with magnesium were found to protect enzyme activity when PEPC, previously shown to contain an

  10. Leaf growth is conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  11. Hormonal regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression is mediated through modulation of an already disrupted chromatin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, Y.T.; Granner, D.K.; Chalkley, R. . School of Medicine)

    1989-03-01

    The authors used indirect end labeling to identify a series of five hypersensitive (HS) sites in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. These sites were found at -4800 base pairs (bp) (site A), at -1300 bp (site B), over a broad domain between -400 and -30 bp (site C), at +4650 bp (site D), and at +6200 bp (site E). Sites A to D were detected only in cells capable of expressing the PEPCK gene, whereas site E was present in all of the cells examined thus far. The HS sites were present in H4IIE cells even when transcriptional activity was reduced to a minimum by treatment with insulin. Stimulation of transcription by a cyclic AMP analog to a 40-fold increase over the insulin-repressed level did not affect the main features of the HS sites. Furthermore, increased transcription did not disrupt the nucleosomal arrangement of the coding region of the gene, nor did it affect the immediate 5' region (site C), which is always nucleosome-free. In HTC cells, a rat hepatoma line that is hormonally responsive but unable to synthesize PEPCK mRNA, the four expression-specific HS sites were totally absent. The authors experimental results also showed that, although there is a general correlation between lack of DNA methylation and transcriptional competence of the PEPCK gene, the role, if any, of methylation in the regulation of PEPCK gene activity is likely to be exerted at very specific sites.

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) deficiency affects the germination, growth and fruit sugar content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Xing; Yin, Yong-Gen; Sanuki, Atsuko; Fukuda, Naoya; Ezura, Hiroshi; Matsukura, Chiaki

    2015-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key regulatory enzyme and is utilized in the gluconeogenesis pathway in plants. Although, its catalytic and regulatory properties are quite well understood, there are uncertainties regarding its physiological role in many plants tissues such as the flesh of developing fruits. To further understand the function of PEPCK in fruits and other tissues, RNAi transgenic tomato plants in which SlPEPCK transcription was down-regulated by either CaMV 35S constitutive promoter or the fruit-specific E8 promoter were generated and characterized on the basis of their phenotypic and metabolic aspects. In the PEPCK-deficient lines, prominent growth suppression of germinated seedlings was observed and other vegetative suppression appeared during the early stage of plant growth in the 35S promoter-driven lines. In particular, root elongation was most obviously suppressed in the germinated seedlings, indicating that the gluconeogenesis pathway is involved in the root growth of seedlings. Regarding the primary metabolism in fruit, the soluble sugar content tended to decrease, whereas the malate content tended to increase in ripening fruits of the RNAi lines compared with the wild type. These results indicate that activation of the gluconeogenesis pathway from organic acids to sugars occurs during ripening but is suppressed by the knocking down of the PEPCK gene, suggesting that PEPCK participates in determining the sugar/acid ratio in ripening fruit.

  13. The regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase by autophagy in low-glycolytic hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Yong; Lee, Hyangkyu; Park, Jeayeo; Lee, Misu; Park, Sae Whan; Kim, Ji Sook; Lee, Milim; Cho, Byoungchul; Kim, Kyungsup; Choi, Augustine M K; Kim, Chun K; Yun, Mijin

    2015-07-31

    The glycolytic phenotype is a dominant metabolic phenomenon in cancer and is reflected in becoming aggressive. Certain hepatocellular carcinoma lack increased glycolysis and prefer to uptake acetate than glucose for metabolism. Autophagy plays a role in preserving energies and nutrients when there is limited external nutrient supply and maintains glucose level of blood though supporting gluconeogenesis in the liver. As the role of autophagy and gluconeogenesis in HCC following the glycolic activity was not clear, we cultured HCC cells with different glycolytic levels in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) to induce autophagy and conducted the activity of gluconeogenesis. Both autophagy and gluconeogenesis were induced in low glycolytic HCC cells (HepG2). In glycolytic Hep3B cells, only autophagy without gluconeogenesis was induced upon starvation. When autophagy was blocked, the level of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was reduced in HepG2 cells and not in Hep3B. Altogether, we investigated contribution of hepatic gluconeogenesis to the metabolic phenotype of HCC cells and the role of autophagy as a potential mechanism regulating gluconeogenesis in low glycolytic HCC.

  14. Constitutive and dark-induced expression of Solanum tuberosum phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase enhances stomatal opening and photosynthetic performance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kebeish, Rashad; Niessen, Markus; Oksaksin, Mehtap; Blume, Christian; Peterhaensel, Christoph

    2012-02-01

    The effect of constitutive and dark-induced expression of Solanum tuberosum phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) on the opening state of stomata and photosynthetic performance in Arabidopsis thaliana plants was studied. Transcript accumulation analyses of the A. thaliana dark-induced (Din10 and Din6) and the Pisum sativum asparagine synthetase 2 promoters (Asn2) in transiently transformed tobacco leaves showed that Din10 promoter induced more DsRed accumulation in the dark compared to the other din genes. Overexpression of PEPC under the control of the constitutive enhanced CaMV 35S (p35SS) and dark-induced Din10 promoter in stably transformed A. thaliana plants increased the number of opened stomata in dark adapted leaves. Gas exchange measurements using A. thaliana plants transgenic for p35SS-PEPC and Din10-PEPC revealed a marked increase in stomatal conductance, transpiration, and dark respiration rates measured in the dark compared to wild-type plants. Moreover, measurement of CO(2) assimilation rates at different external CO(2) concentrations (C(a) ) and different light intensities shows an increase in the CO(2) assimilation rates in transgenic Arabidopsis lines compared to wild-type plants. This is considered as first step towards transferring the aspects of Crassulacean acid metabolism-like photosynthetic mechanism into C3 plants.

  15. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cucumber plants is increased both by ammonium and by acidification, and is present in the phloem.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Walker, Robert P; Técsi, László I; Lea, Peter J; Leegood, Richard C

    2004-05-01

    In cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was shown by activity measurements and immunoblots to be present in leaves, stems, roots, flowers, fruit and seed. However, immunolocalisation showed that it was present only in certain cell types. PEPCK was present in the companion cells of the adaxial phloem of minor veins, the adaxial and abaxial phloem of larger veins, the internal and external phloem of vascular bundles in petioles and stems, the phloem in roots and the extra-fascicular phloem in leaves, cotyledons, petioles and stems. Immunohistochemical evidence suggests that both the extra-fascicular phloem and the adaxial phloem are involved in the transport of amino acids. In roots and stems, the abundance of PEPCK was greatly increased by watering plants with a solution of ammonium chloride at low, but not at high pH. PEPCK also increased in leaves, but not roots or stems, of seedlings grown in an atmosphere containing 5% CO(2), and in roots and stems of seedlings watered with butyric acid. All these treatments are known to lower the pH of plant cells. Amino acid metabolism in the phloem may produce an excess of carbon skeletons, pH perturbations and an imbalance in the production/utilisation of NADH. This raises the possibility that PEPCK may function in the conversion of these carbon skeletons to PEP, which, depending on the energy requirements of the phloem, is subsequently utilised by either gluconeogenesis or the Krebs cycle, which both consume protons.

  16. Localization and hormonal control of serine dehydratase during metabolic acidosis differ markedly from those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tohru; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Matsushima, Takako; Kawamata, Seiichi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Kuroda, Kazunari; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Takata, Yoshimi; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Takusagawa, Fusao; Pitot, Henry C

    2003-08-01

    Serine dehydratase (SDH) is abundant in the rat liver but scarce in the kidney. When administrated with dexamethasone, the renal SDH activity was augmented 20-fold, whereas the hepatic SDH activity was affected little. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that SDH was localized to the proximal straight tubule of the nephron. To address the role of this hormone, rats were made acidotic by gavage of NH(4)Cl. Twenty-two hours later, the SDH activity was increased three-fold along with a six-fold increment in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity, a rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis. PEPCK, which is localized to the proximal tubules under the normal condition, spreads throughout the entire cortex to the outer medullary rays by acidosis, whereas SDH does not change regardless of treatment with dexamethasone or NH(4)Cl. When NH(4)Cl was given to adrenalectomized rats, in contrast to the SDH activity no longer increasing, the PEPCK activity responded to acidosis to the same extent as in the intact rats. A simultaneous administration of dexamethasone and NH(4)Cl into the adrenalectomized rats fully restored the SDH activity, demonstrating that the rise in the SDH activity during acidosis is primarily controlled by glucocorticoids. The present findings clearly indicate that the localization of SDH and its hormonal regulation during acidosis are strikingly different from those of PEPCK.

  17. Amylin impairment of insulin effects on glycogen synthesis and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression in rat primary cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Baqué, S; Guinovart, J J; Gómez-Foix, A M

    1994-01-01

    The ability of amylin to impair hepatic insulin action is controversial. We have found that the effect of amylin in primary cultured hepatocytes is strongly dependent on the culture conditions. Only in hepatocytes preincubated in the presence of fetal serum did amylin, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 nM, reduce insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis rate and glycogen accumulation without showing direct effects. Neither basal glycogen synthase nor glycogen phosphorylase activity was modified by amylin treatment. Nevertheless, amylin (100 nM) blocked the activation of glycogen synthase by insulin. Amylin also proved capable of opposing the reduction in the expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene induced by insulin, whereas the basal mRNA level of PEPCK was unaffected by amylin treatment. Thus, these results show that, in cultured rat hepatocytes, amylin is indeed able to interfere with insulin regulation of glycogenesis and PEPCK gene expression, favouring the hypothesis that amylin may modulate liver sensitivity to insulin. Images Figure 3 PMID:7998979

  18. Reaction of wild-type C365S, and C458S saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinases with fluorescent iodoacetamide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Krautwurst, H; Berti, M; Encinas, M V; Frey, P A

    1996-03-01

    The reactivities of Cys365 and Cys458 of ATP-dependent Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase against a range of sulfhydryl reagents have been investigated. The effect of pH on the second order reaction constants of N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide with mutant C458S and C365S PEP carboxykinases allowed the determination of pKa values of 9.4 and 9.1 for Cys365 and Cys458, respectively. The analysis of the inactivation rates of C458S and C365S mutant enzymes by several sulfhydryl reagents of different hydrophobicity showed that the microenvironment of these residues is rather polar. Anisotrophy measurements and acrylamide quenching experiments carried out with N-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-labeled mutant enzymes indicated a higher rotational freedom and solvent exposure for the probe linked to Cys458 than to Cys365. These findings point to differences in the protein microenvironments around Cys365 and Cys458 in S. cerevisiae PEP carboxykinase. A comparison of the results obtained with published data for GTP-dependent PEP carboxykinases, suggest significant differences for the protein region around the reactive cysteinyl residues in these enzymes.

  19. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+).

  20. Genome-wide Analysis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family and Their Response to Abiotic Stresses in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Zhong, Xiujuan; Cong, Yahui; Wang, Tingting; Yang, Songnan; Li, Yan; Gai, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) plays an important role in assimilating atmospheric CO2 during C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism photosynthesis, and also participates in various non-photosynthetic processes, including fruit ripening, stomatal opening, supporting carbon–nitrogen interactions, seed formation and germination, and regulation of plant tolerance to stresses. However, a comprehensive analysis of PEPC family in Glycine max has not been reported. Here, a total of ten PEPC genes were identified in soybean and denominated as GmPEPC1-GmPEPC10. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the PEPC proteins from 13 higher plant species including soybean, PEPC family could be classified into two subfamilies, which was further supported by analyses of their conserved motifs and gene structures. Nineteen cis-regulatory elements related to phytohormones, abiotic and biotic stresses were identified in the promoter regions of GmPEPC genes, indicating their roles in soybean development and stress responses. GmPEPC genes were expressed in various soybean tissues and most of them responded to the exogenously applied phytohormones. GmPEPC6, GmPEPC8 and GmPEPC9 were significantly induced by aluminum toxicity, cold, osmotic and salt stresses. In addition, the enzyme activities of soybean PEPCs were also up-regulated by these treatments, suggesting their potential roles in soybean response to abiotic stresses. PMID:27924923

  1. Characterization of mutant histidine-containing proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Waygood, E.B.; Reiche, B.; Hengstenberg, W.; Lee, J.S.

    1987-06-01

    Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) is common to all of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS) in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, except the fructose-specific PTS. Strains which lack HPr activity (ptsH) have been characterized in the past, and it has proved difficult to delineate between tight and leaky mutants. In this study four different parameters of ptsH strains were measured: in vitro sugar phosphorylation activity of the mutant HPr; detection of /sup 32/P-labeled P-HPr; ability of monoclonal antibodies to bind mutant HPr; and sensitivity of ptsH strains to fosfomycin. Tight ptsH strains could be defined; they were fosfomycin resistant and produced no HPr protein or completely inactive mutant HPr. All leaky ptsH strains were fosfomycin sensitive, Usually produced normal amounts of mutant HPr protein, and had low but measurable activity, and HPr was detectable as a phosphoprotein. This indicates that the regulatory functions of the PTS require a very low level of HPr activity (about 1%). The antibodies used to detect mutant HPr in crude extracts were two monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibodies Jel42 and Jel44. Both antibodies, which have different pIs, inhibited PTS sugar phosphorylation assays, but the antibody-JPr complex could still be phosphorylated by enzyme I. Preliminary evidence suggests that the antibodies bind to two different epitopes which are in part located in a ..beta..-sheet structure.

  2. ppc, the gene for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Rhodothermus obamensis: cloning, sequencing and overexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Takai, K; Sako, Y; Uchida, A

    1998-05-01

    The ppc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Rhodothermus obamensis, was directly sequenced by the thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL) PCR method. An ORF for a 937 amino acid polypeptide was found in the gene. The ppc gene had a high G+C content (66.2 mol%) and the third position of the codon exhibited strong preference for G or C usage (85.0 mol%). The calculated molecular mass was 107,848 Da, which was consistent with the molecular mass of the enzyme as determined by SDS-PAGE (100 kDa). The amino acid sequence of R. obamensis PEPC was closely related to that of PEPC from another thermophile, a Thermus sp., and from a mesophile, Corynebacterium glutamicum, exhibiting 45.3% or 37.7% identity and 61.5% or 56.5% similarity, respectively. By Southern analysis, the ppc gene was found to be present in a single copy in the genomic DNA of this organism. The cloned gene was expressed in Escherichia coli using a pET expression vector system and a thermostable recombinant PEPC was obtained. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the thermophilic and mesophilic PEPCs revealed distinct or common preferences for specific amino acid composition and substitutions in the two thermophilic enzymes.

  3. Insulinotropic effect of cinnamaldehyde on transcriptional regulation of pyruvate kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and GLUT4 translocation in experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Anand, Prachi; Murali, K Y; Tandon, Vibha; Murthy, P S; Chandra, Ramesh

    2010-06-07

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting about 6% of population worldwide with its complications and is rapidly reaching epidemic scale. Cinnamomum zeylanicum is widely used in alternative system of medicine for treatment of diabetes. In the present study, we have performed bioassay guided fractionation of chloroform extract of C. zeylaniucm and identified cinnamaldehyde (CND) as an active principle against diabetes. In continuation to it, a detailed study was undertaken to elucidate its mode of antidiabetic action in STZ induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of CND (20 mg/kg bw) to diabetic rats for 2 months showed significant improvement (p<0.001) in muscle and hepatic glycogen content. In vitro incubation of pancreatic islets with CND enhanced the insulin release compared to glibenclamide. The insulinotropic effect of CND was found to increase the glucose uptake through glucose transporter (GLUT4) translocation in peripheral tissues. The treatment also showed a significant improvement in altered enzyme activities of pyruvate kinase (PK) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and their mRNA expression levels. Furthermore, the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of CND could not be obtained even at 20 times (0.4 g/kg bw) of its effective dose. With the high margin of safety of CND, it can be developed as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of diabetes.

  4. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP): Characterization of the human PCK1 gene and localization distal to MODY on chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Chao Nan; Burgess, D.L.; Chamberlain, J.S.; Meisler, M.H. ); Keith, T.P.; Falls, K. )

    1993-06-01

    The human PCK 1 gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) was isolated and sequenced. There is 91% amino acid sequence identity (567/622 residues) between the human and the rat proteins, with conservation of intron/exon borders. A polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite with the structure (CA)[sub 16](TA)[sub 5](CA) was identified in the 3[prime] untranslated region of the cloned human PCK1 gene. This highly informative genetic marker has an estimated PIC value of 0.79 and heterozygosity of 0.81. Analysis of the RW pedigree demonstrated recombination between PCK1 and the MODY gene on chromosome 20. Multipoint linkage analysis of the reference pedigrees of the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain localized PCK1 on the genetic map of chromosome 20 at a position distal to markers that are closely linked to MODY. PCK1 is part of a conserved linkage group on mouse Chromosome 2 with identical gene order but expanded length in the human genome. 34ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Regulated high-level expression of the mannitol permease of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    van Weeghel, R P; Keck, W; Robillard, G T

    1990-01-01

    The structural gene (mtlA) of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannitol-transport protein (EIImtl) and its upstream promoter region (Pmtl) were subcloned approximately 150 base pairs downstream of a lambda PR promoter on a multicopy mutagenesis/expression vector and used to transform a mutant (MtlA-) E. coli strain. Induction at 42 degrees C led to 50 to 100-fold overproduction of EIImtl (5-10 mg/g of cell wet weight) relative to mannitol-induced levels in a wild-type (Mtl+) strain. Most of the overproduced protein was sequestered as an inactive form in inclusion bodies and cytoplasmic membranous structures. The protein could be extracted in an active form by rupturing the cells with lysozyme and sonication or with a passage through a French pressure cell and incubating the inclusion bodies and membranous structures with detergent (Lubrol PX or deoxycholate) in the presence of Q or S Sepharose ion-exchange resin for several hours. This procedure resulted in a 20- to 25-fold overproduction of active EIImtl compared with mannitol-induced wild-type levels. Images PMID:2181442

  6. Reciprocal Changes in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase and Pyruvate Kinase with Age Are a Determinant of Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yiyuan; Hakimi, Parvin; Kao, Clara; Kao, Allison; Liu, Ruifu; Janocha, Allison; Boyd-Tressler, Andrea; Hang, Xi; Alhoraibi, Hanna; Slater, Erin; Xia, Kevin; Cao, Pengxiu; Shue, Quinn; Ching, Tsui-Ting; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Dubyak, George R.; Berger, Nathan A.; Hanson, Richard W.; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Aging involves progressive loss of cellular function and integrity, presumably caused by accumulated stochastic damage to cells. Alterations in energy metabolism contribute to aging, but how energy metabolism changes with age, how these changes affect aging, and whether they can be modified to modulate aging remain unclear. In locomotory muscle of post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a progressive decrease in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C), a longevity-associated metabolic enzyme, and a reciprocal increase in glycolytic pyruvate kinase (PK) that were necessary and sufficient to limit lifespan. Decline in PEPCK-C with age also led to loss of cellular function and integrity including muscle activity, and cellular senescence. Genetic and pharmacologic interventions of PEPCK-C, muscle activity, and AMPK signaling demonstrate that declines in PEPCK-C and muscle function with age interacted to limit reproductive life and lifespan via disrupted energy homeostasis. Quantifications of metabolic flux show that reciprocal changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age shunted energy metabolism toward glycolysis, reducing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Last, calorie restriction countered changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age to elicit anti-aging effects via TOR inhibition. Thus, a programmed metabolic event involving PEPCK-C and PK is a determinant of aging that can be modified to modulate aging. PMID:26631730

  7. Project LEAF Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project LEAF has a goal of educating farmworkers about how to reduce pesticide exposure to their families from pesticide residues they may be inadvertently taking home on their clothing, etc. Find outreach materials.

  8. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer ( Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  9. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer (Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  10. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase 1 Gene (Pck1) Displays Parallel Evolution between Old World and New World Fruit Bats

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle. PMID:25807515

  11. Induction of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) during Acute Acidosis and Its Role in Acid Secretion by V-ATPase-Expressing Ionocytes

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Fumiya; Tseng, Yung-Che; Liu, Sian-Tai; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ching-Chun; Sung, Po-Hsuan; Uchida, Katsuhisa; Lin, Li-Yih; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar-Type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) takes the central role in pumping H+ through cell membranes of diverse organisms, which is essential for surviving acid-base fluctuating lifestyles or environments. In mammals, although glucose is believed to be an important energy source to drive V-ATPase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key enzyme for gluconeogenesis, is known to be activated in response to acidosis, the link between acid secretion and PEPCK activation remains unclear. In the present study, we used zebrafish larva as an in vivo model to show the role of acid-inducible PEPCK activity in glucose production to support higher rate of H+ secretion via V-ATPase, by utilizing gene knockdown, glucose supplementation, and non-invasive scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET). Zebrafish larvae increased V-ATPase-mediated acid secretion and transiently expression of Pck1, a zebrafish homolog of PEPCK, in response to acid stress. When pck1 gene was knocked down by specific morpholino, the H+ secretion via V-ATPase decreased, but this effect was rescued by supplementation of glucose into the yolk. By assessing changes in amino acid content and gene expression of respective enzymes, glutamine and glutamate appeared to be the major source for replenishment of Krebs cycle intermediates, which are subtracted by Pck1 activity. Unexpectedly, pck1 knockdown did not affect glutamine/glutamate catalysis, which implies that Pck1 does not necessarily drive this process. The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that acid-induced PEPCK provides glucose for acid-base homeostasis at an individual level, which is supported by rapid pumping of H+ via V-ATPase at the cellular level. PMID:25999794

  12. Glucose transport by a mutant of Streptococcus mutans unable to accumulate sugars via the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed Central

    Cvitkovitch, D G; Boyd, D A; Thevenot, T; Hamilton, I R

    1995-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans transports glucose via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). Earlier studies indicated that an alternate glucose transport system functions in this organism under conditions of high growth rates, low pH, or excess glucose. To identify this system, S. mutans BM71 was transformed with integration vector pDC-5 to generate a mutant, DC10, defective in the general PTS protein enzyme I (EI). This mutant expressed a defective EI that had been truncated by approximately 150 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus as revealed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with anti-EI antibody and Southern hybridizations with a fragment of the wild-type EI gene as a probe. Phosphotransfer assays utilizing 32P-PEP indicated that DC10 was incapable of phosphorylating HPr and EIIAMan, indicating a nonfunctional PTS. This was confirmed by the fact that DC10 was able to ferment glucose but not a variety of other PTS substrates and phosphorylated glucose with ATP and not PEP. Kinetic assays indicated that the non-PTS system exhibited an apparent Ks of 125 microM for glucose and a Vmax of 0.87 nmol mg (dry weight) of cells-1 min-1. Sugar competition experiments with DC10 indicated that the non-PTS transport system had high specificity for glucose since glucose transport was not significantly by a 100-fold molar excess of several competing sugar substrates, including 2-deoxyglucose and alpha-methylglucoside. These results demonstrate that S. mutans possesses a glucose transport system that can function independently of the PEP PTS. PMID:7730250

  13. The effects of stress and injury on the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the liver of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, J G; Heath, D F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of stress (diethyl ether anaesthesia for 4-8 min, or intravenous injection of 0.05 ml of a dimethyl sulphoxide/water mixture) and of a scald injury given under ether anaesthesia on hepatic PEPCK (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, EC 4.1.1.32) were studied in the post-absorptive rat. Injury raised PEPCK activity by about 70% in 2 h and by over 100% in 4 h, over three times as fast as in animals that had only been handled (controls). The two stresses, both of types commonly imposed in animal experiments, had almost as much effect as injury for the first 2 h, although much less thereafter. The roles of sympathetic stimulation and corticosterone in mediating these rises were studied by using alpha beta-blockers and trilostane respectively as inhibitors. (Trilostane only decreased corticosterone concentrations to a little above control values.) The ether-induced increase was somewhat decreased by alpha beta-blockade, but was only eliminated by combined alpha beta-blockade and trilostane. After injury, however, PEPCK synthesis was unaffected by either alpha beta-blockade or trilostane, although it was decreased by their combined action; and it seems that either corticosterone or sympathetic stimulation was sufficient to stimulate PEPCK synthesis maximally. Stimulation by corticosterone was much greater than reported previously by others, for reasons that are discussed. Sympathetic stimulation may have been mediated by glucagon and cyclic AMP, since injury raised portal glucagon concentrations, and stress and injury raised those of hepatic cyclic AMP. PEPCK synthesis was, however, stimulated despite increases in portal insulin concentration, and was not related to the [insulin]/[glucagon] ratio. Thus stress and injury over-rode normal control mechanisms. PMID:3006659

  14. Positive selection of Kranz and non-Kranz C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase amino acids in Suaedoideae (Chenopodiaceae).

    PubMed

    Rosnow, Josh J; Edwards, Gerald E; Roalson, Eric H

    2014-07-01

    In subfamily Suaedoideae, four independent gains of C4 photosynthesis are proposed, which includes two parallel origins of Kranz anatomy (sections Salsina and Schoberia) and two independent origins of single-cell C4 anatomy (Bienertia and Suaeda aralocaspica). Additional phylogenetic support for this hypothesis was generated from sequence data of the C-terminal portion of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene used in C4 photosynthesis (ppc-1) in combination with previous sequence data. ppc-1 sequence was generated for 20 species in Suaedoideae and two outgroup Salsola species that included all types of C4 anatomies as well as two types of C3 anatomies. A branch-site test for positively selected codons was performed using the software package PAML. From labelling of the four branches where C4 is hypothesized to have developed (foreground branches), residue 733 (maize numbering) was identified to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 and residue 868 at the >0.95 interval using Bayes empirical Bayes (BEB). When labelling all the branches within C4 clades, the branch-site test identified 13 codons to be under selection with a posterior probability >0.95 by BEB; this is discussed considering current information on functional residues. The signature C4 substitution of an alanine for a serine at position 780 in the C-terminal end (which is considered a major determinant of affinity for PEP) was only found in four of the C4 species sampled, while eight of the C4 species and all the C3 species have an alanine residue; indicating that this substitution is not a requirement for C4 function.

  15. Identification of tumor necrosis factor as a transcriptional regulator of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene following endotoxin treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M R; McCallum, R E

    1992-01-01

    The decreased synthesis of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, that occurs during endotoxemia was shown previously in rats to occur at the transcriptional level. In the current study, the exogenous administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a proximal mediator of endotoxic shock, reduced the PEPCK transcription rate, mRNAPEPCK levels, and PEPCK enzyme activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner in CD-1 mice. Comparable amounts of circulating TNF were measured in mice 2 h after injection of human recombinant TNF (10(5) U) or a 50% lethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg). Direct action of TNF to decrease the PEPCK transcription rate was confirmed in vitro with H-4-II-E Reuber hepatoma cells, in which a dose-dependent inhibition of PEPCK transcription was observed with 1 to 100 U of TNF per ml. A role for TNF-elicited changes in PEPCK gene expression during endotoxemia was confirmed by the protective effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies to recombinant murine TNF. C57BL/6 mice passively immunized with anti-TNF 4 h prior to endotoxin challenge exhibited normal PEPCK enzyme activity. Neutralization of circulating TNF with anti-TNF failed, however, to prevent the hypoglycemia commonly observed during endotoxemia, suggesting the participation of other mediators. Anti-TNF treatment reduced circulating interleukins 1 and 6 at 3 and 6 h after endotoxin treatment, respectively. These results suggest that during endotoxemia, the development of hypoglycemia is multifaceted and that several cytokines are most likely involved. The findings from the Reuber hepatoma cell model afford an opportunity in future work to map putative cytokine response elements in the PEPCK promoter responsible for perturbed hormonal regulation of the gene during endotoxemia. PMID:1398916

  16. Novel listerial glycerol dehydrogenase- and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinase system connected to the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Monniot, Céline; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Deutscher, Josef; Milohanic, Eliane

    2012-09-01

    Several bacteria use glycerol dehydrogenase to transform glycerol into dihydroxyacetone (Dha). Dha is subsequently converted into Dha phosphate (Dha-P) by an ATP- or phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent Dha kinase. Listeria innocua possesses two potential PEP-dependent Dha kinases. One is encoded by 3 of the 11 genes forming the glycerol (gol) operon. This operon also contains golD (lin0362), which codes for a new type of Dha-forming NAD(+)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase. The subsequent metabolism of Dha requires its phosphorylation via the PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system components enzyme I, HPr, and EIIA(Dha)-2 (Lin0369). P∼EIIA(Dha)-2 transfers its phosphoryl group to DhaL-2, which phosphorylates Dha bound to DhaK-2. The resulting Dha-P is probably metabolized mainly via the pentose phosphate pathway, because two genes of the gol operon encode proteins resembling transketolases and transaldolases. In addition, purified Lin0363 and Lin0364 exhibit ribose-5-P isomerase (RipB) and triosephosphate isomerase activities, respectively. The latter enzyme converts part of the Dha-P into glyceraldehyde-3-P, which, together with Dha-P, is metabolized via gluconeogenesis to form fructose-6-P. Together with another glyceraldehyde-3-P molecule, the transketolase transforms fructose-6-P into intermediates of the pentose phosphate pathway. The gol operon is preceded by golR, transcribed in the opposite orientation and encoding a DeoR-type repressor. Its inactivation causes the constitutive but glucose-repressible expression of the entire gol operon, including the last gene, encoding a pediocin immunity-like (PedB-like) protein. Its elevated level of synthesis in the golR mutant causes slightly increased immunity against pediocin PA-1 compared to the wild-type strain or a pedB-like deletion mutant.

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 gene (Pck1) displays parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yin, Qiuyuan; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle.

  18. The pepper phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CaPEPCK1 is involved in plant immunity against bacterial and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-09-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a member of the lyase family, is involved in the metabolic pathway of gluconeogenesis in organisms. Although the major function of PEPCK in gluconeogenesis is well established, it is unclear whether this enzyme is involved in plant immunity. Here, we isolated and identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) PEPCK (CaPEPCK1) gene from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaPEPCK1 was strongly expressed in pepper leaves during the incompatible interaction with avirulent Xcv and in response to environmental stresses, especially salicylic acid (SA) treatment. PEPCK activity was low in healthy leaves but dramatically increased in avirulent Xcv-infected leaves. Knock-down expression of CaPEPCK1 by virus-induced gene silencing resulted in high levels of susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Xcv infection. CaPEPCK1 silencing in pepper compromised induction of the basal defense-marker genes CaPR1 (pathogenesis-related 1 protein), CaPR10 (pathogenesis-related 10 protein) and CaDEF1 (defensin) during Xcv infection. SA accumulation was also significantly suppressed in the CaPEPCK1-silenced pepper leaves infected with Xcv. CaPEPCK1 in an Arabidopsis overexpression (OX) line inhibited the proliferation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa). CaPEPCK1-OX plants developed more rapidly, with enlarged leaves, compared to wild-type plants. The T-DNA insertion Arabidopsis orthologous mutants pck1-3 and pck1-4 were more susceptible to the bacterial Pst and oomycete Hpa pathogens than the wild type. Taken together, these results suggest that CaPEPCK positively contributes to plant innate immunity against hemibiotrophic bacterial and obligate biotrophic oomycete pathogens.

  19. Increasing the conformational entropy of the Omega-loop lid domain in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase impairs catalysis and decreases catalytic fidelity .

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Holyoak, Todd

    2010-06-29

    Many studies have shown that the dynamic motions of individual protein segments can play an important role in enzyme function. Recent structural studies of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) demonstrate that PEPCK contains a 10-residue Omega-loop domain that acts as an active site lid. On the basis of these structural studies, we have previously proposed a model for the mechanism of PEPCK catalysis in which the conformation of this mobile lid domain is energetically coupled to ligand binding, resulting in the closed conformation of the lid, necessary for correct substrate positioning, becoming more energetically favorable as ligands associate with the enzyme. Here we test this model by introducing a point mutation (A467G) into the center of the Omega-loop lid that is designed to increase the entropic penalty for lid closure. Structural and kinetic characterization of this mutant enzyme demonstrates that the mutation has decreased the favorability of the enzyme adapting the closed lid conformation. As a consequence of this shift in the equilibrium defining the conformation of the active site lid, the enzyme's ability to stabilize the reaction intermediate is weakened, resulting in catalytic defect. This stabilization is initially surprising, as the lid domain makes no direct contacts with the enolate intermediate formed during the reaction. Furthermore, during the conversion of OAA to PEP, the destabilization of the lid-closed conformation results in the reaction becoming decoupled as the enolate intermediate is protonated rather than phosphorylated, resulting in the formation of pyruvate. Taken together, the structural and kinetic characterization of A467G-PEPCK supports our model of the role of the active site lid in catalytic function and demonstrates that the shift in the lowest-energy conformation between open and closed lid states is a function of the free energy available to the enzyme through ligand binding and the entropic

  20. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein kinase from developing castor oil seeds: partial purification, characterization, and reversible control by photosynthate supply.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Jhadeswar; Plaxton, William C

    2007-10-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) protein kinase (PPCK) was purified approximately 1,500-fold from developing castor oil seeds (COS). Gel filtration and immunoblotting with anti-(rice PPCK2)-immune serum indicated that this Ca2+-insensitive PPCK exists as a 31-kDa monomer. COS PPCK-mediated rephosphorylation of the 107-kDa subunit (p107) of COS PEPC1 (Km = 2.2 microM) activated PEPC1 by approximately 80% when assayed under suboptimal conditions (pH 7.3, 0.2 mM PEP, and 0.125 mM malate). COS PPCK displayed remarkable selectivity for phosphorylating COS PEPC1 (relative to tobacco, sorghum, or maize PEPCs), exhibited a broad pH-activity optima of approximately pH 8.5, and at pH 7.3 was activated 40-65% by 1 mM PEP, or 10 mM Gln or Asn, but inhibited 65% by 10 mM L-malate. The possible control of COS PPCK by disulfide-dithiol interconversion was suggested by its rapid inactivation and subsequent reactivation when incubated with oxidized glutathione and then dithiothreitol. In vitro PPCK activity correlated with in vivo p107 phosphorylation status, with both peaking in mid-cotyledon to full-cotyledon developing COS. Notably, PPCK activity and p107 phosphorylation of developing COS were eliminated following pod excision or prolonged darkness of intact plants. Both effects were fully reversed 12 h following reillumination of darkened plants. These results implicate a direct relationship between the up-regulation of COS PPCK and p107 phosphorylation during the recommencement of photosynthate delivery from illuminated leaves to the non-photosynthetic COS. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that PEPC and PPCK participate in the control of photosynthate partitioning into C-skeletons needed as precursors for key biosynthetic pathways of developing COS.

  1. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  2. Functional reconstitution of the purified phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannitol-specific transport system of Escherichia coli in phospholipid vesicles: coupling between transport and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Elferink, M G; Driessen, A J; Robillard, G T

    1990-01-01

    Purified mannitol-specific enzyme II (EII) from Escherichia coli was reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles with the aid of a detergent-dialysis procedure followed by a freeze-thaw sonication step. The orientation of EII in the proteoliposomes was random. The cytoplasmic moiety of the inverted EII could be removed with trypsin without effecting the integrity of the liposomal membrane. This enabled us to study the two different EII orientations independently. The population of inverted EII molecules was monitored by measuring active extrusion of mannitol after the addition of phosphoenolpyruvate, EI, and histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) at the outside of the vesicles. The population of correctly oriented EII molecules was monitored by measuring active uptake of mannitol with internal phosphoenolpyruvate, EI, and HPr. A low rate of facilitated diffusion of mannitol via the unphosphorylated carrier could be measured. On the other hand, a high phosphorylation activity without translocation was observed at the outside of the liposomes. The kinetics of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent transport reaction and the nonvectorial phosphorylation reaction were compared. Transport of mannitol into the liposomes via the correctly oriented EII molecules occurred with a high affinity (Km, lower than 10 microM) and with a relatively low Vmax. Phosphorylation at the outside of the liposomes catalyzed by the inverted EII molecules occurred with a low affinity (Km of about 66 microM), while the maximal velocity was about 10 times faster than the transport reaction. The latter observation is kinetic proof for the lack of strict coupling between transport and phosphorylation in these enzymes. Images PMID:2123863

  3. Comparative leaf development in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2014-02-01

    Recent accumulation of our knowledge on basic leaf development mechanisms in model angiosperm species has allowed us to pursue evolutionary development (evo/devo) studies of various kinds of leaf development. As a result, unexpected findings and clues have been unearthed aiding our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the diversity of leaf morphology, although the covered remain limited. In this review, we highlight recent findings of diversified leaf development in angiosperms.

  4. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  5. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  6. Metabolic engineering for the production of shikimic acid in an evolved Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is utilized in the synthesis of oseltamivir-phosphate, an anti-influenza drug. In this work, metabolic engineering approaches were employed to produce SA in Escherichia coli strains derived from an evolved strain (PB12) lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS-) but with capacity to grow on glucose. Derivatives of PB12 strain were constructed to determine the effects of inactivating aroK, aroL, pykF or pykA and the expression of plasmid-coded genes aroGfbr, tktA, aroB and aroE, on SA synthesis. Results Batch cultures were performed to evaluate the effects of genetic modifications on growth, glucose consumption, and aromatic intermediate production. All derivatives showed a two-phase growth behavior with initial high specific growth rate (μ) and specific glucose consumption rate (qs), but low level production of aromatic intermediates. During the second growth phase the μ decreased, whereas aromatic intermediate production reached its maximum. The double aroK- aroL- mutant expressing plasmid-coded genes (strain PB12.SA22) accumulated SA up to 7 g/L with a yield of SA on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol and a total aromatic compound yield (TACY) of 0.38 mol/mol. Single inactivation of pykF or pykA was performed in PB12.SA22 strain. Inactivation of pykF caused a decrease in μ, qs, SA production, and yield; whereas TACY increased by 33% (0.5 mol/mol). Conclusions The effect of increased availability of carbon metabolites, their channeling into the synthesis of aromatic intermediates, and disruption of the SA pathway on SA production was studied. Inactivation of both aroK and aroL, and transformation with plasmid-coded genes resulted in the accumulation of SA up to 7 g/L with a yield on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol PB12.SA22, which represents the highest reported yield. The pykF and pykA genes were inactivated in strain PB12.SA22 to increase the production of aromatic compounds in the PTS- background. Results

  7. Rapid Metabolic Changes in the Wounding Response of Leaf Discs following Excision

    PubMed Central

    Macnicol, Peter K.

    1976-01-01

    The dark respiration rate of discs from fully expanded tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum) increased linearly with decreasing diameter, the relative increase being independent of leaf age. The wound respiration responsible for this situation reached a plateau within 15 minutes of excision. Metabolite analysis gave evidence for two independent effects, also unrelated to age. The first was a forward crossover between phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate which was found as early as 1 minute after excision and persisted for up to 40 minutes. It was attributed to activation of pyruvate kinase by a changed ionic balance resulting from membrane damage, was accompanied by a reverse crossover between triose phosphates and 3-phosphoglycerate, and was localized in the outer region of the discs. The second effect was a rapid rise in hexose monophosphate and ATP levels throughout the discs. After 1 to 10 minutes the ATP/ADP ratio rose strongly for at least 3 hours; after 20 to 40 minutes there was net synthesis of adenine nucleotide as ATP. These results indicate that extrapolation from leaf discs to intact leaves is highly inadvisable. PMID:16659430

  8. [Effect of preparations exhibiting cytokinin-like activity on the specific density of leaf in grasses].

    PubMed

    Cherniad'ev, I I

    2002-01-01

    The effects of synthetic preparations exhibiting cytokinin-like activity (6-benzylaminopurine, Thidiazuron, and kartolin-2) on the specific leaf area (SLA) were studied in plants of the family Gramineae (wheat, Triticum aestivum L.; meadow fescue, Festuca pratensis Huds.; and reed fescue, F. arindinacea Schreb.). At the early stages of ontogeny (until the leaf area reached 50-60% of the maximum value), treatment of plants of the three species with cytokinin-like preparations caused an increase in SLA. The SLA value in these plants was correlated with the rate of photosynthetic assimilation of carbon dioxide and activities of carbon metabolism enzymes: ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39), NAD-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37), and NADP-glyceraldehydrophosphate dehydrogenase complex, which includes phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) and glyceraldehydrophosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13). However, there was no correlation of SLA with the activity of phospho(enol)pyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31), an anaplerotic carboxylation enzyme of grasses. SLA is suggested to reflect the state and activity of the photosynthetic apparatus and can be recommended as a characteristic of photosynthesis variability (e.g., caused by cytokinin-like preparations).

  9. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  10. Evolution of C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Flaveria, a conserved serine residue in the carboxyl-terminal part of the enzyme is a major determinant for C4-specific characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, O E; Westhoff, P; Svensson, P

    2000-09-08

    C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases have evolved from ancestral C3 isoforms during the evolution of angiosperms and gained distinct kinetic and regulatory properties compared with the C3 isozymes. To identify amino acid residues and/or domains responsible for these C4-specific properties the C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase of Flaveria trinervia (C4) was compared with its orthologue in the closely related C3 plant Flaveria pringlei. Reciprocal enzyme chimera were constructed and the kinetic constants, K(0.5) and k(cat), as well as the Hill coefficient, h, were determined for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate both in the presence and absence of the activator glucose 6-phosphate. By this approach two regions were identified which determined most of the kinetic differences of the C4 and C3 ppcA phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases with respect to the substrate PEP. In addition, the experiments suggest that the two regions do not act additively but interact with each other. The region between amino acids 296 and 437 is essential for activation by glucose 6-phosphate. The carboxyl-terminal segment between amino acids 645 and 966 contains a C4 conserved serine or a C3 invariant alanine at position 774 in the respective enzyme isoform. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that this position is a key determinant for the kinetic properties of the two isozymes.

  11. The worldwide leaf economics spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wright, Ian J; Reich, Peter B; Westoby, Mark; Ackerly, David D; Baruch, Zdravko; Bongers, Frans; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Chapin, Terry; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Diemer, Matthias; Flexas, Jaume; Garnier, Eric; Groom, Philip K; Gulias, Javier; Hikosaka, Kouki; Lamont, Byron B; Lee, Tali; Lee, William; Lusk, Christopher; Midgley, Jeremy J; Navas, Marie-Laure; Niinemets, Ulo; Oleksyn, Jacek; Osada, Noriyuki; Poorter, Hendrik; Poot, Pieter; Prior, Lynda; Pyankov, Vladimir I; Roumet, Catherine; Thomas, Sean C; Tjoelker, Mark G; Veneklaas, Erik J; Villar, Rafael

    2004-04-22

    Bringing together leaf trait data spanning 2,548 species and 175 sites we describe, for the first time at global scale, a universal spectrum of leaf economics consisting of key chemical, structural and physiological properties. The spectrum runs from quick to slow return on investments of nutrients and dry mass in leaves, and operates largely independently of growth form, plant functional type or biome. Categories along the spectrum would, in general, describe leaf economic variation at the global scale better than plant functional types, because functional types overlap substantially in their leaf traits. Overall, modulation of leaf traits and trait relationships by climate is surprisingly modest, although some striking and significant patterns can be seen. Reliable quantification of the leaf economics spectrum and its interaction with climate will prove valuable for modelling nutrient fluxes and vegetation boundaries under changing land-use and climate.

  12. Establishment of an effective TLC bioautographic method for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra phosphoglucose isomerase inhibition by phosphoenolpyruvate.

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Polak, Beata; Chomicki, Adam; Ginalska, Grażyna

    2016-12-01

    A bioautographic assay based on thin layer chromatography was developed for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) detecting as a known but rarely studied inhibitor of phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI). The protocol with NADP(+)/NBT/PMS (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate/nitrotetrazolium blue chloride/phenazine methosulfate) staining was capable of detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra PGI inhibition using PEP. According to this method, visibly brighter spots (zones) against purple background are observed in the area of inhibition of the above-mentioned enzyme activity. The detection limit for PEP as an inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra PGI was 226 μg per spot/zone. Noteworthy is that we are the first authors to have successfully used a bioautographic assay to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra PGI inhibition by PEP.

  13. Cloning, expression, purification and physical and kinetic characterization of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from orange (Citrus sinensis osbeck var. Valencia) fruit juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Valeria E; Figueroa, Carlos M; Andreo, Carlos S; Iglesias, Alberto A; Podestá, Florencio E

    2010-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPCase) from orange fruit juice sacs has been cloned and heterogously expressed in high yield. The purified recombinant enzyme displays properties typical of plant PEPCase, including activation by sugar phosphates and inhibition by malate and citrate. Malate inhibition is weak in the physiological pH range, and the enzyme is also poorly affected by Glu and Asp, known inhibitors of C(3) plants PEPCases. However, it is strongly inhibited by citrate. Orange fruit PEPCase phosphorylation by mammalian protein kinase A decreased inhibition by malate. The enzyme presents an unusual high molecular mass in the absence of PEP, while in its presence it displays a more common tetrameric arrangement. The overall properties of the enzyme suggest that it is suited for organic acid synthesis and NADH reoxidation in the mature fruit. The present study provides the first analysis of a recombinant fruit PEPCase.

  14. The bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozyme from developing castor oil seeds is subject to in vivo regulatory phosphorylation at serine-451.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, Katie J; O'Leary, Brendan; Brikis, Carolyne; Rao, Srinath K; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; Plaxton, William C

    2012-04-05

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly controlled anaplerotic enzyme situated at a pivotal branch point of plant carbohydrate-metabolism. In developing castor oil seeds (COS) a novel allosterically-densensitized 910-kDa Class-2 PEPC hetero-octameric complex arises from a tight interaction between 107-kDa plant-type PEPC and 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting with anti-phosphoSer451 specific antibodies established that COS BTPC is in vivo phosphorylated at Ser451, a highly conserved target residue that occurs within an intrinsically disordered region. This phosphorylation was enhanced during COS development or in response to depodding. Kinetic characterization of a phosphomimetic (S451D) mutant indicated that Ser451 phosphorylation inhibits the catalytic activity of BTPC subunits within the Class-2 PEPC complex.

  15. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV–V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  16. Unraveling the evolutionary history of the phosphoryl-transfer chain of the phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase system through phylogenetic analyses and genome context

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) plays a major role in sugar transport and in the regulation of essential physiological processes in many bacteria. The PTS couples solute transport to its phosphorylation at the expense of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and it consists of general cytoplasmic phosphoryl transfer proteins and specific enzyme II complexes which catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of solutes. Previous studies have suggested that the evolution of the constituents of the enzyme II complexes has been driven largely by horizontal gene transfer whereas vertical inheritance has been prevalent in the general phosphoryl transfer proteins in some bacterial groups. The aim of this work is to test this hypothesis by studying the evolution of the phosphoryl transfer proteins of the PTS. Results We have analyzed the evolutionary history of the PTS phosphoryl transfer chain (PTS-ptc) components in 222 complete genomes by combining phylogenetic methods and analysis of genomic context. Phylogenetic analyses alone were not conclusive for the deepest nodes but when complemented with analyses of genomic context and functional information, the main evolutionary trends of this system could be depicted. Conclusion The PTS-ptc evolved in bacteria after the divergence of early lineages such as Aquificales, Thermotogales and Thermus/Deinococcus. The subsequent evolutionary history of the PTS-ptc varied in different bacterial lineages: vertical inheritance and lineage-specific gene losses mainly explain the current situation in Actinobacteria and Firmicutes whereas horizontal gene transfer (HGT) also played a major role in Proteobacteria. Most remarkably, we have identified a HGT event from Firmicutes or Fusobacteria to the last common ancestor of the Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Shewanellaceae and Vibrionaceae. This transfer led to extensive changes in the metabolic and regulatory networks of these bacteria including the development of a

  17. Coutilization of glucose and glycerol enhances the production of aromatic compounds in an Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Karla; de Anda, Ramón; Hernández, Georgina; Escalante, Adelfo; Gosset, Guillermo; Ramírez, Octavio T; Bolívar, Francisco G

    2008-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli strains lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) are capable of coutilizing glucose and other carbon sources due to the absence of catabolite repression by glucose. In these strains, the lack of this important regulatory and transport system allows the coexistence of glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. Strains lacking PTS have been constructed with the goal of canalizing part of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) not consumed in glucose transport to the aromatic pathway. The deletion of the ptsHIcrr operon inactivates PTS causing poor growth on this sugar; nonetheless, fast growing mutants on glucose have been isolated (PB12 strain). However, there are no reported studies concerning the growth potential of a PTS- strain in mixtures of different carbon sources to enhance the production of aromatics compounds. Results PB12 strain is capable of coutilizing mixtures of glucose-arabinose, glucose-gluconate and glucose-glycerol. This capacity increases its specific growth rate (μ) given that this strain metabolizes more moles of carbon source per unit time. The presence of plasmids pRW300aroGfbr and pCLtktA reduces the μ of strain PB12 in all mixtures of carbon sources, but enhances the productivity and yield of aromatic compounds, especially in the glucose-glycerol mixture, as compared to glucose or glycerol cultures. No acetate was detected in the glycerol and the glucose-glycerol batch fermentations. Conclusion Due to the lack of catabolite repression, PB12 strain carrying multicopy plasmids containing tktA and aroGfbr genes is capable of coutilizing glucose and other carbon sources; this capacity, reduces its μ but increases the production of aromatic compounds. PMID:18211716

  18. Coimmunopurification of phosphorylated bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases with the plastidial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from developing castor oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; O'Leary, Brendan; Spang, H Elizabeth; MacDonald, Justin A; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William C

    2008-03-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) interactome of developing castor oil seed (COS; Ricinus communis) endosperm was assessed using coimmunopurification (co-IP) followed by proteomic analysis. Earlier studies suggested that immunologically unrelated 107-kD plant-type PEPCs (p107/PTPC) and 118-kD bacterial-type PEPCs (p118/BTPC) are subunits of an unusual 910-kD hetero-octameric class 2 PEPC complex of developing COS. The current results confirm that a tight physical interaction occurs between p118 and p107 because p118 quantitatively coimmunopurified with p107 following elution of COS extracts through an anti-p107-IgG immunoaffinity column. No PEPC activity or immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides were detected in the corresponding flow-through fractions. Although BTPCs lack the N-terminal phosphorylation motif characteristic of PTPCs, Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein staining, immunoblotting with phospho-serine (Ser)/threonine Akt substrate IgG, and phosphate-affinity PAGE established that coimmunopurified p118 was multiphosphorylated at unique Ser and/or threonine residues. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of an endoproteinase Lys-C p118 peptide digest demonstrated that Ser-425 is subject to in vivo proline-directed phosphorylation. The co-IP of p118 with p107 did not appear to be influenced by their phosphorylation status. Because p118 phosphorylation was unchanged 48 h following elimination of photosynthate supply due to COS depodding, the signaling mechanisms responsible for photosynthate-dependent p107 phosphorylation differ from those controlling p118's in vivo phosphorylation. A 110-kD PTPC coimmunopurified with p118 and p107 when depodded COS was used. The plastidial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC(pl)) was identified as a novel PEPC interactor. Thus, a putative metabolon involving PEPC and PDC(pl) could function to channel carbon from phosphoenolpyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A and/or to recycle CO(2) from PDC(pl) to PEPC.

  19. Leaf Extract from Lithocarpus polystachyus Rehd. Promote Glycogen Synthesis in T2DM Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingying; Vanegas, Diana; McLamore, Eric Scott; Shen, Yingbai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of leaf extract from Lithocarpus polystachyus Rehd. on type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the active ingredients of this effect. In addition, this study determined, for the first time, the underlying molecular and pharmacological mechanisms of the extracts on hyperglycemia using long-term double high diet-fed and streptozotocin (STZ) induced type II diabetic mice. In the present study, leaf extract, phloridzin and trilobatin were assessed in vivo (gavage) and in vitro (non-invasive micro-test technique, NMT) in experimental T2DM mice. The biochemical parameters were measured including blood glucose and blood lipid level, liver biochemical indexes, and hepatic glycogen. The relative expression of glycometabolism-related genes was detected. The effect of leaf extracts on physiological glucose flux in liver tissue from control and T2DM mice was also investigated. Body weight of experimental T2DM mice increased significantly after the first week, but stabilized over the subsequent three weeks; body weight of all other groups did not change during the four weeks’ study. After four weeks, all treatment groups decreased blood glucose, and treatment with leaf extract had numerous positive effects: a) promoted in glucose uptake in liver, b) increased synthesis of liver glycogen, c) reduced oxidative stress, d) up-regulation of glucokinase (GK), glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS) expression in liver, e) down-regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-P) expression, and f) ameliorated blood lipid levels. Both treatment with trilobatin or phloridzin accelerated liver glycogen synthesis, decreased oxidative stress and increased expression of GK. IRS and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) were both up-regulated after treatment with trilobatin. Expression of GLUT2, PEPCK and G-6-P were also increased in liver tissue after treatment with phloridzin. Our data

  20. How to pattern a leaf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, an...

  1. Subcellular Localization of a UDP-Glucose:Aldehyde Cyanohydrin β-Glucosyl Transferase in Epidermal Plastids of Sorghum Leaf Blades 1

    PubMed Central

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Thayer, Susan S.; Conn, Eric E.

    1982-01-01

    Epidermal and mesophyll protoplasts, prepared from leaf blades of 6-day-old light-grown Sorghum bicolor seedlings were separated by differential sedimentation and assayed for a number of enzymes. The epidermal protoplasts contained higher levels of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase (EC 1.6.2.4), triose phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.1), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31), and a UDP-glucose:cyanohydrin β-glucosyl transferase (EC 2.4.1.85), but lower levels of NADP+ triosephosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) than did mesophyll protoplasts. When protoplast preparations were lysed and applied to linear sucrose density gradients, triosephosphate isomerase was found to be present in epidermal plastids. A significant fraction (41%) of the glucosyl transferase activity was also associated with the epidermal plastids. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16662753

  2. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-07

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements.

  3. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  4. Diffuse and specular characteristics of leaf reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Lois

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the evolution of current understanding of the mechanisms of leaf reflectance is reviewed. The use of measurements of polarized reflectance to separate leaf reflectance into diffuse and specular components is discussed. A section on the factors influencing leaf reflectance - leaf structure and physiological disturbances - is included along with discussion on the manner in which these influences are manifested.

  5. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface...

  6. Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling using Fresnel's equation (Kumar and Silva, 1973) and Snell's Law successfully approximated the spectral curve for a 0.25-mm turgid oak leaf lying on a Halon background. Calculations were made for ten interfaces, air-wax, wax-cellulose, cellulose-water, cellulose-air, air-water, and their inverses. A water path of 0.5 mm yielded acceptable results, and it was found that assignment of more weight to those interfaces involving air versus water or cellulose, and less to those involving wax, decreased the standard deviation of the error for all wavelengths. Data suggest that the air-cell interface is not the only important contributor to the overall reflectance of a leaf. Results also argue against the assertion that the near infrared plateau is a function of cell structure within the leaf.

  7. Experiments in Whole Leaf Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, J. C.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Described is a simple experimental system, which uses radioactive carbon dioxide to study whole leaf photosynthesis under a variety of conditions. Other experiments and simple apparatus for the experiments are also described. (Author/RH)

  8. Why do leaf-tying caterpillars abandon their leaf ties?

    PubMed Central

    Sliwinski, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-tying caterpillars act as ecosystem engineers by building shelters between overlapping leaves, which are inhabited by other arthropods. Leaf-tiers have been observed to leave their ties and create new shelters (and thus additional microhabitats), but the ecological factors affecting shelter fidelity are poorly known. For this study, we explored the effects of resource limitation and occupant density on shelter fidelity and assessed the consequences of shelter abandonment. We first quantified the area of leaf material required for a caterpillar to fully develop for two of the most common leaf-tiers that feed on white oak, Quercus alba. On average, Psilocorsis spp. caterpillars consumed 21.65 ± 0.67 cm2 leaf material to complete development. We also measured the area of natural leaf ties found in a Maryland forest, to determine the distribution of resources available to caterpillars in situ. Of 158 natural leaf ties examined, 47% were too small to sustain an average Psilocorsis spp. caterpillar for the entirety of its development. We also manipulated caterpillar densities within experimental ties on potted trees to determine the effects of cohabitants on the likelihood of a caterpillar to leave its tie. We placed 1, 2, or 4 caterpillars in ties of a standard size and monitored the caterpillars twice daily to track their movement. In ties with more than one occupant, caterpillars showed a significantly greater propensity to leave their tie, and left sooner and at a faster rate than those in ties as single occupants. To understand the consequences of leaf tie abandonment, we observed caterpillars searching a tree for a site to build a shelter in the field. This is a risky behavior, as 17% of the caterpillars observed died while searching for a shelter site. Caterpillars that successfully built a shelter traveled 110 ± 20 cm and took 28 ± 7 min to find a suitable site to build a shelter. In conclusion, leaf-tying caterpillars must frequently abandon their leaf

  9. Why do leaf-tying caterpillars abandon their leaf ties?

    PubMed

    Sliwinski, Michelle; Sigmon, Elisha

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-tying caterpillars act as ecosystem engineers by building shelters between overlapping leaves, which are inhabited by other arthropods. Leaf-tiers have been observed to leave their ties and create new shelters (and thus additional microhabitats), but the ecological factors affecting shelter fidelity are poorly known. For this study, we explored the effects of resource limitation and occupant density on shelter fidelity and assessed the consequences of shelter abandonment. We first quantified the area of leaf material required for a caterpillar to fully develop for two of the most common leaf-tiers that feed on white oak, Quercus alba. On average, Psilocorsis spp. caterpillars consumed 21.65 ± 0.67 cm(2) leaf material to complete development. We also measured the area of natural leaf ties found in a Maryland forest, to determine the distribution of resources available to caterpillars in situ. Of 158 natural leaf ties examined, 47% were too small to sustain an average Psilocorsis spp. caterpillar for the entirety of its development. We also manipulated caterpillar densities within experimental ties on potted trees to determine the effects of cohabitants on the likelihood of a caterpillar to leave its tie. We placed 1, 2, or 4 caterpillars in ties of a standard size and monitored the caterpillars twice daily to track their movement. In ties with more than one occupant, caterpillars showed a significantly greater propensity to leave their tie, and left sooner and at a faster rate than those in ties as single occupants. To understand the consequences of leaf tie abandonment, we observed caterpillars searching a tree for a site to build a shelter in the field. This is a risky behavior, as 17% of the caterpillars observed died while searching for a shelter site. Caterpillars that successfully built a shelter traveled 110 ± 20 cm and took 28 ± 7 min to find a suitable site to build a shelter. In conclusion, leaf-tying caterpillars must frequently abandon their leaf

  10. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  11. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand.

  12. Barley leaf transcriptome and metabolite analysis reveals new aspects of compatibility and Piriformospora indica-mediated systemic induced resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Alexandra; Zajic, Doreen; Voll, Lars M; Pons-K Hnemann, Jorn; Samans, Birgit; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Waller, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Colonization of barley roots with the basidiomycete fungus Piriformospora indica (Sebacinales) induces systemic resistance against the biotrophic leaf pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (B. graminis). To identify genes involved in this mycorrhiza-induced systemic resistance, we compared the leaf transcriptome of P. indica-colonized and noncolonized barley plants 12, 24, and 96 h after challenge with a virulent race of B. graminis. The leaf pathogen induced specific gene sets (e.g., LRR receptor kinases and WRKY transcription factors) at 12 h postinoculation (hpi) (prepenetration phase) and vesicle-localized gene products 24 hpi (haustorium establishment). Metabolic analysis revealed a progressing shift of steady state contents of the intermediates glucose-1-phosphate, uridinediphosphate-glucose, and phosphoenolpyruvate 24 and 96 hpi, indicating that B. graminis shifts central carbohydrate metabolism in favor of sucrose biosynthesis. Both B. graminis and P. indica increased glutamine and alanine contents, whereas substrates for starch and nitrogen assimilation (adenosinediphosphate- glucose and oxoglutarate) decreased. In plants that were more B. graminis resistant due to P. indica root colonization, 22 transcripts, including those of pathogenesis-related genes and genes encoding heat-shock proteins, were differentially expressed ?twofold in leaves after B. graminis inoculation compared with non-mycorrhized plants. Detailed expression analysis revealed a faster induction after B. graminis inoculation between 8 and 16 hpi, suggesting that priming of these genes is an important mechanism of P. indica-induced systemic disease resistance.

  13. Evidence for the presence of heat-stable protein (HPr) and ATP-dependent HPr kinase in heterofermentative lactobacilli lacking phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J; Peterkofsky, A; Romano, A H

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the biochemical basis for the lack of phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase activity in heterofermentative lactobacilli was carried out. Extracts of Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus buchneri failed to reconstitute phosphotransferase activity of extracts of Staphylococcus aureus mutants impaired in the phosphotransferase system due to the absence of enzyme I, enzyme IILac, or enzyme IIILac activity, suggesting that these lactobacilli lack those phosphotransferase system components. In contrast, complementation tests with an extract of a S. aureus mutant deficient in heat-stable protein (HPr) indicated the presence of HPr activity in heterofermentative lactobacilli. The HPr of L. brevis was purified and shown to have properties similar to those of a typical HPr. In addition, L. brevis possesses an ATP-dependent protein kinase that phosphorylates a serine residue of the endogenous HPr as well as other HPrs of Gram-positive origin. The kinase activity is markedly stimulated by phosphorylated compounds related to sugar metabolism and is negatively modulated by orthophosphate, pyrophosphate, or arsenate and by a low molecular weight endogenous factor. In keeping with the idea of a regulatory role for the phosphorylation of HPr in lactobacilli, a HPr[Ser(P)] phosphatase activity in L. brevis was also demonstrated. On the basis of the finding of HPr and a system for its reversible covalent modification in an organism devoid of a functional phosphotransferase system we propose that, in lactobacilli, HPr has a role in the regulation of pathways other than the phosphotransferase system. Images PMID:2832843

  14. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1) helps regulate the triglyceride/fatty acid cycle and development of insulin resistance in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Millward, Carrie A.; DeSantis, David; Hsieh, Chang-Wen; Heaney, Jason D.; Pisano, Sorana; Olswang, Yael; Reshef, Lea; Beidelschies, Michelle; Puchowicz, Michelle; Croniger, Colleen M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1) in the development of insulin resistance. Previous studies have shown that the roles of Pck1 in white adipose tissue (WAT) in glyceroneogenesis and reesterification of free fatty acids (FFA) to generate triglyceride are vital for the prevention of diabetes. We hypothesized that insulin resistance develops when dysregulation of Pck1 occurs in the triglyceride/fatty acid cycle, which regulates lipid synthesis and transport between adipose tissue and the liver. We examined this by analyzing mice with a deletion of the PPARγ binding site in the promoter of Pck1 (PPARE−/−). This mutation reduced the fasting Pck1 mRNA expression in WAT in brown adipose tissue (BAT). To analyze insulin resistance, we performed hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamp analyses. PPARE−/− mice were profoundly insulin resistant and had more FFA and glycerol released during the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp compared with wild-type mice (WT). Finally, we analyzed insulin secretion in isolated islets. We found a 2-fold increase in insulin secretion in the PPARE−/− mice at 16.7 mM glucose. Thus, the PPARE site in the Pck1 promoter is essential for maintenance of lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis and disease prevention. PMID:20124556

  15. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase, a Key Enzyme That Controls Blood Glucose, Is a Target of Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Shima, Akiho; Kuramoto, Daisuke; Kikumoto, Daisuke; Matsui, Takashi; Michihara, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes a committed and rate-limiting step in hepatic gluconeogenesis, and its activity is tightly regulated to maintain blood glucose levels within normal limits. PEPCK activity is primarily regulated through hormonal control of gene transcription. Transcription is additionally regulated via a cAMP response unit, which includes a cAMP response element and four binding sites for CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP). Notably, the cAMP response unit also contains a putative response element for retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα). In this paper, we characterize the effect of the RORα response element on cAMP-induced transcription. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay indicates that RORα binds this response element in a sequence-specific manner. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assays indicate that RORα interacts with C/EBP at the PEPCK promoter to synergistically enhance transcription. We also found that cAMP-induced transcription depends in part on RORα and its response element. In addition, we show that suppression of RORα by siRNA significantly decreased PEPCK transcription. Finally, we found that a RORα antagonist inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis in an in vitro glucose production assay. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that PEPCK is a direct RORα target. These results define possible new roles for RORα in hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:26383638

  16. Correlation between depression of catabolite control of xylose metabolism and a defect in the phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system in Pediococcus halophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, K; Uchida, K

    1989-01-01

    Pediococcus halophilus X-160 which lacks catabolite control by glucose was isolated from nature (soy moromi mash). Wild-type strains, in xylose-glucose medium, utilized glucose preferentially over xylose and showed diauxic growth. With wild-type strain I-13, xylose isomerase activity was not induced until glucose was consumed from the medium. Strain X-160, however, utilized xylose concurrently with glucose and did not show diauxic growth. In this strain, xylose isomerase was induced even in the presence of glucose. Glucose transport activity in intact cells of strain X-160 was less than 10% of that assayed in strain I-13. Determinations of glycolytic enzymes did not show any difference responsible for the unique behavior of strain X-160, but the rate of glucose-6-phosphate formation with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) as a phosphoryl donor in permeabilized cells was less than 10% of that observed in the wild type. Starved P. halophilus I-13 cells contained the glycolytic intermediates 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycerate, and PEP (PEP pool). These were consumed concomitantly with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose uptake but were not consumed with xylose uptake. The glucose transport system in P. halophilus was identified as a PEP:mannose phosphotransferase system on the basis of the substrate specificity of PEP pool-starved cells. It is concluded that, in P. halophilus, this system is functional as a main glucose transport system and that defects in this system may be responsible for the depression of glucose-mediated catabolite control. Images PMID:2703460

  17. Cloning of cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes: functional expression in recombinant Escherichia coli and identification of a putative binding region for disaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, X; Davis, F C; Hespell, R B; Ingram, L O

    1997-01-01

    Genomic libraries from nine cellobiose-metabolizing bacteria were screened for cellobiose utilization. Positive clones were recovered from six libraries, all of which encode phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins. Clones from Bacillus subtilis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Klebsiella oxytoca allowed the growth of recombinant Escherichia coli in cellobiose-M9 minimal medium. The K. oxytoca clone, pLOI1906, exhibited an unusually broad substrate range (cellobiose, arbutin, salicin, and methylumbelliferyl derivatives of glucose, cellobiose, mannose, and xylose) and was sequenced. The insert in this plasmid encoded the carboxy-terminal region of a putative regulatory protein, cellobiose permease (single polypeptide), and phospho-beta-glucosidase, which appear to form an operon (casRAB). Subclones allowed both casA and casB to be expressed independently, as evidenced by in vitro complementation. An analysis of the translated sequences from the EIIC domains of cellobiose, aryl-beta-glucoside, and other disaccharide permeases allowed the identification of a 50-amino-acid conserved region. A disaccharide consensus sequence is proposed for the most conserved segment (13 amino acids), which may represent part of the EIIC active site for binding and phosphorylation. PMID:9023916

  18. Xanthone derivatives could be potential antibiotics: virtual screening for the inhibitors of enzyme I of bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Jien; Lin, Shih-Hung; Lin, Meei-Ru; Ku, Hao; Szkaradek, Natalia; Marona, Henryk; Hsu, Alvin; Shiuan, David

    2013-08-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is ubiquitous in eubacteria and absent from eukaryotes. The system consists of two phosphoryl carriers, enzyme I (EI) and the histidine-containing phosphoryl carrier protein (HPr), and several PTS transporters, catalyzing the concomitant uptake and phosphorylation of several carbohydrates. Since a deficiency of EI in bacterial mutants lead to severe growth defects, EI could be a drug target to develop antimicrobial agents. We used the 3D structure PDB 1ZYM of Escherichia coli EI as the target to virtually screen the potential tight binders from NPPEDIA (Natural Product Encyclopedia), ZINC and Super Natural databases. These databases were screened using the docking tools of Discovery Studio 2.0 and the Integrated Drug Design System IDDS. Among the many interesting hits, xanthone derivatives with reasonably high Dock scores received more attentions. Two of the xanthone derivatives were obtained to examine their capabilities to inhibit cell growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. The results indicate that they may exert the inhibition effects by blocking the EI activities. We have demonstrated for the first time that the xanthone derivatives have high potential to be developed as future antibiotics.

  19. CO2 reduction and organic compounds production by photosynthetic bacteria with surface displayed carbonic anhydrase and inducible expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Yong; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2017-01-01

    In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc-containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-) while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; 4.1.1.31), an enzyme involved in the carbon metabolism that catalyzed the fixation of CO2 to PEP, is a key factor for biological fixation of CO2 and enhances the production of organic compounds. In this study, the recombinant R. sphaeroides with highly-expressed CA was developed based on a surface displayed system of CA (pJY-OmpCA) on the outer membrane of R. sphaeroides using outer membrane protein (Omp) in R. sphaeroides, Finally, two more different recombinant R. sphaeroides were developed, which transformed with a two-vector system harboring cytosolic expressed CA (pJY-OmpCA-CA)or PEPC (pJY-OMPCA-PEPC) in R. sphaeroides with surface displayed CA on the outer membrane. In case of recombinant R. sphaeroides with the pJY-OmpCA-PEPC, it has shown the highest CO2 reduction efficiency and the production of several organic compounds (carotenoids, polyhydroxybutyrate, malic acid, succinic acid). It means that the surface displayed CA on the R. sphaeroides would accelerate the CO2-bicabonate conversion on the bacterial outer membrane. Moreover, inducible over-expression of PEPC with surface-displayed CA was successfully used to facilitate a rapider CO2 reduction and quicker production of organic compounds.

  20. Functional relationships of leafing intensity to plant height, growth form and leaf habit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, En-Rong; Milla, Rubén; Aarssen, Lonnie W.; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Leafing intensity, i.e. the number of leaves per unit of stem volume or mass, is a common developmental correlate of leaf size. However, the ecological significance and the functional implications of variation in leafing intensity, other than its relation to leaf size, are unknown. Here, we explore its relationships with plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit to test a series of corollaries derived from the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. Volume-based leafing intensities and plant heights were recorded for 109 woody species from the subtropical evergreen broadleaf forests of eastern China. In addition, we compiled leafing intensity data from published literature, and combined it with our data to form a 398 species dataset, to test for differences of leafing intensity between plant growth forms (i.e. herbaceous and woody) and leaf habits (i.e. deciduous and evergreens). Leafing intensity was negatively correlated with plant height and individual leaf mass. Volume-based leafing intensities were significantly higher in herbaceous species than in woody species, and also higher in deciduous than in evergreen woody species. In conclusion, leafing intensity relates strongly to plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit in directions generally in accordance to the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. These results can be interpreted in terms of the evolution of adaptive strategies involving response to herbivory, competitive ability for light and reproductive economy.

  1. Active suppression of a leaf meristem orchestrates determinate leaf growth

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, John Paul; Furumizu, Chihiro; Efroni, Idan; Eshed, Yuval; Bowman, John L

    2016-01-01

    Leaves are flat determinate organs derived from indeterminate shoot apical meristems. The presence of a specific leaf meristem is debated, as anatomical features typical of meristems are not present in leaves. Here we demonstrate that multiple NGATHA (NGA) and CINCINNATA-class-TCP (CIN-TCP) transcription factors act redundantly, shortly after leaf initiation, to gradually restrict the activity of a leaf meristem in Arabidopsis thaliana to marginal and basal domains, and that their absence confers persistent marginal growth to leaves, cotyledons and floral organs. Following primordia initiation, the restriction of the broadly acting leaf meristem to the margins is mediated by the juxtaposition of adaxial and abaxial domains and maintained by WOX homeobox transcription factors, whereas other marginal elaboration genes are dispensable for its maintenance. This genetic framework parallels the morphogenetic program of shoot apical meristems and may represent a relic of an ancestral shoot system from which seed plant leaves evolved. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15023.001 PMID:27710768

  2. Behavior of Leaf Meristems and Their Modification

    PubMed Central

    Ichihashi, Yasunori; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A major source of diversity in flowering plant form is the extensive variability of leaf shape and size. Leaf formation is initiated by recruitment of a handful of cells flanking the shoot apical meristem (SAM) to develop into a complex three-dimensional structure. Leaf organogenesis depends on activities of several distinct meristems that are established and spatiotemporally differentiated after the initiation of leaf primordia. Here, we review recent findings in the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate leaf meristem activities in a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We then discuss recent key studies investigating the natural variation in leaf morphology to understand how the gene regulatory networks modulate leaf meristems to yield a substantial diversity of leaf forms during the course of evolution. PMID:26648955

  3. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2278 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2351.)...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2278 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2351.)...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2278 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2351.)...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2278 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2351.)...

  7. Spectral reflectance relationships to leaf water stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data were collected from detached snapbean leaves in the laboratory with a multiband radiometer. Four experiments were designed to study the spectral response resulting from changes in leaf cover, relative water content of leaves, and leaf water potential. Spectral regions included in the analysis were red (630-690 nm), NIR (760-900 nm), and mid-IR (2.08-2.35 microns). The red and mid-IR bands showed sensitivity to changes in both leaf cover and relative water content of leaves. The NIR was only highly sensitive to changes in leaf cover. Results provided evidence that mid-IR reflectance was governed primarily by leaf moisture content, although soil reflectance was an important factor when leaf cover was less than 100 percent. High correlations between leaf water potentials and reflectance were attributed to covariances with relative water content of leaves and leaf cover.

  8. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) and serine biosynthetic pathway genes are co-ordinately increased during anabolic agent-induced skeletal muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. M.; Williams, H.; Ryan, K. J. P.; Wilson, T. L.; Daniel, Z. C. T. R.; Mareko, M. H. D.; Emes, R. D.; Harris, D. W.; Jones, S.; Wattis, J. A. D.; Dryden, I. L.; Hodgman, T. C.; Brameld, J. M.; Parr, T.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify novel molecular mechanisms for muscle growth during administration of anabolic agents. Growing pigs (Duroc/(Landrace/Large-White)) were administered Ractopamine (a beta-adrenergic agonist; BA; 20 ppm in feed) or Reporcin (recombinant growth hormone; GH; 10 mg/48 hours injected) and compared to a control cohort (feed only; no injections) over a 27-day time course (1, 3, 7, 13 or 27-days). Longissimus Dorsi muscle gene expression was analyzed using Agilent porcine transcriptome microarrays and clusters of genes displaying similar expression profiles were identified using a modified maSigPro clustering algorithm. Anabolic agents increased carcass (p = 0.002) and muscle weights (Vastus Lateralis: p < 0.001; Semitendinosus: p = 0.075). Skeletal muscle mRNA expression of serine/one-carbon/glycine biosynthesis pathway genes (Phgdh, Psat1 and Psph) and the gluconeogenic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-M (Pck2/PEPCK-M), increased during treatment with BA, and to a lesser extent GH (p < 0.001, treatment x time interaction). Treatment with BA, but not GH, caused a 2-fold increase in phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) protein expression at days 3 (p < 0.05) and 7 (p < 0.01), and a 2-fold increase in PEPCK-M protein expression at day 7 (p < 0.01). BA treated pigs exhibit a profound increase in expression of PHGDH and PEPCK-M in skeletal muscle, implicating a role for biosynthetic metabolic pathways in muscle growth. PMID:27350173

  9. Confirmation and elimination of xylose metabolism bottlenecks in glucose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system-deficient Clostridium acetobutylicum for simultaneous utilization of glucose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Han; Gu, Yang; Ning, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yunliu; Mitchell, Wilfrid J; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Efficient cofermentation of D-glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose, three major sugars present in lignocellulose, is a fundamental requirement for cost-effective utilization of lignocellulosic biomass. The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum, known for its excellent capability of producing ABE (acetone, butanol, and ethanol) solvent, is limited in using lignocellulose because of inefficient pentose consumption when fermenting sugar mixtures. To overcome this substrate utilization defect, a predicted glcG gene, encoding enzyme II of the D-glucose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS), was first disrupted in the ABE-producing model strain Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, resulting in greatly improved D-xylose and L-arabinose consumption in the presence of D-glucose. Interestingly, despite the loss of GlcG, the resulting mutant strain 824glcG fermented D-glucose as efficiently as did the parent strain. This could be attributed to residual glucose PTS activity, although an increased activity of glucose kinase suggested that non-PTS glucose uptake might also be elevated as a result of glcG disruption. Furthermore, the inherent rate-limiting steps of the D-xylose metabolic pathway were observed prior to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in strain ATCC 824 and then overcome by co-overexpression of the D-xylose proton-symporter (cac1345), D-xylose isomerase (cac2610), and xylulokinase (cac2612). As a result, an engineered strain (824glcG-TBA), obtained by integrating glcG disruption and genetic overexpression of the xylose pathway, was able to efficiently coferment mixtures of D-glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose, reaching a 24% higher ABE solvent titer (16.06 g/liter) and a 5% higher yield (0.28 g/g) compared to those of the wild-type strain. This strain will be a promising platform host toward commercial exploitation of lignocellulose to produce solvents and biofuels.

  10. Reciprocal Control of Anaplerotic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by in Vivo Monoubiquitination and Phosphorylation in Developing Proteoid Roots of Phosphate-Deficient Harsh Hakea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Michael W.; Fedosejevs, Eric T.; Plaxton, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates important functions for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) in inorganic phosphate (Pi)-starved plants. This includes controlling the production of organic acid anions (malate, citrate) that are excreted in copious amounts by proteoid roots of nonmycorrhizal species such as harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata). This, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of mineral-bound Pi by solubilizing Al3+, Fe3+, and Ca2+ phosphates in the rhizosphere. Harsh hakea thrives in the nutrient-impoverished, ancient soils of southwestern Australia. Proteoid roots from Pi-starved harsh hakea were analyzed over 20 d of development to correlate changes in malate and citrate exudation with PEPC activity, posttranslational modifications (inhibitory monoubiquitination versus activatory phosphorylation), and kinetic/allosteric properties. Immature proteoid roots contained an equivalent ratio of monoubiquitinated 110-kD and phosphorylated 107-kD PEPC polypeptides (p110 and p107, respectively). PEPC purification, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry indicated that p110 and p107 are subunits of a 430-kD heterotetramer and that they both originate from the same plant-type PEPC gene. Incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme converted the p110:p107 PEPC heterotetramer of immature proteoid roots into a p107 homotetramer while significantly increasing the enzyme’s activity under suboptimal but physiologically relevant assay conditions. Proteoid root maturation was paralleled by PEPC activation (e.g. reduced Km [PEP] coupled with elevated I50 [malate and Asp] values) via in vivo deubiquitination of p110 to p107, and subsequent phosphorylation of the deubiquitinated subunits. This novel mechanism of posttranslational control is hypothesized to contribute to the massive synthesis and excretion of organic acid anions that dominates the carbon metabolism of the mature proteoid roots. PMID:23407057

  11. Implications of various phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system mutations on glycerol utilization and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) accumulation in Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced global biodiesel production is also yielding increased quantities of glycerol as main coproduct. An effective application of glycerol, for example, as low-cost substrate for microbial growth in industrial fermentation processes to specific products will reduce the production costs for biodiesel. Our study focuses on the utilization of glycerol as a cheap carbon source during cultivation of the thermoplastic producing bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, and on the investigation of carbohydrate transport proteins involved herein. Seven open reading frames were identified in the genome of strain H16 to encode for putative proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS). Although the core components of PEP-PTS, enzyme I (ptsI) and histidine phosphocarrier protein (ptsH), are available in strain H16, a complete PTS-mediated carbohydrate transport is lacking. Growth experiments employing several PEP-PTS mutants indicate that the putative ptsMHI operon, comprising ptsM (a fructose-specific EIIA component of PTS), ptsH, and ptsI, is responsible for limited cell growth and reduced PHB accumulation (53%, w/w, less PHB than the wild type) of this strain in media containing glycerol as a sole carbon source. Otherwise, the deletion of gene H16_A0384 (ptsN, nitrogen regulatory EIIA component of PTS) seemed to largely compensate the effect of the deleted ptsMHI operon (49%, w/w, PHB). The involvement of the PTS homologous proteins on the utilization of the non-PTS sugar alcohol glycerol and its effect on cell growth as well as PHB and carbon metabolism of R. eutropha will be discussed. PMID:21906371

  12. Effects of Homologous Phosphoenolpyruvate-Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System Proteins on Carbohydrate Uptake and Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Ralstonia eutropha H16▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kaddor, Chlud; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Seven gene loci encoding putative proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) were identified in the genome of Ralstonia eutropha H16 by in silico analysis. Except the N-acetylglucosamine-specific PEP-PTS, an additional complete PEP-PTS is lacking in strain H16. Based on these findings, we generated single and multiple deletion mutants defective mainly in the PEP-PTS genes to investigate their influence on carbon source utilization, growth behavior, and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) accumulation. As supposed, the H16 ΔfrcACB and H16 ΔnagFEC mutants exhibited no growth when cultivated on fructose and N-acetylglucosamine, respectively. Furthermore, a transposon mutant with a ptsM-ptsH insertion site did not grow on both carbon sources. The observed phenotype was not complemented, suggesting that it results from an interaction of genes or a polar effect caused by the Tn5::mob insertion. ptsM, ptsH, and ptsI single, double, and triple mutants stored much less PHB than the wild type (about 10 to 39% [wt/wt] of cell dry weight) and caused reduced PHB production in mutants lacking the H16_A2203, H16_A0384, frcACB, or nagFEC genes. In contrast, mutant H16 ΔH16_A0384 accumulated 11.5% (wt/wt) more PHB than the wild type when grown on gluconate and suppressed partially the negative effect of the ptsMHI deletion on PHB synthesis. Based on our experimental data, we discussed whether the PEP-PTS homologous proteins in R. eutropha H16 are exclusively involved in the complex sugar transport system or whether they are also involved in cellular regulatory functions of carbon and PHB metabolism. PMID:21478317

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae Cell-Wall-Localized Phosphoenolpyruvate Protein Phosphotransferase Can Function as an Adhesin: Identification of Its Host Target Molecules and Evaluation of Its Potential as a Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa; Blau, Karin; Kushnir, Tatyana; Shagan, Marilou; Portnoi, Maxim; Cohen, Aviad; Azriel, Shalhevet; Malka, Itai; Adawi, Asad; Kafka, Daniel; Dotan, Shahar; Guterman, Gali; Troib, Shany; Fishilevich, Tali; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Braiman, Alex; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J; Porat, Nurith; Goliand, Inna; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Swiatlo, Edwin; Tal, Michael; Ellis, Ronald; Elia, Natalie; Dagan, Ron

    2016-01-01

    In Streptococcus pneumonia, phosphoenolpyruvate protein phosphotransferase (PtsA) is an intracellular protein of the monosaccharide phosphotransferase systems. Biochemical and immunostaining methods were applied to show that PtsA also localizes to the bacterial cell-wall. Thus, it was suspected that PtsA has functions other than its main cytoplasmic enzymatic role. Indeed, recombinant PtsA and anti-rPtsA antiserum were shown to inhibit adhesion of S. pneumoniae to cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Screening of a combinatorial peptide library expressed in a filamentous phage with rPtsA identified epitopes that were capable of inhibiting S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptides in the phages were sequenced, and homologous sequences were found in human BMPER, multimerin1, protocadherin19, integrinβ4, epsin1 and collagen type VIIα1 proteins, all of which can be found in A549 cells except the latter. Six peptides, synthesized according to the homologous sequences in the human proteins, specifically bound rPtsA in the micromolar range and significantly inhibited pneumococcal adhesion in vitro to lung- and tracheal-derived cell lines. In addition, the tested peptides inhibited lung colonization after intranasal inoculation of mice with S. pneumoniae. Immunization with rPtsA protected the mice against a sublethal intranasal and a lethal intravenous pneumococcal challenge. In addition, mouse anti rPtsA antiserum reduced bacterial virulence in the intravenous inoculation mouse model. These findings showed that the surface-localized PtsA functions as an adhesin, PtsA binding peptides derived from its putative target molecules can be considered for future development of therapeutics, and rPtsA should be regarded as a candidate for vaccine development. PMID:26990554

  14. Enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene via NO and Ca(2+).

    PubMed

    Qian, Baoyun; Li, Xia; Liu, Xiaolong; Chen, Pingbo; Ren, Chengang; Dai, Chuanchao

    2015-03-01

    We determined the effects of endogenous nitric oxide and Ca(2+) on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) under drought. In this study, seedlings were subjected to PEG 6000 treatments using PC and wild type (WT; Kitaake). The results showed that, compared with WT, PC had higher relative water content (RWC) and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) under drought. During a 2-day re-watering treatment, Pn recovered faster in PC than in WT. Further analyses showed that, under the drought treatment, the amount of endogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) increased in WT mainly via NADPH oxidase. While in PC, the endogenous nitric oxide (NO) content increased via nitrate reductase and nitric oxide synthase on day 2 of the drought treatment and day 1 of the re-watering treatment. After 2 days of drought treatment, PC also showed higher PEPC activity, calcium content, phospholipase D (PLD) activity, C4-pepc and NAC6 transcript levels, and protein kinase activity as compared with PC without treatment. These changes did not occur in WT. Correlation analysis also proved NO associated with these indicators in PC. Based on these results, there was a particular molecular mechanism of drought tolerance in PC. The mechanism is related to the signaling processes via NO and Ca(2+) involving the protein kinase and the transcription factor, resulted in up-regulation of PEPC activity and its gene expression, such as C4pepc. Some genes encode antioxidant system, cu/zn-sod as well, which promote antioxidant system to clear MDA and superoxide anion radical, thereby conferring drought tolerance.

  15. Pyramiding expression of maize genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) synergistically improve the photosynthetic characteristics of transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, HuiFang; Xu, WeiGang; Wang, HuiWei; Hu, Lin; Li, Yan; Qi, XueLi; Zhang, Lei; Li, ChunXin; Hua, Xia

    2014-09-01

    Using particle bombardment transformation, we introduced maize pepc cDNA encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ppdk cDNA encoding pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) into the C3 crop wheat to generate transgenic wheat lines carrying cDNA of pepc (PC lines), ppdk (PK lines) or both (PKC lines). The integration, transcription, and expression of the foreign genes were confirmed by Southern blot, Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Q-RT-PCR), and Western blot analysis. Q-RT-PCR results indicated that the average relative expression levels of pepc and ppdk in the PKC lines reached 10 and 4.6, respectively, compared to their expressions in untransformed plants (set to 1). The enzyme activities of PEPC and PPDK in the PKC lines were 4.3- and 2.1-fold higher, respectively, than in the untransformed control. The maximum daily net photosynthetic rates of the PKC, PC, and PK lines were enhanced by 26.4, 13.3, and 4.5%, respectively, whereas the diurnal accumulations of photosynthesis were 21.3, 13.9, and 6.9%, respectively, higher than in the control. The Fv/Fm of the transgenic plants decreased less than in the control under high temperature and high light conditions (2 weeks after anthesis), suggesting that the transgenic wheat transports more absorbed light energy into a photochemical reaction. The exogenous maize C4-specific pepc gene was more effective than ppdk at improving the photosynthetic performance and yield characteristics of transgenic wheat, while the two genes showed a synergistic effect when they were transformed into the same genetic background, because the PKC lines exhibited improved photosynthetic and physiological traits.

  16. Modulation of Escherichia coli Adenylyl Cyclase Activity by Catalytic-Site Mutants of Protein IIAGlc of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Prasad; Kamireddi, Madhavi

    1998-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated form of the glucose-specific phosphocarrier protein IIAGlc of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is an activator of adenylyl cyclase and that unphosphorylated IIAGlc has no effect on the basal activity of adenylyl cyclase. To elucidate the specific role of IIAGlc phosphorylation in the regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, both the phosphorylatable histidine (H90) and the interactive histidine (H75) of IIAGlc were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to glutamine and glutamate. Wild-type IIAGlc and the H75Q mutant, in which the histidine in position 75 has been replaced by glutamine, were phosphorylated by the phosphohistidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr∼P) and were equally potent activators of adenylyl cyclase. Neither the H90Q nor the H90E mutant of IIAGlc was phosphorylated by HPr∼P, and both failed to activate adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, replacement of H75 by glutamate inhibited the appearance of a steady-state level of phosphorylation of H90 of this mutant protein by HPr∼P, yet the H75E mutant of IIAGlc was a partial activator of adenylyl cyclase. The H75E H90A double mutant, which cannot be phosphorylated, did not activate adenylyl cyclase. This suggests that the H75E mutant was transiently phosphorylated by HPr∼P but the steady-state level of the phosphorylated form of the mutant protein was decreased due to the repulsive forces of the negatively charged glutamate at position 75 in the catalytic pocket. These results are discussed in the context of the proximity of H75 and H90 in the IIAGlc structure and the disposition of the negative charge in the modeled glutamate mutants. PMID:9457881

  17. Seasonal freeze resistance of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is generated by differential expression of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and antifreeze protein genes.

    PubMed

    Liebscher, Ryan S; Richards, Robert C; Lewis, Johanne M; Short, Connie E; Muise, Denise M; Driedzic, William R; Ewart, K Vanya

    2006-01-01

    In winter, rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) accumulate glycerol and produce an antifreeze protein (AFP), which both contribute to freeze resistance. The role of differential gene expression in the seasonal pattern of these adaptations was investigated. First, cDNAs encoding smelt and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and smelt glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were cloned so that all sequences required for expression analysis would be available. Using quantitative PCR, expression of beta actin in rainbow smelt liver was compared with that of GAPDH in order to determine its validity as a reference gene. Then, levels of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), PEPCK, and AFP relative to beta actin were measured in smelt liver over a fall-winter-spring interval. Levels of GPDH mRNA increased in the fall just before plasma glycerol accumulation, implying a driving role in glycerol synthesis. GPDH mRNA levels then declined during winter, well in advance of serum glycerol, suggesting the possibility of GPDH enzyme or glycerol conservation in smelt during the winter months. PEPCK mRNA levels rose in parallel with serum glycerol in the fall, consistent with an increasing requirement for amino acids as metabolic precursors, remained elevated for much of the winter, and then declined in advance of the decline in plasma glycerol. AFP mRNA was elevated at the onset of fall sampling in October and remained elevated until April, implying separate regulation from GPDH and PEPCK. Thus, winter freezing point depression in smelt appears to result from a seasonal cycle of GPDH gene expression, with an ensuing increase in the expression of PEPCK, and a similar but independent cycle of AFP gene expression.

  18. Bacterial-type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC) Functions as a Catalytic and Regulatory Subunit of the Novel Class-2 PEPC Complex of Vascular Plants*

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Brendan; Rao, Srinath K.; Kim, Julia; Plaxton, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly regulated anaplerotic enzyme situated at a major branch point of the plant C metabolism. Two distinct oligomeric classes of PEPC occur in the triglyceride-rich endosperm of developing castor oil seeds (COS). Class-1 PEPC is a typical homotetramer composed of identical 107-kDa plant-type PEPC (PTPC) subunits (encoded by RcPpc3), whereas the novel Class-2 PEPC 910-kDa hetero-octameric complex arises from a tight interaction between Class-1 PEPC and distantly related 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) polypeptides (encoded by RcPpc4). Here, COS BTPC was expressed from full-length RcPpc4 cDNA in Escherichia coli as an active PEPC that exhibited unusual properties relative to PTPCs, including a tendency to form large aggregates, enhanced thermal stability, a high Km(PEP), and insensitivity to metabolite effectors. A chimeric 900-kDa Class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer having a 1:1 stoichiometry of BTPC:PTPC subunits was isolated from a mixture of clarified extracts containing recombinant RcPPC4 and an Arabidopsis thaliana Class-1 PEPC (the PTPC, AtPPC3). The purified Class-2 PEPC exhibited biphasic PEP saturation kinetics with high and low affinity sites attributed to its AtPPC3 and RcPPC4 subunits, respectively. The RcPPC4 subunits: (i) catalyzed the majority of the Class-2 PEPC Vmax, particularly in the presence of the inhibitor l-malate, and (ii) also functioned as Class-2 PEPC regulatory subunits by modulating PEP binding and catalytic potential of its AtPPC3 subunits. BTPCs appear to associate with PTPCs to form stable Class-2 PEPC complexes in vivo that are hypothesized to maintain high flux from PEP under physiological conditions that would otherwise inhibit Class-1 PEPCs. PMID:19605358

  19. Bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) functions as a catalytic and regulatory subunit of the novel class-2 PEPC complex of vascular plants.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Brendan; Rao, Srinath K; Kim, Julia; Plaxton, William C

    2009-09-11

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly regulated anaplerotic enzyme situated at a major branch point of the plant C metabolism. Two distinct oligomeric classes of PEPC occur in the triglyceride-rich endosperm of developing castor oil seeds (COS). Class-1 PEPC is a typical homotetramer composed of identical 107-kDa plant-type PEPC (PTPC) subunits (encoded by RcPpc3), whereas the novel Class-2 PEPC 910-kDa hetero-octameric complex arises from a tight interaction between Class-1 PEPC and distantly related 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) polypeptides (encoded by RcPpc4). Here, COS BTPC was expressed from full-length RcPpc4 cDNA in Escherichia coli as an active PEPC that exhibited unusual properties relative to PTPCs, including a tendency to form large aggregates, enhanced thermal stability, a high K(m)((PEP)), and insensitivity to metabolite effectors. A chimeric 900-kDa Class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer having a 1:1 stoichiometry of BTPC:PTPC subunits was isolated from a mixture of clarified extracts containing recombinant RcPPC4 and an Arabidopsis thaliana Class-1 PEPC (the PTPC, AtPPC3). The purified Class-2 PEPC exhibited biphasic PEP saturation kinetics with high and low affinity sites attributed to its AtPPC3 and RcPPC4 subunits, respectively. The RcPPC4 subunits: (i) catalyzed the majority of the Class-2 PEPC V(max), particularly in the presence of the inhibitor l-malate, and (ii) also functioned as Class-2 PEPC regulatory subunits by modulating PEP binding and catalytic potential of its AtPPC3 subunits. BTPCs appear to associate with PTPCs to form stable Class-2 PEPC complexes in vivo that are hypothesized to maintain high flux from PEP under physiological conditions that would otherwise inhibit Class-1 PEPCs.

  20. Bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes from developing castor oil seeds interact in vivo and associate with the surface of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonho; Khuu, Nicholas; Howard, Alexander S M; Mullen, Robert T; Plaxton, William C

    2012-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from developing castor oil seeds (COS) exists as two distinct oligomeric isoforms. The typical class-1 PEPC homotetramer consists of 107-kDa plant-type PEPC (PTPC) subunits, whereas the allosterically desensitized 910-kDa class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer arises from the association of class-1 PEPC with 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. The in vivo interaction and subcellular location of COS BTPC and PTPC were assessed by imaging fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged PEPCs in tobacco suspension-cultured cells. The BTPC-FP mainly localized to cytoplasmic punctate/globular structures, identified as mitochondria by co-immunostaining of endogenous cytochrome oxidase. Inhibition of respiration with KCN resulted in proportional decreases and increases in mitochondrial versus cytosolic BTPC-FP, respectively. The FP-PTPC and NLS-FP-PTPC (containing an appended nuclear localization signal, NLS) localized to the cytosol and nucleus, respectively, but both co-localized with mitochondrial-associated BTPC when co-expressed with BTPC-FP. Transmission electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled developing COS revealed that BTPC and PTPC are localized at the mitochondrial (outer) envelope, as well as the cytosol. Moreover, thermolysin-sensitive BTPC and PTPC polypeptides were detected on immunoblots of purified COS mitochondria. Overall, our results demonstrate that: (i) COS BTPC and PTPC interact in vivo as a class-2 PEPC complex that associates with the surface of mitochondria, (ii) BTPC's unique and divergent intrinsically disordered region mediates its interaction with PTPC, whereas (iii) the PTPC-containing class-1 PEPC is entirely cytosolic. We hypothesize that mitochondrial-associated class-2 PEPC facilitates rapid refixation of respiratory CO(2) while sustaining a large anaplerotic flux to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons withdrawn for biosynthesis.

  1. Phosphorylation of bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase at Ser425 provides a further tier of enzyme control in developing castor oil seeds.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Brendan; Rao, Srinath K; Plaxton, William C

    2011-01-01

    PEPC [PEP (phosphoenolpyruvate) carboxylase] is a tightly controlled anaplerotic enzyme situated at a pivotal branch point of plant carbohydrate metabolism. Two distinct oligomeric PEPC classes were discovered in developing COS (castor oil seeds). Class-1 PEPC is a typical homotetramer of 107 kDa PTPC (plant-type PEPC) subunits, whereas the novel 910-kDa Class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer arises from a tight interaction between Class-1 PEPC and 118 kDa BTPC (bacterial-type PEPC) subunits. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunopurified COS BTPC indicated that it is subject to in vivo proline-directed phosphorylation at Ser425. We show that immunoblots probed with phosphorylation site-specific antibodies demonstrated that Ser425 phosphorylation is promoted during COS development, becoming maximal at stage IX (maturation phase) or in response to depodding. Kinetic analyses of a recombinant, chimaeric Class-2 PEPC containing phosphomimetic BTPC mutant subunits (S425D) indicated that Ser425 phosphorylation results in significant BTPC inhibition by: (i) increasing its Km(PEP) 3-fold, (ii) reducing its I50 (L-malate and L-aspartate) values by 4.5- and 2.5-fold respectively, while (iii) decreasing its activity within the physiological pH range. The developmental pattern and kinetic influence of Ser425 BTPC phosphorylation is very distinct from the in vivo phosphorylation/activation of COS Class-1 PEPC's PTPC subunits at Ser11. Collectively, the results establish that BTPC's phospho-Ser425 content depends upon COS developmental and physiological status and that Ser425 phosphorylation attenuates the catalytic activity of BTPC subunits within a Class-2 PEPC complex. To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for the in vivo control of vascular plant BTPC activity.

  2. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity....

  5. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by...

  6. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity....

  7. Comparison of half and full-leaf shape feature extraction for leaf classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainin, Mohd Shamrie; Ahmad, Faudziah; Alfred, Rayner

    2016-08-01

    Shape is the main information for leaf feature that most of the current literatures in leaf identification utilize the whole leaf for feature extraction and to be used in the leaf identification process. In this paper, study of half-leaf features extraction for leaf identification is carried out and the results are compared with the results obtained from the leaf identification based on a full-leaf features extraction. Identification and classification is based on shape features that are represented as cosines and sinus angles. Six single classifiers obtained from WEKA and seven ensemble methods are used to compare their performance accuracies over this data. The classifiers were trained using 65 leaves in order to classify 5 different species of preliminary collection of Malaysian medicinal plants. The result shows that half-leaf features extraction can be used for leaf identification without decreasing the predictive accuracy.

  8. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C5L Low Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C4F Fair Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  9. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color intensity... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, moderate color... may be waste. H5F—Low Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C5L Low Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C4F Fair Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C5L Low Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C4F Fair Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C5L Low Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C4F Fair Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  13. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C5L Low Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C4F Fair Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  14. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  15. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  16. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  17. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  18. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  19. Leafing patterns and leaf traits of four evergreen shrubs in the Patagonian Monte, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, María Victoria; Bertiller, Mónica B.

    2009-11-01

    We assessed leafing patterns (rate, timing, and duration of leafing) and leaf traits (leaf longevity, leaf mass per area and leaf-chemistry) in four co-occurring evergreen shrubs of the genus Larrea and Chuquiraga (each having two species) in the arid Patagonian Monte of Argentina. We asked whether species with leaves well-defended against water shortage (high LMA, leaf longevity, and lignin concentration, and low N concentration) have lower leaf production, duration of the leafing period, and inter-annual variation of leafing than species with the opposite traits. We observed two distinctive leafing patterns each related to one genus. Chuquiraga species produced new leaves concentrated in a massive short leafing event (5-48 days) while new leaves of Larrea species emerged gradually (128-258 days). Observed leafing patterns were consistent with simultaneous and successive leafing types previously described for woody plants. The peak of leaf production occurred earlier in Chuquiraga species (mid September) than in Larrea species (mid October-late November). Moreover, Chuquiraga species displayed leaves with the longest leaf lifespan, while leaves of Larrea species had the lowest LMA and the highest N and soluble phenolics concentrations. We also observed that only the leaf production of Larrea species increased in humid years. We concluded that co-occurring evergreen species in the Patagonian Monte displayed different leafing patterns, which were associated with some relevant leaf traits acting as plant defenses against water stress and herbivores. Differences in leafing patterns could provide evidence of ecological differentiation among coexisting species of the same life form.

  20. Leaf area dynamics of conifer forests

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H.; Oren, R.; Whitehead, D.; Kaufmann, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Estimating the surface area of foliage supported by a coniferous forest canopy is critical for modeling its biological properties. Leaf area represents the surface area available for the interception of energy, the absorption of carbon dioxide, and the diffusion of water from the leaf to the atmosphere. The concept of leaf area is pertinent to the physiological and ecological dynamics of conifers at a wide range of spatial scales, from individual leaves to entire biomes. In fact, the leaf area of vegetation at a global level can be thought of as a carbon-absorbing, water-emitting membrane of variable thickness, which can have an important influence on the dynamics and chemistry of the Earth`s atmosphere over both the short and the long term. Unless otherwise specified, references to leaf area herein refer to projected leaf area, i.e., the vertical projection of needles placed on a flat plane. Total leaf surface area is generally from 2.0 to 3.14 times that of projected leaf area for conifers. It has recently been suggested that hemisurface leaf area, i.e., one-half of the total surface area of a leaf, a more useful basis for expressing leaf area than is projected area. This chapter is concerned with the dynamics of coniferous forest leaf area at different spatial and temporal scales. In the first part, we consider various hypotheses related to the control of leaf area development, ranging from simple allometric relations with tree size to more complex mechanistic models that consider the movement of water and nutrients to tree canopies. In the second part, we consider various aspects of leaf area dynamics at varying spatial and temporal scales, including responses to perturbation, seasonal dynamics, genetic variation in crown architecture, the responses to silvicultural treatments, the causes and consequences of senescence, and the direct measurement of coniferous leaf area at large spatial scales using remote sensing.

  1. SPAD-based leaf nitrogen estimation is impacted by environmental factors and crop leaf characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dongliang; Chen, Jia; Yu, Tingting; Gao, Wanlin; Ling, Xiaoxia; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll meters are widely used to guide nitrogen (N) management by monitoring leaf N status in agricultural systems, but the effects of environmental factors and leaf characteristics on leaf N estimations are still unclear. In the present study, we estimated the relationships among SPAD readings, chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area for seven species grown in multiple environments. There were similar relationships between SPAD readings and chlorophyll content per leaf area for the species groups, but the relationship between chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area, and the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area varied widely among the species groups. A significant impact of light-dependent chloroplast movement on SPAD readings was observed under low leaf N supplementation in both rice and soybean but not under high N supplementation. Furthermore, the allocation of leaf N to chlorophyll was strongly influenced by short-term changes in growth light. We demonstrate that the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area is profoundly affected by environmental factors and leaf features of crop species, which should be accounted for when using a chlorophyll meter to guide N management in agricultural systems. PMID:26303807

  2. Habitat Complexity of Stream Leaf Packs: Effects on Benthic Macroinvertebrates and Leaf Litter Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetz, C. R.; Vanhaitsma, D. L.; Breen, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    We investigated two attributes of leaf-pack complexity (i.e., leaf-pack mass and leaf surface area) on fish predation, colonization of benthic macroinvertebrates, and leaf breakdown rates in a coldwater Michigan stream. We manipulated three factors using a factorial design: fish (exclusion or control cage), leaf-pack mass (1, 3, or 5 g dry mass), and leaf surface area (<7, 7-10, or >10 cm leaf width). Acer leaves were fastened into leaf packs. Exclusion cages had mesh on all sides; control cages lacked mesh on two sides to provide access to fishes. Two replicate leaf packs were randomly collected after 25-31 d from two sections of the stream (n = 4). Common shredders were Gammarus, Pycnopsyche, and Lepidostoma. We did not detect a significant effect of fish predation on benthic macroinvertebrates or leaf breakdown (i.e., mass loss). Colonization of benthic macroinvertebrates appeared proportional to leaf-pack mass but was unaffected by the surface area of leaves. Leaf breakdown was more rapid among leaf packs with fewer leaves (i.e., leaves with large surface area and leaf packs with low mass) and greater numbers of shredders. We suspect that physical fragmentation is the primary mechanism for higher breakdown rates among leaf packs with fewer leaves.

  3. Leaf physiognomy and climate: A multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. M.; Taylor, S. E.

    1980-11-01

    Research has demonstrated that leaf physiognomy is representative of the local or microclimate conditions under which plants grow. The physiognomy of leaf samples from Oregon, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee, and the Panama Canal Zone has been related to the microclimate using Walter diagrams and Thornthwaite water-budget data. A technique to aid paleoclimatologists in identifying the nature of the microclimate from leaf physiognomy utilizes statistical procedures to classify leaf samples into one of six microclimate regimes based on leaf physiognomy information available from fossilized samples.

  4. Hormonal regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium.

    PubMed

    Arrom, Laia; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-10-15

    In addition to floral senescence and longevity, the control of leaf senescence is a major factor determining the quality of several cut flowers, including Lilium, in the commercial market. To better understand the physiological process underlying leaf senescence in this species, we evaluated: (i) endogenous variation in the levels of phytohormones during leaf senescence, (ii) the effects of leaf darkening in senescence and associated changes in phytohormones, and (iii) the effects of spray applications of abscisic acid (ABA) and pyrabactin on leaf senescence. Results showed that while gibberellin 4 (GA(4)) and salicylic acid (SA) contents decreased, that of ABA increased during the progression of leaf senescence. However, dark-induced senescence increased ABA levels, but did not affect GA(4) and SA levels, which appeared to correlate more with changes in air temperature and/or photoperiod than with the induction of leaf senescence. Furthermore, spray applications of pyrabactin delayed the progression of leaf senescence in cut flowers. Thus, we conclude that (i) ABA plays a major role in the regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium, (ii) darkness promotes leaf senescence and increases ABA levels, and (iii) exogenous applications of pyrabactin inhibit leaf senescence in Lilium, therefore suggesting that it acts as an antagonist of ABA in senescing leaves of cut lily flowers.

  5. Size-dependent leaf area ratio in plant twigs: implication for leaf size optimization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J.; Xiang, Shuang; Sun, Shucun

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Although many hypotheses have been proposed to explain variation in leaf size, the mechanism underlying the variation remains not fully understood. To help understand leaf size variation, the cost/benefit of twig size was analysed, since, according to Corner's rule, twig size is positively correlated with the size of appendages the twig bears. Methods An extensive survey of twig functional traits, including twig (current-year shoots including one stem and few leaves) and leaf size (individual leaf area and mass), was conducted for 234 species from four broadleaved forests. The scaling relationship between twig mass and leaf area was determined using standardized major axis regression and phylogenetic independent comparative analyses. Key Results Leaf area was found to scale positively and allometrically with both stem and twig mass (stem mass plus leaf mass) with slopes significantly smaller than 1·0, independent of life form and habitat type. Thus, the leaf area ratio (the ratio of total leaf area to stem or twig mass) decreases with increasing twig size. Moreover, the leaf area ratio correlated negatively with individual leaf mass. The results of phylogenetic independent comparativeanalyses were consistent with the correlations. Based on the above results, a simple model for twig size optimization was constructed, from which it is postulated that large leaf size–twig size may be favoured when leaf photosynthetic capacity is high and/or when leaf life span and/or stem longevity are long. The model's predictions are consistent with leaf size variation among habitats, in which leaf size tends to be small in poor habitats with a low primary productivity. The model also explains large variations in leaf size within habitats for which leaf longevity and stem longevity serve as important determinants. Conclusions The diminishing returns in the scaling of total leaf area with twig size can be explained in terms of a very simple model on twig size

  6. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits - V cmax and J max - to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: a meta-analysis and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anthony P; Beckerman, Andrew P; Gu, Lianhong; Kattge, Jens; Cernusak, Lucas A; Domingues, Tomas F; Scales, Joanna C; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wullschleger, Stan D; Woodward, F Ian

    2014-08-01

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (V cmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (J max). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between V cmax and J max and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derived from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between V cmax and J max and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of V cmax and J max with leaf N, P, and SLA. V cmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of V cmax to leaf N. J max was strongly related to V cmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm(-2)), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm(-2) nearly doubled assimilation rates. Finally, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of J max to V cmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting.

  7. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits V cmax and Jmax - to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: A meta-analysis and modeling study

    DOE PAGES

    Walker, Anthony P.; Beckerman, Andrew P.; Gu, Lianhong; ...

    2014-07-25

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between Vcmax and Jmax and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derivedmore » from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between Vcmax and Jmax and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of Vcmax and Jmax with leaf N, P, and SLA. Vcmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of Vcmax to leaf N. Jmax was strongly related to Vcmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm 2), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm 2 nearly doubled assimilation rates. Lastly, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of Jmax to Vcmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting.« less

  8. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits V cmax and Jmax - to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: A meta-analysis and modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Anthony P.; Beckerman, Andrew P.; Gu, Lianhong; Kattge, Jens; Cernusak, Lucas A.; Domingues, Tomas F.; Scales, Joanna C.; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Woodward, F. Ian

    2014-07-25

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between Vcmax and Jmax and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derived from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between Vcmax and Jmax and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of Vcmax and Jmax with leaf N, P, and SLA. Vcmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of Vcmax to leaf N. Jmax was strongly related to Vcmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm 2), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm 2 nearly doubled assimilation rates. Lastly, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of Jmax to Vcmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting.

  9. Leaf hydraulic conductance is coordinated with leaf morpho-anatomical traits and nitrogen status in the genus Oryza.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dongliang; Yu, Tingting; Zhang, Tong; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-02-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf) is a major determinant of photosynthetic rate in plants. Previous work has assessed the relationships between leaf morpho-anatomical traits and K leaf with woody species, but there has been very little focus on cereal crops. The genus Oryza, which includes rice (Oryza sativa) and wild species (such as O. rufipogon cv. Griff), is ideal material for identifying leaf features associated with K leaf and gas exchange. Leaf morpho-anatomical traits, K leaf, leaf N content per leaf area, and CO2 diffusion efficiency were investigated in 11 Oryza cultivars. K leaf was positively correlated with leaf thickness and related traits, and therefore positively correlated with leaf mass per area and leaf N content per leaf area, and negatively with inter-veinal distance. K leaf was also positively correlated with leaf area and its related traits, and therefore negatively correlated with the proportion of minor vein length per area. In addition, coordination between K leaf and CO2 diffusion conductance in leaves was observed. We conclude that leaf morpho-anatomical traits and N content per leaf area strongly influence K leaf. Our results suggest that more detailed anatomical and structural studies are needed to elucidate the impacts of leaf feature traits on K leaf and gas exchange in grasses.

  10. Yeasts colonizing the leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sláviková, Elena; Vadkertiová, Renata; Vránová, Dana

    2007-08-01

    The yeasts were isolated from the leaf surfaces of ten species of trees. The study site was a forest park (Zelezná Studnicka) of the Small Carpathians mountain range. One hundred and thirty seven yeast strains belonging to 13 genera were isolated from 320 samples of leaves and needles. Seventeen yeast species were isolated, but only seven occurred regularly: Aureobasidium pullulans, Cryptococcus laurentii, Pichia anomala, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Saccharomyces sp., Lachancea thermotolerans, and Rhodotorula glutinis. The remaining species were isolated from the leaves and needles of three or less tree species. A. pullulans, Cr. laurentii, and P. anomala were the most frequently found species and they occurred on leaves and needles of all ten tree species. Saccharomyces sp. occurred in leaf samples collected from eight kinds of trees. M. pulcherrima and L. thermotolerans were found in samples collected from six species of trees. Both these species occurred almost always on the leaves of deciduous trees. Rh. glutinis was the most frequently isolated carotenoids producing species. We have found out that the ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species were present in the leaf samples in approximately equal frequency, contrary to the soil samples taken from this forest park, where the ascomycetous species were found rarely.

  11. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanoi, Keitaro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency. PMID:27135350

  12. Increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression and steatosis during hepatitis C virus subgenome replication: role of nonstructural component 5A and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Ishtiaq; Choudhury, Mahua; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Knotts, Trina A; Janssen, Rachel C; Schaack, Jerome; Iwahashi, Mieko; Puljak, Livia; Simon, Francis R; Kilic, Gordan; Fitz, J Gregory; Friedman, Jacob E

    2012-10-26

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated transcription factors are dramatically up-regulated in Huh.8 cells, which stably express an HCV subgenome replicon. HCV increased activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and involved activation of the cAMP response element in the PEPCK promoter. Infection with dominant-negative CREB or C/EBPβ-shRNA significantly reduced or normalized PEPCK expression, with no change in PGC-1α or FOXO1 levels. Notably, expression of HCV nonstructural component NS5A in Huh7 or primary hepatocytes stimulated PEPCK gene expression and glucose output in HepG2 cells, whereas a deletion in NS5A reduced PEPCK expression and lowered cellular lipids but was without effect on insulin resistance, as demonstrated by the inability of insulin to stimulate mobilization of a pool of insulin-responsive vesicles to the plasma membrane. HCV-replicating cells demonstrated increases in cellular lipids with insulin resistance at the level of the insulin receptor, increased insulin receptor substrate 1 (Ser-312), and decreased Akt (Ser-473) activation in response to insulin. C/EBPβ-RNAi normalized lipogenic genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and liver X receptor α but was unable to reduce accumulation of triglycerides in Huh.8 cells or reverse the increase in ApoB expression, suggesting a role for increased lipid retention in steatotic hepatocytes. Collectively, these data reveal an important role of NS5A, C/EBPβ, and pCREB in promoting HCV-induced gluconeogenic gene expression

  13. The Influence of Leaf Angle and Leaf Surface Characteristics on the Process of Rainfall Interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, C.; Ginebra, R.; Webb, R.

    2015-12-01

    Individual choice in plant selection for household landscaping influences differences in runoff from urban watersheds because the variation in plant canopy architecture results in rainfall interception differences. Understanding the variables that influence rainfall interception and understanding the mechanism of rainfall interception are important concepts for sustainable watershed management. The broad objective of this study was to explore the influence of leaf hydrophobicity, water droplet retention, and leaf angle on the mechanism and process of rainfall interception and raindrop impaction on leaf surfaces of common tree species from the semi-arid regions of the western United States. Leaf hydrophobicity is determined by the cohesive forces of the water molecules among themselves and the adhesive forces that result from the molecular interactions between the water droplet and the leaf surface. Water droplet retention is a measure of how easily a water droplet drains off a leaf surface. The specific hypotheses examined were 1) larger raindrops falling on leaf surfaces will deflect the leaf to an angle greater than the water droplet retention angle; 2) an increased leaf angle, whether from natural position or deflection due to droplet impact and retention, reduces interception from raindrop impaction on hydrophobic and hydrophilic leaf surfaces; and 3) increased droplet size and frequency decrease rainfall interception more significantly in the hydrophilic case. These hypotheses were addressed in a laboratory experiment by 1) measuring leaf hydrophobicity and water droplet retention using a goniometer with a tilting base; 2) measuring leaf traits such as leaf area, leaf surface roughness, trichome density, and specific storage capacity; 3) examining raindrop splash on leaf surfaces with varying leaf hydrophobicity, water droplet retention, and leaf angle with a raindrop generator and high-speed video camera; and 4) modeling the impact of raindrop splash on leaf

  14. Leaf drop affects herbivory in oaks.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Ian S; Karban, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Leaf phenology is important to herbivores, but the timing and extent of leaf drop has not played an important role in our understanding of herbivore interactions with deciduous plants. Using phylogenetic general least squares regression, we compared the phenology of leaves of 55 oak species in a common garden with the abundance of leaf miners on those trees. Mine abundance was highest on trees with an intermediate leaf retention index, i.e. trees that lost most, but not all, of their leaves for 2-3 months. The leaves of more evergreen species were more heavily sclerotized, and sclerotized leaves accumulated fewer mines in the summer. Leaves of more deciduous species also accumulated fewer mines in the summer, and this was consistent with the idea that trees reduce overwintering herbivores by shedding leaves. Trees with a later leaf set and slower leaf maturation accumulated fewer herbivores. We propose that both leaf drop and early leaf phenology strongly affect herbivore abundance and select for differences in plant defense. Leaf drop may allow trees to dispose of their herbivores so that the herbivores must recolonize in spring, but trees with the longest leaf retention also have the greatest direct defenses against herbivores.

  15. The contribution of stored malate and citrate to the substrate requirements of metabolism of ripening peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) flesh is negligible. Implications for the occurrence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Famiani, Franco; Farinelli, Daniela; Moscatello, Stefano; Battistelli, Alberto; Leegood, Richard C; Walker, Robert P

    2016-04-01

    The first aim of this study was to determine the contribution of stored malate and citrate to the substrate requirements of metabolism in the ripening flesh of the peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) cultivar Adriatica. In the flesh, stored malate accumulated before ripening could contribute little or nothing to the net substrate requirements of metabolism. This was because there was synthesis and not dissimilation of malate throughout ripening. Stored citrate could potentially contribute a very small amount (about 5.8%) of the substrate required by metabolism when the whole ripening period was considered, and a maximum of about 7.5% over the latter part of ripening. The second aim of this study was to investigate why phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) an enzyme utilised in gluconeogenesis from malate and citrate is present in peach flesh. The occurrence and localisation of enzymes utilised in the metabolism of malate, citrate and amino acids were determined in peach flesh throughout its development. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (essential for the synthesis of malate and citrate) was present in the same cells and at the same time as PEPCK and NADP-malic enzyme (both utilised in the dissimilation of malate and citrate). A hypothesis is presented to explain the presence of these enzymes and to account for the likely occurrence of gluconeogenesis.

  16. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  17. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  18. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  19. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf tobacco does not include any manufactured or semimanufactured tobacco, stems which have been removed...

  20. Transcriptional networks in leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-10-01

    Plant senescence is a natural phenomenon known for the appearance of beautiful autumn colors and the ripening of cereals in the field. Senescence is a controlled process that plants utilize to remobilize nutrients from source leaves to developing tissues. While during the past decades, molecular components underlying the onset of senescence have been intensively studied, knowledge remains scarce on the age-dependent mechanisms that control the onset of senescence. Recent advances have uncovered transcriptional networks regulating the competence to senesce. Here, gene regulatory networks acting as internal timing mechanisms for the onset of senescence are highlighted, illustrating that early and late leaf developmental phases are highly connected.

  1. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  2. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  3. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  4. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  5. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances B1F Choice Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Ripe medium body, open leaf structure... percent injury tolerance. B2F Fine Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Ripe, medium body, open leaf structure... percent injury tolerance. B3F Good Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Mature, medium body, firm...

  7. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalat, Lars; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Hartmann, Michelle; Mormann, Sascha; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P) as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P

  8. Spatial division of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and nitrate reductase activity and its regulation by cytokinins in CAM-induced leaves of Guzmania monostachia (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Paula Natália; Purgatto, Eduardo; Mercier, Helenice

    2013-08-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a physiological adaptation of plants that live in stress environment conditions. A good model of CAM modulation is the epiphytic bromeliad, Guzmania monostachia, which switches between two photosynthetic pathways (C3-CAM) in response to different environmental conditions, such as light stress and water availability. Along the leaf length a gradient of acidity can be observed when G. monostachia plants are kept under water deficiency. Previous studies showed that the apical portions of the leaves present higher expression of CAM, while the basal regions exhibit lower expression of this photosynthetic pathway. The present study has demonstrated that it is possible to induce the CAM pathway in detached leaves of G. monostachia kept under water deficit for 7 d. Also, it was evaluated whether CAM expression can be modulated in detached leaves of Guzmania and whether some spatial separation between NO3(-) reduction and CO2 fixation occurs in basal and apical portions of the leaf. In addition, we analyzed the involvement of endogenous cytokinins (free and ribosylated forms) as possible signal modulating both NO3(-) reduction and CO2 fixation along the leaf blade of this bromeliad. Besides demonstrating a clear spatial and functional separation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism along G. monostachia leaves, the results obtained also indicated a probable negative correlation between endogenous free cytokinins - zeatin (Z) and isopentenyladenine (iP) - concentration and PEPC activity in the apical portions of G. monostachia leaves kept under water deficit. On the other hand, a possible positive correlation between endogenous Z and iP levels and NR activity in basal portions of drought-exposed and control leaves was verified. Together with the observations presented above, results obtained with exogenous cytokinins treatments, strongly suggest that free cytokinins might act as a stimulatory signal involved in NR activity regulation and as

  9. The unique structural and biochemical development of single cell C4 photosynthesis along longitudinal leaf gradients in Bienertia sinuspersici and Suaeda aralocaspica (Chenopodiaceae).

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Berry, James O; Cousins, Asaph B; Edwards, Gerald E

    2016-04-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of photosynthetic enzyme expression and structural maturation of chlorenchyma cells along longitudinal developmental gradients were characterized in young leaves of two single cell C4 species, Bienertia sinuspersici and Suaeda aralocaspica Both species partition photosynthetic functions between distinct intracellular domains. In the C4-C domain, C4 acids are formed in the C4 cycle during capture of atmospheric CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. In the C4-D domain, CO2 released in the C4 cycle via mitochondrial NAD-malic enzyme is refixed by Rubisco. Despite striking differences in origin and intracellular positioning of domains, these species show strong convergence in C4 developmental patterns. Both progress through a gradual developmental transition towards full C4 photosynthesis, with an associated increase in levels of photosynthetic enzymes. Analysis of longitudinal sections showed undeveloped domains at the leaf base, with Rubisco rbcL mRNA and protein contained within all chloroplasts. The two domains were first distinguishable in chlorenchyma cells at the leaf mid-regions, but still contained structurally similar chloroplasts with equivalent amounts of rbcL mRNA and protein; while mitochondria had become confined to just one domain (proto-C4-D). The C4 state was fully formed towards the leaf tips, Rubisco transcripts and protein were compartmentalized specifically to structurally distinct chloroplasts in the C4-D domains indicating selective regulation of Rubisco expression may occur by control of transcription or stability of rbcL mRNA. Determination of CO2 compensation points showed young leaves were not functionally C4, consistent with cytological observations of the developmental progression from C3 default to intermediate to C4 photosynthesis.

  10. "Breath figures" on leaf surfaces-formation and effects of microscopic leaf wetness.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    "Microscopic leaf wetness" means minute amounts of persistent liquid water on leaf surfaces which are invisible to the naked eye. The water is mainly maintained by transpired water vapor condensing onto the leaf surface and to attached leaf surface particles. With an estimated average thickness of less than 1 μm, microscopic leaf wetness is about two orders of magnitude thinner than morning dewfall. The most important physical processes which reduce the saturation vapor pressure and promote condensation are cuticular absorption and the deliquescence of hygroscopic leaf surface particles. Deliquescent salts form highly concentrated solutions. Depending on the type and concentration of the dissolved ions, the physicochemical properties of microscopic leaf wetness can be considerably different from those of pure water. Microscopic leaf wetness can form continuous thin layers on hydrophobic leaf surfaces and in specific cases can act similar to surfactants, enabling a strong potential influence on the foliar exchange of ions. Microscopic leaf wetness can also enhance the dissolution, the emission, and the reaction of specific atmospheric trace gases e.g., ammonia, SO2, or ozone, leading to a strong potential role for microscopic leaf wetness in plant/atmosphere interaction. Due to its difficult detection, there is little knowledge about the occurrence and the properties of microscopic leaf wetness. However, based on the existing evidence and on physicochemical reasoning it can be hypothesized that microscopic leaf wetness occurs on almost any plant worldwide and often permanently, and that it significantly influences the exchange processes of the leaf surface with its neighboring compartments, i.e., the plant interior and the atmosphere. The omission of microscopic water in general leaf wetness concepts has caused far-reaching, misleading conclusions in the past.

  11. “Breath figures” on leaf surfaces—formation and effects of microscopic leaf wetness

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    “Microscopic leaf wetness” means minute amounts of persistent liquid water on leaf surfaces which are invisible to the naked eye. The water is mainly maintained by transpired water vapor condensing onto the leaf surface and to attached leaf surface particles. With an estimated average thickness of less than 1 μm, microscopic leaf wetness is about two orders of magnitude thinner than morning dewfall. The most important physical processes which reduce the saturation vapor pressure and promote condensation are cuticular absorption and the deliquescence of hygroscopic leaf surface particles. Deliquescent salts form highly concentrated solutions. Depending on the type and concentration of the dissolved ions, the physicochemical properties of microscopic leaf wetness can be considerably different from those of pure water. Microscopic leaf wetness can form continuous thin layers on hydrophobic leaf surfaces and in specific cases can act similar to surfactants, enabling a strong potential influence on the foliar exchange of ions. Microscopic leaf wetness can also enhance the dissolution, the emission, and the reaction of specific atmospheric trace gases e.g., ammonia, SO2, or ozone, leading to a strong potential role for microscopic leaf wetness in plant/atmosphere interaction. Due to its difficult detection, there is little knowledge about the occurrence and the properties of microscopic leaf wetness. However, based on the existing evidence and on physicochemical reasoning it can be hypothesized that microscopic leaf wetness occurs on almost any plant worldwide and often permanently, and that it significantly influences the exchange processes of the leaf surface with its neighboring compartments, i.e., the plant interior and the atmosphere. The omission of microscopic water in general leaf wetness concepts has caused far-reaching, misleading conclusions in the past. PMID:24167510

  12. Seasonal variability of multiple leaf traits captured by leaf spectroscopy at two temperate deciduous forests

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xi; Tang, Jianwu; Mustard, John F.; ...

    2016-04-02

    Understanding the temporal patterns of leaf traits is critical in determining the seasonality and magnitude of terrestrial carbon, water, and energy fluxes. However, we lack robust and efficient ways to monitor the temporal dynamics of leaf traits. Here we assessed the potential of leaf spectroscopy to predict and monitor leaf traits across their entire life cycle at different forest sites and light environments (sunlit vs. shaded) using a weekly sampled dataset across the entire growing season at two temperate deciduous forests. In addition, the dataset includes field measured leaf-level directional-hemispherical reflectance/transmittance together with seven important leaf traits [total chlorophyll (chlorophyllmore » a and b), carotenoids, mass-based nitrogen concentration (Nmass), mass-based carbon concentration (Cmass), and leaf mass per area (LMA)]. All leaf traits varied significantly throughout the growing season, and displayed trait-specific temporal patterns. We used a Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) modeling approach to estimate leaf traits from spectra, and found that PLSR was able to capture the variability across time, sites, and light environments of all leaf traits investigated (R2 = 0.6–0.8 for temporal variability; R2 = 0.3–0.7 for cross-site variability; R2 = 0.4–0.8 for variability from light environments). We also tested alternative field sampling designs and found that for most leaf traits, biweekly leaf sampling throughout the growing season enabled accurate characterization of the seasonal patterns. Compared with the estimation of foliar pigments, the performance of Nmass, Cmass and LMA PLSR models improved more significantly with sampling frequency. Our results demonstrate that leaf spectra-trait relationships vary with time, and thus tracking the seasonality of leaf traits requires statistical models calibrated with data sampled throughout the growing season. In conclusion, our results have broad implications for future

  13. Leaf Histology--Two Modern Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods for examining leaf structure are presented; both methods involve use of "superglue." The first method uses the glue to form a thin, permanent, direct replica of a leaf surface on a microscope slide. The second method uses the glue to examine the three-dimensional structure of spongy mesophyll. (JN)

  14. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf tobacco. 30.2 Section 30.2 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.2...

  15. 7 CFR 29.2530 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2530 Section 29.2530 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2530 Leaf structure. The cell development...

  16. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2278 Section 29.2278 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See chart, § 29.2351.)...

  17. [Study on pharmacognosy of Ginkgo leaf].

    PubMed

    Geng, Guo-Ping; Ma, Zhi-Gang; Mao, Chong-Wu

    2007-05-01

    The primary study of Ginkgo leaf such as crude drug macroscopic and powder characteristics were carried out, and the flavonoids content in the leaf of Ginkgo in different areas of Gansu province was determined by HPLC, in order to provide scientific references for the exploitation of Ginkgo in Gansu province.

  18. Possible Roles of Strigolactones during Leaf Senescence.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yusuke; Umehara, Mikihisa

    2015-09-11

    Leaf senescence is a complicated developmental process that involves degenerative changes and nutrient recycling. The progress of leaf senescence is controlled by various environmental cues and plant hormones, including ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, cytokinins, and strigolactones. The production of strigolactones is induced in response to nitrogen and phosphorous deficiency. Strigolactones also accelerate leaf senescence and regulate shoot branching and root architecture. Leaf senescence is actively promoted in a nutrient-poor soil environment, and nutrients are transported from old leaves to young tissues and seeds. Strigolactones might act as important signals in response to nutrient levels in the rhizosphere. In this review, we discuss the possible roles of strigolactones during leaf senescence.

  19. [Photoprotective mechanisms of leaf anthocyanins: research progress].

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Zai; Hu, Yan-Bo; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Xu, Nan; Zhang, Xiu-Li; Sun, Guang-Yu

    2012-03-01

    Anthocyanin is widely distributed in plant organs such as root, stem, leaf, flower and fruit, being a kind of secondary metabolites generated in plant morphogenesis or for stress response. Leaf anthocyanin has special chemical structure and spectral properties, playing important roles in plant photoprotection, and becomes a hotspot in plant photosynthetic physiological ecology. This paper summarized the recent research progress in the effects of leaf anthocyanin on plant photosynthesis, including the distribution of leaf anthocyanin, its spectral properties, and its relationships with photosynthetic pigments, with the focus on the potential mechanisms of anthocyanins photoprotection, including light absorption, antioxidation, and osmotic regulation. The further research directions on the effects of leaf anthocyanin on photoprotection were proposed.

  20. Inferring climate from angiosperm leaf venation networks.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Benjamin; Enquist, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    Leaf venation networks provide an integrative linkage between plant form, function and climate niche, because leaf water transport underlies variation in plant performance. Here, we develop theory based on leaf physiology that uses community-mean vein density to predict growing season temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The key assumption is that leaf water supply is matched to water demand in the local environment. We test model predictions using leaves from 17 temperate and tropical sites that span broad climatic gradients. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed climate values. We also highlight additional leaf traits that may improve predictions. Our study provides a novel approach for understanding the functional linkages between functional traits and climate that may improve the reconstruction of paleoclimate from fossil assemblages.

  1. Leaf movement in Calathea lutea (Marantaceae).

    PubMed

    Herbert, Thomas J; Larsen, Parry B

    1985-09-01

    Calathea lutea is a broad-leaved, secondary successional plant which shows complex leaf movements involving both elevation and folding of the leaf surface about the pulvinus. In the plants studied, mean leaf elevation increased from approximately 34 degrees in the early morning to 70 degrees at noon while the angle of leaf folding increased from 13 degrees to 50 degrees over the same time period. During the period from early morning to noon, these movements resulted in a significant decrease in the cosine of the angle of incidence, a measure of the direct solar radiation intercepted. The observed changes in elevational angle significantly reduce the cosine of angle of incidence while folding does not significantly reduce the fraction of direct solar radiation intercepted during the period of direct exposure of the leaf surface to the solar beam. Since elevational changes seem to account for the reduction in exposure to direct solar radiation, the role of folding remains unclear.

  2. Easy Leaf Area: Automated digital image analysis for rapid and accurate measurement of leaf area1

    PubMed Central

    Easlon, Hsien Ming; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Measurement of leaf areas from digital photographs has traditionally required significant user input unless backgrounds are carefully masked. Easy Leaf Area was developed to batch process hundreds of Arabidopsis rosette images in minutes, removing background artifacts and saving results to a spreadsheet-ready CSV file. • Methods and Results: Easy Leaf Area uses the color ratios of each pixel to distinguish leaves and calibration areas from their background and compares leaf pixel counts to a red calibration area to eliminate the need for camera distance calculations or manual ruler scale measurement that other software methods typically require. Leaf areas estimated by this software from images taken with a camera phone were more accurate than ImageJ estimates from flatbed scanner images. • Conclusions: Easy Leaf Area provides an easy-to-use method for rapid measurement of leaf area and nondestructive estimation of canopy area from digital images. PMID:25202639

  3. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits.

    PubMed

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-10-12

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants' regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES.

  4. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits

    PubMed Central

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants’ regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES

  5. Phosphorylation of bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase suggests a link between Ca2+ signalling and anaplerotic pathway control in developing castor oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Hill, Allyson T; Ying, Sheng; Plaxton, William C

    2014-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the native protein kinase [BTPC (bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase)-K (BTPC Ser451 kinase)] that in vivo phosphorylates Ser451 of the BTPC subunits of an unusual Class-2 PEP (phosphoenolpyruvate) carboxylase hetero-octameric complex of developing COS (castor oil seeds). COS BTPC-K was highly purified by PEG fractionation and hydrophobic size-exclusion anion-exchange and affinity chromatographies. BTPC-K phosphorylated BTPC strictly at Ser451 (Km=1.0 μM; pH optimum=7.3), a conserved target residue occurring within an intrinsically disordered region, as well as the protein histone III-S (Km=1.7 μM), but not a COS plant-type PEP carboxylase or sucrose synthase or α-casein. Its activity was Ca2+- (K0.5=2.7 μM) and ATP- (Km=6.6 μM) dependent, and markedly inhibited by trifluoperazine, 3-phosphoglycerate and PEP, but insensitive to calmodulin or 14-3-3 proteins. BTPC-K exhibited a native molecular mass of ~63 kDa and was soluble rather than membrane-bound. Inactivation and reactivation occurred upon BTPC-K's incubation with GSSG and then DTT respectively. Ser451 phosphorylation by BTPC-K inhibited BTPC activity by ~50% when assayed under suboptimal conditions (pH 7.3, 1 mM PEP and 10 mM L-malate). Our collective results indicate a possible link between cytosolic Ca2+ signalling and anaplerotic flux control in developing COS.

  6. Staphylococcal phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system: purification and characterization of the mannitol-specific enzyme III/sup mtl/ of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus carnosus and homology with the enzyme II/sup mtl/ of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, B.; Frank, R.; Deutscher, J.; Meyer, N.; Hengstenberg, W.

    1988-08-23

    Enzyme III/sup mtl/ is part of the mannitol phosphotransferase system of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus carnosus and is phosphorylated by phosphoenolpyruvate in a reaction sequence requiring enzyme I (phosphoenolpyruvate-protein phosphotransferase) and the histidine-containing protein HPr. In this paper, the authors report the isolation of III/sup mtl/ from both S. aureus and S. carnosus and the characterization of the active center. After phosphorylation of III/sup mtl/ with (/sup 32/P)PEP, enzyme I, and HPr, the phosphorylated protein was cleaved with endoproteinase GLu(C). The amino acid sequence of the S. aureus peptide carrying the phosphoryl group was found to be Gln-Val-Val-Ser-Thr-Phe-Met-Gly-Asn-Gly-Leu-Ala-Ile-Pro-His-Gly-Thr-Asp-Asp. The corresponding peptide from S. carnosus shows an equal sequence except that the first residue is Ala instead of Gln. These peptides both contain a single histidyl residue which they assume to carry the phosphoryl group. All proteins of the PTS so far investigated indeed carry the phosphoryl group attached to a histidyl residue. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, the molecular weight of the III/sup mtl/ proteins was found to be 15,000. They have also determined the N-terminal sequence of both proteins. Comparison of the III/sup mtl/ peptide sequences and the C-terminal part of the enzyme II/sup mtl/ of Escherichia coli reveals considerable sequence homology, which supports the suggestion that II/sup mtl/ of E. coli is a fusion protein of a soluble III protein with a membrane-bound enzyme II.

  7. Leaf dynamics and profitability in wild strawberries.

    PubMed

    Jurik, Thomas W; Chabot, Brian F

    1986-05-01

    Leaf dynamics and carbon gain were evaluated for two species of wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana and F. vesca. Five populations on sites representing a gradient of successional regrowth near Ithaca, N.Y., U.S.A., were studied for two or three years each. A computer-based model of plant growth and CO2 exchange combined field studies of leaf biomass dynamics with previously-determined gas exchange rates to estimate carbon balances of leaves and whole plants in different environments.Leaves were produced throughout the growing season, although there was usually a decline in rate of leaf-production in mid-summer. Leaves produced in late spring had the largest area and longest lifespan (except for overwintering leaves produced in the fall). Specific Leaf Weight (SLW) varied little with time of leaf production, but differed greatly among populations; SLW increased with amount of light received in each habitat. The population in the most open habitat had the least seasonal variation in all leaf characters. F. vesca produced lighter, longer-lived leaves than F. virginiana.Simulations showed that age had the largest effect on leaf carbon gain in high-light environments; water stress and temperature had lesser effects. Leaf carbon gain in lowlight environments was relatively unaffected by age and environmental factors other than light. Leaves in high-light environments had the greatest lifetime profit and the greatest ratio of profit to cost. Increasing lifespan by 1/3 increased profit by 80% in low-light leaves and 50% in high-light leaves. Increasing the number of days during which the leaf had the potential to exhibit high photosynthetic rate in response to high light led to little change in profit of low-light leaves while increasing profit of high-light leaves by 49%.

  8. An Apparent Anomaly in Peanut Leaf Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Pallas, James E.

    1980-01-01

    Conductance to gaseous transfer is normally considered to be greater from the abaxial than from the adaxial side of a leaf. Measurements of the conductance to water vapor of peanut leaves (Arachis hypogaea L.) under well watered and stress conditions in a controlled environment, however, indicated a 2-fold higher conductance from the adaxial side of the leaf than from the abaxial. Studies of conductance as light level was varied showed an increase in conductance from either surface with increasing light level, but conductance was always greater from the adaxial surface at any given light level. In contrast, measurements of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaf conductance showed an approximate 2-fold greater conductance from the abaxial surface than from the adaxial. Approximately the same number of stomata were present on both peanut leaf surfaces and stomatal size was similar. Electron microscopic examination of peanut leaves did not reveal any major structural differences between stomata on the two surfaces that would account for the differences in conductance. Light microscope studies of leaf sections revealed an extensive network of bundle sheaths with achloraplastic bundle sheath extensions; the lower epidermis was lined with a single layer of large achloraplastic parenchyma cells. Measurements of net photosynthesis made on upper and lower leaf surfaces collectively and individually indicated that two-thirds of the peanut leaf's total net photosynthesis can be attributed to diffusion of CO2 through the adaxial leaf surface. Possibly the high photosynthetic efficiency of peanut cultivars as compared with certain other C3 species is associated with the greater conductance of CO2 through their upper leaf surfaces. Images PMID:16661294

  9. Global Climatic Controls On Leaf Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. J.; Prentice, I. C.; Dong, N.; Maire, V.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 1890s it's been known that the wet tropics harbour plants with exceptionally large leaves. Yet the observed latitudinal gradient of leaf size has never been fully explained: it is still unclear which aspects of climate are most important for understanding geographic trends in leaf size, a trait that varies many thousand-fold among species. The key is the leaf-to-air temperature difference, which depends on the balance of energy inputs (irradiance) and outputs (transpirational cooling, losses to the night sky). Smaller leaves track air temperatures more closely than larger leaves. Widely cited optimality-based theories predict an advantage for smaller leaves in dry environments, where transpiration is restricted, but are silent on the latitudinal gradient. We aimed to characterize and explain the worldwide pattern of leaf size. Across 7900 species from 651 sites, here we show that: large-leaved species predominate in wet, hot, sunny environments; smaller-leaved species typify hot, sunny environments only when arid; small leaves are required to avoid freezing in high latitudes and at high elevation, and to avoid overheating in dry environments. This simple pattern was unclear in earlier, more limited analyses. We present a simple but robust, fresh approach to energy-balance modelling for both day-time and night-time leaf-to-air temperature differences, and thus risk of overheating and of frost damage. Our analysis shows night-chilling is important as well as day-heating, and simplifies leaf temperature modelling. It provides both a framework for modelling leaf size constraints, and a solution to one of the oldest conundrums in ecology. Although the path forward is not yet fully clear, because of its role in controlling leaf temperatures we suggest that climate-related leaf size constraints could usefully feature in the next generation of land ecosystem models.

  10. Leaf-closing substance in Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sohtome, Yoshihiro; Tokunaga, Takashi; Ueda, Katsuhiro; Yamamura, Shosuke; Ueda, Minoru

    2002-01-01

    Potassium (2R,3R)-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutanoate (1) was identified as a leaf-closing substance in the nyctinastic plant, Leucaena leucocephala. Compound 1 showed strong leaf-closing activity toward L. leucocephala and was not effective against other nyctinastic plants. The potassium ion was indispensable for the bioactivity of 1. Compound 1 gradually lost its bioactivity because of the exchange of the counter cation during isolation. A leaf-opening substance was also observed in the same plant.

  11. A climatology of leaf surface wetness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, O.; Milford, C.; Sutton, M. A.; Spindler, G.; van Putten, E.

    The wetness of plant leaf surfaces is an important parameter in the deposition process of atmospheric trace gases. Particularly gases with high water solubility tend to deposit faster to a wet surface, compared to a dry one. Further, drying up of a wet leaf surface may lead to revolatilization of previously deposited gases. Despite the high importance of leaf surface wetness in biosphere/atmosphere exchange, there is no quantitative description of this parameter on the ecosystem scale, quantifying its initiation, duration, dissipation, correlation with parameters such as air humidity, turbulence, vegetation type, plant physiology, and others. This contribution is a first step towards a climatology of leaf surface wetness, based on a large data basis from various ecosystems. Leaf surface wetness was monitored at two grassland and two forest research sites in NW and central Europe throughout the vegetation period of 1998. It was sensed through measurement of the electrical conductivity between two electrodes that were clipped to the living plant leaf surfaces. This yields a relative signal that responds promptly to the presence of leaf wetness. A routine is presented that combines the data from several sensors to the dimensionless leaf wetness, LW, with values between zero and one. Periods of high leaf wetness (LW>0.9) were in most cases triggered by precipitation events. After termination of rain, LW decreased quickly at the forest sites and dropped to values below 0.1 within less than 24 hours in most cases. At the grassland sites, the formation of dew led to a more complex pattern, with the occurrence of diurnal cycles of LW. Although periods of low relative air humidity (e.g., rH<50%) are normally associated with periods of low leaf wetness, the extent of correlation between these two parameters at rH>60% varies between the different sites. The grassland sites show very similar distributions of the LW data with rH, indicating a positive correlation between LW and

  12. Why so strong for the lotus leaf?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin; Su, Bao-Lian

    2008-11-01

    The authors discussed the potential reasons why the lotus leaf is so strong by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the good mechanical properties of lotus leaf should be attributed to its architecture, such as paralleled microtubes structure, umbrellalike structure, and hierarchically layered hexagon structure. The important observation from this work is that the surface of the rear face of the lotus leaf seems to be constituted by the layers of hexagons whose hierarchical pilling up of size decreases as we go deeper from surface. This is a typical fractal-like phenomenon.

  13. Leaf anatomy mediates coordination of leaf hydraulic conductance and mesophyll conductance to CO2 in Oryza.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dongliang; Flexas, Jaume; Yu, Tingting; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2017-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf ) and mesophyll conductance (gm ) both represent major constraints to photosynthetic rate (A), and previous studies have suggested that Kleaf and gm is correlated in leaves. However, there is scarce empirical information about their correlation. In this study, Kleaf , leaf hydraulic conductance inside xylem (Kx ), leaf hydraulic conductance outside xylem (Kox ), A, stomatal conductance (gs ), gm , and anatomical and structural leaf traits in 11 Oryza genotypes were investigated to elucidate the correlation of H2 O and CO2 diffusion inside leaves. All of the leaf functional and anatomical traits varied significantly among genotypes. Kleaf was not correlated with the maximum theoretical stomatal conductance calculated from stomatal dimensions (gsmax ), and neither gs nor gsmax were correlated with Kx . Moreover, Kox was linearly correlated with gm and both were closely related to mesophyll structural traits. These results suggest that Kleaf and gm are related to leaf anatomical and structural features, which may explain the mechanism for correlation between gm and Kleaf .

  14. Evaluation of Methane from Sisal Leaf Residue and Palash Leaf Litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisutha, S.; Baredar, P.; Deshpande, D. M.; Suresh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate methane production from sisal leaf residue and palash leaf litter mixed with different bulky materials such as vegetable market waste, hostel kitchen waste and digested biogas slurry in a laboratory scale anaerobic reactor. The mixture was prepared with 1:1 proportion. Maximum methane content of 320 ml/day was observed in the case of sisal leaf residue mixed with vegetable market waste as the feed. Methane content was minimum (47 ml/day), when palash leaf litter was used as feed. This was due to the increased content of lignin and polyphenol in the feedstock which were of complex structure and did not get degraded directly by microorganisms. Sisal leaf residue mixtures also showed highest content of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as compared to palash leaf litter mixtures. It was observed that VFA concentration in the digester first increased, reached maximum (when pH was minimum) and then decreased.

  15. Effect of harvest timing and leaf hairiness on fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent concerns over leaf grades have generated questions of how both time of day cotton is harvested, as well as leaf hairiness levels of certain varieties, influence fiber quality. To address this, two smooth leaf varieties and two varieties with higher levels of leaf pubescence were harvested at...

  16. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic, narrow, 70..., medium body, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic... Leaf. Mature, heavy, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color...

  17. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic, narrow, 70..., medium body, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic... Leaf. Mature, heavy, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic, narrow, 70..., medium body, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic... Leaf. Mature, heavy, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic, narrow, 70..., medium body, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color intensity, inelastic... Leaf. Mature, heavy, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil, dull finish, pale color...

  20. Effect of herbivore damage on broad leaf motion in wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Nicholas; Kothari, Adit

    2015-11-01

    Terrestrial plants regularly experience wind that imposes aerodynamic forces on the plants' leaves. Passive leaf motion (e.g. fluttering) and reconfiguration (e.g. rolling into a cone shape) in wind can affect the drag on the leaf. In the study of passive leaf motion in wind, little attention has been given to the effect of herbivory. Herbivores may alter leaf motion in wind by making holes in the leaf. Also, a small herbivore (e.g. snail) on a leaf can act as a point mass, thereby affecting the leaf's motion in wind. Conversely, accelerations imposed on an herbivore sitting on a leaf by the moving leaf may serve as a defense by dislodging the herbivore. In the present study, we investigated how point masses (>1 g) and holes in leaves of the tuliptree affected passive leaf motion in turbulent winds of 1 and 5 m s-1. Leaf motion was unaffected by holes in the leaf surface (about 10% of leaf area), but an herbivore's mass significantly damped the accelerations of fluttering leaves. These results suggest that an herbivore's mass, but not the damage it inflicts, can affect leaf motion in the wind. Furthermore, the damping of leaf fluttering from an herbivore's mass may prevent passive leaf motions from being an effective herbivore defense.

  1. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  2. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  3. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  4. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  5. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  6. What Is a Leaf? An Online Tutorial and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    A leaf is a fundamental unit in botany and understanding what constitutes a leaf is fundamental to many plant science activities. My observations and subsequent testing indicated that many students could not confidently and consistently recognise a leaf from a leaflet, or recognise basic leaf arrangements and the various types of compound or…

  7. Genetic control of leaf curl in maize.

    PubMed

    Entringer, G C; Guedes, F L; Oliveira, A A; Nascimento, J P; Souza, J C

    2014-03-17

    Among the many implications of climatic change on agriculture, drought is expected to continue to have a major impact on agribusinesses. Leaf curling is an anatomical characteristic that might be potentially used to enhance plant tolerance to water deficit. Hence, we aimed to study the genetic control of leaf curl in maize. From 2 contrasting inbred lines for the trait, generations F1, F2, and the backcrosses were obtained. All of these generations were evaluated in a randomized block design with 2 replicates. Leaf curl samples were collected from 3 leaves above the first ear at the tasseling stage, and quantified by dividing the width of the leaf blade with natural curling against its extended width. The mean and variance components were estimated by the weighted least square method. It was found that the trait studied has predominance of the additive effects, with genetic control being attributed to few genes that favor selection and exhibit minimal influence from the environment.

  8. 7 CFR 29.2530 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2530 Leaf structure. The cell development...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2530 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2530 Leaf structure. The cell development...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2530 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2530 Leaf structure. The cell development...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2530 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2530 Leaf structure. The cell development...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco...

  13. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco...

  14. Interaction between photons and leaf canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knyazikhin, Yuri V.; Marshak, Alexander L.; Myneni, Ranga B.

    1991-01-01

    The physics of neutral particle interaction for photons traveling in media consisting of finite-dimensional scattering centers that cross-shade mutually is investigated. A leaf canopy is a typical example of such media. The leaf canopy is idealized as a binary medium consisting of randomly distributed gaps (voids) and regions with phytoelements (turbid phytomedium). In this approach, the leaf canopy is represented by a combination of all possible open oriented spheres. The mathematical approach for characterizing the structure of the host medium is considered. The extinction coefficient at any phase-space location in a leaf canopy is the product of the extinction coefficient in the turbid phytomedium and the probability of absence gaps at that location. Using a similar approach, an expression for the differential scattering coefficient is derived.

  15. A hotspot model for leaf canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.

    1991-01-01

    The hotspot effect, which provides important information about canopy structure, is modeled using general principles of environmental physics as driven by parameters of interest in remote sensing, such as leaf size, leaf shape, leaf area index, and leaf angle distribution. Specific examples are derived for canopies of horizontal leaves. The hotspot effect is implemented within the framework of the model developed by Suits (1972) for a canopy of leaves to illustrate what might occur in an agricultural crop. Because the hotspot effect arises from very basic geometrical principles and is scale-free, it occurs similarly in woodlands, forests, crops, rough soil surfaces, and clouds. The scaling principles advanced are also significant factors in the production of image spatial and angular variance and covariance which can be used to assess land cover structure through remote sensing.

  16. The red edge of plant leaf reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed study of the red edge spectral feature of green vegetation based on laboratory reflectance spectrophotometry is presented. A parameter lambda is defined as the wavelength is defined as the wavelength of maximum slope and found to be dependent on chlorophyll concentration. Species, development stage, leaf layering, and leaf water content of vegetation also influences lambda. The maximum slope parameter is found to be independent of simulated ground area coverage. The results are interpreted in terms of Beer's Law and Kubelka-Munk theory. The chlorophyll concentration dependence of lambda seems to be explained in terms of a pure absorption effect, and it is suggested that the existence of two lambda components arises from leaf scattering properties. The results indicate that red edge measurements will be valuable for assessment of vegetative chlorophyll status and leaf area index independently of ground cover variations, and will be particularly suitable for early stress detection.

  17. Photosynthesis and Respiration in Leaf Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how leaf slices provide an inexpensive material for illustrating several fundamental points about the biochemistry of photosynthesis and respiration. Presents experiments that illustrate the effects of photon flux density and herbicides and carbon dioxide concentration. (DDR)

  18. Reflectance model of a plant leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.; Silva, L.

    1973-01-01

    A light ray, incident at 5 deg to the normal, is geometrically plotted through the drawing of the cross section of a soybean leaf using Fresnel's Equations and Snell's Law. The optical mediums of the leaf considered for ray tracing are: air, cell sap, chloroplast, and cell wall. The above ray is also drawn through the same leaf cross section considering cell wall and air as the only optical mediums. The values of the reflection and transmission found from ray tracing agree closely with the experimental results obtained using a Beckman DK-2A Spectroreflectometer. Similarly a light ray, incident at about 60 deg to the normal, is drawn through the palisade cells of a soybean leaf to illustrate the pathway of light, incident at an oblique angle, through the palisade cells.

  19. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco...

  2. Monitoring Air Quality with Leaf Yeasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, D. H. S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Proposes that leaf yeast serve as quick, inexpensive, and effective techniques for monitoring air quality. Outlines procedures and provides suggestions for data analysis. Includes results from sample school groups who employed this technique. (ML)

  3. Characterization of potato leaf starch.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Stalin; Koch, Kristine; Andersson, Roger; Aman, Per

    2004-04-07

    The starch accumulation-degradation process as well as the structure of leaf starch are not completely understood. To study this, starch was isolated from potato leaves collected in the early morning and late afternoon in July and August, representing different starch accumulation rates. The starch content of potato leaves varied between 2.9 and 12.9% (dry matter basis) over the night and day in the middle of July and between 0.6 and 1.5% in August. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of the four isolated starch samples showed that the granules had either an oval or a round shape and did not exceed 5 microm in size. Starch was extracted by successive washing steps with dimethyl sulfoxide and precipitated with ethanol. An elution profile on Sepharose CL-6B of debranched starch showed the presence of a material with a chain length distribution between that generally found for amylose and amylopectin. Amylopectin unit chains of low molecular size were present in a higher amount in the afternoon than in the morning samples. What remains at the end of the night is depleted in specific chain lengths, mainly between DP 15 and 24 and above DP 35, relative to the end of the day.

  4. Nutrient influences on leaf photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreth, D.J.; Nobel, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The net rate of CO/sub 2/ uptake for leaves of Gossypium hirsutum L. was reduced when the plants were grown at low concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup -/, PO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, or K/sup +/. The water vapor conductance was relatively constant for all nutrient levels, indicating little effect on stomatal response. Although leaves under nutrient stress tended to be lower in chlorophyll and thinner, the ratio of mesophyll surface area to leaf area did not change appreciably. Thus, the reduction in CO/sub 2/ uptake rate at low nutrient levels was due to a decrease in the CO/sub 2/ conductance expressed per unit mesophyll cell wall area (g/sub CO/sup cell//sub 2/). The use of g/sub CO//sup cell//sub 2/ and nutrient levels expressed per unit of mesophyll cell wall provides a new means of assessing nutrient effects on CO/sub 2/ uptake of leaves. 14 figures, 1 table.

  5. Semi-Rolled Leaf2 modulates rice leaf rolling by regulating abaxial side cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofei; Li, Ming; Liu, Kai; Tang, Ding; Sun, Mingfa; Li, Yafei; Shen, Yi; Du, Guijie; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-01-01

    Moderate leaf rolling maintains the erectness of leaves and minimizes the shadowing between leaves which is helpful to establish ideal plant architecture. Here, we describe a srl2 (semi-rolled leaf2) rice mutant, which has incurved leaves due to the presence of defective sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side of the leaf and displays narrow leaves and reduced plant height. Map-based cloning revealed that SRL2 encodes a novel plant-specific protein of unknown biochemical function. SRL2 was mainly expressed in the vascular bundles of leaf blades, leaf sheaths, and roots, especially in their sclerenchymatous cells. The transcriptional activities of several leaf development-related YABBY genes were significantly altered in the srl2 mutant. Double mutant analysis suggested that SRL2 and SHALLOT-LIKE1 (SLL1)/ROLLED LEAF9 (RL9) function in distinct pathways that regulate abaxial-side leaf development. Hence, SRL2 plays an important role in regulating leaf development, particularly during sclerenchymatous cell differentiation. PMID:26873975

  6. Semi-Rolled Leaf2 modulates rice leaf rolling by regulating abaxial side cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Li, Ming; Liu, Kai; Tang, Ding; Sun, Mingfa; Li, Yafei; Shen, Yi; Du, Guijie; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-04-01

    Moderate leaf rolling maintains the erectness of leaves and minimizes the shadowing between leaves which is helpful to establish ideal plant architecture. Here, we describe asrl2(semi-rolled leaf2) rice mutant, which has incurved leaves due to the presence of defective sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side of the leaf and displays narrow leaves and reduced plant height. Map-based cloning revealed that SRL2 encodes a novel plant-specific protein of unknown biochemical function.SRL2 was mainly expressed in the vascular bundles of leaf blades, leaf sheaths, and roots, especially in their sclerenchymatous cells. The transcriptional activities of several leaf development-related YABBY genes were significantly altered in the srl2 mutant. Double mutant analysis suggested that SRL2 and SHALLOT-LIKE1(SLL1)/ROLLED LEAF9(RL9) function in distinct pathways that regulate abaxial-side leaf development. Hence, SRL2 plays an important role in regulating leaf development, particularly during sclerenchymatous cell differentiation.

  7. Antibacterial activity on Citrullus colocynthis Leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    gowri, S. Shyamala; Priyavardhini, S.; Vasantha, K.; Umadevi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on the antibacterial activities of the leaf extract of Citrullus colocynthis (Cucurbitaceae), a medicinal plant used for the treatment of various ailments was carried out using agar disc diffusion technique. The results revealed that the crude acetone extract exhibited antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with zones of inhibition measuring 14.0mm. The chloroform leaf extract exhibited no antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration for the chloroform extract was 4.0mm for Escherichia coli. PMID:22557336

  8. Wind increases leaf water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J; Or, Dani

    2016-07-01

    A widespread perception is that, with increasing wind speed, transpiration from plant leaves increases. However, evidence suggests that increasing wind speed enhances carbon dioxide (CO2 ) uptake while reducing transpiration because of more efficient convective cooling (under high solar radiation loads). We provide theoretical and experimental evidence that leaf water use efficiency (WUE, carbon uptake per water transpired) commonly increases with increasing wind speed, thus improving plants' ability to conserve water during photosynthesis. Our leaf-scale analysis suggests that the observed global decrease in near-surface wind speeds could have reduced WUE at a magnitude similar to the increase in WUE attributed to global rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, there is indication that the effect of long-term trends in wind speed on leaf gas exchange may be compensated for by the concurrent reduction in mean leaf sizes. These unintuitive feedbacks between wind, leaf size and water use efficiency call for re-evaluation of the role of wind in plant water relations and potential re-interpretation of temporal and geographic trends in leaf sizes.

  9. Antihypertensive properties of spinach leaf protein digests.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjun; Marczak, Ewa D; Usui, Hachiro; Kawamura, Yukio; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2004-04-21

    Leaf protein containing approximately 50% rubisco (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) was obtained from fresh spinach leaf with the use of a simple extraction method. Pepsin and pepsin-pancreatin digests of spinach leaf protein have potent angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory properties with IC(50) values of 56 and 120 microg/mL, respectively. Both digests of leaf protein have antihypertensive effects after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with minimum effective doses of 0.25 and 0.5 g/kg, respectively. The maximum antihypertensive effect for the pepsin digest was observed 4 h after oral administration, while for the pepsin-pancreatin digest, the maximum effect was observed 2 h after oral administration. Undigested spinach leaf protein did not exert any significant antihypertensive effect after oral administration to SHR at doses of 0.5 and 1 g/kg. Obtained results show that the pepsin digest of leaf protein may be useful in treatment of hypertension.

  10. Association of tomato leaf curl Sudan virus with leaf curl disease of tomato in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Yasir, Muhammad; El-Kafrawy, Sherif Ali; Abbas, Ayman T; Mousa, Magdi Ali Ahmed; Bakhashwain, Ahmed A

    2016-06-01

    Tomato is an important vegetable crop and its production is adversely affected by leaf curl disease caused by begomovirus. Leaf curl disease is a serious concern for tomato crops caused by begomovirus in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Tomato leaf curl disease has been shown to be mainly caused either by tomato leaf curl Sudan virus or tomato yellow leaf curl virus as well as tomato leaf curl Oman virus. Many tomato plants infected with monopartite begomoviruses were also found to harbor a symptom enhancing betasatellites. Here we report the association of tomato leaf curl Sudan virus causing leaf curl disease of tomato in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The complete genome sequence analysis showed highest (99.9 %) identity with tomato leaf curl Sudan virus causing leaf curl disease in Arabian Peninsula. In phylogenetic relationships analysis, the identified virus formed closest cluster with tomato leaf curl Sudan virus. In recombination analysis study, the major parent was identified as tomato leaf curl Sudan virus. Findings of this study strongly supports the associated virus is a variant of tomato leaf curl Sudan virus causing disease in Sudan, Yemen and Arabian Peninsula. The betasatellites sequence analysis showed highest identity (99.8 %) with tomato leaf curl betasatellites-Amaranthus-Jeddah. The phylogenetic analysis result based on betasatellites formed closed cluster with tomato yellow leaf curl Oman betasatellites. The importance of these findings and occurrence of begomovirus in new geographic regions causing leaf curl disease of tomato in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are discussed.

  11. Seasonal variability of multiple leaf traits captured by leaf spectroscopy at two temperate deciduous forests

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Tang, Jianwu; Mustard, John F.; Wu, Jin; Zhao, Kaiguang; Serbin, Shawn; Lee, Jung-Eun

    2016-04-02

    Understanding the temporal patterns of leaf traits is critical in determining the seasonality and magnitude of terrestrial carbon, water, and energy fluxes. However, we lack robust and efficient ways to monitor the temporal dynamics of leaf traits. Here we assessed the potential of leaf spectroscopy to predict and monitor leaf traits across their entire life cycle at different forest sites and light environments (sunlit vs. shaded) using a weekly sampled dataset across the entire growing season at two temperate deciduous forests. In addition, the dataset includes field measured leaf-level directional-hemispherical reflectance/transmittance together with seven important leaf traits [total chlorophyll (chlorophyll a and b), carotenoids, mass-based nitrogen concentration (Nmass), mass-based carbon concentration (Cmass), and leaf mass per area (LMA)]. All leaf traits varied significantly throughout the growing season, and displayed trait-specific temporal patterns. We used a Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) modeling approach to estimate leaf traits from spectra, and found that PLSR was able to capture the variability across time, sites, and light environments of all leaf traits investigated (R2 = 0.6–0.8 for temporal variability; R2 = 0.3–0.7 for cross-site variability; R2 = 0.4–0.8 for variability from light environments). We also tested alternative field sampling designs and found that for most leaf traits, biweekly leaf sampling throughout the growing season enabled accurate characterization of the seasonal patterns. Compared with the estimation of foliar pigments, the performance of Nmass, Cmass and LMA PLSR models improved more significantly with sampling frequency. Our results demonstrate that leaf spectra-trait relationships vary with time, and thus tracking the seasonality of leaf traits requires statistical models calibrated with data sampled throughout the growing season

  12. Decline of leaf hydraulic conductance with dehydration: relationship to leaf size and venation architecture.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Rawls, Michael; McKown, Athena; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2011-06-01

    Across plant species, leaves vary enormously in their size and their venation architecture, of which one major function is to replace water lost to transpiration. The leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)) represents the capacity of the transport system to deliver water, allowing stomata to remain open for photosynthesis. Previous studies showed that K(leaf) relates to vein density (vein length per area). Additionally, venation architecture determines the sensitivity of K(leaf) to damage; severing the midrib caused K(leaf) and gas exchange to decline, with lesser impacts in leaves with higher major vein density that provided more numerous water flow pathways around the damaged vein. Because xylem embolism during dehydration also reduces K(leaf), we hypothesized that higher major vein density would also reduce hydraulic vulnerability. Smaller leaves, which generally have higher major vein density, would thus have lower hydraulic vulnerability. Tests using simulations with a spatially explicit model confirmed that smaller leaves with higher major vein density were more tolerant of major vein embolism. Additionally, for 10 species ranging strongly in drought tolerance, hydraulic vulnerability, determined as the leaf water potential at 50% and 80% loss of K(leaf), was lower with greater major vein density and smaller leaf size (|r| = 0.85-0.90; P < 0.01). These relationships were independent of other aspects of physiological and morphological drought tolerance. These findings point to a new functional role of venation architecture and small leaf size in drought tolerance, potentially contributing to well-known biogeographic trends in leaf size.

  13. The scaling of leaf area and mass: the cost of light interception increases with leaf size

    PubMed Central

    Milla, Rubén; Reich, Peter B

    2007-01-01

    For leaves, the light-capturing surface area per unit dry mass investment (specific leaf area, SLA) is a key trait from physiological, ecological and biophysical perspectives. To address whether SLA declines with leaf size, as hypothesized due to increasing costs of support in larger leaves, we compiled data on intraspecific variation in leaf dry mass (LM) and leaf surface area (LA) for 6334 leaves of 157 species. We used the power function LM=α LAβ to test whether, within each species, large leaves deploy less surface area per unit dry mass than small leaves. Comparing scaling exponents (β) showed that more species had a statistically significant decrease in SLA as leaf size increased (61) than the opposite (7) and the average β was significantly greater than 1 (βmean=1.10, 95% CI 1.08–1.13). However, scaling exponents varied markedly from the few species that decreased to the many that increased SLA disproportionately fast as leaf size increased. This variation was unrelated to growth form, ecosystem of origin or climate. The average within-species tendency found here (allometric decrease of SLA with leaf size, averaging 13%) is in accord with concurrent findings on global-scale trends among species, although the substantial scatter around the central tendency suggests that the leaf size dependency does not obligately shape SLA. Nonetheless, the generally greater mass per unit leaf area of larger than smaller leaves directly translates into a greater cost to build and maintain a unit of leaf area, which, all else being equal, should constrain the maximum leaf size displayed. PMID:17591590

  14. [Influence of photosynthetic parameters on leaf longevity].

    PubMed

    Vasfilov, S P

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants show a wide range of leaf lifespan (LL) variability. LL is calculated as a sum of functional LL(f) (corresponding to the time of active photosynthesis and CO2 accumulation in the leaf) and nonfunctional LL(n) (the time of photosynthetic activity absence). For evergreen species of boreal zones, LL(n) corresponds to the period of winter rest. Photosynthetic potential of leaf (PPL), interpreted as the maximum possible amount of CO2 that can be fixed during its life, can be estimated on the basis of maximum photosynthesis rate (P(a)) dynamics during LL(f); the maximum (P(a max)) being achieved in mature leaf. Photosynthetic potential depends on LL(f) more strongly than on P(a max). The PPL/LL(f) ratio is indicative of the rate of PPL realization over leaf lifespan. As LL(f) shows strong positive correlation with LL, the latter parameter can also characterize the rate of PPL realization. Long LL(f) in evergreen species provides higher PPL, which is advantageous by comparison with deciduous ones. In evergreen species, the PPL itself is realized slower than in deciduous ones. The increase in LL(f) and LL is accompanied by the increase in leaf constructional cost (LCC(a)) as well as the decrease in photosynthesis rate. At that, photosynthesis rate per unit of dry weight (P(m)) decreases much faster than that per unit of leaf area (P(a)). Apparently, when considering dry leaf weight, the apoplast share seems to be much higher in long-living leaves of evergreen species than in short-living leaves of deciduous species. The leaf payback (LP) may be stabilized by unidirectional shifts in PPL and LCC(a). Species with short/long LL(f) and high/low PPL realization rate are typical for early/late succession stages and for habitats with the environmental conditions favorable/adverse for photosynthesis and growth. If the conditions for photosynthesis and growth are favorable, high PPL realization rate provides advantage in competition. The PPL realization rate is

  15. Final report on the safety assessment of AloeAndongensis Extract, Aloe Andongensis Leaf Juice,aloe Arborescens Leaf Extract, Aloe Arborescens Leaf Juice, Aloe Arborescens Leaf Protoplasts, Aloe Barbadensis Flower Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice,aloe Barbadensis Leaf Polysaccharides, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Water, Aloe Ferox Leaf Extract, Aloe Ferox Leaf Juice, and Aloe Ferox Leaf Juice Extract.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Plant materials derived from the Aloe plant are used as cosmetic ingredients, including Aloe Andongensis Extract, Aloe Andongensis Leaf Juice, Aloe Arborescens Leaf Extract, Aloe Arborescens Leaf Juice, Aloe Arborescens Leaf Protoplasts, Aloe Barbadensis Flower Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Polysaccharides, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Water, Aloe Ferox Leaf Extract, Aloe Ferox Leaf Juice, and Aloe Ferox Leaf Juice Extract. These ingredients function primarily as skin-conditioning agents and are included in cosmetics only at low concentrations. The Aloe leaf consists of the pericyclic cells, found just below the plant's skin, and the inner central area of the leaf, i.e., the gel, which is used for cosmetic products. The pericyclic cells produce a bitter, yellow latex containing a number of anthraquinones, phototoxic compounds that are also gastrointestinal irritants responsible for cathartic effects. The gel contains polysaccharides, which can be acetylated, partially acetylated, or not acetylated. An industry established limit for anthraquinones in aloe-derived material for nonmedicinal use is 50 ppm or lower. Aloe-derived ingredients are used in a wide variety of cosmetic product types at concentrations of raw material that are 0.1% or less, although can be as high as 20%. The concentration of Aloe in the raw material also may vary from 100% to a low of 0.0005%. Oral administration of various anthraquinone components results in a rise in their blood concentrations, wide systemic distribution, accumulation in the liver and kidneys, and excretion in urine and feces; polysaccharide components are distributed systemically and metabolized into smaller molecules. aloe-derived material has fungicidal, antimicrobial, and antiviral activities, and has been effective in wound healing and infection treatment in animals. Aloe barbadensis (also known as Aloe vera)-derived ingredients were not toxic

  16. Leaf alkaloids, phenolics, and coffee resistance to the leaf miner Leucoptera coffeella (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae).

    PubMed

    Magalhães, S T V; Fernandes, F L; Demuner, A J; Picanço, M C; Guedes, R N C

    2010-08-01

    Coffee (Coffea spp.) alkaloids (caffeine and related methylxanthines) and phenolics (caffeic and chlorogenic acids) have recognized pestistatic/pesticidal activity and mediate insect-plant interactions. The present investigation assessed the resistance of 12 coffee genotypes to the leaf miner Leucoptera (= Perileucoptera) coffeella (Guérin-Méneville & Perrottet) (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae) and correlated such results with the leaf content of coffee alkaloids and phenolics that probably play a role in the interaction between coffee and this leaf miner. The levels of chlorogenic and caffeic acid, caffeine, and related methylxanthines were measured and quantified in leaf extracts of these genotypes before and 7 d after their infestation by the leaf miner. Some coffee genotypes (Coffea canephora L. and Coffea racemosa Lour. and its hybrids with Coffea arabica L.) exhibited high pesticidal activity (100% mortality) toward the L. coffeella, indicating their antibiosis resistance. However, there was no correlation between this activity and the leaf levels of coffee alkaloids and phenolics. Curiously, infestation by L. coffeella leads to a nearly four-fold decline in the leaf levels of chlorogenic acid, which does not affect this pest species but may affect other generalist species. Indeed, chlorogenic acid sprayed on coffee leaves stimulated locomotory activity of the green scale Coccus viridis (Green) (Hemiptera: Coccidae), thus minimizing their feeding in contrast with the absence of this polyphenol. Therefore, reduction of chlorogenic acid levels in coffee leaves due to leaf miner infestation seems to also favor infestation by generalist insects, such as the green scale.

  17. Reaction of sorghum lines to zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundant, frequent rains, along with humid and cloudy conditions during the early part of the 2015 growing season, provided conducive conditions for an unusually severe outbreak of zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot in a block of sorghum lines at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Farm, Burleson Coun...

  18. Measurement of leaf relative water content by infrared reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Rock, Barrett N.; Nobel, Park S.

    1987-01-01

    From basic considerations and Beer's law, a leaf water content index incorporating reflectances of wavelengths from 0.76 to 0.90 microns and from 1.55 to 1.75 microns was developed that relates leaf reflectance to leaf relative water content. For the leaf succulent, Agave deserti, the leaf water content index was not significantly different from the relative water content for either individual leaves or an entire plant. Also, the relative water contents of intact plants of Encelia farinosa and Hilaria rigida in the field were estimated by the leaf water content index; variations in the proportion of living to dead leaf area could cause large errors in the estimate of relative water content. Thus, the leaf water content index may be able to estimate average relative water content of canopies when TM4 and TM5 are measured at a known relative water content and fraction of dead leaf material.

  19. How do leaf veins influence the worldwide leaf economic spectrum? Review and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sack, Lawren; Scoffoni, Christine; John, Grace P; Poorter, Hendrik; Mason, Chase M; Mendez-Alonzo, Rodrigo; Donovan, Lisa A

    2013-10-01

    Leaf vein traits are implicated in the determination of gas exchange rates and plant performance. These traits are increasingly considered as causal factors affecting the 'leaf economic spectrum' (LES), which includes the light-saturated rate of photosynthesis, dark respiration, foliar nitrogen concentration, leaf dry mass per area (LMA) and leaf longevity. This article reviews the support for two contrasting hypotheses regarding a key vein trait, vein length per unit leaf area (VLA). Recently, Blonder et al. (2011, 2013) proposed that vein traits, including VLA, can be described as the 'origin' of the LES by structurally determining LMA and leaf thickness, and thereby vein traits would predict LES traits according to specific equations. Careful re-examination of leaf anatomy, published datasets, and a newly compiled global database for diverse species did not support the 'vein origin' hypothesis, and moreover showed that the apparent power of those equations to predict LES traits arose from circularity. This review provides a 'flux trait network' hypothesis for the effects of vein traits on the LES and on plant performance, based on a synthesis of the previous literature. According to this hypothesis, VLA, while virtually independent of LMA, strongly influences hydraulic conductance, and thus stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate. We also review (i) the specific physiological roles of VLA; (ii) the role of leaf major veins in influencing LES traits; and (iii) the role of VLA in determining photosynthetic rate per leaf dry mass and plant relative growth rate. A clear understanding of leaf vein traits provides a new perspective on plant function independently of the LES and can enhance the ability to explain and predict whole plant performance under dynamic conditions, with applications towards breeding improved crop varieties.

  20. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Leaf Chlorophyll Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Sy, Mikailou

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. These data were collected to help provide an explanation of potential seasonal and spatial changes of leaf pigment properties in boreal forest species at the NSA. At different dates (FFC-Winter, FFC-Thaw, IFC-1, IFC-2, and IMC-3), foliage samples were collected from the upper third of the canopy for five NSA sites (YJP, OJP, OBS, UBS, and OA) near Thompson, Manitoba. Subsamples of 100 needles for black spruce, 20 needles for jack pine, and single leaf for trembling aspen were cut into pieces and immersed in a 20-mL DMF aliquot in a Nalgene test tube. The extracted foliage materials were then oven-dried at 68 C for 48 hours and weighed. Extracted leaf dry weight was converted to a total leaf area basis to express the chlorophyll content in mg/sq cm of total leaf area. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  1. Computer vision cracks the leaf code

    PubMed Central

    Wilf, Peter; Zhang, Shengping; Chikkerur, Sharat; Little, Stefan A.; Wing, Scott L.; Serre, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the extremely variable, complex shape and venation characters of angiosperm leaves is one of the most challenging problems in botany. Machine learning offers opportunities to analyze large numbers of specimens, to discover novel leaf features of angiosperm clades that may have phylogenetic significance, and to use those characters to classify unknowns. Previous computer vision approaches have primarily focused on leaf identification at the species level. It remains an open question whether learning and classification are possible among major evolutionary groups such as families and orders, which usually contain hundreds to thousands of species each and exhibit many times the foliar variation of individual species. Here, we tested whether a computer vision algorithm could use a database of 7,597 leaf images from 2,001 genera to learn features of botanical families and orders, then classify novel images. The images are of cleared leaves, specimens that are chemically bleached, then stained to reveal venation. Machine learning was used to learn a codebook of visual elements representing leaf shape and venation patterns. The resulting automated system learned to classify images into families and orders with a success rate many times greater than chance. Of direct botanical interest, the responses of diagnostic features can be visualized on leaf images as heat maps, which are likely to prompt recognition and evolutionary interpretation of a wealth of novel morphological characters. With assistance from computer vision, leaves are poised to make numerous new contributions to systematic and paleobotanical studies. PMID:26951664

  2. Computer vision cracks the leaf code.

    PubMed

    Wilf, Peter; Zhang, Shengping; Chikkerur, Sharat; Little, Stefan A; Wing, Scott L; Serre, Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Understanding the extremely variable, complex shape and venation characters of angiosperm leaves is one of the most challenging problems in botany. Machine learning offers opportunities to analyze large numbers of specimens, to discover novel leaf features of angiosperm clades that may have phylogenetic significance, and to use those characters to classify unknowns. Previous computer vision approaches have primarily focused on leaf identification at the species level. It remains an open question whether learning and classification are possible among major evolutionary groups such as families and orders, which usually contain hundreds to thousands of species each and exhibit many times the foliar variation of individual species. Here, we tested whether a computer vision algorithm could use a database of 7,597 leaf images from 2,001 genera to learn features of botanical families and orders, then classify novel images. The images are of cleared leaves, specimens that are chemically bleached, then stained to reveal venation. Machine learning was used to learn a codebook of visual elements representing leaf shape and venation patterns. The resulting automated system learned to classify images into families and orders with a success rate many times greater than chance. Of direct botanical interest, the responses of diagnostic features can be visualized on leaf images as heat maps, which are likely to prompt recognition and evolutionary interpretation of a wealth of novel morphological characters. With assistance from computer vision, leaves are poised to make numerous new contributions to systematic and paleobotanical studies.

  3. Stomatal Density Influences Leaf Water and Leaf Wax D/H Values in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Feakins, S. J.; Sternberg, L. O.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of plant leaf wax is a powerful tool to study the hydrology of past and present environments. The δD value of leaf waxes is known to primarily reflect the δD value of source water, modified by biological fractionations commonly summarized as the 'net or apparent' fractionation. It remains a challenge, however, to quantitatively relate the isotopic composition of the end product (wax) back to that of the precursor (water) because multiple isotope effects contributing to the net fractionation are not yet well understood. Transgenic variants have heretofore unexplored potential to isolate individual isotope effects. Here we report the first hydrogen isotopic measurements from transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with calculations of leaf water enrichment, net and biosynthetic fractionation values from measured δD of plant waters and leaf wax n-alkanes. We employed transgenic Arabidopsis leaves, engineered to have different stomatal density, by differential expression of the stomatal growth hormone stomagen. Comparison of variants and wild types allow us to isolate the effects of stomatal density on leaf water and the net fractionation expressed by leaf wax biomarkers. Results show that transgenic leaves with denser pores have more enriched leaf water and leaf wax δD values than wild type and even more so than transgenic leaves with sparse stomata (difference of 10 ‰). Our findings that stomatal density controls leaf water and leaf wax δD values adds insights into the cause of variations in net fractionations between species, as well as suggesting that geological variations in stomatal density may modulate the sedimentary leaf wax δD record. In nature, stomatal density varies between species and environments, and all other factors being equal, this will contribute to variations in fractionations observed. Over geological history, lower stomatal densities occur at times of elevated pCO2; our findings predict reduced leaf

  4. Leaf and stem morphoanatomy of Petiveria alliacea.

    PubMed

    Duarte, M R; Lopes, J F

    2005-12-01

    Petiveria alliacea is a perennial herb native to the Amazonian region and used in traditional medicine for different purposes, such as diuretic, antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory. The morphoanatomical characterization of the leaf and stem was carried out, in order to contribute to the medicinal plant identification. The plant material was fixed, freehand sectioned and stained either with toluidine blue or astra blue and basic fuchsine. Microchemical tests were also applied. The leaf is simple, alternate and elliptic. The blade exhibits paracytic stomata on the abaxial side, non-glandular trichomes and dorsiventral mesophyll. The midrib is biconvex and the petiole is plain-convex, both traversed by collateral vascular bundles adjoined with sclerenchymatic caps. The stem, in incipient secondary growth, presents epidermis, angular collenchyma, starch sheath and collateral vascular organization. Several prisms of calcium oxalate are seen in the leaf and stem.

  5. Global variability in leaf respiration in relation to climate and leaf traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Owen K.

    2015-04-01

    Leaf respiration plays a vital role in regulating ecosystem functioning and the Earth's climate. Because of this, it is imperative that that Earth-system, climate and ecosystem-level models be able to accurately predict variations in rates of leaf respiration. In the field of photosynthesis research, the F/vC/B model has enabled modellers to accurately predict variations in photosynthesis through time and space. By contrast, we lack an equivalent biochemical model to predict variations in leaf respiration. Consequently, we need to rely on phenomenological approaches to model variations in respiration across the Earth's surface. Such approaches require that we develop a thorough understanding of how rates of respiration vary among species and whether global environmental gradients play a role in determining variations in leaf respiration. Dealing with these issues requires that data sets be assembled on rates of leaf respiration in biomes across the Earth's surface. In this talk, I will use a newly-assembled global database on leaf respiration and associated traits (including photosynthesis) to highlight variation in leaf respiration (and the balance between respiration and photosynthesis) across global gradients in growth temperature and aridity.

  6. Mueller matrix of a dicot leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern C.; Daughtry, Craig S. T.

    2012-06-01

    A better understanding of the information contained in the spectral, polarized bidirectional reflectance and transmittance of leaves may lead to improved techniques for identifying plant species in remotely sensed imagery as well as better estimates of plant moisture and nutritional status. Here we report an investigation of the optical polarizing properties of several leaves of one species, Cannabis sativa, represented by a 3x3 Mueller matrix measured over the wavelength region 400-2,400 nm. Our results support the hypothesis that the leaf surface alters the polarization of incident light - polarizing off nadir, unpolarized incident light, for example - while the leaf volume tends to depolarized incident polarized light.

  7. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in guard cells of Vicia faba L. is enhanced by fusicoccin and suppressed by abscisic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z.; Aghoram, K.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Plants regulate water loss and CO{sub 2} gain by modulating the aperture sizes of stomata that penetrate the epidermis. Aperture size itself is increased by osmolyte accumulation and consequent turgor increase in the pair of guard cells that flank each stoma. Guard-cell phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the regulated step leading to malate synthesis, is crucial for charge and pH maintenance during osmolyte accumulation. Regulation of this cytosolic enzyme by effectors is well documented, but additional regulation by posttranslational modification is predicted by the alteration of PEPC kinetics during stomatal opening. In this study, the authors have investigated whether this alteration is associated with the phosphorylation status of this enzyme. Using sonicated epidermal peels (isolated guard cells) pre-loaded with {sub 32}PO{sub 4}, the authors induced stomatal opening and guard-cell malate accumulation by incubation with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with the FC antagonist, 10 {micro}M abscisic acid (ABA). The phosphorylation status of PEPC was assessed by immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and autoradiography. PEPC was phosphorylated when stomata were stimulated to open, and phosphorylation was lessened by incubation with ABA.

  8. Dietary n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids modify phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity and lipid synthesis from glucose in adipose tissue of rats fed a high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Londero, Lisiane G; Rieger, Débora K; Hansen, Fernanda; Silveira, Simone L; Martins, Tiago L; Lulhier, Francisco; da Silva, Roselis S; Souza, Diogo O; Perry, Marcos L S; de Assis, Adriano M

    2013-12-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFAs) have hypolipidemic effects and modulate intermediary metabolism to prevent or reverse insulin resistance in a way that is not completely elucidated. Here, effects of these fatty acids on the lipid profile, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity, lipid synthesis from glucose in epididymal adipose tissue (Ep-AT) and liver were investigated. Male rats were fed a high-sucrose diet (SU diet), containing either sunflower oil or a mixture of sunflower and fish oil (SU-FO diet), and the control group was fed a standard diet. After 13 weeks, liver, adipose tissue and blood were harvested and analysed. The dietary n-3 LCPUFAs prevented sucrose-induced increase in adiposity and serum free fat acids, serum and hepatic triacylglycerol and insulin levels. Furthermore, these n-3 LCPUFAs decreased lipid synthesis from glucose and increased PEPCK activity in the Ep-AT of rats fed the SU-FO diet compared to those fed the SU diet, besides reducing lipid synthesis from glucose in hepatic tissue. Thus, the inclusion of n-3 LCPUFAs in the diet may be beneficial for the prevention or attenuation of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, and for reducing the risk of related chronic diseases.

  9. Leaf-level nitrogen use efficiency: definition and importance.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tadaki

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) has been widely used to study the relationship between nitrogen uptake and dry mass production in the plant. As a subsystem of plant nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), I have defined leaf-level NUE as the surplus production (gross production minus leaf respiration) per unit amount of nitrogen allocated to the leaf, with factorization into leaf nitrogen productivity (NP) and mean residence time of leaf nitrogen (MRT). These concepts were applied to two herbaceous stands: a perennial Solidago altissima stand and an annual Amaranthus patulus stand. S. altissima had more than three times higher leaf NUE than A. patulus due to nearly three times longer MRT of leaf N. In both species, NUE and NP were higher at the leaf level than at the plant level, because most leaf N is involved directly in the photosynthetic activity and because leaf surplus production is higher than the plant net production. MRT was longer at the plant level. The more than twice as long MRT at the plant level as at the leaf level in S. altissima was due to a large contribution of nitrogen storage belowground in the winter in this species. Thus, comparisons between a perennial and an annual system and between plant- and leaf-level NUE with their components revealed the importance of N allocation, storage, recycling, and turnover of organs for leaf photosynthetic production and plant dry mass growth.

  10. DIGITAL IMAGE ANALYSIS OF ZOSTERA MARINA LEAF INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods for assessing leaf injury in Zostera marina (eelgrass) utilize subjective indexes for desiccation injury and wasting disease. Because of the subjective nature of these measures, they are inherently imprecise making them difficult to use in quantifying complex leaf...

  11. Evaluation of leaf cuticle biophysical characteristics by laser polarimetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaruk, Aleh V.; Vashchula, Ihar V.; Zhumar, Andrew Y.

    2005-09-01

    The appearance of elliptical polarization for linear polarized radiation reflected by plant leaves was investigated. The leaf cuticle reflectance model was proposed. The evaluation of refractive index and mean angle of cuticle roughness to leaf surface was carried out.

  12. Effects of stomatal density and leaf water content on the ¹⁸O enrichment of leaf water.

    PubMed

    Larcher, Leticia; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Sternberg, Leonel

    2015-04-01

    Leaf water isotopic composition is imprinted in several biomarkers of interest and it is imperative that we understand the isotopic enrichment of leaf water. Here, we test the effect of stomatal density and leaf water content on the oxygen isotopic composition of leaf water in transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different stomatal densities, and several other species showing a range of stomatal density. We grew Arabidopsis plants hydroponically and collected other species in the field. Stomatal density and leaf water content were determined for each plant. We measured transpiration and extracted leaf water for isotopic determination. Using these measurements and the current leaf water isotope model, we calculated several of the parameters related to leaf water isotopic enrichment. High stomatal density promoted leaf water isotope enrichment. No conclusion, however, can be drawn regarding the effect of leaf water content on leaf water isotope enrichment. Factors such as transpiration might mask the effect of stomatal density on leaf water isotopic enrichment. We propose a method by which stomatal density can be incorporated in the current Peclet model of leaf water isotope enrichment. These findings have important applications in the use of plant-based metabolic proxies in paleoclimate studies.

  13. Leaf N and P stoichiometry in relation to leaf shape and plant size for Quercus acutissima provenances across China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Xiuqing; Wang, Jingyuan; Wang, G. Geoff; Yu, Mukui; Wu, Tonggui

    2017-01-01

    Plant stoichiometry in relation to the structure and function of biological systems has been investigated at multiple scales. However, few studies have focused on the roles of stoichiometry for a given species. In this study, we determined leaf N and P stoichiometry, leaf shape and plant size in three Quercus acutissima common gardens with different climatic and site conditions. In the three common gardens, leaf N and P stoichiometry was significantly correlated with leaf shape and plant size, suggesting that leaf N and P stoichiometry affects the morphological performance of the leaves and stem. The scaling slopes of the relationships between leaf N and P stoichiometry and leaf shape ranged from |0.12| to |1.00|, while the slopes of the relationships between leaf N and P stoichiometry and plant size ranged from |0.95| to |2.66|. These results suggest that non-functional tissues (stem) are more susceptible to leaf nutrition than functional tissues (leaves), and leaf stoichiometry is more important in the construction of non-functional tissues (stem). Between the northernmost and southernmost common gardens, leaf N and leaf width (W), N:P and stem height (H), and N:P and stem diameter (D) showed significant covariations, which indicates that leaf N and W, N:P and plant size exhibit similar plastic responses to environmental change. PMID:28393848

  14. Leaf Stomata as Bioindicators: Stimulating Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Steven B.

    2006-01-01

    Stomata are the pores on leaves through which carbon dioxide, oxygen, and water vapor are exchanged with the atmosphere. Researchers have found that leaf stomatal densities change in response to several environmental variables, including humidity, light intensity, and atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas (Van Der Burgh, Dilcher,…

  15. Mechanisms for leaf control of gas exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, T.A.; Davies, W.J.

    1985-03-01

    Several mechanisms enable leaf stomata to optimize water loss with respect to carbon gain. Stomatal responses to environmental variation constitute a plant's first and second lines of defense against damaging water deficits. Changes in the concentrations of endogenous growth regulations and their influence on stomata may well be important to both defense strategies.

  16. Antioxidant properties of fermented mango leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Park, Anna; Ku, Taekyu; Yoo, Ilsou

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant properties of mango (Mangifera indica) leaves were evaluated. Hydroalcoholic leaf extracts that were lyophilized were subsequently fermented with either Lactobacillus casei or effective microorganisms (EM) such as probiotic bacteria and/or other anaerobic organisms. Antioxidant properties were measured as a function of the mango leaf extract concentration in the fermentation broth. Tests for radical scavenging using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical showed higher antioxidant activity for Lactobacillus- and EM-fermented mango leaf extracts than for the synthetic antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene. Antioxidant activity generally increased with increasing fermented extract concentration as did the fermented extracts' polyphenol and flavonoid contents. Fermented extracts reduced reactive oxygen species generation by lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells when measured via fluorescence of dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate treated cells using flow cytometry. RAW 264.7 cells also showed a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of the fermented extracts using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthialol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase activity as well as nitrite scavenging by the fermented extracts increased as fermented extract concentrations increased. Tyrosinase activity was assayed with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine as substrate. Nitrite scavenging was assessed via measurement of inhibition of chromophore production from nitrite-naphthylamine-sulfanilic acid mixtures. The antioxidant properties of fermented mango leaf extracts suggest the fermented extracts may be useful in developing health food and fermentation-based beauty products.

  17. Bioinformatic pipelines in Python with Leaf

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An incremental, loosely planned development approach is often used in bioinformatic studies when dealing with custom data analysis in a rapidly changing environment. Unfortunately, the lack of a rigorous software structuring can undermine the maintainability, communicability and replicability of the process. To ameliorate this problem we propose the Leaf system, the aim of which is to seamlessly introduce the pipeline formality on top of a dynamical development process with minimum overhead for the programmer, thus providing a simple layer of software structuring. Results Leaf includes a formal language for the definition of pipelines with code that can be transparently inserted into the user’s Python code. Its syntax is designed to visually highlight dependencies in the pipeline structure it defines. While encouraging the developer to think in terms of bioinformatic pipelines, Leaf supports a number of automated features including data and session persistence, consistency checks between steps of the analysis, processing optimization and publication of the analytic protocol in the form of a hypertext. Conclusions Leaf offers a powerful balance between plan-driven and change-driven development environments in the design, management and communication of bioinformatic pipelines. Its unique features make it a valuable alternative to other related tools. PMID:23786315

  18. Winter leaf reddening in 'evergreen' species.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nicole M

    2011-05-01

    Leaf reddening during autumn in senescing, deciduous tree species has received widespread attention from the public and in the scientific literature, whereas leaf reddening in evergreen species during winter remains largely ignored. Winter reddening can be observed in evergreen herbs, shrubs, vines and trees in Mediterranean, temperate, alpine, and arctic regions, and can persist for several months before dissipating with springtime warming. Yet, little is known about the functional significance of this colour change, or why it occurs in some species but not others. Here, the biochemistry, physiology and ecology associated with winter leaf reddening are reviewed, with special focus on its possible adaptive function. Photoprotection is currently the favoured hypothesis for winter reddening, but alternative explanations have scarcely been explored. Intraspecific reddening generally increases with sunlight incidence, and may also accompany photosynthetic inferiority in photosynthetically 'weak' (e.g. low-nitrogen) individuals. Red leaves tend to show symptoms of shade acclimation relative to green, consistent with a photoprotective function. However, winter-red and winter-green species often cohabitate the same high-light environments, and exhibit similar photosynthetic capacities. The factors dictating interspecific winter leaf colouration therefore remain unclear. Additional outstanding questions and future directions are also highlighted, and possible alternative functions of winter reddening discussed.

  19. Pharmacognostic evaluation of Cayratia trifolia (Linn.) leaf

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dinesh; Gupta, Jyoti; Kumar, Sunil; Arya, Renu; Kumar, Tarun; Gupta, Ankit

    2012-01-01

    Objective To present a detailed pharmacognostic study of the leaf of Cayratia trifolia (C. trifolia) Linn. (Vitaceae), an important plant in the Indian system of medicine. Methods The macroscopy, microscopy, physiochemical analysis, preliminary testing, fluorescence analysis of powder of the plant and other WHO recommended methods for standardization were investigated. Results Leaves are trifoliolated with petioles (2–3 cm) long. Leaflets are ovate to oblong-ovate, (2–8 cm) long, (1.5–5 cm) wide, pointed at the tip. The leaf surface shows the anisocytic type stomata covered with guard cells followed by epidermis layer. Leaf surface contents including veins, vein islet and vein termination were also determined. Transverse section of leaf shows the epidermis layer followed by cuticle layer and vascular bandles (xylem and phloem). The mesophyll is differentiated into palisade and spongy parenchyma. Abundant covering trichomes emerge from the upper epidermis. Trichomes are uniseriate and multicellular. Strips of collenchyma are present below and upper layer of epidermis. Conclusions It can be concluded that the pharmacognostic profile of the C. trifolia is helpful in developing standards for quality, purity and sample identification. PMID:23569825

  20. ACTION OF AUXIN ON LEAF ABSCISSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate a two-stage effect of auxin on abscission. The two stages were demonstrated on greenhouse-grown Black...the second stage - the stage which is stimulated by auxin . Similar experiments were performed with petioles of various lengths and ages. The...implications of these results indicate possible sites of auxin action on leaf abscission. (Author)

  1. Leaf hydraulic evolution led a surge in leaf photosynthetic capacity during early angiosperm diversification.

    PubMed

    Brodribb, Tim J; Feild, Taylor S

    2010-02-01

    Angiosperm evolution transformed global ecology, and much of this impact derives from the unrivalled vegetative productivity of dominant angiosperm clades. However, the origins of high photosynthetic capacity in angiosperms remain unknown. In this study, we describe the steep trajectory of leaf vein density (D(v)) evolution in angiosperms, and predict that this leaf plumbing innovation enabled a major shift in the capacity of leaves to assimilate CO(2). Reconstructing leaf vein evolution from an examination of 504 angiosperm species we found a rapid three- to fourfold increase in D(v) occurred during the early evolution of angiosperms. We demonstrate how this major shift in leaf vein architecture potentially allowed the maximum photosynthetic capacity in angiosperms to rise above competing groups 140-100 Ma. Our data suggest that early terrestrial angiosperms produced leaves with low photosynthetic rates, but that subsequent angiosperm success is linked to a surge in photosynthetic capacity during their early diversification.

  2. A Journey Through a Leaf: Phenomics Analysis of Leaf Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Vanhaeren, Hannes; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, leaves contribute to the largest part of the aboveground biomass. In these organs, light is captured and converted into chemical energy, which plants use to grow and complete their life cycle. Leaves emerge as a small pool of cells at the vegetative shoot apical meristem and develop into planar, complex organs through different interconnected cellular events. Over the last decade, numerous phenotyping techniques have been developed to visualize and quantify leaf size and growth, leading to the identification of numerous genes that contribute to the final size of leaves. In this review, we will start at the Arabidopsis rosette level and gradually zoom in from a macroscopic view on leaf growth to a microscopic and molecular view. Along this journey, we describe different techniques that have been key to identify important events during leaf development and discuss approaches that will further help unraveling the complex cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie leaf growth. PMID:26217168

  3. Relating Leaf Nitrogen, Leaf Photosynthesis and Canopy CO2 Exchange in a Temperate Winter Barley Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, R.; Boegh, E.; Herbst, M.; Friborg, T.

    2012-12-01

    Net exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the soil-vegetation interface (NEE) is controlled by a wide range of biochemical and biophysical processes where leaf photosynthesis is often the most important. In mechanistically and physically based photosynthesis models (e.g. Farquhar et al. 1980) leaf nutrient status is a limiting factor for the photosynthetic capacity since it is implicitly incorporated through the parameters of maximum rate of carboxylation of CO2 (Vcmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax). These are closely related to leaf nitrogen concentration (Na) and leaf chlorophyll content (Cab) and often show a characteristic seasonal dynamic. When simulating CO2 exchange, model outputs are sensitive to leaf photosynthetic capacity, which is labour consuming to verify through field measurements. A less time consuming method is to measure leaf "greenness" (SPAD), which is closely related to chlorophyll content and thus photosynthetic capacity. In the present study field measurements of leaf photosynthesis (LI-6400, LICOR Inc.), leaf reflectance (SPAD-502, Minolta), and LAI (LAI-2000, LICOR Inc.) were conducted on agricultural fields in Western Denmark during one growing season. The leaf photosynthesis measurements provided the basis for estimating photosynthetic capacity. SPAD measurements and LAI was measured with a higher spatial and temporal resolution. SPAD readings were calibrated against Cab and Na analyzed on leaf material in the laboratory and later correlated to photosynthetic capacity. These data were used to parameterize a coupled photosynthesis and stomatal model that was run for the growing season 2012 to estimate NEE. As a part of the hydrological observatory HOBE (hobe.dk), fluxes of greenhouse gasses are continuously measured by eddy covariance systems at three field sites in the Skjern River Catchment, Western Denmark, providing the basis for estimating the exchange of energy, water vapour, and CO2 on canopy scale. One of

  4. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish... Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, narrow... tolerance. C4F Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2438 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak... Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull... Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak,...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2438 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak... Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull... Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak,...

  7. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish... Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, narrow... tolerance. C4F Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish... Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, narrow... tolerance. C4F Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish... Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, narrow... tolerance. C4F Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2438 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak... Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull... Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak,...

  11. Turbine rotor-stator leaf seal and related method

    DOEpatents

    Herron, William Lee; Butkiewicz, Jeffrey John

    2003-01-01

    A seal assembly for installation between rotating and stationary components of a machine includes a first plurality of leaf spring segments secured to the stationary component in a circumferential array surrounding the rotating component, the leaf spring segments each having a radial mounting portion and a substantially axial sealing portion, the plurality of leaf spring segments shingled in a circumferential direction.

  12. Scaling leaf measurements to estimate cotton canopy gas exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diurnal leaf and canopy gas exchange of well watered field grown cotton were measured. Leaf measurements were made with a portable photosynthesis system and canopy measurements with open Canopy Evapo-Transpiration and Assimilation (CETA) systems. Leaf level measurements were arithmetically scaled to...

  13. Fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces inspired by lotus leaf and silver ragwort leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyou; Cai, Yu; Wang, Xianfeng; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Wang, Moran

    2011-03-01

    Inspired by the self-cleaning lotus leaf and silver ragwort leaf, here we demonstrate the fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic fibrous mats via electrospinning polystyrene (PS) solution in the presence of silica nanoparticles. The resultant electrospun fiber surfaces exhibited a fascinating structure with the combination of nano-protrusions and numerous grooves due to the rapid phase separation in electrospinning. The content of silica nanoparticles incorporated into the fibers proved to be the key factor affecting the fiber surface morphology and hydrophobicity. The PS fibrous mats containing 14.3 wt% silica nanoparticles showed a stable superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle as high as 157.2°, exceeding that (147°) of the silver ragwort leaf and approaching that (160°) of the lotus leaf. The superhydrophobicity was explained by the hierarchical surfaces increasing the surface roughness which trapped more air under the water droplets that fell on the fibers.Inspired by the self-cleaning lotus leaf and silver ragwort leaf, here we demonstrate the fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic fibrous mats via electrospinning polystyrene (PS) solution in the presence of silica nanoparticles. The resultant electrospun fiber surfaces exhibited a fascinating structure with the combination of nano-protrusions and numerous grooves due to the rapid phase separation in electrospinning. The content of silica nanoparticles incorporated into the fibers proved to be the key factor affecting the fiber surface morphology and hydrophobicity. The PS fibrous mats containing 14.3 wt% silica nanoparticles showed a stable superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle as high as 157.2°, exceeding that (147°) of the silver ragwort leaf and approaching that (160°) of the lotus leaf. The superhydrophobicity was explained by the hierarchical surfaces increasing the surface roughness which trapped more air under the water droplets that fell on the fibers. Electronic

  14. Apparent Overinvestment in Leaf Venation Relaxes Leaf Morphological Constraints on Photosynthesis in Arid Habitats1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Hugo J.; Drake, Paul L.; Wendt, Erin; Price, Charles A.; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Turner, Neil C.; Nicolle, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Leaf veins supply the mesophyll with water that evaporates when stomata are open to allow CO2 uptake for photosynthesis. Theoretical analyses suggest that water is optimally distributed in the mesophyll when the lateral distance between veins (dx) is equal to the distance from these veins to the epidermis (dy), expressed as dx:dy ≈ 1. Although this theory is supported by observations of many derived angiosperms, we hypothesize that plants in arid environments may reduce dx:dy below unity owing to climate-specific functional adaptations of increased leaf thickness and increased vein density. To test our hypothesis, we assembled leaf hydraulic, morphological, and photosynthetic traits of 68 species from the Eucalyptus and Corymbia genera (termed eucalypts) along an aridity gradient in southwestern Australia. We inferred the potential gas-exchange advantage of reducing dx beyond dy using a model that links leaf morphology and hydraulics to photosynthesis. Our observations reveal that eucalypts in arid environments have thick amphistomatous leaves with high vein densities, resulting in dx:dy ratios that range from 1.6 to 0.15 along the aridity gradient. Our model suggests that, as leaves become thicker, the effect of reducing dx beyond dy is to offset the reduction in leaf gas exchange that would result from maintaining dx:dy at unity. This apparent overinvestment in leaf venation may be explained from the selective pressure of aridity, under which traits associated with long leaf life span, high hydraulic and thermal capacitances, and high potential rates of leaf water transport confer a competitive advantage. PMID:27784769

  15. Impact of epidermal leaf mining by the aspen leaf miner (Phyllocnistis populiella) on the growth, physiology, and leaf longevity of quaking aspen.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Diane; DeFoliart, Linda; Doak, Patricia; Schneiderheinze, Jenny

    2008-08-01

    The aspen leaf miner, Phyllocnistis populiella, feeds on the contents of epidermal cells on both top (adaxial) and bottom (abaxial) surfaces of quaking aspen leaves, leaving the photosynthetic tissue of the mesophyll intact. This type of feeding is taxonomically restricted to a small subset of leaf mining insects but can cause widespread plant damage during outbreaks. We studied the effect of epidermal mining on aspen growth and physiology during an outbreak of P. populiella in the boreal forest of interior Alaska. Experimental reduction of leaf miner density across two sites and 3 years significantly increased annual aspen growth rates relative to naturally mined controls. Leaf mining damage was negatively related to leaf longevity. Leaves with heavy mining damage abscised 4 weeks earlier, on average, than leaves with minimal mining damage. Mining damage to the top and bottom surfaces of leaves had different effects on physiology. Mining on the top surface of the leaf had no significant effect on photosynthesis or conductance and was unrelated to leaf stable C isotope ratio (delta(13)C). Mining damage to the bottom leaf surface, where stomata are located, had significant negative effects on net photosynthesis and water vapor conductance. Percent bottom mining was positively related to leaf delta(13)C. Taken together, the data suggest that the primary mechanism for the reduction of photosynthesis by epidermal leaf mining by P. populiella is the failure of stomata to open normally on bottom-mined leaves.

  16. An evolutionary perspective on leaf economics: phylogenetics of leaf mass per area in vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Olivier; Garnier, Eric; Wright, Ian J; Reich, Peter B; Pierce, Simon; Dìaz, Sandra; Pakeman, Robin J; Rusch, Graciela M; Bernard-Verdier, Maud; Testi, Baptiste; Bakker, Jan P; Bekker, Renée M; Cerabolini, Bruno E L; Ceriani, Roberta M; Cornu, Guillaume; Cruz, Pablo; Delcamp, Matthieu; Dolezal, Jiri; Eriksson, Ove; Fayolle, Adeline; Freitas, Helena; Golodets, Carly; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Hodgson, John G; Brusa, Guido; Kleyer, Michael; Kunzmann, Dieter; Lavorel, Sandra; Papanastasis, Vasilios P; Pérez-Harguindeguy, Natalia; Vendramini, Fernanda; Weiher, Evan

    2014-01-01

    In plant leaves, resource use follows a trade-off between rapid resource capture and conservative storage. This “worldwide leaf economics spectrum” consists of a suite of intercorrelated leaf traits, among which leaf mass per area, LMA, is one of the most fundamental as it indicates the cost of leaf construction and light-interception borne by plants. We conducted a broad-scale analysis of the evolutionary history of LMA across a large dataset of 5401 vascular plant species. The phylogenetic signal in LMA displayed low but significant conservatism, that is, leaf economics tended to be more similar among close relatives than expected by chance alone. Models of trait evolution indicated that LMA evolved under weak stabilizing selection. Moreover, results suggest that different optimal phenotypes evolved among large clades within which extremes tended to be selected against. Conservatism in LMA was strongly related to growth form, as were selection intensity and phenotypic evolutionary rates: woody plants showed higher conservatism in relation to stronger stabilizing selection and lower evolutionary rates compared to herbaceous taxa. The evolutionary history of LMA thus paints different evolutionary trajectories of vascular plant species across clades, revealing the coordination of leaf trait evolution with growth forms in response to varying selection regimes. PMID:25165520

  17. An evolutionary perspective on leaf economics: phylogenetics of leaf mass per area in vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Flores, Olivier; Garnier, Eric; Wright, Ian J; Reich, Peter B; Pierce, Simon; Dìaz, Sandra; Pakeman, Robin J; Rusch, Graciela M; Bernard-Verdier, Maud; Testi, Baptiste; Bakker, Jan P; Bekker, Renée M; Cerabolini, Bruno E L; Ceriani, Roberta M; Cornu, Guillaume; Cruz, Pablo; Delcamp, Matthieu; Dolezal, Jiri; Eriksson, Ove; Fayolle, Adeline; Freitas, Helena; Golodets, Carly; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Hodgson, John G; Brusa, Guido; Kleyer, Michael; Kunzmann, Dieter; Lavorel, Sandra; Papanastasis, Vasilios P; Pérez-Harguindeguy, Natalia; Vendramini, Fernanda; Weiher, Evan

    2014-07-01

    In plant leaves, resource use follows a trade-off between rapid resource capture and conservative storage. This "worldwide leaf economics spectrum" consists of a suite of intercorrelated leaf traits, among which leaf mass per area, LMA, is one of the most fundamental as it indicates the cost of leaf construction and light-interception borne by plants. We conducted a broad-scale analysis of the evolutionary history of LMA across a large dataset of 5401 vascular plant species. The phylogenetic signal in LMA displayed low but significant conservatism, that is, leaf economics tended to be more similar among close relatives than expected by chance alone. Models of trait evolution indicated that LMA evolved under weak stabilizing selection. Moreover, results suggest that different optimal phenotypes evolved among large clades within which extremes tended to be selected against. Conservatism in LMA was strongly related to growth form, as were selection intensity and phenotypic evolutionary rates: woody plants showed higher conservatism in relation to stronger stabilizing selection and lower evolutionary rates compared to herbaceous taxa. The evolutionary history of LMA thus paints different evolutionary trajectories of vascular plant species across clades, revealing the coordination of leaf trait evolution with growth forms in response to varying selection regimes.

  18. Genome-wide association study of rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf traits with a high-throughput leaf scorer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanneng; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Chenglong; Wang, Ke; Jiang, Ni; Feng, Hui; Chen, Guoxing; Liu, Qian; Xiong, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Leaves are the plant’s solar panel and food factory, and leaf traits are always key issues to investigate in plant research. Traditional methods for leaf trait measurement are time-consuming. In this work, an engineering prototype has been established for high-throughput leaf scoring (HLS) of a large number of Oryza sativa accessions. The mean absolute per cent of errors in traditional measurements versus HLS were below 5% for leaf number, area, shape, and colour. Moreover, HLS can measure up to 30 leaves per minute. To demonstrate the usefulness of HLS in dissecting the genetic bases of leaf traits, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for 29 leaf traits related to leaf size, shape, and colour at three growth stages using HLS on a panel of 533 rice accessions. Nine associated loci contained known leaf-related genes, such as Nal1 for controlling the leaf width. In addition, a total of 73, 123, and 177 new loci were detected for traits associated with leaf size, colour, and shape, respectively. In summary, after evaluating the performance with a large number of rice accessions, the combination of GWAS and high-throughput leaf phenotyping (HLS) has proven a valuable strategy to identify the genetic loci controlling rice leaf traits. PMID:25796084

  19. Joint Leaf chlorophyll and leaf area index retrieval from Landsat data using a regularized model inversion system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf area index (LAI) and leaf chlorophyll (Chl) content represent key biophysical and biochemical controls on water, energy and carbon exchange processes in the terrestrial biosphere. In combination, LAI and leaf Chl content provide critical information on vegetation density, vitality and photosynt...

  20. Baby leaf lettuce germplasm enhancement: developing diverse populations with resistance to bacterial leaf spot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baby leaf lettuce cultivars with resistance to bacterial leaf spot (BLS) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv) are needed to reduce crop losses. The objectives of this research were to assess the genetic diversity for BLS resistance in baby leaf lettuce cultivars and to select early gen...

  1. Genome-wide association study of rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf traits with a high-throughput leaf scorer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanneng; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Chenglong; Wang, Ke; Jiang, Ni; Feng, Hui; Chen, Guoxing; Liu, Qian; Xiong, Lizhong

    2015-09-01

    Leaves are the plant's solar panel and food factory, and leaf traits are always key issues to investigate in plant research. Traditional methods for leaf trait measurement are time-consuming. In this work, an engineering prototype has been established for high-throughput leaf scoring (HLS) of a large number of Oryza sativa accessions. The mean absolute per cent of errors in traditional measurements versus HLS were below 5% for leaf number, area, shape, and colour. Moreover, HLS can measure up to 30 leaves per minute. To demonstrate the usefulness of HLS in dissecting the genetic bases of leaf traits, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for 29 leaf traits related to leaf size, shape, and colour at three growth stages using HLS on a panel of 533 rice accessions. Nine associated loci contained known leaf-related genes, such as Nal1 for controlling the leaf width. In addition, a total of 73, 123, and 177 new loci were detected for traits associated with leaf size, colour, and shape, respectively. In summary, after evaluating the performance with a large number of rice accessions, the combination of GWAS and high-throughput leaf phenotyping (HLS) has proven a valuable strategy to identify the genetic loci controlling rice leaf traits.

  2. Top predator absence enhances leaf breakdown in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2016-12-01

    Current biodiversity loss is characterized by the extinction of top predators, but small-bodied freshwater fish are often overlooked in research and conservation management even when threatened because they usually lack commercial value. Therefore, the ecosystem impacts of their possible loss remain mostly unknown. We assessed whether the presence/absence of an endangered predatory fish (Barbus meridionalis (A. Risso, 1827)) in an intermittent stream affects leaf fungal biomass and leaf quality (i.e. leaf carbon:nitrogen ratio and leaf toughness), macroinvertebrate assemblages colonizing leaf packs, and leaf breakdown rates. We conducted a leaf bag experiment comparing a control reach with a population of B. meridionalis with an adjacent upstream fishless reach. In the fishless reach, leaf fungal biomass and microbially mediated breakdown rate were lower compared to the control reach. This was probably caused by the lack of the bottom-up stimulation through nutrient recycling by fish. Shredders and scrapers were found at higher abundance and biomass in the fishless compared to the control reach, and the whole macroinvertebrate community composition changed with fish absence. Consequently, macroinvertebrate mediated leaf breakdown was faster in the fishless than in the control reach, not only compensating for the lower microbially mediated leaf breakdown in the fishless reach, but accelerating the overall leaf breakdown rate. Our study contributes to understand the potential cascading effects produced by the extirpation of endangered small-bodied fish.

  3. Variations in the polarized leaf reflectance of Sorghum bicolor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Lois; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1987-01-01

    The polarized reflectance factor, Rq, of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor, L.) leaves from field-grown plants was measured in situ in the summers of 1983 and 1984. In 1983, three leaves of two randomly selected plants were measured at 2-week intervals. The value of Rq varied, depending on leaf and day of measurement. Measured values of Rq for the adaxial leaf surface ranged from 16 to 53; for the abaxial leaf surface the values ranged from 28 to 69. In 1984, measurements consisted of repeated observations made on the same leaf at biweekly intervals. The values of Rq from the adaxial leaf surface ranged from 26 to 38. Values of Rq from the abaxial leaf surface increased throughout the season, from 16 to 45. Differences in Rq were attributed to changes in surface details of the leaf.

  4. Use of NAP gene to manipulate leaf senescence in plants

    DOEpatents

    Gan, Susheng; Guo, Yongfeng

    2013-04-16

    The present invention discloses transgenic plants having an altered level of NAP protein compared to that of a non-transgenic plant, where the transgenic plants display an altered leaf senescence phenotype relative to a non-transgenic plant, as well as mutant plants comprising an inactivated NAP gene, where mutant plants display a delayed leaf senescence phenotype compared to that of a non-mutant plant. The present invention also discloses methods for delaying leaf senescence in a plant, as well as methods of making a mutant plant having a decreased level of NAP protein compared to that of a non-mutant plant, where the mutant plant displays a delayed leaf senescence phenotype relative to a non-mutant plant. Methods for causing precocious leaf senescence or promoting leaf senescence in a plant are also disclosed. Also disclosed are methods of identifying a candidate plant suitable for breeding that displays a delayed leaf senescence and/or enhanced yield phenotype.

  5. Transient state kinetics of enzyme IICBGlc, a glucose transporter of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli: equilibrium and second order rate constants for the glucose binding and phosphotransfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Meadow, Norman D; Savtchenko, Regina S; Nezami, Azin; Roseman, Saul

    2005-12-23

    During translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli, glucose is phosphorylated by phospho-IIA(Glc) and Enzyme IICB(Glc), the last two proteins in the phosphotransfer sequence of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glucose phosphotransferase system. Transient state (rapid quench) methods were used to determine the second order rate constants that describe the phosphotransfer reactions (phospho-IIA(Glc) to IICB(Glc) to Glc) and also the second order rate constants for the transfer from phospho-IIA(Glc) to molecularly cloned IIB(Glc), the soluble, cytoplasmic domain of IICB(Glc). The rate constants for the forward and reverse phosphotransfer reactions between IIA(Glc) and IICB(Glc) were 3.9 x 10(6) and 0.31 x 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, and the rate constant for the physiologically irreversible reaction between [P]IICB(Glc) and Glc was 3.2 x 10(6) m(-1) s(-1). From the rate constants, the equilibrium constants for the transfer of the phospho-group from His90 of [P]IIA(Glc) to the phosphorylation site Cys of IIB(Glc) or IICB(Glc) were found to be 3.5 and 12, respectively. These equilibrium constants signify that the thiophospho-group in these proteins has a high phosphotransfer potential, similar to that of the phosphohistidinyl phosphotransferase system proteins. In these studies, preparations of IICB(Glc) were invariably found to contain endogenous, firmly bound Glc (estimated K'(D) approximately 10(-7) m). The bound Glc was kinetically competent and was rapidly phosphorylated, indicating that IICB(Glc) has a random order, Bi Bi, substituted enzyme mechanism. The equilibrium constant for the binding of Glc was deduced from differences in the statistical goodness of fit of the phosphotransfer data to the kinetic model.

  6. Interplay of light and temperature during the in planta modulation of C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from the leaves of Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.: diurnal and seasonal effects manifested at molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Uday K; Izui, Katsura; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2011-01-01

    The interactive effects of light and temperature on C(4) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) were examined both in vivo and in situ using the leaves of Amaranthus hypochondriacus collected at different times during a day and in each month during the year. The maximum activity of PEPC, least inhibition by malate, and highest activation by glucose-6-phosphate were at 15.00 h during a typical day, in all the months. This peak was preceded by maximum ambient light but coincided with high temperature in the field. The highest magnitude in such responses was in the summer (e.g. May) and least in the winter (e.g. December). Light appeared to dominate in modulating the PEPC catalytic activity, whereas temperature had a strong influence on the regulatory properties, suggesting interesting molecular interactions. The molecular mechanisms involved in such interactive effects were determined by examining the PEPC protein/phosphorylation/mRNA levels. A marked diurnal rhythm could be seen in the PEPC protein levels and phosphorylation status during May (summer month). In contrast, only the phosphorylation status increased during the day in December (winter month). The mRNA peaks were not as strong as those of phosphorylation. Thus, the phosphorylation status and the protein levels of PEPC were crucial in modulating the daily and seasonal patterns in C(4) leaves in situ. This is the first detailed study on the diurnal as well as seasonal patterns in PEPC activity, its regulatory properties, protein levels, phosphorylation status, and mRNA levels, in relation to light and temperature intensities in the field.

  7. Adaptation for fast growth on glucose by differential expression of central carbon metabolism and gal regulon genes in an Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Flores, Noemí; Flores, Salvador; Escalante, Adelfo; de Anda, Ramón; Leal, Lidia; Malpica, Roxana; Georgellis, Dimitris; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco

    2005-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is a key intermediate of cellular metabolism and a precursor of commercially relevant products. In Escherichia coli 50% of the glucose-derived PEP is consumed by the PEP:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) for glucose transport. PTS, encoded by the ptsHIcrr operon, was deleted from JM101 to generate strain PB11 (PTS-Glc-). PB12, a mutant derived from PB11, grows faster than the parental strain on glucose (PTS-Glc+ phenotype). This strain can redirect some of the PEP not utilized by PTS into the high yield synthesis of aromatic compounds from glucose. Here, we report a comparative transcription analysis among these strains of more than 100 genes involved in central carbon metabolism during growth on glucose. It was found that in the PTS- strains that have reduced glucose transport capacities, several genes encoding proteins with functions related to carbon transport and metabolism were upregulated. Therefore, it could be inferred that these strains synthesize autoinducers of these genes when sensing very low internal glucose concentrations, probably for scavenging purposes. This condition that is permanently present in the PTS- strains even when growing in high glucose concentrations allowed the simultaneous utilization of glucose and acetate as carbon sources. It was found that the gal operon is upregulated in these strains, as well as the aceBAK, poxB and acs genes among others. In PB12, glk, pgi, the TCA cycle and certain respiratory genes are also upregulated. A mutation in arcB in PB12 is apparently responsible for the upregulation of the TCA cycle and certain respiratory genes.

  8. Leaf-wax n-alkanes record the plant–water environment at leaf flush

    PubMed Central

    Tipple, Brett J.; Berke, Melissa A.; Doman, Christine E.; Khachaturyan, Susanna; Ehleringer, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-wax n-alkanes 2H/1H ratios are widely used as a proxy in climate reconstruction. Although the broad nature of the relationship between n-alkanes δ2H values and climate is appreciated, the quantitative details of the proxy remain elusive. To examine these details under natural environmental conditions, we studied a riparian broadleaf angiosperm species, Populus angustifolia, growing on water with a constant δ2H value and monitored the δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes and of stem, leaf, stream, and atmospheric waters throughout the entire growing season. Here we found the δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes recorded only a 2-wk period during leaf flush and did not vary for the 19 weeks thereafter when leaves remained active. We found δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes of P. angustifolia record conditions earlier in the season rather than fully integrating the entire growing season. Using these data, we modeled precipitation δ2H values during the time of wax synthesis. We observed that the isotope ratios of this precipitation generally were 2H-enriched compared with mean annual precipitation. This model provides a mechanistic basis of the often-observed 2H-enrichment from the expected fractionation values in studies of broadleaf angiosperm leaf-wax δ2H. In addition, these findings may have implications for the spatial and temporal uses of n-alkane δ2H values in paleoapplications; when both plant community and growth form are known, this study allows the isolation of the precipitation dynamics of individual periods of the growing season. PMID:23359675

  9. Leaf-wax n-alkanes record the plant-water environment at leaf flush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipple, Brett J.; Berke, Melissa A.; Doman, Christine E.; Khachaturyan, Susanna; Ehleringer, James R.

    2013-02-01

    Leaf-wax n-alkanes 2H/1H ratios are widely used as a proxy in climate reconstruction. Although the broad nature of the relationship between n-alkanes δ2H values and climate is appreciated, the quantitative details of the proxy remain elusive. To examine these details under natural environmental conditions, we studied a riparian broadleaf angiosperm species, Populus angustifolia, growing on water with a constant δ2H value and monitored the δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes and of stem, leaf, stream, and atmospheric waters throughout the entire growing season. Here we found the δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes recorded only a 2-wk period during leaf flush and did not vary for the 19 weeks thereafter when leaves remained active. We found δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes of P. angustifolia record conditions earlier in the season rather than fully integrating the entire growing season. Using these data, we modeled precipitation δ2H values during the time of wax synthesis. We observed that the isotope ratios of this precipitation generally were 2H-enriched compared with mean annual precipitation. This model provides a mechanistic basis of the often-observed 2H-enrichment from the expected fractionation values in studies of broadleaf angiosperm leaf-wax δ2H. In addition, these findings may have implications for the spatial and temporal uses of n-alkane δ2H values in paleoapplications; when both plant community and growth form are known, this study allows the isolation of the precipitation dynamics of individual periods of the growing season.

  10. Canopy bidirectional reflectance dependence on leaf orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, Thomas W.; Otterman, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The dependence of the bidirectional reflectance (BR) on the inclination and azimuthal orientation of a leaf is analyzed, with the primary assumption that, in terms of both obscuration and shadowing, the entire canopy consists of the same leaves. The BR patterns of a dense canopy are examined as a function of canopy architecture. It is assumed that the leaves are opaque Lambertian reflectors, having identical orientation and relfecting properties throughout the canopy, and distributed randomly with respect to the the irradiation field and the viewing direction. Analytical expressions are presented and analyzed for the BR factor. It is noted that maximal BR occurs at large viewing zenith angles. A complex and often steep dependence of the BR on azimuthal location is reported, noting that the BR thus depends on the leaf azimuth as well as the zenith angle. It is concluded that the question of azimuthal distribution has to be addressed when conducting model inversions to infer canopy characteristics and architecture.

  11. BOREAS TE-5 Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. The leaf photosynthetic gas exchange data were collected in the BOREAS NSA and the SSA from 06-Jun- 1994 to 13-Sep- 1994 using a LI-COR 6200 portable photosynthesis system. The data were collected to compare the photosynthetic capacity, stomata] conductance, and leaf intercellular CO, concentrations among the major tree species at the BOREAS sites. The data are average values from diurnal measurements on the upper canopy foliage (sun leaves). The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  12. BOREAS TE-5 Leaf Carbon Isotope Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. This documentation describes leaf carbon isotope data that were collected in 1993 and 1994 at the NSA and SSA OJP sites, the SSA OBS site, and the NSA UBS site. In addition, leaf carbon isotope data were collected in 1994 only at the NSA and SSA OA sites. These data was collected to provide seasonal integrated physiological information for 10 to 15 common species at these 6 BOREAS sites. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  13. Preventing leaf identity theft with hormones.

    PubMed

    Lumba, Shelley; McCourt, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Genetic analysis of plant development has begun to demonstrate the importance of hormone synthesis and transport in regulating morphogenesis. In the case of leaf development, for example, auxin pooling determines where a primordium will emerge and leads to the activation of transcription factors, which determine leaf identities by modulating abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) concentrations. Signal transduction studies suggest that negative regulation of transcription factors through protein turnover is commonly used as a mechanism of hormone action. Together, these findings suggest that auxin might degrade a repressor that allows the activation of genes that modulate ABA/GA ratios in emerging leaves. With our increased understanding of the molecular basis of hormone signaling, it is becoming possible to overlay important regulators onto signaling modules that determine morphological outputs.

  14. The edge extraction of agricultural crop leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Beilei; Cao, Ying; Xiao, Huiming; Jiang, Huiyan; Liu, Hongjuan

    2009-07-01

    In agricultural engineering, to ensure rational use of pesticide and improvement of crop production, computer image recognition technology is currently applied to help farmers to identify the degree of crop diseases. Considering the importance of feature extraction in this field, in this paper, we first present and discuss several widely used edge operator, including Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, Canny and LoG. Furthermore, an experiment is conducted to compare performance and accuracy of five operators by applying them to a leaf image taken from agricultural crop for edge detection. The results of experiment show that, in practice, LoG edge operator is relatively a better choice and performs well for edge detection of agricultural crop leaf image.

  15. Evolution of leaf warbler songs (Aves: Phylloscopidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Martens, Jochen; Fischer, Balduin S; Sun, Yue-Hua; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette; Päckert, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Songs in passerine birds are important for territory defense and mating. Speciation rates in oscine passerines are so high, due to cultural evolution, that this bird lineage makes up half of the extant bird species. Leaf warblers are a speciose Old-World passerine family of limited morphological differentiation, so that songs are even more important for species delimitation. We took 16 sonographic traits from song recordings of 80 leaf warbler taxa and correlated them with 15 potentially explanatory variables, pairwise, and in linear models. Based on a well-resolved molecular phylogeny of the same taxa, all pairwise correlations were corrected for relatedness with phylogenetically independent contrasts and phylogenetic generalized linear models were used. We found a phylogenetic signal for most song traits, but a strong one only for the duration of the longest and of the shortest element, which are presumably inherited instead of learned. Body size of a leaf warbler species is a constraint on song frequencies independent of phylogeny. At least in this study, habitat density had only marginal impact on song features, which even disappeared through phylogenetic correction. Maybe most leaf warblers avoid the deterioration through sound propagation in dense vegetation by singing from exposed perches. Latitudinal (and longitudinal) extension of the breeding ranges was correlated with most song features, especially verse duration (longer polewards and westwards) and complexity (lower polewards). Climate niche or expansion history might explain these correlations. The number of different element types per verse decreases with elevation, possibly due to fewer resources and congeneric species at higher elevations. PMID:25691998

  16. Nitrogen release pattern in decomposing leaf litter of banj oak and chir pine seedlings leaf under glass house condition.

    PubMed

    Usman, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Decomposition rate for leaf litter of banj oak (Quercus leucotrichophora) and chir pine (Pinus roxburghii), seedlings was studied over a period of one year, under glass house condition. The leaf litter of Quercus leucotrichophora decomposed faster as compared to Pinus roxburghii. Initially during 0-62 days of placement, the decomposition rate was slower for leaf litter of both species but after 123 days of placement it was 53% for Quercus leucotrichophora leaf litter and 33% for Pinus roxburghii leaf litter. The Quercus leucotrichophora leaf litter was completely decomposed after 11 months; however, 65% weight loss was recorded in Pinus roxburghii leaf litter after 12 months study. In Quercus leucotrichophora leaf litter the, initial (at the start of decomposition) nitrogen concentration was much higher (1.15%) than that of Pinus roxburghii leaf litter (1.41%), release of N was slower in chir pine leaf litter compared to banj oak leaf litter. Material with higher C/N ratio had longer duration of immobilization and in turn slower release phase. The concentration of N increased approximately linearly as a function of mass loss towards the end of annual cycle. Concentration of N was about 1.2 to 1.9 fold higher than the initial litter for seedlings of both the species.

  17. Seasonality of Leaf Carbon Isotopic Composition and Leaf Water Isotopic Enrichment in a Mixed Evergreen Forest in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. S.; Sickman, J. O.; Goulden, M.; DeVan, C.; Pasquini, S. C.; Pivovaroff, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Leaf carbon isotopic composition and leaf water isotopic enrichment reflect physiological processes and are important for linking local and regional scale processes to global patterns. We investigated how seasonality affects the isotopic composition of bulk leaf carbon, leaf sugar carbon, and leaf water hydrogen under a Mediterranean climate. Leaf and stem samples were collected monthly from four tree species (Calocedrus decurrens, Pinus lambertiana, Pinus ponderosa, and Quercus chrysolepis) at the James San Jacinto Mountain Reserve in southern California. Mean monthly bulk leaf carbon isotopic composition varied from -34.5 % in P. ponderosa to -24.7 % in P. lambertiana and became more depleted in 13C from the spring to the summer. Mean monthly leaf sugar varied from -29.3 % in P. ponderosa to -21.8 % in P. lambertiana and was enriched in 13C during the winter, spring and autumn, but depleted during the mid-summer. Leaf water hydrogen isotopic composition was 28.4 to 68.8 % more enriched in deuterium than source water and this enrichment was greater as seasonal drought progressed. These data indicate that leaf carbon and leaf water hydrogen isotopic composition provide sensitive measures that connect plant physiological processes to short-term climatic variability.

  18. Enzymatic activities in coniferous leaf litter

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.

    1980-07-01

    Assays for measuring the activities of cellulase, xylanase, mannase, amylase, ..beta..-glucosidase, invertase, and protease employing buffered suspensions of ground coniferous and deciduous leaf litter exhibited zero-order kinetics. Only a small percentage of the whole-litter activities of invertase, ..beta..-glucosidase, and protease were extractable into 0.05M potassium acetate, pH 5.0; however, extractable activities of cellulase and xylanase represented from 39 to 174% of the whole-litter activities indicating their soluble exocellar nature. Extractable protease and amylase activities were best correlated with the average daily rates of CO/sub 2/ evolution in a group of 90 leaf litter samples equally representing 18 coniferous species. Enzymatic activities were readily detectable in extracts of all samples but classification of the samples by species provided little differentiation in the distribution of either enzymatic activities or rates of CO/sub 2/ evolution. Mannase, cellulase, and xylanase activities were well-correlated with each other in all samples. Assays attempting to measure a pool of readily-metabolizable substances in litter by extractable reducing substances, ninhydrin-positive substances, glucose, and phenolics failed to show correlation coefficients >0.41 with rates of CO/sub 2/ evolution. Addition of D-(+)-catechin to litter extracts, up to levels equivalent to those observed in the group of samples, did not inhibit any carbohydrase thus suggesting the lack of inhibition of litter-decomposing enzymes by the concentrations of phenolics present in these coniferous leaf litters.

  19. Air bubble bursting effect of lotus leaf.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingming; Zheng, Yongmei; Nie, Fu-Qiang; Zhai, Jin; Jiang, Lei

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, a phenomenon of air bubbles quickly bursting within several milliseconds on a "self-cleaning" lotus leaf was described. This observation prompted the synthesis of artificial surfaces similar to that of the lotus leaf. The artificial leaf surfaces, prepared by photolithography and wet etching, showed a similar air bubble bursting effect. Smooth and rough silicon surfaces with an ordered nanostructure or patterned microstructure were utilized to study the contribution of the micro/nano hierarchical structures to this phenomenon of air bubble bursting. Air bubbles were found to burst on some superhydrophobic surfaces with microstructure (within 220 ms). However, air bubbles burst much more rapidly (within 13 ms) on similar surfaces with micro/nanostructure. The height, width, and spacing of hierarchical structures could also affect air bubble bursting, and the effect of the height was more obvious. When the height of hierarchical structures was around the height found in natural lotus papillae, the width and spacing were significant for air bubble bursting. An original model was proposed to further evaluate the reason why the micro/nano hierarchical rough structures had an excellent air bubble bursting effect, and the validity of the model was theoretically demonstrated.

  20. VOC Emissions From Decomposing Leaf Litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. M.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Fierer, N.; Monson, R. K.

    2007-12-01

    The emission of VOCs from the biosphere has a profound effect on the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. Most studies of the flux of reactive carbon from the biosphere have focused on BVOC emissions at leaf and canopy scales with relatively few studies investigating BVOC emissions from soils. Here we present results describing the emissions of a suite of BVOCs from different litter types under different levels of nitrogen availability. To investigate these effects, three biochemically distinct litter types (Deschampsia sp., Acomostylis sp., and Rhododendron sp.) were coarsely ground and incubated in the dark for two months under different nitrogen regimes at optimal conditions for microbial activity. We used proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and an infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to monitor BVOC emissions and CO2 production rates throughout the course of the investigation. When different leaf litter types decomposed, they released distinctly different types and quantities of VOCs. However, varying nitrogen availability caused the VOC signature from some litters to change dramatically. We suggest that decomposition of leaf litter could provide a substantive source of reactive carbon to the atmosphere at local and regional scales and hypothesize that nitrogen deposition may play a role in attenuating the release of some reactive species.

  1. Simulating droplet motion on virtual leaf surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lisa C.; McCue, Scott W.; Moroney, Timothy J.; Forster, W. Alison; Kempthorne, Daryl M.; Belward, John A.; Turner, Ian W.

    2015-01-01

    A curvilinear thin film model is used to simulate the motion of droplets on a virtual leaf surface, with a view to better understand the retention of agricultural sprays on plants. The governing model, adapted from Roy et al. (2002 J. Fluid Mech. 454, 235–261 (doi:10.1017/S0022112001007133)) with the addition of a disjoining pressure term, describes the gravity- and curvature-driven flow of a small droplet on a complex substrate: a cotton leaf reconstructed from digitized scan data. Coalescence is the key mechanism behind spray coating of foliage, and our simulations demonstrate that various experimentally observed coalescence behaviours can be reproduced qualitatively. By varying the contact angle over the domain, we also demonstrate that the presence of a chemical defect can act as an obstacle to the droplet's path, causing break-up. In simulations on the virtual leaf, it is found that the movement of a typical spray size droplet is driven almost exclusively by substrate curvature gradients. It is not until droplet mass is sufficiently increased via coalescence that gravity becomes the dominating force. PMID:26064657

  2. Quantitative trait loci mapping of leaf angle and leaf orientation value in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Ku, L X; Zhao, W M; Zhang, J; Wu, L C; Wang, C L; Wang, P A; Zhang, W Q; Chen, Y H

    2010-09-01

    A major limiting factor for high productivity of maize (Zea mays L.) in dense planting is light penetration through the canopy. Plant architecture with a narrower leaf angle (LA) and an optimum leaf orientation value (LOV) is desirable to increase light capture for photosynthesis and production per unit area. However, the genetic control of the plant architecture traits remains poorly understood in maize. In this study, QTL for LA, LOV, and related traits were mapped using a set of 229 F(2:3) families derived from the cross between compact and expanded inbred lines, evaluated in three environments. Twenty-five QTL were detected in total. Three of the QTL explained 37.4% and five of the QTL explained 53.9% of the phenotypic variance for LA and LOV, respectively. Two key genome regions controlling leaf angle and leaf orientation were identified. qLA1 and qLOV1 at nearest marker umc2226 on chromosome 1.02 accounted for 20.4 and 23.2% of the phenotypic variance, respectively; qLA5 and qLOV5 at nearest bnlg1287 on chromosome 5 accounted for 9.7 and 9.8% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. These QTL could provide useful information for marker-assisted selection in improving performance of plant architecture with regard to leaf angle and orientation.

  3. Nematode Root Herbivory in Tomato Increases Leaf Defenses and Reduces Leaf Miner Oviposition and Performance.

    PubMed

    Arce, Carla C M; Machado, Ricardo A R; Ribas, Natália S; Cristaldo, Paulo F; Ataíde, Lívia M S; Pallini, Ângelo; Carmo, Flávia M; Freitas, Leandro G; Lima, Eraldo

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of plant-mediated interactions among herbivores from several feeding guilds has been studied intensively. However, our understanding on the effects of nematode root herbivory on leaf miner oviposition behavior and performance remain limited. In this study, we evaluated whether Meloidogyne incognita root herbivory affects Tuta absoluta oviposition preference on Solanum lycopersicum plants and the development of the resulting offspring. To investigate the M. incognita-herbivory induced plant systemic responses that might explain the observed biological effects, we measured photosynthetic rates, leaf trypsin protease inhibitor activities, and analyzed the profile of volatiles emitted by the leaves of root-infested and non-infested plants. We found that T. absoluta females avoided laying eggs on the leaves of root-infested plants, and that root infestation negatively affected the pupation process of T. absoluta. These effects were accompanied by a strong suppression of leaf volatile emissions, a decrease in photosynthetic rates, and an increase in the activity of leaf trypsin protease inhibitors. Our study reveals that root attack by nematodes can shape leaf physiology, and thereby increases plant resistance.

  4. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity and the co-ordination of carbon partitioning during sucrose and amino acid accumulation in desiccation-tolerant leaf material of the C4 resurrection plant Sporobolus stapfianus during dehydration.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Anne; Martinelli, Tommaso; Farrant, Jill M; Bochicchio, Adriana; Vazzana, Concetta

    2007-01-01

    Both sucrose and amino acids accumulate in desiccation-tolerant leaf material of the C(4) resurrection plant, Sporobolus stapfianus Gandoger (Poaceae). The present investigation was aimed at examining sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity and various metabolic checkpoints involved in the co-ordination of carbon partitioning between these competing pathways during dehydration. In the initial phase of dehydration, photosynthesis and starch content declined to immeasurable levels, whilst significant increases in hexose sugars, sucrose, and amino acids were associated with concomitant significant increases in SPS and pyruvate kinase (PK) activities, and maximal activity levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), and NADH-dependent glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT). The next phase of dehydration was characterized by changes in metabolism coinciding with net hexose sugar phosphorylation. This phase was characterized by a further significant increase in sucrose accumulation, with increased rates of net sucrose accumulation and maximum rates of SPS activity measured under both saturating and limiting (inhibitory) conditions. SPS protein was also increased. The stronger competitive edge of SPS for carbon entering glycolysis during hexose phosphorylation was also demonstrated by the further decrease in respiration and the simultaneous, significant decline in both PEPCase and PK activities. A decreased anabolic demand for 2-oxoglutarate (2OG), which remained constant, was shown by the co-ordinated decrease in GOGAT. It is proposed that the further increase in amino acids in this phase of dehydration may be in part attributable to the breakdown of insoluble proteins.

  5. Photosynthetic responses to leaf surface wetness in tropical plant species of Costa Rica with varying leaf traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparecido, L. M. T.; Moore, G. W.; Miller, G. R.; Cahill, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Wet tropical forests are some of the environments with the greatest annual precipitation, but are also considered as the world's major carbon sink; however, literature postulates that phothsynthesis rates are inhibited while leaves are wet. Yet measurements of photosynthesis during wet conditions are challenging to obtain due to equipment limitations and the extreme complexity of canopy-atmosphere interactions in tropical environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate tropical species reactions to simulated leaf wetness and test the hypothesis that leaf wetness reduces rates of photosynthesis. In a central Costa Rica site with an average 4200 mm annual rainfall, we selected six tropical species with distinct leaf traits in which five sun-exposed leaf replicates from each species were subjected to gas exchange measurements using a LI-6400 IRGA (LICOR Inc., Lincoln, NE) under dry and wet/misted leaf conditions. Relationships between photosynthesis (As) and stomatal conductance (gs) with leaf to air temperature difference (DT), VPD, and relative humidity were evaluated using linear regression analysis. We found that the responses varied greatly among species, but all plants maintained a baseline of activity under wet leaf conditions, suggesting that abaxial leaf As was a significant percentage of total leaf As. Stachytarpheta jamaicens had an 18.7% reduction in As, while others, like Zamia skinneri, had a 7% increase in As. Tibouchina heteromalla showed a rapid stomatal recovery of 2 mins, while Carapa guianensis was slower with 7 mins. This variability between species suggests that leaf traits, such as presence or absence of trichomes, water repellency, vein distribution and size and leaf angle variation, may be critical for optimizing photosynthesis under wet conditions. Relative humidity and leaf temperature were the strongest secondary influences on As and gs under wet leaf conditions. While tropical vegetation-atmosphere interactions are complex, such

  6. Leaf morphological effects predict effective path length and enrichment of 18O in leaf water of different Eucalyptus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Merchant, A.; Callister, A.; Dawson, T. E.; Arndt, S. K.

    2006-12-01

    Stable isotopes have been a valuable tool to study water or carbon fluxes of plants and ecosystems. In particular oxygen isotopes (δ18O) in leaf water or plant organic material are now beginning to be established as a simple and integrative measure for plant - water relations. Current δ18O models, however, are still limited in their application to a broad range of different species and ecosystems. It remains for example unclear, if species-specific effects such as different leaf morphologies need to be included in the models for a precise understanding and prediction of δ18O signals. In a common garden experiment (Currency Creek Arboretum, South Australia), where over 900 different Eucalyptus species are cultivated in four replicates, we tested effects of leaf morphology and anatomy on δ18O signals in leaf water of 25 different species. In particular, we determined for all species enrichment in 18O of mean lamina leaf water above source water (Δ18O) as related to leaf physiology as well as leaf thickness, leaf area, specific leaf area and weight and selected anatomical properties. Our data revealed that diurnal Δ18O in leaf water at steady state was significantly different among the investigated species and with differences up to 10% at midday. Fitting factors (effective path length) of leaf water Δ18O models were also significantly different among the investigated species and were highly affected by species-specific morphological parameters. For example, leaf area explained a high percentage of the differences in effective path length observed among the investigated species. Our data suggest that leaf water δ18O can act as powerful tool to estimate plant - water relations in comparative studies but that additional leaf morphological parameters need to be considered in existing δ18O models for a better interpretation of the observed δ18O signals.

  7. Interaction between Silver Nanoparticles and Spinach Leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Li, H.; Zhang, Y.; Riser, E.; He, S.; Zhang, W.

    2013-12-01

    Interactions of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) with plant surfaces are critical to assessing the bioavailability of ENPs to edible plants and to further evaluating impacts of ENPs on ecological health and food safety. Silver nanoparticles (i.e., nanoAg) could enter the agroecosystems either as an active ingredient in pesticides or from other industrial and consumer applications. Thus, in the events of pesticide application, rainfall, and irrigation, vegetable leaves could become in contact and then interact with nanoAg. The present study was to assess whether the interaction of nanoAg with spinach leaves can be described by classical sorption models and to what extent it depends on and varies with dispersion methods, environmental temperature, and ion release. We investigated the stability and ion release of nanoAg dispersed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, 1%) and humic acid (HA, 10 mg C/L) solutions, as well as sorption and desorption of nanoAg on and from the fresh spinach leaf. Results showed SDS-nanoAg released about 2%-8% more Ag ion than HA-nanoAg. The sorption of Ag ion, described by the Freundlich model in the initial concentration range of 0.6-50 mg/L, was 2-4 times higher than that of nanoAg. The sorption of nanoAg on spinach leaf can be fitted by the Langmuir model, and the maximum sorption amount of HA-nanoAg and SDS-nanoAg was 0.21 and 0.41 mg/g, respectively. The higher sorption of SDS-nanoAg relative to that of HA-nanoAg could be partially resulted from the higher release of Ag ion from the former. The maximum desorption amount of HA-nanoAg and SDS-nanoAg in 1% SDS solution was 0.08 and 0.10 mg/g, respectively. NanoAg attachment on and its penetration to the spinach leaf was visualized by the Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS). It is equally important that the less sorption of nanoAg under low environmental temperature could be partially due to the closure of stomata, as verified by SEM-EDS. Cyto

  8. Leaf optical properties in Venezuelan cloud forest trees.

    PubMed

    Poorter, Lourens; Kwant, R.; Hernández, R.; Medina, E.; Werger, M. J. A.

    2000-04-01

    Leaf optical properties and related leaf characteristics were compared for thirteen cloud forest tree species differing in successional status. Sun leaves were sampled for the eight pioneer species and sun and shade leaves were sampled for the five climax species. Sun leaves had a slightly higher absorptance than shade leaves, although differences were small. Sun leaves had a higher leaf mass per unit area (LMA) and a lower chlorophyll concentration per unit leaf mass, resulting in similar chlorophyll concentrations per unit leaf area and hence similar light harvesting capacities as shade leaves. However, shade leaves realized a higher efficiency of absorptance per unit leaf biomass than sun leaves. There were few differences in leaf characteristics of sun leaves between the climax and pioneer species. Absorptance values of cloud forest species were comparable with values reported for rain forest and more seasonal forest species. Intraspecific variation in leaf absorptance was largely the result of variation in LMA, whereas interspecific variation in leaf absorptance was largely a result of variation in chlorophyll concentration per unit leaf area.

  9. Using Leaf Samples to Establish a Library of Tropical Leaf Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, P.; Nguyen, R.; Anderson, C.; Weiss, P.

    2010-12-01

    Variation in leaf chemistry is directly expressed in spectroscopic patterns of tropical canopies. The goal of the Spectranomics project is to explore this variation in the hopes of developing a method to measure tropical forest diversity remotely from airborne or space-bound spectroscopy in the future. We analyzed tomato leaves for various chemical compositions to better understand the Spectranomics approach to quantifying chemical data of tropical species. We also compared our data to standard data in each analysis. Our results allow us to give the tomato leaves a chemical signature in which we are able to use to compare to other leaf samples. Using this process, we are able to create a library of leaf signatures and document the variety of tree species in tropical forests around the world.

  10. Changes in clonal poplar leaf chemistry caused by stem galls alter herbivory and leaf litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Künkler, Nora; Brandl, Roland; Brändle, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gall-inducing insects are highly specialized herbivores that modify the phenotype of their host plants. Beyond the direct manipulation of plant morphology and physiology in the immediate environment of the gall, there is also evidence of plant-mediated effects of gall-inducing insects on other species of the assemblages and ecosystem processes associated with the host plant. We analysed the impact of gall infestation by the aphid Pemphigus spirothecae on chemical leaf traits of clonal Lombardy poplars (Populus nigra var. italica) and the subsequent effects on intensity of herbivory and decomposition of leaves across five sites. We measured the herbivory of two feeding guilds: leaf-chewing insects that feed on the blade (e.g. caterpillars and sawfly larvae) and skeletonising insects that feed on the mesophyll of the leaves (e.g. larvae of beetles). Galled leaves had higher phenol (35%) and lower nitrogen and cholorophyll contents (35% respectively 37%) than non-galled leaves, and these differences were stronger in August than in June. Total herbivory intensity was 27% higher on galled than on non-galled leaves; damage by leaf chewers was on average 61% higher on gall infested leaves, whereas damage by skeletonising insects was on average 39% higher on non-galled leaves. After nine months the decomposition rate of galled leaf litter was 15% lower than that of non-galled leaf litter presumably because of the lower nitrogen content of the galled leaf litter. This indicated after-life effects of gall infestation on the decomposers. We found no evidence for galling x environment interactions.

  11. Quantitative trait loci mapping for leaf length and leaf width in rice cv. IR64 derived lines.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad; Tagle, Analiza G; Santos, Rizza E; Ebron, Leodegario A; Fujita, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Nobuya

    2010-06-01

    The present study was conducted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for leaf size traits in IR64 introgression lines (INLs). For this purpose, selected F(2) populations derived from crosses between recurrent parent IR64 and its derived INLs, unique for leaf length and leaf width, were used to confirm QTLs. A total of eight QTLs, mapped on three chromosomes, were identified for the four leaf size traits in six F(2) populations. A QTL for leaf length, qLLnpt-1, in HKL69 was identified around simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker RM3709 on chromosome 1. Two QTLs for flag leaf length, qFLLnpt-2 and qFLLnpt-4, in HFG39 were indentified on chromosomes 2 and 4, respectively. For flag leaf width, a QTL, qFLWnpt-4, in HFG39 was identified around RM17483 on chromosome 4. While another QTL for flag leaf width, qFLWnpt-1, in HFG27 was identified around RM3252 on chromosome 1. A QTL for leaf width, qLWnpt-2, in HKL75 was identified around RM7451 on chromosome 2. For leaf width, two QTLs, qLWnpt-4a, qLWnpt-4b, in HKL48 and HKL99 were identified around RM7208 and RM6909, respectively on chromosome 4. Results from this study suggest the possibilities to use marker-assisted selection and pyramiding these QTLs to improve rice water productivity.

  12. How cellulose-based leaf toughness and lamina density contribute to long leaf lifespans of shade-tolerant species.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Kaoru; Llorens, Anna-Maria; Stefanescu, Carla; Timchenko, Marta Vargas; Lucas, Peter W; Wright, S Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Cell wall fibre and lamina density may interactively affect leaf toughness and leaf lifespan. Here, we tested this with seedlings of 24 neotropical tree species differing in shade tolerance and leaf lifespan under standardized field conditions (140-867 d in gaps; longer in shade). We quantified toughness with a cutting test, explicitly seeking a mechanistic linkage to fibre. Lamina density, but not fracture toughness, exhibited a plastic response to gaps vs shade, while neither trait was affected by leaf age. Toughness corrected for lamina density, a recently recognized indicator of material strength per unit mass, was linearly correlated with cellulose content per unit dry mass. Leaf lifespan was positively correlated with cellulose and toughness in shade-tolerant species but only weakly in gap-dependent species. Leaf lifespan was uncorrelated with lamina thickness, phenolics and tannin concentrations. In path analysis including all species, leaf lifespan was directly enhanced by density and toughness, and indirectly by cellulose via its effect on toughness. Different suites of leaf traits were correlated with early seedling survival in gaps vs shade. In conclusion, cellulose and lamina density jointly enhance leaf fracture toughness, and these carbon-based physical traits, rather than phenolic-based defence, explain species differences in herbivory, leaf lifespan and shade survival.

  13. Leaf age dependent changes in within-canopy variation in leaf functional traits: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-05-01

    Within-canopy variation in leaf structural and photosynthetic characteristics is a major means by which whole canopy photosynthesis is maximized at given total canopy nitrogen. As key acclimatory modifications, leaf nitrogen content (N A) and photosynthetic capacity (A A) per unit area increase with increasing light availability in the canopy and these increases are associated with increases in leaf dry mass per unit area (M A) and/or nitrogen content per dry mass and/or allocation. However, leaf functional characteristics change with increasing leaf age during leaf development and aging, but the importance of these alterations for within-canopy trait gradients is unknown. I conducted a meta-analysis based on 71 canopies that were sampled at different time periods or, in evergreens, included measurements for different-aged leaves to understand how within-canopy variations in leaf traits (trait plasticity) depend on leaf age. The analysis demonstrated that in evergreen woody species, M A and N A plasticity decreased with increasing leaf age, but the change in A A plasticity was less suggesting a certain re-acclimation of A A to altered light. In deciduous woody species, M A and N A gradients in flush-type species increased during leaf development and were almost invariable through the rest of the season, while in continuously leaf-forming species, the trait gradients increased constantly with increasing leaf age. In forbs, N A plasticity increased, while in grasses, N A plasticity decreased with increasing leaf age, reflecting life form differences in age-dependent changes in light availability and in nitrogen resorption for growth of generative organs. Although more work is needed to improve the coverage of age-dependent plasticity changes in some plant life forms, I argue that the age-dependent variation in trait plasticity uncovered in this study is large enough to warrant incorporation in simulations of canopy photosynthesis through the growing period.

  14. Impact of plant architecture versus leaf quality on attack by leaf-tying caterpillars on five oak species.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Robert J; Lill, John T

    2010-05-01

    Because shelter-building herbivorous insect species often consider structural features of their host plants in selecting construction sites, their probability of attack is likely to be a function of some combination of plant architectural traits and leaf quality factors. We tested the hypothesis that plant architecture, in the form of the number of touching leaves, influences interspecific variation in attack by leaf-tying caterpillars in five species of sympatric Missouri oaks (Quercus). We compared colonization on control branches, in which both architecture and leaf quality were potentially important, with colonization on experimental branches for which we controlled for the effects of architecture by creating equal numbers of artificial ties. Colonization of artificial ties was highly correlated with natural colonization on neighboring control branches, suggesting that leaf quality factors and not architecture influenced interspecific variation in attack by leaf-tying caterpillars. Of the leaf quality factors measured (water, protein-binding capacity, nitrogen, specific leaf area, pubescence, and toughness), nitrogen was the most explanatory. With the exception of white oak, natural leaf tie colonization was positively correlated with nitrogen availability (ratio of nitrogen to protein-binding capacity), and negatively correlated with protein-binding capacity of leaf extracts. Both host plant species and subgenus oak influenced the community composition of leaf-tying caterpillars and the non-tying symbionts colonizing the ties. Host plant differences in leaf nitrogen content were positively correlated with pupal weight of one of two caterpillar species reared on all five host plant species. Thus, interspecific differences in nitrogen, nitrogen availability, and protein-binding capacity of leaf extracts are the best predictors at this time of interspecific differences in attack by leaf-tying caterpillars, in turn affecting their success on individual host plants

  15. Transcriptomic analysis of incised leaf-shape determination in birch.

    PubMed

    Mu, Huaizhi; Lin, Lin; Liu, Guifeng; Jiang, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Plant researchers have focused much attention on leaf shape because of its importance in the identification. To evaluate the impact of intraspecies leaf-shape variation on the transcriptome, a series of Betula pendula 'Dalecarlica' and B. pendula saplings were generated through tissue culture. The leaf shapes and transcriptomes of B. pendula 'Dalecarlica' clones were compared with those of B. pendula clones. The leaf shape of B. pendula 'Dalecarlica' was incised and that of B. pendula was ovate. Transcriptome data revealed numerous changes in gene expression between B. pendula 'Dalecarlica' and B. pendula, including upregulation of 8767 unigenes and downregulation of 8379 unigenes in B. pendula 'Dalecarlica'. A pathway analysis revealed that the transport and signal transduction of auxin were altered in 'Dalecarlica', which may have contributed to its altered leaf shape. These results shed light on variation in birch leaf shape and help identify important genes for the genetic engineering of birch trees.

  16. Generality of leaf trait relationships: A test across six biomes

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, P.B.; Ellsworth, D.S.; Walters, M.B.; Vose, J.M.; Gresham, C.; Volin, J.C.; Bowman, W.D. |

    1999-09-01

    Convergence in interspecific leaf trait relationships across diverse taxonomic groups and biomes would have important evolutionary and ecological implications. Such convergence has been hypothesized to result from trade-offs that limit the combination of plant traits for any species. Here the authors address this issue by testing for biome differences in the slope and intercept of interspecific relationships among leaf traits: longevity, net photosynthetic capacity (A{sub max}), leaf diffusive conductance (G{sub S}), specific leaf area (SLA), and nitrogen (N) status, for more than 100 species in six distinct biomes of the Americas. The six biomes were: alpine tundra-subalpine forest ecotone, cold temperate forest-prairie ecotone, montane cool temperate forest, desert shrubland, subtropical forest, and tropical rain forest. Despite large differences in climate and evolutionary history, in all biomes mass-based leaf N (N{sub mass}), SLA, G{sub S}, and A{sub max} were positively related to one another and decreased with increasing leaf life span. The relationships between pairs of leaf traits exhibited similar slopes among biomes, suggesting a predictable set of scaling relationships among key leaf morphological, chemical, and metabolic traits that are replicated globally among terrestrial ecosystems regardless of biome or vegetation type. However, the intercept (i.e., the overall elevation of regression lines) of relationships between pairs of leaf traits usually differed among biomes. With increasing aridity across sites, species had greater A{sub max} for a given level of G{sub S} and lower SLA for any given leaf life span. Using principal components analysis, most variation among species was explained by an axis related to mass-based leaf traits (A{sub max}, N, and SLA) while a second axis reflected climate, G{sub S}, and other area-based leaf traits.

  17. Biometamaterials: Black Ultrathin Gold Film Fabricated on Lotus Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Ebihara, Yuusuke; Ota, Ryoichi; Noriki, Takahiro; Shimojo, Masayuki; Kajikawa, Kotaro

    2015-01-01

    We report on a black metamaterial of gold fabricated on a lotus leaf that was used as a template. In spite of the extremely thin gold coating (10-nm thick) on the lotus leaf, the surface shows reflectivity below 0.01 over the entire visible spectral range. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations suggest that the low reflectivity stems from the secondary structures on the lotus leaf, where randomly oriented nanorods are distributed. PMID:26530514

  18. Strategies of leaf expansion in Ficus carica under semiarid conditions.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, A M; Peters, J

    2010-05-01

    Leaf area expansion, thickness and inclination, gas exchange parameters and relative chlorophyll content were analysed in field-grown fig (Ficus carica L.) leaves over time, from emergence until after full leaf expansion (FLE). Ficus carica leaves showed a subtle change in shape during the early stages of development, and FLE was reached within ca. 30 days after emergence. Changes in leaf thickness and inclination after FLE demonstrated good adaptation to environmental conditions during summer in areas with a Mediterranean climate. Changes in gas exchange parameters and relative chlorophyll content showed that F. carica is a delayed-greening species, reaching maximum values 20 days after FLE. Correlation analysis of datasets collected during leaf expansion, confirmed dependence among structural and functional traits in F. carica. Pn was directly correlated with stomatal conductance (Gs), transpiration (E), leaf area (LA) and relative chlorophyll content up to FLE. The effect of pruning on leaf expansion, a cultural technique commonly applied in this fruit tree, was also evaluated. Although leaf development in pruned branches gave a significantly higher relative leaf area growth rate (RGR(l)) and higher LA than non-pruned branches, no significant differences were found in other morphological and physiological traits, indicating no pruning effect on leaf development. All studied morphological and physiological characteristics indicate that F. carica is well adapted to semiarid conditions. The delayed greening strategy of this species is discussed.

  19. Targeted manipulation of leaf form via local growth repression.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Robert; Kasprzewska, Ania; Fleming, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    A classical view is that leaf shape is the result of local promotion of growth linked to cell proliferation. However, an alternative hypothesis is that leaf form is the result of local repression of growth in an otherwise growing system. Here we show that leaf form can indeed be manipulated in a directed fashion by local repression of growth. We show that targeting expression of an inhibitor of a cyclin-dependent kinase (KRP1) to the sinus area of developing leaves of Arabidopsis leads to local growth repression and the formation of organs with extreme lobing, including generation of leaflet-like organs. Directing KRP1 expression to other regions of the leaf using an miRNA target sequence tagging approach also leads to predictable novel leaf forms, and repression of growth in the leaf margin blocks the outgrowth of lobes, leading to a smoother perimeter. In addition, we show that decreased growth around the perimeter and across the leaf abaxial surface leads to a change in 3D form, as predicted by mechanical models of leaf growth. Our analysis provides experimental evidence that local repression of growth influences leaf shape, suggesting that it could be part of the mechanism of morphogenesis in plants in the context of an otherwise growing system.

  20. Ozone-induced ethylene release from leaf surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rodecap, K.D.; Tingey, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Ozone-induced stress-ethylene emissions from the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of four plant species (Glycine max (L) Merr. cv. Dare, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv. Roma VF, Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Hedera helix L.) were studied to determine if the stress ethylene diffused through the stomata or cuticle. In plants not exposed to ozone, basal ethylene was detected above both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of all the plant species examined, indicating that some ethylene can diffuse across the leaf cuticle. Oxone-induced stress ethylene production in all species examined. These data indicate that ozone-induced stress ethylene primarily diffuses from the leaf via the stomata.

  1. Olive leaf extract inhibits lead poisoning-induced brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Shengqing; Cui, Wenhui; He, Jiujun; Wang, Zhenfu; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    Olive leaves have an antioxidant capacity, and olive leaf extract can protect the blood, spleen and hippocampus in lead-poisoned mice. However, little is known about the effects of olive leaf extract on lead-induced brain injury. This study was designed to determine whether olive leaf extract can inhibit lead-induced brain injury, and whether this effect is associated with antioxidant capacity. First, we established a mouse model of lead poisoning by continuous intragastric administration of lead acetate for 30 days. Two hours after successful model establishment, lead-poisoned mice were given olive leaf extract at doses of 250, 500 or 1 000 mg/kg daily by intragastric administration for 50 days. Under the transmission electron microscope, olive leaf extract attenuated neuronal and capillary injury and reduced damage to organelles and the matrix around the capillaries in the frontal lobe of the cerebral cortex in the lead-poisoned mice. Olive leaf extract at a dose of 1 000 mg/kg had the greatest protective effect. Spectrophotometry showed that olive leaf extract significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase, while it reduced malondialdehyde content, in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed that olive leaf extract dose-dependently decreased Bax protein expression in the cerebral cortex of lead-poisoned mice. Our findings indicate that olive leaf extract can inhibit lead-induced brain injury by increasing antioxidant capacity and reducing apoptosis. PMID:25206510

  2. Global Patterns in Leaf Respiration and its Temperature Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heskel, M.; Atkin, O. K.; O'Sullivan, O. S.; Reich, P. B.; Tjoelker, M. G.; Weerasinghe, L. K.; Penillard, A.; Egerton, J. J. G.; Creek, D.; Bloomfield, K. J.; Xiang, J.; Sinca, F.; Stangl, Z.; Martinez-de la Torre, A.; Griffin, K. L.; Huntingford, C.; Hurry, V.; Meir, P.; Turnbull, M.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf respiration (R) represents a massive flux of carbon to the atmosphere. Currently, neither physiological models nor terrestrial biosphere models are able to disentangle sources of variation in leaf R among different plant species and contrasting environments. Similarly, such models do not adequately describe the short-term temperature (T) response of R, which can lead to inaccurate representation of leaf R in simulation models of regional and global terrestrial carbon cyling. Even minor differences in the underlying basal rate of leaf R and/or shape of the T-response curve can significantly impact estimates of carbon released and stored in ecosystems. Given this, we recently assembled and analyzed two new global databases (arctic-to-tropics) of leaf R and its short-term T-dependence. The results highlight variation in basal leaf R among species and across global gradients in T and aridity, with leaf R at a standard T (e.g. 25°C) being greatest in plants growing in the cold, dry Arctic and lowest in the warm, moist tropics. Arctic plants also exhibit higher rates of leaf R at a given photosynthetic capacity or leaf N concentration than their tropical counterparts. The results also point to convergence in the short-term temperature response of respiration across biomes and plant functional types. The applicability and significance of the short-term T-response of R for simulation models of plant and ecosystem carbon fluxes will be discussed.

  3. Antibacterial activity of various leaf extracts of Merremia emarginata

    PubMed Central

    Elumalai, EK; Ramachandran, M; Thirumalai, T; Vinothkumar, P

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity and phytochemical screening of the aqueous, methanol and petroleum ether leaf extracts of Merremia emarginata (M. emarginata). Methods The antibacterial activity of leaf extracts of M. emarginata were evaluated by agar well diffusion method against four selected bacterial species. Results The presence of tannins, flavonoids, amino acids, starch, glycosides and carbohydrates in the different leaf extracts was established. The methanol extract was more effective against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli, whereas aqueous extract was more effective against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusions : The results in the present study suggest that M. emarginata leaf can be used in treating diseases caused by the tested organisms. PMID:23569802

  4. Assessing the generality of global leaf trait relationships.

    PubMed

    Wright, Ian J; Reich, Peter B; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Falster, Daniel S; Garnier, Eric; Hikosaka, Kouki; Lamont, Byron B; Lee, William; Oleksyn, Jacek; Osada, Noriyuki; Poorter, Hendrik; Villar, Rafael; Warton, David I; Westoby, Mark

    2005-05-01

    Global-scale quantification of relationships between plant traits gives insight into the evolution of the world's vegetation, and is crucial for parameterizing vegetation-climate models. A database was compiled, comprising data for hundreds to thousands of species for the core 'leaf economics' traits leaf lifespan, leaf mass per area, photosynthetic capacity, dark respiration, and leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, as well as leaf potassium, photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), and leaf N : P ratio. While mean trait values differed between plant functional types, the range found within groups was often larger than differences among them. Future vegetation-climate models could incorporate this knowledge. The core leaf traits were intercorrelated, both globally and within plant functional types, forming a 'leaf economics spectrum'. While these relationships are very general, they are not universal, as significant heterogeneity exists between relationships fitted to individual sites. Much, but not all, heterogeneity can be explained by variation in sample size alone. PNUE can also be considered as part of this trait spectrum, whereas leaf K and N : P ratios are only loosely related.

  5. BOREAS TE-12 Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Yang, Litao

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-12 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the reflectance, transmittance, and gas exchange of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of leaf gas exchange conducted in the SSA during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1995 using a portable gas exchange system. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Center (DAAC).

  6. Diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH Mutants That Can Be Isolated in the Presence of 2-Deoxyglucose and Galactose and Characterization of Two Mutants Synthesizing Reduced Levels of HPr, a Phosphocarrier of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne; Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In streptococci, HPr, a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS), undergoes multiple posttranslational chemical modifications resulting in the formation of HPr(His∼P), HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), whose cellular concentrations vary with growth conditions. Distinct physiological functions are associated with specific forms of HPr. We do not know, however, the cellular thresholds below which these forms become unable to fulfill their functions and to what extent modifications in the cellular concentrations of the different forms of HPr modify cellular physiology. In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH mutants that can be isolated by positive selection on a solid medium containing 2-deoxyglucose and galactose and identify 13 amino acids that are essential for HPr to properly accomplish its physiological functions. We also report the characterization of two S. salivarius mutants that produced approximately two- and threefoldless HPr and enzyme I (EI) respectively. The data indicated that (i) a reduction in the synthesis of HPr due to a mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of ptsH reduced ptsI expression; (ii) a threefold reduction in EI and HPr cellular levels did not affect PTS transport capacity; (iii) a twofold reduction in HPr synthesis was sufficient to reduce the rate at which cells metabolized PTS sugars, increase generation times on PTS sugars and to a lesser extent on non-PTS sugars, and impede the exclusion of non-PTS sugars by PTS sugars; (iv) a threefold reduction in HPr synthesis caused a strong derepression of the genes coding for α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase when the cells were grown at the expense of a PTS sugar but did not affect the synthesis of α-galactosidase when cells were grown at the expense of lactose, a noninducing non-PTS sugar; and (v) no correlation was found between the magnitude of enzyme derepression and

  7. Leaf Mass Area, Leaf Carbon and Nitrogen Content, Barrow, Alaska, Beginning 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Alistair Rogers; Kim Ely; Shawn Serbin; Stefanie Lasota; Wil Lieberman-Cribbin

    2016-12-20

    Carbon, Nitrogen and Leaf Mass Area of leaves sampled from the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska. Species measured; Arctophila fulva, Arctagrostis latifolia, Carex aquatilis, Dupontia fisheri, Eriophorum angustifolium, Petasites frigidus, Salix pulchra, Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Salix rotundifolia, Luzula arctica, Saxifraga punctata and Potentilla hyparctica

  8. Do leaf-litter attributes affect the richness of leaf-litter ants?

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo S D; Bieber, A G D; Corrêa, M M; Leal, I R

    2011-10-01

    The search for factors shaping leaf-litter ant communities has received particular attention due to the essential role of these insects in many ecological processes. Here, we aimed to investigate how the number of leaves and leaf morphotypes affect the litter-ant species density at forest edge and interior in an Atlantic Forest remnant in the state of Alagoas, Brazil. This study was developed based on 28 litter plots (1m² each), 14 in the forest interior and 14 in the forest edge. As we early expected, ant species density increased with increasing both the number of leaves and the number of leaf morphotypes, but this result was clearly influenced by plot location. Contrasting with the forest interior, ant species density did not increase as the number of leaves increased in the forest edge. Possibly, factors such as plant species richness, vegetation structure and environmental conditions affect ant species density as well as promote a patchy distribution of species in ant communities along the edge-to-interior gradient. Our findings suggest that edge-affected forests present more simplified ant communities, with different factors shaping its structure. We encourage future studies to include leaf litter heterogeneity as one of the explanatory variables investigated.

  9. Phoma glycinicola (Red Leaf Blotch): A threat to soybean production in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red leaf blotch of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is the common name for the disease caused by the fungal pathogen Phoma glycinicola Gruyter & Boerema. Other names for red leaf blotch inlcude Dactuliophora leaf spot, Pyrenochaeta leaf blotch, and Pyrenochaeta leaf spot. The disease was first repor...

  10. Estimating leaf photosynthetic pigments information by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis and a leaf optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pudong; Shi, Runhe; Wang, Hong; Bai, Kaixu; Gao, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Leaf pigments are key elements for plant photosynthesis and growth. Traditional manual sampling of these pigments is labor-intensive and costly, which also has the difficulty in capturing their temporal and spatial characteristics. The aim of this work is to estimate photosynthetic pigments at large scale by remote sensing. For this purpose, inverse model were proposed with the aid of stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) analysis. Furthermore, a leaf radiative transfer model (i.e. PROSPECT model) was employed to simulate the leaf reflectance where wavelength varies from 400 to 780 nm at 1 nm interval, and then these values were treated as the data from remote sensing observations. Meanwhile, simulated chlorophyll concentration (Cab), carotenoid concentration (Car) and their ratio (Cab/Car) were taken as target to build the regression model respectively. In this study, a total of 4000 samples were simulated via PROSPECT with different Cab, Car and leaf mesophyll structures as 70% of these samples were applied for training while the last 30% for model validation. Reflectance (r) and its mathematic transformations (1/r and log (1/r)) were all employed to build regression model respectively. Results showed fair agreements between pigments and simulated reflectance with all adjusted coefficients of determination (R2) larger than 0.8 as 6 wavebands were selected to build the SMLR model. The largest value of R2 for Cab, Car and Cab/Car are 0.8845, 0.876 and 0.8765, respectively. Meanwhile, mathematic transformations of reflectance showed little influence on regression accuracy. We concluded that it was feasible to estimate the chlorophyll and carotenoids and their ratio based on statistical model with leaf reflectance data.

  11. Leaf thickness controls variation in leaf mass per area (LMA) among grazing-adapted grasses in Serengeti.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Daniel M; Quigley, Kathleen M; Anderson, T Michael

    2016-08-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) is a primary plant functional trait that represents the cost of constructing a leaf. Ultimately, plants modify LMA by altering leaf thickness (LT), leaf dry matter content (LDMC), or both. While LMA can be modified through both of these constituents, studies of LMA have found that there is variation in whether LT or LDMC changes are responsible for LMA-and the relationships change depending on the species or functional groups being compared. In this study, we used a phylogenetic framework to determine that evolutionary shifts in LMA are driven by LT, and not LDMC, among 45 Serengeti grass species. We considered two alternative hypotheses that could result in evolutionary correlation of LMA on LT but not LDMC: either (1) LT is more labile than LDMC-and is therefore a less costly means to change LMA or (2) LDMC is tightly coupled to a different dimension of leaf variation (e.g., leaf hydraulics), leaving LT as the source of variation in LMA. LT was not more labile than LDMC, leading us to conclude that the evolution of LMA has been shaped by LT because LDMC is responding to other demands on leaf physiology. We speculate that leaf hydraulics provide this constraint on LDMC. The decoupling of LDMC from LT may allow plants to better optimize resource allocation in ecosystems where gradients in light competition, herbivory, and aridity place competing demands on leaf economics.

  12. The shape of a long leaf

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Haiyi; Mahadevan, L.

    2009-01-01

    Long leaves in terrestrial plants and their submarine counterparts, algal blades, have a typical, saddle-like midsurface and rippled edges. To understand the origin of these morphologies, we dissect leaves and differentially stretch foam ribbons to show that these shapes arise from a simple cause, the elastic relaxation via bending that follows either differential growth (in leaves) or differential stretching past the yield point (in ribbons). We quantify these different modalities in terms of a mathematical model for the shape of an initially flat elastic sheet with lateral gradients in longitudinal growth. By using a combination of scaling concepts, stability analysis, and numerical simulations, we map out the shape space for these growing ribbons and find that as the relative growth strain is increased, a long flat lamina deforms to a saddle shape and/or develops undulations that may lead to strongly localized ripples as the growth strain is localized to the edge of the leaf. Our theory delineates the geometric and growth control parameters that determine the shape space of finite laminae and thus allows for a comparative study of elongated leaf morphology. PMID:19966215

  13. A quest for the artificial leaf.

    PubMed

    Janna Olmos, Julian David; Kargul, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    It has been estimated that the energy captured in one hour of sunlight that reaches our planet is equivalent to annual energy production by human population globally. To efficiently capture the practically inexhaustible solar energy and convert it into high energy density solar fuels provides an attractive 'green' alternative to running our present day economies on rapidly depleting fossil fuels, especially in the context of ever growing global energy demand. Natural photosynthesis represents one of the most fundamental processes that sustain life on Earth. It provides nearly all the oxygen we breathe, the food we consume and fossil fuels that we so much depend on. Imitating the reactions that occur at the early stages of photosynthesis represents the main challenge in the quest for construction of an efficient, robust, self-renewing and cost-effective 'artificial leaf'. In this review we summarize the main molecular features of the natural solar energy converters, photosystem I and photosystem II, that allow them to operate at high quantum efficiencies, and thus inspire the smart matrix design of the artificial solar-to-fuel devices. We also discuss the main challenges that face the field and overview selected recent technological advances that have tremendously accelerated the race for a fully operational artificial leaf that could serve as a viable alternative to fossil fuels for energy production.

  14. Leaf metallome preserved over 50 million years.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N P; Manning, P L; Bergmann, U; Larson, P L; van Dongen, B E; Sellers, W I; Webb, S M; Sokaras, D; Alonso-Mori, R; Ignatyev, K; Barden, H E; van Veelen, A; Anné, J; Egerton, V M; Wogelius, R A

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale Synchrotron Rapid Scanning X-ray Fluorescence (SRS-XRF) elemental mapping and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are applied here to fossil leaf material from the 50 Mya Green River Formation (USA) in order to improve our understanding of the chemistry of fossilized plant remains. SRS-XRF of fossilized animals has previously shown that bioaccumulated trace metals and sulfur compounds may be preserved in their original distributions and these elements can also act as biomarkers for specific biosynthetic pathways. Similar spatially resolved chemical data for fossilized plants is sparsely represented in the literature despite the multitude of other chemical studies performed. Here, synchrotron data from multiple specimens consistently show that fossil leaves possess chemical inventories consisting of organometallic and organosulfur compounds that: (1) map discretely within the fossils, (2) resolve fine scale biological structures, and (3) are distinct from embedding sedimentary matrices. Additionally, the chemical distributions in fossil leaves are directly comparable to those of extant leaves. This evidence strongly suggests that a significant fraction of the chemical inventory of the examined fossil leaf material is derived from the living organisms and that original bioaccumulated elements have been preserved in situ for 50 million years. Chemical information of this kind has so far been unknown for fossilized plants and could for the first time allow the metallome of extinct flora to be studied.

  15. Intraspecific growth and functional leaf trait responses to natural soil resource gradients for conifer species with contrasting leaf habit.

    PubMed

    Walters, Michael B; Gerlach, John P

    2013-03-01

    Interspecific relationships among species mean leaf traits, performance and species resource/climate distributions help provide the foundation for a predictive, functionally based plant ecology. Intraspecific responses of leaf traits and performance to resource gradients and how these vary among species may be equally important but have received less attention. Here, we examine relationships between proxies of soil resource availability, leaf traits and growth (height at 25 years, SI25) for winter deciduous Larix decidua Mill. and evergreen Pinus resinosa Ait. trees distributed over soil resource gradients in the Great Lakes region of North America. We predicted that (i) leaf trait responses to soil resources within species will be similar to reported distributions of mean leaf traits over soil resource gradients among species; (ii) soil resource-related variation in leaf traits can help explain SI25; and (iii) SI25 will be greater for Larix than Pinus at higher soil resources and greater for Pinus than Larix at lower soil resources and this pattern will be associated with species differences in leaf trait responses to soil resources. Among the measured leaf traits (live N, Mg, Ca, K, P, and Mn, litter N, N resorption, carbon isotope discrimination, specific leaf area, lifespan), soil resources only impacted live and litter N for both species and K for Pinus. In turn, only the leaf traits responsive to soil resources affected SI25 in the expected manner. Larix had greater SI25 than Pinus across soil resource gradients and both species had similar growth and leaf trait sensitivities to resources. In summary: (i) several leaf traits reported to be associated with performance and edaphic distributions across species were, within species, unresponsive to nitrogen and water availability and unrelated to growth; (ii) leaf N showed high plasticity to soil resources and this plasticity was functionally relevant to growth over its entire range of response; (iii) large

  16. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... leaves normally grown at or above the midportion of the stalk. Leaves of the H group show a high degree... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color intensity... intensity, normal width. Uniformity, 70 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5...

  17. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... leaves normally grown at or above the midportion of the stalk. Leaves of the H group show a high degree... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color intensity... intensity, normal width. Uniformity, 70 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5...

  18. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... leaves normally grown at or above the midportion of the stalk. Leaves of the H group show a high degree... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color intensity... intensity, normal width. Uniformity, 70 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5...

  19. 7 CFR 29.1163 - Smoking Leaf (H Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... leaves normally grown at or above the midportion of the stalk. Leaves of the H group show a high degree... Quality Orange Smoking Leaf Mellow, open leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, strong color intensity... intensity, normal width. Uniformity, 70 percent; injury tolerance 20 percent, of which not over 5...

  20. Coconut leaf bioactivity toward generalist maize insect pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical plants are often more resistant to insects than temperate plants due to evolution of robust defenses to cope with a more constant insect threat. Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) has very few chewing leaf feeding insect pests and was tested against two omnivorous leaf feeding caterpillar species,...

  1. Ontogeny of the sheathing leaf base in maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robyn; Leiboff, Samuel; Scanlon, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Leaves develop from the shoot apical meristem (SAM) via recruitment of leaf founder cells. Unlike eudicots, most monocot leaves display parallel venation and sheathing bases wherein the margins overlap the stem. Here we utilized computed tomography (CT) imaging, localization of PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1) auxin transport proteins, and in situ hybridization of leaf developmental transcripts to analyze the ontogeny of monocot leaf morphology in maize (Zea mays). CT imaging of whole-mounted shoot apices illustrates the plastochron-specific stages during initiation of the basal sheath margins from the tubular disc of insertion (DOI). PIN1 localizations identify basipetal auxin transport in the SAM L1 layer at the site of leaf initiation, a process that continues reiteratively during later recruitment of lateral leaf domains. Refinement of these auxin transport domains results in multiple, parallel provascular strands within the initiating primordium. By contrast, auxin is transported from the L2 toward the L1 at the developing margins of the leaf sheath. Transcripts involved in organ boundary formation and dorsiventral patterning accumulate within the DOI, preceding the outgrowth of the overlapping margins of the sheathing leaf base. We suggest a model wherein sheathing bases and parallel veins are both patterned via the extended recruitment of lateral maize leaf domains from the SAM.

  2. 41. VIEW OF WEST BASCULE LEAF LOCKING PINS IN EXTENDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW OF WEST BASCULE LEAF LOCKING PINS IN EXTENDED POSITION - PINS FIT INTO MATCHING BUSHINGS ON THE EAST LEAF AND SECURE THE EAST AND WEST SECTIONS WHEN THE BRIDGE IS DOWN. - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  3. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... percent injury tolerance. B4F Fair Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil... tolerance. B5F Low Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull... to heavy body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... percent injury tolerance. B4F Fair Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil... tolerance. B5F Low Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull... to heavy body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity,...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... percent injury tolerance. B4F Fair Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil... tolerance. B5F Low Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull... to heavy body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity,...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... percent injury tolerance. B4F Fair Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil... tolerance. B5F Low Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Medium body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull... to heavy body, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity,...

  7. The Analysis of Leaf Shape Using Fractal Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartvigsen, Gregg

    2000-01-01

    Describes ways to examine leaf structure and shape using fractal geometry. Students can test hypotheses using the leaves of replicated plants to look for non-linear trends in leaf shape along the stems of plants, across species, and under different environmental growth conditions. (SAH)

  8. Modeling the leaf angle dynamics in rice plant

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghui; Tang, Liang; Liu, Xiaojun; Liu, Leilei; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The leaf angle between stem and sheath (SSA) is an important rice morphological trait. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a dynamic SSA model under different nitrogen (N) rates for selected rice cultivars. The time-course data of SSA were collected in three years, and a dynamic SSA model was developed for different main stem leaf ranks under different N rates for two selected rice cultivars. SSA increased with tiller age. The SSA of the same leaf rank increased with increase in N rate. The maximum SSA increased with leaf rank from the first to the third leaf, then decreased from the third to the final leaf. The relationship between the maximum SSA and leaf rank on main stem could be described with a linear piecewise function. The change of SSA with thermal time (TT) was described by a logistic equation. A variety parameter (the maximum SSA of the 3rd leaf on main stem) and a nitrogen factor were introduced to quantify the effect of cultivar and N rate on SSA. The model was validated against data collected from both pot and field experiments. The relative root mean square error (RRMSE) was 11.56% and 14.05%, respectively. The resulting models could be used for virtual rice plant modeling and plant-type design. PMID:28207799

  9. 7 CFR 29.3153 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...″ or over in length, 70 percent uniform, and 30 percent injury tolerance. B2M Fine Mixed Color Leaf... percent uniform, and 10 percent injury tolerance. B3M Good Mixed Color Leaf. Fleshy to medium body,...

  10. Genetics and breeding of bacterial leaf spot resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot (BLS) caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv) is a globally important disease of whole head and baby leaf lettuce that reduces crop yield and quality. Host resistance is the most feasible method to reduce disease losses. Screening Lactuca accessions has id...

  11. Hands-On Whole Science: A Leaf Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1991-01-01

    Presents two elementary school activities to help students learn about autumn. The activities use autumn leaves to teach that each type of tree has its own distinctive type of leaf. One activity involves tracing, drawing, and writing about leaves; the other involves making a quilt using leaf designs. (SM)

  12. Novel sources of leaf rust resistance in winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf rust is one of the most widespread diseases of wheat, causing significant yield losses. More than 70 leaf rust resistance genes have been reported, but most of them have lost their effectiveness in the southern Great Plains of the USA. Thus continuous search for new sources of resistance is e...

  13. 7 CFR 29.2438 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... body than those of the B group, and show little or no ground injury. Choice- and fine-quality tobacco... Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak... Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak,...

  14. Pulvinus activity, leaf movement and leaf water-use efficiency of bush bean ( Phaseplus vulgaris L.) in a hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeini-Sarjaz, Mahmoud; Chalavi, Vida

    2008-11-01

    Pulvinus activity of Phaseolus species in response to environmental stimuli plays an essential role in heliotropic leaf movement. The aims of this study were to monitor the continuous daily pulvinus movement and pulvinus temperature, and to evaluate the effects of leaf movements, on a hot day, on instantaneous leaf water-use efficiency (WUEi), leaf gas exchange, and leaf temperature. Potted plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Provider were grown in Chicot sandy loam soil under well-watered conditions in a greenhouse. When the second trifoliate leaf was completely extended, one plant was selected to measure pulvinus movement using a beta-ray gauging (BRG) meter with a point source of thallium-204 (204Tl). Leaf gas exchange measurements took place on similar leaflets of three plants at an air temperature interval of 33-42°C by a steady-state LI-6200 photosynthesis system. A copper-constantan thermocouple was used to monitor pulvinus temperature. Pulvinus bending followed the daily diurnal rhythm. Significant correlations were found between the leaf-incident angle and the stomatal conductance ( R 2 = 0.54; P < 0.01), and photosynthesis rate ( R 2 = 0.84; P < 0.01). With a reduction in leaf-incidence angle and increase in air temperature, WUEi was reduced. During the measurements, leaf temperature remained below air temperature and was a significant function of air temperature ( r = 0.92; P < 0.01). In conclusion, pulvinus bending followed both light intensity and air temperature and influenced leaf gas exchange.

  15. Effects of Nitrogen Application Rate and Leaf Age on the Distribution Pattern of Leaf SPAD Readings in the Rice Canopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingping; Wang, Hua; Zou, Junliang; He, Junjun

    2014-01-01

    A Soil-Plant Analysis Development (SPAD) chlorophyll meter can be used as a simple tool for evaluating N concentration of the leaf and investigating the combined effects of nitrogen rate and leaf age on N distribution. We conducted experiments in a paddy field over two consecutive years (2008–2009) using rice plants treated with six different N application levels. N distribution pattern was determined by SPAD readings based on the temporal dynamics of N concentrations in individual leaves. At 62 days after transplantation (DAT) in 2008 and DAT 60 in 2009, leaf SPAD readings increased from the upper to lower in the rice canopy that received N levels of 150 to 375 kg ha−1The differences in SPAD readings between the upper and lower leaf were larger under higher N application rates. However, as plants grew, this atypical distribution of SPAD readings in canopy leaf quickly reversed to the general order. In addition, temporal dynamics of the leaf SPAD readings (N concentrations) were fitted to a piecewise function. In our model, changes in leaf SPAD readings were divided into three stages: growth, functioning, and senescence periods. The leaf growth period lasted approximately 6 days, and cumulative growing days were not affected by N application rates. The leaf functioning period was represented with a relatively stable SPAD reading related to N application rate, and cumulative growing days were extended with increasing N application rates. A quadratic equation was utilized to describe the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf age during the leaf senescence period. The rate of decrease in SPAD readings increased with the age of leaves, but the rate was slowed by N application. As leaves in the lower canopy were physiologically older than leaves in the upper canopy, the rate of decrease in SPAD readings was faster in the lower leaves. PMID:24520386

  16. Ocimum sanctum leaf extract induces drought stress tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Veena; Ansari, M.W.; Tula, Suresh; Sahoo, R.K.; Bains, Gurdeep; Kumar, J.; Tuteja, Narendra; Shukla, Alok

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ocimum leaves are highly enriched in antioxidant components. Thus, its leaf extract, if applied in plants, is believed to efficiently scavenge ROS, thereby preventing oxidative damage under drought stress. Thus, the present study was performed in kharif 2013 and rabi 2014 season to evaluate the effect of aqueous leaf extract of Ocimum sanctum against drought stress in 2 rice genotype under glass house conditions. Here we show that various morpho- physiological (chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf rolling score, leaf tip burn, number of senesced leaves and total dry matter) and biochemical parameters (proline, malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase content) were amended by Ocimum treatment in both the seasons. Application of Ocimum extract increased expression of dehydrin genes, while reducing expression of aquaporin genes in drought stressed rice plant. Thus, application of Ocimum leaf extract under drought stress can be suggested as a promising strategy to mitigate drought stress in economical, accessible and ecofriendly manner. PMID:26890603

  17. Understanding of Leaf Development-the Science of Complexity.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Robert

    2013-06-25

    The leaf is the major organ involved in light perception and conversion of solar energy into organic carbon. In order to adapt to different natural habitats, plants have developed a variety of leaf forms, ranging from simple to compound, with various forms of dissection. Due to the enormous cellular complexity of leaves, understanding the mechanisms regulating development of these organs is difficult. In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the use of technically advanced imaging techniques and computational modeling in studies of leaf development. Additionally, molecular tools for manipulation of morphogenesis were successfully used for in planta verification of developmental models. Results of these interdisciplinary studies show that global growth patterns influencing final leaf form are generated by cooperative action of genetic, biochemical, and biomechanical inputs. This review summarizes recent progress in integrative studies on leaf development and illustrates how intrinsic features of leaves (including their cellular complexity) influence the choice of experimental approach.

  18. A ray tracing model for leaf bidirectional scattering studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, T. W.; Smith, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    A leaf is modeled as a deterministic two-dimensional structure consisting of a network of circular arcs designed to represent the internal morphology of major species. The path of an individual ray through the leaf is computed using geometric optics. At each intersection of the ray with an arc, the specular reflected and transmitted rays are calculated according to the Snell and Fresnel equations. Diffuse scattering is treated according to Lambert's law. Absorption is also permitted but requires a detailed knowledge of the spectral attenuation coefficients. An ensemble of initial rays are chosen for each incident direction with the initial intersection points on the leaf surface selected randomly. The final equilibrium state after all interactions then yields the leaf bidirectional reflectance and transmittance distributions. The model also yields the internal two dimensional light gradient profile of the leaf.

  19. Functional overlap of the Arabidopsis leaf and root microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Müller, Daniel B; Srinivas, Girish; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Potthoff, Eva; Rott, Matthias; Dombrowski, Nina; Münch, Philipp C; Spaepen, Stijn; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja; Hüttel, Bruno; McHardy, Alice C; Vorholt, Julia A; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-12-17

    Roots and leaves of healthy plants host taxonomically structured bacterial assemblies, and members of these communities contribute to plant growth and health. We established Arabidopsis leaf- and root-derived microbiota culture collections representing the majority of bacterial species that are reproducibly detectable by culture-independent community sequencing. We found an extensive taxonomic overlap between the leaf and root microbiota. Genome drafts of 400 isolates revealed a large overlap of genome-encoded functional capabilities between leaf- and root-derived bacteria with few significant differences at the level of individual functional categories. Using defined bacterial communities and a gnotobiotic Arabidopsis plant system we show that the isolates form assemblies resembling natural microbiota on their cognate host organs, but are also capable of ectopic leaf or root colonization. While this raises the possibility of reciprocal relocation between root and leaf microbiota members, genome information and recolonization experiments also provide evidence for microbiota specialization to their respective niche.

  20. Leaf light reflectance, transmittance, absorptance, and optical and geometrical parameters for eleven plant genera with different leaf mesophyll arrangements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Wiegand, C. L.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Review of research on radiation interactions within plant canopies and communities and interactions of various leaf structures (mesophyll arrangements) with electromagnetic radiation involved in the interpretation of data sensed from air or spacecraft. The hypothesis underlying the research reported is that leaf mesophyll arrangements influence spectral energy measurements of leaves.

  1. Evolution of the leaf economics spectrum in herbs: Evidence from environmental divergences in leaf physiology across Helianthus (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Mason, Chase M; Donovan, Lisa A

    2015-10-01

    The leaf economics spectrum (LES) describes a major axis of plant functional trait variation worldwide, defining suites of leaf traits aligned with resource-acquisitive to resource-conservative ecological strategies. The LES has been interpreted to arise from leaf-level trade-offs among ecophysiological traits common to all plants. However, it has been suggested that the defining leaf-level trade-offs of the LES may not hold within specific functional groups (e.g., herbs) nor within many groups of closely related species, which challenges the usefulness of the LES paradigm across evolutionary scales. Here, we examine the evolution of the LES across 28 species of the diverse herbaceous genus Helianthus (the sunflowers), which occupies a wide range of habitats and climate variation across North America. Using a phylogenetic comparative approach, we find repeated evolution of more resource-acquisitive LES strategies in cooler, drier, and more fertile environments. We also find macroevolutionary correlations among LES traits that recapitulate aspects of the global LES, but with one major difference: leaf mass per area is uncorrelated with leaf lifespan. This indicates that whole-plant processes likely drive variation in leaf lifespan across Helianthus, rather than leaf-level trade-offs. These results suggest that LES patterns do not reflect universal physiological trade-offs at small evolutionary scales.

  2. 77 FR 20503 - Revision of Cotton Classification Procedures for Determining Cotton Leaf Grade

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... was determined by visual examination and comparison to the Universal Cotton Standards for Leaf Grade... procedures which replaces classer visual examinations to determine leaf grade with instrument...

  3. [Leaf anatomy study in Solanaceae of Venezuela. V. leaf anatomy of eleven species of Cestrum L] .

    PubMed

    Jáuregul, D; Rodriguez, N; Benítez, C E

    2000-01-01

    Leaf anatomy of the following eleven species: C. buxifolium Kunth, C. humboldtii Francey, C. lindenii Dunal, C. mariquitense Kunth, C. megalophyllum Dunal, C. olivaceum Francey, C. pariense Steyerm., C petiolare Kunth, C. scandans Vahl, C. strigilatum Ruiz et Pavón and C. tomentosum L.f. is described. Transverse sectioning, bruise and clearing according to the classical methods for optical microscopy were made. The species studied show dissimilitude in relation to a) fohar blade: thickness and sinuosity of epidermal cell walls; type, density and presence of trichornes, leaf type according the position of the stomata, thickness of both palisade and spongy parenchy-ma, number of spongy parenchyma layers, occurrence or not of paranchymatous sheath and sclerifled cells in mesophyll, tmbeculae or projection walls b) Midvein: degree of development and arrangement of the parenchyma and collenchyma, c) Petiole: size and form in transverse section, presence of ornamented cuticle, peridermis and degree of development of the sclerenctiyma next to vascular bundles.

  4. [Leaf anatomic studies in solanaceae of Venezuela. VI. Leaf anatomy of 10 species of Cestrum L].

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, D; de Ríos, N R; Benítez de Rojas, C E

    2001-01-01

    The leaf anatomy of Cestrum acuminatissimum Dunal, C. alternifolium (Jacq.) O.E. Schulz, C. glabrescens (C.V. Morton) Steyerm. et Maguire, C. imbricatum Rusby, C. Iatifolium Lam., C. neblinense D'Arcy et Benítez, C. ruizteranianum Benítez et D'Arcy, C. schulzianum Francey, C. tillettii Benítez et D'Arcy y C. tubulosum Sendtner, is described in order to value its diagnostic characters useful as source of data in the taxonomy of the Solanaceae. The material was obtained from specimens deposited in MY herbarium, coming from different geographical areas of Venezuela, and it was prepared according the classical methodology used in leaf anatomy studies. The results obtained have, besides the common features mentions for other species of the genus Cestrum, some differences in: types and density of trichomes, thickness and sinuousities of the cell wall, stomata position, as well as in the distribution of esclerenchymatous cells of the mesophyll, midvein petiole.

  5. Modelling transcriptional networks in leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Christopher A; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky

    2014-07-01

    The process of leaf senescence is induced by an extensive range of developmental and environmental signals and controlled by multiple, cross-linking pathways, many of which overlap with plant stress-response signals. Elucidation of this complex regulation requires a step beyond a traditional one-gene-at-a-time analysis. Application of a more global analysis using statistical and mathematical tools of systems biology is an approach that is being applied to address this problem. A variety of modelling methods applicable to the analysis of current and future senescence data are reviewed and discussed using some senescence-specific examples. Network modelling with a senescence transcriptome time course followed by testing predictions with gene-expression data illustrates the application of systems biology tools.

  6. Solute Leakage Resulting from Leaf Desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, A. Carl; Musgrave, Mary E.; Williams, Kathleen M.

    1981-01-01

    The leakage of solutes from foliar tissue is utilized as a dynamic measure of apparent changes in membrane integrity in response to desiccation. It is found that rehydrating leaf discs of cowpea (Vigna sinensis [L.] Endl.) show increasing leakiness in proportion to the extent of prior desiccation, whereas Selaginella lepidophylla Spring., a resurrection plant, does not. The elevated leakage rate of cowpea after desiccation recovers with time, and the passage of time in the stressed condition results in reduced subsequent leakiness. These characteristics are interpreted as suggesting that the leakage of solute reflects the condition of cellular membranes, and that desiccation stress leads to lesions in the membranes. The kinetics of solute leakage is suggested as a simple means of following changes in membrane lesions and associated features of membrane repair and hardening. PMID:16662082

  7. Functional relationships between leaf hydraulics and leaf economic traits in response to nutrient addition in subtropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Mariana; Campanello, Paula I; Bucci, Sandra J; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-12-01

    Leaves can be both a hydraulic bottleneck and a safety valve against hydraulic catastrophic dysfunctions, and thus changes in traits related to water movement in leaves and associated costs may be critical for the success of plant growth. A 4-year fertilization experiment with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) addition was done in a semideciduous Atlantic forest in northeastern Argentina. Saplings of five dominant canopy species were grown in similar gaps inside the forests (five control and five N + P addition plots). Leaf lifespan (LL), leaf mass per unit area (LMA), leaf and stem vulnerability to cavitation, leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf_area) and K(leaf_mass)) and leaf turgor loss point (TLP) were measured in the five species and in both treatments. Leaf lifespan tended to decrease with the addition of fertilizers, and LMA was significantly higher in plants with nutrient addition compared with individuals in control plots. The vulnerability to cavitation of leaves (P50(leaf)) either increased or decreased with the nutrient treatment depending on the species, but the average P50(leaf) did not change with nutrient addition. The P50(leaf) decreased linearly with increasing LMA and LL across species and treatments. These trade-offs have an important functional significance because more expensive (higher LMA) and less vulnerable leaves (lower P50(leaf)) are retained for a longer period of time. Osmotic potentials at TLP and at full turgor became more negative with decreasing P50(leaf) regardless of nutrient treatment. The K(leaf) on a mass basis was negatively correlated with LMA and LL, indicating that there is a carbon cost associated with increased water transport that is compensated by a longer LL. The vulnerability to cavitation of stems and leaves were similar, particularly in fertilized plants. Leaves in the species studied may not function as safety valves at low water potentials to protect the hydraulic pathway from water stress-induced cavitation

  8. Leaf morphophysiology of a Neotropical mistletoe is shaped by seasonal patterns of host leaf phenology.

    PubMed

    Scalon, Marina Corrêa; Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo; Domingos, Fabricius Maia Chaves Bicalho; Franco, Augusto Cesar

    2016-04-01

    Several mistletoe species are able to grow and reproduce on both deciduous and evergreen hosts, suggesting a degree of plasticity in their ability to cope with differences in intrinsic host functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of host phenology on mistletoe water relations and leaf gas exchange. Mistletoe Passovia ovata parasitizing evergreen (Miconia albicans) hosts and P. ovata parasitizing deciduous (Byrsonima verbascifolia) hosts were sampled in a Neotropical savanna. Photosynthetic parameters, diurnal cycles of stomatal conductance, pre-dawn and midday leaf water potential, and stomatal anatomical traits were measured during the peak of the dry and wet seasons, respectively. P. ovata showed distinct water-use strategies that were dependent on host phenology. For P. ovata parasitizing the deciduous host, water use efficiency (WUE; ratio of photosynthetic rate to transpirational water loss) was 2-fold lower in the dry season than in the wet season; in contrast, WUE was maintained at the same level during the wet and dry seasons in P. ovata parasitizing the evergreen host. Generally, mistletoe and host diurnal cycles of stomatal conductance were linked, although there were clear differences in leaf water potential, with mistletoe showing anisohydric behaviour and the host showing isohydric behaviour. Compared to mistletoes attached to evergreen hosts, those parasitizing deciduous hosts had a 1.4-fold lower stomatal density and 1.2-fold wider stomata on both leaf surfaces, suggesting that the latter suffered less intense drought stress. This is the first study to show morphophysiological differences in the same mistletoe species parasitizing hosts of different phenological groups. Our results provide evidence that phenotypical plasticity (anatomical and physiological) might be essential to favour the use of a greater range of hosts.

  9. Spectral radiance estimates of leaf area and leaf phytomass of small grains and native vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aase, J. K.; Brown, B. S.; Millard, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Similarities and/or dissimilarities in radiance characteristics were studied among barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oats (Avena fatua L.), spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and short-grass prairie vegetation. The site was a Williams loam soil (fine-loamy mixed, Typic Argiborolls) near Sidney, Montana. Radiances were measured with a truck-mounted radiometer. The radiometer was equipped with four wavelength bands: 0.45 to 0.52, 0.52 to 0.60, 0.63 to 0.69, and 0.76 to 0.90 micron. Airborne scanner measurements were made at an altitude of 600 m four times during the season under clear sky conditions. The airborne scanner was equipped with the same four bands as the truck-mounted radiometer plus the following: 1.00 to 1.30, 1.55 to 1.75, 2.08 to 2.35, and 10.4 to 12.5 microns. Comparisons using individual wave bands, the near IR/red, (0.76 to 0.90 micron)/(0.63 to 0.69 micron) ratio and the normalized difference vegetation index, ND = (IR - red)/(IR + red), showed that only during limited times during the growing season were some of the small grains distinguishable from one another and from native rangeland vegetation. There was a common relation for all small grains between leaf area index and green leaf phytomass and between leaf area index or green leaf phytomass and the IR/red ratio.

  10. Predicting leaf traits of herbaceous species from their spectral characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Roelofsen, Hans D; van Bodegom, Peter M; Kooistra, Lammert; Witte, Jan-Philip M

    2014-01-01

    Trait predictions from leaf spectral properties are mainly applied to tree species, while herbaceous systems received little attention in this topic. Whether similar trait–spectrum relations can be derived for herbaceous plants that differ strongly in growing strategy and environmental constraints is therefore unknown. We used partial least squares regression to relate key traits to leaf spectra (reflectance, transmittance, and absorbance) for 35 herbaceous species, sampled from a wide range of environmental conditions. Specific Leaf Area and nutrient-related traits (N and P content) were poorly predicted from any spectrum, although N prediction improved when expressed on a per area basis (mg/m2 leaf surface) instead of mass basis (mg/g dry matter). Leaf dry matter content was moderately to good correlated with spectra. We explain our results by the range of environmental constraints encountered by herbaceous species; both N and P limitations as well as a range of light and water availabilities occurred. This weakened the relation between the measured response traits and the leaf constituents that are truly responsible for leaf spectral behavior. Indeed, N predictions improve considering solely upper or under canopy species. Therefore, trait predictions in herbaceous systems should focus on traits relating to dry matter content and the true, underlying drivers of spectral properties. PMID:24683454

  11. Genetic variability of Cotton leaf curl betasatellite in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Azhar, Esam I.; Kamal, Mohammad A.; Bhattacharya, P.S.; Rana, D.

    2014-01-01

    Cotton is an important crop and its production is affected by various disease pathogens. Monopartite begomovirus associated betasatellites cause Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) in Northern India. In order to access the occurrence and genetic variability of Cotton leaf curl betasatellites, an extensive field survey was conducted in states of Rajasthan, Punjab and Haryana. We selected the betasatellite sequence for analysis as they are reported as important for disease severity and sequence variability. Based on the field observations, the disease incidence ranged from 30% to 80% during the survey. Full genome and DNA β were amplified from various samples while no amplicon was obtained in some samples. The nucleotide sequence homology ranged from 90.0% to 98.7% with Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV), 55.2–55.5% with Bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus, 55.8% with Okra leaf curl virus and 51.70% with Tomato leaf curl virus isolates. The lowest similarity (47.8%) was found in CLCuV-Sudan isolate. Phylogenetic analysis showed that analyzed isolates formed a close cluster with various CLCuV isolates reported earlier. The analysis results show sequence variation in Cotton leaf curl betasatellite which could be the result of recombination. The results obtained by genome amplification and sequence variability indicate that some new variants are circulating and causing leaf curl disease in Rajasthan, Punjab and Haryana. PMID:25473373

  12. Genetic variability of Cotton leaf curl betasatellite in Northern India.

    PubMed

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Azhar, Esam I; Kamal, Mohammad A; Bhattacharya, P S; Rana, D

    2014-12-01

    Cotton is an important crop and its production is affected by various disease pathogens. Monopartite begomovirus associated betasatellites cause Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) in Northern India. In order to access the occurrence and genetic variability of Cotton leaf curl betasatellites, an extensive field survey was conducted in states of Rajasthan, Punjab and Haryana. We selected the betasatellite sequence for analysis as they are reported as important for disease severity and sequence variability. Based on the field observations, the disease incidence ranged from 30% to 80% during the survey. Full genome and DNA β were amplified from various samples while no amplicon was obtained in some samples. The nucleotide sequence homology ranged from 90.0% to 98.7% with Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV), 55.2-55.5% with Bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus, 55.8% with Okra leaf curl virus and 51.70% with Tomato leaf curl virus isolates. The lowest similarity (47.8%) was found in CLCuV-Sudan isolate. Phylogenetic analysis showed that analyzed isolates formed a close cluster with various CLCuV isolates reported earlier. The analysis results show sequence variation in Cotton leaf curl betasatellite which could be the result of recombination. The results obtained by genome amplification and sequence variability indicate that some new variants are circulating and causing leaf curl disease in Rajasthan, Punjab and Haryana.

  13. Estimation of leaf area with an integrating sphere.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Lydia; Gamon, J. A.; Berry, J.

    1997-01-01

    Relative absorptance of intact branches measured with an integrating sphere was compared to leaf area estimated by conventional methods (volume displacement and scanning area meter) for three conifer species: Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP, Pinus banksiana (Lamb.) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco. A consistent relationship between relative absorptance and surface area emerged for the three species. The ability to predict leaf area from absorptance was further explored by measuring branches of Pseudotsuga menziesii grown in varying light and nutrient regimes. When a single equation was used to predict leaf area under all growth conditions, errors were as large as 40% primarily because of variation in leaf absorptivity, with the largest errors associated with extremely nutrient-deficient foliage. When separate empirical equations were developed for each growth treatment, predicted leaf surface area agreed to within 5% of the area determined by the volume displacement method. Leaf surface area estimated from theoretical principles was also in good agreement with total surface area estimated independently by conventional methods. With proper accounting for needle absorptivity, which varied with growth conditions, leaf area estimates obtained by the integrating sphere method were of similar accuracy to those obtained by conventional methods, with the added advantage that the method allowed intact foliage to be sampled nondestructively in the field. Because the integrating sphere method preserves branch structure during measurement, it could provide a useful measure of needle area for photosynthetic or developmental studies requiring repeated sampling of the same branch.

  14. Revealing catastrophic failure of leaf networks under stress

    PubMed Central

    Brodribb, Timothy J.; Bienaimé, Diane; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The intricate patterns of veins that adorn the leaves of land plants are among the most important networks in biology. Water flows in these leaf irrigation networks under tension and is vulnerable to embolism-forming cavitations, which cut off water supply, ultimately causing leaf death. Understanding the ways in which plants structure their vein supply network to protect against embolism-induced failure has enormous ecological and evolutionary implications, but until now there has been no way of observing dynamic failure in natural leaf networks. Here we use a new optical method that allows the initiation and spread of embolism bubbles in the leaf network to be visualized. Examining embolism-induced failure of architecturally diverse leaf networks, we found that conservative rules described the progression of hydraulic failure within veins. The most fundamental rule was that within an individual venation network, susceptibility to embolism always increased proportionally with the size of veins, and initial nucleation always occurred in the largest vein. Beyond this general framework, considerable diversity in the pattern of network failure was found between species, related to differences in vein network topology. The highest-risk network was found in a fern species, where single events caused massive disruption to leaf water supply, whereas safer networks in angiosperm leaves contained veins with composite properties, allowing a staged failure of water supply. These results reveal how the size structure of leaf venation is a critical determinant of the spread of embolism damage to leaves during drought. PMID:27071104

  15. Phenotypic selection on leaf ecophysiological traits in Helianthus.

    PubMed

    Donovan, L A; Ludwig, F; Rosenthal, D M; Rieseberg, L H; Dudley, S A

    2009-08-01

    Habitats that differ in soil resource availability are expected to differ for selection on resource-related plant traits. Here, we examined spatial and temporal variation in phenotypic selection on leaf ecophysiological traits for 10 Helianthus populations, including two species of hybrid origin, Helianthus anomalus and Helianthus deserticola, and artificial hybrids of their ancestral parents. Leaf traits assessed were leaf size, succulence, nitrogen (N) concentration and water-use efficiency (WUE). Biomass and leaf traits of artificial hybrids indicate that the actively moving dune habitat of H. anomalus was more growth limiting, with lower N availability but higher relative water availability than the stabilized dune habitat of H. deserticola. Habitats differed for direct selection on leaf N and WUE, but not size or succulence, for the artificial hybrids. However, within the H. anomalus habitat, direct selection on WUE also differed among populations. Across years, direct selection on leaf traits did not differ. Leaf N was the only trait for which direct selection differed between habitats but not within the H. anomalus habitat, suggesting that nutrient limitation is an important selective force driving adaptation of H. anomalus to the active dune habitat.

  16. Leaf wetness distributions in a heterogeneous agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosh, M.; Hornbuckle, B.; Kabela, E.; Gleason, M. L.; Jackson, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    Spatial variability of leaf wetness quantity is a rising concern for remote sensing and hydrology. The presence of liquid water on the plant surface may impact the ability of new and future remote sensing technologies to measure surface soil moisture. Furthermore, the potential recharge of surface soil moisture from leaf wetness is small but critical element of the water balance, especially in dry environments. Measuring the variability and spatial extent of leaf wetness events will provide an upper limit for modeling and remote sensing in determine the effect of such events on hydrologic studies. In coordination with the SMEX05 experiment, leaf wetness sensors were deployed and measurements collected during June of 2005 in and around the Walnut Creek Watershed near Ames, Iowa. Column density estimates of leaf wetness were calculated hourly for each day of record for the study region at 20 different fields. These data were combined with a vegetation leaf area index map to produce a spatial leaf wetness product daily during the experiment.

  17. Expanding our understanding of leaf functional syndromes in savanna systems: the role of plant growth form.

    PubMed

    Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo; Franco, Augusto Cesar

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of leaf strategies has been a common theme in ecology, especially where multiple sources of environmental constraints (fire, seasonal drought, nutrient-poor soils) impose a strong selection pressure towards leaf functional diversity, leading to inevitable tradeoffs among leaf traits, and ultimately to niche segregation among coexisting species. As diversification on leaf functional strategies is dependent on integration at whole plant level, we hypothesized that regardless of phylogenetic relatedness, leaf trait functional syndromes in a multivariate space would be associated with the type of growth form. We measured traits related to leaf gas exchange, structure and nutrient status in 57 coexisting species encompassing all Angiosperms major clades, in a wide array of plant morphologies (trees, shrubs, sub-shrubs, herbs, grasses and palms) in a savanna of Central Brazil. Growth forms differed in mean values for the studied functional leaf traits. We extracted 4 groups of functional typologies: grasses (elevated leaf dark respiration, light-saturated photosynthesis on a leaf mass and area basis, lower values of leaf Ca and Mg), herbs (high values of SLA, leaf N and leaf Fe), palms (high values of stomatal conductance, leaf transpiration and leaf K) and woody eudicots (sub-shrubs, shrubs and trees; low SLA and high leaf Ca and Mg). Despite the large range of variation among species for each individual trait and the independent evolutionary trajectory of individual species, growth forms were strongly associated with particular leaf trait combinations, suggesting clear evolutionary constraints on leaf function for morphologically similar species in savanna ecosystems.

  18. Spring Wheat Leaf Appearance and Temperature: Extending the Paradigm?

    PubMed Central

    MCMASTER, GREGORY S.; WILHELM, W. W.; PALIC, D. B.; PORTER, JOHN R.; JAMIESON, P. D.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive research shows temperature to be the primary environmental factor controlling the phyllochron, or rate of leaf appearance, of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Experimental results suggest that soil temperature at crown depth, rather than air temperature above the canopy, would better predict wheat leaf appearance rates. To test this hypothesis, leaf appearance in spring wheat (‘Nordic’) was measured in a 2‐year field experiment (Nunn clay loam soil; fine, smectitic, mesic Aridic, Argiustoll) with three planting dates and two soil temperature treatments. One temperature treatment (denoted +3C) consisted of heating the soil at crown depth to 3 °C above the ambient soil temperature (denoted +0C). Main stem cumulative leaf number was measured at least weekly until flag leaf emergence. Leaf appearance was essentially linear with both air and soil growing degree‐days (GDD), although there was a stronger linear relationship with soil GDD in the +0C plants than in +3C plants. A weak positive relationship between planting date and the phyllochron was observed. Unexpectedly, we found that heating the soil did not increase the rate of leaf appearance, as the paradigm would predict. To explain these results, we propose extending the paradigm in two ways. First, three processes are involved in leaf appearance: (1) cell division at the shoot apex forms the primordium; (2) cell division in the intercalary meristem forms the cells that then (3) expand to produce the leaf. Cell division is predominately controlled by temperature, but cell expansion is considerably more affected by factors other than temperature, explaining the influence of other factors on the phyllochron. Secondly, the vertical distribution of the two meristems and region of cell expansion occur over a significant distance, where temperature varies considerably, and temperature at a specific point (e.g. crown depth) does not account for the entire temperature regime under which leaves are

  19. Plasticity in sunflower leaf and cell growth under high salinity.

    PubMed

    Céccoli, G; Bustos, D; Ortega, L I; Senn, M E; Vegetti, A; Taleisnik, E

    2015-01-01

    A group of sunflower lines that exhibit a range of leaf Na(+) concentrations under high salinity was used to explore whether the responses to the osmotic and ionic components of salinity can be distinguished in leaf expansion kinetics analysis. It was expected that at the initial stages of the salt treatment, leaf expansion kinetics changes would be dominated by responses to the osmotic component of salinity, and that later on, ion inclusion would impose further kinetics changes. It was also expected that differential leaf Na(+) accumulation would be reflected in specific changes in cell division and expansion rates. Plants of four sunflower lines were gradually treated with a relatively high (130 mm NaCl) salt treatment. Leaf expansion kinetics curves were compared in leaves that were formed before, during and after the initiation of the salt treatment. Leaf areas were smaller in salt-treated plants, but the analysis of growth curves did not reveal differences that could be attributed to differential Na(+) accumulation, since similar changes in leaf expansion kinetics were observed in lines with different magnitudes of salt accumulation. Nevertheless, in a high leaf Na(+) -including line, cell divisions were affected earlier, resulting in leaves with proportionally fewer cells than in a Na(+) -excluding line. A distinct change in leaf epidermal pavement shape caused by salinity is reported for the first time. Mature pavement cells in leaves of control plants exhibited typical lobed, jigsaw-puzzle shape, whereas in treated plants, they tended to retain closer-to-circular shapes and a lower number of lobes.

  20. Optimal Leaf Positions for SPAD Meter Measurement in Rice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhaofeng; Cao, Qiang; Zhang, Ke; Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Tian, Yongchao; Zhu, Yan; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD) chlorophyll meter is one of the most commonly used diagnostic tools to measure crop nitrogen status. However, the measurement method of the meter could significantly affect the accuracy of the final estimation. Thus, this research was undertaken to develop a new methodology to optimize SPAD meter measurements in rice (Oryza sativa L.). A flatbed color scanner was used to map the dynamic chlorophyll distribution and irregular leaf shapes. Calculus algorithm was adopted to estimate the potential positions for SPAD meter measurement along the leaf blade. Data generated by the flatbed color scanner and SPAD meter were analyzed simultaneously. The results suggested that a position 2/3 of the distance from the leaf base to the apex (2/3 position) could represent the chlorophyll content of the entire leaf blade, as indicated by the relatively low variance of measurements at that position. SPAD values based on di-positional leaves and the extracted chlorophyll a and b contents were compared. This comparison showed that the 2/3 position on the lower leaves tended to be more sensitive to changes in chlorophyll content. Finally, the 2/3 position and average SPAD values of the fourth fully expanded leaf from the top were compared with leaf nitrogen concentration. The results showed the 2/3 position on that leaf was most suitable for predicting the nitrogen status of rice. Based on these results, we recommend making SPAD measurements at the 2/3 position on the fourth fully expanded leaf from the top. The coupling of dynamic chlorophyll distribution and irregular leaf shapes information can provide a promising approach for the calibration of SPAD meter measurement, which can further benefit the in situ nitrogen management by providing reliable estimation of crops nitrogen nutrition status.

  1. Remote sensing of leaf N to improve carbon assimilation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loozen, Yasmina; Rebel, Karin; Karssenberg, Derek; de Jong, Steven; Wassen, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Predicting and understanding carbon assimilation by terrestrial vegetation remains fundamental in the context of climate change. Carbon and nitrogen cycles are linked as nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth. In this respect the N cycle is integrated into vegetation models predicting vegetation carbon uptake. However plant traits within the N cycle, such as leaf nitrogen, are lacking at large scales, which complicates the calibration and optimization of the N cycling modelling modules. Remote sensing techniques could offer the possibility to detect leaf N concentration at continental scales. In fact, it has already been used to sense leaf N at local, e.g. in agricultural oriented applications, as well as at regional scales. The objective of this study is to enhance the availability of leaf N estimates in forested ecosystems at European scale using remote sensing products. European forest leaf N data were obtained from the TRY database. The MERIS Terrestrial chlorophyll Index (MTCI) Level 3 product as well as two reflectance bands in the NIR region (band centers at 865 and 885nm) both from MERIS aboard ENVISAT (ESA) were used to study statistical relationship with leaf N data. In a first step, we analyzed 1892 Catalonian (NE Spain) forest plots using a linear regression method. The regressions results between leaf N and either MTCI or NIR bands were significant (p< 0.001). The R-square for the regression between leaf N and MTCI was equal to 0.13. The method performed better for broadleaves deciduous plots (R-square = 0.11) than for needleleaves or broadleaves evergreen plots. The relationship between leaf N and MTCI was also higher for the plots sampled during summer (R-square = 0.28 in July) than for the plots sampled during the rest of the year. In a second step the method will be applied on and will include more diverse forest types at the European level.

  2. Optimal Leaf Positions for SPAD Meter Measurement in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhaofeng; Cao, Qiang; Zhang, Ke; Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Tian, Yongchao; Zhu, Yan; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD) chlorophyll meter is one of the most commonly used diagnostic tools to measure crop nitrogen status. However, the measurement method of the meter could significantly affect the accuracy of the final estimation. Thus, this research was undertaken to develop a new methodology to optimize SPAD meter measurements in rice (Oryza sativa L.). A flatbed color scanner was used to map the dynamic chlorophyll distribution and irregular leaf shapes. Calculus algorithm was adopted to estimate the potential positions for SPAD meter measurement along the leaf blade. Data generated by the flatbed color scanner and SPAD meter were analyzed simultaneously. The results suggested that a position 2/3 of the distance from the leaf base to the apex (2/3 position) could represent the chlorophyll content of the entire leaf blade, as indicated by the relatively low variance of measurements at that position. SPAD values based on di-positional leaves and the extracted chlorophyll a and b contents were compared. This comparison showed that the 2/3 position on the lower leaves tended to be more sensitive to changes in chlorophyll content. Finally, the 2/3 position and average SPAD values of the fourth fully expanded leaf from the top were compared with leaf nitrogen concentration. The results showed the 2/3 position on that leaf was most suitable for predicting the nitrogen status of rice. Based on these results, we recommend making SPAD measurements at the 2/3 position on the fourth fully expanded leaf from the top. The coupling of dynamic chlorophyll distribution and irregular leaf shapes information can provide a promising approach for the calibration of SPAD meter measurement, which can further benefit the in situ nitrogen management by providing reliable estimation of crops nitrogen nutrition status. PMID:27303416

  3. Influences of Environmental Factors on Leaf Morphology of Chinese Jujubes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Li, Yupeng; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall and temperature are the primary limiting factors for optimum quality and yield of cultivated jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.). Adaptation to arid and cool environments has been and remains an important goal of many jujube improvement programs. This study summarized the survey results of 116 Chinese jujube varieties grown at 33 sites in China. The objective was to identify the environmental factors that influence leaf morphology, and the implications for breeding and introduction of new jujube varieties. Jujube leaf morphological traits were evaluated for their potential relationships with mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP). The results showed that many leaf morphological traits had a strong linear relationship with local precipitation and temperature. Longer veins per unit area (VLA) and reduced leaf area and leaf perimeter were typical of arid areas. VLA was inversely related to MAT and MAP at the centers of origin of jujube. There was a positive relationship between leaf shape (perimeter2/area) and both MAT and MAP. These results indicated that leaf vein traits of Chinese jujubes might have resulted from their adaptation to environmental factors in the course of long-term evolution. Principal component analysis allocated the 116 jujube varieties to three different groups, differentiated on the basis of morphological and physiological leaf characteristics. Jujube varieties from the Hebei, Shandong, Henan, southern Shanxi and central Shaanxi provinces were closely related, as were varieties from northwest Shanxi and northeast Shaanxi provinces, and varieties from the Gansu and Ningxia provinces. These close relationships were partially attributed to the frequent exchanges of varieties within each group. Leaf venation characteristics might be used as reference indices for jujube variety introduction between different locations. PMID:26020971

  4. Leaf Area Adjustment As an Optimal Drought-Adaptation Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, S.; Beyer, F.; Thompson, S. E.; Vico, G.; Weih, M.

    2014-12-01

    Leaf phenology plays a major role in land-atmosphere mass and energy exchanges. Much work has focused on phenological responses to light and temperature, but less to leaf area changes during dry periods. Because the duration of droughts is expected to increase under future climates in seasonally-dry as well as mesic environments, it is crucial to (i) predict drought-related phenological changes and (ii) to develop physiologically-sound models of leaf area dynamics during dry periods. Several optimization criteria have been proposed to model leaf area adjustment as soil moisture decreases. Some theories are based on the plant carbon (C) balance, hypothesizing that leaf area will decline when instantaneous net photosynthetic rates become negative (equivalent to maximization of cumulative C gain). Other theories draw on hydraulic principles, suggesting that leaf area should adjust to either maintain a constant leaf water potential (isohydric behavior) or to avoid leaf water potentials with negative impacts on photosynthesis (i.e., minimization of water stress). Evergreen leaf phenology is considered as a control case. Merging these theories into a unified framework, we quantify the effect of phenological strategy and climate forcing on the net C gain over the entire growing season. By accounting for the C costs of leaf flushing and the gains stemming from leaf photosynthesis, this metric assesses the effectiveness of different phenological strategies, under different climatic scenarios. Evergreen species are favored only when the dry period is relatively short, as they can exploit most of the growing season, and only incur leaf maintenance costs during the short dry period. In contrast, deciduous species that lower maintenance costs by losing leaves are advantaged under drier climates. Moreover, among drought-deciduous species, isohydric behavior leads to lowest C gains. Losing leaves gradually so as to maintain a net C uptake equal to zero during the driest period in

  5. Coca Leaf and Cocaine Addiction: Some Historical Notes

    PubMed Central

    Blejer-Prieto, H.

    1965-01-01

    Coca-leaf habituation has affected millions of Andean natives for over 400 years. In the last half-century it has also involved millions more Malayans. Coca leaf, from which cocaine and extracts for some commercial carbonated soft drinks are obtained, remains relatively unknown by the medical and allied professions elsewhere. A review of the original medical, historical and other pertinent literature of the last 350 years illustrates the origins of the use of coca leaf, its spread, the isolation of cocaine and its first uses, as well as some of the euphoric and other effects of both substances. PMID:5318484

  6. Light ray tracing through a leaf cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.; Silva, L. F.

    1973-01-01

    A light ray, incident at about 5 deg to the normal, is geometrically plotted through the drawing of the cross section of a soybean leaf using Fresnel's equations and Snell's law. The optical mediums of the leaf considered for ray tracing are: air, cell sap, chloroplast, and cell wall. The ray is also drawn through the same leaf cross section with cell wall and air as the only optical mediums. The values of the reflection and transmission found from the ray tracing tests agree closely with the experimental results obtained using a Beckman Dk-2A Spectroreflector.

  7. Comparison of dwarf bamboos (Indocalamus sp.) leaf parameters to determine relationship between spatial density of plants and total leaf area per plant.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pei-Jian; Xu, Qiang; Sandhu, Hardev S; Gielis, Johan; Ding, Yu-Long; Li, Hua-Rong; Dong, Xiao-Bo

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between spatial density and size of plants is an important topic in plant ecology. The self-thinning rule suggests a -3/2 power between average biomass and density or a -1/2 power between stand yield and density. However, the self-thinning rule based on total leaf area per plant and density of plants has been neglected presumably because of the lack of a method that can accurately estimate the total leaf area per plant. We aimed to find the relationship between spatial density of plants and total leaf area per plant. We also attempted to provide a novel model for accurately describing the leaf shape of bamboos. We proposed a simplified Gielis equation with only two parameters to describe the leaf shape of bamboos one model parameter represented the overall ratio of leaf width to leaf length. Using this method, we compared some leaf parameters (leaf shape, number of leaves per plant, ratio of total leaf weight to aboveground weight per plant, and total leaf area per plant) of four bamboo species of genus Indocalamus Nakai (I. pedalis (Keng) P.C. Keng, I. pumilus Q.H. Dai and C.F. Keng, I. barbatus McClure, and I. victorialis P.C. Keng). We also explored the possible correlation between spatial density and total leaf area per plant using log-linear regression. We found that the simplified Gielis equation fit the leaf shape of four bamboo species very well. Although all these four species belonged to the same genus, there were still significant differences in leaf shape. Significant differences also existed in leaf area per plant, ratio of leaf weight to aboveground weight per plant, and leaf length. In addition, we found that the total leaf area per plant decreased with increased spatial density. Therefore, we directly demonstrated the self-thinning rule to improve light interception.

  8. Leaf hydraulic conductance declines in coordination with photosynthesis, transpiration and leaf water status as soybean leaves age regardless of soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Locke, Anna M; Ort, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis requires sufficient water transport through leaves for stomata to remain open as water transpires from the leaf, allowing CO2 to diffuse into the leaf. The leaf water needs of soybean change over time because of large microenvironment changes over their lifespan, as leaves mature in full sun at the top of the canopy and then become progressively shaded by younger leaves developing above. Leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)), a measure of the leaf's water transport capacity, can often be linked to changes in microenvironment and transpiration demand. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that K(leaf) would decline in coordination with transpiration demand as soybean leaves matured and aged. Photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)) were also measured at various leaf ages with both field- and chamber-grown soybeans to assess transpiration demand. K(leaf) was found to decrease as soybean leaves aged from maturity to shading to senescence, and this decrease was strongly correlated with midday A. Decreases in K(leaf) were further correlated with decreases in g(s), although the relationship was not as strong as that with A. Separate experiments investigating the response of K(leaf) to drought demonstrated no acclimation of K(leaf) to drought conditions to protect against cavitation or loss of g(s) during drought and confirmed the effect of leaf age in K(leaf) observed in the field. These results suggest that the decline of leaf hydraulic conductance as leaves age keeps hydraulic supply in balance with demand without K(leaf)becoming limiting to transpiration water flux.

  9. Leaf conductance in relation to rate of CO/sub 2/ assimilation. I. Influence of nitrogen nutrition, phosphorus nutrition, photon flux density, and ambient partial pressure of CO/sub 2/ during ontogeny. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.C.; Cowan, I.R.; Farquhar, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Plants of Zea mays were grown with different concentrations of nitrate (0.6, 4, 12, and 24 millimolar) and phosphate (0.04, 0.13, 0.53, and 1.33 millimolar) supplied to the roots, photon flux densities (0.04, 0.13, 0.53, and 1.33 millimolar) supplied to the roots, photon flux densities (0.12, 0.5, and 2 millimoles per square meter per second), and ambient partial pressures of CO/sub 2/ (305 and 610 microbars). Differences in mineral nutrition and irradiance led to a large variation in rate of CO/sub 2/ assimilation per unit leaf area (A, 11 to 58 micromoles per square meter per second) when measured under standard conditions. The variation was shown, with the plants that had received different amounts of nitrate, to be related to variations in the nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, and phosphoenolpyruvate and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activities per unit leaf area. Irrespective of growth treatment, A and leaf conductance to CO/sub 2/ transfer (g), measured under standard conditions were in almost constant proportion, implying that intercellular partial pressure of CO/sub 2/ (p/sub i/), was almost constant at 95 microbars. The same proportionality was maintained as A and g increased in an initially nitrogen-deficient plant that had been supplied with abundant nitrate. It was shown that p/sub i/ measured at a given ambient partial pressure was not affected by the ambient partial pressure at which the plants had been grown, although it was different when measured at different ambient partial pressures. This suggests that the close coupling between A and g in these experiments is not associated with sensitivity of stomata to change in p/sub i/. Similar, though less comprehensive, experiments were done with Gosypium hirsutum, and yielded similar conclusions, except that the proportionality between A and g at normal ambient partial pressure of CO/sub 2/ implied p/sub i/ approx. = 200 microbars. 11 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  10. The oxygen isotope enrichment of leaf-exported assimilates – does it always reflect lamina leaf water enrichment?

    PubMed Central

    Gessler, Arthur; Brandes, Elke; Keitel, Claudia; Boda, Sonja; Kayler, Zachary E; Granier, André; Barbour, Margaret; Farquhar, Graham D; Treydte, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The oxygen stable isotope composition of plant organic matter (OM) (particularly of wood and cellulose in the tree ring archive) is valuable in studies of plant–climate interaction, but there is a lack of information on the transfer of the isotope signal from the leaf to heterotrophic tissues. We studied the oxygen isotopic composition and its enrichment above source water of leaf water over diel courses in five tree species covering a broad range of life forms. We tracked the transfer of the isotopic signal to leaf water-soluble OM and further to phloem-transported OM. Observed leaf water evaporative enrichment was consistent with values predicted from mechanistic models taking into account nonsteady-state conditions. While leaf water-soluble OM showed the expected 18O enrichment in all species, phloem sugars were less enriched than expected from leaf water enrichment in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), European larch (Larix decidua) and Alpine ash (Eucalyptus delegatensis). Oxygen atom exchange with nonenriched water during phloem loading and transport, as well as a significant contribution of assimilates from bark photosynthesis, can explain these phloem 18O enrichment patterns. Our results indicate species-specific uncoupling between the leaf water and the OM oxygen isotope signal, which is important for the interpretation of tree ring data. PMID:23763637

  11. SHALLOT-LIKE1 is a KANADI transcription factor that modulates rice leaf rolling by regulating leaf abaxial cell development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Heng; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Xu-Dong; Qian, Qian; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2009-03-01

    As an important agronomic trait, rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf rolling has attracted much attention from plant biologists and breeders. Moderate leaf rolling increases the photosynthesis of cultivars and hence raises grain yield. However, the relevant molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show the isolation and functional characterization of SHALLOT-LIKE1 (SLL1), a key gene controlling rice leaf rolling. sll1 mutant plants have extremely incurved leaves due to the defective development of sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side. Defective development can be functionally rescued by expression of SLL1. SLL1 is transcribed in various tissues and accumulates in the abaxial epidermis throughout leaf development. SLL1 encodes a SHAQKYF class MYB family transcription factor belonging to the KANADI family. SLL1 deficiency leads to defective programmed cell death of abaxial mesophyll cells and suppresses the development of abaxial features. By contrast, enhanced SLL1 expression stimulates phloem development on the abaxial side and suppresses bulliform cell and sclerenchyma development on the adaxial side. Additionally, SLL1 deficiency results in increased chlorophyll and photosynthesis. Our findings identify the role of SLL1 in the modulation of leaf abaxial cell development and in sustaining abaxial characteristics during leaf development. These results should facilitate attempts to use molecular breeding to increase the photosynthetic capacity of rice, as well as other crops, by modulating leaf development and rolling.

  12. Leaf Length Tracker: a novel approach to analyse leaf elongation close to the thermal limit of growth in the field.

    PubMed

    Nagelmüller, Sebastian; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Yates, Steven; Hiltpold, Maya; Walter, Achim

    2016-03-01

    Leaf growth in monocot crops such as wheat and barley largely follows the daily temperature course, particularly under cold but humid springtime field conditions. Knowledge of the temperature response of leaf extension, particularly variations close to the thermal limit of growth, helps define physiological growth constraints and breeding-related genotypic differences among cultivars. Here, we present a novel method, called 'Leaf Length Tracker' (LLT), suitable for measuring leaf elongation rates (LERs) of cereals and other grasses with high precision and high temporal resolution under field conditions. The method is based on image sequence analysis, using a marker tracking approach to calculate LERs. We applied the LLT to several varieties of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), summer barley (Hordeum vulgare), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne), grown in the field and in growth cabinets under controlled conditions. LLT is easy to use and we demonstrate its reliability and precision under changing weather conditions that include temperature, wind, and rain. We found that leaf growth stopped at a base temperature of 0°C for all studied species and we detected significant genotype-specific differences in LER with rising temperature. The data obtained were statistically robust and were reproducible in the tested environments. Using LLT, we were able to detect subtle differences (sub-millimeter) in leaf growth patterns. This method will allow the collection of leaf growth data in a wide range of future field experiments on different graminoid species or varieties under varying environmental or treatment conditions.

  13. Leaf Length Tracker: a novel approach to analyse leaf elongation close to the thermal limit of growth in the field

    PubMed Central

    Kirchgessner, Norbert; Yates, Steven; Hiltpold, Maya; Walter, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Leaf growth in monocot crops such as wheat and barley largely follows the daily temperature course, particularly under cold but humid springtime field conditions. Knowledge of the temperature response of leaf extension, particularly variations close to the thermal limit of growth, helps define physiological growth constraints and breeding-related genotypic differences among cultivars. Here, we present a novel method, called ‘Leaf Length Tracker’ (LLT), suitable for measuring leaf elongation rates (LERs) of cereals and other grasses with high precision and high temporal resolution under field conditions. The method is based on image sequence analysis, using a marker tracking approach to calculate LERs. We applied the LLT to several varieties of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), summer barley (Hordeum vulgare), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne), grown in the field and in growth cabinets under controlled conditions. LLT is easy to use and we demonstrate its reliability and precision under changing weather conditions that include temperature, wind, and rain. We found that leaf growth stopped at a base temperature of 0°C for all studied species and we detected significant genotype-specific differences in LER with rising temperature. The data obtained were statistically robust and were reproducible in the tested environments. Using LLT, we were able to detect subtle differences (sub-millimeter) in leaf growth patterns. This method will allow the collection of leaf growth data in a wide range of future field experiments on different graminoid species or varieties under varying environmental or treatment conditions. PMID:26818912

  14. Does investment in leaf defenses drive changes in leaf economic strategy? A focus on whole-plant ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Mason, Chase M; Donovan, Lisa A

    2015-04-01

    Leaf defenses have long been studied in the context of plant growth rate, resource availability, and optimal investment theory. Likewise, one of the central modern paradigms of plant ecophysiology, the leaf economics spectrum (LES), has been extensively studied in the context of these factors across ecological scales ranging from global species data sets to temporal shifts within individuals. Despite strong physiological links between LES strategy and leaf defenses in structure, function, and resource investment, the relationship between these trait classes has not been well explored. This study investigates the relationship between leaf defenses and LES strategy across whole-plant ontogeny in three diverse Helianthus species known to exhibit dramatic ontogenetic shifts in LES strategy, focusing primarily on physical and quantitative chemical defenses. Plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions and sampled for LES and defense traits at four ontogenetic stages. Defenses were found to shift strongly with ontogeny, and to correlate strongly with LES strategy. More advanced ontogenetic stages with more conservative LES strategy leaves had higher tannin activity and toughness in all species, and higher leaf dry matter content in two of three species. Modeling results in two species support the conclusion that changes in defenses drive changes in LES strategy through ontogeny, and in one species that changes in defenses and LES strategy are likely independently driven by ontogeny. Results of this study support the hypothesis that leaf-level allocation to defenses might be an important determinant of leaf economic traits, where high investment in defenses drives a conservative LES strategy.

  15. The influence of leaf size and shape on leaf thermal dynamics: does theory hold up under natural conditions?

    PubMed

    Leigh, A; Sevanto, S; Close, J D; Nicotra, A B

    2017-02-01

    Laboratory studies on artificial leaves suggest that leaf thermal dynamics are strongly influenced by the two-dimensional size and shape of leaves and associated boundary layer thickness. Hot environments are therefore said to favour selection for small, narrow or dissected leaves. Empirical evidence from real leaves under field conditions is scant and traditionally based on point measurements that do not capture spatial variation in heat load. We used thermal imagery under field conditions to measure the leaf thermal time constant (τ) in summer and the leaf-to-air temperature difference (∆T) and temperature range across laminae (Trange ) during winter, autumn and summer for 68 Proteaceae species. We investigated the influence of leaf area and margin complexity relative to effective leaf width (we ), the latter being a more direct indicator of boundary layer thickness. Normalized difference of margin complexity had no or weak effects on thermal dynamics, but we strongly predicted τ and ∆T, whereas leaf area influenced Trange . Unlike artificial leaves, however, spatial temperature distribution in large leaves appeared to be governed largely by structural variation. Therefore, we agree that small size, specifically we , has adaptive value in hot environments but not with the idea that thermal regulation is the primary evolutionary driver of leaf dissection.

  16. Do initial S reserves and mineral S availability alter leaf S-N mobilization and leaf senescence in oilseed rape?

    PubMed

    Abdallah, M; Etienne, P; Ourry, A; Meuriot, F

    2011-03-01

    Winter oilseed rape is sensitive to S limitation, however few studies have clearly assessed the impact of initial S reserves on the remobilization of leaf N-S compounds and senescence dynamics within the leaves in S limited plants. As a consequence, the impacts of high or low initial S reserves on these parameters, further cross-combined with either high or low S availabilities, were examined using a ¹⁵N and ³⁴S double-labelling method associated with a study of gene expression of relevant tonoplastic sulphate transporters (BnSultr4;1 and BnSultr4;2) and a molecular indicator of leaf senescence (BnSAG12/BnCab). Plants with high initial S status and S limitation showed an optimal growth comparable to control plants. Moreover, in response to S limitation, leaf soluble protein content, total S, recently assimilated S (i.e., ³⁴S) and the sulphate content in the oldest leaves declined, and the expression of genes encoding tonoplastic sulphate transporters were up-regulated. However, compared to control plants, S limitation delayed leaf senescence. These data suggested that in response to S limitation, plants with high initial S were able to sustain optimized leaf growth by increasing endogenous N and S remobilization independently of the leaf senescence process. In contrast, if these low S plants had no initial S reserves, leaf N-S remobilization was not sufficient to allow optimal growth. As a conclusion, our study supports a model where oilseed rape is able to compensate transiently for S limitation through a fine management of leaf N-S remobilization and a delayed leaf senescence dynamics.

  17. Leaf-age effects on seasonal variability in photosynthetic parameters and its relationships with leaf mass per area and leaf nitrogen concentration within a Pinus densiflora crown.

    PubMed

    Han, Qingmin; Kawasaki, Tatsuro; Nakano, Takashi; Chiba, Yukihiro

    2008-04-01

    In the temperate zone of Japan, Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc. bears needles of up to three age classes in the upper crown and up to five age classes in the lower crown. To elucidate the effects of leaf age on photosynthetic parameters and its relationships with leaf mass per unit area (LMA) and leaf nitrogen (N(l)) concentration on an area (N(a)) and mass (N(m)) basis, we measured seasonal variations in LMA, N(l), light-saturated photosynthetic rate (A(max)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), maximum rate of carboxylation (V(cmax)) and maximum rate of electron transport (J(max)) in leaves of all age classes in the upper and lower crown. Leaf mass per unit area increased by 27% with increasing leaf age in the lower crown, but LMA did not depend on age in the upper crown. Leaf age had a significant effect on N(m) but not on N(a) in both crown positions, indicating that decreases in N(m) resulted from dilution. Photosynthetic parameters decreased significantly with leaf age in the lower crown (39% for A(max) and 43% for V(cmax)), but the effect of leaf age was not as great in the upper crown, although these parameters exhibited seasonal variation in both crown positions. Regression analysis indicated a close relationship between LMA and N(a), regardless of age class or when each age class was pooled (r(2) = 0.57-0.86). Relationships between LMA and N(a) and among A(max), V(cmax) and J(max) were weak or not significant when all age classes were examined by regression analysis. However, compared with older leaves, relationships among LMA, N(a) and A(max) were stronger in younger leaves. These results indicate that changes in LMA and N(l) mainly reflect light acclimation during leaf development, but they are only slightly affected by irradiance in mature leaves. In conclusion, LMA and N(l) are useful parameters for estimating photosynthetic capacity, but age-related effects need to be taken into account, especially in evergreen conifers.

  18. Whitefly transmission of the Sweet potato leaf curl virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is highly adaptive and polyphagous on taxonomically diverse species of plants on a global scale. This whitefly transmits numerous plant viruses, including Begomoviruses (Geminiviridae). We recently found the Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus (SPLCV) ...

  19. Somatic chromosome counts from leaf meristems in the tribe Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H C; Gill, B S

    1984-07-01

    The Feulgen procedure was applied to chromosome preparations of leaf meristems from growing plants of wheat, barley, and wheat-wheatgrass hybrids. Leaf primordia from the base of secondary tillers were pretreated in cold water (overnight, 2 C), fixed in glacial acetic acid (20 min, 2 C), hydrolyzed in 1 N HC1 (14 min), stained in leuco-basic fuchsin (about 15 min) and squashed in 1% acetocarmine. The chromosome spreads from leaf meristems were generally superior to those of the root meristems of the same plant. Mitotic index in leaf meristems was higher than in root meristems in some species. The method appears useful for counting the chromosome number of growing plants, detecting chimeras, and verifying root tip chromosome counts.

  20. Effects of Shading on Cercospora Leaf Spot in Bigleaf Hydrangea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shading densities significantly affected severity of Cercospora leaf spot on bigleaf hydrangeas. In general, lower disease severities were associated with higher shading densities. However, significantly differences in disease severities among cultivars could not be detected in higher shading densi...

  1. Effects of Shading on Cercospora Leaf Spot in Bigleaf Hydrangea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shading densities significantly affected disease severities of Cercospora leaf spot on bigleaf hydrangeas. In general, lower disease severities were associated with higher shading densities. However, significantly differences in disease severities among cultivars could not be detected in higher sha...

  2. Effects of Shading on Cerospora Leaf Spot in Bigleaf Hydrangea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shading densities significantly affected disease severities of Cercospora leaf spot on bigleaf hydrangeas. In general, lower disease severities were associated with higher shading densities. However, significantly differences in disease severities among cultivars could not be detected in higher sha...

  3. 7 CFR 29.2437 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER... tolerance. B3M Good Mixed Color Heavy Leaf. Medium to heavy body, mature, firm, oily, semielastic,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2662 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER... percent uniform, and 40 percent injury tolerance. B3M Good Mixed Color or Variegated Heavy Leaf. Medium...

  5. Allometric method to estimate leaf area index for row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf area index (LAI) is critical for predicting plant metabolism, biomass production, evapotranspiration, and greenhouse gas sequestration, but direct LAI measurements are difficult and labor intensive. Several methods are available to measure LAI indirectly or calculate LAI using allometric method...

  6. Niclosamide inhibits leaf blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae in rice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Il; Song, Jong Tae; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Seo, Hak Soo

    2016-01-01

    Rice leaf blight, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), results in huge losses in grain yield. Here, we show that Xoo-induced rice leaf blight is effectively controlled by niclosamide, an oral antihelminthic drug and molluscicide, which also functions as an anti-tumor agent. Niclosamide directly inhibited the growth of the three Xoo strains PXO99, 10208 and K3a. Niclosamide moved long distances from the site of local application to distant rice tissues. Niclosamide also increased the levels of salicylate and induced the expression of defense-related genes such as OsPR1 and OsWRKY45, which suppressed Xoo-induced leaf wilting. Niclosamide had no detrimental effects on vegetative/reproductive growth and yield. These combined results indicate that niclosamide can be used to block bacterial leaf blight in rice with no negative side effects. PMID:26879887

  7. The anatomical and compositional basis of leaf mass per area.

    PubMed

    John, Grace P; Scoffoni, Christine; Buckley, Thomas N; Villar, Rafael; Poorter, Hendrik; Sack, Lawren

    2017-04-01

    Leaf dry mass per unit leaf area (LMA) is a central trait in ecology, but its anatomical and compositional basis has been unclear. An explicit mathematical and physical framework for quantifying the cell and tissue determinants of LMA will enable tests of their influence on species, communities and ecosystems. We present an approach to explaining LMA from the numbers, dimensions and mass densities of leaf cells and tissues, which provided unprecedented explanatory power for 11 broadleaved woody angiosperm species diverse in LMA (33-262 g m(-2) ; R(2)  = 0.94; P < 0.001). Across these diverse species, and in a larger comparison of evergreen vs. deciduous angiosperms, high LMA resulted principally from larger cell sizes, greater major vein allocation, greater numbers of mesophyll cell layers and higher cell mass densities. This explicit approach enables relating leaf anatomy and composition to a wide range of processes in physiological, evolutionary, community and macroecology.

  8. Leaf transpiration efficiency of some drought-resistant maize lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field measurements of leaf gas exchange in maize often indicate stomatal conductances higher than required to provide substomatal carbon dioxide concentrations saturating to photosynthesis. Thus maize leaves often operate at lower transpiration efficiency (TE) than potentially achievable for specie...

  9. 21. VIEW EAST, UNDERSIDE OF BASCULE LEAF SHOWING STRUCTURAL MEMBERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW EAST, UNDERSIDE OF BASCULE LEAF SHOWING STRUCTURAL MEMBERS AND BASCULE GIRDERS WITH RACK GEAR SECTION - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. 20. VIEW EAST, UNDERSIDE OF BASCULE LEAF SHOWING STRUCTURAL MEMBERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW EAST, UNDERSIDE OF BASCULE LEAF SHOWING STRUCTURAL MEMBERS AND BASCULE GIRDERS WITH RACK GEAR SECTION - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. Leaf mineral nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence and modulation by nutrient deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Anne; Diquélou, Sylvain; Billard, Vincent; Laîné, Philippe; Garnica, Maria; Prudent, Marion; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants have to cope with fluctuating mineral resource availability. However, strategies such as stimulation of root growth, increased transporter activities, and nutrient storage and remobilization have been mostly studied for only a few macronutrients. Leaves of cultivated crops (Zea mays, Brassica napus, Pisum sativum, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare) and tree species (Quercus robur, Populus nigra, Alnus glutinosa) grown under field conditions were harvested regularly during their life span and analyzed to evaluate the net mobilization of 13 nutrients during leaf senescence. While N was remobilized in all plant species with different efficiencies ranging from 40% (maize) to 90% (wheat), other macronutrients (K–P–S–Mg) were mobilized in most species. Ca and Mn, usually considered as having low phloem mobility were remobilized from leaves in wheat and barley. Leaf content of Cu–Mo–Ni–B–Fe–Zn decreased in some species, as a result of remobilization. Overall, wheat, barley and oak appeared to be the most efficient at remobilization while poplar and maize were the least efficient. Further experiments were performed with rapeseed plants subjected to individual nutrient deficiencies. Compared to field conditions, remobilization from leaves was similar (N–S–Cu) or increased by nutrient deficiency (K–P–Mg) while nutrient deficiency had no effect on Mo–Zn–B–Ca–Mn, which seemed to be non-mobile during leaf senescence under field conditions. However, Ca and Mn were largely mobilized from roots (-97 and -86% of their initial root contents, respectively) to shoots. Differences in remobilization between species and between nutrients are then discussed in relation to a range of putative mechanisms. PMID:26029223

  12. Leaf mineral nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence and modulation by nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Anne; Diquélou, Sylvain; Billard, Vincent; Laîné, Philippe; Garnica, Maria; Prudent, Marion; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants have to cope with fluctuating mineral resource availability. However, strategies such as stimulation of root growth, increased transporter activities, and nutrient storage and remobilization have been mostly studied for only a few macronutrients. Leaves of cultivated crops (Zea mays, Brassica napus, Pisum sativum, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare) and tree species (Quercus robur, Populus nigra, Alnus glutinosa) grown under field conditions were harvested regularly during their life span and analyzed to evaluate the net mobilization of 13 nutrients during leaf senescence. While N was remobilized in all plant species with different efficiencies ranging from 40% (maize) to 90% (wheat), other macronutrients (K-P-S-Mg) were mobilized in most species. Ca and Mn, usually considered as having low phloem mobility were remobilized from leaves in wheat and barley. Leaf content of Cu-Mo-Ni-B-Fe-Zn decreased in some species, as a result of remobilization. Overall, wheat, barley and oak appeared to be the most efficient at remobilization while poplar and maize were the least efficient. Further experiments were performed with rapeseed plants subjected to individual nutrient deficiencies. Compared to field conditions, remobilization from leaves was similar (N-S-Cu) or increased by nutrient deficiency (K-P-Mg) while nutrient deficiency had no effect on Mo-Zn-B-Ca-Mn, which seemed to be non-mobile during leaf senescence under field conditions. However, Ca and Mn were largely mobilized from roots (-97 and -86% of their initial root contents, respectively) to shoots. Differences in remobilization between species and between nutrients are then discussed in relation to a range of putative mechanisms.

  13. Topological Phenotypes in Complex Leaf Venation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Lasser, Jana; Daly, Douglas; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-03-01

    The leaves of vascular plants contain highly complex venation networks consisting of recursively nested, hierarchically organized loops. We analyze the topology of the venation of leaves from ca. 200 species belonging to ca. 10 families, defining topological metrics that quantify the hierarchical nestedness of the network cycles. We find that most of the venation variability can be described by a two dimensional phenotypic space, where one dimension consists of a linear combination of geometrical metrics and the other dimension of topological, previously uncharacterized metrics. We show how this new topological dimension in the phenotypic space significantly improves identification of leaves from fragments, by calculating a ``leaf fingerprint'' from the topology and geometry of the higher order veins. Further, we present a simple model suggesting that the topological phenotypic traits can be explained by noise effects and variations in the timing of higher order vein developmental events. This work opens the path to (a) new quantitative identification techniques for leaves which go beyond simple geometric traits such as vein density and (b) topological quantification of other planar or almost planar networks such as arterial vaculature in the neocortex and lung tissue.

  14. Leaf support biomechanics of neotropical understory herbs.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Arielle M; Reich, Alexandra; Rundel, Philip

    2004-04-01

    Plants in light-limited tropical rainforest understories face an important carbon allocation trade-off: investment of available carbon into photosynthetic tissue should be advantageous, while risk of damage and mortality from falling debris favors investment into nonphotosynthetic structural tissue. We examined the modulus of rupture (σ(max)), Young's modulus of elasticity (E), and flexural stiffness (F) of stems and petioles in 14 monocot species from six families. These biomechanical properties were evaluated with respect to habitat, rates of leaf production, clonality, and growth form. Species with higher E and σ(max), indicating greater resistance per unit area to bending and breaking, respectively, tended to be shade-tolerant, slow growing, and nonclonal. This result is consistent with an increase in carbon allocation to structural tissue in shade-tolerant species at the expense of photosynthetic tissue and growth. Forest- edge species were weaker per unit area (had a lower E), but had higher flexural stiffness due to increases in stem and petiole diameter. While this is inefficient in requiring more carbon per unit of structural support, it may enable forest-edge species to support larger and heavier leaves. Our results emphasize the degree to which biomechanical traits vary with ecological niche and illustrate suites of characteristics associated with different carbon allocation strategies.

  15. Identifying leaf traits that signal stress in TIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago Acevedo, Maria F.; Groen, Thomas A.; Hecker, Christoph A.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2017-03-01

    Plants under constant water and temperature stress experience a chain of reactions that in the long term alter their leaf traits (morphology, anatomy and chemistry). The use of these traits as proxies for assessing plant stress was so far mainly based on conventional laboratory methods, which are expensive and time-consuming. Remote sensing methods based on spectral changes can detect changes in pigments and productivity using the visible and near infrared. However, the use of infrared spectra, where changes in the spectra are associated with physical changes of the leaf, is still incipient. In this study plants of Rhododendron cf. catawbiense, were exposed to low temperatures and low soil water content during a six months experiment. The spectral response in the infrared region 1.4-16 μm, microstructural variables, leaf water content, leaf area and leaf molecules such as lignin and cellulose concentrations were measured in individual leaves after the period of stress. This study revealed that under cold conditions plants have most changes in leaf water content, lignin and cellulose concentrations and leaf area, while under drought conditions the most striking change is water loss. These leaf trait modifications are also correlated with changes in thermal infrared spectra, showing their potential as proxies for detecting plant stress in this species. A multinomial model allows the estimation of the stress treatments imposed on these plants from their infrared spectra. This model reveals a group of 15 bands in the SWIR and MWIR between 2.23 and 7.77 μm, which show relatively large changes, and had an overall accuracy of 87%. Finally, individual partial least squares regression models show that lignin, cellulose, leaf water content and leaf area are the leaf traits reacting significantly to long-term stress and that are also generating measurable changes in the infrared spectra. Although these models are based on laboratory data, the congruence of the identified

  16. Joint leaf chlorophyll and leaf area index retrieval using a regularized canopy reflectance model inversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houborg, R.; McCabe, M. F.; Gitelson, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and leaf chlorophyll (Chl) represent key biophysical and biochemical controls on water, energy and carbon exchange processes in the terrestrial biosphere. In combination LAI and Chl provide critical information on vegetation density and phenology, the vitality of vegetation and photosynthetic functioning, and joint satellite-based retrievals can be used to inform land surface models and reduce uncertainties of model predicted ecosystem fluxes in space and time. Simultaneous retrieval of LAI and Chl from space observations is however extremely challenging as the interference of atmospheric effects, canopy characteristics and background reflectance may confound the detection of relatively subtle differences in canopy reflectance resulting from changes in Chl. Regularization strategies are therefore required to increase robustness and accuracy of retrieved properties and more reliably separate soil, leaf and canopy variables. Here we describe recent refinements to the REGularized canopy reFLECtance model (REGFLEC) retrieval system, which includes enhanced regularization techniques for exploiting ancillary LAI and temporal information derived from multiple satellite scenes over a given growing season. REGFLEC is applied to Landsat time-series data and retrieval results evaluated against in-situ LAI and Chl collected over maize and soybean sites in central Nebraska over a 5-year period (2001-2005). While REGFLEC may provide useful information on the density and vitality of vegetation, the results reflect the challenges associated with accurately extracting the relatively small leaf-level chlorophyll signal from the total satellite signal when using a few standard broad bands available operationally (i.e. blue, green, red and near-infrared) as input to a homogeneous canopy reflectance model. A noteworthy and novel aspect of the REGFLEC approach is the fact that no site-specific data were used to calibrate the model that may be run in a completely

  17. Leaf hydraulic conductance declines in coordination with photosynthesis, transpiration and leaf water status as soybean leaves age regardless of soil moisture

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Anna M.; Ort, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis requires sufficient water transport through leaves for stomata to remain open as water transpires from the leaf, allowing CO2 to diffuse into the leaf. The leaf water needs of soybean change over time because of large microenvironment changes over their lifespan, as leaves mature in full sun at the top of the canopy and then become progressively shaded by younger leaves developing above. Leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf), a measure of the leaf’s water transport capacity, can often be linked to changes in microenvironment and transpiration demand. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that K leaf would decline in coordination with transpiration demand as soybean leaves matured and aged. Photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g s) and leaf water potential (Ψleaf) were also measured at various leaf ages with both field- and chamber-grown soybeans to assess transpiration demand. K leaf was found to decrease as soybean leaves aged from maturity to shading to senescence, and this decrease was strongly correlated with midday A. Decreases in K leaf were further correlated with decreases in g s, although the relationship was not as strong as that with A. Separate experiments investigating the response of K leaf to drought demonstrated no acclimation of K leaf to drought conditions to protect against cavitation or loss of g s during drought and confirmed the effect of leaf age in K leaf observed in the field. These results suggest that the decline of leaf hydraulic conductance as leaves age keeps hydraulic supply in balance with demand without K leaf becoming limiting to transpiration water flux. PMID:25281701

  18. Analysis of leaf surfaces using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Walker, Shaun C; Allen, Stephanie; Bell, Gordon; Roberts, Clive J

    2015-05-01

    Leaf surfaces are highly complex functional systems with well defined chemistry and structure dictating the barrier and transport properties of the leaf cuticle. It is a significant imaging challenge to analyse the very thin and often complex wax-like leaf cuticle morphology in their natural state. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to a lesser extent Atomic force microscopy are techniques that have been used to study the leaf surface but their remains information that is difficult to obtain via these approaches. SEM is able to produce highly detailed and high-resolution images needed to study leaf structures at the submicron level. It typically operates in a vacuum or low pressure environment and as a consequence is generally unable to deal with the in situ analysis of dynamic surface events at submicron scales. Atomic force microscopy also possess the high-resolution imaging required and can follow dynamic events in ambient and liquid environments, but can over exaggerate small features and cannot image most leaf surfaces due to their inherent roughness at the micron scale. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which operates in a liquid environment, provides a potential complementary analytical approach able to address these issues and which is yet to be explored for studying leaf surfaces. Here we illustrate the potential of SICM on various leaf surfaces and compare the data to SEM and atomic force microscopy images on the same samples. In achieving successful imaging we also show that SICM can be used to study the wetting of hydrophobic surfaces in situ. This has potentially wider implications than the study of leaves alone as surface wetting phenomena are important in a range of fundamental and applied studies.

  19. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains single-leaf gas exchange data from the SSA-Fen site during 1994 and 1995. These leaf gas exchange properties were measured for the dominant vascular plants using portable gas exchange systems. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  20. Strigolactone Regulates Leaf Senescence in Concert with Ethylene in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hiroaki; Kusaba, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Leaf senescence is not a passive degenerative process; it represents a process of nutrient relocation, in which materials are salvaged for growth at a later stage or to produce the next generation. Leaf senescence is regulated by various factors, such as darkness, stress, aging, and phytohormones. Strigolactone is a recently identified phytohormone, and it has multiple functions in plant development, including repression of branching. Although strigolactone is implicated in the regulation of leaf senescence, little is known about its molecular mechanism of action. In this study, strigolactone biosynthesis mutant strains of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) showed a delayed senescence phenotype during dark incubation. The strigolactone biosynthesis genes MORE AXIALLY GROWTH3 (MAX3) and MAX4 were drastically induced during dark incubation and treatment with the senescence-promoting phytohormone ethylene, suggesting that strigolactone is synthesized in the leaf during leaf senescence. This hypothesis was confirmed by a grafting experiment using max4 as the stock and Columbia-0 as the scion, in which the leaves from the Columbia-0 scion senesced earlier than max4 stock leaves. Dark incubation induced the synthesis of ethylene independent of strigolactone. Strigolactone biosynthesis mutants showed a delayed senescence phenotype during ethylene treatment in the light. Furthermore, leaf senescence was strongly accelerated by the application of strigolactone in the presence of ethylene and not by strigolactone alone. These observations suggest that strigolactone promotes leaf senescence by enhancing the action of ethylene. Thus, dark-induced senescence is regulated by a two-step mechanism: induction of ethylene synthesis and consequent induction of strigolactone synthesis in the leaf.

  1. Leaf economics and hydraulic traits are decoupled in five species-rich tropical-subtropical forests.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; McCormack, M Luke; Ma, Chengen; Kong, Deliang; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xiaoyong; Zeng, Hui; Niinemets, Ülo; Guo, Dali

    2015-09-01

    Leaf economics and hydraulic traits are critical to leaf photosynthesis, yet it is debated whether these two sets of traits vary in a fully coordinated manner or there is room for independent variation. Here, we tested the relationship between leaf economics traits, including leaf nitrogen concentration and leaf dry mass per area, and leaf hydraulic traits including stomatal density and vein density in five tropical-subtropical forests. Surprisingly, these two suites of traits were statistically decoupled. This decoupling suggests that independent trait dimensions exist within a leaf, with leaf economics dimension corresponding to light capture and tissue longevity, and the hydraulic dimension to water-use and leaf temperature maintenance. Clearly, leaf economics and hydraulic traits can vary independently, thus allowing for more possible plant trait combinations. Compared with a single trait dimension, multiple trait dimensions may better enable species adaptations to multifarious niche dimensions, promote diverse plant strategies and facilitate species coexistence.

  2. Influence of temperature gradients on leaf water potential.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, H H; Prosser, R J

    1977-02-01

    Water potential was monitored at nine locations along single maize (Zea mays L.) leaf blades with aluminum block in situ thermocouple hygrometers. Water potential showed a continuous decrease toward the tip, with a 2- to 4-bar difference between leaf base and tip under both moist and dry soil conditions. The water potential difference between the soil and the leaf base was about 4 bars. Water potentials decreased during the day and during a drying cycle, and increased at night and after irrigation. Heating a band of a leaf to 40 C or cooling it to 7 C had no influence on the water potential of the affected portion when this was corrected for hygrometer output over standard calibrating solutions at the respective temperatures. Heating or cooling a portion of a leaf had neither short nor long term effects on water potential of more distal leaf portions continuously monitored by hygrometers in dew point readout. Water potential fluctuated with an amplitude of about 1.5 bars and an irregular period of 10 to 30 minutes. Measurements with silver foil in situ psychrometers gave similar results.

  3. Costs of measuring leaf area index of corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Hollinger, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The magnitude of plant-to-plant variability of leaf area of corn plants selected from uniform plots was examined and four representative methods for measuring leaf area index (LAI) were evaluated. The number of plants required and the relative costs for each sampling method were calculated to detect 10, 20, and 50% differences in LAI using 0.05 and 0.01 tests of significance and a 90% probability of success (beta = 0.1). The natural variability of leaf area per corn plant was nearly 10%. Additional variability or experimental error may be introduced by the measurement technique employed and by nonuniformity within the plot. Direct measurement of leaf area with an electronic area meter had the lowest CV, required that the fewest plants be sampled, but required approximately the same amount of time as the leaf area/weight ratio method to detect comparable differences. Indirect methods based on measurements of length and width of leaves required more plants but less total time than the direct method. Unless the coefficients for converting length and width to area are verified frequently, the indirect methods may be biased. When true differences in LAI among treatments exceed 50% of mean, all four methods are equal. The method of choice depends on the resources available, the differences to be detected, and what additional information, such as leaf weight or stalk weight, is also desired.

  4. Safety and efficacy of Bixa orellana (achiote, annatto) leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Stohs, Sidney J

    2014-07-01

    Bixa orellana leaf preparations have been used for many years by indigenous people for a variety of medicinal applications. Published research studies in animals indicate that various extracts of Bixa leaves exhibit antioxidant, broad antimicrobial (antibacterial and antifungal), anti-inflammatory, analgesic, hypoglycemic, and antidiarrheal activities. No studies have specifically assessed the ability of leaf extracts to inhibit urogenital infections although Bixa products have been used in folkloric medicine to treat gonorrhea and other infections. Few human studies have been conducted and published using Bixa leaf preparations. Many more studies have been conducted and published involving Bixa seed (annatto) extracts than with leaf extracts. No subchronic safety (toxicity) studies have been conducted in animals. A 6 month study in humans given 750 mg of leaf powder per day demonstrated no significant or serious adverse effects. Bixa leaf extracts appear to be safe when given under current conditions of use. However, additional human and animal controlled safety and efficacy studies are needed. In addition, detailed chemical analyses are required to establish structure-function relationships.

  5. Consequences of leaf calibration errors on IMRT delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre-Padro, M.; Welleweerd, J.; Malinen, E.; Eilertsen, K.; Olsen, D. R.; van der Heide, U. A.

    2007-02-01

    IMRT treatments using multi-leaf collimators may involve a large number of segments in order to spare the organs at risk. When a large proportion of these segments are small, leaf positioning errors may become relevant and have therapeutic consequences. The performance of four head and neck IMRT treatments under eight different cases of leaf positioning errors has been studied. Systematic leaf pair offset errors in the range of ±2.0 mm were introduced, thus modifying the segment sizes of the original IMRT plans. Thirty-six films were irradiated with the original and modified segments. The dose difference and the gamma index (with 2%/2 mm criteria) were used for evaluating the discrepancies between the irradiated films. The median dose differences were linearly related to the simulated leaf pair errors. In the worst case, a 2.0 mm error generated a median dose difference of 1.5%. Following the gamma analysis, two out of the 32 modified plans were not acceptable. In conclusion, small systematic leaf bank positioning errors have a measurable impact on the delivered dose and may have consequences for the therapeutic outcome of IMRT.

  6. Leaf venations in some Ficus L. (Moraceae) species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siti-Khaulah, A. R.; Noraini, T.

    2016-11-01

    A study on the leaf venation anatomical characteristics was conducted on eight chosen Ficus L. (Moraceae) species in Peninsular Malaysia, namely F. callosa, F. apiocarpa, F. caulocarpa, F. pubigera, F. pendens, F. celebensis, F. mollissima, and F. drupacea. The objective of this study was to observe the significant leaf venation anatomical characteristics that can be used in species classification and identification. Leaf clearing, staining, mounting and observation under a light microscope were techniques used for the study. Veinlets, the ultimate marginal and areolar venation were the main leaf venation anatomical characteristics observed in this study. The presence of complex veinlets in the areolar venation were shown in most species studied (F. callosa, F. pubigera, F. celebensis, F. pendens), whilst simple or uni-veinlets were shown in F. apiocarpa, F. caulocarpa and F. mollissima. Free ending veinlet was absence in F. drupacea. Complete ultimate marginal venation was shown in most species studied, such as in F. callosa, F. caulocarpa, F. pendends, F. mollissima and F. drupacea. Opened areolar venation was observed in most species studied, such as in F. callosa, F. pubigera, F. pendens, F. mollissima, and F. celebensis. Diagnostic leaf venation anatomical characteristic was present in cystolith cells in F. pubigera and trichomes were present on venation in F. mollissima only. As a conclusion, the results of this study have shown that leaf venation anatomical characteristics have taxonomic significance that can be used in differentiation and identification in selected Ficus species studied.

  7. Latent developmental and evolutionary shapes embedded within the grapevine leaf.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, Daniel H; Klein, Laura L; O'Hanlon, Regan; Chacko, Steven; Greg, Matthew; Kitchen, Cassandra; Miller, Allison J; Londo, Jason P

    2016-04-01

    Across plants, leaves exhibit profound diversity in shape. As a single leaf expands, its shape is in constant flux. Plants may also produce leaves with different shapes at successive nodes. In addition, leaf shape varies among individuals, populations and species as a result of evolutionary processes and environmental influences. Because leaf shape can vary in many different ways, theoretically, the effects of distinct developmental and evolutionary processes are separable, even within the shape of a single leaf. Here, we measured the shapes of > 3200 leaves representing > 270 vines from wild relatives of domesticated grape (Vitis spp.) to determine whether leaf shapes attributable to genetics and development are separable from each other. We isolated latent shapes (multivariate signatures that vary independently from each other) embedded within the overall shape of leaves. These latent shapes can predict developmental stages independent from species identity and vice versa. Shapes predictive of development were then used to stage leaves from 1200 varieties of domesticated grape (Vitis vinifera), revealing that changes in timing underlie leaf shape diversity. Our results indicate that distinct latent shapes combine to produce a composite morphology in leaves, and that developmental and evolutionary contributions to shape vary independently from each other.

  8. Encapsulation of olive leaf extract in beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Mourtzinos, Ioannis; Salta, Fotini; Yannakopoulou, Konstantina; Chiou, Antonia; Karathanos, Vaios T

    2007-10-03

    Olive leaf extract, rich in oleuropein, formed an inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) upon mixing of the components in aqueous media and subsequent freeze-drying. Inclusion complex formation was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC thermograms indicated that the endothermic peaks of both the olive leaf extract and the physical mixture of olive leaf extract with beta-CD, attributed to the melting of crystals of the extract, were absent in DSC thermogram of inclusion complex. Moreover, DSC studies under oxidative conditions indicated that the complex of olive leaf extract with beta-CD was protected against oxidation, since it remained intact at temperatures where the free olive leaf extract was oxidized. Phase solubility studies afforded A L type diagrams, 1:1 complex stoichiometry, a moderate binding constant ( approximately 300 M (-1)), and an increase of the aqueous solubility by approximately 50%. The formation of the inclusion complex was also confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of beta-CD solutions in the presence of both pure oleuropein and olive leaf extract. The NMR data have established the formation of a 1:1 complex with beta-CD that involves deep insertion of the dihydroxyphenethyl moiety inside the cavity from its secondary side.

  9. Quantifying Shape Changes and Tissue Deformation in Leaf Development.

    PubMed

    Rolland-Lagan, Anne-Gaëlle; Remmler, Lauren; Girard-Bock, Camille

    2014-06-01

    The analysis of biological shapes has applications in many areas of biology, and tools exist to quantify organ shape and detect shape differences between species or among variants. However, such measurements do not provide any information about the mechanisms of shape generation. Quantitative data on growth patterns may provide insights into morphogenetic processes, but since growth is a complex process occurring in four dimensions, growth patterns alone cannot intuitively be linked to shape outcomes. Here, we present computational tools to quantify tissue deformation and surface shape changes over the course of leaf development, applied to the first leaf of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The results show that the overall leaf shape does not change notably during the developmental stages analyzed, yet there is a clear upward radial deformation of the leaf tissue in early time points. This deformation pattern may provide an explanation for how the Arabidopsis leaf maintains a relatively constant shape despite spatial heterogeneities in growth. These findings highlight the importance of quantifying tissue deformation when investigating the control of leaf shape. More generally, experimental mapping of deformation patterns may help us to better understand the link between growth and shape in organ development.

  10. Genetic variation for leaf morphology, leaf structure and leaf carbon isotope discrimination in European populations of black poplar (Populus nigra L.).

    PubMed

    Guet, Justine; Fabbrini, Francesco; Fichot, Régis; Sabatti, Maurizio; Bastien, Catherine; Brignolas, Franck

    2015-08-01

    To buffer against the high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the riparian habitat, riparian tree species, such as black poplar (Populus nigra L.), may display a high level of genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity for functional traits. Using a multisite common garden experiment, we estimated the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on the phenotypic variation expressed for individual leaf area, leaf shape, leaf structure and leaf carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) in natural populations of black poplar. Twenty-four to 62 genotypes were sampled in nine metapopulations covering a latitudinal range from 48 °N to 42 °N in France and in Italy and grown in two common gardens at Orléans (ORL) and at Savigliano (SAV). In the two common gardens, substantial genetic variation was expressed for leaf traits within all metapopulations, but its expression was modulated by the environment, as attested by the genotype × environment (G × E) interaction variance being comparable to or even greater than genetic effects. For LA, G × E interactions were explained by both changes in genotype ranking between common gardens and increased variation in SAV, while these interactions were mainly attributed to changes in genotype ranking for Δ(13)C. The nine P. nigra metapopulations were highly differentiated for LA, as attested by the high coefficient of genetic differentiation (QST = 0.50 at ORL and 0.51 at SAV), and the pattern of metapopulation differentiation was highly conserved between the two common gardens. In contrast, they were moderately differentiated for Δ(13)C (QST = 0.24 at ORL and 0.25 at SAV) and the metapopulation clustering changed significantly between common gardens. Our results evidenced that the nine P. nigra metapopulations present substantial genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity for leaf traits, which both represent potentially significant determinants of populations' capacities to respond, on a short-term basis and

  11. Pepper leaf curl Lahore virus requires the DNA B component of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus to cause leaf curl symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Begomoviruses are whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses with genomes that consist of either two components (known as DNA A and DNA B) or a single component (homologous to the DNA A component of bipartite begomoviruses). Monopartite begomoviruses are often associated with a symptom-modulating DNA satellite (collectively known as betasatellites). Both bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses with associated satellites have previously been identified in chillies showing leaf curl symptoms in Pakistan. Results A chilli plant (Capsicum annum) with chilli leaf curl disease symptoms was found to contain a begomovirus, a betasatellite and the DNA B component of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). The begomovirus consisted of 2747 nucleotides and had the highest sequence identity (99%) with Pepper leaf curl Lahore virus (PepLCLV-[PK: Lah:04], acc. no. AM404179). Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of the clone to Nicotiana benthamiana, induced very mild symptoms and low levels of viral DNA, detected in systemically infected leaves by PCR. No symptoms were induced in Nicotiana tabacum or chillies either in the presence or absence of a betasatellite. However, inoculation of PepLCLV with the DNA B component of ToLCNDV induced leaf curl symptoms in N. benthamiana, N. tabacum and chillies and viral DNA accumulated to higher levels in comparison to plants infected with just PepLCLV. Conclusions Based on our previous efforts aimed at understanding of diversity of begomoviruses associated with chillies, we propose that PepLCLV was recently mobilized into chillies upon its interaction with DNA B of ToLCNDV. Interestingly, the putative rep-binding iterons found on PepLCLV (GGGGAC) differ at two base positions from those of ToLCNDV (GGTGTC). This is the first experimental demonstration of the infectivity for a bipartite begomovirus causing chilli leaf curl disease in chillies from Pakistan and suggests that component capture is contributing to the emerging complexity of

  12. Seasonal patterns of leaf gas exchange and water relations in dry rain forest trees of contrasting leaf phenology.

    PubMed

    Choat, Brendan; Ball, Marilyn C; Luly, Jon G; Donnelly, Christine F; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2006-05-01

    Diurnal and seasonal patterns of leaf gas exchange and water relations were examined in tree species of contrasting leaf phenology growing in a seasonally dry tropical rain forest in north-eastern Australia. Two drought-deciduous species, Brachychiton australis (Schott and Endl.) A. Terracc. and Cochlospermum gillivraei Benth., and two evergreen species, Alphitonia excelsa (Fenzal) Benth. and Austromyrtus bidwillii (Benth.) Burret. were studied. The deciduous species had higher specific leaf areas and maximum photosynthetic rates per leaf dry mass in the wet season than the evergreens. During the transition from wet season to dry season, total canopy area was reduced by 70-90% in the deciduous species and stomatal conductance (g(s)) and assimilation rate (A) were markedly lower in the remaining leaves. Deciduous species maintained daytime leaf water potentials (Psi(L)) at close to or above wet season values by a combination of stomatal regulation and reduction in leaf area. Thus, the timing of leaf drop in deciduous species was not associated with large negative values of daytime Psi(L) (greater than -1.6 MPa) or predawn Psi(L) (greater than -1.0 MPa). The deciduous species appeared sensitive to small perturbations in soil and leaf water status that signalled the onset of drought. The evergreen species were less sensitive to the onset of drought and g(s) values were not significantly lower during the transitional period. In the dry season, the evergreen species maintained their canopies despite increasing water-stress; however, unlike Eucalyptus species from northern Australian savannas, A and g(s) were significantly lower than wet season values.

  13. Patterns of leaf morphology and leaf N content in relation to winter temperatures in three evergreen tree species.

    PubMed

    Mediavilla, Sonia; Gallardo-López, Victoria; González-Zurdo, Patricia; Escudero, Alfonso

    2012-09-01

    The competitive equilibrium between deciduous and perennial species in a new scenario of climate change may depend closely on the productivity of leaves along the different seasons of the year and on the morphological and chemical adaptations required for leaf survival during the different seasons. The aim of the present work was to analyze such adaptations in the leaves of three evergreen species (Quercus ilex, Q. suber and Pinus pinaster) and their responses to between-site differences in the intensity of winter harshness. We explore the hypothesis that the harshness of winter would contribute to enhancing the leaf traits that allow them to persist under conditions of stress. The results revealed that as winter harshness increases a decrease in leaf size occurs in all three species, together with an increase in the content of nitrogen per unit leaf area and a greater leaf mass per unit area, which seems to be achieved only through increased thickness, with no associated changes in density. P. pinaster was the species with the most intense response to the harshening of winter conditions, undergoing a more marked thickening of its needles than the two Quercus species. Our findings thus suggest that lower winter temperatures involve an increase in the cost of leaf production of evergreen species, which must be taken into account in the estimation of the final cost and benefit balance of evergreens. Such cost increases would be more pronounced for those species that, like P. pinaster, show a stronger response to the winter cold.

  14. Patterns of leaf morphology and leaf N content in relation to winter temperatures in three evergreen tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Sonia; Gallardo-López, Victoria; González-Zurdo, Patricia; Escudero, Alfonso

    2012-09-01

    The competitive equilibrium between deciduous and perennial species in a new scenario of climate change may depend closely on the productivity of leaves along the different seasons of the year and on the morphological and chemical adaptations required for leaf survival during the different seasons. The aim of the present work was to analyze such adaptations in the leaves of three evergreen species ( Quercus ilex, Q. suber and Pinus pinaster) and their responses to between-site differences in the intensity of winter harshness. We explore the hypothesis that the harshness of winter would contribute to enhancing the leaf traits that allow them to persist under conditions of stress. The results revealed that as winter harshness increases a decrease in leaf size occurs in all three species, together with an increase in the content of nitrogen per unit leaf area and a greater leaf mass per unit area, which seems to be achieved only through increased thickness, with no associated changes in density. P. pinaster was the species with the most intense response to the harshening of winter conditions, undergoing a more marked thickening of its needles than the two Quercus species. Our findings thus suggest that lower winter temperatures involve an increase in the cost of leaf production of evergreen species, which must be taken into account in the estimation of the final cost and benefit balance of evergreens. Such cost increases would be more pronounced for those species that, like P. pinaster, show a stronger response to the winter cold.

  15. The Péclet effect on leaf water enrichment correlates with leaf hydraulic conductance and mesophyll conductance for CO(2).

    PubMed

    Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Pou, Alícia; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Gessler, Arthur; Kodama, Naomi; Flexas, Jaume; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel

    2012-03-01

    Leaf water gets isotopically enriched through transpiration, and diffusion of enriched water through the leaf depends on transpiration flow and the effective path length (L). The aim of this work was to relate L with physiological variables likely to respond to similar processes. We studied the response to drought and vein severing of leaf lamina hydraulic conductance (K(lamina) ), mesophyll conductance for CO(2) (g(m) ) and leaf water isotope enrichment in Vitis vinifera L cv. Grenache. We hypothesized that restrictions in water pathways would reduce K(lamina) and increase L. As a secondary hypothesis, we proposed that, given the common pathways for water and CO(2) involved, a similar response should be found in g(m) . Our results showed that L was strongly related to mesophyll variables, such as K(lamina) or g(m) across experimental drought and vein-cutting treatments, showing stronger relationships than with variables included as input parameters for the models, such as transpiration. Our findings were further supported by a literature survey showing a close link between L and leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf) = 31.5 × L(-0.43) , r(2) = 0.60, n = 24). The strong correlation found between L, K(lamina) and g(m) supports the idea that water and CO(2) share an important part of their diffusion pathways through the mesophyll.

  16. Placing the effects of leaf litter diversity on saprotrophic microorganisms in the context of leaf type and habitat.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan; Feinstein, Larry M; Valverde-Barrantes, Oscar; Kershner, Mark W; Leff, Laura G; Blackwood, Christopher B

    2011-02-01

    Because of conflicting results in previous studies, it is unclear whether litter diversity has a predictable impact on microbial communities or ecosystem processes. We examined whether effects of litter diversity depend on factors that could confound comparisons among previous studies, including leaf type, habitat type, identity of other leaves in the mixture, and spatial covariance at two scales within habitats. We also examined how litter diversity affects the saprotrophic microbial community using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism to profile bacterial and fungal community composition, direct microscopy to quantify bacterial biomass, and ergosterol extraction to quantify fungal biomass. We found that leaf mixture diversity was rarely significant as a main effect (only for fungal biomass), but was often significant as an interaction with leaf type (for ash-free dry mass recovered, carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, fungal biomass, and bacterial community composition). Leaf type and habitat were significant as main effects for all response variables. The majority of variance in leaf ash-free dry mass and C/N ratio was explained after accounting for treatment effects and spatial covariation at the meter (block) and centimeter (litterbag) scales. However, a substantial amount of variability in microbial communities was left unexplained and must be driven by factors at other spatial scales or more complex spatiotemporal dynamics. We conclude that litter diversity effects are primarily dependent on leaf type, rather than habitat type or identity of surrounding leaves, which can guide the search for mechanisms underlying effects of litter diversity on ecosystem processes.

  17. Probing the role of tightly bound phosphoenolpyruvate in Escherichia coli 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate synthase catalysis using quantitative time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the millisecond time range.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Sau, Apurba K; Furdui, Cristina M; Anderson, Karen S

    2005-08-01

    Escherichia coli 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate (KDO8P) synthase catalyzes the condensation of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and D-arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) to produce KDO8P and inorganic phosphate. The enzyme is often isolated with varying amounts of tightly bound PEP substrate. To better understand the role of tightly bound PEP in E. coli KDO8P synthase catalysis, a combination of transient kinetic methodologies including rapid chemical quench and mass spectrometry techniques such as time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS) were used to study the enzyme purified both in the PEP-bound state and in the unbound state. Pre-steady state burst and single-turnover experiments using radiolabeled [1-(14)C] and [(32)P]A5P revealed significant kinetic differences between these enzyme preparations. The active sites concentrations for the bound and unbound states of the enzyme were almost the same (approximately 100%) and the product release for both states of the enzyme was rate limiting. However, the rate constant of product formation for the PEP-bound enzyme (125 s(-1)) was higher than that of the unbound enzyme (46 s(-1)). This was further confirmed by single-turnover experiments using radiolabeled [(32)P]A5P. Interestingly, when PEP was removed from the PEP-bound enzyme and external PEP was added before the kinetic experiments, both the pre-steady state burst and the single-turnover kinetic parameters were similar to those of the enzyme purified in the unbound state. The rate constants of product formation were determined as 44 s(-1) (burst experiment) and 48 s(-1) (single-turnover experiment). The reaction kinetics of the E. coli KDO8P synthase was also followed by time-resolved ESI mass spectrometry. To validate the suitability of this technique for conducting enzyme kinetics, the standard reaction of p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis by chymotrypsin was analyzed by stopped-flow and time-resolved ESI-TOF MS. The rate constant of p

  18. The first record of a leaf-hole shelter in leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) with descriptions of two new Orthaltica Crotch species from southern India

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two behavioral novelties in adults of leaf beetles were observed in a couple of new species of Orthaltica Crotch: 1) use of low cost, leaf-hole shelter, which are pre-formed holes produced by larger beetles that fed on the same leaf, or made artificially as part of an experiment; 2) use of feces t...

  19. Influence of vegetation structure on lidar-derived canopy height and fractional cover in forested riparian buffers during leaf-off and leaf-on conditions.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Leah; Day, Rick; Chasmer, Laura; Taylor, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of canopy height (H) and fractional canopy cover (FC) derived from lidar data collected during leaf-on and leaf-off conditions are compared with field measurements from 80 forested riparian buffer plots. The purpose is to determine if existing lidar data flown in leaf-off conditions for applications such as terrain mapping can effectively estimate forested riparian buffer H and FC within a range of riparian vegetation types. Results illustrate that: 1) leaf-off and leaf-on lidar percentile estimates are similar to measured heights in all plots except those dominated by deciduous compound-leaved trees where lidar underestimates H during leaf off periods; 2) canopy height models (CHMs) underestimate H by a larger margin compared to percentile methods and are influenced by vegetation type (conifer needle, deciduous simple leaf or deciduous compound leaf) and canopy height variability, 3) lidar estimates of FC are within 10% of plot measurements during leaf-on periods, but are underestimated during leaf-off periods except in mixed and conifer plots; and 4) depth of laser pulse penetration lower in the canopy is more variable compared to top of the canopy penetration which may influence within canopy vegetation structure estimates. This study demonstrates that leaf-off lidar data can be used to estimate forested riparian buffer canopy height within diverse vegetation conditions and fractional canopy cover within mixed and conifer forests when leaf-on lidar data are not available.

  20. Leaf shrinkage with dehydration: coordination with hydraulic vulnerability and drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Vuong, Christine; Diep, Steven; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2014-04-01

    Leaf shrinkage with dehydration has attracted attention for over 100 years, especially as it becomes visibly extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer simulations of the leaf hydraulic system showed that a reduction of hydraulic conductance of the mesophyll pathways outside the xylem would cause a strong decline of leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)). For 14 diverse species, we tested the hypothesis that shrinkage during dehydration (i.e. in whole leaf, cell and airspace thickness, and leaf area) is associated with reduction in K(leaf) at declining leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)). We tested hypotheses for the linkage of leaf shrinkage with structural and physiological water relations parameters, including modulus of elasticity, osmotic pressure at full turgor, turgor loss point (TLP), and cuticular conductance. Species originating from moist habitats showed substantial shrinkage during dehydration before reaching TLP, in contrast with species originating from dry habitats. Across species, the decline of K(leaf) with mild dehydration (i.e. the initial slope of the K(leaf) versus Ψ(leaf) curve) correlated with the decline of leaf thickness (the slope of the