Science.gov

Sample records for leaf rolling angle

  1. A high sensitive roll angle interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Yanfen; Hou, Wenmei; Hu, Kai; Ju, Aisong

    2013-01-01

    A roll angle interferometer with high sensitivity is designed in this paper. Two sets of centrosymmetric beams are used to travel through the measurement and reference arms of the roll angle interferometer which contains two specific optical devices: wedge prism assembly and wedge mirror assembly. The optical path change in both arms caused by roll is converted into phase shift which can be measured by interferometer. Because of the adoption of the centrosymmetric measurement structure, the straightness errors, yaw error and pitch error can be avoided and the dead path is minimized, so that the stability and the accuracy of the measurement can be greatly enhanced. The resolution for the roll measurement is about 0.006″ with the measurement range of ±1°.

  2. Semi-Rolled Leaf2 modulates rice leaf rolling by regulating abaxial side cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Li, Ming; Liu, Kai; Tang, Ding; Sun, Mingfa; Li, Yafei; Shen, Yi; Du, Guijie; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-04-01

    Moderate leaf rolling maintains the erectness of leaves and minimizes the shadowing between leaves which is helpful to establish ideal plant architecture. Here, we describe asrl2(semi-rolled leaf2) rice mutant, which has incurved leaves due to the presence of defective sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side of the leaf and displays narrow leaves and reduced plant height. Map-based cloning revealed that SRL2 encodes a novel plant-specific protein of unknown biochemical function.SRL2 was mainly expressed in the vascular bundles of leaf blades, leaf sheaths, and roots, especially in their sclerenchymatous cells. The transcriptional activities of several leaf development-related YABBY genes were significantly altered in the srl2 mutant. Double mutant analysis suggested that SRL2 and SHALLOT-LIKE1(SLL1)/ROLLED LEAF9(RL9) function in distinct pathways that regulate abaxial-side leaf development. Hence, SRL2 plays an important role in regulating leaf development, particularly during sclerenchymatous cell differentiation.

  3. Semi-Rolled Leaf2 modulates rice leaf rolling by regulating abaxial side cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofei; Li, Ming; Liu, Kai; Tang, Ding; Sun, Mingfa; Li, Yafei; Shen, Yi; Du, Guijie; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-01-01

    Moderate leaf rolling maintains the erectness of leaves and minimizes the shadowing between leaves which is helpful to establish ideal plant architecture. Here, we describe a srl2 (semi-rolled leaf2) rice mutant, which has incurved leaves due to the presence of defective sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side of the leaf and displays narrow leaves and reduced plant height. Map-based cloning revealed that SRL2 encodes a novel plant-specific protein of unknown biochemical function. SRL2 was mainly expressed in the vascular bundles of leaf blades, leaf sheaths, and roots, especially in their sclerenchymatous cells. The transcriptional activities of several leaf development-related YABBY genes were significantly altered in the srl2 mutant. Double mutant analysis suggested that SRL2 and SHALLOT-LIKE1 (SLL1)/ROLLED LEAF9 (RL9) function in distinct pathways that regulate abaxial-side leaf development. Hence, SRL2 plays an important role in regulating leaf development, particularly during sclerenchymatous cell differentiation. PMID:26873975

  4. Semi-Rolled Leaf2 modulates rice leaf rolling by regulating abaxial side cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Li, Ming; Liu, Kai; Tang, Ding; Sun, Mingfa; Li, Yafei; Shen, Yi; Du, Guijie; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-04-01

    Moderate leaf rolling maintains the erectness of leaves and minimizes the shadowing between leaves which is helpful to establish ideal plant architecture. Here, we describe asrl2(semi-rolled leaf2) rice mutant, which has incurved leaves due to the presence of defective sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side of the leaf and displays narrow leaves and reduced plant height. Map-based cloning revealed that SRL2 encodes a novel plant-specific protein of unknown biochemical function.SRL2 was mainly expressed in the vascular bundles of leaf blades, leaf sheaths, and roots, especially in their sclerenchymatous cells. The transcriptional activities of several leaf development-related YABBY genes were significantly altered in the srl2 mutant. Double mutant analysis suggested that SRL2 and SHALLOT-LIKE1(SLL1)/ROLLED LEAF9(RL9) function in distinct pathways that regulate abaxial-side leaf development. Hence, SRL2 plays an important role in regulating leaf development, particularly during sclerenchymatous cell differentiation. PMID:26873975

  5. Characterization of Rolled and Erect Leaf 1 in regulating leave morphology in rice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiaoling; Xie, Qingjun; Gao, Ju; Wang, Wenyi; Sun, Bo; Liu, Bohan; Zhu, Haitao; Peng, Haifeng; Zhao, Haibing; Liu, Changhong; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan; Zhang, Zemin

    2015-01-01

    Leaf morphology, particularly in crop, is one of the most important agronomic traits because it influences the yield through the manipulation of photosynthetic capacity and transpiration. To understand the regulatory mechanism of leaf morphogenesis, an Oryza sativa dominant mutant, rolled and erect leaf 1 (rel1) has been characterized. This mutant has a predominant rolled leaf, increased leaf angle, and reduced plant height phenotype that results in a reduction in grain yield. Electron microscope observations indicated that the leaf incurvations of rel1 dominant mutants result from the alteration of the size and number of bulliform cells. Molecular cloning revealed that the rel1 dominant mutant phenotype is caused by the activation of the REL1 gene, which encodes a novel unknown protein, despite its high degree of conservation among monocot plants. Moreover, the downregulation of the REL1 gene in the rel1 dominant mutant restored the phenotype of this dominant mutant. Alternatively, overexpression of REL1 in wild-type plants induced a phenotype similar to that of the dominant rel1 mutant, indicating that REL1 plays a positive role in leaf rolling and bending. Consistent with the observed rel1 phenotype, the REL1 gene was predominantly expressed in the meristem of various tissues during plant growth and development. Nevertheless, the responsiveness of both rel1 dominant mutants and REL1-overexpressing plants to exogenous brassinosteroid (BR) was reduced. Moreover, transcript levels of BR response genes in the rel1 dominant mutants and REL1-overexpressing lines were significantly altered. Additionally, seven REL1-interacting proteins were also identified from a yeast two-hybrid screen. Taken together, these findings suggest that REL1 regulates leaf morphology, particularly in leaf rolling and bending, through the coordination of BR signalling transduction. PMID:26142419

  6. Characterization of Rolled and Erect Leaf 1 in regulating leave morphology in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiaoling; Xie, Qingjun; Gao, Ju; Wang, Wenyi; Sun, Bo; Liu, Bohan; Zhu, Haitao; Peng, Haifeng; Zhao, Haibing; Liu, Changhong; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan; Zhang, Zemin

    2015-09-01

    Leaf morphology, particularly in crop, is one of the most important agronomic traits because it influences the yield through the manipulation of photosynthetic capacity and transpiration. To understand the regulatory mechanism of leaf morphogenesis, an Oryza sativa dominant mutant, rolled and erect leaf 1 (rel1) has been characterized. This mutant has a predominant rolled leaf, increased leaf angle, and reduced plant height phenotype that results in a reduction in grain yield. Electron microscope observations indicated that the leaf incurvations of rel1 dominant mutants result from the alteration of the size and number of bulliform cells. Molecular cloning revealed that the rel1 dominant mutant phenotype is caused by the activation of the REL1 gene, which encodes a novel unknown protein, despite its high degree of conservation among monocot plants. Moreover, the downregulation of the REL1 gene in the rel1 dominant mutant restored the phenotype of this dominant mutant. Alternatively, overexpression of REL1 in wild-type plants induced a phenotype similar to that of the dominant rel1 mutant, indicating that REL1 plays a positive role in leaf rolling and bending. Consistent with the observed rel1 phenotype, the REL1 gene was predominantly expressed in the meristem of various tissues during plant growth and development. Nevertheless, the responsiveness of both rel1 dominant mutants and REL1-overexpressing plants to exogenous brassinosteroid (BR) was reduced. Moreover, transcript levels of BR response genes in the rel1 dominant mutants and REL1-overexpressing lines were significantly altered. Additionally, seven REL1-interacting proteins were also identified from a yeast two-hybrid screen. Taken together, these findings suggest that REL1 regulates leaf morphology, particularly in leaf rolling and bending, through the coordination of BR signalling transduction.

  7. Roll angle measurement using a polarization scanning reference source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Kankipati, Varun

    2014-06-01

    On board measurement of attitude position, for example roll angle, of autonomous vehicles is critical to the execution of a successful mission. This paper describes a real-time technique, which combines a polarization scanning reference source and a priori knowledge of the scanning pattern. Measurements in an anechoic chamber, as well as, field tests in a busy parking lot, verify the efficacy of the technique, for both line of sight and non-line of sight capability.

  8. Autocollimating systems for roll angle measurement of large-scale object deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgalieva, Tatyana V.; Konyakhin, Igor A.

    2015-05-01

    Autocollimating systems for roll angle measurement with tetrahedral reflector, which has the small deviation from 90° in two dihedral angles between reflecting sides is considered. Established that autocollimator scheme with symmetrical track of the beam relative to roll axis with addition re-reflection allow implement precision measurement roll angle.

  9. The Influence of Leaf Angle and Leaf Surface Characteristics on the Process of Rainfall Interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, C.; Ginebra, R.; Webb, R.

    2015-12-01

    Individual choice in plant selection for household landscaping influences differences in runoff from urban watersheds because the variation in plant canopy architecture results in rainfall interception differences. Understanding the variables that influence rainfall interception and understanding the mechanism of rainfall interception are important concepts for sustainable watershed management. The broad objective of this study was to explore the influence of leaf hydrophobicity, water droplet retention, and leaf angle on the mechanism and process of rainfall interception and raindrop impaction on leaf surfaces of common tree species from the semi-arid regions of the western United States. Leaf hydrophobicity is determined by the cohesive forces of the water molecules among themselves and the adhesive forces that result from the molecular interactions between the water droplet and the leaf surface. Water droplet retention is a measure of how easily a water droplet drains off a leaf surface. The specific hypotheses examined were 1) larger raindrops falling on leaf surfaces will deflect the leaf to an angle greater than the water droplet retention angle; 2) an increased leaf angle, whether from natural position or deflection due to droplet impact and retention, reduces interception from raindrop impaction on hydrophobic and hydrophilic leaf surfaces; and 3) increased droplet size and frequency decrease rainfall interception more significantly in the hydrophilic case. These hypotheses were addressed in a laboratory experiment by 1) measuring leaf hydrophobicity and water droplet retention using a goniometer with a tilting base; 2) measuring leaf traits such as leaf area, leaf surface roughness, trichome density, and specific storage capacity; 3) examining raindrop splash on leaf surfaces with varying leaf hydrophobicity, water droplet retention, and leaf angle with a raindrop generator and high-speed video camera; and 4) modeling the impact of raindrop splash on leaf

  10. A study of roll attractor and wing rock of delta wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjana, T.; Rao, D. M.; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1993-01-01

    Wing rock is a high angle of attack dynamic phenomenon of limited cycle motion predominantly in roll. The wing rock is one of the limitations to combat effectiveness of the fighter aircraft. Roll Attractor is the steady state or equilibrium trim angle (phi(sub trim)) attained by the free-to-roll model, held at some angle of attack, and released form rest at a given initial roll (bank) angle (phi(sub O)). Multiple roll attractors are attained at different trim angles depending on initial roll angle. The test facility (Vigyan's low speed wind tunnel) and experimental work is presented here along with mathematical modelling of roll attractor phenomenon and analysis and comparison of predictions with experimental data.

  11. Wind and gravity mechanical effects on leaf inclination angles.

    PubMed

    Tadrist, Loïc; Saudreau, Marc; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2014-01-21

    In a tree, the distribution of leaf inclination angles plays an important role in photosynthesis and water interception. We investigate here the effect of mechanical deformations of leaves due to wind or their own weight on this distribution. First, the specific role of the geometry of the tree is identified and shown to be weak, using models of idealized tree and tools of statistical mechanics. Then the deformation of individual leaves under gravity or wind is quantified experimentally. New dimensionless parameters are proposed, and used in simple models of these deformations. By combining models of tree geometry and models of leaf deformation, we explore the role of all mechanical parameters on the Leaf Inclination Angle Distributions. These are found to have a significant influence, which is exemplified finally in computations of direct light interception by idealized trees.

  12. SHALLOT-LIKE1 is a KANADI transcription factor that modulates rice leaf rolling by regulating leaf abaxial cell development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Heng; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Xu-Dong; Qian, Qian; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2009-03-01

    As an important agronomic trait, rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf rolling has attracted much attention from plant biologists and breeders. Moderate leaf rolling increases the photosynthesis of cultivars and hence raises grain yield. However, the relevant molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show the isolation and functional characterization of SHALLOT-LIKE1 (SLL1), a key gene controlling rice leaf rolling. sll1 mutant plants have extremely incurved leaves due to the defective development of sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side. Defective development can be functionally rescued by expression of SLL1. SLL1 is transcribed in various tissues and accumulates in the abaxial epidermis throughout leaf development. SLL1 encodes a SHAQKYF class MYB family transcription factor belonging to the KANADI family. SLL1 deficiency leads to defective programmed cell death of abaxial mesophyll cells and suppresses the development of abaxial features. By contrast, enhanced SLL1 expression stimulates phloem development on the abaxial side and suppresses bulliform cell and sclerenchyma development on the adaxial side. Additionally, SLL1 deficiency results in increased chlorophyll and photosynthesis. Our findings identify the role of SLL1 in the modulation of leaf abaxial cell development and in sustaining abaxial characteristics during leaf development. These results should facilitate attempts to use molecular breeding to increase the photosynthetic capacity of rice, as well as other crops, by modulating leaf development and rolling.

  13. SHALLOT-LIKE1 is a KANADI transcription factor that modulates rice leaf rolling by regulating leaf abaxial cell development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Heng; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Xu-Dong; Qian, Qian; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2009-03-01

    As an important agronomic trait, rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf rolling has attracted much attention from plant biologists and breeders. Moderate leaf rolling increases the photosynthesis of cultivars and hence raises grain yield. However, the relevant molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show the isolation and functional characterization of SHALLOT-LIKE1 (SLL1), a key gene controlling rice leaf rolling. sll1 mutant plants have extremely incurved leaves due to the defective development of sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side. Defective development can be functionally rescued by expression of SLL1. SLL1 is transcribed in various tissues and accumulates in the abaxial epidermis throughout leaf development. SLL1 encodes a SHAQKYF class MYB family transcription factor belonging to the KANADI family. SLL1 deficiency leads to defective programmed cell death of abaxial mesophyll cells and suppresses the development of abaxial features. By contrast, enhanced SLL1 expression stimulates phloem development on the abaxial side and suppresses bulliform cell and sclerenchyma development on the adaxial side. Additionally, SLL1 deficiency results in increased chlorophyll and photosynthesis. Our findings identify the role of SLL1 in the modulation of leaf abaxial cell development and in sustaining abaxial characteristics during leaf development. These results should facilitate attempts to use molecular breeding to increase the photosynthetic capacity of rice, as well as other crops, by modulating leaf development and rolling. PMID:19304938

  14. Small roll angle measurement based on auto-collimation and moiré fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xu-guang; Cai, Sheng; Qiao, Yan-feng; Dai, Ming

    2009-11-01

    A novel method for small roll angle measurement based on auto-collimation and moiré fringe is presented. A right-angle prism is used as an indicator of small roll angle around the optical axis, and a CCD is used to collect moiré fringes that are generated by scale grating image which is reflected by prism and index grating. Any small roll angle of the prism will change the include angle of the grating pair and meanwhile induce a change in the moiré fringe period. The relationship between roll angle and period of moiré fringes is established. The period data is obtained by image processing. The experimental result certifies that the principle of small angle measurement method based on auto-collimation and moiré fringe is correct and feasible. The measuring error is smaller than 0.2" within 7' range compared with 0.2" autocollimator.

  15. Static Roll Characteristics of an SST at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirotake, Masashi; Kwak, Dong-Youn; Rinoie, Kenichi; Sunada, Yasuto

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to investigate static roll characteristics of an SST model at high angles of attack. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord was 6.2×104. Normal force and rolling moment measurements have been done at different roll angles for the cranked arrow wing SST model. Smoke visualizations and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were also performed. Force measurement results were compared both with flow visualization pictures and with PIV measurement results. It was shown that the vortex breakdown has strong influences on the static roll characteristics of the cranked arrow wing.

  16. Coherent optical determination of the leaf angle distribution of corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Pihlman, M.

    1981-01-01

    A coherent optical technique for the diffraction analysis of an image is presented. Developments in radar remote sensing shows a need to understand plant geometry and its relationship to plant moisture, soil moisture, and the radar backscattering coefficient. A corn plant changes its leaf angle distribution, as a function of time, from a uniform distribution to one that is strongly vertical. It is shown that plant and soil moisture may have an effect on plant geometry.

  17. Real-time estimation of projectile roll angle using magnetometers: in-lab experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changey, S.; Pecheur, E.; Wey, P.; Sommer, E.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the roll angle of a projectile is decisive to apply guidance and control law. For example, the goal of ISL's project GSP (Guided Supersonic Projectile) is to change the flight path of an airdefence projectile in order to correct the aim error due to the target manoeuvres. The originality of the concept is based on pyrotechnical actuators and onboard sensors which control the angular motion of the projectile. First of all, the control of the actuators requires the precise control of the roll angle of the projectile. To estimate the roll angle of the projectile, two magnetometers are embedded in the projectile to measure the projection of the Earth magnetic field along radial axes of the projectiles. Then, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) is used to compute the roll angle estimation. As the rolling frequency of the GSP is about 22 Hz, it was easy to test the navigation algorithm in laboratory. In a previous paper [1], the In-Lab demonstration of this concept showed that the roll angle estimation was possible with an accuracy of about 1◦ . In this paper, the demonstration is extended to high-speed roll rate, up to 1000 Hz. Thus, two magnetometers, a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) and a LED (Light Eminent Diode), are rotated using a pneumatic motor; the DSP runs an EKF and a guidance algorithm to compute the trigger times of the LED. By using a high-speed camera, the accuracy of the method can be observed and improved.

  18. Determination of the Nip Angle in Roller Compactors With Serrated Rolls.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bernice Mei Jin; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2016-06-01

    In roller compaction, the nip angle defines the critical transition interface between the slip and nip regions which is used to model material densification behavior and the properties of compacted ribbons. Current methods to determine the nip angle require either sophisticated instrumentation on smooth rolls or input parameters that are difficult to obtain experimentally. In this study, a practical method to determine nip angles for serrated rolls was developed based on mass balance considerations established around the nip region. Experimental input relating to roll geometry, powder density, and mass output from the compactor were required and they could be obtained reliably. The calculated nip angles were validated against those obtained from physical measurements during actual roll compaction. These nip angles were in agreement for various powder formulations containing plastic and brittle materials. The nip angles ranged from 4° to 12° and decreased significantly when the proportion of brittle material increased. Nip angles were also calculated using the widely used Johanson model. However, wall friction measurement on serrated roll surfaces could be impractical. The Johanson model-derived nip angles could differ by 3°-8° just by altering the roughness of the reference wall and this had compromised their reliability. PMID:27238494

  19. Modified bubble level senses pitch and roll angles over wide range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, E. J.; Mcnally, P. F.

    1971-01-01

    Bubble level sensor with fiber-optic field flattener is simple, rugged, small, and impervious to temperature and vibration effects. Pitch angles from -15 deg to +40 deg and roll angles of +30 deg are determined within 0.5 deg.

  20. Characterization of R genes involved in resistance to Cherry leaf roll virus in paradox hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single dominant ‘R’ gene (clrvR), in black walnuts (Juglans hindsii) or ‘paradox’ hybrids (J. hindsii x J. regia) confers resistance to Cherry leaf roll virus (CLRV), the causal agent of blackline disease. The identification and cloning of the ‘R’ gene is expected to aid the walnut breeding progra...

  1. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.513 Potato Leaf Roll... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all...

  2. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.513 Potato Leaf Roll... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all...

  3. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.513 Potato Leaf Roll... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all...

  4. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.513 Potato Leaf Roll... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all...

  5. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.513 Potato Leaf Roll... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all...

  6. Clinical Relevance of Foam Rolling on Hip Extension Angle in a Functional Lunge Position.

    PubMed

    Bushell, Jennifer E; Dawson, Sierra M; Webster, Margaret M

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the duration of effectiveness of foam rolling on hip extension angles in a dynamic lunge position. Thirty-one subjects were assigned to control (n = 15) or intervention (n = 16) group. All the subjects followed the same testing timeline; 3 testing sessions, with 2 lunges in each session. The intervention group performed foam rolling between each lunge in sessions 1 and 2, and 5 times in 7 days between sessions 1 and 2. They did not foam roll during the week between sessions 2 and 3 or in session 3. The control group did not foam roll at all. Hip extension angles were recorded using Dartfish software and subjects filled out a global perceived effect scale rating the feeling of the second lunge and the intervention for each session. A 6 × 2 mixed-effects analysis of variance was run with post hoc t-tests revealing significant gains in hip extension within session 2 for the intervention group (p ≤ 0.05). Hip extension angles returned to baseline values after subject's ceased foam rolling for 1 week. Global perceived effect scores were higher for the intervention group and 29 of 32 words of descriptive feedback included positive words regarding foam rolling. We concluded that consistent foam rolling produced increases in hip extension during a dynamic lunge, but these effects are not seen within the first exposure. Foam rolling received positive reception and perceived improvements in hip extension. The findings indicate that repeated foam rolling is beneficial, both objectively and subjectively, for increasing range of motion immediately preceding a dynamic activity.

  7. Photosystem II functionality and antioxidant system changes during leaf rolling in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabiye; Saruhan, Neslihan; Sağlam, A; Nar, Hatice; Kadioğlu, A

    2009-12-01

    We studied the changes in antioxidant system and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) plants (PSE plants) having reduced leaf area under drought stress causing leaf rolling and re-watering. PSE plants were compared to primary stressed plants (PS) in previous studies. The parameters were measured at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others is intermediate form). Water potentials and stomatal conductance of leaves were gradually decreased during leaf rolling. Similarly, maximum quantum efficiency of open PS II center and quantum yield of PS II decreased during the rolling period. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence decreased at score 2 then increased while photochemical quenching did not change during leaf rolling. Electron transport rate decreased only at score 4 but approximately reached to score 1 level after re-watering. Superoxide dismutase activity was not constant at all leaf rolling scores. Ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities generally tended to increase during leaf rolling. Lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content increased at score 2 but decreased at the later scores. On the other hand, O 2 .- production increased during the rolling period. After re-watering of the plants having score 4 of leaf rolling, antioxidant enzyme activities were lower than those of score 1. Other physiological parameters also tended to reach the value of score 1. The results indicated that PSE plants gained drought tolerance by reducing leaf area effectively induced their antioxidant systems and protected the photosynthesis under drought stress similar to PS plants. PMID:20015833

  8. Photosystem II functionality and antioxidant system changes during leaf rolling in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabiye; Saruhan, Neslihan; Sağlam, A; Nar, Hatice; Kadioğlu, A

    2009-12-01

    We studied the changes in antioxidant system and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) plants (PSE plants) having reduced leaf area under drought stress causing leaf rolling and re-watering. PSE plants were compared to primary stressed plants (PS) in previous studies. The parameters were measured at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others is intermediate form). Water potentials and stomatal conductance of leaves were gradually decreased during leaf rolling. Similarly, maximum quantum efficiency of open PS II center and quantum yield of PS II decreased during the rolling period. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence decreased at score 2 then increased while photochemical quenching did not change during leaf rolling. Electron transport rate decreased only at score 4 but approximately reached to score 1 level after re-watering. Superoxide dismutase activity was not constant at all leaf rolling scores. Ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities generally tended to increase during leaf rolling. Lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content increased at score 2 but decreased at the later scores. On the other hand, O 2 .- production increased during the rolling period. After re-watering of the plants having score 4 of leaf rolling, antioxidant enzyme activities were lower than those of score 1. Other physiological parameters also tended to reach the value of score 1. The results indicated that PSE plants gained drought tolerance by reducing leaf area effectively induced their antioxidant systems and protected the photosynthesis under drought stress similar to PS plants.

  9. Notes on the ecology of rolled-leaf hispines (Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae) at La Gamba (Costa Rica).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Michael; Frank, Meike

    2013-01-01

    A total of 301 adult hispine beetles of the genera Cephaloleia and Chelobasis were found in rolled leaves of plants of 17 species of Zingiberales (families Costaceae, Heliconiaceae, Maranthaceae, Musaceae, and Zingiberaceae) during a field study at La Gamba, Golfito region, Costa Rica. Of these beetles, Cephaloleia belti was recorded from 12 potential host plant species, C. distincta from 7, C. dilaticollis from 5, C., Chelobasis bicolor, C. championi, and C. histrionica from 3, Chelobasis perplexa and C. instabilis from 2, whereas C. trivittata from only one. Of the plant species, Heliconia latispatha had 7 beetle species in its leaf rolls, Calathea lutea had 5, H. imbricata and H. rostrata had 4, H. stricta and Musa paradisiaca had 3, H. wagneriana had 2, while on H. vaginalis, H. danielsiana, H. densiflora, H. longiflora, Calathea crotalifera, C. platystachya, Goeppertia lasiophylla, Alpinia purpurata, Costus pulverulentus and Costus barbatus, H. densiflora, H. vaginalis, and H. danielsana only hispines of one species were found. Cephaloleia belti occurred together with beetles of six other hispine species, whereas Cephaloleia trivittata never shared a leaf roll with another hispine species. The remaining beetle species aggregated with one to four other hispines. Adults of C. belti and C. championi were frequently seen, occasionally also with C. dilaticollis, C. histrionica, and Chelobasis perplexa, to co-occur with the carabid Calophaena ligata in the same leaf roll without any sign of interspecific aggression. A comparison of host choices and the phylogeny of the hispines and of their host plants revealed no signs that beetles used species level phylogenetic relationships within the Zingiberales to select food plants. Obviously, within this plant order, rolled-leaf hispines choose their plant hosts in a nearly opportunistic manner. Seemingly, they use differences among plants at higher taxonomic levels but within the Zingiberales, the availability of young

  10. Harnessing Genetic Variation in Leaf Angle to Increase Productivity of Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Truong, Sandra K; McCormick, Ryan F; Rooney, William L; Mullet, John E

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency with which a plant intercepts solar radiation is determined primarily by its architecture. Understanding the genetic regulation of plant architecture and how changes in architecture affect performance can be used to improve plant productivity. Leaf inclination angle, the angle at which a leaf emerges with respect to the stem, is a feature of plant architecture that influences how a plant canopy intercepts solar radiation. Here we identify extensive genetic variation for leaf inclination angle in the crop plant Sorghum bicolor, a C4 grass species used for the production of grain, forage, and bioenergy. Multiple genetic loci that regulate leaf inclination angle were identified in recombinant inbred line populations of grain and bioenergy sorghum. Alleles of sorghum dwarf-3, a gene encoding a P-glycoprotein involved in polar auxin transport, are shown to change leaf inclination angle by up to 34° (0.59 rad). The impact of heritable variation in leaf inclination angle on light interception in sorghum canopies was assessed using functional-structural plant models and field experiments. Smaller leaf inclination angles caused solar radiation to penetrate deeper into the canopy, and the resulting redistribution of light is predicted to increase the biomass yield potential of bioenergy sorghum by at least 3%. These results show that sorghum leaf angle is a heritable trait regulated by multiple loci and that genetic variation in leaf angle can be used to modify plant architecture to improve sorghum crop performance.

  11. Simulations of Seasonal and Latitudinal Variations in Leaf Inclination Angle Distribution: Implications for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huemmrich, Karl F.

    2013-01-01

    The leaf inclination angle distribution (LAD) is an important characteristic of vegetation canopy structure affecting light interception within the canopy. However, LADs are difficult and time consuming to measure. To examine possible global patterns of LAD and their implications in remote sensing, a model was developed to predict leaf angles within canopies. Canopies were simulated using the SAIL radiative transfer model combined with a simple photosynthesis model. This model calculated leaf inclination angles for horizontal layers of leaves within the canopy by choosing the leaf inclination angle that maximized production over a day in each layer. LADs were calculated for five latitude bands for spring and summer solar declinations. Three distinct LAD types emerged: tropical, boreal, and an intermediate temperate distribution. In tropical LAD, the upper layers have a leaf angle around 35 with the lower layers having horizontal inclination angles. While the boreal LAD has vertical leaf inclination angles throughout the canopy. The latitude bands where each LAD type occurred changed with the seasons. The different LADs affected the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) with similar relationships between fAPAR and leaf area index (LAI), but different relationships between NDVI and LAI for the different LAD types. These differences resulted in significantly different relationships between NDVI and fAPAR for each LAD type. Since leaf inclination angles affect light interception, variations in LAD also affect the estimation of leaf area based on transmittance of light or lidar returns.

  12. Operator assessment of tractor roll angle with and without a tractor stability visual feedback device.

    PubMed

    Tillapaugh, J A; Murphy, D J; Sommer, H J; Garvey, P M

    2010-10-01

    According to a 2004 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) report, approximately 250 to 350 fatalities occur each year due to incidents involving production agriculture workers and tractors. Tractor overturns account for about 150 to 200 of these deaths. The goals of this project were to study operators' understanding of tractor roll angles and test a device to effectively deliver stability information to the tractor operator. This project required the design and construction of a full-scale tractor cab roll simulator that was used to identify lateral roll angles at which volunteer participants felt uncomfortable, as well as lateral roll angles at which they would no longer operate a tractor. In addition, the participants performed a series of tasks to test the functionality of a visual slope indicator that was designed to help them estimate slope angles. The project tested 231 tractor operators' perceptions of safe operation on side slopes and 128 participants' interactions with the visual slope indicator. Testing showed that the visual slope indicator was able to influence the angle estimations of the novice tractor operator population and helped the entire population of participants more accurately rank the simulator scenarios.

  13. Angle Measurement System (AMS) for Establishing Model Pitch and Roll Zero, and Performing Single Axis Angle Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Bradley L.

    2007-01-01

    The angle measurement system (AMS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is a system for many uses. It was originally developed to check taper fits in the wind tunnel model support system. The system was further developed to measure simultaneous pitch and roll angles using 3 orthogonally mounted accelerometers (3-axis). This 3-axis arrangement is used as a transfer standard from the calibration standard to the wind tunnel facility. It is generally used to establish model pitch and roll zero and performs the in-situ calibration on model attitude devices. The AMS originally used a laptop computer running DOS based software but has recently been upgraded to operate in a windows environment. Other improvements have also been made to the software to enhance its accuracy and add features. This paper will discuss the accuracy and calibration methodologies used in this system and some of the features that have contributed to its popularity.

  14. Computer programs for calculation of sting pitch and roll angles required to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Two programs have been developed to calculate the pitch and roll angles of a wind-tunnel sting drive system that will position a model at the desired angle of attack and and angle of sideslip in the wind tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs from on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented in the report and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  15. Roll-Yaw control at high angle of attack by forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, N.; Rock, S. M.; Celik, Z. Z.; Roberts, L.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using forebody tangential blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model is experimentally demonstrated. An unsteady model of the aerodynamics is developed based on the fundamental physics of the flow. Data from dynamic experiments is used to validate the aerodynamic model. A unique apparatus is designed and built that allows the wind tunnel model two degrees of freedom, roll and yaw. Dynamic experiments conducted at 45 degrees angle of attack reveal the system to be unstable. The natural motion is divergent. The aerodynamic model is incorporated into the equations of motion of the system and used for the design of closed loop control laws that make the system stable. These laws are proven through dynamic experiments in the wind tunnel using blowing as the only actuator. It is shown that asymmetric blowing is a highly non-linear effector that can be linearized by superimposing symmetric blowing. The effects of forebody tangential blowing and roll and yaw angles on the flow structure are determined through flow visualization experiments. The transient response of roll and yaw moments to a step input blowing are determined. Differences on the roll and yaw moment dependence on blowing are explained based on the physics of the phenomena.

  16. SHALLOT-LIKE1 Is a KANADI Transcription Factor That Modulates Rice Leaf Rolling by Regulating Leaf Abaxial Cell Development[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang-Heng; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Xu-Dong; Qian, Qian; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    As an important agronomic trait, rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf rolling has attracted much attention from plant biologists and breeders. Moderate leaf rolling increases the photosynthesis of cultivars and hence raises grain yield. However, the relevant molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show the isolation and functional characterization of SHALLOT-LIKE1 (SLL1), a key gene controlling rice leaf rolling. sll1 mutant plants have extremely incurved leaves due to the defective development of sclerenchymatous cells on the abaxial side. Defective development can be functionally rescued by expression of SLL1. SLL1 is transcribed in various tissues and accumulates in the abaxial epidermis throughout leaf development. SLL1 encodes a SHAQKYF class MYB family transcription factor belonging to the KANADI family. SLL1 deficiency leads to defective programmed cell death of abaxial mesophyll cells and suppresses the development of abaxial features. By contrast, enhanced SLL1 expression stimulates phloem development on the abaxial side and suppresses bulliform cell and sclerenchyma development on the adaxial side. Additionally, SLL1 deficiency results in increased chlorophyll and photosynthesis. Our findings identify the role of SLL1 in the modulation of leaf abaxial cell development and in sustaining abaxial characteristics during leaf development. These results should facilitate attempts to use molecular breeding to increase the photosynthetic capacity of rice, as well as other crops, by modulating leaf development and rolling. PMID:19304938

  17. Functional and evolutionary correlations of steep leaf angles in the mexical shrubland.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Verdú, Miguel; Valladares, Fernando; García-Fayos, Patricio

    2010-05-01

    In the evergreen shrubland vegetation of Mexico (mexical), most of the species are sclerophyllous woody plants with steep leaf angles. This architectural pattern has been interpreted as a strategy to cope with water shortages and high radiation. However, the current association between evergreenness and steep leaf angles across mexical plant species could be the result of an adaptive association achieved through correlated evolutionary change between both traits or, alternatively, may be the result of common evolutionary ancestry. In this study, we quantified leaf angle in 28 dominant species under a phylogenetic framework and evaluated the functional implications of the observed range of leaf angles in terms of leaf temperature, water potentials and transpiration by combining manipulative experiments restraining leaves horizontally with microclimatic and stomatal conductance measurements in selected species and energy balance calculations. Horizontally restrained leaves exhibited reduced water potentials and stomatal conductances, and significantly increased temperatures and transpiration rates. Steeply inclined leaves operated near air temperatures and could sustain relatively high stomatal conductances during the dry season since they were associated with low transpiration rates. Phylogenetic analyses showed that steep leaf angles evolved in a correlated fashion in evergreen species. The functional consequences of leaf angle together with the phylogenetic analysis indicate the adaptive nature of this trait which allows the evergreen species to cope with arid conditions and therefore to persist within the mexical community.

  18. Roll angle measurement with a large range based on the photoelectronic autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-jie; Mu, Quan-quan; Wang, Shao-xin; Wang, Hai-ping; Yang, Cheng-liang; Cao, Zhao-liang; Xuan, Li

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a roll angle measurement method with a large range based on the photoelectronic autocollimator. According to the corresponding relationship between the rotation position of the measured shaft and the spot position on the circular trajectory, the roll angle is calculated quickly and conveniently using a simple algorithm. Only a mirror, a coupler and a fine shaft are contained in the measurement system besides the photoelectronic autocollimator. Aiming at the terrible measurement error induced by the axis wobbly error, two measurement schemes are proposed, which are linking the fine precision shaft to the measured shaft for reducing the axis wobbly error and using the segment measurement to enlarge the radius of the circular trajectory. The experimental results show that the measurement error is decreased by ±0.38°. The roll angle error of the mechanism is ±0.14°, and the measurement precision is about ±2'. The proposed method can be widely used in the engineering fields.

  19. SU-E-T-195: Gantry Angle Dependency of MLC Leaf Position Error

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, S; Hong, C; Kim, M; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Ahn, S; Chung, S; Shin, E; Shin, J; Kim, H; Kim, D; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the gantry angle dependency of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position error. Methods: An automatic MLC quality assurance system (AutoMLCQA) was developed to evaluate the gantry angle dependency of the MLC leaf position error using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To eliminate the EPID position error due to gantry rotation, we designed a reference maker (RM) that could be inserted into the wedge mount. After setting up the EPID, a reference image was taken of the RM using an open field. Next, an EPID-based picket-fence test (PFT) was performed without the RM. These procedures were repeated at every 45° intervals of the gantry angle. A total of eight reference images and PFT image sets were analyzed using in-house software. The average MLC leaf position error was calculated at five pickets (-10, -5, 0, 5, and 10 cm) in accordance with general PFT guidelines using in-house software. This test was carried out for four linear accelerators. Results: The average MLC leaf position errors were within the set criterion of <1 mm (actual errors ranged from -0.7 to 0.8 mm) for all gantry angles, but significant gantry angle dependency was observed in all machines. The error was smaller at a gantry angle of 0° but increased toward the positive direction with gantry angle increments in the clockwise direction. The error reached a maximum value at a gantry angle of 90° and then gradually decreased until 180°. In the counter-clockwise rotation of the gantry, the same pattern of error was observed but the error increased in the negative direction. Conclusion: The AutoMLCQA system was useful to evaluate the MLC leaf position error for various gantry angles without the EPID position error. The Gantry angle dependency should be considered during MLC leaf position error analysis.

  20. Resistance to potato leaf roll virus multiplication in potato is under major gene control.

    PubMed

    Barker, H; Solomon-Blackburn, R M; McNicol, J W; Bradshaw, J E

    1994-08-01

    The concentration of potato leaf roll virus (PLRV), as measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in the foliage of potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) of cv 'Maris Piper' with secondary infection was 2900 ng/g leaf, whereas in clones G7445(1) and G7032(5) it was 180 ng/g leaf and 120 ng/g leaf, respectively. To examine the genetic control of resistance to PLRV multiplication, reciprocal crosses were made between the susceptible cultivar 'Maris Piper' and the two resistant clones, and the three parents were selfed. Seedling progenies of these families were grown to generate tubers of individual genotypes (clones). Clonally propagated plants were graft-inoculated, and their daughter tubers were collected and used to grow plants with secondary infection in which PLRV concentration was estimated. The expression of resistance to PLRV multiplication had a bimodal distribution in progenies from crosses between 'Maris Piper' and either resistant clone, and also in progeny from selfing the resistant parents, with genotypes segregating into high and low virus titre groups. Only the progeny obtained from selfing 'Maris Piper' did not segregate, all genotypes being susceptible to PLRV multiplication. The pattern of segregation obtained from these progenies fits more closely with the genetical hypothesis that resistance to PLRV multiplication is controlled by two unlinked dominant complementary genes, both of which are required for resistance, than with the simpler hypothesis that resistance is conferred by a single dominant gene, as published previously.

  1. Joint Mapping and Allele Mining of the Rolled Leaf Trait in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunchao; Nafisah; Joseph, Charles; Zhang, Wenzhong; Xu, Jianlong; Li, Zhikang

    2016-01-01

    The rolled leaf trait, long considered to be a key component of plant architecture, represents an important target trait for improving plant architecture at the population level. We therefore performed linkage mapping using a set of 262 highly variable RILs from two rice cultivars (Minghui 63 and 02428) with minor differences in leaf rolling index (LRI) in conjunction with GWAS mapping of a random subset of the 1127 germplasms from the 3K Rice Genomes Project (3K Rice). A total of seven main-effect loci were found to underlie the transgressive segregation of progenies from parents with minor differences in LRI. Five of these loci were previously identified and two (qRl7b and qRl9b) are newly reported with additional evidence from GWAS mapping for qRl7b. A total of 18 QTLs were identified by GWAS, including four newly identified QTLs. Six QTLs were confirmed by linkage mapping with the above RIL population, and 83.3% were found to be consistent with previously reported loci based on comparative mapping. We also performed allele mining with representative SNPs and identified the elite germplasms for the improvement of rolled leaf trait. Most favorable alleles at the detected loci were contributed by various 3K Rice germplasms. By a re-scanning of the candidate region with more saturated SNP markers, we dissected the region harboring gRl4-2 into three subregions, in which the average effect on LRI was 3.5% with a range from 2.4 to 4.1% in the third subregion, suggesting the presence of a new locus or loci within this region. The representative SNPs for favorable alleles in the reliable QTLs which were consistently identified in both bi-parental mapping and GWAS, such as qRl4, qRl5, qRl6, qRl7a, and qRl7b will be useful for future molecular breeding programs for ideal plant type in rice. PMID:27441398

  2. Joint Mapping and Allele Mining of the Rolled Leaf Trait in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Tianqing; Hoang, Long; Wang, Chunchao; Nafisah; Joseph, Charles; Zhang, Wenzhong; Xu, Jianlong; Li, Zhikang

    2016-01-01

    The rolled leaf trait, long considered to be a key component of plant architecture, represents an important target trait for improving plant architecture at the population level. We therefore performed linkage mapping using a set of 262 highly variable RILs from two rice cultivars (Minghui 63 and 02428) with minor differences in leaf rolling index (LRI) in conjunction with GWAS mapping of a random subset of the 1127 germplasms from the 3K Rice Genomes Project (3K Rice). A total of seven main-effect loci were found to underlie the transgressive segregation of progenies from parents with minor differences in LRI. Five of these loci were previously identified and two (qRl7b and qRl9b) are newly reported with additional evidence from GWAS mapping for qRl7b. A total of 18 QTLs were identified by GWAS, including four newly identified QTLs. Six QTLs were confirmed by linkage mapping with the above RIL population, and 83.3% were found to be consistent with previously reported loci based on comparative mapping. We also performed allele mining with representative SNPs and identified the elite germplasms for the improvement of rolled leaf trait. Most favorable alleles at the detected loci were contributed by various 3K Rice germplasms. By a re-scanning of the candidate region with more saturated SNP markers, we dissected the region harboring gRl4-2 into three subregions, in which the average effect on LRI was 3.5% with a range from 2.4 to 4.1% in the third subregion, suggesting the presence of a new locus or loci within this region. The representative SNPs for favorable alleles in the reliable QTLs which were consistently identified in both bi-parental mapping and GWAS, such as qRl4, qRl5, qRl6, qRl7a, and qRl7b will be useful for future molecular breeding programs for ideal plant type in rice. PMID:27441398

  3. A Sensor Fusion Method Based on an Integrated Neural Network and Kalman Filter for Vehicle Roll Angle Estimation.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Meléndez, Leandro; Boada, Beatriz L; Boada, María Jesús L; Gauchía, Antonio; Díaz, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel estimator based on sensor fusion, which combines the Neural Network (NN) with a Kalman filter in order to estimate the vehicle roll angle. The NN estimates a "pseudo-roll angle" through variables that are easily measured from Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) sensors. An IMU is a device that is commonly used for vehicle motion detection, and its cost has decreased during recent years. The pseudo-roll angle is introduced in the Kalman filter in order to filter noise and minimize the variance of the norm and maximum errors' estimation. The NN has been trained for J-turn maneuvers, double lane change maneuvers and lane change maneuvers at different speeds and road friction coefficients. The proposed method takes into account the vehicle non-linearities, thus yielding good roll angle estimation. Finally, the proposed estimator has been compared with one that uses the suspension deflections to obtain the pseudo-roll angle. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed NN and Kalman filter-based estimator. PMID:27589763

  4. A Sensor Fusion Method Based on an Integrated Neural Network and Kalman Filter for Vehicle Roll Angle Estimation.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Meléndez, Leandro; Boada, Beatriz L; Boada, María Jesús L; Gauchía, Antonio; Díaz, Vicente

    2016-08-31

    This article presents a novel estimator based on sensor fusion, which combines the Neural Network (NN) with a Kalman filter in order to estimate the vehicle roll angle. The NN estimates a "pseudo-roll angle" through variables that are easily measured from Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) sensors. An IMU is a device that is commonly used for vehicle motion detection, and its cost has decreased during recent years. The pseudo-roll angle is introduced in the Kalman filter in order to filter noise and minimize the variance of the norm and maximum errors' estimation. The NN has been trained for J-turn maneuvers, double lane change maneuvers and lane change maneuvers at different speeds and road friction coefficients. The proposed method takes into account the vehicle non-linearities, thus yielding good roll angle estimation. Finally, the proposed estimator has been compared with one that uses the suspension deflections to obtain the pseudo-roll angle. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed NN and Kalman filter-based estimator.

  5. Notes on the ecology of rolled-leaf hispines (Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae) at La Gamba (Costa Rica)1

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Michael; Frank, Meike

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A total of 301 adult hispine beetles of the genera Cephaloleia and Chelobasis were found in rolled leaves of plants of 17 species of Zingiberales (families Costaceae, Heliconiaceae, Maranthaceae, Musaceae, and Zingiberaceae) during a field study at La Gamba, Golfito region, Costa Rica. Of these beetles, Cephaloleia belti was recorded from 12 potential host plant species, C. distincta from 7, C. dilaticollis from 5, C., Chelobasis bicolor, C. championi, and C. histrionica from 3, Chelobasis perplexa and C. instabilis from 2, whereas C. trivittata from only one. Of the plant species, Heliconia latispatha had 7 beetle species in its leaf rolls, Calathea lutea had 5, H. imbricata and H. rostrata had 4, H. stricta and Musa paradisiaca had 3, H. wagneriana had 2, while on H. vaginalis, H. danielsiana, H. densiflora, H. longiflora, Calathea crotalifera, C. platystachya, Goeppertia lasiophylla, Alpinia purpurata, Costus pulverulentus and Costus barbatus, H. densiflora, H. vaginalis, and H. danielsana only hispines of one species were found. Cephaloleia belti occurred together with beetles of six other hispine species, whereas Cephaloleia trivittata never shared a leaf roll with another hispine species. The remaining beetle species aggregated with one to four other hispines. Adults of C. belti and C. championi were frequently seen, occasionally also with C. dilaticollis, C. histrionica, and Chelobasis perplexa, to co-occur with the carabid Calophaena ligata in the same leaf roll without any sign of interspecific aggression. A comparison of host choices and the phylogeny of the hispines and of their host plants revealed no signs that beetles used species level phylogenetic relationships within the Zingiberales to select food plants. Obviously, within this plant order, rolled-leaf hispines choose their plant hosts in a nearly opportunistic manner. Seemingly, they use differences among plants at higher taxonomic levels but within the Zingiberales, the availability of

  6. Effect of Variation of Chord and Span of Ailerons on Rolling and Yawing Moments at Several Angles of Pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, R H; Strother, D H; Monish, B H

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extension to higher angles of attack of the investigation of the rolling and yawing moments due to ailerons of various chords and spans on two airfoils having the Clark Y and U. S. A. 27 wings. The measurements were made at various angles of pitch but at zero angle of roll and yaw, the wing chord being set at an angle of +4 degrees to the fuselage axis. In the case of the Clark Y airfoil the measurements have been extended to a pitch angle of 40 degrees, using ailerons of span equal to 67 per cent of the wing semispan and chord equal to 20 and 30 per cent of the wing chord. The work was conducted on wing models of 60-inch span and 10-inch chord.

  7. A Sensor Fusion Method Based on an Integrated Neural Network and Kalman Filter for Vehicle Roll Angle Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Meléndez, Leandro; Boada, Beatriz L.; Boada, María Jesús L.; Gauchía, Antonio; Díaz, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel estimator based on sensor fusion, which combines the Neural Network (NN) with a Kalman filter in order to estimate the vehicle roll angle. The NN estimates a “pseudo-roll angle” through variables that are easily measured from Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) sensors. An IMU is a device that is commonly used for vehicle motion detection, and its cost has decreased during recent years. The pseudo-roll angle is introduced in the Kalman filter in order to filter noise and minimize the variance of the norm and maximum errors’ estimation. The NN has been trained for J-turn maneuvers, double lane change maneuvers and lane change maneuvers at different speeds and road friction coefficients. The proposed method takes into account the vehicle non-linearities, thus yielding good roll angle estimation. Finally, the proposed estimator has been compared with one that uses the suspension deflections to obtain the pseudo-roll angle. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed NN and Kalman filter-based estimator. PMID:27589763

  8. A detailed analysis of the leaf rolling mutant sll2 reveals complex nature in regulation of bulliform cell development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-J; Wu, S-Y; Jiang, L; Wang, J-L; Zhang, X; Guo, X-P; Wu, C-Y; Wan, J-M

    2015-03-01

    Bulliform cells are large, thin-walled and highly vacuolated cells, and play an important role in controlling leaf rolling in response to drought and high temperature. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating bulliform cell development have not been well documented. Here, we report isolation and characterisation of a rice leaf-rolling mutant, named shallot-like 2 (sll2). The sll2 plants exhibit adaxially rolled leaves, starting from the sixth leaf stage, accompanied by increased photosynthesis and reduced plant height and tiller number. Histological analyses showed shrinkage of bulliform cells, resulting in inward-curved leaves. The mutant is recessive and revertible at a rate of 9%. The leaf rolling is caused by a T-DNA insertion. Cloning of the insertion using TAIL-PCR revealed that the T-DNA was inserted in the promoter region of LOC_Os07 g38664. Unexpectedly, the enhanced expression of LOC_Os07 g38664 by the 35S enhancer in the T-DNA is not responsible for the leaf rolling phenotype. Further, the enhancer also exerted a long-distance effect, including up-regulation of several bulliform cell-related genes. sll2 suppressed the outward leaf rolling of oul1 in the sll2oul1 double mutant. We conclude that leaf rolling in sll2 could be a result of the combined effect of multi-genes, implying a complex network in regulation of bulliform cell development.

  9. A detailed analysis of the leaf rolling mutant sll2 reveals complex nature in regulation of bulliform cell development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-J; Wu, S-Y; Jiang, L; Wang, J-L; Zhang, X; Guo, X-P; Wu, C-Y; Wan, J-M

    2015-03-01

    Bulliform cells are large, thin-walled and highly vacuolated cells, and play an important role in controlling leaf rolling in response to drought and high temperature. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating bulliform cell development have not been well documented. Here, we report isolation and characterisation of a rice leaf-rolling mutant, named shallot-like 2 (sll2). The sll2 plants exhibit adaxially rolled leaves, starting from the sixth leaf stage, accompanied by increased photosynthesis and reduced plant height and tiller number. Histological analyses showed shrinkage of bulliform cells, resulting in inward-curved leaves. The mutant is recessive and revertible at a rate of 9%. The leaf rolling is caused by a T-DNA insertion. Cloning of the insertion using TAIL-PCR revealed that the T-DNA was inserted in the promoter region of LOC_Os07 g38664. Unexpectedly, the enhanced expression of LOC_Os07 g38664 by the 35S enhancer in the T-DNA is not responsible for the leaf rolling phenotype. Further, the enhancer also exerted a long-distance effect, including up-regulation of several bulliform cell-related genes. sll2 suppressed the outward leaf rolling of oul1 in the sll2oul1 double mutant. We conclude that leaf rolling in sll2 could be a result of the combined effect of multi-genes, implying a complex network in regulation of bulliform cell development. PMID:25213398

  10. Flight Investigation of a Roll-stabilized Missile Configuration at Varying Angles of Attack at Mach Numbers Between 0.8 and 1.79

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarovsky, Jacob; Gardiner, Robert A

    1957-01-01

    A missile research model was flown at supersonic speed to determine the quality of automatic roll stabilization at varying angles of attack. Aerodynamic rolling and pitching derivatives were determined from the flight record. It was concluded that the combination of the gyro-actuated automatic pilot with wing-tip ailerons provided adequate roll stabilization under conditions encountered in flight.

  11. Polarization Methods of Measuring the Roll Angle of an Object in Motion in Radio Beacon Navigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulko, V. L.; Mescheryakov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Polarization methods of measuring the roll angle of an object in motion with the help of radio beacon systems are considered. The polarization properties of the beacon signals received on board the object and amplitude-phase processing of their orthogonal polarized components are used to accomplish this goal.

  12. The relationship between leaf rolling and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in apoplastic and symplastic areas of Ctenanthe setosa subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Neslihan; Terzi, Rabiye; Saglam, Aykut; Kadioglu, Asim

    2009-01-01

    The ascorbate-glutathione (ASC-GSH) cycle has an important role in defensive processes against oxidative damage generated by drought stress. In this study, the changes that take place in apoplastic and symplastic ASC-GSH cycle enzymes of the leaf and petiole were investigated under drought stress causing leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa (Rose.) Eichler (Marantaceae). Apoplastic and symplastic extractions of leaf and petiole were performed at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others are intermediate forms). Glutathione reductase (GR), a key enzyme in the GSH regeneration cycle, and ascorbate (ASC) were present in apoplastic spaces of the leaf and petiole, whereas dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which uses glutathione as reductant, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), which uses NAD(P)H as reductant, and glutathione were absent. GR, DHAR and MDHAR activities increased in the symplastic and apoplastic areas of the leaf. Apoplastic and symplastic ASC and dehydroascorbate (DHA), the oxidized form of ascorbate, rose at all scores except score 4 of symplastic ASC in the leaf. On the other hand, while reduced glutathione (GSH) content was enhanced, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content decreased in the leaf during rolling. As for the petiole, GR activity increased in the apoplastic area but decreased in the symplastic area. DHAR and MDHAR activities increased throughout all scores, but decreased to the score 1 level at score 4. The ASC content of the apoplast increased during leaf rolling. Conversely, symplastic ASC content increased at score 2, however decreased at the later scores. While the apoplastic DHA content declined, symplastic DHA rose at score 2, but later was down to the level of score 1. While GSH content enhanced during leaf rolling, GSSG content did not change except at score 2. As well, there were good correlations between leaf rolling and ASC-GSH cycle enzyme activities in the leaf (GR and DHAR

  13. The relationship between leaf rolling and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in apoplastic and symplastic areas of Ctenanthe setosa subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Neslihan; Terzi, Rabiye; Saglam, Aykut; Kadioglu, Asim

    2009-01-01

    The ascorbate-glutathione (ASC-GSH) cycle has an important role in defensive processes against oxidative damage generated by drought stress. In this study, the changes that take place in apoplastic and symplastic ASC-GSH cycle enzymes of the leaf and petiole were investigated under drought stress causing leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa (Rose.) Eichler (Marantaceae). Apoplastic and symplastic extractions of leaf and petiole were performed at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others are intermediate forms). Glutathione reductase (GR), a key enzyme in the GSH regeneration cycle, and ascorbate (ASC) were present in apoplastic spaces of the leaf and petiole, whereas dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which uses glutathione as reductant, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), which uses NAD(P)H as reductant, and glutathione were absent. GR, DHAR and MDHAR activities increased in the symplastic and apoplastic areas of the leaf. Apoplastic and symplastic ASC and dehydroascorbate (DHA), the oxidized form of ascorbate, rose at all scores except score 4 of symplastic ASC in the leaf. On the other hand, while reduced glutathione (GSH) content was enhanced, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content decreased in the leaf during rolling. As for the petiole, GR activity increased in the apoplastic area but decreased in the symplastic area. DHAR and MDHAR activities increased throughout all scores, but decreased to the score 1 level at score 4. The ASC content of the apoplast increased during leaf rolling. Conversely, symplastic ASC content increased at score 2, however decreased at the later scores. While the apoplastic DHA content declined, symplastic DHA rose at score 2, but later was down to the level of score 1. While GSH content enhanced during leaf rolling, GSSG content did not change except at score 2. As well, there were good correlations between leaf rolling and ASC-GSH cycle enzyme activities in the leaf (GR and DHAR

  14. Leaf-rolling sawflies (Hymenoptera, Pamphiliidae, Pamphiliinae) of Tianmushan Mountains, Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Akihiko; Wei, Mei-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Two species of Neurotoma, six species of Onycholyda, and five species of Pamphilius are recorded from Tianmushan, Zhejiang Province, China, and a key is given to these three genera and 13 species. Three new species, Onycholyda atra Shinohara & Wei, sp. nov. from Zhejiang Province, O. fulvicornis Shinohara, sp. nov. from Shaanxi Province and Zhejiang Province, and Pamphilius padus Shinohara, sp. nov. from Zhejiang Province, are described. New distribution records are: Onycholyda shaanxiana Shinohara, 1999, from Hubei Province, Zhejiang Province and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, O. subquadrata (Maa, 1944) from Zhejiang Province, O. tianmushana Shinohara & Xiao, 2006, from Hunan Province and Jiangxi Province, Pamphilius palliceps Shinohara & Xiao, 2006, from Anhui Province, P. lizejiani Shinohara in Shinohara & Wei, 2012, from Zhejiang Province, P. shengi Wei in Wei & Xiao, 1999, from Hubei Province and Zhejiang Province, and P. qinlingicus Wei in Wu & Wei, 2010, from Zhejiang Province. The larva of P. padus feeds on Padus obtusata (Rosaceae) and that of P. palliceps feeds on Rosa multiflora (Rosaceae), both singly making a leaf-roll. Rubus peltatus (Rosaceae) is recorded as a host plant of O. atra based on the observation of oviposition. PMID:27395926

  15. Electron transport efficiency at opposite leaf sides: effect of vertical distribution of leaf angle, structure, chlorophyll content and species in a forest canopy.

    PubMed

    Mänd, Pille; Hallik, Lea; Peñuelas, Josep; Kull, Olevi

    2013-02-01

    We investigated changes in chlorophyll a fluorescence from alternate leaf surfaces to assess the intraleaf light acclimation patterns in combination with natural variations in radiation, leaf angles, leaf mass per area (LMA), chlorophyll content (Chl) and leaf optical parameters. Measurements were conducted on bottom- and top-layer leaves of Tilia cordata Mill. (a shade-tolerant sub-canopy species, sampled at heights of 11 and 16 m) and Populus tremula L. (a light-demanding upper canopy species, sampled at canopy heights of 19 and 26 m). The upper canopy species P. tremula had a six times higher PSII quantum yield (Φ(II)) and ratio of open reaction centres (qP), and a two times higher LMA than T. cordata. These species-specific differences were also present when the leaves of both species were in similar light conditions. Leaf adaxial/abaxial fluorescence ratio was significantly larger in the case of more horizontal leaves. Populus tremula (more vertical leaves), had smaller differences in fluorescence parameters between alternate leaf sides compared with T. cordata (more horizontal leaves). However, optical properties on alternate leaf sides showed a larger difference for P. tremula. Intraspecifically, the measured optical parameters were better correlated with LMA than with leaf Chl. Species-specific differences in leaf anatomy appear to enhance the photosynthetic potential of leaf biochemistry by decreasing the interception of excess light in P. tremula and increasing the light absorptance in T. cordata. Our results indicate that intraleaf light absorption gradient, described here as leaf adaxial/abaxial side ratio of chlorophyll a fluorescence, varies significantly with changes in leaf light environment in a multi-layer multi-species tree canopy. However, this variation cannot be described merely as a simple function of radiation, leaf angle, Chl or LMA, and species-specific differences in light acclimation strategies should also be considered.

  16. Effect of MLC leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Sen; Li, Guangjun; Wang, Maojie; Jiang, Qinfeng; Zhang, Yingjie; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. To compare dosimetric differences between the simulating plans and the clinical plans with evaluation parameters, 6 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected for simulation of systematic and random MLC leaf position errors, collimator rotation angle errors, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors. There was a high sensitivity to dose distribution for systematic MLC leaf position errors in response to field size. When the systematic MLC position errors were 0.5, 1, and 2 mm, respectively, the maximum values of the mean dose deviation, observed in parotid glands, were 4.63%, 8.69%, and 18.32%, respectively. The dosimetric effect was comparatively small for systematic MLC shift errors. For random MLC errors up to 2 mm and collimator and gantry rotation angle errors up to 0.5°, the dosimetric effect was negligible. We suggest that quality control be regularly conducted for MLC leaves, so as to ensure that systematic MLC leaf position errors are within 0.5 mm. Because the dosimetric effect of 0.5° collimator and gantry rotation angle errors is negligible, it can be concluded that setting a proper threshold for allowed errors of collimator and gantry rotation angle may increase treatment efficacy and reduce treatment time.

  17. Seasonal and vertical changes in leaf angle distribution for selected deciduous broadleaf tree species common to Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, Kairi; Pisek, Jan; Sonnentag, Oliver; Annuk, Kalju

    2014-05-01

    Leaf inclination angle distribution is a key parameter in determining the transmission and reflection of radiation by vegetation canopies. It has been previously observed that leaf inclination angle might change gradually from more vertical in the upper canopy and in high light habitats to more horizontal in the lower canopy and in low light habitats [1]. Despite its importance, relatively few measurements on actual leaf angle distributions have been reported for different tree species. Even smaller number of studies have dealt with the possible seasonal changes in leaf angle distribution [2]. In this study the variation of leaf inclination angle distributions was examined both temporally throughout the growing season and vertically at different heights of trees. We report on leaf inclination angle distributions for five deciduous broadleaf species found commonly in several parts of Europe: grey alder (Alnus incana), Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth), chestnut (Castanea), Norway maple (Acer platanoides), and aspen (Populus tremula). The angles were measured using the leveled camera method [3], with the data collected at several separate heights and four times during the period of May-September 2013. The results generally indicate the greatest change in leaf inclination angles for spring, with the changes usually being the most pronounced at the top of the canopy. It should also be noted, however, that whereas the temporal variation proved to be rather consistent for different species, the vertical variation differed more between species. The leveled camera method was additionally tested in terms of sensitivity to different users. Ten people were asked to measure the leaf angles for four different species. The results indicate the method is quite robust in providing coinciding distributions irrespective of the user and level of previous experience with the method. However, certain caution must be exercised when measuring long narrow leaves. References [1] G.G. Mc

  18. Rolling element bearing defect diagnosis under variable speed operation through angle synchronous averaging of wavelet de-noised estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, C.; Samantaray, A. K.; Chakraborty, G.

    2016-05-01

    Rolling element bearings are widely used in rotating machines and their faults can lead to excessive vibration levels and/or complete seizure of the machine. Under special operating conditions such as non-uniform or low speed shaft rotation, the available fault diagnosis methods cannot be applied for bearing fault diagnosis with full confidence. Fault symptoms in such operating conditions cannot be easily extracted through usual measurement and signal processing techniques. A typical example is a bearing in heavy rolling mill with variable load and disturbance from other sources. In extremely slow speed operation, variation in speed due to speed controller transients or external disturbances (e.g., varying load) can be relatively high. To account for speed variation, instantaneous angular position instead of time is used as the base variable of signals for signal processing purposes. Even with time synchronous averaging (TSA) and well-established methods like envelope order analysis, rolling element faults in rolling element bearings cannot be easily identified during such operating conditions. In this article we propose to use order tracking on the envelope of the wavelet de-noised estimate of the short-duration angle synchronous averaged signal to diagnose faults in rolling element bearing operating under the stated special conditions. The proposed four-stage sequential signal processing method eliminates uncorrelated content, avoids signal smearing and exposes only the fault frequencies and its harmonics in the spectrum. We use experimental data1

  19. Modeling and Analysis of Phase Fluctuation in a High-Precision Roll Angle Measurement Based on a Heterodyne Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junhui; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Yu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometry is a high-precision method applied in roll angle measurements. Phase metering is essential for high precision. During a high-precision measurement, a phase fluctuation appears even when the roll angle does not vary, which has never been analyzed before. Herein, the reason for the phase fluctuation is revealed, which results from the frequency-difference fluctuation and time difference between measurement and reference beams. A mathematical model of that phase-fluctuation mechanism is established, and that model provides a theoretical basis for analyzing and reducing the phase fluctuation. The impact that the main factors have on the phase metering is analyzed quantitatively, and experiments are carried out to validate the model. Finally, the phase fluctuation decreases to 0.02° by frequency reduction, which conversely verifies the theoretical model. PMID:27490552

  20. Estimation of the maximum angle of sideslip for determination of vertical-tail loads in rolling maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Ralph W , Jr

    1953-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Technical Reports 1135 through 1157. Recent experiences have indicated that angles of sideslip in rolling maneuvers may be critical in the design of vertical tails for current research airplanes having weight distributed mainly along the fuselage. Previous investigations have indicated the seriousness of the problem for the World War II type of airplane. This report presents some preliminary calculations for airplanes of current design, particularly with weight distributed primarily along the fuselage. The results of this study indicate that existing simplified expressions for calculating maximum sideslip angles to determine the vertical-tail loads in rolling maneuvers are not generally applicable to airplanes of current design.

  1. Modeling and Analysis of Phase Fluctuation in a High-Precision Roll Angle Measurement Based on a Heterodyne Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junhui; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Yu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometry is a high-precision method applied in roll angle measurements. Phase metering is essential for high precision. During a high-precision measurement, a phase fluctuation appears even when the roll angle does not vary, which has never been analyzed before. Herein, the reason for the phase fluctuation is revealed, which results from the frequency-difference fluctuation and time difference between measurement and reference beams. A mathematical model of that phase-fluctuation mechanism is established, and that model provides a theoretical basis for analyzing and reducing the phase fluctuation. The impact that the main factors have on the phase metering is analyzed quantitatively, and experiments are carried out to validate the model. Finally, the phase fluctuation decreases to 0.02° by frequency reduction, which conversely verifies the theoretical model. PMID:27490552

  2. SLG controls grain size and leaf angle by modulating brassinosteroid homeostasis in rice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhiming; Wu, Chuanyin; Wang, Chunming; Roh, Jeehee; Zhang, Long; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Shengzhong; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Chunyan; Hu, Jinlong; You, Xiaoman; Liu, Xi; Yang, Xiaoming; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Fuqing; Terzaghi, William; Kim, Seong-Ki; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-07-01

    Grain size and leaf angle are two important traits determining grain yield in rice. However, the mechanisms regulating the two traits remain largely unknown. Here, we characterized a rice gain-of-function mutant, slender grain Dominant (slg-D), which exhibited longer and narrower grains and larger leaf angles, similar to plants with elevated brassinosteroid (BR) levels or strengthened BR signaling. The increased cell length is responsible for the mutant phenotypes in slg-D We demonstrated that the phenotype of slg-D is caused by enhanced expression of SLG, a BAHD acyltransferase-like protein gene. SLG is preferentially expressed in young panicles and lamina joints, implying its role in controlling cell growth in those two tissues. slg-D was restored to wild type by treatment with brassinazole, an inhibitor of BR biosynthesis. Overexpression of SLG in d11-2 (deficient in BR synthesis) and d61-1 (deficient in BR signaling) did not change the existing phenotypes. The slg-D plants had elevated BR contents and, accordingly, expression of BR-related genes was changed in a manner similar to BR treatment. Moreover, SLG RNAi plants displayed mild BR-deficient phenotypes including shorter grains, smaller leaf angles, and compact semi-dwarf plant types. The in vitro biochemical assays and transgenic approaches collectively demonstrated that SLG functions as homomers. Taken together, we conclude that SLG is an important regulator in BR homeostasis and that manipulation of SLG expression to an optimal level may provide a way to develop an ideal plant type. PMID:27252468

  3. Rice ONAC106 Inhibits Leaf Senescence and Increases Salt Tolerance and Tiller Angle.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Piao, Weilan; Lim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Su-Hyun; Kim, Ye-Sol; An, Gynheung; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-12-01

    NAM/ATAF1/ATAF2/CUC2 (NAC) is a plant-specific transcription factor (TF) family, and NACs participate in many diverse processes during the plant life cycle. Several Arabidopsis thaliana NACs have important roles in positively or negatively regulating leaf senescence, but in other plant species, including rice, the senescence-associated NACs (senNACs) remain largely unknown. Here we show that the rice senNAC TF ONAC106 negatively regulates leaf senescence. Leaves of onac106-1D (insertion of the 35S enhancer in the promoter region of the ONAC106 gene) mutants retained their green color under natural senescence and dark-induced senescence conditions. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that key senescence-associated genes (SGR, NYC1, OsNAC5, OsNAP, OsEIN3 and OsS3H) were differentially expressed in onac106-1D during dark-induced senescence. In addition to delayed senescence, onac106-1D also showed a salt stress-tolerant phenotype; key genes that down-regulate salt response signaling (OsNAC5, OsDREB2A, OsLEA3 and OsbZIP23) were rapidly up-regulated in onac106-1D under salt stress. Interestingly, onac106-1D also exhibited a wide tiller angle phenotype throughout development, and the tiller angle-related gene LPA1 was down-regulated in onac106-1D. Using yeast one-hybrid assays, we found that ONAC106 binds to the promoter regions of SGR, NYC1, OsNAC5 and LPA1. Taking these results together, we propose that ONAC106 functions in leaf senescence, salt stress tolerance and plant architecture by modulating the expression of its target genes that function in each signaling pathway.

  4. Investigation on Stability in Roll of Square Section Missile at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Fan, Zhaolin; Wu, Jifei; Wu, Wenhua

    An experimental investigation of the stability in roll of a square section missile at high incidence was conducted in FL-23 wind tunnel. Dynamic motions were obtained on a square section missile that is free to rotate about its longitudinal axis. Different dynamic rolling motions were observed depending on the incidence of the model sting. These dynamic regimes include damped oscillations, quasi-limit-cycle wing-rock motion, and constant rolling. A coupling numerical method was established by solving the fluid dynamics equations and the rigid-body dynamics equations synchronously in order to predict the onset and the development of uncommented motions and then explore the unsteady movement characteristics of the aircraft. The study indicates that the aircraft loss stability at high incidence is caused by the asymmetric vertex on the level fin tip liftoff and attach alternately. The computation results are in line with the experiment results.

  5. Self-rolling and light-trapping in flexible quantum well-embedded nanomembranes for wide-angle infrared photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Zhen, Honglou; Li, Shilong; Jing, Youliang; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Lu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) design and manufacturing enable flexible nanomembranes to deliver unique properties and applications in flexible electronics, photovoltaics, and photonics. We demonstrate that a quantum well (QW)-embedded nanomembrane in a rolled-up geometry facilitates a 3D QW infrared photodetector (QWIP) device with enhanced responsivity and detectivity. Circular geometry of nanomembrane rolls provides the light coupling route; thus, there are no external light coupling structures, which are normally necessary for QWIPs. This 3D QWIP device under tube-based light-trapping mode presents broadband enhancement of coupling efficiency and omnidirectional detection under a wide incident angle (±70°), offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array. The winding number of these rolled-up QWIPs provides well-tunable blackbody photocurrents and responsivity. 3D self-assembly of functional nanomembranes offers a new path for high conversion efficiency between light and electricity in photodetectors, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. PMID:27536723

  6. Self-rolling and light-trapping in flexible quantum well–embedded nanomembranes for wide-angle infrared photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Zhen, Honglou; Li, Shilong; Jing, Youliang; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) design and manufacturing enable flexible nanomembranes to deliver unique properties and applications in flexible electronics, photovoltaics, and photonics. We demonstrate that a quantum well (QW)–embedded nanomembrane in a rolled-up geometry facilitates a 3D QW infrared photodetector (QWIP) device with enhanced responsivity and detectivity. Circular geometry of nanomembrane rolls provides the light coupling route; thus, there are no external light coupling structures, which are normally necessary for QWIPs. This 3D QWIP device under tube-based light-trapping mode presents broadband enhancement of coupling efficiency and omnidirectional detection under a wide incident angle (±70°), offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array. The winding number of these rolled-up QWIPs provides well-tunable blackbody photocurrents and responsivity. 3D self-assembly of functional nanomembranes offers a new path for high conversion efficiency between light and electricity in photodetectors, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. PMID:27536723

  7. Epigenetic Mutation of RAV6 Affects Leaf Angle and Seed Size in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Sun, Jing; Cao, Xiaofeng; Song, Xianwei

    2015-11-01

    Heritable epigenetic variants of genes, termed epialleles, can broaden genetic and phenotypic diversity in eukaryotes. Epialleles may also provide a new source of beneficial traits for crop breeding, but very few epialleles related to agricultural traits have been identified in crops. Here, we identified Epi-rav6, a gain-of-function epiallele of rice (Oryza sativa) RELATED TO ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3)/VIVIPAROUS1 (VP1) 6 (RAV6), which encodes a B3 DNA-binding domain-containing protein. The Epi-rav6 plants show larger lamina inclination and smaller grain size; these agronomically important phenotypes are inherited in a semidominant manner. We did not find nucleotide sequence variation of RAV6. Instead, we found hypomethylation in the promoter region of RAV6, which caused ectopic expression of RAV6 in Epi-rav6 plants. Bisulfite analysis revealed that cytosine methylation of four CG and two CNG loci within a continuous 96-bp region plays essential roles in regulating RAV6 expression; this region contains a conserved miniature inverted repeat transposable element transposon insertion in cultivated rice genomes. Overexpression of RAV6 in the wild type phenocopied the Epi-rav6 phenotype. The brassinosteroid (BR) receptor BR INSENSITIVE1 and BR biosynthetic genes EBISU DWARF, DWARF11, and BR-DEFICIENT DWARF1 were ectopically expressed in Epi-rav6 plants. Also, treatment with a BR biosynthesis inhibitor restored the leaf angle defects of Epi-rav6 plants. This indicates that RAV6 affects rice leaf angle by modulating BR homeostasis and demonstrates an essential regulatory role of epigenetic modification on a key gene controlling important agricultural traits. Thus, our work identifies a unique rice epiallele, which may represent a common phenomenon in complex crop genomes. PMID:26351308

  8. Epigenetic Mutation of RAV6 Affects Leaf Angle and Seed Size in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Sun, Jing; Cao, Xiaofeng; Song, Xianwei

    2015-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic variants of genes, termed epialleles, can broaden genetic and phenotypic diversity in eukaryotes. Epialleles may also provide a new source of beneficial traits for crop breeding, but very few epialleles related to agricultural traits have been identified in crops. Here, we identified Epi-rav6, a gain-of-function epiallele of rice (Oryza sativa) RELATED TO ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3)/VIVIPAROUS1 (VP1) 6 (RAV6), which encodes a B3 DNA-binding domain-containing protein. The Epi-rav6 plants show larger lamina inclination and smaller grain size; these agronomically important phenotypes are inherited in a semidominant manner. We did not find nucleotide sequence variation of RAV6. Instead, we found hypomethylation in the promoter region of RAV6, which caused ectopic expression of RAV6 in Epi-rav6 plants. Bisulfite analysis revealed that cytosine methylation of four CG and two CNG loci within a continuous 96-bp region plays essential roles in regulating RAV6 expression; this region contains a conserved miniature inverted repeat transposable element transposon insertion in cultivated rice genomes. Overexpression of RAV6 in the wild type phenocopied the Epi-rav6 phenotype. The brassinosteroid (BR) receptor BR INSENSITIVE1 and BR biosynthetic genes EBISU DWARF, DWARF11, and BR-DEFICIENT DWARF1 were ectopically expressed in Epi-rav6 plants. Also, treatment with a BR biosynthesis inhibitor restored the leaf angle defects of Epi-rav6 plants. This indicates that RAV6 affects rice leaf angle by modulating BR homeostasis and demonstrates an essential regulatory role of epigenetic modification on a key gene controlling important agricultural traits. Thus, our work identifies a unique rice epiallele, which may represent a common phenomenon in complex crop genomes. PMID:26351308

  9. Computer programs for the calculation of dual sting pitch and roll angles required for an articulated sting to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind-tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two programs were developed to calculate the pitch and roll position of the conventional sting drive and the pitch of a high angle articulated sting to position a wind tunnel model at the desired angle of attack and sideslip and position the model as near as possible to the centerline of the tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles, and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs form on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  10. Comparison of diagnostic techniques for the detection and differentiation of Cherry leaf roll virus strains for quarantine purposes.

    PubMed

    Lebas, B S M; Veerakone, S; Liefting, L W; Tang, J; Perez-Egusquiza, Z; von Bargen, S; Ward, L

    2016-08-01

    Some strains of Cherry leaf roll virus (CLRV) are considered as quarantine pests in New Zealand. CLRV was detected in seven plant host species: Actinidia chinensis, Hydrangea macrophylla, Malus domestica, Plantago major, Ribes rubrum, Rubus idaeus and Rumex sp. collected from New Zealand between 2005 and 2012. Biological, serological and molecular techniques were compared for the detection and differentiation of CLRV isolates. The biological analysis revealed differences in symptomatology and disease severity among the isolates. The five isolates tested by ELISA were serologically related to each other using polyclonal antisera with only one out of four commercially-available antisera successfully detecting all of them. The phylogenetic analysis of sequences obtained from parts of the coat protein, polymerase and 3'-untranslated regions revealed that the New Zealand CLRV isolates clustered into two closely related but distinct phylogenetic groups with some isolates grouping differently depending on the gene studied. The New Zealand CLRV isolates were clearly distinct to overseas isolates found in phylogenetic groups A, D and E. The conventional RT-PCR using primers targeting the CLRV coat protein coding region is recommended for determining sequence differences between strains. These findings will be useful in making regulatory decisions with regard to the testing requirements and the CLRV strains to be regulated in New Zealand. PMID:27129669

  11. Differences in properties and proteomes of the midribs contribute to the size of the leaf angle in two near-isogenic maize lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Cao, Di; Gong, Fangping; Ku, Lixia; Chen, Yanhui; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-14

    The midrib of maize leaves provides the primary support for the blade and is largely associated with leaf angle size. To elucidate the role of the midrib in leaf angle formation, the maize line Shen137 (larger leaf angle) and a near isogenic line (NIL, smaller leaf angle) were used in the present study. The results of the analysis showed that both the puncture forces and proximal collenchyma number of the midribs of the first and second leaves above the ear were higher in NIL than in Shen137. Comparative proteomic analysis was performed to reveal protein profile differences in the midribs of the 5th, 10th and 19th newly expanded leaves between Shen137 and NIL. Quantitative analysis of 24 identified midrib proteins indicated that the maximum changes in abundance of 22 proteins between Shen137 and NIL appeared at the 10th leaf stage, of which phosphoglycerate kinase, adenosine kinase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and adenylate kinase were implicated in glycometabolism. Thus, glycometabolism might be associated with leaf angle formation and the physical and mechanical properties of the midribs. These results provide insight into the mechanism underlying maize leaf angle formation.

  12. Branching angles reflect a trade-off between reducing trail maintenance costs or travel distances in leaf-cutting ants.

    PubMed

    Farji-Brener, Alejandro Gustavo; Chinchilla, Federico; Umaña, María Natalia; Ocasio-Torres, Maríia Elena; Chauta-Mellizo, Alexander; Acosta-Rojas, Diana; Marinaro, Sofía; Curth, Mónica de Torres; Amador-Vargas, Sabrina

    2015-02-01

    The design of transport paths in consuming entities that use routes to access food should be under strong selective pressures to reduce costs and increase benefits. We studied the adaptive nature of branching angles in foraging trail networks of the two most abundant tropical leaf-cutting ant species. We mathematically assessed how these angles should reflect the relative weight of the pressure for reducing either trail maintenance effort or traveling distances. Bifurcation angles of ant foraging trails strongly differed depending on the location of the nests. Ant colonies in open areas showed more acute branching angles, which best shorten travel distances but create longer new trail sections to maintain than a perpendicular branch, suggesting that trail maintenance costs are smaller compared to the benefit of reduced traveling distance. Conversely, ant colonies in forest showed less acute branching angles, indicating that maintenance costs are of larger importance relative to the benefits of shortening travel distances. The trail pattern evident in forests may be attributable to huge amounts of litterfall that .increase trail maintenance costs, and the abundant canopy cover that reduces traveling costs by mitigating direct sunlight and rain. These results suggest that branching angles represent a trade-off between reducing maintenance work and shortening travel distances, illustrating how animal constructions can adjust to diverse environmental conditions. This idea may help to understand diverse networks systems, including urban travel networks. PMID:26240872

  13. OsMYB103L, an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, influences leaf rolling and mechanical strength in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The shape of grass leaves possesses great value in both agronomy and developmental biology research. Leaf rolling is one of the important traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.) breeding. MYB transcription factors are one of the largest gene families and have important roles in plant development, metabolism and stress responses. However, little is known about their functions in rice. Results In this study, we report the functional characterization of a rice gene, OsMYB103L, which encodes an R2R3-MYB transcription factor. OsMYB103L was localized in the nucleus with transactivation activity. Overexpression of OsMYB103L in rice resulted in a rolled leaf phenotype. Further analyses showed that expression levels of several cellulose synthase genes (CESAs) were significantly increased, as was the cellulose content in OsMYB103L overexpressing lines. Knockdown of OsMYB103L by RNA interference led to a decreased level of cellulose content and reduced mechanical strength in leaves. Meanwhile, the expression levels of several CESA genes were decreased in these knockdown lines. Conclusions These findings suggest that OsMYB103L may target CESA genes for regulation of cellulose synthesis and could potentially be engineered for desirable leaf shape and mechanical strength in rice. PMID:24906444

  14. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol.

  15. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  16. Cherry leaf roll virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the blackberry cultivar Himalaya Giant naturally infected in England, CLRV is reported to cause chlorotic mottling and line patterning in leaves. Infected plants are stunted and may be killed. In three red raspberry cultivars naturally infected by CLRV in New Zealand, infected plants had stunted,...

  17. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Gregory J.; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson’s r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = −1.39° (−5.53, +2.75); t(22) = −0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen’s d = − 0.15 (−0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = −0.005 (−0.013, +0.003); t(22) = −1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen’s d = − 0.27 (−0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  18. Assessing the Impact of Central Appalachian Tree Species on Canopy Albedo via Measurement of Leaf Angles from Repeated Ground-based, Drone, and Hemispherical Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, B. E.; Erazo, D.; Heimerl, T.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite measurements of forest albedo are directly used in climate models, and could be used in models of the C and N cycles if we more fully understood the mechanism causing a strong correlation of forest albedo with canopy N and C assimilation. One attractive mechanism posits that tree species have evolved convergent leaf and canopy traits. While the leaf traits of tree species are known to drive variability in canopy N and C assimilation, linking tree species to variability in albedo is challenging because of the difficulty in measuring important canopy traits like leaf angle. To refine techniques for measuring leaf angle, and test the hypothesis that high albedo in the central Appalachians could be linked to the abundance of species with canopy traits of more horizontal leaf angles, we conducted four tests with ground-based, drone, and hemispherical photographs. First, we used a leveled camera on a steep slope to repeatedly, and directly measure the leaf angle of over 400 leaves within the canopies of oak, maple, and beech trees. Across all 21 repetitions (3 times a day on 7 dates between May and July), we observed consistent species differences in mean leaf angle (MLA), with maple always being the most horizontal (MLA = 14-18°) and oak the most vertical (MLA = 19-28°). Second, we again found highly significant species differences in MLA when we used a hexacopter drone with a camera on a self-leveling gimbal to make over 1020 direct measurements of leaf angle from six tree species in three broadleaf deciduous forest plots. Third, to measure MLA of a whole multi-species canopy, we compared a species abundance-weighted plot average of the drone-measured MLA values with an indirect, ground-based hemispherical photograph method. The strong agreement of these direct and indirect plot-level methods finally led us to compare a broader set of 61 plot-level hemispherical photo MLA measurements with canopy albedo measured by AVIRIS in broadleaf deciduous forests. In

  19. Dorsoventral asymmetry of photosynthesis and photoinhibition in flag leaves of two rice cultivars that differ in nitrogen response and leaf angle.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Etsushi; Hamaoka, Norimitsu; Araki, Takuya; Ueno, Osamu

    2014-08-01

    Rice is believed to show photosynthetic symmetry between adaxial and abaxial leaf sides. To verify this, we re-examined dorsoventral asymmetry in photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence and anatomical traits in flag leaves of two Oryza sativa cultivars that differ in nitrogen (N) response and in leaf angle: 'Akenohoshi', a cultivar that can adapt to low-N (LN), with low leaf angle (more erect leaves), and 'Shirobeniya', a cultivar that is unable to adapt to LN, with higher leaf angle. Plants were grown under standard-N (SN) and LN conditions. LN leaves of both cultivars became more erect than SN, but LN Akenohoshi still had more erect ones than Shirobeniya. Contrary to results of previous studies, leaves of both cultivars showed an asymmetry in photosynthetic rate between adaxial and abaxial sides (higher on the adaxial side) under SN. SN leaves of both cultivars showed lower susceptibility to photoinhibition on the adaxial side than on the abaxial side. However, leaves of Akenohoshi showed less asymmetry in these traits under LN than under SN, whereas leaves of Shirobeniya had similar degrees of asymmetry in these traits under both SN and LN. Both cultivars also showed dorsoventral asymmetry in anatomical traits of mesophyll tissue regardless of N level, but the degree of asymmetry was lower in LN Akenohoshi. These data reveal that rice leaves exhibit dorsoventral asymmetry in photosynthetic and anatomical features, and that the degree of asymmetry varies with cultivar and N level. It is suggested that lower leaf angles (particularly in Akenohoshi) in the presence of LN represent a light acclimation to prevent photoinhibition.

  20. Generating and Evaluation Leaf Area Index (LAI) from MODIS MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) Surface Reflectance Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Park, T.; Yan, K.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; CHOI, S.; Yang, B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Myneni, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    This study generates and evaluates prototype Leaf Area Index (LAI) product based on MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer's (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF, commonly known as surface reflectance) which is a product of MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) package. LAI is a key parameter of vegetation in characterizing interactions of energy and mass between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. On the other hand, MAIAC BRF is retrieved from a new atmospheric correction algorithm, which has higher spatial resolution and is believed to have more reliable cloud/aerosol detection technique than standard MODIS BRF product. Two main objectives of this study are: 1). Maintaining the radiative transfer theory based LAI algorithm's look up table (LUT) unchanged, to compare LAI product retrieved from different versions of BRF products (MODIS collection 5, collection 6 and MAIAC); 2). To adjust the LUT to resolve LAI's possible systematic discrepancies resulting from atmospheric correction methods within the input BRF other than our LAI algorithm. Before the LUT adjusting, comparing to standard MODIS products shows that MAIAC LAI product will overestimate among herbaceous biome types which have low LAI values, while underestimate among woody biome types which have relatively higher values. Based on the theory of radiative transfer of canopy spectral invariants, two biome and MAIAC specific configurable parameters (Single Scattering Albedo and Uncertainty) in the LUT are adjusted to minimize the inconsistency due to input BRFs. Experiments shows that our new result: 1). has good agreement with field measured data (e.g. DIRECT); 2) is consistent with standard MODIS LAI product.

  1. Molecular phylogenetics and evolution of host plant use in the Neotropical rolled leaf 'hispine' beetle genus Cephaloleia (Chevrolat) (Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae).

    PubMed

    McKenna, Duane D; Farrell, Brian D

    2005-10-01

    Here, we report the results of a species level phylogenetic study of Cephaloleia beetles designed to clarify relationships and patterns of host plant taxon and tissue use among species. Our study is based on up to 2088bp of mtDNA sequence data. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods of phylogenetic inference consistently recover a monophyletic Cephaloleia outside of a basal clade of primarily palm feeding species (the 'Arecaceae-feeding clade'), and C. irregularis. In all three analyses, the 'Arecaceae-feeding clade' includes Cephaloleia spp. with unusual morphological features, and a few species currently placed in other cassidine genera and tribes. All three analyses also recover a clade that includes all Zingiberales feeding Cephaloleia and most Cephaloleia species (the 'Zingiberales-feeding clade'). Two notable clades are found within the 'Zingiberales-feeding clade.' One is comprised of beetles that normally feed only on the young rolled leaves of plants in the families Heliconiaceae and Marantaceae (the 'Heliconiaceae & Marantaceae-feeding clade'). The other is comprised of relative host tissue generalist, primarily Zingiberales feeding species (the 'generalist-feeding clade'). A few species in the 'generalist-feeding clade' utilize Cyperaceae or Poaceae as hosts. Overall, relatively basal Cephaloleia (e.g., the 'Arecaceae clade') feed on relatively basal monocots (e.g., Cyclanthaceae and Arecaceae), and relatively derived Cephaloleia (e.g., the 'Zingiberales-feeding clade') feed on relatively derived monocots (mostly in the order Zingiberales). Zingiberales feeding and specialization on young rolled Zingiberales leaves have each apparently evolved just once in Cephaloleia. PMID:16054400

  2. Molecular phylogenetics and evolution of host plant use in the Neotropical rolled leaf 'hispine' beetle genus Cephaloleia (Chevrolat) (Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae).

    PubMed

    McKenna, Duane D; Farrell, Brian D

    2005-10-01

    Here, we report the results of a species level phylogenetic study of Cephaloleia beetles designed to clarify relationships and patterns of host plant taxon and tissue use among species. Our study is based on up to 2088bp of mtDNA sequence data. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods of phylogenetic inference consistently recover a monophyletic Cephaloleia outside of a basal clade of primarily palm feeding species (the 'Arecaceae-feeding clade'), and C. irregularis. In all three analyses, the 'Arecaceae-feeding clade' includes Cephaloleia spp. with unusual morphological features, and a few species currently placed in other cassidine genera and tribes. All three analyses also recover a clade that includes all Zingiberales feeding Cephaloleia and most Cephaloleia species (the 'Zingiberales-feeding clade'). Two notable clades are found within the 'Zingiberales-feeding clade.' One is comprised of beetles that normally feed only on the young rolled leaves of plants in the families Heliconiaceae and Marantaceae (the 'Heliconiaceae & Marantaceae-feeding clade'). The other is comprised of relative host tissue generalist, primarily Zingiberales feeding species (the 'generalist-feeding clade'). A few species in the 'generalist-feeding clade' utilize Cyperaceae or Poaceae as hosts. Overall, relatively basal Cephaloleia (e.g., the 'Arecaceae clade') feed on relatively basal monocots (e.g., Cyclanthaceae and Arecaceae), and relatively derived Cephaloleia (e.g., the 'Zingiberales-feeding clade') feed on relatively derived monocots (mostly in the order Zingiberales). Zingiberales feeding and specialization on young rolled Zingiberales leaves have each apparently evolved just once in Cephaloleia.

  3. Retrieval of remotely sensed LAI using Landsat ETM+ data and ground measurements of solar radiation and vegetation structure: Implication of leaf inclination angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Propastin, Pavel; Panferov, Oleg

    2013-12-01

    A time series of leaf area index (LAI) of a managed birch forest in Germany (near Dresden) has been developed based on 16-day normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from the Landsat ETM+ sensor at 30 m resolution. The Landsat ETM+ LAI was retrieved using a modified physical radiative transfer (RTM) model which establishes a relationship between LAI, fractional vegetation cover (fC), and given patterns of surface reflectance, view-illumination conditions and optical properties of vegetation. In situ measurements of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and vegetation structure parameters using hemispherical photography (HSP) served for calibration of model parameters, while data from litter collection at the study site provided the ground-based estimates of LAI for validation of modelling results. Influence of view-illumination conditions on optical properties of canopy was simulated by a view angle geometry model incorporating the solar zenith angle and the sensor viewing angle. Effects of intra-annual and inter-annual variability of structural properties of the canopy on the light extinction coefficient were simulated by implementing variability of the leaf inclination angle (LIA), which was confirmed in the study site. The results revealed good compatibility of the produced Landsat ETM+ LAI data set with the litter-estimated LAI. The results also showed high sensitivity of the LAI retrieval algorithm to variability of structural properties of the canopy: the implementation of LIA dynamics into the LAI retrieval algorithm significantly improved the model accuracy.

  4. Leaf rolling and stem fasciation in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) mutant are mediated through glutathione-dependent cellular and metabolic changes and associated with a metabolic diversion through cysteine during phenotypic reversal.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2014-01-01

    A Lathyrus sativus L. mutant isolated in ethylmethane sulfonate-treated M2 progeny of mother variety BioL-212 and designated as rlfL-1 was characterized by inwardly rolled-leaf and stem and bud fasciations. The mutant exhibited karyomorphological peculiarities in both mitosis and meiosis with origin of aneuploidy. The mitosis was vigorous with high frequency of divisional cells and their quick turnover presumably steered cell proliferations. Significant transcriptional upregulations of cysteine and glutathione synthesis and concomitant stimulations of glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense helped rlfL-1 mutant to maintain balanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolisms, as deduced by ROS-imaging study. Glutathione synthesis was shut down in buthionine sulfoximine- (BSO-) treated mother plant and mutant, and leaf-rolling and stems/buds fasciations in the mutant were reversed, accompanied by normalization of mitotic cell division process. Antioxidant defense was downregulated under low glutathione-redox but cysteine-desulfurations and photorespiratory glycolate oxidase transcripts were markedly overexpressed, preventing cysteine overaccumulation but resulted in excess H2O2 in BSO-treated mutant. This led to oxidative damage in proliferating cells, manifested by severe necrosis in rolled-leaf and fasciated stems. Results indicated vital role of glutathione in maintaining abnormal proliferations in plant organs, and its deficiency triggered phenotypic reversal through metabolic diversions of cysteine and concomitant cellular and metabolic modulations. PMID:24987684

  5. Leaf rolling and stem fasciation in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) mutant are mediated through glutathione-dependent cellular and metabolic changes and associated with a metabolic diversion through cysteine during phenotypic reversal.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2014-01-01

    A Lathyrus sativus L. mutant isolated in ethylmethane sulfonate-treated M2 progeny of mother variety BioL-212 and designated as rlfL-1 was characterized by inwardly rolled-leaf and stem and bud fasciations. The mutant exhibited karyomorphological peculiarities in both mitosis and meiosis with origin of aneuploidy. The mitosis was vigorous with high frequency of divisional cells and their quick turnover presumably steered cell proliferations. Significant transcriptional upregulations of cysteine and glutathione synthesis and concomitant stimulations of glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense helped rlfL-1 mutant to maintain balanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolisms, as deduced by ROS-imaging study. Glutathione synthesis was shut down in buthionine sulfoximine- (BSO-) treated mother plant and mutant, and leaf-rolling and stems/buds fasciations in the mutant were reversed, accompanied by normalization of mitotic cell division process. Antioxidant defense was downregulated under low glutathione-redox but cysteine-desulfurations and photorespiratory glycolate oxidase transcripts were markedly overexpressed, preventing cysteine overaccumulation but resulted in excess H2O2 in BSO-treated mutant. This led to oxidative damage in proliferating cells, manifested by severe necrosis in rolled-leaf and fasciated stems. Results indicated vital role of glutathione in maintaining abnormal proliferations in plant organs, and its deficiency triggered phenotypic reversal through metabolic diversions of cysteine and concomitant cellular and metabolic modulations.

  6. Leaf Rolling and Stem Fasciation in Grass Pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) Mutant Are Mediated through Glutathione-Dependent Cellular and Metabolic Changes and Associated with a Metabolic Diversion through Cysteine during Phenotypic Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2014-01-01

    A Lathyrus sativus L. mutant isolated in ethylmethane sulfonate-treated M2 progeny of mother variety BioL-212 and designated as rlfL-1 was characterized by inwardly rolled-leaf and stem and bud fasciations. The mutant exhibited karyomorphological peculiarities in both mitosis and meiosis with origin of aneuploidy. The mitosis was vigorous with high frequency of divisional cells and their quick turnover presumably steered cell proliferations. Significant transcriptional upregulations of cysteine and glutathione synthesis and concomitant stimulations of glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense helped rlfL-1 mutant to maintain balanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolisms, as deduced by ROS-imaging study. Glutathione synthesis was shut down in buthionine sulfoximine- (BSO-) treated mother plant and mutant, and leaf-rolling and stems/buds fasciations in the mutant were reversed, accompanied by normalization of mitotic cell division process. Antioxidant defense was downregulated under low glutathione-redox but cysteine-desulfurations and photorespiratory glycolate oxidase transcripts were markedly overexpressed, preventing cysteine overaccumulation but resulted in excess H2O2 in BSO-treated mutant. This led to oxidative damage in proliferating cells, manifested by severe necrosis in rolled-leaf and fasciated stems. Results indicated vital role of glutathione in maintaining abnormal proliferations in plant organs, and its deficiency triggered phenotypic reversal through metabolic diversions of cysteine and concomitant cellular and metabolic modulations. PMID:24987684

  7. Cross-directional interlocking of rolls in an air press of a papermaking machine

    DOEpatents

    Beck, David A.; Gorshe, Thomas

    2003-05-13

    An air press for pressing a paper web is composed of a plurality of rolls including at least a first roll and a second roll. The first roll and the second roll are positioned adjacent one another and form a first nip therebetween. Further, the first roll and the second roll each have a roll end, the roll end of the first roll adjoining the roll end of the second roll. A bevel plate is attached to the roll end of the first roll, the bevel plate having at least a first angled plate face. A seal ring is positioned adjacent the roll end of the second roll, the seal ring being juxtaposed to the bevel plate. The seal ring has at least a first angled ring face, and the first angled ring face mates with the first angled plate face.

  8. The ZmCLA4 gene in the qLA4-1 QTL controls leaf angle in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Ku, L X; Han, Z P; Guo, S L; Liu, H J; Zhang, Z Z; Cao, L R; Cui, X J; Chen, Y H

    2014-09-01

    Maize architecture is a major contributing factor to their high level of productivity. Maize varieties with an erect-leaf-angle (LA) phenotype, which increases light harvesting for photosynthesis and grain-filling, have elevated grain yields. Although a large body of information is available on the map positions of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for LA, little is known about the molecular mechanism of these QTL. In this study, the ZmCLA4 gene, which is responsible for the qLA4-1 QTL associated with LA, was identified and isolated by fine mapping and positional cloning. The ZmCLA4 gene is an orthologue of LAZY1 in rice and Arabidopsis. Sequence analysis revealed two SNPs and two indel sites in ZmCLA4 between the D132 and D132-NIL inbred maize lines. Association analysis showed that C/T/mutation667 and CA/indel965 were strongly associated with LA. Subcellular localization verified the functions of a predicted transmembrane domain and a nuclear localization signal in ZmCLA4. Transgenic maize plants with a down-regulated ZmCLA4 RNAi construct and transgenic rice plants over-expressing ZmCLA4 confirmed that the ZmCLA4 gene located in the qLA4 QTL regulated LA. The allelic variants of ZmCLA4 in the D132 and D132-NIL lines exhibited significant differences in leaf angle. ZmCLA4 transcript accumulation was higher in D132-NIL than in D132 during all the developmental stages and was negatively correlated with LA. The gravitropic response was increased and cell shape and number at the leaf and stem junctions were altered in D132-NIL relative to D132. These findings suggest that ZmCLA4 plays a negative role in the control of maize LA through the alteration of mRNA accumulation, leading to altered shoot gravitropism and cell development. The cloning of the gene responsible for the qLA4-1 QTL provides information on the molecular mechanisms of LA in maize and an opportunity for the improvement of plant architecture with regard to LA through maize breeding.

  9. Increased Leaf Angle1, a Raf-Like MAPKKK That Interacts with a Nuclear Protein Family, Regulates Mechanical Tissue Formation in the Lamina Joint of Rice[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jing; Zhang, Baocai; Wang, Nili; Zhou, Yihua; Xiong, Lizhong

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs), which function at the top level of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, are clustered into three groups. However, no Group C Raf-like MAPKKKs have yet been functionally identified. We report here the characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant, increased leaf angle1 (ila1), resulting from a T-DNA insertion in a Group C MAPKKK gene. The increased leaf angle in ila1 is caused by abnormal vascular bundle formation and cell wall composition in the leaf lamina joint, as distinct from the mechanism observed in brassinosteroid-related mutants. Phosphorylation assays revealed that ILA1 is a functional kinase with Ser/Thr kinase activity. ILA1 is predominantly resident in the nucleus and expressed in the vascular bundles of leaf lamina joints. Yeast two-hybrid screening identified six closely related ILA1 interacting proteins (IIPs) of unknown function. Using representative IIPs, the interaction of ILA1 and IIPs was confirmed in vivo. IIPs were localized in the nucleus and showed transactivation activity. Furthermore, ILA1 could phosphorylate IIP4, indicating that IIPs may be the downstream substrates of ILA1. Microarray analyses of leaf lamina joints provided additional evidence for alterations in mechanical strength in ila1. ILA1 is thus a key factor regulating mechanical tissue formation at the leaf lamina joint. PMID:22207574

  10. Video Analysis of Rolling Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phommarach, S.; Wattanakasiwich, P.; Johnston, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we studied the rolling motion of solid and hollow cylinders down an inclined plane at different angles. The motions were captured on video at 300 frames s[superscript -1], and the videos were analyzed frame by frame using video analysis software. Data from the real motion were compared with the theory of rolling down an inclined…

  11. Computational Analysis of Ares I Roll Control System Jet Interaction Effects on Rolling Moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2011-01-01

    The computational flow solver USM3D was used to investigate the jet interaction effects from the roll control system on the rolling moment of the Ares I full protuberance configuration at wind tunnel Reynolds numbers. Solutions were computed at freestream Mach numbers from M = 0.5 to M = 5 at the angle of attack 0deg, at the angle of attack 3.5deg for a roll angle of 120deg, and at the angle of attack 7deg for roll angles of 120deg and 210deg. Results indicate that the RoCS housing provided a beneficial jet interaction effect on vehicle rolling moment for M > or = 0.9. Most of the components downstream of the roll control system housing contributed to jet interaction penalties on vehicle rolling moment.

  12. Metal rolling - Asymmetrical rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, V.; Raţiu, S.; Kiss, I.

    2016-02-01

    The development of theory and practice related to the asymmetric longitudinal rolling process is based on the general theory of metalworking by pressure and symmetric rolling theory, to which a large number of scientists brought their contribution. The rolling of metal materials was a serious problem throughout history, either economically or technically, because the plating technologies enabled the consumption of raw materials (scarce and expensive) to be reduced, while improving the mechanical properties. Knowing the force parameters related to asymmetric rolling leads to the optimization of energy and raw material consumption. This paper presents data on symmetric rolling process, in order to comparatively highlight the particularities of the asymmetric process.

  13. Rolling Reloaded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Simon A.; Nieminen, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Not so long ago a new observation about rolling motion was described: for a rolling wheel, there is a set of points with instantaneous velocities directed at or away from the centre of the wheel; these points form a circle whose diameter connects the centre of the wheel to the wheel's point of contact with the ground (Sharma 1996 "Eur. J. Phys."…

  14. 46 CFR 28.575 - Severe wind and roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Severe wind and roll. 28.575 Section 28.575 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.575 Severe wind and roll. (a) Each vessel must meet paragraphs (f) and (g) of this section when subjected to the gust wind heeling arm and the angle of roll to windward...

  15. 46 CFR 28.575 - Severe wind and roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Severe wind and roll. 28.575 Section 28.575 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.575 Severe wind and roll. (a) Each vessel must meet paragraphs (f) and (g) of this section when subjected to the gust wind heeling arm and the angle of roll to windward...

  16. 46 CFR 28.575 - Severe wind and roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Severe wind and roll. 28.575 Section 28.575 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.575 Severe wind and roll. (a) Each vessel must meet paragraphs (f) and (g) of this section when subjected to the gust wind heeling arm and the angle of roll to windward...

  17. Effect of temper rolling on final shape defects in a V-section roll forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abvabi, Akbar; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter D.; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Roll forming is a continuous process in which a flat strip is shaped to the desired profile by sequential bending in a series of roll stands. Because of the large variety of applications of roll forming in the industry, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is increasingly utilized for roll forming process design. Bending is the dominant deformation mode in roll forming. Sheet materials used in this process are generally temper rolled, roller- or tension- leveled. These processes introduce residual stresses into the material, and recent studies have shown that those affect the material behavior in bending. In this study a numerical model of the temper rolling (skin passing) process was used to determine a residual stress distribution in a dual phase, DP780, steel strip. A 5-stand roll forming process for the forming of a V-section was modeled, and the effect of various thickness reduction levels in the temper rolling process on the final shape defects was analyzed. The results show that a small thickness reduction in the temper rolling process decreases the maximum bow height but the final springback angle increases. It is also shown that reasonable model accuracy can be achieved by including the residual stress information due to temper rolling as initial condition in the numerical modeling of a roll forming process.

  18. Rolling Moments Due to Rolling and Yaw for Four Wing Models in Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results of a series of autorotation and torque tests on four different rotating wing systems at various rates of roll and at several angles of yaw. The investigation covered an angle of attack range up to 90 degrees and angles of yaw of 0 degree, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, and 20 degrees. The tests were made in a 5-foot, closed-throat atmospheric wind tunnel. The object of the tests was primarily to determine the effects of various angles of yaw on the rolling moments of the rotating wings up to large angles of attack. It was found that at angles of attack above that of maximum lift the rolling moments on the wings due to yaw (or side slip) from 5 degrees to 20 degrees were roughly of the same magnitude as those due to rolling. There was a wide variation in magnitude of the rolling moment due to yaw angle. The rates and ranges of stable autorotation for the monoplane models were considerably increased by yaw, whereas for an unstaggered biplane they were little affected. The immediate cause of the rolling moment due to yaw is apparently the building up of large loads on the forward wing tip and the reduction of loads on the rearward wing tip.

  19. Silk gland gene expression during larval-pupal transitionin the cotton leaf roller Sylepta derogate (Lepidoptera: pyralidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cotton leaf roller, Sylepta derogata, is a silk-producing insect pest. While young larvae feed on the underside of leaves, the older ones roll cotton leaves and feed on the leaf edges, which defoliates cotton plants. The larvae produce silk to stabilize the rolled leaf and to balloon from used t...

  20. Measurements of canard-induced roll oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Levin, D.

    1985-01-01

    A small canard wing was installed in front of a delta wing which was mounted on a free-to-roll sting balance in a low-speed wind tunnel. The leading edge vortices, originating from the canard, enhanced self-induced roll oscillations at test conditions for which the basic delta wing would otherwise have been stable. Time-dependent roll angle, and normal and side force data recorded during these oscillations are presented along with their phase relations. It was found that the canard increased the range of angle of attack at which self-induced oscillations occurred. Also, at an angle of attack of about 46 deg asymmetric oscillations are observed.

  1. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  2. Three-dimensional lamina architecture alters light-harvesting efficiency in Fagus: a leaf-scale analysis.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Stefan; Niinemets, Ulo; Cescatti, Alessandro; Tenhunen, John D

    2003-06-01

    Modification of foliage exposition and morphology by seasonal average integrated quantum flux density (Qint) was investigated in the canopies of the shade-tolerant late-successional deciduous tree species Fagus orientalis Lipsky and Fagus sylvatica L. Because the leaves were not entirely flat anywhere in the canopy, the leaf lamina was considered to be three-dimensional and characterized by the cross-sectional angle between the leaf halves (theta). Both branch and lamina inclination angles with respect to the horizontal scaled positively with irradiance in the canopy, allowing light to penetrate to deeper canopy horizons. Lamina cross-sectional angle varied from 170 degrees in the most shaded leaves to 90-100 degrees in leaves in the top of the canopy. Thus, the degree of leaf rolling increased with increasing Qint, further reducing the light-interception efficiency of the upper-canopy leaves. Simulations of the dependence of foliage light-interception efficiency on theta demonstrated that decreases in theta primarily reduce the interception efficiency of direct irradiance, but that diffuse irradiance was equally efficiently intercepted over the entire range of theta values in our study. Despite strong alteration in foliage light-harvesting capacity within the canopy and greater transmittance of the upper crown compared with the lower canopy, mean incident irradiances varied more than 20-fold within the canopy, indicating inherent limitations in light partitioning within the canopy. This extensive canopy light gradient was paralleled by plastic changes in foliar structure and chemistry. Leaf dry mass per unit area varied 3-4-fold between the canopy top and bottom, providing an important means of scaling foliage nitrogen contents and photosynthetic capacity per unit area with Qint. Although leaf structure versus light relationships were qualitatively similar in all cases, there were important tree-to-tree and species-to-species variations, as well as evidence of

  3. Strelitzia reginae leaf as a natural template for anisotropic wetting and superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Mele, Elisa; Girardo, Salvatore; Pisignano, Dario

    2012-03-20

    Artificial surfaces that exhibit unidirectional water spreading and superhydrophobicity are obtained by Strelitzia reginae leaves. Both green and dried leaves are used, thus exploiting the plant senescence. We demonstrate that the natural drying process of the leaves strongly affects the surface morphology and wettability. Polymeric stamps from the green leaf show an arrangement of periodic microridges/microgrooves that favor anisotropic wetting, with a water contact angle (WCA) variation of about 21% along the two principal directions. Instead, the shrinkage of the leaf tissue, as a consequence of the natural dehydration process, induces an enhancement of the superficial corrugation. This results in the establishment of a superhydrophobic state, which shows a WCA of up to 160°, and water rolling off. S. reginae leaves are therefore easily accessible stamps suitable for controlling wettability and realizing surfaces that exhibit various wetting behaviors. PMID:22401575

  4. Vortex-lift roll-control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A wing is described for aircraft of cropped, arrow-type planform with thin leading and side edges. The wing has a pivotable tip to alter the crop angle of the wing during flight. Increasing the crop angle causes the wing side edge to become a trailing edge which reduces the strength of the side edge vortex flow. Decreasing the crop angle causes opposite results, in particular the side edge is now a leading edge and can generate a leading edge vortex flow. The wing constitutes a roll control device for aircraft of the stated design particularly effective at higher angles of attack.

  5. WORK ROLLS AND BACKUP ROLLS FROM #43 AND #44 MILLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORK ROLLS AND BACKUP ROLLS FROM #43 AND #44 MILLS AWAIT DRESSING IN ROLL GRINDER. ROLL SHOP OPERATIONS, INCLUDING REPAIR, CLEANING AND GREASING, ARE HOUSED IN THE REROLL BAY. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  6. Facility No. 175, interior detail showing rolling doors, trusses, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 175, interior detail showing rolling doors, trusses, and angled monitor roof - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Landplane Hangar Type, Wasp Boulevard and Gambier Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Leaf Angle, Light Interception, and Water Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Alan K.; Smith, Dixie L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an exercise that demonstrates how plants cope with multiple resource limitations in the field. Stimulates students to think about interactions among multiple limited resources and the challenges plants as immobile organisms face when characteristics that increase the capture of one resource negatively impact the availability of another.…

  8. Comparison of half and full-leaf shape feature extraction for leaf classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainin, Mohd Shamrie; Ahmad, Faudziah; Alfred, Rayner

    2016-08-01

    Shape is the main information for leaf feature that most of the current literatures in leaf identification utilize the whole leaf for feature extraction and to be used in the leaf identification process. In this paper, study of half-leaf features extraction for leaf identification is carried out and the results are compared with the results obtained from the leaf identification based on a full-leaf features extraction. Identification and classification is based on shape features that are represented as cosines and sinus angles. Six single classifiers obtained from WEKA and seven ensemble methods are used to compare their performance accuracies over this data. The classifiers were trained using 65 leaves in order to classify 5 different species of preliminary collection of Malaysian medicinal plants. The result shows that half-leaf features extraction can be used for leaf identification without decreasing the predictive accuracy.

  9. Internal roll compression system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Graydon E.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a machine for squeezing water out of peat or other material of low tensile strength; the machine including an inner roll eccentrically positioned inside a tubular outer roll, so as to form a gradually increasing pinch area at one point therebetween, so that, as the rolls rotate, the material is placed between the rolls, and gets wrung out when passing through the pinch area.

  10. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  11. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  12. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-15

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  13. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-01

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002″. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  14. Diamond turning of high-precision roll-to-roll imprinting molds for fabricating subwavelength gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Wei; Yan, Jiwang; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2016-06-01

    Diamond turning of high-precision molds is a vital process for the roll-to-roll-based ultraviolet resin imprinting process in fabricating subwavelength gratings. The effects of the grating shape and grating period on diffraction efficiencies and diffraction angles were simulated. Experiments were then conducted to examine the effects of shape design, grating period, and cutting speed on machinability of the mold. According to the optical measurement results, the performance of the subwavelength gratings matched the design well at various incident angles. The results confirm that diamond turning of high-precision molds is a feasible approach for ensuring the continual mass production of subwavelength gratings.

  15. The effects of forming parameters on conical ring rolling process.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wen; Zhao, Guoqun; Guan, Yanjin

    2014-01-01

    The plastic penetration condition and biting-in condition of a radial conical ring rolling process with a closed die structure on the top and bottom of driven roll, simplified as RCRRCDS, were established. The reasonable value range of mandrel feed rate in rolling process was deduced. A coupled thermomechanical 3D FE model of RCRRCDS process was established. The changing laws of equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) and temperature distributions with rolling time were investigated. The effects of ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes on the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions, average rolling force, and average rolling moment were studied. The results indicate that the PEEQ at the inner layer and outer layer of rolled ring are larger than that at the middle layer of ring; the temperatures at the "obtuse angle zone" of ring's cross-section are higher than those at "acute angle zone"; the temperature at the central part of ring is higher than that at the middle part of ring's outer surfaces. As the ring's outer radius growth rate increases at its reasonable value ranges, the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions increase. Finally, the optimal values of the ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes were obtained.

  16. The Effects of Forming Parameters on Conical Ring Rolling Process

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wen; Zhao, Guoqun; Guan, Yanjin

    2014-01-01

    The plastic penetration condition and biting-in condition of a radial conical ring rolling process with a closed die structure on the top and bottom of driven roll, simplified as RCRRCDS, were established. The reasonable value range of mandrel feed rate in rolling process was deduced. A coupled thermomechanical 3D FE model of RCRRCDS process was established. The changing laws of equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) and temperature distributions with rolling time were investigated. The effects of ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes on the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions, average rolling force, and average rolling moment were studied. The results indicate that the PEEQ at the inner layer and outer layer of rolled ring are larger than that at the middle layer of ring; the temperatures at the “obtuse angle zone” of ring's cross-section are higher than those at “acute angle zone”; the temperature at the central part of ring is higher than that at the middle part of ring's outer surfaces. As the ring's outer radius growth rate increases at its reasonable value ranges, the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions increase. Finally, the optimal values of the ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes were obtained. PMID:25202716

  17. Effect of herbivore damage on broad leaf motion in wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Nicholas; Kothari, Adit

    2015-11-01

    Terrestrial plants regularly experience wind that imposes aerodynamic forces on the plants' leaves. Passive leaf motion (e.g. fluttering) and reconfiguration (e.g. rolling into a cone shape) in wind can affect the drag on the leaf. In the study of passive leaf motion in wind, little attention has been given to the effect of herbivory. Herbivores may alter leaf motion in wind by making holes in the leaf. Also, a small herbivore (e.g. snail) on a leaf can act as a point mass, thereby affecting the leaf's motion in wind. Conversely, accelerations imposed on an herbivore sitting on a leaf by the moving leaf may serve as a defense by dislodging the herbivore. In the present study, we investigated how point masses (>1 g) and holes in leaves of the tuliptree affected passive leaf motion in turbulent winds of 1 and 5 m s-1. Leaf motion was unaffected by holes in the leaf surface (about 10% of leaf area), but an herbivore's mass significantly damped the accelerations of fluttering leaves. These results suggest that an herbivore's mass, but not the damage it inflicts, can affect leaf motion in the wind. Furthermore, the damping of leaf fluttering from an herbivore's mass may prevent passive leaf motions from being an effective herbivore defense.

  18. Leaf Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    Leaf activities can provide a means of using basic concepts of outdoor education to learn in elementary level subject areas. Equipment needed includes leaves, a clipboard with paper, and a pencil. A bag of leaves may be brought into the classroom if weather conditions or time do not permit going outdoors. Each student should pick a leaf, examine…

  19. TECHNICAL NOTE: Multiple-degrees-of-freedom electroelastomer roll actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Qibing; Rosenthal, Marcus; Stanford, Scott; Prahlad, Harsha; Pelrine, Ron

    2004-10-01

    Electroelastomers (electroactive elastomers) such as the 3M VHB 4910 acrylic adhesive films have exhibited up to 380% strain in area expansion at 5 6 kV when they are highly prestrained. By rolling highly prestrained electroelastomer films around a compression spring, we have demonstrated multifunctional electroelastomer rolls (MERs, or spring rolls) that combine load bearing, actuation, and sensing functions. We extended the design to two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) and 3-DOF spring rolls by patterning the electrodes to align radially on two and four circumferential spans of the rolls, respectively. Multiple-DOF spring rolls retain the linear actuation of 1-DOF spring rolls with additional bending actuation. Mathematical equations are derived to correlate the bending angle and lateral force of the rolls with the actuated stroke in one of the electroded spans. Two-DOF spring rolls with a 1.4 cm outside diameter, 6.8 cm axial length, and 11 g weight have been fabricated; these rolls have a 90° maximum actuation bending angle, 0.7 N maximum lateral force, and up to 15 N blocked axial force. Three-DOF spring rolls with a 2.3 cm outside diameter, 9.0 cm axial length, and 29 g weight exhibit a 35° maximum bending angle and 1.0 N maximum lateral force. These specifications can be modified by variations in roll parameters according to the equations. Multi-DOF spring rolls are easy to fabricate, compact, multifunctional, and mechanically robust. They represent a radically new actuation technology and may enable a number of unique applications. We have demonstrated a small walking robot, MERbot, with one 2-DOF spring roll as each of its six legs. The robot's speed is as high as 13.6 cm s-1 or two-thirds of its length per second. 'Sushi rolls' have also been fabricated: these consist of six 2-DOF springs connected in series and monolithic in structure. The sushi rolls can be driven so as to generate wavelike or serpentine motion.

  20. Conical Euler analysis and active roll suppression for unsteady vortical flows about rolling delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1993-01-01

    A conical Euler code was developed to study unsteady vortex-dominated flows about rolling, highly swept delta wings undergoing either forced motions or free-to-roll motions that include active roll suppression. The flow solver of the code involves a multistage, Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme that uses a cell-centered, finite-volume, spatial discretization of the Euler equations on an unstructured grid of triangles. The code allows for the additional analysis of the free to-roll case by simultaneously integrating in time the rigid-body equation of motion with the governing flow equations. Results are presented for a delta wing with a 75 deg swept, sharp leading edge at a free-stream Mach number of 1.2 and at 10 deg, 20 deg, and 30 deg angle of attack alpha. At the lower angles of attack (10 and 20 deg), forced-harmonic analyses indicate that the rolling-moment coefficients provide a positive damping, which is verified by free-to-roll calculations. In contrast, at the higher angle of attack (30 deg), a forced-harmonic analysis indicates that the rolling-moment coefficient provides negative damping at the small roll amplitudes. A free-to-roll calculation for this case produces an initially divergent response, but as the amplitude of motion grows with time, the response transitions to a wing-rock type of limit cycle oscillation, which is characteristic of highly swept delta wings. This limit cycle oscillation may be actively suppressed through the use of a rate-feedback control law and antisymmetrically deflected leading-edge flaps. Descriptions of the conical Euler flow solver and the free-to roll analysis are included in this report. Results are presented that demonstrate how the systematic analysis of the forced response of the delta wing can be used to predict the stable, neutrally stable, and unstable free response of the delta wing. These results also give insight into the flow physics associated with unsteady vortical flows about delta wings undergoing forced

  1. Controlling roll perturbations in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Beatus, Tsevi; Guckenheimer, John M.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Owing to aerodynamic instabilities, stable flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here, we investigate how flies control perturbations along their body roll angle, which is unstable and their most sensitive degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly and apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air. Fast video shows flies correct perturbations up to 100° within 30 ± 7 ms by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear proportional–integral controller. For more aggressive perturbations, we show evidence for nonlinear and hierarchical control mechanisms. Flies respond to roll perturbations within 5 ms, making this correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom. PMID:25762650

  2. Spray coating of superhydrophobic and angle-independent coloured films.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dengteng; Yang, Lili; Wu, Gaoxiang; Yang, Shu

    2014-03-01

    Angle-independent coloured films with superhydrophobicity were fabricated from quasi-amorphous arrays of monodispersed fluorinated silica nanoparticles via one-step spray coating. The film exhibited a high contact angle (>150°) and a low roll-off angle (~2°) and the colour could be tuned to blue, green and moccasin by varying the size of the nanoparticles.

  3. How to pattern a leaf.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, N; O'Connor, D; Moon, J; Lewis, M; Hake, S

    2012-01-01

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, and function, all leaves initiate in the same manner: from the flanks of a meristem. The maize leaf is useful for analysis of patterning due to the wealth of mutants and the distinct tissues along the proximal distal axis. The blade is distal, the sheath is proximal, and the ligule forms at the blade/sheath boundary. Establishment of this boundary involves the transcription factors LIGULELESS1 and LIGULELESS2 and the kinase LIGULELESS NARROW. The meristem-specific protein KNOTTED1 (KN1) binds and modulates the lg2 gene. Given the localization of KN1 at the proximal end of the leaf from the time of inception, we hypothesize that KN1 has a role in establishing the very proximal end of the leaf, whereas an auxin maximum guides the growing distal tip. PMID:23174765

  4. Understanding Rolle's Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parameswaran, Revathy

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment studying twelfth grade students' understanding of Rolle's Theorem. In particular, we study the influence of different concept images that students employ when solving reasoning tasks related to Rolle's Theorem. We argue that students' "container schema" and "motion schema" allow for rich concept images.…

  5. Wind-tunnel investigation at supersonic speeds of a canard-controlled missile with fixed and free-rolling tail fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was made at free stream Mach numbers from 1.70 to 2.86 to determine the effects of fixed and free rolling tail fin afterbodies on the static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of a cruciform canard controlled missile model. The effect of small canard roll and yaw control deflections was also examined. The results indicate that the fixed and free rolling tail configurations have about the same lift curve slope and longitudinal stability level at low angles of attack. For the free rolling tail configuration, the canards provide conventional roll control with no roll control reversal at low angles of attack. The free rolling tail configuration reduced induced roll due to model roll angle and canard yaw control.

  6. OsLBD3-7 Overexpression Induced Adaxially Rolled Leaves in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Shao, Qinghao; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bin; Li, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate leaf rolling enhances erect-leaf habits and photosynthetic efficiency, which consequently improves grain yield. Here, we reported the novel lateral organ boundaries domain (LBD) gene OsLBD3-7, which is involved in the regulation of leaf rolling. OsLBD3-7 works as a transcription activator and its protein is located on the plasma membrane and in the nucleus. Overexpression of OsLBD3-7 leads to narrow and adaxially rolled leaves. Microscopy of flag leaf cross-sections indicated that overexpression of OsLBD3-7 led to a decrease in both bulliform cell size and number. Transcriptional analysis showed that key genes that had been reported to be negative regulators of bulliform cell development were up-regulated in transgenic plants. These results indicated that OsLBD3-7 might acts as an upstream regulatory gene of bulliform cell development to regulate leaf rolling, which will give more insights on the leaf rolling regulation mechanism. PMID:27258066

  7. Roll-to-roll embossing of optical linear Fresnel lens polymer film for solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, XinQuan; Liu, Kui; Shan, Xuechuan; Liu, Yuchan

    2014-12-15

    Roll-to-roll manufacturing has been proven to be a high-throughput and low-cost technology for continuous fabrication of functional optical polymer films. In this paper, we have firstly studied a complete manufacturing cycle of linear Fresnel lens polymer film for solar concentration in the aspects of ultra-precision diamond machining of metal roller mold, roll-to-roll embossing, and measurement on film profile and functionality. A metal roller mold patterned with linear Fresnel lenses is obtained using single point diamond turning technique. The roller mold is installed onto a self-developed roll-to-roll UV embossing system to realize continuous manufacturing of linear Fresnel lens film. Profile measurement of the machined roller mold and the embossed polymer film, which is conducted using a stylus profilometer, shows good agreement between measured facet angles with designed ones. Functionality test is conducted on a solar simulation system with a reference solar cell, and results show that strong light concentration is realized.

  8. Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leaves are the most important organs for plants. Without leaves, plants cannot capture light energy or synthesize organic compounds via photosynthesis. Without leaves, plants would be unable perceive diverse environmental conditions, particularly those relating to light quality/quantity. Without leaves, plants would not be able to flower because all floral organs are modified leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana is a good model system for analyzing mechanisms of eudicotyledonous, simple-leaf development. The first section of this review provides a brief history of studies on development in Arabidopsis leaves. This history largely coincides with a general history of advancement in understanding of the genetic mechanisms operating during simple-leaf development in angiosperms. In the second section, I outline events in Arabidopsis leaf development, with emphasis on genetic controls. Current knowledge of six important components in these developmental events is summarized in detail, followed by concluding remarks and perspectives. PMID:23864837

  9. Correcting Quadrupole Roll in Magnetic Lenses with Skew Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell

    2014-11-10

    Quadrupole rolls (i.e. rotation around the magnet axis) are known to be a significant source of image blurring in magnetic quadrupole lenses. These rolls may be caused by errors in mechanical mounting of quadrupoles, by uneven radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent-magnet quadrupoles, etc. Here a four-quadrupole ×10 lens with so-called ”Russian” or A -B B-A symmetry is used as a model problem. Existing SLAC 1/2 in. bore high-gradient quadrupoles are used in the design. The dominant quadrupole roll effect is changes in the first-order part of the transfer map (the R matrix) from the object to the image plane (Note effects on the R matrix can be of first order in rotation angle for some R-matrix elements and second order in rotation angle for other elements, as shown below). It is possible to correct roll-induced image blur by mechanically adjusting the roll angle of one or more of the quadrupoles. Usually, rotation of one quadrupole is sufficient to correct most of the combined effect of rolls in all four quadrupoles. There are drawbacks to this approach, however, since mechanical roll correction requires multiple entries into experimental area to make the adjustments, which are made according to their effect on images. An alternative is to use a single electromagnetic skew quadrupole corrector placed either between two of the quadrupoles or after the fourth quadrupole (so-called “non-local” correction). The basic feasibility of skew quadrupole correction of quadrupole roll effects is demonstrated here. Rolls of the third lens quadrupole of up to about 1 milliradian can be corrected with a 15 cm long skew quadrupole with a gradient of up to 1 T/m. Since the effect of rolls of the remaining three lens quadrupoles are lower, a weaker skew quadrupole can be used to correct them. Non-local correction of quadrupole roll effects by skew quadrupoles is shown to be about one-half as effective as local correction (i.e. rotating individual quadrupoles to zero

  10. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species in apoplastic and symplastic areas of rolled leaves in Ctenanthe setosa under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Neslihan; Terzi, Rabiye; Sağlam, Aykut; Kadioğlu, Asim

    2010-09-01

    The correspondence among apoplastic and symplastic antioxidant status, stomatal conductance and water potential was investigated during leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) under drought stress. Apoplastic and symplastic extractions of leaf and petiole were performed at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others are intermediate form). In the leaf symplast, the highest changes were found in catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities when compared to score 1 during leaf rolling. No significant change was observed in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities in the symplast of leaf during the rolling. The same phenomenon was also present in the symplast of petiole except APX activity. In the leaf apoplast, the highest increase occurred in APX and GPX activities, whilst a slight increase in CAT and SOD activities. In the apoplast of petiole, the highest increment was found only in GPX activity, while there were small increases in SOD, APX and CAT activities. Hydrogen peroxide content increased up to score 3 in the apoplast and symplast of leaf and petiole but then slightly decreased. Also, superoxide production increased in the leaf and petiole apoplast but its quantity in the apoplast was much more than that of the symplast. On the other hand, NAD(P)H oxidase activity increased in the leaf but no change was observed in the petiole. In conclusion, as a result of water deficit during leaf rolling antioxidant enzymes are induced to scavenging of ROS produced in symplast and apoplast. PMID:20724275

  11. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species in apoplastic and symplastic areas of rolled leaves in Ctenanthe setosa under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Neslihan; Terzi, Rabiye; Sağlam, Aykut; Kadioğlu, Asim

    2010-09-01

    The correspondence among apoplastic and symplastic antioxidant status, stomatal conductance and water potential was investigated during leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) under drought stress. Apoplastic and symplastic extractions of leaf and petiole were performed at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others are intermediate form). In the leaf symplast, the highest changes were found in catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities when compared to score 1 during leaf rolling. No significant change was observed in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities in the symplast of leaf during the rolling. The same phenomenon was also present in the symplast of petiole except APX activity. In the leaf apoplast, the highest increase occurred in APX and GPX activities, whilst a slight increase in CAT and SOD activities. In the apoplast of petiole, the highest increment was found only in GPX activity, while there were small increases in SOD, APX and CAT activities. Hydrogen peroxide content increased up to score 3 in the apoplast and symplast of leaf and petiole but then slightly decreased. Also, superoxide production increased in the leaf and petiole apoplast but its quantity in the apoplast was much more than that of the symplast. On the other hand, NAD(P)H oxidase activity increased in the leaf but no change was observed in the petiole. In conclusion, as a result of water deficit during leaf rolling antioxidant enzymes are induced to scavenging of ROS produced in symplast and apoplast.

  12. Unsteady Aerodynamics of ``Roll-Tacking'' in Olympic Class Sailboats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutt, Riley; Williamson, Chk

    2015-11-01

    When tacking a sailboat (turning a boat through the wind during upwind sailing), racers employ a ``roll-tacking'' technique. During a roll-tack, sailors use body weight movements to roll the boat through extreme angles of heel. This contrasts with a flat-tack, where the boat remains upright throughout the turn. The dynamic heeling motion of a roll-tack causes the sail to vigorously sweep through the air, resulting in large-scale vortex shedding and increased propulsion. In this research, we use a characteristic roll-tack motion derived from on-the-water data. On-the-water data is collected from a full-scale Olympic racing boat sailed by a national champion in the Laser sailboat class. Using this data, we run a series of representative experiments in the laboratory. Two dimensional flexible sail extrusions are built using rapid-prototyping and are tested in a three degree-of-freedom (X, Y, and theta) towing tank. Particle Image Velocimetry and force measurements are used to compare vortex dynamics and propulsive forces generated by roll-tacks versus flat-tacks. An increase in thrust observed during roll-tack tests agrees with on-the-water experiments, which show a racing advantage greater than one boatlength when a roll-tack is performed relative to a flat tack.

  13. Static roll-tilt over 5 minutes locally distorts the internal estimate of direction of gravity.

    PubMed

    Tarnutzer, A A; Bockisch, C J; Straumann, D; Marti, S; Bertolini, G

    2014-12-01

    The subjective visual vertical (SVV) indicates perceived direction of gravity. Even in healthy human subjects, roll angle-dependent misestimations, roll overcompensation (A-effect, head-roll > 60° and <135°) and undercompensation (E-effect, head-roll < 60°), occur. Previously, we demonstrated that, after prolonged roll-tilt, SVV estimates when upright are biased toward the preceding roll position, which indicates that perceived vertical (PV) is shifted by the prior tilt (Tarnutzer AA, Bertolini G, Bockisch CJ, Straumann D, Marti S. PLoS One 8: e78079, 2013). Hypothetically, PV in any roll position could be biased toward the previous roll position. We asked whether such a "global" bias occurs or whether the bias is "local". The SVV of healthy human subjects (N = 9) was measured in nine roll positions (-120° to +120°, steps = 30°) after 5 min of roll-tilt in one of two adaptation positions (±90°) and compared with control trials without adaptation. After adapting, adjustments were shifted significantly (P < 0.05) toward the previous adaptation position for nearby roll-tilted positions (±30°, ±60°) and upright only. We computationally simulated errors based on the sum of a monotonically increasing function (producing roll undercompensation) and a mixture of Gaussian functions (representing roll overcompensation centered around PV). In combination, the pattern of A- and E-effects could be generated. By shifting the function representing local overcompensation toward the adaptation position, the experimental postadaptation data could be fitted successfully. We conclude that prolonged roll-tilt locally distorts PV rather than globally shifting it. Short-term adaptation of roll overcompensation may explain these shifts and could reflect the brain's strategy to optimize SVV estimates around recent roll positions. Thus postural stability can be improved by visually-mediated compensatory responses at any sustained body-roll orientation.

  14. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  15. Wear of hot rolling mill rolls: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuzic, S.; Strafford, K. N.; Subramanian, C.; Savage, G.

    1994-08-01

    Rolling is today one of the most important industrial processes because a greater volume of material is worked by rolling than by any other technique. Roll wear is a multiplex process where mechanical and thermal fatigue combines with impact, abrasion, adhesion and corrosion, which all depend on system interactions rather than material characteristics only. The situation is more complicated in section rolling because of the intricacy of roll geometry. Wear variables and modes are reviewed along with published methods and models used in the study and testing of roll wear. This paper reviews key aspects of roll wear control - roll material properties, roll pass design, and system factors such as temperature, loads and sliding velocity. An overview of roll materials is given including adamites, high Cr materials, high speed tool steels and compound rolls. Non-uniform wear, recognized as the most detrimental phenomenon in section rolling, can be controlled by roll pass design. This can be achieved by computer-aided graphical and statistical analyses of various pass series. Preliminary results obtained from pilot tests conducted using a two-disc hot wear rig and a scratch tester are discussed.

  16. Angular and Linear Accelerations of a Rolling Cylinder Acted by an External Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, V.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a cylinder rolling on a horizontal plane acted on by an external force applied at an arbitrary angle is studied with emphasis on the directions of the acceleration of the centre-of-mass and the angular acceleration of the body. If rolling occurs without slipping, there is a relationship between the directions of these…

  17. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  18. Rocking and rolling: A can that appears to rock might actually roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Manoj; Ruina, Andy

    2008-12-01

    A beer bottle or soda can on a table, when slightly tipped and released, falls to an upright position and then rocks up to a somewhat opposite tilt. Superficially this rocking motion involves a collision when the flat circular base of the container slaps the table before rocking up to the opposite tilt. A keen eye notices that the after-slap rising tilt is not generally just diametrically opposite the initial tilt but is veered to one side or the other. Cushman and Duistermaat [Regular Chaotic Dyn. 11, 31 (2006)] recently noticed such veering when a flat disk with rolling boundary conditions is dropped nearly flat. Here, we generalize these rolling disk results to arbitrary axi-symmetric bodies and to frictionless sliding. More specifically, we study motions that almost but do not quite involve a face-down collision of the round container’s bottom with the tabletop. These motions involve a sudden rapid motion of the contact point around the circular base. Surprisingly, similar to the rolling disk, the net angle of motion of this contact point is nearly independent of initial conditions. This angle of turn depends simply on the geometry and mass distribution but not on the moment of inertia about the symmetry axis. We derive simple asymptotic formulas for this “angle of turn” of the contact point and check the result with numerics and with simple experiments. For tall containers (height much bigger than radius) the angle of turn is just over π and the sudden rolling motion superficially appears as a nearly symmetric collision leading to leaning on an almost diametrically opposite point on the bottom rim.

  19. Do Liquid Drops on Inclined Surfaces Slide or Roll?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pt, Sumesh; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Adhikari, Ronojoy; Govindarajan, Rama

    2011-11-01

    A solid sphere is likely to roll, while a rectangular box is likely to slide, on an inclined surface. Instead, a liquid drop can exhibit a variety of shapes and complex but interesting dynamics. We obtain global minimum energy static shapes first, for two realistic bases of potential energy, front and back-pinned. We find that the free end always assumes Young's equilibrium angle. Using this clue, simple equations describing the angles and the maximum volume may be derived. Combining the lattice Boltzmann method for hydrodynamics and method of lines for a Cahn-Hilliard equation, a hybrid numerical scheme is developed to study the dynamics of binary fluids on an inclined plate. The contribution of pure translation, and the vorticities associated with rolling and shearing motion are distinguished, using which the motion of the drop can be split into roll and slip. Surprisingly, as gravity increases, the fraction of motion due to roll decreases significantly for certain contact angles. The rolling motion is strongly dependent on the slip length which is in contrast to predictions by the lubrication approximation, where all dependence on the slip length is generally logarithamic.

  20. Extended slow-roll conditions and rapid-roll conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: gucci@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2008-10-15

    We derive slow-roll conditions for a scalar field which is non-minimally coupled with gravity in a consistent manner and express spectral indices of scalar/tensor perturbations in terms of the slow-roll parameters. The conformal invariance of the curvature perturbation is proved without linear approximations. Rapid-roll conditions are also derived, and the relation with the slow-roll conditions is discussed.

  1. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  2. Research on work roll thermal crown in cold rolling mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lei; Shen, Mingang; Chen, Xuebo; Wang, Junsheng

    2013-05-01

    The factors which have influence on the work roll thermal crown in cold strip rolling are discussed. The heat transferring in three directions (radial axis and circumference) were considered for calculating the work roll thermal deformation. Therefore, it is a three dimensions unstable system for the work roll temperature calculation. The plastic deformation work and friction heat are calculated by the divided element and digital integration method. The simplified calculation model is built for the heat transferring along work roll. There are four zones for work roll heat transferring: roll gap zone air cooling zone emulsion zone rolls contact zone. The heat transferring between the zones is decided by the temperature difference. The inter temperature field and thermal deformation of work roll can be calculated by two-dimension finite difference method. The work roll temperature and thermal crown of actual application cold rolling mill are analyzed by the model. By the comparison between calculated values and measured values, the work roll thermal calculation model can meet the accuracy requirement of on-line control.

  3. Rolling behavior of a micro-cylinder in adhesional contact

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Shigeki; Ochiai, Toshihiro; Yoshizawa, Fumikazu; Dao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the rolling behavior of a micro-object is essential to establish the techniques of micro-manipulation and micro-assembly by mechanical means. Using a combined theoretical/computational approach, we studied the critical conditions of rolling resistance of an elastic cylindrical micro-object in adhesional contact with a rigid surface. Closed-form dimensionless expressions for the critical rolling moment, the initial rolling contact area, and the initial rolling angle were extracted after a systematic parametric study using finite element method (FEM) simulations. The total energy of this system is defined as the sum of three terms: the elastic energy stored in the deformed micro-cylinder, the interfacial energy within the contact area, and the mechanical potential energy that depends on the external moment applied to the cylindrical micro-object. A careful examination of the energy balance of the system surprisingly revealed that the rolling resistance per unit cylindrical length can be simply expressed by “work of adhesion times cylindrical radius” independent of the Young’s modulus. In addition, extending a linear elastic fracture mechanics based approach in the literature, we obtained the exact closed-form asymptotic solutions for the critical conditions for initial rolling; these asymptotic solutions were found in excellent agreement with the full-field FEM results. PMID:27677706

  4. Mach 6 experimental and theoretical stability and performance of a cruciform missile at angles of attack up to 65 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edward R.; Johnston, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control of an axisymmetric cruciform-finned missile has been conducted at Mach 6. The angle-of-attack range extended from 20 to 65 deg to encompass maximum lift. Longitudinal stability, performance, and trim could be accurately predicted with the fins at a fin roll angle of 0 deg but not when the fins were at a fin roll angle of 45 deg. At this roll angle, windward fin choking occurred at angles of attack above 50 deg and reduced the effectiveness of the fins and caused pitch-up.

  5. Precession of a Spinning Ball Rolling down an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    A routine problem in an introductory physics course considers a rectangular block at rest on a plane inclined at angle a to the horizontal. In order for the block not to slide down the incline, the coefficient of sliding friction, µ, must be at least tan a. The situation is similar for the case of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. In order…

  6. 9. COMPLETED ROLLING CAMERA CAR ON RAILROAD TRACK AND BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. COMPLETED ROLLING CAMERA CAR ON RAILROAD TRACK AND BRIDGE LOOKING WEST, APRIL 26, 1948. (ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH IN POSSESSION OF DAVE WILLIS, SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Cedar leaf oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Cedar leaf oil is made from some types of cedar trees. Cedar leaf oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... The substance in cedar leaf oil that can be harmful is thujone (a hydrocarbon).

  8. Explicit Nonlinear Finite Element Geometric Analysis of Parabolic Leaf Springs under Various Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Y. S.; Omar, M. Z.; Chua, L. B.; Abdullah, S.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the effects of bounce, brake, and roll behavior of a bus toward its leaf spring suspension systems. Parabolic leaf springs are designed based on vertical deflection and stress; however, loads are practically derived from various modes especially under harsh road drives or emergency braking. Parabolic leaf springs must sustain these loads without failing to ensure bus and passenger safety. In this study, the explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element (FE) method is implemented because of the complexity of experimental testing A series of load cases; namely, vertical push, wind-up, and suspension roll are introduced for the simulations. The vertical stiffness of the parabolic leaf springs is related to the vehicle load-carrying capability, whereas the wind-up stiffness is associated with vehicle braking. The roll stiffness of the parabolic leaf springs is correlated with the vehicle roll stability. To obtain a better bus performance, two new parabolic leaf spring designs are proposed and simulated. The stress level during the loadings is observed and compared with its design limit. Results indicate that the newly designed high vertical stiffness parabolic spring provides the bus a greater roll stability and a lower stress value compared with the original design. Bus safety and stability is promoted, as well as the load carrying capability. PMID:24298209

  9. Explicit nonlinear finite element geometric analysis of parabolic leaf springs under various loads.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y S; Omar, M Z; Chua, L B; Abdullah, S

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the effects of bounce, brake, and roll behavior of a bus toward its leaf spring suspension systems. Parabolic leaf springs are designed based on vertical deflection and stress; however, loads are practically derived from various modes especially under harsh road drives or emergency braking. Parabolic leaf springs must sustain these loads without failing to ensure bus and passenger safety. In this study, the explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element (FE) method is implemented because of the complexity of experimental testing A series of load cases; namely, vertical push, wind-up, and suspension roll are introduced for the simulations. The vertical stiffness of the parabolic leaf springs is related to the vehicle load-carrying capability, whereas the wind-up stiffness is associated with vehicle braking. The roll stiffness of the parabolic leaf springs is correlated with the vehicle roll stability. To obtain a better bus performance, two new parabolic leaf spring designs are proposed and simulated. The stress level during the loadings is observed and compared with its design limit. Results indicate that the newly designed high vertical stiffness parabolic spring provides the bus a greater roll stability and a lower stress value compared with the original design. Bus safety and stability is promoted, as well as the load carrying capability.

  10. Roll Eccentricity Control Using Identified Eccentricity of Top/Bottom Rolls by Roll Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanari, Hiroyuki; Koshinuma, Kazuyoshi

    Roll eccentricity is a periodic disturbance caused by a structure of back up rolls in rolling mills, and it affects product thickness accuracy. It cannot be measured directly by sensors, so it should be identified by measured thickness or measured roll force. When there is a large difference of diameters between top and bottom back up roll, the performance of roll eccentricity control using feedback signals of roll force or thickness has not been so good. Also it has been difficult for the control to be applied from the most head end because it is necessary to identify the roll eccentricity during rolling. A new roll eccentricity control has been developed to improve these disadvantages and to get better performance. The method identifies top and bottom roll eccentricity respectively from one signal of roll force and it can start the control from head end. In this paper the new control method is introduced and actual application results to a hot strip mill are shown.

  11. Influence of head orientation on visually induced pitch and roll sensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.; Oman, C. M.; Dichgans, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Observers viewing rotating scenes in their periphery frequently experience self-motion in the opposite direction. A full field flight simulator projection system was used to investigate the sensations resulting from pitch, roll, and yaw stimuli at various head orientations. Steady yaw rate (circularvection) and development of a constant roll tilt angle, for the head erect and constant velocity yaw and roll stimuli, confirmed previous reports. Pitch stimuli also were found to produce a sensation of tilting to a steady pitch angle, which was much stronger for pitch forward than backward. Pitch and roll effects were strongly dependent on head position, increasing for the head rolled 90 deg to the side or inverted, and decreasing for the head pitched 25 deg forward. These results support a hypothesis that visually induced tilt is limited by conflict with otolith information.

  12. GRCop-84 Rolling Parameter Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a section of the final report on the GRCop-84 task of the Constellation Program and incorporates the results obtained between October 2000 and September 2005, when the program ended. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed a new copper alloy, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb), for rocket engine main combustion chamber components that will improve rocket engine life and performance. This work examines the sensitivity of GRCop-84 mechanical properties to rolling parameters as a means to better define rolling parameters for commercial warm rolling. Experiment variables studied were total reduction, rolling temperature, rolling speed, and post rolling annealing heat treatment. The responses were tensile properties measured at 23 and 500 C, hardness, and creep at three stress-temperature combinations. Understanding these relationships will better define boundaries for a robust commercial warm rolling process. The four processing parameters were varied within limits consistent with typical commercial production processes. Testing revealed that the rolling-related variables selected have a minimal influence on tensile, hardness, and creep properties over the range of values tested. Annealing had the expected result of lowering room temperature hardness and strength while increasing room temperature elongations with 600 C (1112 F) having the most effect. These results indicate that the process conditions to warm roll plate and sheet for these variables can range over wide levels without negatively impacting mechanical properties. Incorporating broader process ranges in future rolling campaigns should lower commercial rolling costs through increased productivity.

  13. Ecosystem engineers on plants: indirect facilitation of arthropod communities by leaf-rollers at different scales.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Camila; Romero, Gustavo Q

    2013-07-01

    Ecosystem engineering is a process by which organisms change the distribution of resources and create new habitats for other species via non-trophic interactions. Leaf-rolling caterpillars can act as ecosystem engineers because they provide shelter to secondary users. In this study, we report the influence of leaf-rolling caterpillars on speciose tropical arthropod communities along both spatial scales (leaf-level and plant-level effects) and temporal scales (dry and rainy seasons). We predict that rolled leaves can amplify arthropod diversity at both the leaf and plant levels and that this effect is stronger in dry seasons, when arthropods are prone to desiccation. Our results show that the abundance, richness, and biomass of arthropods within several guilds increased up to 22-fold in naturally and artificially created leaf shelters relative to unaltered leaves. These effects were observed at similar magnitudes at both the leaf and plant scales. Variation in the shelter architecture (funnel, cylinders) did not influence arthropod parameters, as diversity, abundance, orbiomass, but rolled leaves had distinct species composition if compared with unaltered leaves. As expected, these arthropod parameters on the plants with rolled leaves were on average approximately twofold higher in the dry season. Empty leaf rolls and whole plants were rapidly recolonized by arthropods over time, implying a fast replacement of individuals; within 15-day intervals the rolls and plants reached a species saturation. This study is the first to examine the extended effects of engineering caterpillars as diversity amplifiers at different temporal and spatial scales. Because shelter-building caterpillars are ubiquitous organisms in tropical and temperate forests, they can be considered key structuring elements for arthropod communities on plants.

  14. Ocimum sanctum leaf extract induces drought stress tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Veena; Ansari, M W; Tula, Suresh; Sahoo, R K; Bains, Gurdeep; Kumar, J; Tuteja, Narendra; Shukla, Alok

    2016-05-01

    Ocimum leaves are highly enriched in antioxidant components. Thus, its leaf extract, if applied in plants, is believed to efficiently scavenge ROS, thereby preventing oxidative damage under drought stress. Thus, the present study was performed in kharif 2013 and rabi 2014 season to evaluate the effect of aqueous leaf extract of Ocimum sanctum against drought stress in 2 rice genotype under glass house conditions. Here we show that various morpho- physiological (chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf rolling score, leaf tip burn, number of senesced leaves and total dry matter) and biochemical parameters (proline, malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase content) were amended by Ocimum treatment in both the seasons. Application of Ocimum extract increased expression of dehydrin genes, while reducing expression of aquaporin genes in drought stressed rice plant. Thus, application of Ocimum leaf extract under drought stress can be suggested as a promising strategy to mitigate drought stress in economical, accessible and ecofriendly manner. PMID:26890603

  15. Walk and roll robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A mobile robotic unit features a main body, a plurality of legs for supporting the main body on and moving the main body in forward and reverse directions about a base surface, and a drive assembly. According to an exemplary embodiment each leg includes a respective pivotal hip joint, a pivotal knee joint, and a wheeled foot adapted to roll along the base surface. Also according to an exemplary embodiments the drive assembly includes a motor operatively associated with the hip and knee joints and the wheeled foot for independently driving pivotal movement of the hip joint and the knee joint and rolling motion of the wheeled foot. The hip joint may include a ball-and-socket-type joint interconnecting top portion of the leg to the main body, such that the hip joint is adapted to pivot said leg in a direction transverse to a forward-and-reverse direction.

  16. Continuous roll-to-roll amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izu, M.; Ovshinsky, S. R.; Deng, X.; Krisko, A.; Ovshinsky, H. C.; Narasimhan, K. L.; Young, R.

    1994-06-01

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) has designed and constructed a 2 Megawatt (mW) manufacturing line that produces triple-junction spectrum-splitting a-Si alloy solar cells in a continuous roll-to-roll process. This manufacturing line has reliably and consistently produced high efficiency solar cells. We have demonstrated the production of 4ft 2 triple-junction two band-gap a-Si alloy PV production modules with 8% stable aperture area efficiency. The production line has successfully incorporated: 1) a band-gap profiled a-Si-Ge narrow band-gap solar cell deposited in a continuous roll-to-roll process using a proprietary gas distribution manifold and cathode configuration; and 2) a textured Ag/ZnO back-reflector deposited in a continuous roll-to-roll sputtering machine with production subcell yields greater than 99%.

  17. Roll-to-Roll production of carbon nanotubes based supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Childress, Anthony; Karakaya, Mehmet; Roberts, Mark; Arcilla-Velez, Margarita; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials provide an excellent platform for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). However, current industrial methods for producing carbon nanotubes are expensive and thereby increase the costs of energy storage to more than 10 Wh/kg. In this regard, we developed a facile roll-to-roll production technology for scalable manufacturing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with variable density on run-of-the-mill kitchen Al foils. Our method produces MWNTs with diameter (heights) between 50-100 nm (10-100 μm), and a specific capacitance as high as ~ 100 F/g in non-aqueous electrolytes. In this talk, the fundamental challenges involved in EDLC-suitable MWNT growth, roll-to-roll production, and device manufacturing will be discussed along with electrochemical characteristics of roll-to-roll MWNTs. Research supported by NSF CMMI Grant1246800.

  18. Accuracy of System Step Response Roll Magnitude Estimation from Central and Peripheral Visual Displays and Simulator Cockpit Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosman, R. J. A. W.; Vandervaart, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment to investigate visual roll attitude and roll rate perception is described. The experiment was also designed to assess the improvements of perception due to cockpit motion. After the onset of the motion, subjects were to make accurate and quick estimates of the final magnitude of the roll angle step response by pressing the appropriate button of a keyboard device. The differing time-histories of roll angle, roll rate and roll acceleration caused by a step response stimulate the different perception processes related the central visual field, peripheral visual field and vestibular organs in different, yet exactly known ways. Experiments with either of the visual displays or cockpit motion and some combinations of these were run to asses the roles of the different perception processes. Results show that the differences in response time are much more pronounced than the differences in perception accuracy.

  19. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a maneuvering canard-controlled missile with fixed and free-rolling tail fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations were conducted on a generic cruciform canard-controlled missile configuration. The model featured fixed or free-rolling tail-fin afterbodies to provide an expanded aerodynamic data base with particular emphasis on alleviating large induced rolling moments and/or for providing canard roll control throughout the entire test angle-of-attack range. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers from 2.50 to 3.50 at a constant Reynolds number per foot of 2.00 x 10 to the 6th. Selected test results are presented to show the effects of a fixed or free-rolling tail-fin afterbody on the static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of a canard-controlled missile with pitch, yaw, and roll control at model roll angles of 0 deg and 45 deg.

  20. The evaluation of the rolling moments induced by wraparound fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Bar-Haim, B.

    1983-01-01

    A possible reason is suggested for the induced rolling moments occurring on wraparound-fin configurations in subsonic flight at zero angle of attack. The subsonic potential flow over the configuration at zero incidence is solved numerically. The body is simulated by a distribution of sources along its axis, and the fins are described by a vortex-lattice method. It is shown that rolling moments can be induced on the antisymmetric fins by the radial flow generated at the base of the configuration, either over the converging separated wake, or over the diverging plume of a rocket motor.

  1. Reflectance model of a plant leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.; Silva, L.

    1973-01-01

    A light ray, incident at 5 deg to the normal, is geometrically plotted through the drawing of the cross section of a soybean leaf using Fresnel's Equations and Snell's Law. The optical mediums of the leaf considered for ray tracing are: air, cell sap, chloroplast, and cell wall. The above ray is also drawn through the same leaf cross section considering cell wall and air as the only optical mediums. The values of the reflection and transmission found from ray tracing agree closely with the experimental results obtained using a Beckman DK-2A Spectroreflectometer. Similarly a light ray, incident at about 60 deg to the normal, is drawn through the palisade cells of a soybean leaf to illustrate the pathway of light, incident at an oblique angle, through the palisade cells.

  2. Rolling vs. Sliding: The inclusion of non-conservative work in the classic comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chediak, Alex; Buehler, Terry

    2010-03-01

    A semester-long mechanics course typically covers moment of inertia, angular velocity, and rolling. A classic comparison is made between rolling without slipping and sliding without friction. In either case, no non-conservation work is performed---all the gravitational potential energy that the rolling or sliding object possesses at the top of the incline plane is converted into kinetic energy. In the case of the sliding object, the kinetic energy term is simply .5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 mv^2. In the case of the rolling object, the kinetic energy term is .5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 mv^2 + .5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 Iφ^2. The friction here is static not kinetic, so it does no mechanical work. Since the sliding object has no angular velocity, its linear velocity is greater than that of the rolling object, and it reaches the bottom of the track faster. But if a rolling and sliding object, each of the same material, were to race down an incline plane, which would win? The answer depends on the effective coefficient of friction, C. If C > μs, which will occur at angles approaching 90^o, the rolling object slips. And if C < μk, the rolling object has a greater linear acceleration and wins the race to the bottom. Experimental results to verify a theoretical model (including the dependency on incline angle) will also be presented.

  3. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  4. VIEW OF HANDOPERATED ROLLING MILLS ROLLING STANDS FROM LEFT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF HAND-OPERATED ROLLING MILLS ROLLING STANDS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: THREE HIGH; THREE HIGH; THREE HIGH; THREE HIGH (OPERATED AS A TWO-HIGH); TWO HIGH TWO HIGH MANUFACTURED BY BLAW-KNOX THREE HIGH MANUFACTURED BY LEWIS FOUNDRY AND MACHINE CO. - Cambria Iron Company, Gautier Works, 12" Mill, Clinton Street & Little Conemaugh River, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  5. LEDs are on a roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Paul; van Mol, Ton

    2011-11-01

    Light-emitting diodes are more efficient than conventional lighting, but high production costs limit their uptake. Organic versions that can be produced using a cheap newspaper-style "roll-to-roll" printing process are likely to revolutionize our lighting and signage.

  6. Towards identifying the roll motion parameters of a motorcycle simulator.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Amit; Dagonneau, Virginie; Caro, Séphane; Israël, Isabelle; Lobjois, Régis

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed at identifying the roll motion parameters of a motorcycle simulator prototype. Experienced motorcyclists tuned the angular physical movement of the mock-up and that of the visual scene to achieve an optimal riding experience during curves. The participants exceeded the rolling angles that would be required in real-world riding, while avoiding leaning the mock-up beyond 10°. In addition, they were more influenced by the speed of the virtual motorcycle than by road curvature, especially in a wide field of view. Heterogeneity was found in the roll applied to the visual scene. The overall patterns suggest that at least when washout is not applied to remove the side forces that in real-world riding are compensated by a centrifugal force, greater roll of the visual at the expense of the mock-up is mandatory to avoid performance biases that might be enhanced due to fear of falling off the simulator. Future roll motion models must take into consideration factors such as riding postures, which might not only influence the forces operating on the rider-motorcycle system, but also how motorcyclists perceive the visual world.

  7. Influence of water relations and temperature on leaf movements of rhododendron species.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, E T

    1987-03-01

    Rhododendron maximum L. and R. Catawbiense L. are subcanopy evergreen shrubs of the eastern United States deciduous forest. Field measurements of climate factors and leaf movements of these species indicated a high correlation between leaf temperature and leaf curling; and between leaf water potential and leaf angle. Laboratory experiments were performed to isolate the influence of temperature and cellular water relations on leaf movements. Significant differences were found between the patterns of temperature induction of leaf curling in the two species. Leaves of the species which curled at higher temperatures (R. catawbiense) also froze at higher leaf temperatures. However, in both cases leaf curling occurred at leaf temperatures two to three degrees above the leaf freezing point. Pressure volume curves indicated that cellular turgor loss was associated with a maximum of 45% curling while 100% or more curling occurred in field leaves which still had positive cell turgor. Moisture release curves indicated that 70% curling requires a loss of greater than 60% of symplastic water which corresponds to leaf water potentials far below those experienced in field situations. Conversely, most laboratory induced changes in leaf angle could be related to leaf cell turgor loss.

  8. Structure irregularity impedes drop roll-off at superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Søgaard, Emil; Taboryski, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    We study water drop roll-off at superhydrophobic surfaces with different surface patterns. Superhydrophobic microcavity surfaces were fabricated in silicon and coated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS). For the more irregular surface patterns, the observed increase in roll-off angles is found to be caused by a decrease of the receding contact angle, which in turn is caused by an increase of the triple phase contact line of the drops for those more irregular surfaces. To understand the observation, we propose to treat the microdrops as rigid bodies and apply a torque balance between the torque exerted by the projected gravity force and the torque exerted by the adhesion force acting along the triple line on the receding side of the drop. This simple model provides a proper order of magnitude estimate of the measured effects.

  9. Human Ocular Counter-Rolling and Roll Tilt Perception during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation after Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott J.

    2007-01-01

    Ocular counter-rolling (OCR) induced by whole body tilt in roll has been explored after spaceflight as an indicator of the adaptation of the otolith function to microgravity. It has been claimed that the overall pattern of OCR responses during static body tilt after spaceflight is indicative of a decreased role of the otolith function, but the results of these studies have not been consistent, mostly due to large variations in the OCR within and across individuals. By contrast with static head tilt, off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) presents the advantage of generating a sinusoidal modulation of OCR, allowing averaged measurements over several cycles, thus improving measurement accuracy. Accordingly, OCR and the sense of roll tilt were evaluated in seven astronauts before and after spaceflight during OVAR at 45 /s in darkness at two angles of tilt (10 and 20 ). There was no significant difference in OCR during OVAR immediately after landing compared to preflight. However, the amplitude of the perceived roll tilt during OVAR was significantly larger immediately postflight, and then returned to control values in the following days. Since the OCR response is predominantly attributed to the shearing force exerted on the utricular macula, the absence of change in OCR postflight suggests that the peripheral otolith organs function normally after short-term spaceflight. However, the increased sense of roll tilt indicates an adaptation in the central processing of gravitational input, presumably related to a re-weigthing of the internal representation of gravitational vertical as a result of adaptation to microgravity.

  10. Design and Calibration of Rolling Resistance Test Trailer R2Mk.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronowski, G.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes construction and calibration procedures of the rolling resistance test trailer R2 Mk.2. The trailer is design to measure rolling resistance of passenger car tyres in various road conditions on trafficked roads. The trailer utilizes so called angle method also known as vertical arm method. The paper presents also calibration procedures that are necessary to ascertain good precision of the measurements.

  11. An Initial Examination of Roll-Lateral Coordination Motion Requirements in Flight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Chung, William W.; Laforce, Soren; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    A piloted simulation that examined the effects of uncoordinated roll-lateral motion cues from a coordinated math model was conducted. The vehicle model represented a typical helicopter with satisfactory handling qualities in the roll-lateral axes. The task was a two-degree-of-freedom horizontal sidestep, where the pilot controlled lateral position through roll angle. The motion platform commands were varied via two motion control system gains. One gain reduced the ratio between platform roll angle to math model (and thus visual) roll angle. The other gain was placed on how much lateral platform movement would result from platform roll attitude in an attempt to align the apparent gravity vector vertically relative to the pilot. Gains from one to zero were examined in both axes. Thus, the true 1:1 motion case, where the motion cues matched the visual cues was evaluated. Pilots subjective ratings of motion fidelity matched well against an earlier developed motion fidelity criteria. Significant differences were noted in the fixed-base versus motion base configurations.

  12. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Roll-to-Roll Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, Panos G; Joshi, Pooran C; List III, Frederick Alyious; Duty, Chad E; Armstrong, Beth L; Ivanov, Ilia N; Jacobs, Christopher B; Graham, David E; Moon, Ji Won

    2015-08-01

    This Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)e roll-to-roll processing effort described in this report provided an excellent opportunity to investigate a number of advanced manufacturing approaches to achieve a path for low cost devices and sensors. Critical to this effort is the ability to deposit thin films at low temperatures using nanomaterials derived from nanofermentation. The overarching goal of this project was to develop roll-to-roll manufacturing processes of thin film deposition on low-cost flexible substrates for electronics and sensor applications. This project utilized ORNL s unique Pulse Thermal Processing (PTP) technologies coupled with non-vacuum low temperature deposition techniques, ORNL s clean room facility, slot dye coating, drop casting, spin coating, screen printing and several other equipment including a Dimatix ink jet printer and a large-scale Kyocera ink jet printer. The roll-to-roll processing project had three main tasks: 1) develop and demonstrate zinc-Zn based opto-electronic sensors using low cost nanoparticulate structures manufactured in a related MDF Project using nanofermentation techniques, 2) evaluate the use of silver based conductive inks developed by project partner NovaCentrix for electronic device fabrication, and 3) demonstrate a suite of low cost printed sensors developed using non-vacuum deposition techniques which involved the integration of metal and semiconductor layers to establish a diverse sensor platform technology.

  13. Reduced Blood Coagulation on Roll-to-Roll, Shrink-Induced Superhydrophobic Plastics.

    PubMed

    Nokes, Jolie M; Liedert, Ralph; Kim, Monica Y; Siddiqui, Ali; Chu, Michael; Lee, Eugene K; Khine, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    The unique antiwetting properties of superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces prevent the adhesion of water and bodily fluids, including blood, urine, and saliva. While typical manufacturable approaches to create SH surfaces rely on chemical and structural modifications, such approaches are expensive, require postprocessing, and are often not biocompatible. By contrast, it is demonstrated that purely structural SH features are easily formed using high throughput roll-to-roll (R2R) manufacturing by shrinking a prestressed thermoplastic with a thin, stiff layer of silver and calcium. These features are subsequently embossed into any commercially available and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved plastic. The R2R SH surfaces have contact angles >150° and contact angle hysteresis <10°. Importantly, the surfaces minimize blood adhesion, leading to reduced blood coagulation without the need for anticoagulants. SH surfaces have >4200× reduction of blood residue area compared to the nonstructured controls of the same material. In addition, blood clotting is reduced >5× using whole blood directly from the patient. Furthermore, these surfaces can be easily configured into 3D shapes, as demonstrated with SH tubes. With the simple scale-up production and the eliminated need for anticoagulants to prevent clotting, the proposed conformable SH surfaces can be impactful for a wide range of medical tools, including catheters and microfluidic channels. PMID:26784916

  14. Body roll in swimming: a review.

    PubMed

    Psycharakis, Stelios G; Sanders, Ross H

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we present a critical review of the swimming literature on body roll, for the purposes of summarizing and highlighting existing knowledge, identifying the gaps and limitations, and stimulating further research. The main research findings can be summarized as follows: swimmers roll their shoulders significantly more than their hips; swimmers increase hip roll but maintain shoulder roll when fatigued; faster swimmers roll their shoulders less than slower swimmers during a 200-m swim; roll asymmetries, temporal differences in shoulder roll and hip roll, and shoulder roll side dominance exist in front crawl swimming, but there is no evidence to suggest that they affect swimming performance; and buoyancy contributes strongly to generating body roll in front crawl swimming. Based on and stimulated by current knowledge, future research should focus on the following areas: calculation of body roll for female swimmers and for backstroke swimming; differences in body roll between breathing and non-breathing cycles; causes of body roll asymmetries and their relation to motor laterality; body roll analysis across a wide range of velocities and swimming distances; exploration of the association between body roll and the magnitude and direction of propulsive/resistive forces developed during the stroke cycle; and the influence of kicking actions on the generation of body roll. PMID:20131140

  15. Body roll in swimming: a review.

    PubMed

    Psycharakis, Stelios G; Sanders, Ross H

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we present a critical review of the swimming literature on body roll, for the purposes of summarizing and highlighting existing knowledge, identifying the gaps and limitations, and stimulating further research. The main research findings can be summarized as follows: swimmers roll their shoulders significantly more than their hips; swimmers increase hip roll but maintain shoulder roll when fatigued; faster swimmers roll their shoulders less than slower swimmers during a 200-m swim; roll asymmetries, temporal differences in shoulder roll and hip roll, and shoulder roll side dominance exist in front crawl swimming, but there is no evidence to suggest that they affect swimming performance; and buoyancy contributes strongly to generating body roll in front crawl swimming. Based on and stimulated by current knowledge, future research should focus on the following areas: calculation of body roll for female swimmers and for backstroke swimming; differences in body roll between breathing and non-breathing cycles; causes of body roll asymmetries and their relation to motor laterality; body roll analysis across a wide range of velocities and swimming distances; exploration of the association between body roll and the magnitude and direction of propulsive/resistive forces developed during the stroke cycle; and the influence of kicking actions on the generation of body roll.

  16. Rolling Process Modeling Report: Finite-Element Prediction of Roll Separating Force and Rolling Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Soulami, Ayoub; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

    2014-04-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum (U-10Mo) alloy plate-type fuel for the U.S. high-performance research reactors. This work supports the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative. This report documents modeling results of PNNL’s efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll separating forces and rolling defects. Simulations were performed using a finite-element model developed using the commercial code LS-Dyna. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel have been conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll-pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. This report discusses various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., dog-boning and thickness non-uniformity).

  17. Photosynthetic responses to leaf surface wetness in tropical plant species of Costa Rica with varying leaf traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparecido, L. M. T.; Moore, G. W.; Miller, G. R.; Cahill, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Wet tropical forests are some of the environments with the greatest annual precipitation, but are also considered as the world's major carbon sink; however, literature postulates that phothsynthesis rates are inhibited while leaves are wet. Yet measurements of photosynthesis during wet conditions are challenging to obtain due to equipment limitations and the extreme complexity of canopy-atmosphere interactions in tropical environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate tropical species reactions to simulated leaf wetness and test the hypothesis that leaf wetness reduces rates of photosynthesis. In a central Costa Rica site with an average 4200 mm annual rainfall, we selected six tropical species with distinct leaf traits in which five sun-exposed leaf replicates from each species were subjected to gas exchange measurements using a LI-6400 IRGA (LICOR Inc., Lincoln, NE) under dry and wet/misted leaf conditions. Relationships between photosynthesis (As) and stomatal conductance (gs) with leaf to air temperature difference (DT), VPD, and relative humidity were evaluated using linear regression analysis. We found that the responses varied greatly among species, but all plants maintained a baseline of activity under wet leaf conditions, suggesting that abaxial leaf As was a significant percentage of total leaf As. Stachytarpheta jamaicens had an 18.7% reduction in As, while others, like Zamia skinneri, had a 7% increase in As. Tibouchina heteromalla showed a rapid stomatal recovery of 2 mins, while Carapa guianensis was slower with 7 mins. This variability between species suggests that leaf traits, such as presence or absence of trichomes, water repellency, vein distribution and size and leaf angle variation, may be critical for optimizing photosynthesis under wet conditions. Relative humidity and leaf temperature were the strongest secondary influences on As and gs under wet leaf conditions. While tropical vegetation-atmosphere interactions are complex, such

  18. Human perceptual overestimation of whole body roll tilt in hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Michael C.; Oman, Charles M.; Merfeld, Daniel M.; Young, Laurence R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypergravity provides a unique environment to study human perception of orientation. We utilized a long-radius centrifuge to study perception of both static and dynamic whole body roll tilt in hypergravity, across a range of angles, frequencies, and net gravito-inertial levels (referred to as G levels). While studies of static tilt perception in hypergravity have been published, this is the first to measure dynamic tilt perception (i.e., with time-varying canal stimulation) in hypergravity using a continuous matching task. In complete darkness, subjects reported their orientation perception using a haptic task, whereby they attempted to align a hand-held bar with their perceived horizontal. Static roll tilt was overestimated in hypergravity, with more overestimation at larger angles and higher G levels, across the conditions tested (overestimated by ∼35% per additional G level, P < 0.001). As our primary contribution, we show that dynamic roll tilt was also consistently overestimated in hypergravity (P < 0.001) at all angles and frequencies tested, again with more overestimation at higher G levels. The overestimation was similar to that for static tilts at low angular velocities but decreased at higher angular velocities (P = 0.006), consistent with semicircular canal sensory integration. To match our findings, we propose a modification to a previous Observer-type canal-otolith interaction model. Specifically, our data were better modeled by including the hypothesis that the central nervous system treats otolith stimulation in the utricular plane differently than stimulation out of the utricular plane. This modified model was able to simulate quantitatively both the static and the dynamic roll tilt overestimation in hypergravity measured experimentally. PMID:25540216

  19. Pulvinus activity, leaf movement and leaf water-use efficiency of bush bean ( Phaseplus vulgaris L.) in a hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeini-Sarjaz, Mahmoud; Chalavi, Vida

    2008-11-01

    Pulvinus activity of Phaseolus species in response to environmental stimuli plays an essential role in heliotropic leaf movement. The aims of this study were to monitor the continuous daily pulvinus movement and pulvinus temperature, and to evaluate the effects of leaf movements, on a hot day, on instantaneous leaf water-use efficiency (WUEi), leaf gas exchange, and leaf temperature. Potted plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Provider were grown in Chicot sandy loam soil under well-watered conditions in a greenhouse. When the second trifoliate leaf was completely extended, one plant was selected to measure pulvinus movement using a beta-ray gauging (BRG) meter with a point source of thallium-204 (204Tl). Leaf gas exchange measurements took place on similar leaflets of three plants at an air temperature interval of 33-42°C by a steady-state LI-6200 photosynthesis system. A copper-constantan thermocouple was used to monitor pulvinus temperature. Pulvinus bending followed the daily diurnal rhythm. Significant correlations were found between the leaf-incident angle and the stomatal conductance ( R 2 = 0.54; P < 0.01), and photosynthesis rate ( R 2 = 0.84; P < 0.01). With a reduction in leaf-incidence angle and increase in air temperature, WUEi was reduced. During the measurements, leaf temperature remained below air temperature and was a significant function of air temperature ( r = 0.92; P < 0.01). In conclusion, pulvinus bending followed both light intensity and air temperature and influenced leaf gas exchange.

  20. Hot rolling of thick uranium molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    DeMint, Amy L.; Gooch, Jack G.

    2015-11-17

    Disclosed herein are processes for hot rolling billets of uranium that have been alloyed with about ten weight percent molybdenum to produce cold-rollable sheets that are about one hundred mils thick. In certain embodiments, the billets have a thickness of about 7/8 inch or greater. Disclosed processes typically involve a rolling schedule that includes a light rolling pass and at least one medium rolling pass. Processes may also include reheating the rolling stock and using one or more heavy rolling passes, and may include an annealing step.

  1. Resistance to Rolling in the Adhesive Contact of Two Elastic Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    For the stability of agglomerates of micron sized particles it is of considerable importance to study the effects of tangential forces on the contact of two particles. If the particles can slide or roll easily over each other, fractal structures of these agglomerates will not be stable. We use the description of contact forces by Johnson, Kendall and Roberts, along with arguments based on the atomic structure of the surfaces in contact, in order to calculate the resistance to rolling in such a contact. It is shown that the contact reacts elastically to torque forces up to a critical bending angle. Beyond that, irreversible rolling occurs. In the elastic regime, the moment opposing the attempt to roll is proportional to the bending angle and to the pull-off force P(sub c). Young's modulus of the involved materials has hardly any influence on the results. We show that agglomerates of sub-micron sized particles will in general be quite rigid and even long chains of particles cannot be bent easily. For very small particles, the contact will rather break than allow for rolling. We further discuss dynamic properties such as the possibility of vibrations in this degree of freedom and the typical amount of rolling during a collision of two particles.

  2. Dual-scale artificial lotus leaf fabricated by fully nonlithographic simple approach based on sandblasting and anodic aluminum oxidation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Jun; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kong, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Yongsung; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Deug-Woo; Park, Jong-Kweon; Lee, Dongyun; Kim, Jong-Man

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports a micro/nano dual-scaled artificial lotus leaf that is formed on a silicon substrate by simple and inexpensive fully nonlithographic approach, combining a sandblasting technique and an anodic aluminum oxidation (AAO) process. The proposed dual-scaled surface was demonstrated by covering the sandblasted micro-roughened substrate entirely with nano-scale protuberances, and its surface wettability was characterized by measuring the static contact angle (SCA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH). The measurements confirmed that the proposed dual-scaled surface can sufficiently ensure superhydrophobicity in the Cassie wetting regime with a high SCA of 159.4 ± 0.5° and a low CAH of 3.9 ± 0.7°, and the surface wetting properties can be improved greatly compared to those of flat, sandblasted micro-roughened and nano-scale protuberance-arrayed surfaces. Through a dropping test, it was observed that the fabricated dual-scaled surface can ensure its superior water-repellency with various levels of the impact velocity. Finally, a self-cleaning ability of the proposed dual-roughened surface was verified experimentally by observing the dynamic rolling-off behavior of the water droplet on the surface covered with contaminants.

  3. Roll-to-roll DBD plasma pretreated polyethylene web for enhancement of Al coating adhesion and barrier property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibao; Li, Hua; Fang, Ming; Wang, Zhengduo; Sang, Lijun; Yang, Lizhen; Chen, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper the roll-to-roll atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was used to pre-treat polyethylene (PE) web surface before the conventional thermal evaporation aluminum (Al) was performed as a barrier layer. We emphasized the plasma environment effect based on the inlet three kinds of reactive monomers. The cross hatch test was employed to assess the Al coating adhesion; and the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) was used to evaluate gas barrier property. The results showed that after roll-to-roll DBD plasma treatment all Al coatings adhered strongly on PE films and were free from pinhole defects with mirror morphology. The OTR was reduced from 2673 cm3/m2 day for Al-coated original PE to 138 cm3/m2 day for Al-coated allyamine (C3H7N) modified PE. To well understand the mechanism the chemical compositions of the untreated and DBD plasma pretreated PE films were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface topography was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the property of surface energy the water contact angle measurement was also carried out in the DBD plasma treated samples with deionized water.

  4. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  5. The physico-chemical basis of leaf wettability in wheat.

    PubMed

    Netting, A G; von Wettstein-Knowles, P

    1973-12-01

    Wild type wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and three mutant lines that have reduced glaucousness on the flag leaf sheath have been examined for variations in glaucousness, contact angles, wax chemistry and wax morphology. On the sheath and culm, organs that are glaucous in the wild type, increasing glaucousness is correlated with increasing contact angles, an increasing proportion of β-diketones plus hydroxy-β-diketones in the was and an increasing proportion of wax tubes. Organs that were non-glaucous in all four lines, namely both surfaces of the vegetative leaves and the adaxial surface of the flag leaf, had high contact angles, a dense covering of wax plates and waxes rich in primary alcohols but devoid of β-diketones and hydroxy-β-diketones. The abaxial surface of the flag leaf was the most complex of the organ surfaces studied. In the wild type the glaucousness of the sheath continued onto this surface for 1-2 cm and this was correlated with the other characters studied as it was on the sheath. In the mutants, however, the tubes were absent. Flat ribbons of varying widths, a new wax structure in wheat, as well as various types of plates were found instead. These structures continued to the flag leaf tip and were also present on the abaxial surface of the wild type flag leaf. Changes in contact angle at the tip could not be correlated with the other measured parameters.

  6. Analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, William H , Jr

    1952-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling stability derivatives of complete airplane configurations is made by calculating the angularity of the air stream at the vertical tail due to rolling and determining the resulting forces and moments. Some of the important factors which affect the resultant angularity on the vertical tail are wing aspect ratio and sweepback, vertical-tail span, and considerations associated with angle of attack and airplane geometry. Some calculated sidewash results for a limited range of plan forms and vertical-tail sizes are presented. Equations taking into account the sidewash results are given for determining the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives. Comparisons of estimated and experimental results indicate that a consideration of wing interference effects improves the estimated values of the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives and that fair agreement with available experimental data is obtained.

  7. Theoretical development of a simplified wheelset model to evaluate collision-induced derailments of rolling stock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jeong Seo; Choi, Se Young

    2012-06-01

    A theoretical method is proposed to predict and evaluate collision-induced derailments of rolling stock by using a simplified wheelset model and is verified with dynamic simulations. Because the impact forces occurring during collision are transmitted from the car body to the bogies and axles through suspensions, rolling stock leads to derailment as a result of the combination of horizontal and vertical impact forces applied to the axle and a simplified wheelset model enforced at the axle can be used to theoretically formulate derailment behaviors. The derailment type depends on the combination of the horizontal and vertical forces, the flange angle and the friction coefficient. According to collision conditions, wheel-climb, wheel-lift or roll-over derailment can occur between the wheel and the rail. In this theoretical derailment model of a simplified wheelset, the derailment types are classified as Slip-up, Slip/roll-over, Climb-up, Climb/roll-over and pure Roll-over according to the derailment mechanisms between the wheel and the rail and the theoretical conditions needed to generate each derailment mechanism are proposed. The theoretical wheelset model is verified by dynamic simulation and its applicability is demonstrated by comparing the simulation results of the theoretical wheelset model with those of an actual wheelset model. The theoretical derailment wheelset model is in good agreement with the virtual testing model simulation for a collision-induced derailment of rolling stock.

  8. Visual field influence on manual roll and pitch stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.-K.; Young, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Human control performance in nulling perceived tilt angles was investigated for combinations of pseudo-random vestibular disturbances and different waveforms of low frequency wide visual field motions. For both roll and pitch axes, subjects tilted the trainer in which they were seated in the direction of field rotation. This visual bias was much stronger for pitch backwards with upward field rotation. Frequency response analysis showed the dominance of visual cues at low frequencies (below 0.06 Hz) and the reliance on vestibular information in the high frequency range for both axes. Models suggest that operator balancing responses at high frequencies are mainly processed by the semicircular canals rather than the otolith organs. The results also suggest that the subject tends to rely less on the otolith organs for pitch perception than for roll.

  9. A model for leaf initiation

    PubMed Central

    Abraham-Shrauner, Barbara; Pickard, Barbara G

    2011-01-01

    A biophysical model is proposed for how leaf primordia are positioned on the shoot apical
    meristem in both spiral and whorl phyllotaxes. Primordia are initiated by signals that propagate
    in the epidermis in both azimuthal directions away from the cotyledons or the most recently
    specified primordia. The signals are linear waves as inferred from the spatial periodicity of the
    divergence angle and a temporal periodicity. The periods of the waves, which represent actively
    transported auxin, are much smaller than the plastochron interval. Where oppositely directed
    waves meet at one or more angular positions on the periphery of the generative circle, auxin
    concentration builds and as in most models this stimulates local movement of auxin to
    underlying cells, where it promotes polarized cell division and expansion. For higher order
    spirals the wave model requires asymmetric function of auxin transport; that is, opposite wave
    speeds differ. An algorithm for determination of the angular positions of leaves in common leaf
    phyllotaxic configurations is proposed. The number of turns in a pattern repeat, number of leaves
    per level and per pattern repeat, and divergence angle are related to speed of auxin transport and
    radius of the generative circle. The rule for composition of Fibonacci or Lucas numbers
    associated with some phyllotaxes is discussed. A subcellular model suggests how the shoot
    meristem might specify either symmetric or asymmetric transport of auxin away from the
    forming primordia that produce it. Biological tests that could make or break the mathematical
    and molecular hypotheses are proposed. PMID:22212121

  10. A Heading and Flight-Path Angle Control of Aircraft Based on Required Acceleration Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitani, Naoharu

    This paper describes a control of heading and flight-path angles of aircraft to time-varying command angles. The controller first calculates an acceleration command vector (acV), which is vertical to the velocity vector. acV consists of two components; the one is feedforward acceleration obtained from the rates of command angles, and the other is feedback acceleration obtained from angle deviations by using PID control law. A bank angle command around the velocity vector and commands of pitch and yaw rates are then obtained to generate the required acceleration. A roll rate command is calculated from bank angle deviation. Roll, pitch and yaw rate commands are put into the attitude controller, which can be composed of any suitable control laws such as PID control. The control requires neither aerodynamic coefficients nor online calculation of the inverse dynamics of the aircraft. A numerical simulation illustrates the effects of the control.

  11. Modulation of internal estimates of gravity during and after prolonged roll-tilts.

    PubMed

    Tarnutzer, Alexander A; Bertolini, Giovanni; Bockisch, Christopher J; Straumann, Dominik; Marti, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Perceived direction of gravity, as assessed by the subjective visual vertical (SVV), shows roll-angle dependent errors that drift over time and a bias upon return to upright. According to Bayesian observer theory, the estimated direction of gravity is derived from the posterior probability distribution by combining sensory input and prior knowledge about earth-vertical in a statistically optimal fashion. Here we aimed to further characterize the stability of SVV during and after prolonged roll-tilts. Specifically we asked whether the post-tilt bias is related to the drift pattern while roll-tilted. Twenty-nine healthy human subjects (23-56 yo) repetitively adjusted a luminous arrow to the SVV over periods of 5 min while upright, roll-tilted (± 45°, ± 90°), and immediately after returning to upright. Significant (p<0.05) drifts (median absolute drift-amplitude: 10°/5 min) were found in 71% (± 45°) and 78% (± 90°) of runs. At ± 90° roll-tilt significant increases in absolute adjustment errors were more likely (76%), whereas significant increases (56%) and decreases (44%) were about equally frequent at ± 45°. When returning to upright, an initial bias towards the previous roll-position followed by significant exponential decay (median time-constant: 71 sec) was noted in 47% of all runs (all subjects pooled). No significant correlations were found between the drift pattern during and immediately after prolonged roll-tilt. We conclude that the SVV is not stable during and after prolonged roll-tilt and that the direction and magnitude of drift are individually distinct and roll-angle-dependent. Likely sensory and central adaptation and random-walk processes contribute to drift while roll-tilted. Lack of correlation between the drift and the post-tilt bias suggests that it is not the inaccuracy of the SVV estimate while tilted that determines post-tilt bias, but rather the previous head-roll orientation relative to gravity. We therefore favor central

  12. Modulation of internal estimates of gravity during and after prolonged roll-tilts.

    PubMed

    Tarnutzer, Alexander A; Bertolini, Giovanni; Bockisch, Christopher J; Straumann, Dominik; Marti, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Perceived direction of gravity, as assessed by the subjective visual vertical (SVV), shows roll-angle dependent errors that drift over time and a bias upon return to upright. According to Bayesian observer theory, the estimated direction of gravity is derived from the posterior probability distribution by combining sensory input and prior knowledge about earth-vertical in a statistically optimal fashion. Here we aimed to further characterize the stability of SVV during and after prolonged roll-tilts. Specifically we asked whether the post-tilt bias is related to the drift pattern while roll-tilted. Twenty-nine healthy human subjects (23-56 yo) repetitively adjusted a luminous arrow to the SVV over periods of 5 min while upright, roll-tilted (± 45°, ± 90°), and immediately after returning to upright. Significant (p<0.05) drifts (median absolute drift-amplitude: 10°/5 min) were found in 71% (± 45°) and 78% (± 90°) of runs. At ± 90° roll-tilt significant increases in absolute adjustment errors were more likely (76%), whereas significant increases (56%) and decreases (44%) were about equally frequent at ± 45°. When returning to upright, an initial bias towards the previous roll-position followed by significant exponential decay (median time-constant: 71 sec) was noted in 47% of all runs (all subjects pooled). No significant correlations were found between the drift pattern during and immediately after prolonged roll-tilt. We conclude that the SVV is not stable during and after prolonged roll-tilt and that the direction and magnitude of drift are individually distinct and roll-angle-dependent. Likely sensory and central adaptation and random-walk processes contribute to drift while roll-tilted. Lack of correlation between the drift and the post-tilt bias suggests that it is not the inaccuracy of the SVV estimate while tilted that determines post-tilt bias, but rather the previous head-roll orientation relative to gravity. We therefore favor central

  13. Modulation of Internal Estimates of Gravity during and after Prolonged Roll-Tilts

    PubMed Central

    Tarnutzer, Alexander A.; Bertolini, Giovanni; Bockisch, Christopher J.; Straumann, Dominik; Marti, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Perceived direction of gravity, as assessed by the subjective visual vertical (SVV), shows roll-angle dependent errors that drift over time and a bias upon return to upright. According to Bayesian observer theory, the estimated direction of gravity is derived from the posterior probability distribution by combining sensory input and prior knowledge about earth-vertical in a statistically optimal fashion. Here we aimed to further characterize the stability of SVV during and after prolonged roll-tilts. Specifically we asked whether the post-tilt bias is related to the drift pattern while roll-tilted. Twenty-nine healthy human subjects (23-56yo) repetitively adjusted a luminous arrow to the SVV over periods of 5min while upright, roll-tilted (±45°, ±90°), and immediately after returning to upright. Significant (p<0.05) drifts (median absolute drift-amplitude: 10°/5min) were found in 71% (±45°) and 78% (±90°) of runs. At ±90° roll-tilt significant increases in absolute adjustment errors were more likely (76%), whereas significant increases (56%) and decreases (44%) were about equally frequent at ±45°. When returning to upright, an initial bias towards the previous roll-position followed by significant exponential decay (median time-constant: 71sec) was noted in 47% of all runs (all subjects pooled). No significant correlations were found between the drift pattern during and immediately after prolonged roll-tilt. We conclude that the SVV is not stable during and after prolonged roll-tilt and that the direction and magnitude of drift are individually distinct and roll-angle-dependent. Likely sensory and central adaptation and random-walk processes contribute to drift while roll-tilted. Lack of correlation between the drift and the post-tilt bias suggests that it is not the inaccuracy of the SVV estimate while tilted that determines post-tilt bias, but rather the previous head-roll orientation relative to gravity. We therefore favor central adaptation, most

  14. 14 CFR 25.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...(b): (1) Conditions corresponding to steady rolling velocities must be investigated. In addition... rolling velocity may be assumed in the absence of a rational time history investigation of the...

  15. Mixed convective/dynamic roll vortices and their effects on initial wind and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Tracy; Shirer, Hampton N.

    1991-01-01

    The onset and development of both dynamically and convectively forced boundary layer rolls are studied with linear and nonlinear analyses of a truncated spectral model of shallow Boussinesq flow. Emphasis is given here on the energetics of the dominant roll modes, on the magnitudes of the roll-induced modifications of the initial basic state wind and temperature profiles, and on the sensitivity of the linear stability results to the use of modified profiles as basic states. It is demonstrated that the roll circulations can produce substantial changes to the cross-roll component of the initial wind profile and that significant changes in orientation angle estimates can result from use of a roll-modified profile in the stability analysis. These results demonstrate that roll contributions must be removed from observed background wind profiles before using them to investigate the mechanisms underlying actual secondary flows in the boundary layer. The model is developed quite generally to accept arbitrary basic state wind profiles as dynamic forcing. An Ekman profile is chosen here merely to provide a means for easy comparison with other theoretical boundary layer studies; the ultimate application of the model is to study observed boundary layer profiles. Results of the analytic stability analysis are validated by comparing them with results from a larger linear model. For an appropriate Ekman depth, a complete set of transition curves is given in forcing parameter space for roll modes driven both thermally and dynamically. Preferred orientation angles, horizontal wavelengths and propagation frequencies, as well as energetics and wind profile modifications, are all shown to agree rather well with results from studies on Ekman layers as well as with studies on near-neutral and convective atmospheric boundary layers.

  16. 14 CFR 23.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rolling conditions. 23.349 Section 23.349... Rolling conditions. The wing and wing bracing must be designed for the following loading conditions: (a..., the rolling accelerations may be obtained by modifying the symmetrical flight conditions in §...

  17. 46 CFR 170.295 - Special consideration for free surface of passive roll stabilization tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The factor (K) must be calculated as follows: (1) Plot (I/d)tan T on Graph 170.295 where— (i) (I) is... the roll tank; and (iii) (T) is the angle of heel. (2) Plot the moments of transference of the...

  18. 46 CFR 170.295 - Special consideration for free surface of passive roll stabilization tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The factor (K) must be calculated as follows: (1) Plot (I/d)tan T on Graph 170.295 where— (i) (I) is... the roll tank; and (iii) (T) is the angle of heel. (2) Plot the moments of transference of the...

  19. 46 CFR 170.295 - Special consideration for free surface of passive roll stabilization tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) The factor (K) must be calculated as follows: (1) Plot (I/d)tan T on Graph 170.295 where— (i) (I) is... the roll tank; and (iii) (T) is the angle of heel. (2) Plot the moments of transference of the...

  20. Rolling Wrinkles on Elastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imburgia, Michael; Crosby, Alfred

    The mechanics of rolling contact between an elastomer layer and a thin film present unique opportunities for taking advantage of elastic instabilities, such as surface wrinkling, to create patterned surfaces. Here we present a plate-to-roll(P2R) geometry to laminate a thin film onto an elastomer layer in order to induce surface wrinkling. First, a poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) layer is draped around a roller and pressed into contact with a poly(styrene)(PS) film supported on a plate. Once rolling begins, the PS film preferentially laminates onto the PDMS layer. During this process, the deformation of the PDMS layer can induce wrinkling when the contact load exceeds a critical value. Wrinkle feature size consists of amplitudes of 0 . 2 - 4 μm and wavelengths of 15 - 20 μm . Wrinkle amplitude can be controlled by contact load and roller curvature, as well as the mechanical properties and thickness of the film and elastomer. We develop semi-empirical equations to describe the effect of contact load and roller curvature on the wrinkle aspect ratio. Finite-element modeling of an elastomer layer in rolling contact with a rigid plate is used to support experimental results. Using these models, wrinkle-based technologies such as optoelectronics and enhanced adhesives can be envisioned.

  1. Wind-tunnel investigation at supersonic speeds of a remote-controlled canard missile with a free-rolling-tail brake torque system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted at Mach numbers 1.70, 2.16, and 2.86 to determine the static aerodynamic characteristics of a cruciform canard-controlled missile with fixed or free rolling tailfin afterbodies. Mechanical coupling effects of the free-rolling-tail afterbody were investigated by using an electronic electromagnetic brake system providing arbitrary tail-fin brake torques with continuous measurements of tail-to-mainframe torque and tail roll rate. Remote-controlled canards were deflected to provide pitch, yaw, and roll control. Results indicate that the induced rolling moment coefficients due to canard yaw control are reduced and linearized for the free-rolling-tail (free-tail) configuration. The canards of the latter provide conventional roll control for the entire angle-of-attack test range. For the free-tail configuration, the induced rolling moment coefficient due to canard yaw control increased and the canard roll control decreased with increases in brake torque, which simulated bearing friction torque. It appears that a compromise in regard to bearing friction, for example, low-cost bearings with some friction, may allow satisfactory free-tail aerodynamic characteristics that include reductions in adverse rolling-moment coefficients and lower tail roll rates.

  2. Leaf growth is conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  3. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  4. Bidirectional reflectance, leaf optical and physiological properties of prairie vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, E. A.; Blad, B. L.; Starks, P. J; Hays, C. J.; Mesarch, M. A.; Middleton, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    A modular multiband radiometer is used to measure reflected radiation from the vegetative surface of a prairie. The data are compared to estimates of incoming radiation by measuring the reflection from a molded halon panel, and the bidirectional reflectance factors are measured at seven view-zenith angles and various incidence angles. The canopy-reflectance results are compared to leaf-optical and other vegetative physiological properties, and a direct relationship is reported.

  5. A rolling 3-UPU parallel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhihuai; Yao, Yan'an; Kong, Xianwen

    2013-12-01

    A novel rolling mechanism is proposed based on a 3-UPU parallel mechanism in this paper. The rolling mechanism is composed of two platforms connected by three UPU (universal-prismatic-universal) serial-chain type limbs. The degree-of-freedom of the mechanism is analyzed using screw theory. Gait analysis and stability analysis are presented in detail. Four rolling modes of the mechanism are discussed and simulated. The feasibility of the rolling mechanism is verified by means of a physical prototype. Finally, its terrain adaptability is enhanced through planning the rolling gaits.

  6. Pointing/roll mechanism for the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostaszewski, Miroslaw A.; Guy, Larry J.

    1991-01-01

    A pointing/roll mechanism for the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) is presented along with a description of the mechanism control algorithm. The mechanism, operating in space, will position the 2.1 meter long, 0.7 meter diameter UVCS instrument in pitch and yaw, within a 54 arc-minute half angle cone, and will also allow it to rotate + or - 179.75 deg. After considerable design effort, an optimum mechanical solution was achieved, which meets all scientific requirements as well as weight, volume, and power budgets. Evolution of the mechanism is presented along with the design status.

  7. [Roll repair of nonconfluent pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Komiya, T; Yamazaki, K; Kohchi, K; Kanzaki, Y

    1995-11-01

    We reviewed the repair of nonconfluent pulmonary artery using a roll to clarify indication of this operation, operative technique (especially the material and the size of conduit) and possibility of total correction. Eleven patients (mean age: five years) and 13 operations including two reoperations were reviewed. The material of the roll was xenopericardium in nine and artificial graft in four operations. No operative death and late death occurred. Five patients required reoperations from three occlusion and two severe stenosis of the roll. Three of nine xenopericardial roll needed reoperations and in two reoperated cases, the roll had been placed behind the aorta. In contrast, one artificial graft needed reoperation. The diameter of the roll was compared with that of normal pulmonary artery estimated from the body surface area. If the roll was too large (more than 125% normal) or too small (less than 100% normal), the luminal diameter of the roll became significantly smaller than appropriate-sized roll (p = 0.002). The size of nonconfluent side of the pulmonary artery also affect the result of repair. In occluded or stenotic cases, the unilateral PA index was significantly smaller than good patent cases (p = 0.014). Total correction was possible in eight cases (73%) including four Rastelli operation, two right ventricular outflow patch enlargement, and two modified Fontan operations without operative death. Thus preoperative evaluation of the pulmonary artery size and anatomy, selection of roll material and size matching seemed to be important for successful roll repair of nonconfluent pulmonary artery.

  8. Low-Speed Yawed-Rolling Characteristics of a Pair of 56-Inch-Diameter, 32-Ply-Rating, Type 7 Aircraft Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Wilbur E.; Horne, Walter B.

    1959-01-01

    The low-speed (up to 4 miles per hour) yawed-rolling characteristics of two 56 x 16 32-ply-rating, type 7 aircraft tires under straight-yawed rolling were determined over a range of inflation pressures and yaw angles for a vertical load approximately equal to 75 percent of the rated vertical load. The quantities measured or determined included cornering force, drag force self-alining torque, pneumatic caster vertical tire deflection, yaw angle, and relaxation length. During straight-yawed rolling the normal force generally increased with increasing yaw angle within the test range. The self-alining torque increased to a maximum value and then decreased with increasing angle of yaw. The pneumatic caster tended to decrease with increasing yaw angle.

  9. Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls--Application to TiN-Coated Rolls

    SciTech Connect

    Ould, Choumad; Montmitonnet, Pierre; Gachon, Yves; Badiche, Xavier

    2011-05-04

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer (''roll coating'', ''pick up'') may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

  10. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer ( Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  11. Non-linear dynamics of inlet film thickness during unsteady rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Kuo; Zang, Yong; Gao, Zhiying; Qin, Qin; Wu, Diping

    2016-05-01

    The inlet film thickness directly affects film and stress distribution of rolling interfaces. Unsteady factors, such as unsteady back tension, may disturb the inlet film thickness. However, the current models of unsteady inlet film thickness lack unsteady disturbance factors and do not take surface topography into consideration. In this paper, based on the hydrodynamic analysis of inlet zone an unsteady rolling film model which concerns the direction of surface topography is built up. Considering the small fluctuation of inlet angle, absolute reduction, reduction ratio, inlet strip thickness and roll radius as the input variables and the fluctuation of inlet film thickness as the output variable, the non-linear relationship between the input and output is discussed. The discussion results show that there is 180° phase difference between the inlet film thickness and the input variables, such as the fluctuant absolute reduction, the fluctuant reduction ratio and non-uniform inlet strip thickness, but there is no phase difference between unsteady roll radius and the output. The inlet angle, the steady roll radius and the direction of surface topography have significant influence on the fluctuant amplitude of unsteady inlet film thickness. This study proposes an analysis method for unsteady inlet film thickness which takes surface topography and new disturbance factors into consideration.

  12. Slow-roll thawing quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi

    2009-04-15

    We derive slow-roll conditions for thawing quintessence. We solve the equation of motion of {phi} for a Taylor expanded potential (up to the quadratic order) in the limit where the equation of state w is close to -1 to derive the equation of state as a function of the scale factor. We find that the evolution of {phi} and hence w are described by only two parameters. The expression for w(a), which can be applied to general thawing models, coincides precisely with that derived recently by Dutta and Scherrer for hilltop quintessence. The consistency conditions of |w+1|<<1 are derived. The slow-roll conditions for freezing quintessence are also derived.

  13. Slow-roll extended quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Siino, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-04-15

    We derive the slow-roll conditions for a nonminimally coupled scalar field (extended quintessence) during the radiation/matter dominated era extending our previous results for thawing quintessence. We find that the ratio {phi}e/3H{phi} becomes constant but negative, in sharp contrast to the ratio for the minimally coupled scalar field. We also find that the functional form of the equation of state of the scalar field asymptotically approaches that of the minimally coupled thawing quintessence.

  14. Kinematics investigations of cylinders rolling down a ramp using tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prima, Eka Cahya; Mawaddah, Menurseto; Winarno, Nanang; Sriwulan, Wiwin

    2016-02-01

    Nowadays, students' exploration as well as students' interaction in the application stage of learning cycle can be improved by directly model real-world objects based on Newton's Law using Open Source Physics (OSP) computer-modeling tools. In a case of studying an object rolling down a ramp, a traditional experiment method commonly uses a ticker tape sliding through a ticker timer. However, some kinematics parameters such as the instantaneous acceleration and the instantaneous speed of object cannot be investigated directly. By using the Tracker video analysis method, all kinematics parameters of cylinders rolling down a ramp can be investigated by direct visual inspection. The result shows that (1) there are no relations of cylinders' mass as well as cylinders' radius towards their kinetics parameters. (2) Excluding acceleration data, the speed and position as function of time follow the theory. (3) The acceleration data are in the random order, but their trend-lines closely fit the theory with 0.15% error. (4) The decrease of acceleration implicitly occurs due to the air friction acting on the cylinder during rolling down. (5) The cylinder's inertial moment constant has been obtained experimentally with 3.00% error. (6) The ramp angle linearly influences the cylinders' acceleration with 2.36% error. This research implied that the program can be further applied to physics educational purposes.

  15. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The computational model consists of a sharp-edged delta wing of aspect ratio one and swept-back flexible twin tail with taper ratio of 0.23. The configuration model is statically pitched at 30 deg. angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4 deg. and reduced frequency of pi and 2(pi). The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.3 and 1.25 million, respectively. This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The configuration is investigated for inboard position of the twin tails which corresponds to a separation distance between the twin tails of 33% wing span. The computed results are compared with the results of stationary configuration, which previously have been validated using experimental data. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration.

  16. Mechanisms of rolling contact spalling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. M.; Kulkarni, S. M.; Bhargava, V.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study aimed at analyzing the mechanical material interactions responsible for rolling contact spalling of the 440 C steel, high pressure oxygen turbopump bearings are presented. A coupled temperature displacement finite element analysis of the effects of friction heating under the contact is presented. The contact is modelled as a stationary, heat generating, 2 dimensional indent in an elastic perfectly plastic half-space with heat fluxes up to 8.6 x 10000 KW/m sq comparable to those generated in the bearing. Local temperatures in excess of 1000 C are treated. The calculations reveal high levels of residual tension after the contact is unloaded and cools. Efforts to promote Mode 2/Mode 3 fatigue crack growth under cyclic torsion in hardened 440 C steel are described. Spalls produced on 440 C steel by a 3 ball/rod rolling contact testing machine were studied with scanning microscopy. The shapes of the cyclic, stress strain hysteresis loops displayed by hardened 440 C steel in cyclic torsion at room temperature are defined for the plastic strain amplitudes encountered in rolling/sliding contact. Results of these analyses are discussed in detail.

  17. Rolling Contact Fatigue of Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, W.; Wang, Y.; Hadfield, M.; Kanematsu, W.; Kirkland, Timothy Philip; Jadaan, Osama M.

    2006-09-01

    High hardness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high temperature capability are properties also suited to rolling element materials. Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been found to have a good combination of properties suitable for these applications. However, much is still not known about rolling contact fatigue (RCF) behavior, which is fundamental information to assess the lifetime of the material. Additionally, there are several test techniques that are employed internationally whose measured RCF performances are often irreconcilable. Due to the lack of such information, some concern for the reliability of ceramic bearings still remains. This report surveys a variety of topics pertaining to RCF. Surface defects (cracks) in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and their propagation during RCF are discussed. Five methods to measure RCF are then briefly overviewed. Spalling, delamination, and rolling contact wear are discussed. Lastly, methods to destructively (e.g., C-sphere flexure strength testing) and non-destructively identify potential RCF-limiting flaws in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls are described.

  18. The role of gravity in leaf blade curvatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    In the past year we have gained useful information on several aspects of leaf blade growth. The most important observations are as follows: The C(14)-1AA moves preferentially in a gravipositive dorsiventral direction through the blade. This movement is inhibited by inversion of the blade. The responding cells in leaf blade hyponasty are in the lower epidermis and bundle sheath cells. Two additional responses in the leaf were characterized. In addition to blade curvature, the leaf shows petiole curvature and changes in the liminal angle subtended by the pulvinus. Ethylene production was studied under a number of conditions. The blade, rather than the petiole or pulvinus, is the principal site of auxin-promoted ethylene synthesis. The effects of a variety of agents on the blade, including gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, vanadate, low pH buffers, and blue light were reviewed.

  19. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  20. A model for roll stall and the inherent stability modes of low aspect ratio wings at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Matt

    The development of Micro Aerial Vehicles has been hindered by the poor understanding of the aerodynamic loading and stability and control properties of the low Reynolds number regime in which the inherent low aspect ratio (LAR) wings operate. This thesis experimentally evaluates the static and damping aerodynamic stability derivatives to provide a complete aerodynamic model for canonical flat plate wings of aspect ratios near unity at Reynolds numbers under 1 x 105. This permits the complete functionality of the aerodynamic forces and moments to be expressed and the equations of motion to solved, thereby identifying the inherent stability properties of the wing. This provides a basis for characterizing the stability of full vehicles. The influence of the tip vortices during sideslip perturbations is found to induce a loading condition referred to as roll stall, a significant roll moment created by the spanwise induced velocity asymmetry related to the displacement of the vortex cores relative to the wing. Roll stall is manifested by a linearly increasing roll moment with low to moderate angles of attack and a subsequent stall event similar to a lift polar; this behavior is not experienced by conventional (high aspect ratio) wings. The resulting large magnitude of the roll stability derivative, Cl,beta and lack of roll damping, Cl ,rho, create significant modal responses of the lateral state variables; a linear model used to evaluate these modes is shown to accurately reflect the solution obtained by numerically integrating the nonlinear equations. An unstable Dutch roll mode dominates the behavior of the wing for small perturbations from equilibrium, and in the presence of angle of attack oscillations a previously unconsidered coupled mode, referred to as roll resonance, is seen develop and drive the bank angle? away from equilibrium. Roll resonance requires a linear time variant (LTV) model to capture the behavior of the bank angle, which is attributed to the

  1. Deformation Analysis of Surface Crack in Rolling and Wire Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari

    The surface flaw of a drawn wire has a significant influence on the quality of a product. High-surface-quality drawn wires and rods have been required for the manufacture of automobiles and machines. Wire breaks due to large surface defects are common problems in wire drawing. The authors carried out rolling and multi-pass drawing of a stainless-steel wire with an artificial scratch, and investigated the growth and disappearance of a scratch from both sides by experiments and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). When the scratch angle is small, the scratch side surfaces are pushed toward each other and the scratch becomes an overlap defect. In contrast, when the scratch angle is large, the bottom of the scratch rises, and the scratch is recovered satisfactorily. Furthermore, the scratch shape and the drawing conditions were varied, and the deformation state of a scratch was clarified.

  2. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  3. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  4. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossander, Lea H.; Zawacka, Natalia K.; Dam, Henrik F.; Krebs, Frederik C.; Andreasen, Jens W.

    2014-08-01

    The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording scattering measurements in situ, enabling us to follow the crystal formation during drying. By varying the distance between the coating head and the point where the X-ray beam hits the film, we obtained measurements of 4 different stages of drying. For each of those stages, the scattering from as long a foil as possible is summed together, with the distance from coating head to scattering point kept constant. The results are average crystallographic properties for the active layer coated on a 30 m long foil. With this insight into the dynamics of crystallization in a roll-coated polymer film, we find that the formation of textured and untextured crystallites seems uncorrelated, and happens at widely different rates. Untextured P3HT crystallites form later in the drying process than expected which may explain previous studies speculating that untextured crystallization depends on concentration. Textured crystallites, however, begin forming much earlier and steadily increases as the film dries, showing a development similar to other in situ studies of these materials.

  5. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    SciTech Connect

    Rossander, Lea H.; Zawacka, Natalia K.; Dam, Henrik F.; Krebs, Frederik C.; Andreasen, Jens W.

    2014-08-15

    The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording scattering measurements in situ, enabling us to follow the crystal formation during drying. By varying the distance between the coating head and the point where the X-ray beam hits the film, we obtained measurements of 4 different stages of drying. For each of those stages, the scattering from as long a foil as possible is summed together, with the distance from coating head to scattering point kept constant. The results are average crystallographic properties for the active layer coated on a 30 m long foil. With this insight into the dynamics of crystallization in a roll-coated polymer film, we find that the formation of textured and untextured crystallites seems uncorrelated, and happens at widely different rates. Untextured P3HT crystallites form later in the drying process than expected which may explain previous studies speculating that untextured crystallization depends on concentration. Textured crystallites, however, begin forming much earlier and steadily increases as the film dries, showing a development similar to other in situ studies of these materials.

  6. Examining the lateral displacement of HL60 cells rolling on asymmetric P-selectin patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Hua; Bose, Suman; Van Vliet, Krystyn J; Karp, Jeffrey M; Karnik, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    The lateral displacement of cells orthogonal to a flow stream by rolling on asymmetrical receptor patterns presents a new opportunity for the label-free separation and analysis of cells. Understanding the nature of cell rolling trajectories on such substrates is necessary to the engineering of substrates and the design of devices for cell separation and analysis. Here, we investigate the statistical nature of cell rolling and the effect of pattern geometry and flow shear stress on cell rolling trajectories using micrometer-scale patterns of biomolecular receptors with well-defined edges. Leukemic myeloid HL60 cells expressing the PSGL-1 ligand were allowed to flow across a field of patterned lines fabricated using microcontact printing and functionalized with the P-selectin receptor, leveraging both the specific adhesion of this ligand-receptor pair and the asymmetry of the receptor pattern inclination angle with respect to the fluid shear flow direction (α = 5, 10, 15, and 20°). The effects of the fluid shear stress magnitude (τ = 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0 dyn/cm(2)), α, and P-selectin incubation concentration were quantified in terms of the rolling velocity and edge tracking length. Rolling cells tracked along the inclined edges of the patterned lines before detaching and reattaching on another line. The detachment of rolling cells after tracking along the edge was consistent with a Poisson process of history-independent interactions. Increasing the edge inclination angle decreased the edge tracking length in an exponential manner, contrary to the shear stress magnitude and P-selectin incubation concentration, which did not have a significant effect. On the basis of these experimental data, we constructed an empirical model that predicted the occurrence of the maximum lateral displacement at an edge angle of 7.5°. We also used these findings to construct a Monte Carlo simulation for the prediction of rolling trajectories of HL60 cells on P

  7. Effect of viscosity on rolling-element fatigue life at cryogenic temperature with fluorinated ether lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Rolling-element fatigue tests were conducted with 12.7-mm-(1/2-in.-) diameter AISI 52100 steel balls in the NASA five-ball fatigue tester, with a maximum hertz stress of 5500 mN/m2 (800 000 psi), a shaft speed of 4750 rpm, lubricant temperature of 200 K (360 R), a contact angle of 20 deg, using four fluorinated ether lubricants of varying viscosities. No statistically significant differences in rolling-element fatigue life occurred using the four viscosity levels. Elastohydrodynamic calculations indicate that values of the lubricant film parameter were approximately 2 or greater.

  8. Helitrons on a roll: eukaryotic rolling-circle transposons.

    PubMed

    Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Jurka, Jerzy

    2007-10-01

    Rolling-circle eukaryotic transposons, known as Helitron transposons, were first discovered in plants (Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa) and in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. To date, Helitrons have been identified in a diverse range of species, from protists to mammals. They represent a major class of eukaryotic transposons and are fundamentally different from classical transposons in terms of their structure and mechanism of transposition. Helitrons seem to have a major role in the evolution of host genomes. They frequently capture diverse host genes, some of which can evolve into novel host genes or become essential for helitron transposition.

  9. Vortex Roll Breakup in Three-Dimensional Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamman, Curtis; Moin, Parviz

    2011-11-01

    Large helical vortex rolls with axes in the general direction of the mean wind commonly appear in the unstably stratified atmospheric boundary layer. When a rapid shift in the mean wind direction occurs, the vertical transport of momentum and heat flux is sharply reduced compared to the equilibrium value. At long times, this non-equilibrium turbulent flow may develop back into a stable pattern of organized vortex rolls, now aligned with the new wind direction. This transition process is studied via direct numerical simulation of plane channel flow heated from below with impulsively started transverse pressure gradient (Ri = - Ra / PrRe2 = - 0 . 25 , Ra =107 , and Pr = 0 . 71). The timescale for heat flux recovery is approximately the same for turning angles larger than 30 degrees. For higher turning angles, however, the Nusselt number will temporarily drop below one due to a significant reduction in vertical transport. Horizontal velocity and temperature spectra suggest that scale separation between large-scale, organized convective motions and turbulent eddies can prevent heat transfer reduction in transversely accelerated three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers. Supported by the DOE CSGF, grant no. DE-FG02-97ER25308.

  10. How rolling forecasting facilitates dynamic, agile planning.

    PubMed

    Miller, Debra; Allen, Michael; Schnittger, Stephanie; Hackman, Theresa

    2013-11-01

    Rolling forecasting may be used to replace or supplement the annual budget process. The rolling forecast typically builds on the organization's strategic financial plan, focusing on the first three years of plan projections and comparing the strategic financial plan assumptions with the organization's expected trajectory. Leaders can then identify and respond to gaps between the rolling forecast and the strategic financial plan on an ongoing basis.

  11. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip for Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; J.-P. Delplanque; S. B. Johnson

    2005-02-01

    Spray rolling is a novel strip casting technology in which molten aluminum alloy is atomized and deposited into the roll gap of mill rolls to produce aluminum strip. A combined experimental/modeling approach has been followed in developing this technology with active participation from industry. The feasibility of this technology has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale and it is currently being scaled-up. This paper provides an overview of the process and compares the microstructure and properties of spray-rolled 2124 aluminum alloy with commercial ingot-processed material

  12. METHOD OF HOT ROLLING URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Kaufmann, A.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method is given for quickly and efficiently hot rolling uranium metal in the upper part of the alpha phase temperature region to obtain sound bars and sheets possessing a good surface finish. The uranium metal billet is heated to a temperature in the range of 1000 deg F to 1220 deg F by immersion iii a molten lead bath. The heated billet is then passed through the rolls. The temperature is restored to the desired range between successive passes through the rolls, and the rolls are turned down approximately 0.050 inch between successive passes.

  13. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  14. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  15. Rolling-cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, D.R.

    1982-09-27

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping, is described. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  16. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  17. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  18. Comparative leaf development in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2014-02-01

    Recent accumulation of our knowledge on basic leaf development mechanisms in model angiosperm species has allowed us to pursue evolutionary development (evo/devo) studies of various kinds of leaf development. As a result, unexpected findings and clues have been unearthed aiding our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the diversity of leaf morphology, although the covered remain limited. In this review, we highlight recent findings of diversified leaf development in angiosperms.

  19. An EBSD investigation of cryogenically-rolled Cu–30%Zn brass

    SciTech Connect

    Konkova, T.; Mironov, S.; Korznikov, A.; Korznikova, G.; Myshlyaev, M.M.; Semiatin, S.L.

    2015-03-15

    Electron backscatter diffraction was used to study grain structure development in heavily cryogenically-rolled Cu–30%Zn brass. The produced microstructure was found to be very inhomogeneous. At a relatively coarse scale, it consisted of texture bands having crystallographic orientations close to the α- and γ-fibers. The texture bands contained internal structure comprising shear bands, mechanical twins, and low-angle boundaries. Such features were more pronounced within the γ-fiber, and this resulted in a heterogeneous ultrafine grain structure. The cryogenic rolling was concluded to be not straightforward for production of nanocrystalline grain structure in Cu–30%Zn brass. - Highlights: • Cryogenic rolling produced an inhomogeneous ultrafine-grained microstructure. • Grain refinement was mainly related with twinning and shear banding. • Grain refinement preferentially occurred in (111) fiber texture.

  20. Static and yawed-rolling mechanical properties of two type 7 aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, J. A.; Stubbs, S. M.; Mccarty, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of 18 x 5.5 and 49 x 17 size, type 7 aircraft tires were evaluated. The tires were subjected to pure vertical loads and to combined vertical and lateral loads under both static and rolling conditions. Parameters for the static tests consisted of tire load in the vertical and lateral directions, and parameters for the rolling tests included tire vertical load, yaw angle, and ground speed. Effects of each of these parameters on the measured tire characteristics are discussed and, where possible, compared with previous work. Results indicate that dynamic tire properties under investigation were generally insensitive to speed variations and therefore tend to support the conclusion that many tire dynamic characteristics can be obtained from static and low speed rolling tests. Furthermore, many of the tire mechanical properties are in good agreement with empirical predictions based on earlier research.

  1. Evaluation of two methods of predicting MLC leaf positions using EPID measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Dance, David R.; Fielding, Andrew

    2006-09-15

    In intensity modulated radiation treatments (IMRT), the position of the field edges and the modulation within the beam are often achieved with a multileaf collimator (MLC). During the MLC calibration process, due to the finite accuracy of leaf position measurements, a systematic error may be introduced to leaf positions. Thereafter leaf positions of the MLC depend on the systematic error introduced on each leaf during MLC calibration and on the accuracy of the leaf position control system (random errors). This study presents and evaluates two methods to predict the systematic errors on the leaf positions introduced during the MLC calibration. The two presented methods are based on a series of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements. A comparison with film measurements showed that the EPID could be used to measure leaf positions without introducing any bias. The first method, referred to as the 'central leaf method', is based on the method currently used at this center for MLC leaf calibration. It mimics the manner in which leaf calibration parameters are specified in the MLC control system and consequently is also used by other centers. The second method, a new method proposed by the authors and referred to as the ''individual leaf method,'' involves the measurement of two positions for each leaf (-5 and +15 cm) and the interpolation and extrapolation from these two points to any other given position. The central leaf method and the individual leaf method predicted leaf positions at prescribed positions of -11, 0, 5, and 10 cm within 2.3 and 1.0 mm, respectively, with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.3 and 0.2 mm, respectively. The individual leaf method provided a better prediction of the leaf positions than the central leaf method. Reproducibility tests for leaf positions of -5 and +15 cm were performed. The reproducibility was within 0.4 mm on the same day and 0.4 mm six weeks later (1 SD). Measurements at gantry angles of 0 deg., 90 deg., and 270 deg

  2. Aqueous processing of low-band-gap polymer solar cells using roll-to-roll methods.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Thomas R; Larsen-Olsen, Thue T; Andreasen, Birgitta; Böttiger, Arvid P L; Carlé, Jon E; Helgesen, Martin; Bundgaard, Eva; Norrman, Kion; Andreasen, Jens W; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-05-24

    Aqueous nanoparticle dispersions of a series of three low-band-gap polymers poly[4,8-bis(2-ethylhexyloxy)benzo(1,2-b:4,5-b')dithiophene-alt-5,6-bis(octyloxy)-4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)-5,5'-diyl] (P1), poly[(4,4'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]silole)-2,6-diyl-alt-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)-4,7-diyl] (P2), and poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5-diyl] (P3) were prepared using ultrasonic treatment of a chloroform solution of the polymer and [6,6]-phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester ([60]PCBM) mixed with an aqueous solution of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS). The size of the nanoparticles was established using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of the aqueous dispersions and by both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and using both grazing incidence SAXS (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in the solid state as coated films. The aqueous dispersions were dialyzed to remove excess detergent and concentrated to a solid content of approximately 60 mg mL(-1). The formation of films for solar cells using the aqueous dispersion required the addition of the nonionic detergent FSO-100 at a concentration of 5 mg mL(-1). This enabled slot-die coating of high quality films with a dry thickness of 126 ± 19, 500 ± 25, and 612 ± 22 nm P1, P2, and P3, respectively for polymer solar cells. Large area inverted polymer solar cells were thus prepared based on the aqueous inks. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) reached for each of the materials was 0.07, 0.55, and 0.15% for P1, P2, and P3, respectively. The devices were prepared using coating and printing of all layers including the metal back electrodes. All steps were carried out using roll-to-roll (R2R) slot-die and screen printing methods on flexible substrates. All five layers were processed using environmentally friendly methods and solvents. Two of the layers were processed entirely from water (the electron transport layer and the active

  3. Aqueous processing of low-band-gap polymer solar cells using roll-to-roll methods.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Thomas R; Larsen-Olsen, Thue T; Andreasen, Birgitta; Böttiger, Arvid P L; Carlé, Jon E; Helgesen, Martin; Bundgaard, Eva; Norrman, Kion; Andreasen, Jens W; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-05-24

    Aqueous nanoparticle dispersions of a series of three low-band-gap polymers poly[4,8-bis(2-ethylhexyloxy)benzo(1,2-b:4,5-b')dithiophene-alt-5,6-bis(octyloxy)-4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)-5,5'-diyl] (P1), poly[(4,4'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]silole)-2,6-diyl-alt-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)-4,7-diyl] (P2), and poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5-diyl] (P3) were prepared using ultrasonic treatment of a chloroform solution of the polymer and [6,6]-phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester ([60]PCBM) mixed with an aqueous solution of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS). The size of the nanoparticles was established using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of the aqueous dispersions and by both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and using both grazing incidence SAXS (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in the solid state as coated films. The aqueous dispersions were dialyzed to remove excess detergent and concentrated to a solid content of approximately 60 mg mL(-1). The formation of films for solar cells using the aqueous dispersion required the addition of the nonionic detergent FSO-100 at a concentration of 5 mg mL(-1). This enabled slot-die coating of high quality films with a dry thickness of 126 ± 19, 500 ± 25, and 612 ± 22 nm P1, P2, and P3, respectively for polymer solar cells. Large area inverted polymer solar cells were thus prepared based on the aqueous inks. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) reached for each of the materials was 0.07, 0.55, and 0.15% for P1, P2, and P3, respectively. The devices were prepared using coating and printing of all layers including the metal back electrodes. All steps were carried out using roll-to-roll (R2R) slot-die and screen printing methods on flexible substrates. All five layers were processed using environmentally friendly methods and solvents. Two of the layers were processed entirely from water (the electron transport layer and the active

  4. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING THAT HOUSES THE HOT ROLL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING THAT HOUSES THE HOT ROLL MILL, ALSO KNOWN AS THE NO. 31 HOT ROLL MILL; LOOKING SOUTHWEST - American Brass Company, Kenosha Works, Hot Roll Mill, Kenosha, Kenosha County, WI

  5. Dynamic precipitation of Al-Zn alloy during rolling and accumulative roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. Y.; Yu, L.; Ma, M. Z.; Liu, R. P.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, cold rolling was performed on a binary Al-20 wt%Zn alloy and dynamic precipitation identified for the first time in Al alloys under cold rolling. Zn clusters formed after application of 0.6 strain, and the Zn phase precipitated upon further increasing strain. Both grain refinement and rolling-induced defects are considered to promote Zn precipitation. The hardness of Al-Zn alloy initially increased with strain up to a strain of 2.9 and then decreased with increasing rolling strain. Dynamic precipitation greatly affects the strengthening mechanism of the rolled Al-Zn alloy under various strains.

  6. Simulating droplet motion on virtual leaf surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lisa C.; McCue, Scott W.; Moroney, Timothy J.; Forster, W. Alison; Kempthorne, Daryl M.; Belward, John A.; Turner, Ian W.

    2015-01-01

    A curvilinear thin film model is used to simulate the motion of droplets on a virtual leaf surface, with a view to better understand the retention of agricultural sprays on plants. The governing model, adapted from Roy et al. (2002 J. Fluid Mech. 454, 235–261 (doi:10.1017/S0022112001007133)) with the addition of a disjoining pressure term, describes the gravity- and curvature-driven flow of a small droplet on a complex substrate: a cotton leaf reconstructed from digitized scan data. Coalescence is the key mechanism behind spray coating of foliage, and our simulations demonstrate that various experimentally observed coalescence behaviours can be reproduced qualitatively. By varying the contact angle over the domain, we also demonstrate that the presence of a chemical defect can act as an obstacle to the droplet's path, causing break-up. In simulations on the virtual leaf, it is found that the movement of a typical spray size droplet is driven almost exclusively by substrate curvature gradients. It is not until droplet mass is sufficiently increased via coalescence that gravity becomes the dominating force. PMID:26064657

  7. 14 CFR 25.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Maneuver and Gust Conditions § 25.349 Rolling conditions. The airplane must be designed for loads resulting from the rolling conditions specified in... deflections may be limited by pilot effort) must be considered in combination with an airplane load factor...

  8. 14 CFR 25.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Maneuver and Gust Conditions § 25.349 Rolling conditions. The airplane must be designed for loads resulting from the rolling conditions specified in... deflections may be limited by pilot effort) must be considered in combination with an airplane load factor...

  9. 14 CFR 25.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Maneuver and Gust Conditions § 25.349 Rolling conditions. The airplane must be designed for loads resulting from the rolling conditions specified in... deflections may be limited by pilot effort) must be considered in combination with an airplane load factor...

  10. 14 CFR 25.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Maneuver and Gust Conditions § 25.349 Rolling conditions. The airplane must be designed for loads resulting from the rolling conditions specified in... deflections may be limited by pilot effort) must be considered in combination with an airplane load factor...

  11. Lubrication of rolling-element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The lubrication of rolling element bearings is surveyed. Emphasis is on the critical design aspects related to speed, temperature, and ambient pressure environment. Types of lubrication including grease, jets, mist, wick, and through the race are discussed. The historical development, present state of technology, and the future problems of rolling element bearing lubrication are discussed.

  12. Roll forming of eco-friendly stud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Y. T.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, T. H.; Sim, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    In order to manufacture an eco-friendly stud, the sheared pattern is designed by the Taguchi method and expanded by the side rolls. The seven geometrical shape of sheared pattern are considered in the structural and thermal analyses to select the best functional one in terms of the durability and fire resistance of dry wall. For optimizing the size of the sheared pattern chosen, the L9 orthogonal array and smaller-the-better characteristics of the Taguchi method are used. As the roll gap causes forming defects when the upper-and-lower roll type is adopted for expanding the sheared pattern, the side roll type is introduced. The stress and strain distributions obtained by the FEM simulation of roll-forming processes are utilized for the design of expanding process. The expanding process by side rolls shortens the length of expanding process and minimizes the cost of dies. Furthermore, the stud manufactured by expanding the sheared pattern of the web is an eco-friend because of the scrapless roll-forming process. In addition, compared to the conventionally roll-formed stud, the material cost is lessened about 13.6% and the weight is lightened about 15.5%.

  13. 42 CFR 21.46 - Merit roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Merit roll. 21.46 Section 21.46 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.46 Merit roll. Each board appointed pursuant to § 21.30 to consider the qualifications...

  14. Pose Measurement Method and Experiments for High-Speed Rolling Targets in a Wind Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenyuan; Ma, Xin; Liu, Wei; Lu, Wenbo; Li, Xiao; Chen, Ling; Wang, Zhengqu; Cui, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    High-precision wind tunnel simulation tests play an important role in aircraft design and manufacture. In this study, a high-speed pose vision measurement method is proposed for high-speed and rolling targets in a supersonic wind tunnel. To obtain images with high signal-to-noise ratio and avoid impacts on the aerodynamic shape of the rolling targets, a high-speed image acquisition method based on ultrathin retro-reflection markers is presented. Since markers are small-sized and some of them may be lost when the target is rolling, a novel markers layout with which markers are distributed evenly on the surface is proposed based on a spatial coding method to achieve highly accurate pose information. Additionally, a pose acquisition is carried out according to the mentioned markers layout after removing mismatching points by Case Deletion Diagnostics. Finally, experiments on measuring the pose parameters of high-speed targets in the laboratory and in a supersonic wind tunnel are conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the position measurement precision is less than 0.16 mm, the pitching and yaw angle precision less than 0.132° and the roll angle precision 0.712°. PMID:25615732

  15. Design and optimization of wheel-legged robot: Rolling-Wolf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang; Li, Qimin; Liu, Zhangxing

    2014-11-01

    Though the studies of wheel-legged robots have achieved great success, the existing ones still have defects in load distribution, structure stability and carrying capacity. For overcoming these shortcomings, a new kind of wheel-legged robot(Rolling-Wolf) is designed. It is actuated by means of ball screws and sliders, and each leg forms two stable triangle structures at any moment, which is simple but has high structure stability. The positional posture model and statics model are built and used to analyze the kinematic and mechanical properties of Rolling-Wolf. Based on these two models, important indexes for evaluating its motion performance are analyzed. According to the models and indexes, all of the structure parameters which influence the motion performance of Rolling-Wolf are optimized by the method of Archive-based Micro Genetic Algorithm(AMGA) by using Isight and Matlab software. Compared to the initial values, the maximum rotation angle of the thigh is improved by 4.17%, the maximum lifting height of the wheel is improved by 65.53%, and the maximum driving forces of the thigh and calf are decreased by 25.5% and 12.58%, respectively. The conspicuous optimization results indicate that Rolling-Wolf is much more excellent. The novel wheel-leg structure of Rolling-Wolf is efficient in promoting the load distribution, structure stability and carrying capacity of wheel-legged robot and the proposed optimization method provides a new approach for structure optimization.

  16. Deformation textures of AA8011 aluminum alloy sheets severely deformed by accumulative roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung Wook; Kang, Suk Bong; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Amino, Yoritoshi Min

    2005-11-01

    A fully annealed AA8011 aluminum alloy sheet containing a number of large particles (˜5 µm) was severely deformed up to an equivalent strain of 12 by an accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) process. The texture evolution during the ARB process was clarified, along with the microstructure. The ARB-processed aluminum alloy sheets had a different texture distribution through the sheet thickness, due to the high friction between the roll and the material during the ARB process. The shear textures composed of {001} <110> and {111} <110> orientations developed at the sheet surface, while the rolling textures, including Cu {112} <111> and Dillamore {4,4,11} <11,11,8> orientations, developed at the sheet center. The textural change from a shear texture to a rolling texture at the sheet center during the ARB process contributed to an increase in the fraction of high-angle boundaries. Also, a large number of second-phase particles in the AA8011 alloy sheets weakened the texture. Up to the medium strain range (below ɛ=6.4), relatively weak textures developed, due to the inhomogeneous deformation around the second-phase particles; after the strain of 6.4, strong rolling-texture components, such as the Dillamore and Cu orientations, developed. This remarkable textural change can be explained by the reprecipitation of fine particles in grain interiors.

  17. Characterizing Hardening on Annealing of Cold-Rolled Aluminum AA3103 Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraj, Nagaraj Vinayagam; Bjørge, Ruben; Holmedal, Bjørn

    2013-10-01

    AA3103 aluminum strips were cold rolled to various von Mises strains up to 4.7. In addition, two severely deformed conditions were obtained by one and four cycles of cold accumulated roll bonding subsequent to cold rolling to a strain of 4.2. For cases of subsequent annealing at 498 K (225 °C) for 10 minutes, an increase in the ultimate tensile strength was observed at the rolling strains of 1.7 and higher. Similar hardening is observed for a wide range of temperature-time combinations for temperatures greater than 423 K (150 °C). The yield stress is also increased by a few per cent during further cold rolling. The magnitude of the increase in strength on annealing increased with the increasing strain. Electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies showed no significant changes in the high- or low-angle grain boundary spacings by this annealing. A systematic investigation on the roles played by Si and Mn was made with different homogenization treatments of AA3103 and of an AlSi alloy. Based on tensile tests, and differential scanning calorimetry and electrical conductivity measurements, it is concluded that Mn plays a major role. The exact mechanisms causing hardening on annealing are not identified, but through elimination of other explanations, it is suggested that some sort of clustering or precipitation mechanism is involved.

  18. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  19. Orientation angle and the adhesion of single gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ginel C; Soto, Daniel R; Peattie, Anne M; Full, Robert J; Kenny, T W

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of single gecko setae using dual-axis microelectromechanical systems force sensors to simultaneously detect normal and shear force components. Adhesion was highly sensitive to the pitch angle between the substrate and the seta's stalk. Maximum lateral adhesive force was observed with the stalk parallel to the substrate, and adhesion decreased smoothly with increasing pitch. The roll orientation angle only needed to be roughly correct with the spatular tuft of the seta oriented grossly towards the substrate for high adhesion. Also, detailed measurements were made to control for the effect of normal preload forces. Higher normal preload forces caused modest enhancement of the observed lateral adhesive force, provided that adequate contact was made between the seta and the substrate. These results should be useful in the design and manufacture of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with anisotropic properties, an area of substantial recent research efforts.

  20. Orientation angle and the adhesion of single gecko setae

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ginel C.; Soto, Daniel R.; Peattie, Anne M.; Full, Robert J.; Kenny, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of single gecko setae using dual-axis microelectromechanical systems force sensors to simultaneously detect normal and shear force components. Adhesion was highly sensitive to the pitch angle between the substrate and the seta's stalk. Maximum lateral adhesive force was observed with the stalk parallel to the substrate, and adhesion decreased smoothly with increasing pitch. The roll orientation angle only needed to be roughly correct with the spatular tuft of the seta oriented grossly towards the substrate for high adhesion. Also, detailed measurements were made to control for the effect of normal preload forces. Higher normal preload forces caused modest enhancement of the observed lateral adhesive force, provided that adequate contact was made between the seta and the substrate. These results should be useful in the design and manufacture of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with anisotropic properties, an area of substantial recent research efforts. PMID:21288955

  1. Aerodynamics of slender finned bodies at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnone, A. M.; Zakkay, V.; Tory, E.; Stallings, R.

    1977-01-01

    In certain missions finned missiles perform slewing maneuvers. Here, large angles of attack are attained. Experimental data needed to understand the aerodynamics of such vehicles are presented. The purpose of this investigation was to study the interaction of the body flow field with that produced by the fins and the resulting effects on the aerodynamic forces and moments. The experiments were conducted at a nominal Mach number of 2.7 and angles of attack from 0 to 50 deg, with two different models. The tests were performed in a range of Reynolds number from 1.5 x 10 to the 6th to 4 x 10 to the 7th per foot (to cover both the laminar and fully turbulent regimes.) Several fin roll angles were investigated. Static pressures on both body and fin surfaces are reported.

  2. Dynamic analysis of multibodies system with a floating base for rolling of ro-ro ship caused by wave and slip of heavy load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qing; Li, Yue; Chen, Xu-Jun

    2003-12-01

    Common effect of wave and slip of internal heavy load will make rolling of the roll-on ship serious. This is one of the important reasons for overturn of ro-ro ships. The multibodies System with a floating base is composed of ro-ro ship and slipping heavy load. This paper takes the rolling angle of the ship and the transverse displacement of the heavy load on desk as two freedoms. Making use of analysis of apparent gravitation and apparent buoyancy, the wave rolling moment is derived. By use of dynamic method of multibodies system with a floating base, dynamic equations of the system are established. Taking a certain channel ferry as an example, a set of numerical calculation have been carried out for rolling response of the ship and displacement response of the slipping heavy load under common effect of synchro-slipping heavy loads and wave.

  3. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  4. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  5. Interferometric measurement of angles.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Harris, O

    1970-07-01

    A new interferometric device for measuring small angles or rotations with high accuracy is described. This instrument works by counting fringes formed by the rotation of a flat-parallel plate of glass illuminated with a collimated beam from a gas laser. Some possible applications are given.

  6. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by ̈phi/H dot phi remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  7. Signal and power roll ring testing update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the roll ring as a long-life, low-torque alternative to the slip ring is discussed. A roll ring consists of one or more circular flexures captured by their own spring force in the annular space between two concentric conductors or contact rings. The advantages of roll rings over other types of electrical transfer devices are: extremely low drag torque, high transfer efficiencies in high-power configurations, extremely low wear debris generation, long life, and low weight for high-power applications.

  8. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  9. Angle Sense: A Valuable Connector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Rheta N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Proposes angle sense as a fundamental connector between mathematical concepts for middle grade students. Introduces the use of pattern blocks and a goniometer, a tool to measure angles, to help students develop angle sense. Discusses connections between angle measurement and the concepts of rational numbers, circles, area, number theory,…

  10. Linkage between canopy water storage and drop size distributions of leaf drips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanko, Kazuki; Watanabe, Ai; Hotta, Norifumi; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2013-04-01

    Differences in drop size distribution (DSD) of leaf drips among tree species have been estimated and physically interpreted to clarify the leaf drip generation process. Leaf drip generation experiments for nine species were conducted in an indoor location without foliage vibration using an automatic mist spray. Broad-leaved species produced a similar DSD among species whose leaves had a matte surface and a second similar DSD among species whose leaves had a coated surface. The matte broad leaves produced a larger and wider range of DSDs than the coated broad leaves. Coated coniferous needles had a wider range of DSDs than the coated broad leaves and different DSDs were observed for different species. The species with shorter dense needles generated a larger DSD. The leaf drip diameter was calculated through the estimation of a state of equilibrium of a hanging drop on the leaves based on physical theory. The calculations indicated that the maximum diameter of leaf drips was determined by the contact angle, and the range of DSDs was determined by the variation in contact length and the contact diameter at the hanging points. The results revealed that leaf drip DSD changed due to variations in leaf hydrophobicity, leaf roughness, leaf geometry and leaf inclination among the different tree species. This study allows the modelization of throughfall DSD. Furthermore, it indicates the possibility of interpreting canopy water processes from canopy water storage to drainage through the contact angle and leaf drip DSD. The part of this study is published in Nanko et al. (2013, Agric. Forest. Meteorol. 169, 74-84).

  11. [Effects of exogenous 24-epibrassinolde on leaf morphology and photosynthetic characteristics of tomato seedlings under low light stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Guo, Shi-rong; Shu, Sheng; Sun, Jin

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of exogenous 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) on the leaf morphology and photosynthetic characteristics of tomato seedlings (cv. Jiersi) cultured hydroponically under low light stress. The results showed that low light stress induced adaptive changes in the leaf morphology of tomato seedling. Low light stress significantly increased the leaf area, specific leaf area, angle between stem and leaf, vertical angle and cable bent, but significantly decreased the dry mass of leaf. Low light stress also significantly decreased the maximum net photosynthetic rate,. apparent quantum yield, dark respiration rate, carboxylation efficiency and Rubisco large subunit content. The light compensation point and carbon dioxide compensation point were dramatically enhanced under low light stress. However, foliar spraying EBR significantly increased the leaf area, leaf dry mass, angle between stem and leaf, vertical angle by 14.1%, 57.1%, 12.3% and 7.7% under low light stress, respectively. EBR significantly decreased the specific leaf area and cable bent by 30.5% and 10.6% in low light stressed plants. In addition, EBR significantly enhanced the apparent quantum yield, dark respiration rate and carboxylation efficiency by 20.4%, 17.9% and 9.3%, respectively, but significantly reduced the light compensation point and carbon dioxide compensation point by 21.9% and 4.3% under low light stress. Moreover, EBR also significantly increased the Rubisco large subunit content in low light stressed leaves. These results suggested that application of exogenous EBR could effectively alleviate the inhibition of photosynthesis induced by low light stress via improving the apparent quantum yield, dark respiration rate, carboxylation efficiency and Rubisco content, and maintaining the stability of leaf morphology, thus low light tolerance of tomato seedlings.

  12. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  13. Why Low Bounce Balls Exhibit High Rolling Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment is described to measure the coefficient of rolling friction for a low bounce ball rolling on a horizontal surface. As observed previously by others, the coefficient increased with rolling speed. The energy loss due to rolling friction can be explained in terms of the measured coefficient of restitution for the ball, meaning…

  14. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  15. Envelope order tracking for fault detection in rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Liu, Ting-Wei; Na, Jing; Fung, Rong-Fong

    2012-12-01

    An envelope order tracking analysis scheme is proposed in the paper for the fault detection of rolling element bearing (REB) under varying-speed running condition. The developed method takes the advantages of order tracking, envelope analysis and spectral kurtosis. The fast kurtogram algorithm is utilized to obtain both optimal center frequency and bandwidth of the band-pass filter based on the maximum spectral kurtosis. The envelope containing vibration features of the incipient REB fault can be extracted adaptively. The envelope is re-sampled by the even-angle sampling scheme, and thus the non-stationary signal in the time domain is represented as a quasi-stationary signal in the angular domain. As a result, the frequency-smear problem can be eliminated in order spectrum and the fault diagnosis of REB in the varying-speed running condition of the rotating machinery is achieved. Experiments are conducted to verify the validity of the proposed method.

  16. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture Regulations...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  17. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  18. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  19. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  20. 9 CFR 381.159 - Poultry rolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... subchapter, in 9 CFR Chapter III, Subchapter E, or in 21 CFR Chapter I, Subchapter A or Subchapter B. In... use as binders in poultry rolls: transglutaminase enzyme at up to 65 ppm. When binding agents...

  1. Mathematical modeling of deformation during hot rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, D.; Stachowiak, R.G.; Samarasekera, I.V.; Brimacombe, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    The deformation that occurs in the roll bite during the hot rolling of steel, particularly the strain-rate and strain distribution, has been mathematically modeled using finite-element analysis. In this paper three different finite-element models are compared with one another and with industrial measurements. The first model is an Eulerian analysis based on the flow formulation method, while the second utilizes an Updated Lagrangian approach. The third model is based on a commercially available program DEFORM which also utilizes a Lagrangian reference frame. Model predictions of strain and strain-rate distribution, particularly near the surface of the slab, are strongly influenced by the treatment of friction at the boundary and the magnitude of the friction coefficient or shear factor. Roll forces predicted by the model have been compared with industrial rolling loads from a seven-stand hot-strip mill.

  2. Next-Generation Space Ambitions Keep Rolling

    NASA Video Gallery

    As space shuttle Atlantis rolled to its new home at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex earlier this month, NASA and its commercial crew partners reflected on the Space Shuttle Program's treme...

  3. A Simple Modeling of Asymmetric Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloumi, A.; Desrayaud, Ch.; Montheillet, F.

    2010-06-01

    Two complementary analytical approaches and the finite difference method are proposed for modeling asymmetric rolling (ASR) of metal sheet. The first analytical model is an upper bound method based on a uniform strain field depending on one single optimization parameter, viz. the entry velocity of the sheet. Its results can be straightforwardly used for practical applications. The second model uses a more refined analytical velocity field based on the classical parabolic estimation of the material flow lines in rolling. It involves an additional optimization parameter associated with the precise form of the velocity field. Local values of strain, strain rate and self-heating temperature are easily calculated, as well as the rolling force. Finally, the finite difference method is applied to compute heat transfers between the rolls and the sheet. In conclusion, the respective advantages of the three methods are discussed.

  4. Roll motion analysis of deepwater pipelay crane vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Dandan; Sun, Liping; Qu, Zhiguo; Wang, Tao

    2013-12-01

    For a large floating vessel in waves, radiation damping is not an accurate prediction of the degree of roll unlike other degrees of freedom motion. Therefore, to get the knowledge of roll motion performance of deepwater pipelay crane vessels and to keep the vessel working safety, the paper presents the relationship between a series of dimensionless roll damping coefficients and the roll response amplitude operator (RAO). By using two kinds of empirical data, the roll damping is estimated in the calculation flow. After getting the roll damping coefficient from the model test, a prediction of roll motion in regular waves is evaluated. According to the wave condition in the working region, short term statistics of roll motion are presented under different wave parameters. Moreover, the relationship between the maximal roll response level to peak spectral wave period and the roll damping coefficient is investigated. Results may provide some reference to design and improve this kind of vessel.

  5. 75 FR 42782 - Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... party group responses to its notice of institution (75 FR 16504, April 1, 2010) were adequate. A record... COMMISSION Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia AGENCY: United...-year reviews concerning the countervailing duty order on certain hot-rolled flat-rolled...

  6. 49 CFR 393.134 - What are the rules for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or hook lift containers? 393.134 Section 393.134 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers? (a) Applicability. The rules in this section apply to the transportation of roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers. (b) Securement of a...

  7. 49 CFR 393.134 - What are the rules for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or hook lift containers? 393.134 Section 393.134 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers? (a) Applicability. The rules in this section apply to the transportation of roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers. (b) Securement of a...

  8. 49 CFR 393.134 - What are the rules for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or hook lift containers? 393.134 Section 393.134 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers? (a) Applicability. The rules in this section apply to the transportation of roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers. (b) Securement of a...

  9. 49 CFR 393.134 - What are the rules for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or hook lift containers? 393.134 Section 393.134 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers? (a) Applicability. The rules in this section apply to the transportation of roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers. (b) Securement of a...

  10. 49 CFR 393.134 - What are the rules for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or hook lift containers? 393.134 Section 393.134 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... for securing roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers? (a) Applicability. The rules in this section apply to the transportation of roll-on/roll-off or hook lift containers. (b) Securement of a...

  11. Mechanism of fault friction variations associated with rolling of non-spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Friction resisting the fault sliding is known to be rate and path-dependent, which is often related to the movement of the gouge particles. This movement includes particle rotation which can be modelled either using the Cosserat-type models or by direct computer simulation using a discrete element method. These models are however based on the notion that the gouge particles are spherical (circular in 2D) tacitly assuming that the real non-spherical shapes of the particles create quantities effects, which can be accounted for by introducing proper correction factors. We show that non-spherical particles behave qualitatively different. This is a result of the fact that the normal force applied to the non-spherical particle can create a moment whose resistance to the particle rolling changes with the angle - a phenomenon not possible in a spherical (circular) particle due to symmetry. If rolling of a particle is caused by macroscopic shear stress, the normal stress will resist or assist the rolling depending on the angle. As a result the effective friction coefficient associated with a single particle can be reduced to zero in the process of its rolling and then restore its initial value. This leads to the oscillatory behaviour of the friction coefficient as a function of displacement. When sliding involves the rolling of (very) many particles the random variations in their sizes and initial positions cause the friction coefficient to oscillate with decreasing amplitude; the characteristic displacement of this decrease can be an order of magnitude greater than the average particle size. If the gouge layer is sufficiently thick, the friction variations can be associated with rotating clusters of particles. The size of the clusters exceeds the particle size by a factor of the order of the ratio of the effective modulus of the particulate material to the acting shear stress. Thus the clusters may be significantly larger than the original particles and hence the

  12. Biophysical optimality of the golden angle in phyllotaxis.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Plant leaves are arranged around a stem axis in a regular pattern characterized by common fractions, a phenomenon known as phyllotaxis or phyllotaxy. As plants grow, these fractions often transition according to simple rules related to Fibonacci sequences. This mathematical regularity originates from leaf primordia at the shoot tip (shoot apical meristem), which successively arise at fixed intervals of a divergence angle, typically the golden angle of 137.5°. Algebraic and numerical interpretations have been proposed to explain the golden angle observed in phyllotaxis. However, it remains unknown whether phyllotaxis has adaptive value, even though two centuries have passed since the phenomenon was discovered. Here, I propose a new adaptive mechanism explaining the presence of the golden angle. This angle is the optimal solution to minimize the energy cost of phyllotaxis transition. This model accounts for not only the high precision of the golden angle but also the occurrences of other angles observed in nature. The model also effectively explains the observed diversity of rational and irrational numbers in phyllotaxis. PMID:26471765

  13. Biophysical optimality of the golden angle in phyllotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Takuya

    2015-10-01

    Plant leaves are arranged around a stem axis in a regular pattern characterized by common fractions, a phenomenon known as phyllotaxis or phyllotaxy. As plants grow, these fractions often transition according to simple rules related to Fibonacci sequences. This mathematical regularity originates from leaf primordia at the shoot tip (shoot apical meristem), which successively arise at fixed intervals of a divergence angle, typically the golden angle of 137.5°. Algebraic and numerical interpretations have been proposed to explain the golden angle observed in phyllotaxis. However, it remains unknown whether phyllotaxis has adaptive value, even though two centuries have passed since the phenomenon was discovered. Here, I propose a new adaptive mechanism explaining the presence of the golden angle. This angle is the optimal solution to minimize the energy cost of phyllotaxis transition. This model accounts for not only the high precision of the golden angle but also the occurrences of other angles observed in nature. The model also effectively explains the observed diversity of rational and irrational numbers in phyllotaxis.

  14. Biophysical optimality of the golden angle in phyllotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Plant leaves are arranged around a stem axis in a regular pattern characterized by common fractions, a phenomenon known as phyllotaxis or phyllotaxy. As plants grow, these fractions often transition according to simple rules related to Fibonacci sequences. This mathematical regularity originates from leaf primordia at the shoot tip (shoot apical meristem), which successively arise at fixed intervals of a divergence angle, typically the golden angle of 137.5°. Algebraic and numerical interpretations have been proposed to explain the golden angle observed in phyllotaxis. However, it remains unknown whether phyllotaxis has adaptive value, even though two centuries have passed since the phenomenon was discovered. Here, I propose a new adaptive mechanism explaining the presence of the golden angle. This angle is the optimal solution to minimize the energy cost of phyllotaxis transition. This model accounts for not only the high precision of the golden angle but also the occurrences of other angles observed in nature. The model also effectively explains the observed diversity of rational and irrational numbers in phyllotaxis. PMID:26471765

  15. Designing Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James D., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Bearing Analysis Tool (BAT) is a computer program for designing rolling-element bearings for cryogenic turbomachines. BAT provides a graphical user interface (GUI) that guides the entry of data to develop mathematical models of bearings. The GUI breaks model data into logical subsets that are entered through logic-driven input screens. The software generates a threedimensional graphical model of a bearing as the data are entered. Most dataentry errors become immediately obvious in the graphical model. BAT provides for storage of all the data on a shaft/bearing system, enabling the creation of a library of proven designs. Data from the library can be transferred to subsequent projects by use of simple cut-and-paste routines. BAT includes a library of temperature- dependent cryogenic bearing-material properties for use in the mathematical models. BAT implements algorithms that (1) enable the user to select combinations of design and/or operating-condition parameters, and then (2) automatically optimize the design by performing trade studies over all of the parameter combinations. This feature enables optimization over a large trade space in a fraction of the time taken when using prior bearingmodel software.

  16. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  17. Rolling-element bearings in China: From ancient times to the 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lie; Li, Ang

    2016-03-01

    The development of rolling-element bearings in China has spanned a long period. Based on several typical and important cases, the present article reconstructs the history of rolling-element bearings in China by dividing it into four stages according to the various characteristics of the bearings. The first stage represents the origin of rolling bearings in China, which remains controversial because of several suspected races and cages that were likely the components of bearings more than a millennium ago. At the second stage, a type of simple roller bearing was used for astronomical instruments not later than the 13th century based on clear philological and physical evidence. A similar bearing was also applied to an abridged armillary in the 17th century. Another type of spherical thrust bearings with rolling elements, which is a key component of a traditional Chinese windmill, could support a rotating shaft that moves rotationally and at an angle. At the third stage, the Chinese began studying and using the so-called Europeanstyle bearing since the 17th century. Moreover, over the last 100 years, the modern rolling bearing industry was gradually established in China, particularly because of the technology transfer from the Soviet Union in the 1950s. At the fourth stage, the Chinese government initiated the relatively rapid development of bearing technology. The government launched the "bearing movement" from the 1950s to the 1960s to establish the modern bearing industry and to promote rolling bearings as replacement for traditional sliding bearings. Furthermore, a number of large professional factories and institutions in China have continually introduced advanced technology and equipment. At present, these companies and institutions play a significant role in the international bearing industry.

  18. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  19. Trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding: a comparison of shade- and sun-adapted species in a subtropical rainforest.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fengqun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J; Sun, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    Species in high-rainfall regions have two major alternative approaches to quickly drain off water, i.e., increasing leaf inclination angles relative to the horizontal plane, or developing long leaf drip tips. We hypothesized that shade-adapted species will have more pronounced leaf drip tips but not greater inclination angles (which can reduce the ability to intercept light) compared to sun-adapted species and that length of leaf drip tips will be negatively correlated with photosynthetic capacity [characterized by light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (Amax), associated light compensation points (LCP), and light saturation points (LSP)]. We tested this hypothesis by measuring morphological and physiological traits that are associated with light-interception and water shedding for seven shade-adapted shrub species, ten sun-adapted understory shrub species, and 15 sun-adapted tree species in a subtropical Chinese rainforest, where mean annual precipitation is around 1,600 mm. Shade-adapted understory species had lower LMA, Amax, LSP, and LCP compared to understory or canopy sun-adapted species; their leaf and twig inclination angles were significantly smaller and leaf drip tips were significantly longer than those in sun-adapted species. This suggests that shade-adapted understory species tend to develop pronounced leaf drip tips but not large leaf inclination angles to shed water. The length of leaf drip tips was negatively correlated with leaf inclination angles and photosynthetic capacity. These relationships were consistent between ordinary regression and phylogenetic generalized least squares analyses. Our study illustrates the trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding and indicates that length of leaf drip tips can be used as an indicator of adaptation to shady conditions and overall photosynthetic performance of shrub species in subtropical rainforests.

  20. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  1. 40 CFR 1066.225 - Roll runout and diameter verification procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for roll runout and roll diameter. Roll runout is a measure of the variation in roll radius around the... position of the roll surface relative to the roll centerline as it turns through a complete revolution. The... dial indicator. (4) Slowly turn the roll through a complete rotation and record the maximum and...

  2. 40 CFR 1066.225 - Roll runout and diameter verification procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for roll runout and roll diameter. Roll runout is a measure of the variation in roll radius around the... position of the roll surface relative to the roll centerline as it turns through a complete revolution. The... dial indicator. (4) Slowly turn the roll through a complete rotation and record the maximum and...

  3. OSCILLATOR: A system for analysis of diurnal leaf growth using infrared photography combined with wavelet transformation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantification of leaf movement is an important tool for characterising the effects of environmental signals and the circadian clock on plant development. Analysis of leaf movement is currently restricted by the attachment of sensors to the plant or dependent upon visible light for time-lapse photography. The study of leaf growth movement rhythms in mature plants under biological relevant conditions, e.g. diurnal light and dark conditions, is therefore problematic. Results Here we present OSCILLATOR, an affordable system for the analysis of rhythmic leaf growth movement in mature plants. The system contains three modules: (1) Infrared time-lapse imaging of growing mature plants (2) measurement of projected distances between leaf tip and plant apex (leaf tip tracking growth-curves) and (3) extraction of phase, period and amplitude of leaf growth oscillations using wavelet analysis. A proof-of-principle is provided by characterising parameters of rhythmic leaf growth movement of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions as well as of Petunia hybrida and Solanum lycopersicum plants under diurnal conditions. The amplitude of leaf oscillations correlated to published data on leaf angles, while amplitude and leaf length did not correlate, suggesting a distinct leaf growth profile for each accession. Arabidopsis mutant accession Landsberg erecta displayed a late phase (timing of peak oscillation) compared to other accessions and this trait appears unrelated to the ERECTA locus. Conclusions OSCILLATOR is a low cost and easy to implement system that can accurately and reproducibly quantify rhythmic growth of mature plants for different species under diurnal light/dark cycling. PMID:22867627

  4. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  5. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  6. Optimization of cold rolling process parameters in order to increasing rolling speed limited by chatter vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Ali; Forouzan, Mohammad R.

    2012-01-01

    Chatter has been recognized as major restriction for the increase in productivity of cold rolling processes, limiting the rolling speed for thin steel strips. It is shown that chatter has close relation with rolling conditions. So the main aim of this paper is to attain the optimum set points of rolling to achieve maximum rolling speed, preventing chatter to occur. Two combination methods were used for optimization. First method is done in four steps: providing a simulation program for chatter analysis, preparing data from simulation program based on central composite design of experiment, developing a statistical model to relate system tendency to chatter and rolling parameters by response surface methodology, and finally optimizing the process by genetic algorithm. Second method has analogous stages. But central composite design of experiment is replaced by Taguchi method and response surface methodology is replaced by neural network method. Also a study on the influence of the rolling parameters on system stability has been carried out. By using these combination methods, new set points were determined and significant improvement achieved in rolling speed. PMID:25685398

  7. Optimization of cold rolling process parameters in order to increasing rolling speed limited by chatter vibrations.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Ali; Forouzan, Mohammad R

    2013-01-01

    Chatter has been recognized as major restriction for the increase in productivity of cold rolling processes, limiting the rolling speed for thin steel strips. It is shown that chatter has close relation with rolling conditions. So the main aim of this paper is to attain the optimum set points of rolling to achieve maximum rolling speed, preventing chatter to occur. Two combination methods were used for optimization. First method is done in four steps: providing a simulation program for chatter analysis, preparing data from simulation program based on central composite design of experiment, developing a statistical model to relate system tendency to chatter and rolling parameters by response surface methodology, and finally optimizing the process by genetic algorithm. Second method has analogous stages. But central composite design of experiment is replaced by Taguchi method and response surface methodology is replaced by neural network method. Also a study on the influence of the rolling parameters on system stability has been carried out. By using these combination methods, new set points were determined and significant improvement achieved in rolling speed.

  8. Comparing Acute Bouts of Sagittal Plane Progression Foam Rolling vs. Frontal Plane Progression Foam Rolling.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Corey A; Krein, Darren D; Antonio, Jose; Sanders, Gabriel J; Silver, Tobin A; Colas, Megan

    2015-08-01

    Many strength and conditioning professionals have included the use of foam rolling devices within a warm-up routine prior to both training and competition. Multiple studies have investigated foam rolling in regards to performance, flexibility, and rehabilitation; however, additional research is necessary in supporting the topic. Furthermore, as multiple foam rolling progressions exist, researching differences that may result from each is required. To investigate differences in foam rolling progressions, 16 athletically trained males underwent a 2-condition within-subjects protocol comparing the differences of 2 common foam rolling progressions in regards to performance testing. The 2 conditions included a foam rolling progression targeting the mediolateral axis of the body (FRml) and foam rolling progression targeting the anteroposterior axis (FRap). Each was administered in adjunct with a full-body dynamic warm-up. After each rolling progression, subjects performed National Football League combine drills, flexibility, and subjective scaling measures. The data demonstrated that FRml was effective at improving flexibility (p ≤ 0.05) when compared with FRap. No other differences existed between progressions.

  9. Practice of Improving Roll Deformation Theory in Strip Rolling Process Based on Boundary Integral Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhengwen; Xiao, Hong; Xie, Hongbiao

    2014-02-01

    Precise strip-shape control theory is significant to improve rolled strip quality, and roll flattening theory is a primary part of the strip-shape theory. To improve the accuracy of roll flattening calculation based on semi-infinite body model, a new and more accurate roll flattening model is proposed in this paper, which is derived based on boundary integral equation method. The displacement fields of the finite length semi-infinite body on left and right sides are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) and displacement decay functions on left and right sides are established. Based on the new roll flattening model, a new 4Hi mill deformation model is established and verified by FEM. The new model is compared with Foppl formula and semi-infinite body model in different strip width, roll shifting value and bending force. The results show that the pressure and flattening between rolls calculated by the new model are more precise than other two models, especially near the two roll barrel edges.

  10. Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    The project goal is to develop a numerical modeling capability to optimize the hot rolling process used to produce aluminum plate. This tool will be used in the forming process so that loss of product will be minimized. Product lost in the rolling process requires the energy-intensive steps of remelting and reforming into an ingot.

  11. Sun-view angle effects on reflectance factors of corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of sun and view angles on reflectance factors of corn (Zea mays L.) canopies ranging from the six leaf stage to harvest maturity were studied on the Purdue University Agronomy Farm by a multiband radiometer. The two methods of acquiring spectral data, the truck system and the tower systrem, are described. The analysis of the spectral data is presented in three parts: solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at nadir; solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at a fixed sun angle; and both sun and view angles effect on reflectance factors. The analysis revealed that for nadir-viewed reflectance factors there is a strong solar angle dependence in all spectral bands for canopies with low leaf area index. Reflectance factors observed from the sun angle at different view azimuth angles showed that the position of the sensor relative to the sun is important in determining angular reflectance characteristics. For both sun and view angles, reflectance factors are maximized when the sensor view direction is towards the sun.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of roll load, torque and material properties in the roll forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeyrathna, Buddhika; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) and Ultra High Strength Steel (UHSS) are increasingly used in the current automotive industry because of their high strength and weight saving potential. As a sheet forming process, roll forming is capable of forming such materials with precise dimensions, however a small change in processing may results in significant change in the material properties such as yield strength and hardening exponent from coil to coil or within the same coil. This paper presents the effect of yield strength and the hardening exponent on roll load, torque of the roll forming process and the longitudinal bow. The roll forming process is numerically simulated, and then the regression analysis and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) techniques are employed to establish the relationships among the aforementioned parameters and to determine the percentage influence of material properties on longitudinal bow, roll load and torque.

  13. Improvement of vehicle roll stability by varying suspension properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Taehyun; Velusamy, Pradheep C.

    2011-02-01

    Vehicle roll dynamics are strongly influenced by suspension properties such as roll centre height, roll steer, and roll camber. In this paper, the effects of suspension properties on vehicle roll response have been investigated using a multi-body vehicle dynamics programme. Roll dynamics of a vehicle model with MacPherson (front) and multilink (rear) suspensions were evaluated for the fishhook manoeuvre and variations of its roll response due to changes in the suspension properties were assessed by quantitatively analysing the vehicle response through simulation. Critical suspension design parameters for vehicle roll dynamics were identified and adjusted to improve roll stability of the vehicle model with passive suspension. Design of experiments has been used for identifying critical hardpoints affecting the suspension parameters, and optimisation techniques were employed for parameter optimisation. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active control systems for economy-class vehicles.

  14. Beyond the Big Leaf: Quantifying Interactions between Canopy Structure and Canopy Photosynthesis Using Isotopic Partitioning of Net Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of CO2 in a Temperate Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asirwatham, J.; Wehr, R. A.; Saleska, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of the forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon isotopes can be used to partition the net total carbon exchange (measured by standard eddy covariance) into its photosynthetic and respiratory components. This partitioning requires an estimate of the isotopic signature of canopy-scale photosynthesis, which has been obtained to date by assuming that the canopy behaves like a single 'big leaf'. This assumption neglects the heterogeneity of the canopy both vertically and with respect to leaf angles: leaves at various heights and angles experience different sunlight, temperature, and wind, and are physiologically different as well. In order to explore errors associated with the big leaf assumption, we applied a big leaf isotopic partitioning algorithm to canopy-scale net fluxes of 13CO2, 12CO2, heat, and water generated by a multi-leaf isotopic canopy simulation. The simulation included micro-environmental heterogeneity produced by the canopy geometry (leaf angles and arrangement) as well as physiological variation among leaves, invoking leaf-level energy balance to determine leaf temperatures. Leaf behavior in the simulation was parameterized by leaf-level gas-exchange measurements of the relevant characteristics of a range of leaves in the canopy (e.g. limiting photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance, daytime respiration). These measurements indicated that photosynthetic capacity increased with height in the canopy, but that within a given canopy layer, leaf behavior showed surprisingly little variability. They also indicated that stomatal conductance did not relate quasi-linearly to light or photosynthetic rate, but was instead roughly constant with light at all photosynthetic photon flux densities above 100 μE m-2 s-1. The multi-leaf simulation incorporating these leaf behaviors suggested that the big leaf assumption is valid under diffuse light conditions but can lead to significant errors under clear sky conditions.

  15. Free-to-Roll Investigation of Uncommanded Lateral Motions for an Aircraft With Vented Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Elaine M.; Owens, D. Bruce; Barlow, Jewel B.

    2004-01-01

    A free-to-roll study of the low-speed lateral characteristics of the pre-production F/A-18E was conducted in the NASA Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel. In developmental flight tests the F/A-18E unexpectedly experienced uncommanded lateral motions in the power approach configuration. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using the free-to-roll technique for the detection of uncommanded lateral motions for the preproduction F/A-18E in the power approach configuration. The data revealed that this technique in conjunction with static data revealed insight into the cause of the lateral motions. The free-to-roll technique identified uncommanded lateral motions at the same angle-of-attack range as experienced in flight tests. The cause of the uncommanded lateral motions was unsteady asymmetric wing stall. The paper also shows that free-to-roll data or static force and moment data alone are not enough to accurately capture the potential for an aircraft to experience uncommanded lateral motion.

  16. Free-to-Roll Investigation of Uncommanded Lateral Motions for an Aircraft with Vented Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Elaine M.; Bryant, Elaine M.; Barlow, Jewel B.

    2005-01-01

    A free-to-roll study of the low-speed lateral characteristics of the pre-production F/A-l8E was conducted in the NASA Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel. In developmental flight tests the F/A-18E unexpectedly experienced uncommanded lateral motions in the power approach configuration. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using the free-to-roll technique for the detection of uncommanded lateral motions for the pre-production F/A-l8E in the power approach configuration. The data revealed that this technique in conjunction with static data revealed insight into the cause of the lateral motions. The free-to-roll technique identified uncommanded lateral motions at the same angle-of-attack range as experienced in flight tests. The cause of the uncommanded lateral motions was unsteady asymmetric wing stall. The paper also shows that free-to-roll data or static force and moment data alone are not enough to accurately capture the potential for an aircraft to experience uncommanded lateral motion.

  17. Behavioural evidence for a visual and proprioceptive control of head roll in hoverflies (Episyrphus balteatus).

    PubMed

    Goulard, Roman; Julien-Laferriere, Alice; Fleuriet, Jérome; Vercher, Jean-Louis; Viollet, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    The ability of hoverflies to control their head orientation with respect to their body contributes importantly to their agility and their autonomous navigation abilities. Many tasks performed by this insect during flight, especially while hovering, involve a head stabilization reflex. This reflex, which is mediated by multisensory channels, prevents the visual processing from being disturbed by motion blur and maintains a consistent perception of the visual environment. The so-called dorsal light response (DLR) is another head control reflex, which makes insects sensitive to the brightest part of the visual field. In this study, we experimentally validate and quantify the control loop driving the head roll with respect to the horizon in hoverflies. The new approach developed here consisted of using an upside-down horizon in a body roll paradigm. In this unusual configuration, tethered flying hoverflies surprisingly no longer use purely vision-based control for head stabilization. These results shed new light on the role of neck proprioceptor organs in head and body stabilization with respect to the horizon. Based on the responses obtained with male and female hoverflies, an improved model was then developed in which the output signals delivered by the neck proprioceptor organs are combined with the visual error in the estimated position of the body roll. An internal estimation of the body roll angle with respect to the horizon might explain the extremely accurate flight performances achieved by some hovering insects. PMID:26486370

  18. Forebody tangential blowing for control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, I.; Rock, S.; Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study to determine if the use of tangential leading edge blowing over the forebody could produce effective and practical control of the F-18 HARV aircraft at high angles of attack was conducted. A simplified model of the F-18 configuration using a vortex-lattice model was developed to obtain a better understanding of basic aerodynamic coupling effects and the influence of forebody circulation on lifting surface behavior. The effect of tangential blowing was estimated using existing wind tunnel data on normal forebody blowing and analytical studies of tangential blowing over conical forebodies. Incorporation of forebody blowing into the flight control system was investigated by adding this additional yaw control and sideforce generating actuator into the existing F-18 HARV simulation model. A control law was synthesized using LQG design methods that would schedule blowing rates as a function of vehicle sideslip, angle of attack, and roll and yaw rates.

  19. Some Effects of Roll Rate on the Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a Cruciform Missile Configuration as Determined from Flight Test for a Mach Number Range of 1.1. to 1.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, Reginald R; Baber, Hal T , Jr

    1956-01-01

    A model of a cruciform missile configuration having a low-aspect-ratio wing equipped with flap-type controls was flight tested in order to determine stability and control characteristics while rolling at about 5 radians per second. Comparison is made with results from a similar model which rolled at a much lower rate. Results showed that, if the ratio of roll rate to natural circular frequency in pitch is not greater than about 0.3, the motion following a step disturbance in pitch essentially remains in a plane in space. The slope of normal- force coefficient against angle of attack C(sub N(sub alpha)) was the same as for the slowly rolling model at 0 degrees control deflection but C(sub N(sub alpha)) was much higher for the faster rolling model at about 5 degrees control deflection. The slope of pitching-moment coefficient against angle of attack C(sub m(sub alpha)) as determined from the model period of oscillation was the same for both models at 0 degrees control deflection but was lower for the faster rolling model at about 5 degrees control deflection. Damping data for the faster rolling model showed considerably more scatter than for the slowly rolling model.

  20. Cerebellopontine Angle Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Martin U.; Lüdemann, Wolf O.; Schreiber, Hartwig; Samii, Madjid

    1997-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas in an infratentorial and extra-axial location are extremely rare. The presented case of an extensive lipoma of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represents 0.05% of all CPA tumors operated on in our department from 1978 to 1996. The lipoma constitutes an important differential diagnosis because the clinical management differs significantly from other CPA lesions. The clinical presentation and management of the presented case are analyzed in comparison to all previously described cases of CPA lipomas. The etiology and the radiological features of CPA lipomas are reviewed and discussed. CPA lipomas are maldevelopmental lesions that may cause slowly progressive symptoms. Neuroradiology enables a reliable preoperative diagnosis. Attempts of complete lipoma resection usually result in severe neurological deficits. Therefore, we recommend a conservative approach in managing these patients. Limited surgery is indicated if the patient has an associated vascular compression syndrome or suffers from disabling vertigo. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171031

  1. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  2. Applying contextual interference to the Pawlata roll.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Davies, M

    1995-12-01

    Contextual interference is manipulated by changing the practice order of a number of similar motor tasks, so that the learning context of each interferes with that of the other. The effect has been found to generalize to baseball batting, badminton serving and volleyball skills. The present study examined whether this practice technique could be applied to a Pawlata roll in a kayak. The study was further motivated by the fact that many instructors in Britain currently advocate learning the Pawlata roll in one direction only to a criterion of accuracy, thereafter transferring to the opposite direction. Contextual interference literature predicts that skill retention would be better served by practising on alternate sides. Accordingly, 16 undergraduate students with no kayaking experience were randomly allocated to either a low contextual interference group, which followed U'ren's (1993) recommendations, or a high contextual interference group, which practised the skill on alternate sides. The high contextual interference group took less time to acquire the skill, and were also quicker to achieve successful performance in retention (full roll) and transfer (half roll) tests, regardless of the direction of the roll, 1 week later. The time savings in practice were not expected, as acquisition under high contextual interference was improved rather than impaired. This finding suggests that bilateral transfer was increased by randomizing practice. These results are worthy of further investigation, in that they suggest that the recommended training methods may not be optimal. PMID:8850571

  3. Applying contextual interference to the Pawlata roll.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Davies, M

    1995-12-01

    Contextual interference is manipulated by changing the practice order of a number of similar motor tasks, so that the learning context of each interferes with that of the other. The effect has been found to generalize to baseball batting, badminton serving and volleyball skills. The present study examined whether this practice technique could be applied to a Pawlata roll in a kayak. The study was further motivated by the fact that many instructors in Britain currently advocate learning the Pawlata roll in one direction only to a criterion of accuracy, thereafter transferring to the opposite direction. Contextual interference literature predicts that skill retention would be better served by practising on alternate sides. Accordingly, 16 undergraduate students with no kayaking experience were randomly allocated to either a low contextual interference group, which followed U'ren's (1993) recommendations, or a high contextual interference group, which practised the skill on alternate sides. The high contextual interference group took less time to acquire the skill, and were also quicker to achieve successful performance in retention (full roll) and transfer (half roll) tests, regardless of the direction of the roll, 1 week later. The time savings in practice were not expected, as acquisition under high contextual interference was improved rather than impaired. This finding suggests that bilateral transfer was increased by randomizing practice. These results are worthy of further investigation, in that they suggest that the recommended training methods may not be optimal.

  4. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements.

  5. An Analytical Framework for Predicting the Limit in Structural Refinement in Accumulative Roll Bonded Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J. Q.; Quadir, Md. Zakaria; Ferry, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The limit in structural refinement of lamellar bands (LBs) generated during accumulative roll bonding (ARB) of commercially pure nickel was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and transmission Kikuchi diffraction. A typical LB consists of an internal cellular substructure of low angle boundaries (LABs) bounded by two high angle boundaries (HABs) that are aligned parallel to the rolling plane. At low true strains ( ɛ < 2.4; 1 to 3 ARB cycles), the deformation substructure was distributed heterogeneously; nano-sized (~80 nm) equiaxed grains containing mainly HABs were generated in the vicinity of the roll bonding region of the individual nickel layers, whereas a typical dislocation substructure containing LABs was generated in their interior. At high strains ( ɛ > 4.8; 6 to 10 ARB cycles), a homogenous distribution of well-defined, highly elongated LBs of average thickness 75 nm was generated throughout the entire thickness of the material. The thickness of these LBs decreased with increasing number of ARB cycles and reached a saturation thickness of ~75 nm after 6 to 8 cycles. A theoretical framework for the limit to LB refinement during ARB is presented based on the refinement rate due to the stored energy of deformation balanced by the growth rate caused by adiabatic heating. The analysis takes into account the unique features of LB structures and processing parameters.

  6. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  7. Vortex asymmetry on conical forebodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taligoski, Jordan L.

    Vortex asymmetry on axisymmetric forebodies at high angles of attack results in side forces and yawing moments even in symmetrical flight. This can adversely affect the yaw control characteristics of a flight vehicle and limit maneuverability. The mechanisms responsible for vortex asymmetry and the nature of instabilities causing ow asymmetry are still not well understood. Few studies suggest the role of random micro-imperfections in the nose apex region as a cause of vortex asymmetry; however there is a lack of understanding about mechanisms by which these random imperfections result in a side force variation with the roll orientation. The present study involving experiments over a wide range of test conditions and high-fidelity simulations is an attempt to provide an insight to this complex phenomenon. Experiments were carried out on a 12° semi-apex angle cone at high angles of attack at low speeds. Measurements include forces and moments using a six-component strain gauge balance and Particle Image Velocimetry to obtain quantitative flow field characteristics. A high fidelity LES Navier-Stokes solver was utilized to investigate and understand vortex asymmetry phenomenon on the same configuration at a Reynolds number of 100,000 and free stream Mach number of 0.3. Flow field characteristics are assessed with the introduction of multiple random imperfections near the tip of the conical body. Results show that slender cones at high angles of attack display bistable variation of the side force and yawing moments with roll orientation. Vortex asymmetry is initiated very close to the cone tip due to the presence of micro-imperfections on the cone surface, and develop into asymmetric vortex sheet downstream along the conical body. The strength of the fully developed vortex moving away from the surface is nearly double of the vortex residing close to the surface, leading to large magnitude side forces and yawing moments.

  8. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  9. The development of high angle deformation boundaries and local orientations in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    High angle boundaries and their local surroundings are important for all aspects of recrystallization including nucleation, growth and texture formation. They are thus important for processing of aluminum alloys. Deformation induced high angle boundaries have been observed and quantitatively characterized using transmission electron microscopy in aluminum following rolling to large reductions. The distribution of local orientations between individual dislocation boundaries and their angle/axis pairs have been measured using convergent beam Kikuchi analysis and are compared to the macroscopic texture. The sequence of near neighbor orientations shows that individual grains subdivide across their thickness into three to four different texture components separated by sharp boundaries. The local orientations surrounding high angle boundaries are much more diverse than suggested by simple models and single crystal studies. The origins for these high angle boundaries are suggested and discussed.

  10. Regulation of Compound Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Rujin

    2013-01-01

    Leaf morphology is one of the most variable, yet inheritable, traits in the plant kingdom. How plants develop a variety of forms and shapes is a major biological question. Here, we discuss some recent progress in understanding the development of compound or dissected leaves in model species, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), Cardamine hirsuta and Medicago truncatula, with an emphasis on recent discoveries in legumes. We also discuss progress in gene regulations and hormonal actions in compound leaf development. These studies facilitate our understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms and put forward a prospective in compound leaf studies. PMID:27135488

  11. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    PubMed

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation.

  12. Effects of prolonged weightlessness on self-motion perception and eye movements evoked by roll and pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Parker, Donald E.

    1987-01-01

    Seven astronauts reported translational self-motion during roll simulation 1-3 h after landing following 5-7 d of orbital flight. Two reported strong translational self-motion perception when they performed pitch head motions during entry and while the orbiter was stationary on the runway. One of two astronauts from whom adequate data were collected exhibited a 132-deg shift in the phase angle between roll stimulation and horizontal eye position 2 h after landing. Neither of two from whom adequate data were collected exhibited increased horizontal eye movement amplitude or disturbance of voluntary pitch or roll body motion immediately postflight. These results are generally consistent with an otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation model and are being applied to the development of apparatus and procedures intended to preadapt astronauts to the sensory rearrangement of weightlessness.

  13. Rolling bearing stiffness in arbitrary direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhusan; Sun, Xinde; Wu, Linfeng

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a new concept of rolling bearing stiffness in arbitrary direction, which is necessary to the investigation of rotor-bearing dynamics. It includes the axial stiffness and the arbitrary radial stiffness of the rolling bearing. Based on elasticity theory and the geometrical parameters of the bearing, the approximate formulas of the axial stiffness, the arbitrary radial stiffness, and the inner ring displacements are derived. Furthermore, the paper also discusses the effects of the loads, the radial clearance, and the load distribution parameters on the rolling bearing stiffness. In order to verify the model and the computer program, an example of a ball bearing is analyzed in detail. It shows that the model and the program are reliable and the results are consistent with the data supplied by the U.S. Air Force Aeropropulsion Laboratory.

  14. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  15. Log-rolling block copolymers cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Youn; Kim, Ye Chan; Kim, Dong Hyup; Kwon, Na Kyung; Register, Richard A.

    Shear has been the most effective method to create long range order of micro- or nano- structures in soft materials. When shear is applied, soft particles or polymers tend to align along the shear direction to minimize the viscous dissipation, thus transverse (so-called ``log-rolling'') alignment is unfavored. In this study, for the first time we report the transverse alignment of cylinder-forming block copolymers. Poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate), PS-PMMA, can form a metastable hemicylinder structure when confined in a thin film, and this hemicylinder structure can align either along the shear direction, or transverse to the shear direction (``log-rolling''), depending on the shearing temperature. This unusual ``log-rolling'' behavior is explained by the different chain mobility of the two blocks in PS-PMMA; the rigidity of core cylinder is the critical parameter determining the direction of shear alignment.

  16. Computer-aided roll pass design in rolling of airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgerman, N.; Lahoti, G. D.; Altan, T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes two computer-aided design (CAD) programs developed for modeling the shape rolling process for airfoil sections. The first program, SHPROL, uses a modular upper-bound method of analysis and predicts the lateral spread, elongation, and roll torque. The second program, ROLPAS, predicts the stresses, roll separating force, the roll torque and the details of metal flow by simulating the rolling process, using the slab method of analysis. ROLPAS is an interactive program; it offers graphic display capabilities and allows the user to interact with the computer via a keyboard, CRT, and a light pen. The accuracy of the computerized models was evaluated by (a) rolling a selected airfoil shape at room temperature from 1018 steel and isothermally at high temperature from Ti-6Al-4V, and (b) comparing the experimental results with computer predictions. The comparisons indicated that the CAD systems, described here, are useful for practical engineering purposes and can be utilized in roll pass design and analysis for airfoil and similar shapes.

  17. Effect of Surface-Active Pseudomonas spp. on Leaf Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Bunster, Lillian; Fokkema, Nyckle J.; Schippers, Bob

    1989-01-01

    Different strains of Pseudomonas putida and P. fluorescens isolated from the rhizosphere and phyllosphere were tested for surface activity in droplet cultures on polystyrene. Droplets of 6 of the 12 wild types tested spread over the surface during incubation, and these strains were considered surface active; strains not showing this reaction were considered non-surface active. Similar reactions were observed on pieces of wheat leaves. Supernatants from centrifuged broth cultures behaved like droplets of suspensions in broth; exposure to 100°C destroyed the activity. Average contact angles of the supernatants of surface-active and non-surface-active strains on polystyrene were 24° and 72°, respectively. The minimal surface tension of supernatants of the surface-active strains was about 46 mN/m, whereas that of the non-surface-active strains was 64 mN/m (estimations from Zisman plots). After 6 days of incubation, wheat flag leaves sprayed with a dilute suspension of a surface-active strain of P. putida (WCS 358RR) showed a significant increase in leaf wettability, which was determined by contact angle measurements. Increasing the initial concentration of bacteria and the amount of nutrients in the inoculum sprayed on leaves reduced the contact angles from 138° on leaves treated with antibiotics (control) to 43° on leaves treated with surface-active bacteria. A closely related strain with no surface activity on polystyrene did not affect leaf wettability, although it was present in densities similar to those of the surface-active strain. Nutrients alone could occasionally also increase leaf wettability, apparently by stimulating naturally occurring surface-active bacteria. When estimating densities of Pseudomonas spp. underneath droplets with low contact angles, it appeared that populations on leaves treated with a surface-active strain could vary from about 104 to 106 CFU cm−2, suggesting that the surface effect may be prolonged after a decline of the

  18. Routh symmetry in the Chaplygin's rolling ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungsoo

    2011-12-01

    The Routh integral in the symmetric Chaplygin's rolling ball has been regarded as a mysterious conservation law due to its interesting form of sqrt {I_1 I_3 + m< {I_s ,s} rangle } Ω _3 . In this paper, a new form of the Routh integral is proposed as a Noether's pairing form of a conservation law. An explicit symmetry vector for the Routh integral is proved to associate the conserved quantity with the invariance of the Lagrangian function under the rollingly constrained nonholonomic variation. Then, the form of the Routh symmetry vector is discussed for its origin as the linear combination of the configurational vectors.

  19. Roll ring assemblies for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, J.; Vise, J.; Young, K.

    1994-01-01

    Space Station Freedom requires the transmission of high power and signals through three different rotational interfaces. Roll ring technology was baselined by NASA for rotary joints to transfer up to 65.5 kW of power for 30 years at greater than 99 percent efficiency. Signal transfer requirements included MIL-STD-1553 data transmission and 4.5 MHz RS250A base and color video. A unique design for each rotary joint was developed and tested to accomplish power and signal transfer. An overview of roll ring technology is presented, followed by design requirements, hardware configuration, and test results.

  20. Hormonal Regulation of Leaf Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William P.

    1968-01-01

    A review is given of the progress made during the last 6 years in elucidating the nature, locus of action, and transport properties of the endogenous hormones that control leaf abscission. PMID:16657014

  1. Experiments in Whole Leaf Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, J. C.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Described is a simple experimental system, which uses radioactive carbon dioxide to study whole leaf photosynthesis under a variety of conditions. Other experiments and simple apparatus for the experiments are also described. (Author/RH)

  2. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  7. Unsteady Aerodynamic Modeling in Roll for the NASA Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Frink, Neal T.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing the impact of loss-of-control conditions on commercial transport aircraft is a primary goal of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. One aspect in developing the supporting technologies is to improve the aerodynamic models that represent these adverse conditions. Aerodynamic models appropriate for loss of control conditions require a more general mathematical representation to predict nonlinear unsteady behaviors. In this paper, a more general mathematical model is proposed for the subscale NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) that covers both low and high angles of attack. Particular attention is devoted to the stall region where full-scale transports have demonstrated a tendency for roll instability. The complete aerodynamic model was estimated from dynamic wind-tunnel data. Advanced computational methods are used to improve understanding and visualize the flow physics within the region where roll instability is a factor.

  8. Rolling-element fatigue life of AISI M-50 and 18-4-1 balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue studies were conducted with AISI M-50, EFR 18-4-1, and VAR 18-4-1. Groups of 12.7 mm (1/2-in) diameter balls of each material were tested in the five ball fatigue tester. Test conditions included a load of 1540 N (347 lbf) giving a maximum Hertz stress of 5520 MPa (800 000 psi), a shaft speed of 10,700 rpm, and a contact angle of 30 deg. Tests were run at a race temperature of 339 K (150 F) with a type 2 ester lubricant. The rolling element fatigue life of AISI M-50 was not significantly different from that of EFR 18-4-1 or VAR 18-4-1 based on a statistical comparison of the test results.

  9. Intra- and inter-community variation in leaf water repellency along a 4000 m elevation transect in the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, G. R.; Doughty, C.; Bentley, L. P.; Shenkin, A.; Castro-Ccoscco, R. M.; Salinas, N.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Leaf water repellency is a measure of the hydrophobicity, or wettability, of leaf surfaces. At the scale of the plant, leaf water repellency can affect gas exchange, nutrient exchange, and pathogen growth. At the scale of the ecosystem, it can affect canopy water storage, throughfall, and evaporation. To date, very few studies have measured intra- and inter- community variation in leaf water repellency of tropical forest ecosystems. In the context of a broad survey of plant functional traits, we measured leaf water repellency in nine forest plots occurring across a 4000 m elevation gradient in the eastern Andes of Peru. Observed angles of incidence (63 ± 13°) indicate high leaf wettability, with no significant difference between sun and shade leaves. In contrast with previous research along elevation gradients, we find no strong evidence for variation across sites, but rather find high variation within a given site. Finally, we find that leaf water repellency may be predicted using sunlit leaf spectra with a low RMSE (<25% of the mean), indicating that future research on leaf water repellency could be carried out using high resolution hyperspectral remote sensing. As the climate of tropical ecosystems changes, the resultant changes in leaf water repellency will impact plants, communities and ecosystems. Our results inform our understanding of where and to what extent these impacts are most likely to occur.

  10. Archips xylosteana (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a Palearctic leaf-rolling moth, new to North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Archips xylosteana (L.), a widespread Palearctic tortricid moth, is reported from St. John’s, Newfoundland, the first confirmed records of this species in North America. Adults were collected by beating branches and foliage of a variety of ornamental trees and shrubs on the campus of Memorial Univer...

  11. Why do leaf-tying caterpillars abandon their leaf ties?

    PubMed

    Sliwinski, Michelle; Sigmon, Elisha

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-tying caterpillars act as ecosystem engineers by building shelters between overlapping leaves, which are inhabited by other arthropods. Leaf-tiers have been observed to leave their ties and create new shelters (and thus additional microhabitats), but the ecological factors affecting shelter fidelity are poorly known. For this study, we explored the effects of resource limitation and occupant density on shelter fidelity and assessed the consequences of shelter abandonment. We first quantified the area of leaf material required for a caterpillar to fully develop for two of the most common leaf-tiers that feed on white oak, Quercus alba. On average, Psilocorsis spp. caterpillars consumed 21.65 ± 0.67 cm(2) leaf material to complete development. We also measured the area of natural leaf ties found in a Maryland forest, to determine the distribution of resources available to caterpillars in situ. Of 158 natural leaf ties examined, 47% were too small to sustain an average Psilocorsis spp. caterpillar for the entirety of its development. We also manipulated caterpillar densities within experimental ties on potted trees to determine the effects of cohabitants on the likelihood of a caterpillar to leave its tie. We placed 1, 2, or 4 caterpillars in ties of a standard size and monitored the caterpillars twice daily to track their movement. In ties with more than one occupant, caterpillars showed a significantly greater propensity to leave their tie, and left sooner and at a faster rate than those in ties as single occupants. To understand the consequences of leaf tie abandonment, we observed caterpillars searching a tree for a site to build a shelter in the field. This is a risky behavior, as 17% of the caterpillars observed died while searching for a shelter site. Caterpillars that successfully built a shelter traveled 110 ± 20 cm and took 28 ± 7 min to find a suitable site to build a shelter. In conclusion, leaf-tying caterpillars must frequently abandon their leaf

  12. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  13. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  14. What determines a leaf's shape?

    PubMed

    Dkhar, Jeremy; Pareek, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    The independent origin and evolution of leaves as small, simple microphylls or larger, more complex megaphylls in plants has shaped and influenced the natural composition of the environment. Significant contributions have come from megaphyllous leaves, characterized usually as flat, thin lamina entrenched with photosynthetic organelles and stomata, which serve as the basis of primary productivity. During the course of evolution, the megaphylls have attained complexity not only in size or venation patterns but also in shape. This has fascinated scientists worldwide, and research has progressed tremendously in understanding the concept of leaf shape determination. Here, we review these studies and discuss the various factors that contributed towards shaping the leaf; initiated as a small bulge on the periphery of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) followed by asymmetric outgrowth, expansion and maturation until final shape is achieved. We found that the underlying factors governing these processes are inherently genetic: PIN1 and KNOX1 are indicators of leaf initiation, HD-ZIPIII, KANADI, and YABBY specify leaf outgrowth while ANGUSTIFOLIA3 and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR5 control leaf expansion and maturation; besides, recent research has identified new players such as APUM23, known to specify leaf polarity. In addition to genetic control, environmental factors also play an important role during the final adjustment of leaf shape. This immense amount of information available will serve as the basis for studying and understanding innovative leaf morphologies viz. the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes which have evolved to provide additional support to the plant survival in its nutrient-deficient habitat. In hindsight, formation of the pitcher tube in Nepenthes might involve the recruitment of similar genetic mechanisms that occur during sympetaly in Petunia. PMID:25584185

  15. What determines a leaf's shape?

    PubMed

    Dkhar, Jeremy; Pareek, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    The independent origin and evolution of leaves as small, simple microphylls or larger, more complex megaphylls in plants has shaped and influenced the natural composition of the environment. Significant contributions have come from megaphyllous leaves, characterized usually as flat, thin lamina entrenched with photosynthetic organelles and stomata, which serve as the basis of primary productivity. During the course of evolution, the megaphylls have attained complexity not only in size or venation patterns but also in shape. This has fascinated scientists worldwide, and research has progressed tremendously in understanding the concept of leaf shape determination. Here, we review these studies and discuss the various factors that contributed towards shaping the leaf; initiated as a small bulge on the periphery of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) followed by asymmetric outgrowth, expansion and maturation until final shape is achieved. We found that the underlying factors governing these processes are inherently genetic: PIN1 and KNOX1 are indicators of leaf initiation, HD-ZIPIII, KANADI, and YABBY specify leaf outgrowth while ANGUSTIFOLIA3 and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR5 control leaf expansion and maturation; besides, recent research has identified new players such as APUM23, known to specify leaf polarity. In addition to genetic control, environmental factors also play an important role during the final adjustment of leaf shape. This immense amount of information available will serve as the basis for studying and understanding innovative leaf morphologies viz. the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes which have evolved to provide additional support to the plant survival in its nutrient-deficient habitat. In hindsight, formation of the pitcher tube in Nepenthes might involve the recruitment of similar genetic mechanisms that occur during sympetaly in Petunia.

  16. 2. AERIAL VIEW OF ROLLING LIFT BRIDGE. DORCHESTER AVENUE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW OF ROLLING LIFT BRIDGE. DORCHESTER AVENUE IN BACKGROUND. SOUTH STATION VISIBLE AT TOP LEFT. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. 25 CFR 75.4 - Basic membership roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.4 Basic membership roll. All persons whose names appear on the roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina, prepared...

  18. 25 CFR 75.4 - Basic membership roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.4 Basic membership roll. All persons whose names appear on the roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina, prepared...

  19. T Strip Properties Fabricated by Powder Rolling Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jae-Keun; Lee, Chae-Hun; Kim, Jeoung-Han; Yeom, Jong-Taek; Park, Nho-Kwang

    In the present study, the characteristics of the Ti powders fabricated by Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) were analyzed in terms of particle shape, size and size distribution. Ti powders were subjected to roll compaction and their microstructure and green densities were evaluated in terms of particle size, powder morphology, roll gap and rolling speed. Effects of blending elements having different powder sizes on densification properties were analyzed. The strip thickness was proportional to the roll gap up to 0.9 mm and the density of titanium strip was decreased with the increase in roll gap. As the roll speed increased, the strip density and thickness were decreased by using -200 mesh Ti powder. However, the effect of rolling speed for -400 mesh Ti powder was not greater than that of -200 mesh powder. The highest density by 93% was achieved by using -400 mesh Ti powder at 0.1 mm roll gap, however edge cracks and alligator cracks were occurred.

  20. Detail from roadbed showing sprocket teeth in rolling segment and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail from roadbed showing sprocket teeth in rolling segment and typical lateral bracing. View south - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand.

  2. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  3. Processing, mechanical behavior and biocompatibility of ultrafine grained zirconium fabricated by accumulative roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ling

    The aim of this study is to produce large quantities of bulk zirconium with an ultrafine grained microstructure and with enhanced properties. Accumulative roll bonding (ARB), a severe plastic deformation technique based on rolling, is chosen due to its availability in industrial environment. The texture, microstructure and mechanical behavior of bulk ultrafine grained (ufg) Zr fabricated by accumulative roll bonding is investigated by electron backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and mechanical testing. A reasonably homogeneous and equiaxed ufg structure, with a large fraction of high angle boundaries (HABs, ˜70%), can be obtained in Zr after only two ARB cycles. The average grain size, counting only HABs (theta>15°), is 400 nm. (Sub)grain size is equal to 320 nm. The yield stress and ultimate tensile stress (UTS) values are nearly double those from conventionally processed Zr with only a slight loss of ductility. Optimum processing conditions include large thickness reductions per pass (˜75%), which enhance grain refinement, and a rolling temperature (T ˜ 0.3Tm) at which a sufficient number of slip modes are activated, with an absence of significant grain growth. Grain refinement takes place by geometrical thinning and grain subdivision by the formation of geometrically necessary boundaries. The formation of equiaxed grains by geometric dynamic recrystallization is facilitated by enhanced diffusion due to adabatic heating. Optical microscopy examination and shear testing suggest accepted bonding quality compared to that achieved in materials processed by diffusion bonding and that obtained in other ARB studies. Biocompatibility of ultrafine grained Zr processed by large strain rolling is studied by evaluating the behavior of human osteoblast cells. It is suggested that ultrafine grained Zr has a similar good biocompatibility as Ti6Al4V alloy and conventional Zr with a large grain size have. The improved mechanical properties together with

  4. Large-Amplitude, High-Rate Roll Oscillations of a 65 deg Delta Wing at High Incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    2000-01-01

    The IAR/WL 65 deg delta wing experimental results provide both detail pressure measurements and a wide range of flow conditions covering from simple attached flow, through fully developed vortex and vortex burst flow, up to fully-stalled flow at very high incidence. Thus, the Computational Unsteady Aerodynamics researchers can use it at different level of validating the corresponding code. In this section a range of CFD results are provided for the 65 deg delta wing at selected flow conditions. The time-dependent, three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are used to numerically simulate the unsteady vertical flow. Two sting angles and two large- amplitude, high-rate, forced-roll motions and a damped free-to-roll motion are presented. The free-to-roll motion is computed by coupling the time-dependent RANS equations to the flight dynamic equation of motion. The computed results are compared with experimental pressures, forces, moments and roll angle time history. In addition, surface and off-surface flow particle streaks are also presented.

  5. Impact of plant shoot architecture on leaf cooling: a coupled heat and mass transfer model.

    PubMed

    Bridge, L J; Franklin, K A; Homer, M E

    2013-08-01

    Plants display a range of striking architectural adaptations when grown at elevated temperatures. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, these include elongation of petioles, and increased petiole and leaf angles from the soil surface. The potential physiological significance of these architectural changes remains speculative. We address this issue computationally by formulating a mathematical model and performing numerical simulations, testing the hypothesis that elongated and elevated plant configurations may reflect a leaf-cooling strategy. This sets in place a new basic model of plant water use and interaction with the surrounding air, which couples heat and mass transfer within a plant to water vapour diffusion in the air, using a transpiration term that depends on saturation, temperature and vapour concentration. A two-dimensional, multi-petiole shoot geometry is considered, with added leaf-blade shape detail. Our simulations show that increased petiole length and angle generally result in enhanced transpiration rates and reduced leaf temperatures in well-watered conditions. Furthermore, our computations also reveal plant configurations for which elongation may result in decreased transpiration rate owing to decreased leaf liquid saturation. We offer further qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of architectural parameters as key determinants of leaf-cooling capacity.

  6. Impact of plant shoot architecture on leaf cooling: a coupled heat and mass transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, L. J.; Franklin, K. A.; Homer, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Plants display a range of striking architectural adaptations when grown at elevated temperatures. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, these include elongation of petioles, and increased petiole and leaf angles from the soil surface. The potential physiological significance of these architectural changes remains speculative. We address this issue computationally by formulating a mathematical model and performing numerical simulations, testing the hypothesis that elongated and elevated plant configurations may reflect a leaf-cooling strategy. This sets in place a new basic model of plant water use and interaction with the surrounding air, which couples heat and mass transfer within a plant to water vapour diffusion in the air, using a transpiration term that depends on saturation, temperature and vapour concentration. A two-dimensional, multi-petiole shoot geometry is considered, with added leaf-blade shape detail. Our simulations show that increased petiole length and angle generally result in enhanced transpiration rates and reduced leaf temperatures in well-watered conditions. Furthermore, our computations also reveal plant configurations for which elongation may result in decreased transpiration rate owing to decreased leaf liquid saturation. We offer further qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of architectural parameters as key determinants of leaf-cooling capacity. PMID:23720538

  7. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  8. Leaf exsertion, leaf elongation, and leaf senescence in Eriophorum vaginatum and Carex Bigelowii

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, G.R.; Yandow, T.; Laundre, J.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the common sedges of arctic vegetation show a pattern of leaf production in which the exsertion and elongation of new leaves is more or less simultaneous with the senescence of old leaves. The present study was designed to increase our understanding of the variability sequential leaf production by arctic sedges, and to determine some of the controls on that variability. We did this in two ways: first, we compared the sequential patterns of leaf growth and senescence in E. vaginatum with those of Carex Bigelowii Torr. at two tussock tundra sites near Toolik Lake on the North Slope of Alaska. Second, we compared the responses of leaf growth in these species in control and fertilized plots and in two microenvironments thought to differ sharply in nutrient availability and total productivity. 29 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  10. 46 CFR 56.30-15 - Expanded or rolled joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expanded or rolled joints. 56.30-15 Section 56.30-15... APPURTENANCES Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-15 Expanded or rolled joints. (a) Expanded or rolled joints may be used where experience or test has demonstrated that the joint is suitable for...

  11. 46 CFR 56.30-15 - Expanded or rolled joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Expanded or rolled joints. 56.30-15 Section 56.30-15... APPURTENANCES Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-15 Expanded or rolled joints. (a) Expanded or rolled joints may be used where experience or test has demonstrated that the joint is suitable for...

  12. 46 CFR 56.30-15 - Expanded or rolled joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Expanded or rolled joints. 56.30-15 Section 56.30-15... APPURTENANCES Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-15 Expanded or rolled joints. (a) Expanded or rolled joints may be used where experience or test has demonstrated that the joint is suitable for...

  13. 25 CFR 75.15 - Current membership roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Current membership roll. 75.15 Section 75.15 Indians... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.15 Current membership roll. The membership roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be kept current by striking therefrom the names...

  14. 25 CFR 75.15 - Current membership roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current membership roll. 75.15 Section 75.15 Indians... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.15 Current membership roll. The membership roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be kept current by striking therefrom the names...

  15. 25 CFR 75.15 - Current membership roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current membership roll. 75.15 Section 75.15 Indians... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.15 Current membership roll. The membership roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be kept current by striking therefrom the names...

  16. 25 CFR 75.15 - Current membership roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current membership roll. 75.15 Section 75.15 Indians... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.15 Current membership roll. The membership roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be kept current by striking therefrom the names...

  17. 25 CFR 75.15 - Current membership roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current membership roll. 75.15 Section 75.15 Indians... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.15 Current membership roll. The membership roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be kept current by striking therefrom the names...

  18. 25 CFR 75.4 - Basic membership roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Basic membership roll. 75.4 Section 75.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT REVISION OF THE MEMBERSHIP ROLL OF THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.4 Basic membership roll. All persons...

  19. 21 CFR 136.130 - Milk bread, rolls, and buns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Milk bread, rolls, and buns. 136.130 Section 136....130 Milk bread, rolls, and buns. (a) Each of the foods milk bread, milk rolls, and milk buns conforms... permitted in the preparation of the dough is milk or, as an alternative, a combination of dairy products...

  20. 21 CFR 136.130 - Milk bread, rolls, and buns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Milk bread, rolls, and buns. 136.130 Section 136....130 Milk bread, rolls, and buns. (a) Each of the foods milk bread, milk rolls, and milk buns conforms... permitted in the preparation of the dough is milk or, as an alternative, a combination of dairy products...

  1. 14. VIEW OF METAL ROLLING OPERATION. THE METALS ARE BEING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF METAL ROLLING OPERATION. THE METALS ARE BEING PREPARED TO BE ROLLED INTO SHEETS OF SPECIFIC THICKNESS. COMPONENT PARTS WERE FABRICATED FROM THE METAL SHEETS. (11/82) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 15. VIEW OF ROLLING OPERATION. INGOTS AND BAR STOCK WERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF ROLLING OPERATION. INGOTS AND BAR STOCK WERE ROLLED TO A SPECIFIED THICKNESS IN PREPARATION FOR FURTHER PROCESSING. (11/82) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  3. Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Becker, R; Rhee, M; Li, M

    2004-09-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory participated in a U. S. Department of Energy/Office of Industrial Technology sponsored research project 'Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery', as a Cooperative Agreement TC-02028 with the Alcoa Technical Center (ATC). The objective of the joint project with Alcoa is to develop a numerical modeling capability to optimize the hot rolling process used to produce aluminum plate. Product lost in the rolling process and subsequent recycling, wastes resources consumed in the energy-intensive steps of remelting and reprocessing the ingot. The modeling capability developed by project partners will be used to produce plate more efficiently and with reduced product loss.

  4. 9 CFR 381.159 - Poultry rolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... subchapter, in 9 CFR Chapter III, Subchapter E, or in 21 CFR Chapter I, Subchapter A or Subchapter B. In... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Poultry rolls. 381.159 Section 381.159... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION...

  5. 9 CFR 381.159 - Poultry rolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... subchapter, in 9 CFR Chapter III, Subchapter E, or in 21 CFR Chapter I, Subchapter A or Subchapter B. In... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Poultry rolls. 381.159 Section 381.159... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION...

  6. 9 CFR 381.159 - Poultry rolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... subchapter, in 9 CFR Chapter III, Subchapter E, or in 21 CFR Chapter I, Subchapter A or Subchapter B. In... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Poultry rolls. 381.159 Section 381.159... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION...

  7. 9 CFR 381.159 - Poultry rolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... subchapter, in 9 CFR Chapter III, Subchapter E, or in 21 CFR Chapter I, Subchapter A or Subchapter B. In... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poultry rolls. 381.159 Section 381.159... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION...

  8. Engineers Test Roll-Off at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at JPL shows engineers testing the route by which the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity will roll off its lander. Opportunity touched down at Meridiani Planum, Mars on Jan. 24, 9:05 p.m. PST, 2004, Earth-received time.

  9. Roll-Off Test at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This still image illustrates what the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit will look like as it rolls off the northeastern side of the lander on Mars. The image was taken from footage of rover testing at JPL's In-Situ Instruments Laboratory, or 'Testbed.'

  10. Oscillations and Rolling for Duffing's Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Ya.; Piskovskiy, E. V.; Volovich, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    The Duffing equation has been used to model nonlinear dynamics not only in mechanics and electronics but also in biology and in neurology for the brain process modeling. Van der Pol's method is often used in nonlinear dynamics to improve perturbation theory results when describing small oscillations. However, in some other problems of nonlinear dynamics particularly in case of Duffing-Higgs equation in field theory, for the Einsten-Friedmann equations in cosmology and for relaxation processes in neurology not only small oscillations regime is of interest but also the regime of slow rolling. In the present work a method for approximate solution to nonlinear dynamics equations in the rolling regime is developed. It is shown that in order to improve perturbation theory in the rolling regime it turns out to be effective to use an expansion in hyperbolic functions instead of trigonometric functions as it is done in van der Pol's method in case of small oscillations. In particular the Duffing equation in the rolling regime is investigated using solution expressed in terms of elliptic functions. Accuracy of obtained approximation is estimated. The Duffing equation with dissipation is also considered.

  11. 14 CFR 23.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Rolling conditions. The wing and wing bracing must be designed for the following loading conditions: (a) Unsymmetrical wing loads appropriate to the category. Unless the following values result in unrealistic loads... semispan wing airload acts on one side of the plane of symmetry and 60 percent of this load acts on...

  12. 14 CFR 23.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Rolling conditions. The wing and wing bracing must be designed for the following loading conditions: (a) Unsymmetrical wing loads appropriate to the category. Unless the following values result in unrealistic loads... semispan wing airload acts on one side of the plane of symmetry and 60 percent of this load acts on...

  13. 14 CFR 23.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Rolling conditions. The wing and wing bracing must be designed for the following loading conditions: (a) Unsymmetrical wing loads appropriate to the category. Unless the following values result in unrealistic loads... semispan wing airload acts on one side of the plane of symmetry and 60 percent of this load acts on...

  14. 14 CFR 23.349 - Rolling conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Rolling conditions. The wing and wing bracing must be designed for the following loading conditions: (a) Unsymmetrical wing loads appropriate to the category. Unless the following values result in unrealistic loads... semispan wing airload acts on one side of the plane of symmetry and 60 percent of this load acts on...

  15. Antares Rolls Out to Wallops Launch Pad

    NASA Video Gallery

    Orbital Sciences Corporation’s Antares rocket rolls out to the launch pad at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on the morning of Oct. 1, 2012. Over the next several months, Orbital plans a hot-fir...

  16. Land rolling increases broadleaf weed emergence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the northern Great Plains, annual forage and pulse crops typically are land rolled after planting to push rocks back into the soil to prevent damage to harvest equipment. Packer wheels commonly are used at planting to improve soil-seed contact for more uniform crop emergence and subsequent matur...

  17. Large Scale Evaluation fo Nickel Aluminide Rolls

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    This completed project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem Steel (now Mittal Steel) to demonstrate the effectiveness of using nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated, energy-efficient, commercial annealing furnace system.

  18. [Angle-closure chronic glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of chronic angle closure glaucoma is considerably greater than the incidence of the acute type. This type of glaucoma may mimic primary open angle glaucoma with visual field deterioration, optic nerve alteration and intraocular pressure elevation with a quiet painless eye. Its diagnosis is based on indentation gonioscopy showing peripheral anterior synechiae. The mechanisms of angle closure are the pupillary block, the plateau iris configuration and the creeping form. The treatment of chronic angle closure glaucoma is based on laser peripheral iridotomy. PMID:14646832

  19. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  20. An integrated optical pickup with roll-to-roll fabricated diffractive components.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jo-Han; Lee, Chi-Hung; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-07-01

    This work designed and fabricated an optical pickup system based on optical films using the roll-to-roll process. The design combined the advantages of the stacked and planar optical pickup system. Two blazed gratings were used as beam splitters for bending the optical path, while a cylindrical lens was used for astigmatic focus-error detection. The proposed design effectively reduces overall system configuration, component cost, and fabrication complexity.

  1. High-rate, roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing of flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.; Wachter, Ralph F.

    2012-10-01

    Since the National Nanotechnology Initiative was first announced in 2000, nanotechnology has developed an impressive catalog of nano-scale structures with building-blocks such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, nanopillars, and quantum dots. Similarly, there are accompanying materials processes such as, atomic layer deposition, pulsed layer deposition, nanoprinting, nanoimprinting, transfer printing, nanolithography and nanopatterning. One of the challenges of nanomanufacturing is scaling up these processes reliably and affordably. Roll-to-roll manufacturing is a means for scaling up, for increasing throughput. It is high-speed production using a continuous, moving platform such as a web or a flexible substrate. The adoption of roll-to-roll to nanomanufacturing is novel. The goal is to build structures and devices with nano-scale features and specific functionality. The substrate could be a polymer, metal foil, silk, cloth or paper. The materials to build the structures and multi-level devices could be organic, inorganic or biological. Processing could be solution-based, e.g., ink-jet printing, or vacuum-based, e.g., chemical vapor deposition. Products could be electronics, optoelectronics, membranes, catalysts, microfluidics, lab-on-film, filters, etc. By this means, processing of large and conformal areas is achievable. High-throughput translates into low cost, which is the attraction of roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing. There are technical challenges requiring fundamental scientific advances in materials and process development and in manufacturing and system-integration where achieving nano-scale feature size, resolution and accuracy at high speeds can be major hurdles. We will give an overview of roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing with emphasis on the need to understand the material, process and system complexities, the need for instrumentation, measurement, and process control and describe the concept of cyber-enabled nanomanufacturing for reliable and

  2. Minimum requirements for commissioning and long-term quality assurance of Elekta multi-leaf collimator for volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Daisaku; Nakada, Ryosei; Yomoda, Akane; Ishii, Kentaro; Tsutsumi, Shinichi; Inoue, Makoto; Ichida, Takao; Hosono, Masako N; Miki, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    We have proposed minimum requirements for commissioning and long-term quality assurance (QA) of an Elekta multi-leaf collimator (MLC) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The MLC leaf position accuracy during VMAT delivery was evaluated with the use of three different QA test plans: (1) a leaf gap-width test between opposing leaves by measurement of the isocenter dose during constant-gap sliding-window delivery with varied dose rates, MLC leaf speeds, and gantry angles; (2) a leaf position test by picket-fence delivery with and without gantry rotation; and (3) a leaf-bank symmetry test by measurement of the field geometry with different collimator angles at a fixed gantry position. All the QA test plans were created using an ERGO++ treatment-planning system. The leaf gap-width deviation was within 0.2 mm, the leaf position deviation was within 0.5 mm, and the leaf-bank symmetry error was within 0.5 mm under all the test conditions. MLC leaf position accuracy and long-term stability were confirmed by the proposed procedures.

  3. Laser direct write system for fabricating seamless roll-to-roll lithography tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrzelka, Joseph E.; Hardt, David E.

    2013-03-01

    Implementations of roll to roll contact lithography require new approaches towards manufacturing tooling, including stamps for roll to roll nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and soft lithography. Suitable roll based tools must have seamless micro- or nano-scale patterns and must be scalable to roll widths of one meter. The authors have developed a new centrifugal stamp casting process that can produce uniform cylindrical polymer stamps in a scalable manner. The pattern on the resulting polymer tool is replicated against a corresponding master pattern on the inner diameter of a centrifuge drum. This master pattern is created in photoresist using a UV laser direct write system. This paper discusses the design and implementation of a laser direct write system targeting the internal diameter of a rotating drum. The design uses flying optics to focus a laser beam along the axis of the centrifuge drum and to redirect the beam towards the drum surface. Experimental patterning results show uniform coatings of negative photoresist in the centrifuge drum that are effectively patterned with a 405 nm laser diode. Seamless patterns are shown to be replicated in a 50 mm diameter, 60 mm long cylindrical stamp made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Direct write results show gratings with line widths of 10 microns in negative photoresist. Using an FPGA, the laser can be accurately timed against the centrifuge encoder to create complex patterns.

  4. High resolution patterning for flexible electronics via roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Sami; de Riet, Joris; Yakimets, Iryna; Smits, Edsger

    2014-03-01

    Flexible electronics is a growing field and is currently maturing in applications such as displays, smart packaging, organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. In order to process on flexible substrates at high throughput and large areas, novel patterning techniques will be essential. Conventional optical lithography is limited in throughput as well as resolution, and requires several alignment steps to generate multi-layered patterns, required for applications such as thin-film transistors. It therefore remains a complex and expensive process. Nanoimprint lithography is an emerging alternative to optical lithography, demonstrating patterning capabilities over a wide range of resolutions, from several microns down to a few nanometres. For display applications, nanoimprint lithography can be used to pattern various layers. Micron sized thin-film transistors for backplane can be fabricated where a self-aligned geometry is used to decrease the number of alignment steps, and increase the overlay accuracy. In addition, nano-structures can be used for optical applications such as anti-reflective surfaces and nano patterned transparent electrodes. Imprint lithography is a fully roll-to-roll compatible process and enables large area and high throughput fabrication for flexible electronics. In this paper we discuss the possibilities and the challenges of large area patterning by roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography, reviewing micron and nano sized structures realized on our roll-to-roll equipment. Nano patterned transparent electrodes, moth-eye antireflective coatings, and multilevel structures will be covered.

  5. Roll-to-Roll Nanomanufacturing of Hybrid Nanostructures for Energy Storage Device Design.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Landon; Hanken, Trevor; Carter, Rachel; Yates, William; Pint, Cary L

    2015-07-01

    A key limitation to the practical incorporation of nanostructured materials into emerging applications is the challenge of achieving low-cost, high throughput, and highly replicable scalable nanomanufacturing techniques to produce functional materials. Here, we report a benchtop roll-to-roll technique that builds upon the use of binary solutions of nanomaterials and liquid electrophoretic assembly to rapidly construct hybrid materials for battery design applications. We demonstrate surfactant-free hybrid mixtures of carbon nanotubes, silicon nanoparticles, MoS2 nanosheets, carbon nanohorns, and graphene nanoplatelets. Roll-to-roll electrophoretic assembly from these solutions enables the controlled fabrication of homogeneous coatings of these nanostructures that maintain chemical and physical properties defined by the synergistic combination of nanomaterials utilized without adverse effects of surfactants or impurities that typically limit liquid nanomanufacturing routes. To demonstrate the utility of this nanomanufacturing approach, we employed roll-to-roll electrophoretic processing to fabricate both positive and negative electrodes for lithium ion batteries in less than 30 s. The optimized full-cell battery, containing active materials of prelithiated silicon nanoparticles and MoS2 nanosheets, was assessed to exhibit energy densities of 167 Wh/kgcell(-1) and power densities of 9.6 kW/kgcell(-1). PMID:26053115

  6. Roll rotation cues influence roll tilt perception assayed using a somatosensory technique.

    PubMed

    Park, Sukyung; Gianna-Poulin, Claire; Black, F Owen; Wood, Scott; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2006-07-01

    We investigated how the nervous system processes ambiguous cues from the otolith organs by measuring roll tilt perception elicited by two motion paradigms. In one paradigm (tilt), eight subjects were sinusoidally tilted in roll with the axis of rotation near ear level. Stimulus frequencies ranged from 0.005 to 0.7 Hz, and the peak amplitude of tilt was 20 degrees . During this paradigm, subjects experienced a sinusoidal variation of interaural gravitational force with a peak of 0.34 g. The second motion paradigm (translation) was designed to yield the same sinusoidal variation in interaural force but did not include a roll canal cue. This was achieved by sinusoidally translating the subjects along their interaural axis. For the 0.7-Hz translation trial, the subjects were simply translated from side to side. A centrifuge was used for the 0.005- to 0.5-Hz translation trials; the subjects were rotated in yaw at 250 degrees /s for 5 min before initiating sinusoidal translations yielding an interaural otolith stimulus composed of both centrifugal and radial acceleration. Using a somatosensory task to measure roll tilt perception, we found substantial differences in tilt perception during the two motion paradigms. Because the primary difference between the two motion paradigms was the presence of roll canal cues during roll tilt trials, these perceptual differences suggest that canal cues influence tilt perception. Specifically, rotational cues provided by the semicircular canals help the CNS resolve ambiguous otolith cues during head tilt, yielding more accurate tilt perception.

  7. Roll-to-Roll Nanomanufacturing of Hybrid Nanostructures for Energy Storage Device Design.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Landon; Hanken, Trevor; Carter, Rachel; Yates, William; Pint, Cary L

    2015-07-01

    A key limitation to the practical incorporation of nanostructured materials into emerging applications is the challenge of achieving low-cost, high throughput, and highly replicable scalable nanomanufacturing techniques to produce functional materials. Here, we report a benchtop roll-to-roll technique that builds upon the use of binary solutions of nanomaterials and liquid electrophoretic assembly to rapidly construct hybrid materials for battery design applications. We demonstrate surfactant-free hybrid mixtures of carbon nanotubes, silicon nanoparticles, MoS2 nanosheets, carbon nanohorns, and graphene nanoplatelets. Roll-to-roll electrophoretic assembly from these solutions enables the controlled fabrication of homogeneous coatings of these nanostructures that maintain chemical and physical properties defined by the synergistic combination of nanomaterials utilized without adverse effects of surfactants or impurities that typically limit liquid nanomanufacturing routes. To demonstrate the utility of this nanomanufacturing approach, we employed roll-to-roll electrophoretic processing to fabricate both positive and negative electrodes for lithium ion batteries in less than 30 s. The optimized full-cell battery, containing active materials of prelithiated silicon nanoparticles and MoS2 nanosheets, was assessed to exhibit energy densities of 167 Wh/kgcell(-1) and power densities of 9.6 kW/kgcell(-1).

  8. Flatness Control Using Roll Coolant Based on Predicted Flatness Variation in Cold Rolling Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmae, Yukihiro; Okamura, Yoshihide

    Flatness control for cold rolling mills is one of the important technologies for improving of product quality and productivity. In particular, poor flatness leads to strip tearing in the extreme case and, moreover, it significantly reduces productivity. Therefore, various flatness control system has been developed. The main actuators for flatness control are classified into two types; one is mechanical equipment such as roll bender, the other is roll coolant, which controls thermal expansion of roll. Flatness variation such as center buckle or edge wave is mainly controlled by mechanical actuator which has high response characteristics. On another front, flatness variation of local zone can be controlled by roll coolant although one's response is lower than the response of mechanical actuator. For accomplishing good flatness accuracy in cold rolling mills, it is important to improve the performance of coolant control moreover. In this paper, a new coolant control method based on flatness variation model is described. In proposed method, the state of coolant spray on or off is selected to minimize the flatness deviation by using predicted flatness variation. The effectiveness of developed system has been demonstrated by application in actual plant.

  9. Roll to roll fabrication technologies for optoelectronic and electronic devices and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaninen, A.; Tuomikoski, M.; Kivimäki, L.; Kololuoma, T.; Välimäki, M.; Leinonen, M.; Känsäkoski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Embedding of optoelectrical, optical, and electrical functionalities into low-cost products like product packages and printed matter can be used to increase their information content. For these purposes, components like displays, photodetectors, light sources, solar cells, battery elements, diffractive optical elements, lightguides, electrical conductors, resistors, transistors, switching elements etc. and their integration to functional modules are required. Also the need of rapid and reliable di-agnostic systems for wellness and healthcare applications is apparent. Today the time from sampling to result can take hours or even several days. In future the target is to analyze the sample within a few minutes for further action. Additionally, the price of the components for low-end products and disposable sensors has to be in cent scale or preferably below that. Therefore, new, cost-effective, and volume scale capable manufacturing techniques are required. Recent developments of liquid-phase processable electrical and optical polymeric, inorganic, and hybrid material inks together with biocompatible materials have made it possible to fabricate functional components by conventional roll-to-roll techniques such as gravure printing on flexible paper and plastic like substrates. In this paper, we show our current achievements in the field of roll-to-roll fabricated electronics, optoelec-tronics and biosensors. With examples of light guiding structures, organic light emitting diodes, biocompatible materials etc., we demonstrate the huge potential of roll to roll fabrication as a low cost mass production technology for future low end electronic products.

  10. 75 FR 16504 - Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... (``Commerce'') issued an antidumping duty order on imports of hot- rolled steel from Japan (64 FR 34778... duty order on hot-rolled steel from Brazil (70 FR 30417, May 26, 2005), the antidumping duty orders on hot-rolled steel from Brazil and Japan (70 FR 30413, May 26, 2005), and the suspended investigation...

  11. COMPENSATION OF FAST KICKER ROLLS WITH SKEW QUADRUPOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I.

    2011-03-28

    The development of the third generation light sources lead to the implementation of the top-up operation, when injection occurs while users collect data. The beam excursions due to the non-closure of the injection bump can spoil the data and need to be suppressed. In the horizontal plane compensation can be achieved by adjusting timing and kick amplitudes. The rolls of the kicker magnets create non-closure in the vertical plane and usually there is no means for correction. In the paper we describe proposed compensation scheme utilizing two skew quadrupoles placed inside the injection bump. The third generation light sources implement top-up operation firstly introduced at Advanced Photon Source. In this mode the circulating beam current is supported near constant by frequent injection of small charge, while photon beam is delivered for users. The beam perturbations caused by the mismatched injection bump can provide undesired noise in the user data. Usually the injection trigger is distributed to the users end stations so that those affected would be able to blank data acquisition. Nevertheless, as good operational practice such transients should be suppressed as much as possible. In the horizontal plane (which is commonly used for injection) one can adjust individual kicker strength as well as trigger delay while observing motion of the stored beam centroid. In the vertical plane such means are unavailable in the most cases. The possible solutions include dedicated weak vertical kickers and motorized adjustment of the roll angle of the injection kickers. Both abovementioned approaches are expensive and can significantly deteriorate reliability. We suggest two employ two skew quadrupoles (to correct both angle and position) placed inside the injection bump. In this case the beam position itself serves as measure of the kicker strength (assuming that kickers are well matched) and vertical kicks from the skew quadrupoles will be self synchronized with injection bump

  12. Evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors for measuring model angle of attack in wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a laboratory evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors as potential candidates for measuring model attitude or angle of attack in wind tunnel tests are presented. The performance of eight electrolytic tilt sensors was compared with that of typical servo accelerometers used for angle-of-attack measurements. The areas evaluated included linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, temperature characteristics, roll-on-pitch interaction, sensitivity to lead-wire resistance, step response time, and rectification. Among the sensors being evaluated, the Spectron model RG-37 electrolytic tilt sensors have the highest overall accuracy in terms of linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, temperature sensitivity, and roll sensitivity. A comparison of the sensors with the servo accelerometers revealed that the accuracy of the RG-37 sensors was on the average about one order of magnitude worse. Even though a comparison indicates that the cost of each tilt sensor is about one-third the cost of each servo accelerometer, the sensors are considered unsuitable for angle-of-attack measurements. However, the potential exists for other applications such as wind tunnel wall-attitude measurements where the errors resulting from roll interaction, vibration, and response time are less and sensor temperature can be controlled.

  13. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  14. High angle canard missile test in the Ames 11-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwind, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Four blunted ogive-cylinder missile models with a length-to-diameter ratio of 10.4 were tested at transonic speeds and large angles of attack. The configurations are: body, body with tail panels, body with canards, and body with canards and tails. Forces and moments from the entire model and each of the eight fins were measured over the pitch range of 20 deg to 50 deg and 0 deg to 45 deg roll. Canard deflection angles between 0 deg and 15 deg were tested. Exploratory vapor screen flow visualization testing was also performed. Sample force and moment data are reported along with observations from the vapor screen tests.

  15. Use of sleeved rolls in a blooming mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, G.

    1983-03-01

    The use of sleeved rolls in the blooming stand ahead of a continuous semifinishing mill is treated. Two sleeved rolls were produced. One comprises a tough steel arbor and the wear resistant roll sleeve of Cr-Ni-Mo-alloyed spheroidal cast iron with carbide. Both parts were joined together in an unstressed manner by adhesive bonding. Tests show that sleeved rolls can be used in blooming stands, thereby increasing their application possibilities, but porosity in the finishing grooves of the rolls caused during the casting process means that long term behavior can not be assessed.

  16. Measuring Angles in Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeley, Nansee; Offerman, Theresa Reardon

    1997-01-01

    Features articles about physical therapy and its history as related to geometry through measurement of body angles. Includes open-ended worksheets for mathematics activities that introduce students to angle measurement, data analysis, and mathematical tools. Activities include: (1) Making Your Own Goniometer; (2) Range of Motion; (3) Active versus…

  17. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  18. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R. II.

    1989-09-12

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting and accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning magic angle of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position. 2 figs.

  19. Toward large-area roll-to-roll printed nanophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karioja, Pentti; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna M.; Alajoki, Teemu; Tuominen, Jarkko; Hiltunen, Marianne; Siitonen, Samuli; Kontturi, Ville; Böhlen, Karl; Hauser, Rene; Charlton, Martin; Boersma, Arjen; Lieberzeit, Peter; Felder, Thorsten; Eustace, David; Haskal, Eliav

    2014-05-01

    Polymers have become an important material group in fabricating discrete photonic components and integrated optical devices. This is due to their good properties: high optical transmittance, versatile processability at relative low temperatures and potential for low-cost production. Recently, nanoimprinting or nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has obtained a plenty of research interest. In NIL, a mould is pressed against a substrate coated with a moldable material. After deformation of the material, the mold is separated and a replica of the mold is formed. Compared with conventional lithographic methods, imprinting is simple to carry out, requires less-complicated equipment and can provide high-resolution with high throughput. Nanoimprint lithography has shown potential to become a method for low-cost and high-throughput fabrication of nanostructures. We show the development process of nano-structured, large-area multi-parameter sensors using Photonic Crystal (PC) and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) methodologies for environmental and pharmaceutical applications. We address these challenges by developing roll-to-roll (R2R) UV-nanoimprint fabrication methods. Our development steps are the following: Firstly, the proof of concept structures are fabricated by the use of wafer-level processes in Si-based materials. Secondly, the master molds of successful designs are fabricated, and they are used to transfer the nanophotonic structures into polymer materials using sheet-level UV-nanoimprinting. Thirdly, the sheet-level nanoimprinting processes are transferred to roll-to-roll fabrication. In order to enhance roll-to-roll manufacturing capabilities, silicone-based polymer material development was carried out. In the different development phases, Photonic Crystal and SERS sensor structures with increasing complexities were fabricated using polymer materials in order to enhance sheet-level and roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. In addition, chemical and molecular

  20. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, roll out from KSC Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This high angle view inside the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) looks down on Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, its external tank (ET), and its twin solid rocket boosters (SRBs) atop the mobile launcher pad. OV-103 and its propulsion system components are surrounded by the retracted VAB servicing platforms. Atop the mobile launcher platform OV-103 began its roll out from the VAB at 6:00 am. OV-103 will fly on Mission STS-29 scheduled for launch in mid-March. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-89PC-49.

  1. Effects of annealing on texture evolution of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Song, X.; He, J.; Zuo, L.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of annealing on recrystallization texture of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foil were investigated by orientation distribution functions (ODFs) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The results show that the intermediate annealing is beneficial to the development of the cube texture. The cube texture can be promoted by annealing, and the critical annealing temperature is about 280 °C. The cubic orientation grains firstly nucleate, and then expand into other grains with a high growth speed, and large angle grain boundary ratio increases, finally can swallow up most of the original grains, which results in the cube texture

  2. Experiments in aircraft roll-yaw control using forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreiro, Nelson

    Flight at high angles of attack can provide improved maneuverability for fighter aircraft and increased lift capabilities for future supersonic and hypersonic transport aircraft during take-off and landing. At high angles of attack the aerodynamics of the vehicle are dominated by separation, vortex shedding and breakdown, which compromise the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. As a result, controlled flight at high angles of attack is not feasible for current aircraft configurations. Alternate means to augment the control of the vehicle at these flight regimes are therefore necessary. In this work, the feasibility of using Forebody Tangential Blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model at high angles of attack is demonstrated. The method consists of injecting a thin sheet of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle to change the separation lines over the forebody and alter the aerodynamic loads. A unique model was developed that describes the unsteady aerodynamic moments generated by both vehicle motion and the applied blowing. This aerodynamic model is sufficiently detailed to predict transient motion of the wind-tunnel model, and is simple enough to be suitable for control logic design and implementation. Successful closed-loop control was demonstrated experimentally for a delta wing body model with a cone-cylinder fuselage. Experiments were performed at 45 degrees nominal angle of attack. At this condition, the natural motion of the system is divergent. A discrete vortex method was developed to help understand the main physics of the flow. The method correctly captures the interactions between forebody and wing vortices. Moreover, the trends in static loads and flow structure are correctly represented. Flow visualization results revealed the vortical structure of the flow to be asymmetric even for symmetric flight conditions. The effects of blowing, roll and yaw angles on the flow structure were determined. It was shown that

  3. 3D leaf water content mapping using terrestrial laser scanner backscatter intensity with radiometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi; Wang, Tiejun; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Niemann, K. Olaf

    2015-12-01

    Leaf water content (LWC) plays an important role in agriculture and forestry management. It can be used to assess drought conditions and wildfire susceptibility. Terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) data have been widely used in forested environments for retrieving geometrically-based biophysical parameters. Recent studies have also shown the potential of using radiometric information (backscatter intensity) for estimating LWC. However, the usefulness of backscatter intensity data has been limited by leaf surface characteristics, and incidence angle effects. To explore the idea of using LiDAR intensity data to assess LWC we normalized (for both angular effects and leaf surface properties) shortwave infrared TLS data (1550 nm). A reflectance model describing both diffuse and specular reflectance was applied to remove strong specular backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle. Leaves with different surface properties were collected from eight broadleaf plant species for modeling the relationship between LWC and backscatter intensity. Reference reflectors (Spectralon from Labsphere, Inc.) were used to build a look-up table to compensate for incidence angle effects. Results showed that before removing the specular influences, there was no significant correlation (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05) between the backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle and LWC. After the removal of the specular influences, a significant correlation emerged (R2 = 0.74, P < 0.05). The agreement between measured and TLS-derived LWC demonstrated a significant reduction of RMSE (root mean square error, from 0.008 to 0.003 g/cm2) after correcting for the incidence angle effect. We show that it is possible to use TLS to estimate LWC for selected broadleaved plants with an R2 of 0.76 (significance level α = 0.05) at leaf level. Further investigations of leaf surface and internal structure will likely result in improvements of 3D LWC mapping for studying physiology and ecology in vegetation.

  4. Rolled fingerprint construction using MRF-based nonrigid image registration.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dongjin; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk

    2010-12-01

    This paper proposes a new rolled fingerprint construction approach incorporating a state-of-the-art nonrigid image registration method based upon a Markov random field (MRF) energy model. The proposed method finds dense correspondences between images from a rolled fingerprint sequence and warps the entire fingerprint area to synthesize a rolled fingerprint. This method can generate conceptually more accurate rolled fingerprints by preserving the geometric properties of the finger surface as opposed to ink-based rolled impressions and other existing rolled fingerprint construction methods. To verify the accuracy of the proposed method, various comparative experiments were designed to reveal differences among the rolled construction methods. The results show that the proposed method is significantly superior in various aspects compared to previous approaches.

  5. Simultaneous Soft Sensing of Tissue Contact Angle and Force for Millimeter-scale Medical Robots

    PubMed Central

    Arabagi, Veaceslav; Gosline, Andrew; Wood, Robert J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel robotic sensor is proposed to measure both the contact angle and the force acting between the tip of a surgical robot and soft tissue. The sensor is manufactured using a planar lithography process that generates microchannels that are subsequently filled with a conductive liquid. The planar geometry is then molded onto a hemispherical plastic scaffolding in a geometric configuration enabling estimation of the contact angle (angle between robot tip tangent and tissue surface normal) by the rotation of the sensor around its roll axis. Contact force can also be estimated by monitoring the changes in resistance in each microchannel. Bench top experimental results indicate that, on average, the sensor can estimate the angle of contact to within ±2° and the contact force to within ±5.3 g. PMID:24241496

  6. Biophysical control of leaf temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, N.; Prentice, I. C.; Wright, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In principle sunlit leaves can maintain their temperatures within a narrower range than ambient temperatures. This is an important and long-known (but now overlooked) prediction of energy balance theory. Net radiation at leaf surface in steady state (which is reached rapidly) must be equal to the combination of sensible and latent heat exchanges with surrounding air, the former being proportional to leaf-to-air temperature difference (ΔT), the latter to the transpiration rate. We present field measurements of ΔT which confirm the existence of a 'crossover temperature' in the 25-30˚C range for species in a tropical savanna and a tropical rainforest environment. This finding is consistent with a simple representation of transpiration as a function of net radiation and temperature (Priestley-Taylor relationship) assuming an entrainment factor (ω) somewhat greater than the canonical value of 0.26. The fact that leaves in tropical forests are typically cooler than surrounding air, often already by solar noon, is consistent with a recently published comparison of MODIS day-time land-surface temperatures with air temperatures. Theory further predicts a strong dependence of leaf size (which is inversely related to leaf boundary-layer conductance, and therefore to absolute magnitude of ΔT) on moisture availability. Theoretically, leaf size should be determined by either night-time constraints (risk of frost damage to active leaves) or day-time constraints (risk of heat stress damage),with the former likely to predominate - thereby restricting the occurrence of large leaves - at high latitudes. In low latitudes, daytime maximum leaf size is predicted to increase with temperature, provided that water is plentiful. If water is restricted, however, transpiration cannot proceed at the Priestley-Taylor rate, and it quickly becomes advantageous for plants to have small leaves, which do not heat up much above the temperature of their surroundings. The difference between leaf

  7. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  8. Crash Simulation of Roll Formed Parts by Damage Modelling Taking Into Account Preforming Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, Edwin T.; Hackl, Benjamin; Schauer, Hermann

    2011-08-01

    Complex phase steels of strength levels up to 1200 MPa are suitable to roll forming. These may be applied in automotive structures for enhancing the crashworthiness, e. g. as stiffeners in doors. Even though the strain hardening of the material is low there is considerable bending formability. However ductility decreases with the strength level. Higher strength requires more focus to the structural integrity of the part during the process planning stage and with respect to the crash behavior. Nowadays numerical simulation is used as a process design tool for roll-forming in a production environment. The assessment of the stability of a roll forming process is quite challenging for AHSS grades. There are two objectives of the present work. First to provide a reliable assessment tool to the roll forming analyst for failure prediction. Second to establish simulation procedures in order to predict the part's behavior in crash applications taking into account damage and failure. Today adequate ductile fracture models are available which can be used in forming and crash applications. These continuum models are based on failure strain curves or surfaces which depend on the stress triaxiality (e. g. Crach or GISSMO) and may additionally include the Lode angle (extended Mohr Coulomb or extended GISSMO model). A challenging task is to obtain the respective failure strain curves. In the paper the procedure is described in detail how these failure strain curves are obtained using small scale tests within voestalpine Stahl, notch tensile-, bulge and shear tests. It is shown that capturing the surface strains is not sufficient for obtaining reliable material failure parameters. The simulation tool for roll-forming at the site of voestalpine Krems is Copra® FEA RF, which is a 3D continuum finite element solver based on MSC.Marc. The simulation environment for crash applications is LS-DYNA. Shell elements are used for this type of analyses. A major task is to provide results of

  9. Dynamics and Stability of Rolling Viscoelastic Tires

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Trevor

    2013-04-30

    Current steady state rolling tire calculations often do not include treads because treads destroy the rotational symmetry of the tire. We describe two methodologies to compute time periodic solutions of a two-dimensional viscoelastic tire with treads: solving a minimization problem and solving a system of equations. We also expand on work by Oden and Lin on free spinning rolling elastic tires in which they disovered a hierachy of N-peak steady state standing wave solutions. In addition to discovering a two-dimensional hierarchy of standing wave solutions that includes their N-peak hiearchy, we consider the eects of viscoelasticity on the standing wave solutions. Finally, a commonplace model of viscoelasticity used in our numerical experiments led to non-physical elastic energy growth for large tire speeds. We show that a viscoelastic model of Govindjee and Reese remedies the problem.

  10. Automatic Flatness Control of Cold Rolling Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbe, Yoshiharu; Sekiguchi, Kunio

    One of the subjects of cold rolling is a flatness of the rolled strip. Conventionally, measured strip flatness was approximated by polynomial (2th, 4th, 6th) equation across the entire strip width. This made it difficult to deal with desired loose edge or any desired flatness across the entire strip width. Also conventional flatness control was done for the entire strip width, so if there is a different flatness error among drive side and work side, conventional flatness control can not control properly. We propose independent strip flatness control among drive side and work side, and also automatic flatness control (AFC) system with arbitrary desired strip flatness. Also some applied results to cold mill are shown.

  11. From plane to spatial angles: PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Electronic autocollimators are utilised versatilely for non-contact angle measurements in applications like straightness measurements and profilometry. Yet, no calibration of the angle measurement of an autocollimator has been available when both its measurement axes are engaged. Additionally, autocollimators have been calibrated at fixed distances to the reflector, although its distance may vary during the use of an autocollimator. To extend the calibration capabilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spatial angles and variable distances, a novel calibration device has been set up: the spatial angle autocollimator calibrator (SAAC). In this paper, its concept and its mechanical realisation will be presented. The focus will be on the system's mathematical modelling and its application in spatial angle calibrations. The model considers the misalignments of the SAAC's components, including the non-orthogonalities of the measurement axes of the autocollimators and of the rotational axes of the tilting unit. It allows us to derive specific measurement procedures to determine the misalignments in situ and, in turn, to correct the measurements of the autocollimators. Finally, the realisation and the results of a traceable spatial angle calibration of an autocollimator will be presented. This is the first calibration of this type worldwide.

  12. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  13. Use of an amorphous silicon EPID for measuring MLC calibration at varying gantry angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, M. F.; Budgell, G. J.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are used to perform routine quality control (QC) checks on the multileaf collimators (MLCs) at this centre. Presently, these checks are performed at gantry angle 0° and are considered to be valid for all other angles. Since therapeutic procedures regularly require the delivery of MLC-defined fields to the patient at a wide range of gantry angles, the accuracy of the QC checks at other gantry angles has been investigated. When the gantry is rotated to angles other than 0° it was found that the apparent pixel size measured using the EPID varies up to a maximum value of 0.0015 mm per pixel due to a sag in the EPID of up to 9.2 mm. A correction factor was determined using two independent methods at a range of gantry angles between 0° and 360°. The EPID was used to measure field sizes (defined by both x-jaws and MLC) at a range of gantry angles and, after this correction had been applied, any residual gravitational sag was studied. It was found that, when fields are defined by the x-jaws and y-back-up jaws, no errors of greater than 0.5 mm were measured and that these errors were no worse when the MLC was used. It was therefore concluded that, provided the correction is applied, measurements of the field size are, in practical terms, unaffected by gantry angle. Experiments were also performed to study how the reproducibility of individual leaves is affected by gantry angle. Measurements of the relative position of each individual leaf (minor offsets) were performed at a range of gantry angles and repeated three times. The position reproducibility was defined by the RMS error in the position of each leaf and this was found to be 0.24 mm and 0.21 mm for the two leaf banks at a gantry angle of 0°. When measurements were performed at a range of gantry angles, these reproducibility values remained within 0.09 mm and 0.11 mm. It was therefore concluded that the calibration of the Elekta MLC is stable at all

  14. Rolling Bearing Life Prediction, Theory, and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2013-01-01

    A tutorial is presented outlining the evolution, theory, and application of rolling-element bearing life prediction from that of A. Palmgren, 1924; W. Weibull, 1939; G. Lundberg and A. Palmgren, 1947 and 1952; E. Ioannides and T. Harris, 1985; and E. Zaretsky, 1987. Comparisons are made between these life models. The Ioannides-Harris model without a fatigue limit is identical to the Lundberg-Palmgren model. The Weibull model is similar to that of Zaretsky if the exponents are chosen to be identical. Both the load-life and Hertz stress-life relations of Weibull, Lundberg and Palmgren, and Ioannides and Harris reflect a strong dependence on the Weibull slope. The Zaretsky model decouples the dependence of the critical shear stress-life relation from the Weibull slope. This results in a nominal variation of the Hertz stress-life exponent. For 9th- and 8th-power Hertz stress-life exponents for ball and roller bearings, respectively, the Lundberg- Palmgren model best predicts life. However, for 12th- and 10th-power relations reflected by modern bearing steels, the Zaretsky model based on the Weibull equation is superior. Under the range of stresses examined, the use of a fatigue limit would suggest that (for most operating conditions under which a rolling-element bearing will operate) the bearing will not fail from classical rolling-element fatigue. Realistically, this is not the case. The use of a fatigue limit will significantly overpredict life over a range of normal operating Hertz stresses. Since the predicted lives of rolling-element bearings are high, the problem can become one of undersizing a bearing for a particular application.

  15. Rolling circle amplification of metazoan mitochondrialgenomes

    SciTech Connect

    Simison, W. Brian; Lindberg, D.R.; Boore, J.L.

    2005-07-31

    Here we report the successful use of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the amplification of complete metazoan mt genomes to make a product that is amenable to high-throughput genome sequencing techniques. The benefits of RCA over PCR are many and with further development and refinement of RCA, the sequencing of organellar genomics will require far less time and effort than current long PCR approaches.

  16. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin-Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHETA, E. F.; KANDIL, O. A.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration model on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The configuration model is statically pitched at a 30° angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4° and reduced frequency of π and 2π . This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration. The unsteady aerodynamic loads have never reached complete periodicity due to the irregular vibrations of the left and right tails.

  17. The Effect of Foam Rolling Duration on Hamstring Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Grace; Karlik, Dustin; Glass, Stephen C; Hatzel, Brian M

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal health benefits from flexibility training and maintaining a functional, or sport specific, range of motion is important to one’s overall fitness. Commercial foam rollers are commonly used in gyms, therapy clinics and homes, yet data are lacking on the optimal rolling duration and effect on range of motion. Purpose : The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of varied durations of a commercial foam roller treatment on hamstring range of motion. Methods : The knee extension range of motion of 33 college aged men and women (age= 20±1.5y, mass= 72.2±10.8 kg) was assessed after a short (2 sets of 10s) and long (4 sets of 30s) duration of hamstring self-administered myofascial release using a commercial foam roller. A one way ANOVA was performed to compare the mean knee extension angle for each condition to baseline measures. Results : Results indicated that neither the short duration (67.30 ± 10.60 deg) nor long duration (67.41 ± 10.81 deg) rolling condition produced significant increases in knee extension compared to baseline (67.70 ± 9.90 deg). Conclusion : Self-administered foam rolling for a total duration of up to 2 minutes is not adequate to induce improvements in knee joint flexibility. Contributing factors may include the amount of pressure imparted by the commercial roller as well as duration of treatment. PMID:26587061

  18. Rapid roll inflation with conformal coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kofman, Lev; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2008-02-15

    Usual inflation is realized with a slow rolling scalar field minimally coupled to gravity. In contrast, we consider dynamics of a scalar with a flat effective potential, conformally coupled to gravity. Surprisingly, it contains an attractor inflationary solution with the rapidly rolling inflaton field. We discuss models with the conformal inflaton with a flat potential (including hybrid inflation). There is no generation of cosmological fluctuations from the conformally coupled inflaton. We consider realizations of modulated (inhomogeneous reheating) or curvaton cosmological fluctuations in these models. We also implement these unusual features for the popular string-theoretic warped inflationary scenario, based on the interacting D3-D3 branes. The original warped brane inflation suffers a large inflaton mass due to conformal coupling to 4-dimensional gravity. Instead of considering this as a problem and trying to cure it with extra engineering, we show that warped inflation with the conformally coupled, rapidly rolling inflaton is yet possible with N=37 efoldings, which requires low-energy scales 1-100 TeV of inflation. Coincidentally, the same warping numerology can be responsible for the hierarchy. It is shown that the scalars associated with angular isometries of the warped geometry of compact manifold (e.g. S{sup 3} of Klebanov-Strassler (KS) geometry) have solutions identical to conformally coupled modes and also cannot be responsible for cosmological fluctuations. We discuss other possibilities.

  19. Rolling element fatigue testing of gear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue lives of nine alloys were evaluated in Rolling Contact (RC) rigs. Test conditions included a Hertzian stress at 4,826 MPa (700 ksi), a rolling speed of 6.23 m/sec (245 in/sec.). Tests were run with a Type I oil (MIL-L-7808G) at room temperature. B-10 lives (10% failure rate) of alloys were compared versus reference alloys, VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and VAR AISI 9310. Six case carburizing alloys (AISI 9310, CBS600, CBS1000M, EX00014, Vasco X-2 and EX00053) and three through-hardening alloys (AISI M-50, VascoMax 350 and Vasco Matrix 2 evaluated, showed RCF performance inferior or equivalent to that of AISI 9310 and AISI M-50. It was also found that the effects of vacuum melting processes, different tempering temperatures, freezing cycle during heat treating, shot peening, gold plating and chrome plating employed in the present investigation did not significantly affect RCF life.

  20. Monocot Leaves are Eaten Less than Dicot Leaves in Tropical Lowland Rain Forests: Correlations with Toughness and Leaf Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Peter J.; Jackson, Robyn V.; Barberis, Ignacio M.; Bee, Jennie N.; Coomes, David A.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; De La Fuente, Marie Ann S.; Lucas, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Daniel J.; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Turner, Ian M.; Vargas, Orlando

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims In tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) the leaves of most monocots differ from those of most dicots in two ways that may reduce attack by herbivores. Firstly, they are tougher. Secondly, the immature leaves are tightly folded or rolled until 50–100 % of their final length. It was hypothesized that (a) losses of leaf area to herbivorous invertebrates are generally greatest during leaf expansion and smaller for monocots than for dicots, and (b) where losses after expansion are appreciable any difference between monocots and dicots then is smaller than that found during expansion. Methods At six sites on four continents, estimates were made of lamina area loss from the four most recently mature leaves of focal monocots and of the nearest dicot shoot. Measurements of leaf mass per unit area, and the concentrations of water and nitrogen were made for many of the species. In Panama, the losses from monocots (palms) and dicots were also measured after placing fully expanded palm leaflets and whole dicot leaves on trails of leaf-cutter ants. Key Results At five of six sites monocots experienced significantly smaller leaf area loss than dicots. The results were not explicable in terms of leaf mass per unit area, or concentrations of water or nitrogen. At only one site was the increase in loss from first to fourth mature leaf significant (also large and the same in monocots and dicots), but the losses sustained during expansion were much smaller in the monocots. In the leaf-cutter ant experiment, losses were much smaller for palms than for dicots. Conclusions The relationship between toughness and herbivory is complex; despite the negative findings of some recent authors for dicots we hypothesize that either greater toughness or late folding can protect monocot leaves against herbivorous insects in tropical lowland rain forest, and that the relative importance varies widely with species. The difficulties of establishing unequivocally the roles of leaf

  1. Behavior of Leaf Meristems and Their Modification

    PubMed Central

    Ichihashi, Yasunori; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A major source of diversity in flowering plant form is the extensive variability of leaf shape and size. Leaf formation is initiated by recruitment of a handful of cells flanking the shoot apical meristem (SAM) to develop into a complex three-dimensional structure. Leaf organogenesis depends on activities of several distinct meristems that are established and spatiotemporally differentiated after the initiation of leaf primordia. Here, we review recent findings in the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate leaf meristem activities in a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We then discuss recent key studies investigating the natural variation in leaf morphology to understand how the gene regulatory networks modulate leaf meristems to yield a substantial diversity of leaf forms during the course of evolution. PMID:26648955

  2. Spectral reflectance relationships to leaf water stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data were collected from detached snapbean leaves in the laboratory with a multiband radiometer. Four experiments were designed to study the spectral response resulting from changes in leaf cover, relative water content of leaves, and leaf water potential. Spectral regions included in the analysis were red (630-690 nm), NIR (760-900 nm), and mid-IR (2.08-2.35 microns). The red and mid-IR bands showed sensitivity to changes in both leaf cover and relative water content of leaves. The NIR was only highly sensitive to changes in leaf cover. Results provided evidence that mid-IR reflectance was governed primarily by leaf moisture content, although soil reflectance was an important factor when leaf cover was less than 100 percent. High correlations between leaf water potentials and reflectance were attributed to covariances with relative water content of leaves and leaf cover.

  3. An Innovative Way to Monitor Leaf Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnello, A.; Paredes, K.; Trinh, U.; Saleska, S. R.; Wu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Anthony John Garnello, Karina Paredes, Uyen Khanh Ho Trinh, Jin Wu, Scott Saleska Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Leaf age is an important characteristic for controlling plant functional performance and is associated with the changes of leaf physical, chemical, and physiological properties. Understanding how plant physiology changes over time will allow more accurate predictions of growth patterns, and a more comprehensive understanding of vegetative life histories. There still lacks an efficient technique in monitoring leaf age, tagging leaves is still the only way to accurately monitor leaf age. The goal of this study is to develop a multi-metric, accurate technique for better monitoring of leaf age. In order to acquire true leaf age records, 10 individual plant species were selected at the University of Arizona campus, and newly flushing leaves were tagged and monitored during the Monsoon season (from early June, 2013, to mid October, 2013). Every 2 weeks, 10 to 15 leaves in relative age order were harvested from each 1-meter branch to measure multiple key leaf metrics, including leaf thickness (via micrometer), fresh and dry weight, fresh and dry area (via ImageJ software), and leaf hyperspectral reflectance (via a handheld ASD Field Pro). Other leaf traits were also derived from our measurements, such as specific leaf area (SLA), leaf density (fresh weight/leaf volume), water percentage, and shrinkage ratio (1-dry area/fresh area). The hyperspectral version of vegetation index (a ratio derived from two spectral channels) was generated for each branch sample, by randomly selecting two channels from within the spectral domain of 350 nm to 2500 nm. The preliminary result documents three types of hyperspectral vegetation index (VI) which are highly related with leaf relative age order (R2>0.9). These include the sensitive spectral domains correlated with (a) leaf pigments (~550nm) and leaf physical

  4. Crystallographic Reconstruction Study of the Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature on the Variant Selection During Bainite Transformation in C-Mn High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The effect of finish rolling temperature on the austenite-( γ) to-bainite ( α) phase transformation is quantitatively investigated in high-strength C-Mn steels using an alternative crystallographic γ reconstruction procedure, which can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. In particular, the current study aims to clarify the respective contributions of the γ conditioning during the hot rolling and the variant selection during the phase transformation to the inherited texture. The results confirm that the sample finish rolled at the lowest temperature [1102 K (829 °C)] exhibits the sharpest transformation texture. It is shown that this sharp texture is exclusively due to a strong variant selection from parent brass {110}, S {213} and Goss {110}<001> grains, whereas the variant selection from the copper {112} grains is insensitive to the finish rolling temperature. In addition, a statistical variant selection analysis proves that the habit planes of the selected variants do not systematically correspond to the predicted active γ slip planes using the Taylor model. In contrast, a correlation between the Bain group to which the selected variants belong and the finish rolling temperature is clearly revealed, regardless of the parent orientation. These results are discussed in terms of polygranular accommodation mechanisms, especially in view of the observed development in the hot-rolled samples of high-angle grain boundaries with misorientation axes between <111> γ and <110> γ.

  5. Crystallographic Reconstruction Study of the Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature on the Variant Selection During Bainite Transformation in C-Mn High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    The effect of finish rolling temperature on the austenite-(γ) to-bainite (α) phase transformation is quantitatively investigated in high-strength C-Mn steels using an alternative crystallographic γ reconstruction procedure, which can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. In particular, the current study aims to clarify the respective contributions of the γ conditioning during the hot rolling and the variant selection during the phase transformation to the inherited texture. The results confirm that the sample finish rolled at the lowest temperature [1102 K (829 °C)] exhibits the sharpest transformation texture. It is shown that this sharp texture is exclusively due to a strong variant selection from parent brass {110} < {1bar{1}2} > , S {213} < {bar{3}bar{6}4} > and Goss {110}<001> grains, whereas the variant selection from the copper {112} < {bar{1}bar{1}1} > grains is insensitive to the finish rolling temperature. In addition, a statistical variant selection analysis proves that the habit planes of the selected variants do not systematically correspond to the predicted active γ slip planes using the Taylor model. In contrast, a correlation between the Bain group to which the selected variants belong and the finish rolling temperature is clearly revealed, regardless of the parent orientation. These results are discussed in terms of polygranular accommodation mechanisms, especially in view of the observed development in the hot-rolled samples of high-angle grain boundaries with misorientation axes between <111>γ and <110>γ.

  6. Multi-stage FE simulation of hot ring rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2013-05-01

    As a unique and important member of the metal forming family, ring rolling provides a cost effective process route to manufacture seamless rings. Applications of ring rolling cover a wide range of products in aerospace, automotive and civil engineering industries [1]. Above the recrystallization temperature of the material, hot ring rolling begins with the upsetting of the billet cut from raw stock. Next a punch pierces the hot upset billet to form a hole through the billet. This billet, referred to as preform, is then rolled by the ring rolling mill. For an accurate simulation of hot ring rolling, it is crucial to include the deformations, stresses and strains from the upsetting and piercing process as initial conditions for the rolling stage. In this work, multi-stage FE simulations of hot ring rolling process were performed by mapping the local deformation state of the workpiece from one step to the next one. The simulations of upsetting and piercing stages were carried out by 2D axisymmetric models using adaptive remeshing and element erosion. The workpiece for the ring rolling stage was subsequently obtained after performing a 2D to 3D mapping. The commercial FE package LS-DYNA was used for the study and user defined subroutines were implemented to complete the control algorithm. The simulation results were analyzed and also compared with those from the single-stage FE model of hot ring rolling.

  7. Rolling friction—models and experiment. An undergraduate student project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozdecký, L.; Bartoš, J.; Musilová, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the rolling friction (rolling resistance) model is studied theoretically and experimentally in undergraduate level fundamental general physics courses. Rolling motions of a cylinder along horizontal or inclined planes are studied by simple experiments, measuring deformations of the underlay or of the rolling body. The rolling of a hard cylinder on a soft underlay as well as of a soft cylinder on a hard underlay is studied. The experimental data are treated by the open source software Tracker, appropriate for use at the undergraduate level of physics. Interpretation of results is based on elementary considerations comprehensible to university students—beginners. It appears that the commonly accepted model of rolling resistance based on the idea of a warp (little bulge) on the underlay in front of the rolling body does not correspond with experimental results even for the soft underlay and hard rolling body. The alternative model of the rolling resistance is suggested in agreement with experiment and the corresponding concept of the rolling resistance coefficient is presented. In addition to the obtained results we can conclude that the project can be used as a task for students in practical exercises of fundamental general physics undergraduate courses. Projects of similar type effectively contribute to the development of the physical thinking of students.

  8. Two Comments on Bond Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaister, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tetrahedral Bond Angle from Elementary Trigonometry The alternative approach of using the scalar (or dot) product of vectors enables the determination of the bond angle in a tetrahedral molecule in a simple way. There is, of course, an even more straightforward derivation suitable for students who are unfamiliar with vectors, or products thereof, but who do know some elementary trigonometry. The starting point is the figure showing triangle OAB. The point O is the center of a cube, and A and B are at opposite corners of a face of that cube in which fits a regular tetrahedron. The required bond angle alpha = AÔB; and using Pythagoras' theorem, AB = 2(square root 2) is the diagonal of a face of the cube. Hence from right-angled triangle OEB, tan(alpha/2) = (square root 2) and therefore alpha = 2tan-1(square root 2) is approx. 109° 28' (see Fig. 1).

  9. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes an optical calibration apparatus provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted.

  10. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  11. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  12. Influence of landing gear flexibility on aircraft performance during ground roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is made of the influence of landing gear deflection characteristics on aircraft performance on the ground up to rotation. A quasi-steady dynamic equilibrium state is assumed, including other simplifying assumptions such as calm air conditions and normal aircraft lift and drag. Ground incidence is defined as the angle made by the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing with respect to the ground plane, and equations are given for force and balance which determine the quasi-equilibrium conditions for the aircraft during ground roll. Results indicate that the landing gear deflections lead to a substantial increase in the angle of attack, and the variation in the ground incidence due to landing gear flexibility could be as much as + or - 50%, and the reduction in tail load requirements almost 25%.

  13. Free-to-Roll Testing of Airplane Models in Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Owens, D. Bruce; Hall, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    A free-to-roll (FTR) test technique and test rig make it possible to evaluate both the transonic performance and the wingdrop/ rock behavior of a high-strength airplane model in a single wind-tunnel entry. The free-to-roll test technique is a single degree-of-motion method in which the model is free to roll about the longitudinal axis. The rolling motion is observed, recorded, and analyzed to gain insight into wing-drop/rock behavior. Wing-drop/rock is one of several phenomena symptomatic of abrupt wing stall. FTR testing was developed as part of the NASA/Navy Abrupt Wing Stall Program, which was established for the purposes of understanding and preventing significant unexpected and uncommanded (thus, highly undesirable) lateral-directional motions associated with wing-drop/rock, which have been observed mostly in fighter airplanes under high-subsonic and transonic maneuvering conditions. Before FTR testing became available, wingrock/ drop behavior of high-performance airplanes undergoing development was not recognized until flight testing. FTR testing is a reliable means of detecting, and evaluating design modifications for reducing or preventing, very complex abrupt wing stall phenomena in a ground facility prior to flight testing. The FTR test rig was designed to replace an older sting attachment butt, such that a model with its force balance and support sting could freely rotate about the longitudinal axis. The rig (see figure) includes a rotary head supported in a stationary head with a forward spherical roller bearing and an aft needle bearing. Rotation is amplified by a set of gears and measured by a shaft-angle resolver; the roll angle can be resolved to within 0.067 degrees at a rotational speed up to 1,000 degrees/s. An assembly of electrically actuated brakes between the rotary and stationary heads can be used to hold the model against a rolling torque at a commanded roll angle. When static testing is required, a locking bar is used to fix the rotating

  14. LEAF: A Microcomputer Program for Constructing the Tukey Stem and Leaf Graph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascale, Pietro J.; Smith, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a BASIC microcomputer program that constructs the Tukey (1977) stem and leaf graph. Options within the LEAF program include a modified stem and leaf where the stem is split and a parallel stem and leaf graph where two separate sets of data are displayed from a common stem. (Author)

  15. Boundary layer roll circulations during FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirer, Hampton N.; Haack, Tracy

    1990-01-01

    The probable mechanism underlying the development of boundary layer roll circulations are studied using wind and temperature profiles measured by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Electra during the stratocumulus phase of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). The expected, or preferred, roll orientations, horizontal wavelengths, and propagation periods are determined by finding the minimum values of the dynamic and thermodynamic forcing parameters, which here are the eddy Reynolds number (Re) and moist Rayleigh number (Ra sub m). These minimum values depend on the height z sub T of the capping temperature inversion and on the values of the Fourier coefficients of the background height-dependent vector wind profile. As input to our nonlinear spectral model, descent and ascent runs by the Electra provide for initial estimates of the inversion height and the wind profiles. In the first phase of the investigation presented here, a mechanism is said to be a probable contributor to the development of roll circulations within the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer if the modeled roll orientation and wavelengths agree with their observed values. Preliminary results using the 14-coefficient model of Haack-Hirschberg (1988) are discussed for the 7 July 1987 Electra Mission 188-A (Flight 5). This mission was flown across a sharp cloud boundary that was within a LANDSAT/SPOT scene. The stratocumulus deck was relatively solid in the eastern part of the scene, while there was a rapid decrease in cloud cover to scattered cumulus clouds aligned in streets to the west. These cloud streets were oriented nearly parallel to the mean wind direction in the layer, which was approximately 340 degrees. The hypothesis that roll circulations occurred in both the relatively clear and the cloudy regions is investigated using as model input a descent profile obtained in the relatively clear air and an ascent profile obtained in the cloudy air. Initial results for the

  16. Transparent Conductive AGZO/Ag/AGZO Multilayers on PET Substrate by Roll-to-Roll Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu

    2016-02-01

    Indium-free Al and Ga-codoped ZnO (AGZO) multilayer films with nanoscale Ag interlayer were deposited by dual target roll-to-roll RF for AGZO and DC sputtering systems for Ag at room temperature for a large scale. The thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer were optimized by changing the roll speed: 0.15/1.1/0.15 m/min for AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayers, respectively. The optimum thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer are 9.21, 8.32 and 8.04 nm, respectively. Optimized AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films showed an excellent transparency (84% at 550 nm) and a low sheet resistance (9.2 omega/sq.) on PET substrates for opto-electronic applications. The effects of nanoscale Ag interlayer on optical and electrical properties of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films were discussed.

  17. Transparent Conductive AGZO/Ag/AGZO Multilayers on PET Substrate by Roll-to-Roll Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu

    2016-02-01

    Indium-free Al and Ga-codoped ZnO (AGZO) multilayer films with nanoscale Ag interlayer were deposited by dual target roll-to-roll RF for AGZO and DC sputtering systems for Ag at room temperature for a large scale. The thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer were optimized by changing the roll speed: 0.15/1.1/0.15 m/min for AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayers, respectively. The optimum thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer are 9.21, 8.32 and 8.04 nm, respectively. Optimized AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films showed an excellent transparency (84% at 550 nm) and a low sheet resistance (9.2 omega/sq.) on PET substrates for opto-electronic applications. The effects of nanoscale Ag interlayer on optical and electrical properties of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films were discussed. PMID:27433648

  18. SASS Applied to Optimum Work Roll Profile Selection in the Hot Rolling of Wide Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolle, Lars

    The quality of steel strip produced in a wide strip rolling mill depends heavily on the careful selection of initial ground work roll profiles for each of the mill stands in the finishing train. In the past, these profiles were determined by human experts, based on their knowledge and experience. In previous work, the profiles were successfully optimised using a self-organising migration algorithm (SOMA). In this research, SASS, a novel heuristic optimisation algorithm that has only one control parameter, has been used to find the optimum profiles for a simulated rolling mill. The resulting strip quality produced using the profiles found by SASS is compared with results from previous work and the quality produced using the original profile specifications. The best set of profiles found by SASS clearly outperformed the original set and performed equally well as SOMA without the need of finding a suitable set of control parameters.

  19. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2529 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from...

  2. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  6. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  7. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  9. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  11. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  12. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  13. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  14. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  15. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  16. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  17. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  1. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  3. Effect of Taper Ratio on the Low-speed Rolling Stability Derivatives of Swept and Unswept Wings of Aspect Ratio 2.61

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jack D; Fisher, Lewis R

    1951-01-01

    Results of tests conducted in the 6-foot-diameter rolling-flow test section of the Langley stability tunnel to determine the effects of varying taper ratio on the rolling and static stability characteristics of a swept wing are presented; results are also given for the effects of varying taper ratio on an unswept wing and for the effects of sweep on a tapered wing. All the models were of aspect ratio 2.61 and had NACA 0012 sections normal to the quarter-chord line. Taper ratios of 1.00, 0.50, and 0.25 and sweep angles of 0 degrees and 45 degrees were investigated.

  4. Instrumented roll technology for the design space development of roller compaction process.

    PubMed

    Nesarikar, Vishwas V; Vatsaraj, Nipa; Patel, Chandrakant; Early, William; Pandey, Preetanshu; Sprockel, Omar; Gao, Zhihui; Jerzewski, Robert; Miller, Ronald; Levin, Michael

    2012-04-15

    Instrumented roll technology on Alexanderwerk WP120 roller compactor was developed and utilized successfully for the measurement of normal stress on ribbon during the process. The effects of process parameters such as roll speed (4-12 rpm), feed screw speed (19-53 rpm), and hydraulic roll pressure (40-70 bar) on normal stress and ribbon density were studied using placebo and active pre-blends. The placebo blend consisted of 1:1 ratio of microcrystalline cellulose PH102 and anhydrous lactose with sodium croscarmellose, colloidal silicon dioxide, and magnesium stearate. The active pre-blends were prepared using various combinations of one active ingredient (3-17%, w/w) and lubricant (0.1-0.9%, w/w) levels with remaining excipients same as placebo. Three force transducers (load cells) were installed linearly along the width of the roll, equidistant from each other with one transducer located in the center. Normal stress values recorded by side sensors and were lower than normal stress values recorded by middle sensor and showed greater variability than middle sensor. Normal stress was found to be directly proportional to hydraulic pressure and inversely to screw to roll speed ratio. For active pre-blends, normal stress was also a function of compressibility. For placebo pre-blends, ribbon density increased as normal stress increased. For active pre-blends, in addition to normal stress, ribbon density was also a function of gap. Models developed using placebo were found to predict ribbon densities of active blends with good accuracy and the prediction error decreased as the drug concentration of active blend decreased. Effective angle of internal friction and compressibility properties of active pre blend may be used as key indicators for predicting ribbon densities of active blend using placebo ribbon density model. Feasibility of on-line prediction of ribbon density during roller compaction was demonstrated using porosity-pressure data of pre-blend and normal stress

  5. Instrumented roll technology for the design space development of roller compaction process.

    PubMed

    Nesarikar, Vishwas V; Vatsaraj, Nipa; Patel, Chandrakant; Early, William; Pandey, Preetanshu; Sprockel, Omar; Gao, Zhihui; Jerzewski, Robert; Miller, Ronald; Levin, Michael

    2012-04-15

    Instrumented roll technology on Alexanderwerk WP120 roller compactor was developed and utilized successfully for the measurement of normal stress on ribbon during the process. The effects of process parameters such as roll speed (4-12 rpm), feed screw speed (19-53 rpm), and hydraulic roll pressure (40-70 bar) on normal stress and ribbon density were studied using placebo and active pre-blends. The placebo blend consisted of 1:1 ratio of microcrystalline cellulose PH102 and anhydrous lactose with sodium croscarmellose, colloidal silicon dioxide, and magnesium stearate. The active pre-blends were prepared using various combinations of one active ingredient (3-17%, w/w) and lubricant (0.1-0.9%, w/w) levels with remaining excipients same as placebo. Three force transducers (load cells) were installed linearly along the width of the roll, equidistant from each other with one transducer located in the center. Normal stress values recorded by side sensors and were lower than normal stress values recorded by middle sensor and showed greater variability than middle sensor. Normal stress was found to be directly proportional to hydraulic pressure and inversely to screw to roll speed ratio. For active pre-blends, normal stress was also a function of compressibility. For placebo pre-blends, ribbon density increased as normal stress increased. For active pre-blends, in addition to normal stress, ribbon density was also a function of gap. Models developed using placebo were found to predict ribbon densities of active blends with good accuracy and the prediction error decreased as the drug concentration of active blend decreased. Effective angle of internal friction and compressibility properties of active pre blend may be used as key indicators for predicting ribbon densities of active blend using placebo ribbon density model. Feasibility of on-line prediction of ribbon density during roller compaction was demonstrated using porosity-pressure data of pre-blend and normal stress

  6. Roll rotation cues influence roll tilt perception assayed using a somatosensory technique.

    PubMed

    Park, Sukyung; Gianna-Poulin, Claire; Black, F Owen; Wood, Scott; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2006-07-01

    We investigated how the nervous system processes ambiguous cues from the otolith organs by measuring roll tilt perception elicited by two motion paradigms. In one paradigm (tilt), eight subjects were sinusoidally tilted in roll with the axis of rotation near ear level. Stimulus frequencies ranged from 0.005 to 0.7 Hz, and the peak amplitude of tilt was 20 degrees . During this paradigm, subjects experienced a sinusoidal variation of interaural gravitational force with a peak of 0.34 g. The second motion paradigm (translation) was designed to yield the same sinusoidal variation in interaural force but did not include a roll canal cue. This was achieved by sinusoidally translating the subjects along their interaural axis. For the 0.7-Hz translation trial, the subjects were simply translated from side to side. A centrifuge was used for the 0.005- to 0.5-Hz translation trials; the subjects were rotated in yaw at 250 degrees /s for 5 min before initiating sinusoidal translations yielding an interaural otolith stimulus composed of both centrifugal and radial acceleration. Using a somatosensory task to measure roll tilt perception, we found substantial differences in tilt perception during the two motion paradigms. Because the primary difference between the two motion paradigms was the presence of roll canal cues during roll tilt trials, these perceptual differences suggest that canal cues influence tilt perception. Specifically, rotational cues provided by the semicircular canals help the CNS resolve ambiguous otolith cues during head tilt, yielding more accurate tilt perception. PMID:16571732

  7. Experience in applying the critical angle of reflectivity in NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brokowski, A.; Deputat, J.

    1980-12-01

    Experience gained in the application of the critical angle of reflectivity technique as realized by an ultrasonic goniometer is reviewed. The goniometer is described as a one-probehead unit operating in the echo regime, and the operating principles of the device, which measures changes in the height of ultrasonic echos reflected from a sample-water interface as a function of sample rotation, are discussed. Examples of the application of the goniometer to determinations of the tensile strength of cast iron, the extent of cold working of stainless steel, the texture of rolled materials, extents of heat treatment, the hardness and velocity profiles of a cementation layer, surface layer thicknesses, and stresses in steels, and to the testing of bond quality and ceramics, semiconductors and plastics are presented.

  8. The Properties of Terrestrial Laser System Intensity for Measuring Leaf Geometries: A Case Study with Conference Pear Trees (Pyrus Communis)

    PubMed Central

    Balduzzi, Mathilde A.F.; Van der Zande, Dimitry; Stuckens, Jan; Verstraeten, Willem W.; Coppin, Pol

    2011-01-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology can be a valuable tool for describing and quantifying vegetation structure. However, because of their size, extraction of leaf geometries remains complicated. In this study, the intensity data produced by the Terrestrial Laser System (TLS) FARO LS880 is corrected for the distance effect and its relationship with the angle of incidence between the laser beam and the surface of the leaf of a Conference Pear tree (Pyrus Commmunis) is established. The results demonstrate that with only intensity, this relationship has a potential for determining the angle of incidence with the leaves surface with a precision of ±5° for an angle of incidence smaller than 60°, whereas it is more variable for an angle of incidence larger than 60°. It appears that TLS beam footprint, leaf curvatures and leaf wrinkles have an impact on the relationship between intensity and angle of incidence, though, this analysis shows that the intensity of scanned leaves has a potential to eliminate ghost points and to improve their meshing. PMID:22319374

  9. The properties of terrestrial laser system intensity for measuring leaf geometries: a case study with Conference Pear trees (Pyrus communis).

    PubMed

    Balduzzi, Mathilde A F; Van der Zande, Dimitry; Stuckens, Jan; Verstraeten, Willem W; Coppin, Pol

    2011-01-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology can be a valuable tool for describing and quantifying vegetation structure. However, because of their size, extraction of leaf geometries remains complicated. In this study, the intensity data produced by the Terrestrial Laser System (TLS) FARO LS880 is corrected for the distance effect and its relationship with the angle of incidence between the laser beam and the surface of the leaf of a Conference Pear tree (Pyrus commmunis) is established. The results demonstrate that with only intensity, this relationship has a potential for determining the angle of incidence with the leaves surface with a precision of ±5° for an angle of incidence smaller than 60°, whereas it is more variable for an angle of incidence larger than 60°. It appears that TLS beam footprint, leaf curvatures and leaf wrinkles have an impact on the relationship between intensity and angle of incidence, though, this analysis shows that the intensity of scanned leaves has a potential to eliminate ghost points and to improve their meshing. PMID:22319374

  10. Tribological Testing of Anti-Adhesive coatings for Cold Rolling Mill Rolls—Application to TiN-Coated Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ould, Choumad; Gachon, Yves; Montmitonnet, Pierre; Badiche, Xavier

    2011-05-01

    Roll life is a major issue in cold strip rolling. Roll wear may result either in too low roll roughness, bringing friction below the minimum requested for strip entrainment; or it may degrade strip surface quality. On the contrary, adhesive wear and transfer ("roll coating", "pick up") may form a thick metallic deposits on the roll which increases friction excessively and degrades strip surface again [1]. The roll surface, with the help of a materials-adapted lubricant, must therefore possess anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, High Speed Steeel (HSS) rolls show superior properties compared with standard Cr-steel rolls due to their high carbide surface coverage. Another way to improve wear and adhesion properties of surfaces is to apply hard metallic (hard-Cr) or ceramic coatings. Chromium is renowned for its excellent anti-wear and anti-adhesive properties and may serve as a reference. Here, as a first step towards alternative, optimised coatings, a PVD TiN coating has been deposited on tool steels, as previous attempts have proved TiN to be rather successful in cold rolling experiments [2,3]. Different tribological tests are reported here, giving insight in both anti-adhesive properties and fatigue life improvement.

  11. Roll-to-roll gravure with nanomaterials for printing smart packaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minhun; Kim, Junseok; Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Subramanian, Vivek; Cho, Gyoujin

    2014-02-01

    Roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure is considered one of the highest throughput tools for manufacturing inexpensive and flexible ubiquitous IT devices called "smart packaging" in which NFC (near-field communication) transponder, sensors, ADC (analog-to-digital converter), simple processor and signage are all integrated on paper or plastic foils. In this review, we show R2R gravure can be employed to print smart packaging, starting from printing simple electrodes, dielectrics, capacitors, diodes and thin film transistors with appropriate nanomaterial-based inks on plastic foils. PMID:24749427

  12. Roll-to-roll gravure with nanomaterials for printing smart packaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minhun; Kim, Junseok; Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Subramanian, Vivek; Cho, Gyoujin

    2014-02-01

    Roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure is considered one of the highest throughput tools for manufacturing inexpensive and flexible ubiquitous IT devices called "smart packaging" in which NFC (near-field communication) transponder, sensors, ADC (analog-to-digital converter), simple processor and signage are all integrated on paper or plastic foils. In this review, we show R2R gravure can be employed to print smart packaging, starting from printing simple electrodes, dielectrics, capacitors, diodes and thin film transistors with appropriate nanomaterial-based inks on plastic foils.

  13. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  14. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  15. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  16. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  17. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications, and Tolerances B1L—Choice Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil... percent. B2L—Fine Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, rich in oil, deep color.... B3L—Good Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, oily, strong color...

  18. Modelling of spring roll actuators based on viscoelastic dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Chen, Hualing; Tang, Liling; Li, Bo; Sheng, Junjie; Liu, Lei

    2015-06-01

    In this article, the effect of viscoelastic deformation is analyzed theoretically to evaluate the performance of spring roll dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators. By patterning the electrodes on the rolls, respectively, two functions are studied: axial elongation and bending. The thermodynamic model of viscoelastic DE spring roll is established, and the governing equation is deduced by the free energy method. It is found that when the applied voltage is static and relatively small, both the axial elongated and bending deformed spring rolls can reach equilibrium after viscoelastic relaxation. The evolutions in different timescales and the final profile are presented. The dynamic response is studied as well, by applying a sinusoidal voltage. For the axial elongated spring roll, viscoelasticity can reduce amplitude and increase mean stretch of the actuator. For the bending deformed spring rolls, the results indicate that the spring stiffness has a more significant impact on dynamic performance compared to the effect of voltage.

  19. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  20. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.