Science.gov

Sample records for leaky box models

  1. Why do leaky-box models work so fine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Lerche, I.

    1985-01-01

    By introducing the concept of the age distribution of cosmic rays it is possible to decouple spatial from momentum transport, and simple leaky-box type equations result. The influence of spatial inhomogeneities, geometries, and source distributions enters the spatially homogeneous, infinite (i.e., leaky box) problem through appropriate mean lifetimes. A precise prescription of how to obtain these mean lifetimes, i.c., for comparison with data measured in the vicinity of the solar system they have to be calculated from the age distribution at the spatial position of the observer.

  2. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  3. A Review of the Ginzburg-Syrovatskii's Galactic Cosmic-Ray Propagation Model and its Leaky-Box Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Phenomenological models of galactic cosmic-ray propagation are based on a diffusion equation known as the Ginzburg-Syrovatskii s equation, or variants (or limits) of this equation. Its one-dimensional limit in a homogeneous volume, known as the leaky-box limit or model, is sketched here. The justification, utility, limitations, and a typical numerical implementation of the leaky-box model are examined in some detail.

  4. Comparison of distributed reacceleration and leaky-box models of cosmic-ray abundances (Z = 3-28)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, John R.; Silberberg, Rein; Tsao, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    A large collection of elemental and isotopic cosmic-ray data has been analyzed using the leaky-box transport model with and without reacceleration in the interstellar medium. Abundances of isotopes and elements with charges Z = 3-28 and energies E = 10 MeV/nucleon-1 TeV/nucleon were explored. Our results demonstrate that reacceleration models make detailed and accurate predictions with the same number of parameters or fewer as standard leaky-box models. Ad hoc fitting parameters in the standard model are replaced by astrophysically significant reacceleration parameters. Distributed reacceleration models explain the peak in secondary-to-primary ratios around 1 GeV/nucleon. They diminish the discrepancy between rigidity-dependent leakage and energy-independent anisotropy. They also offer the possibility of understanding isotopic anomalies at low energy.

  5. Spectral Intensities of Antiprotons and the Nested Leaky-box Model for Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, R.; Madziwa-Nussinov, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ˜1-300 GeV by BESS, PAMELA, and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ˜2.3 ± 0.7 million years in the Galactic volume, independent of the energy of cosmic rays, matches the observed intensities. A small additional component of secondary antiprotons in the energy range below 10 GeV, generated in cocoon-like regions surrounding the cosmic-ray sources, seems to be present. We discuss this result in the context of observations of other secondary components such as positrons and boron, and the bounds on anisotropy of cosmic rays. In the nested leaky-box model the spectral intensities of antiprotons and positrons can be interpreted as secondary products of cosmic-ray interactions.

  6. A local leaky-box model for the local stellar surface density-gas surface density-gas phase metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Yan, Renbin; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the relation between the stellar surface density, the gas surface density and the gas-phase metallicity of typical disc galaxies in the local Universe with the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, using the star formation rate surface density as an indicator for the gas surface density. We show that these three local parameters form a tight relationship, confirming previous works (e.g. by the PINGS and CALIFA surveys), but with a larger sample. We present a new local leaky-box model, assuming star-formation history and chemical evolution is localized except for outflowing materials. We derive closed-form solutions for the evolution of stellar surface density, gas surface density and gas-phase metallicity, and show that these parameters form a tight relation independent of initial gas density and time. We show that, with canonical values of model parameters, this predicted relation match the observed one well. In addition, we briefly describe a pathway to improving the current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation by incorporating the local leaky-box model in the cosmological context, which can potentially explain simultaneously multiple properties of Milky Way-type disc galaxies, such as the size growth and the global stellar mass-gas metallicity relation.

  7. Neural and Cognitive Modeling with Networks of Leaky Integrator Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graben, Peter beim; Liebscher, Thomas; Kurths, Jürgen

    After reviewing several physiological findings on oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and their possible explanations by dynamical modeling, we present neural networks consisting of leaky integrator units as a universal paradigm for neural and cognitive modeling. In contrast to standard recurrent neural networks, leaky integrator units are described by ordinary differential equations living in continuous time. We present an algorithm to train the temporal behavior of leaky integrator networks by generalized back-propagation and discuss their physiological relevance. Eventually, we show how leaky integrator units can be used to build oscillators that may serve as models of brain oscillations and cognitive processes.

  8. On a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, A; Caputo, L; Pirozzi, E; Ricciardi, L M

    2010-10-01

    The leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model proposed in Stevens and Zador (1998), in which time constant and resting potential are postulated to be time dependent, is revisited within a stochastic framework in which the membrane potential is mathematically described as a gauss-diffusion process. The first-passage-time probability density, miming in such a context the firing probability density, is evaluated by either the Volterra integral equation of Buonocore, Nobile, and Ricciardi ( 1987 ) or, when possible, by the asymptotics of Giorno, Nobile, and Ricciardi (1990). The model examined here represents an extension of the classic leaky integrate-and-fire one based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process in that it is in principle compatible with the inclusion of some other physiological characteristics such as relative refractoriness. It also allows finer tuning possibilities in view of its accounting for certain qualitative as well as quantitative features, such as the behavior of the time course of the membrane potential prior to firings and the computation of experimentally measurable statistical descriptors of the firing time: mean, median, coefficient of variation, and skewness. Finally, implementations of this model are provided in connection with certain experimental evidence discussed in the literature.

  9. A biological plausible Generalized Leaky Integrate-and-Fire neuron model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenzhong; Guo, Lilin; Adjouadi, Malek

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces a new Generalized Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (GLIF) neuron model. Unlike Normal Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (NLIF) models, the leaking resistor in the GLIF model equation is assumed to be variable, and an additional term would have the bias current added to the model equation in order to improve the accuracy. Adjusting the parameters defined for the leaking resistor and bias current, a GLIF model could be accurately matched to any Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model and be able to reproduce plausible biological neuron behaviors.

  10. How to Say "No" to a Nonword: A Leaky Competing Accumulator Model of Lexical Decision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufau, Stephane; Grainger, Jonathan; Ziegler, Johannes C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a leaky competing accumulator (LCA) model of the lexical decision task that can be used as a response/decision module for any computational model of word recognition. The LCA model uses evidence for a word, operationalized as some measure of lexical activity, as input to the "YES" decision node. Input to the "NO" decision node is…

  11. How to Say "No" to a Nonword: A Leaky Competing Accumulator Model of Lexical Decision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufau, Stephane; Grainger, Jonathan; Ziegler, Johannes C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a leaky competing accumulator (LCA) model of the lexical decision task that can be used as a response/decision module for any computational model of word recognition. The LCA model uses evidence for a word, operationalized as some measure of lexical activity, as input to the "YES" decision node. Input to the "NO" decision node is…

  12. A leaky-integrator model as a control mechanism underlying flexible decision making during task switching.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Akinori; Sasaki, Ryo; Oizumi, Masafumi; Uka, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    The ability to switch between tasks is critical for animals to behave according to context. Although the association between the prefrontal cortex and task switching has been well documented, the ultimate modulation of sensory-motor associations has yet to be determined. Here, we modeled the results of a previous study showing that task switching can be accomplished by communication from distinct populations of sensory neurons. We proposed a leaky-integrator model where relevant and irrelevant information were stored separately in two integrators and task switching was achieved by leaking information from the irrelevant integrator. The model successfully explained both the behavioral and neuronal data. Additionally, the leaky-integrator model showed better performance than an alternative model, where irrelevant information was discarded by decreasing the weight on irrelevant information, when animals initially failed to commit to a task. Overall, we propose that flexible switching is, in part, achieved by actively controlling the amount of leak of relevant and irrelevant information.

  13. A generalized Leaky Integrate-and-Fire neuron model with fast implementation method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenzhong; Guo, Lilin; Adjouadi, Malek

    2014-08-01

    This study introduces a new Generalized Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (GLIF) neuron model with variable leaking resistor and bias current in order to reproduce accurately the membrane voltage dynamics of a biological neuron. The accuracy of this model is ensured by adjusting its parameters to the statistical properties of the Hodgkin-Huxley model outputs; while the speed is enhanced by introducing a Generalized Exponential Moving Average method that converts the parameterized kernel functions into pre-calculated lookup tables based on an analytic solution of the dynamic equations of the GLIF model.

  14. Signal Delay in Leaky RC Mesh Models for Bipolar Interconnect,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Mesh Networks," IEEE Trans. Circuits and Systems, vol. CAS-32, no. 5, pp. 507-510, May 1985. (3] Desoer , Charles A., and Ernest S. Kuh, Basic Circuit ...is appropriate for * modelling interconnect in digital bipolar circuits . This paper is intended to serve as a tutorial as well as a research report...class of networks that is appropriate for modelling interconnect in digital bipolar circuits . This paper is intended *" to serve as a tutorial as well

  15. Noisy threshold in neuronal models: connections with the noisy leaky integrate-and-fire model.

    PubMed

    Dumont, G; Henry, J; Tarniceriu, C O

    2016-12-01

    Providing an analytical treatment to the stochastic feature of neurons' dynamics is one of the current biggest challenges in mathematical biology. The noisy leaky integrate-and-fire model and its associated Fokker-Planck equation are probably the most popular way to deal with neural variability. Another well-known formalism is the escape-rate model: a model giving the probability that a neuron fires at a certain time knowing the time elapsed since its last action potential. This model leads to a so-called age-structured system, a partial differential equation with non-local boundary condition famous in the field of population dynamics, where the age of a neuron is the amount of time passed by since its previous spike. In this theoretical paper, we investigate the mathematical connection between the two formalisms. We shall derive an integral transform of the solution to the age-structured model into the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. This integral transform highlights the link between the two stochastic processes. As far as we know, an explicit mathematical correspondence between the two solutions has not been introduced until now.

  16. A biophysical observation model for field potentials of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed

    Beim Graben, Peter; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2012-01-01

    We present a biophysical approach for the coupling of neural network activity as resulting from proper dipole currents of cortical pyramidal neurons to the electric field in extracellular fluid. Starting from a reduced three-compartment model of a single pyramidal neuron, we derive an observation model for dendritic dipole currents in extracellular space and thereby for the dendritic field potential (DFP) that contributes to the local field potential (LFP) of a neural population. This work aligns and satisfies the widespread dipole assumption that is motivated by the "open-field" configuration of the DFP around cortical pyramidal cells. Our reduced three-compartment scheme allows to derive networks of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) models, which facilitates comparison with existing neural network and observation models. In particular, by means of numerical simulations we compare our approach with an ad hoc model by Mazzoni et al. (2008), and conclude that our biophysically motivated approach yields substantial improvement.

  17. A biophysical observation model for field potentials of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons

    PubMed Central

    beim Graben, Peter; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2013-01-01

    We present a biophysical approach for the coupling of neural network activity as resulting from proper dipole currents of cortical pyramidal neurons to the electric field in extracellular fluid. Starting from a reduced three-compartment model of a single pyramidal neuron, we derive an observation model for dendritic dipole currents in extracellular space and thereby for the dendritic field potential (DFP) that contributes to the local field potential (LFP) of a neural population. This work aligns and satisfies the widespread dipole assumption that is motivated by the “open-field” configuration of the DFP around cortical pyramidal cells. Our reduced three-compartment scheme allows to derive networks of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) models, which facilitates comparison with existing neural network and observation models. In particular, by means of numerical simulations we compare our approach with an ad hoc model by Mazzoni et al. (2008), and conclude that our biophysically motivated approach yields substantial improvement. PMID:23316157

  18. Neuronal Spike Timing Adaptation Described with a Fractional Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Model

    PubMed Central

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M.; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation. PMID:24675903

  19. Neuronal spike timing adaptation described with a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model.

    PubMed

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-03-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation.

  20. Statistics of a leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons driven by dichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankin, Romi; Lumi, Neeme

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons is considered. The effect of temporally correlated random neuronal input is modeled as a colored two-level (dichotomous) Markovian noise. Relying on the Riemann method, exact expressions for the output interspike interval density and for the serial correlation coefficient are derived, and their dependence on noise parameters (such as correlation time and amplitude) is analyzed. Particularly, noise-induced sign reversal and a resonancelike amplification of the kurtosis of the interspike interval distribution are established. The features of spike statistics, analytically revealed in our study, are compared with recently obtained results for a perfect integrate-and-fire neuron model.

  1. Statistics of a leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons driven by dichotomous noise.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Romi; Lumi, Neeme

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons is considered. The effect of temporally correlated random neuronal input is modeled as a colored two-level (dichotomous) Markovian noise. Relying on the Riemann method, exact expressions for the output interspike interval density and for the serial correlation coefficient are derived, and their dependence on noise parameters (such as correlation time and amplitude) is analyzed. Particularly, noise-induced sign reversal and a resonancelike amplification of the kurtosis of the interspike interval distribution are established. The features of spike statistics, analytically revealed in our study, are compared with recently obtained results for a perfect integrate-and-fire neuron model.

  2. Simultaneous confidence intervals for a steady-state leaky aquifer groundwater flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, S.; Cooley, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Using the optimization method of Vecchia & Cooley (1987), nonlinear Scheffe??-type confidence intervals were calculated tor the parameters and the simulated heads of a steady-state groundwater flow model covering 450 km2 of a leaky aquifer. The nonlinear confidence intervals are compared to corresponding linear intervals. As suggested by the significant nonlinearity of the regression model, linear confidence intervals are often not accurate. The commonly made assumption that widths of linear confidence intervals always underestimate the actual (nonlinear widths was not correct for the head intervals. Results show that nonlinear effects can cause the nonlinear intervals to be offset from, and either larger or smaller than, the linear approximations. Prior information on some transmissivities helps reduce and stabilize the confidence intervals, with the most notable effects occurring for the parameters on which there is prior information and for head values in parameter zones for which there is prior information on the parameters.

  3. Finite element modeling of microstructured optical fibers: leaky modes, twisted geometries, and spatial Kerr solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, André; Zolla, Frédéric; Renversez, Gilles; Ould Agha, Yacoub; Drouart, Fabien

    2008-11-01

    Microstructured optical fibers have much more degrees of freedom concerning the geometries and index contrasts than step-index fibers. This richness opens totally new fields of application for fiber optics. The finite element method appears as an extremely versatile tool to compute the propagation modes in such systems as it allows to take into account arbitrary geometries of the cross section and also anisotropic and inhomogeneous (i.e. not only piecewise constant) dielectric permittivities. In this paper, we review some more advanced features: how to compute leaky modes (crucial for the understanding of such kind of fibers) by using perfectly matched layers, how to use helicoidal coordinate systems to determine the influence of a twist on the modes via a two-dimensional model (using equivalent materials), and how to compute spatial solitons in fibers involving Kerr optical medium by taking into account the refractive index inhomogeneities caused by the nonlinearity.

  4. Parameters of the diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model for a slowly fluctuating signal.

    PubMed

    Picchini, Umberto; Ditlevsen, Susanne; De Gaetano, Andrea; Lansky, Petr

    2008-11-01

    Stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuronal models are common theoretical tools for studying properties of real neuronal systems. Experimental data of frequently sampled membrane potential measurements between spikes show that the assumption of constant parameter values is not realistic and that some (random) fluctuations are occurring. In this letter, we extend the stochastic LIF model, allowing a noise source determining slow fluctuations in the signal. This is achieved by adding a random variable to one of the parameters characterizing the neuronal input, considering each interspike interval (ISI) as an independent experimental unit with a different realization of this random variable. In this way, the variation of the neuronal input is split into fast (within-interval) and slow (between-intervals) components. A parameter estimation method is proposed, allowing the parameters to be estimated simultaneously over the entire data set. This increases the statistical power, and the average estimate over all ISIs will be improved in the sense of decreased variance of the estimator compared to previous approaches, where the estimation has been conducted on each individual ISI. The results obtained on real data show good agreement with classical regression methods.

  5. A tapered box model of the cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Luyang; Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    The complicated, three dimensional geometry of the fluid chambers in the cochlea is often represented in models of its mechanics by a box with a uniform area along its length. In this paper we use previous measurements of the variation in area of the two fluid chambers along the length of the cochlea in various mammals, to calculate the variation in the "effective area" that determines the 1D fluid coupling, which is given by the harmonic mean of the two chamber areas. The square root of this effective area is found to vary surprisingly linearly along the cochlea length in several mammalian species. This suggests a variation of the box model in which the width and height of the two fluid chambers are still equal, but now decrease linearly along its length. The width of the basilar membrane, BM, is assumed to increase linearly along the length of the model. The analytic form of the 1D fluid pressure distribution due to elemental BM motion is derived for this tapered box model. The added mass due to the near field acoustic coupling can also be computed, which surprisingly turns out to be almost constant along the length of the BM. The coupled response of the box model with a passive BM can then be readily calculated. Although the pressure distributions due to elemental fluid coupling are very different in the uniform and tapered box models, the distribution of the passive BM response in the coupled models are very similar in the two cases, although the overall level of the response in the tapered model is about 10 dB greater than that in the uniform model.

  6. A two-dimensional analytical model for groundwater flow in a leaky aquifer extending finite distance under the estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Hung, Chi-Tung; -Yen Lin, Wen; Ma, Kuo-chen

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, cities and industries in the vicinity of the estuarine region have developed rapidly, resulting in a sharp increase in the population concerned. The increasing demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on massive pumping of water in estuarine area. Since the 1950s, numerous studies have focused on the effects of tidal fluctuations on groundwater flow in the estuarine area. Tide-induced head fluctuation in a two-dimensional estuarine aquifer system is complicated and rather important in dealing with many groundwater management or remediation problems. The conceptual model of the aquifer system considered is multi-layered with estuarine bank and the leaky aquifer extend finite distance under the estuary. The solution of the model describing the groundwater head distribution in such an estuarine aquifer system and subject to the tidal fluctuation effects from estuarine river is developed based on the method of separation of variables along with river boundary. The solutions by Sun (Sun H. A two-dimensional analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary, Water Resour. Res. 1997; 33:1429-35) as well as Tang and Jiao (Tang Z. and J. J. Jiao, A two-dimensional analytical solution for groundwater flow in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water, Hydrological Processes, 2001; 15: 573-585) can be shown to be special cases of the present solution. On the basis of the analytical solution, the groundwater head distribution in response to estuarine boundary is examined and the influences of leakage, hydraulic parameters, and loading effect on the groundwater head fluctuation due to tide are investigated and discussed. KEYWORDS: analytical model, estuarine river, groundwater fluctuation, leaky aquifer.

  7. Modelling Performance: Opening Pandora's Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper argues that it is necessary for researchers and test developers in the area of language performance testing to have a clear understanding of the role of underlying performance capacities in second language performance. It critically evaluates the models proposed by Hymes, Canale and Swain, and Bachman. (71 references) (MDM)

  8. Modelling Performance: Opening Pandora's Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper argues that it is necessary for researchers and test developers in the area of language performance testing to have a clear understanding of the role of underlying performance capacities in second language performance. It critically evaluates the models proposed by Hymes, Canale and Swain, and Bachman. (71 references) (MDM)

  9. Solar box-cooker: Part 1-modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thulasi Das, T.C. ); Karmakar, S. ); Rao, D.P. )

    1994-03-01

    Thermal models for the solar box-cookers loaded with one, two, or four vessels have been presented. The method of Taha and Eldighidy has been utilized to estimate the enhanced solar irradiance on the cooker due to the flat reflector fitted to the cooker. The coupling of the Taha and Eldighidy method with the thermal models yielded the models for the box-cookers. A great many transfer coefficients and view factors are required as the model inputs. The methods for their estimation are given. Analysis of the transfer processes, computer simulation of the cooker, and experimental data on some of the coefficients, which are peculiar to the cooker and not available in the literature are presented in the companion paper.

  10. The Gamma renewal process as an output of the diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Petr; Sacerdote, Laura; Zucca, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Statistical properties of spike trains as well as other neurophysiological data suggest a number of mathematical models of neurons. These models range from entirely descriptive ones to those deduced from the properties of the real neurons. One of them, the diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model, which is based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) stochastic process that is restricted by an absorbing barrier, can describe a wide range of neuronal activity in terms of its parameters. These parameters are readily associated with known physiological mechanisms. The other model is descriptive, Gamma renewal process, and its parameters only reflect the observed experimental data or assumed theoretical properties. Both of these commonly used models are related here. We show under which conditions the Gamma model is an output from the diffusion OU model. In some cases, we can see that the Gamma distribution is unrealistic to be achieved for the employed parameters of the OU process.

  11. box modeling of the eastern mediterranean sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, Y.; Stone, P. H.

    2003-04-01

    Recently (~1990) a new source of deep water formation in the Eastern Mediterranean was found in the southern part of the Aegean sea. Till then, the only source of deep water formation in the Eastern Mediterranean was in the Adriatic sea; the rate of the deep water formation of the new Aegean source is 1Sv=10^6m^3/s, three times larger then the Adriatic source. We develop a simple 3 box-model to study the stability of the thermohaline circulation of the Eastern Mediterranean sea. The 3 boxes represent the Adriatic sea, Aegean sea, and the Ionian sea. The boxes exchange heat and salinity and may be described by a set of nonlinear differential equations. We analytically analyze these equations and find that the system may have one, two, or four stable flux states. We consider two cases for which the temperatures of the boxes are (i) fixed or (ii) variable. After setting the parameters to correspond to the Eastern Mediterranean we find that the system has two stable states, one with (i) two thermally dominant sources of deep water formation in the Adriatic and Aegean and the other with (ii) a salinity dominant source of deep water formation in the Adriatic and a thermally dominant source in the Aegean. While the Adriatic thermally dominant source is comparable to the observed flux of 0.3Sv the Aegean source has much smaller flux than the observed value. This situation is analogous to the state of the thermohaline circulation pre 1990 where the only source of deep water formation was in the Adriatic. If we decrease the atmospheric temperature of the Aegean box by 2C in accordance with recent observations, we find that the deep water formation of the Aegean increases significantly to a value comparable to the recently observed flux.

  12. Leaky Landfills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda L. Cronin

    1992-01-01

    Provides background information on landfills and describes an activity where students learn how a modern landfill is constructed and develop an understanding of the reasons for several regulations regarding modern landfill construction. Students design and construct working models of three types of landfills. (PR)

  13. Leaky Landfills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda L. Cronin

    1992-01-01

    Provides background information on landfills and describes an activity where students learn how a modern landfill is constructed and develop an understanding of the reasons for several regulations regarding modern landfill construction. Students design and construct working models of three types of landfills. (PR)

  14. Different types of noise in leaky integrate-and-fire model of neuronal dynamics with discrete periodical input.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, V; Lánský, P; Rodriguez, R

    2004-03-01

    Different variants of stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire model for the membrane depolarisation of neurons are investigated. The model is driven by a constant input and equidistant pulses of fixed amplitude. These two types of signal are considered under the influence of three types of noise: white noise, jitter on interpulse distance, and noise in the amplitude of pulses. The results of computational experiments demonstrate the enhancement of the signal by noise in subthreshold regime and deterioration of the signal if it is sufficiently strong to carry the information in absence of noise. Our study holds mainly to central neurons that process discrete pulses although an application in sensory system is also available.

  15. Using Time-Varying Evidence to Test Models of Decision Dynamics: Bounded Diffusion vs. the Leaky Competing Accumulator Model

    PubMed Central

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Gao, Juan; McClelland, James L.; Usher, Marius

    2012-01-01

    When people make decisions, do they give equal weight to evidence arriving at different times? A recent study (Kiani et al., 2008) using brief motion pulses (superimposed on a random moving dot display) reported a primacy effect: pulses presented early in a motion observation period had a stronger impact than pulses presented later. This observation was interpreted as supporting the bounded diffusion (BD) model and ruling out models in which evidence accumulation is subject to leakage or decay of early-arriving information. We use motion pulses and other manipulations of the timing of the perceptual evidence in new experiments and simulations that support the leaky competing accumulator (LCA) model as an alternative to the BD model. While the LCA does include leakage, we show that it can exhibit primacy as a result of competition between alternatives (implemented via mutual inhibition), when the inhibition is strong relative to the leak. Our experiments replicate the primacy effect when participants must be prepared to respond quickly at the end of a motion observation period. With less time pressure, however, the primacy effect is much weaker. For 2 (out of 10) participants, a primacy bias observed in trials where the motion observation period is short becomes weaker or reverses (becoming a recency effect) as the observation period lengthens. Our simulation studies show that primacy is equally consistent with the LCA or with BD. The transition from primacy-to-recency can also be captured by the LCA but not by BD. Individual differences and relations between the LCA and other models are discussed. PMID:22701399

  16. Using Time-Varying Evidence to Test Models of Decision Dynamics: Bounded Diffusion vs. the Leaky Competing Accumulator Model.

    PubMed

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Gao, Juan; McClelland, James L; Usher, Marius

    2012-01-01

    When people make decisions, do they give equal weight to evidence arriving at different times? A recent study (Kiani et al., 2008) using brief motion pulses (superimposed on a random moving dot display) reported a primacy effect: pulses presented early in a motion observation period had a stronger impact than pulses presented later. This observation was interpreted as supporting the bounded diffusion (BD) model and ruling out models in which evidence accumulation is subject to leakage or decay of early-arriving information. We use motion pulses and other manipulations of the timing of the perceptual evidence in new experiments and simulations that support the leaky competing accumulator (LCA) model as an alternative to the BD model. While the LCA does include leakage, we show that it can exhibit primacy as a result of competition between alternatives (implemented via mutual inhibition), when the inhibition is strong relative to the leak. Our experiments replicate the primacy effect when participants must be prepared to respond quickly at the end of a motion observation period. With less time pressure, however, the primacy effect is much weaker. For 2 (out of 10) participants, a primacy bias observed in trials where the motion observation period is short becomes weaker or reverses (becoming a recency effect) as the observation period lengthens. Our simulation studies show that primacy is equally consistent with the LCA or with BD. The transition from primacy-to-recency can also be captured by the LCA but not by BD. Individual differences and relations between the LCA and other models are discussed.

  17. Thermohaline circulation and its box models simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyura, Kateryna; Polonsky, Alexander; Sannikov, Viktor

    2014-05-01

    Ocean Thermochaline circulation (THC) is the part of large-scale World Ocean circulation and one of the main climate system components. It is generated by global meridional density gradients, which are controlled by surface heat and freshwater fluxes. THC regulates climate variability on different timescales (from decades to thousands years) [Stocker (2000), Clark (2002)]. Study of paleoclimatic evidences of abrupt and dramatic changes in ocean-atmosphere system in the past (such as, Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events or Younger Dryas, see e.g., [Rahmstorf (2002), Alley & Clark(1999)]) shows that these events are connected with THC regimes. At different times during last 120,000 years, three THC modes have prevailed in the Atlantic. They can be labeled as stadial, interstadial and Heinrich modes or as cold, warm and off mode. THC collapse (or thermohaline catastrophe) can be one of the consequences of global warming (including modern anthropogenic climate changes occurring at the moment). The ideas underlying different box-model studies, possibility of thermochaline catastrophe in present and past are discussed in this presentation. Response of generalized four box model of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation [developing the model of Griffies & Tzippermann (1995)] on periodic, stochastic and linear forcing is studied in details. To estimate climatic parameters of the box model we used monthly salinity and temperature data of ECMWF operational Ocean Reanalysis System 3 (ORA-S3) and data from atmospheric NCEP/NCAR reanalysis on precipitation, and heat fluxes for 1959-2011. Mean values, amplitude of seasonal cycle, amplitudes and periods of typical interdecadal oscillations, white noise level, linear trend coefficients and their significance level were estimated for every hydrophysical parameter. In response to intense freshwater or heat forcing, THC regime can change resulting in thermohaline catastrophe. We analyze relevant thresholds of external forcing in

  18. Boxes of Model Building and Visualization.

    PubMed

    Turk, Dušan

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography and electron microscopy (single-particle and in situ tomography) are merging into a single approach used by the two coalescing scientific communities. The merger is a consequence of technical developments that enabled determination of atomic structures of macromolecules by electron microscopy. Technological progress in experimental methods of macromolecular structure determination, computer hardware, and software changed and continues to change the nature of model building and visualization of molecular structures. However, the increase in automation and availability of structure validation are reducing interactive manual model building to fiddling with details. On the other hand, interactive modeling tools increasingly rely on search and complex energy calculation procedures, which make manually driven changes in geometry increasingly powerful and at the same time less demanding. Thus, the need for accurate manual positioning of a model is decreasing. The user's push only needs to be sufficient to bring the model within the increasing convergence radius of the computing tools. It seems that we can now better than ever determine an average single structure. The tools work better, requirements for engagement of human brain are lowered, and the frontier of intellectual and scientific challenges has moved on. The quest for resolution of new challenges requires out-of-the-box thinking. A few issues such as model bias and correctness of structure, ongoing developments in parameters defining geometric restraints, limitations of the ideal average single structure, and limitations of Bragg spot data are discussed here, together with the challenges that lie ahead.

  19. Box modeling the critical zone isotope black box (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Bouchez, J.; Schuessler, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    A picture is emerging from about 50 studies reporting about 1200 ratios of 'non-traditional' (Li, B, Mg, Si, Ca) stable isotopes in the critical zone: isotope ratios in river- and ground water are typically higher than those of the associated parent rock, except for those found for dissolved Mg that are mostly lower, and Ca that hardly fractionates. Yet we have still no full understanding over the controlling factors that govern these isotope shifts. We designed a steady state, batch reactor, mass balance model representing the weathering zone from the soil scale to the large river scale. We assume that the main fractionating processes are formation of secondary precipitates, such as clays, and uptake by plants [1]. We solve the mass balances in terms of the primary mineral dissolution fluxes, secondary mineral formation fluxes, plant uptake and recycling, and dissolved and erosional export. The main predictions are: (1) The isotope composition of an element in the compartments of the weathering zone is controlled by the combination of (a) the rate of release of this element to soil water through primary mineral dissolution; (b) the erosion rate of this element as isotopically fractionated material, that is as secondary precipitates and solid organic matter; (c) the associated isotope fractionation factors. More specifically, the isotope composition of dissolved species in water will evolve away from that of source rock if the ratio of (a) to (b) is high. Hence for very 'soluble' elements (i.e. those with a low affinity for secondary precipitates and easily redissolved from plant litter), no fractionated solid is exported by erosion, and the dissolved composition is likely to be close to the source rock. Therefore, such elements are not viable tracers of weathering processes. The effect of (c) is best represented by a "lumped" isotope fractionation factor that is a weighted average of the isotope fractionation factors associated with secondary mineral precipitation

  20. Diseases associated with leaky hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; Reyes, Edison P.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo; Martínez, Agustín D.; González, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Hemichannels (HCs) and gap junction channels (GJCs) formed by protein subunits called connexins (Cxs) are major pathways for intercellular communication. While HCs connect the intracellular compartment with the extracellular milieu, GJCs allow the interchange of molecules between cytoplasm of two contacting cells. Under physiological conditions, HCs are mostly closed, but they can open under certain stimuli allowing the release of autocrine and paracrine molecules. Moreover, some pathological conditions, like ischemia or other inflammation conditions, significantly increase HCs activity. In addition, some mutations in Cx genes associated with human diseases, such as deafness or cataracts, lead to the formation of more active HCs or “leaky HCs.” In this article we will revise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the appearance of leaky HCs, and the consequences of their expression in different cellular systems and animal models, in seeking a common pattern or pathological mechanism of disease. PMID:26283912

  1. Reconstruction of the input signal of the leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model from its interspike intervals.

    PubMed

    Seydnejad, Saeid R

    2016-02-01

    Extracting the input signal of a neuron by analyzing its spike output is an important step toward understanding how external information is coded into discrete events of action potentials and how this information is exchanged between different neurons in the nervous system. Most of the existing methods analyze this decoding problem in a stochastic framework and use probabilistic metrics such as maximum-likelihood method to determine the parameters of the input signal assuming a leaky and integrate-and-fire (LIF) model. In this article, the input signal of the LIF model is considered as a combination of orthogonal basis functions. The coefficients of the basis functions are found by minimizing the norm of the observed spikes and those generated by the estimated signal. This approach gives rise to the deterministic reconstruction of the input signal and results in a simple matrix identity through which the coefficients of the basis functions and therefore the neuronal stimulus can be identified. The inherent noise of the neuron is considered as an additional factor in the membrane potential and is treated as the disturbance in the reconstruction algorithm. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated by numerical simulations, and it is shown that input signals with different characteristics can be well recovered by this algorithm.

  2. Abnormalities of Thymic Stroma may Contribute to Immune Dysregulation in Murine Models of Leaky Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Caraffi, Stefano; Paganini, Tiziana; Fontana, Elena; Giliani, Silvia; Alt, Frederick W.; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Lymphostromal cross-talk in the thymus is essential to allow generation of a diversified repertoire of T lymphocytes and to prevent autoimmunity by self-reactive T cells. Hypomorphic mutations in genes that control T cell development have been associated with immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation both in humans and in mice. We have studied T cell development and thymic stroma architecture and maturation in two mouse models of leaky severe combined immune deficiency, carrying hypomorphic mutations in rag1 and lig4 genes. Defective T cell development was associated with abnormalities of thymic architecture that predominantly affect the thymic medulla, with reduction of the pool of mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the ability of mTECs to express autoimmune regulator (Aire) is preserved in mutant mice, the frequency of mature mTECs expressing Aire and tissue-specific antigens is severely reduced. Similarly, the ability of CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells is preserved in rag1 and lig4 mutant mice, but their number is greatly reduced. These data indicate that hypomorphic defects in T cell development may cause defective lymphostromal cross-talk and impinge on thymic stromal cells maturation, and thus favor immune dysregulation. PMID:21822418

  3. Fractional-order leaky integrate-and-fire model with long-term memory and power law dynamics.

    PubMed

    Teka, Wondimu W; Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Mondal, Argha

    2017-09-01

    Pyramidal neurons produce different spiking patterns to process information, communicate with each other and transform information. These spiking patterns have complex and multiple time scale dynamics that have been described with the fractional-order leaky integrate-and-Fire (FLIF) model. Models with fractional (non-integer) order differentiation that generalize power law dynamics can be used to describe complex temporal voltage dynamics. The main characteristic of FLIF model is that it depends on all past values of the voltage that causes long-term memory. The model produces spikes with high interspike interval variability and displays several spiking properties such as upward spike-frequency adaptation and long spike latency in response to a constant stimulus. We show that the subthreshold voltage and the firing rate of the fractional-order model make transitions from exponential to power law dynamics when the fractional order α decreases from 1 to smaller values. The firing rate displays different types of spike timing adaptation caused by changes on initial values. We also show that the voltage-memory trace and fractional coefficient are the causes of these different types of spiking properties. The voltage-memory trace that represents the long-term memory has a feedback regulatory mechanism and affects spiking activity. The results suggest that fractional-order models might be appropriate for understanding multiple time scale neuronal dynamics. Overall, a neuron with fractional dynamics displays history dependent activities that might be very useful and powerful for effective information processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Leaky magnetohydrodynamic waveguide model for the acceleration of high-speed solar wind streams in coronal holes

    SciTech Connect

    Davila, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    It is well established observationally that high-speed solar wind streams originate in coronal hole regions in the solor corona. Models of the solar wind flow based on this observation indicate that heat conduction alone cannot account for the observed properties of the wind and that other sources of heat and/or momentum must be sought. One suggested source for this additional momentum is ''wave pressure'' generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Theories of wave-driven winds exist, but they are not consistent with the observed fact that high-speed streams originate in discrete magnetic structures in the solar corona. The waves assumed responsible for acceleration of the high-speed solar wind streams should have periods of approximately a hundred seconds if they are driven by photospheric turbulence. But MHD waves with periods this large have wavelengths lambda> or approx. =d, where d is the characteristic tranverse size of the coronal hole. Current theories for the acceleration of the solar wind by MHD waves are valid only if the wavelength of the disturbance is much smaller than the characteristic transverse size of the coronal structure. This limit is not appropriate for the propagation of disturbances with periods Proughly-equal100 s in the acceleration region of the solar wind. In this paper the effect of coronal hole magnetic structure on the propagation of MHD waves of all periods is considered. It is found that for the wave-period range discussed above the coronal hole structure acts as a ''leaky'' MHD waveguide, i.e., wave flux which enters at the base of the coronal hole is only weakly guided by the coronal hole structure. A significant amount of wave energy leaks through the side of the coronal hole into the surrounding corona.

  5. Homology model building of the HMG-1 box structural domain.

    PubMed Central

    Baxevanis, A D; Bryant, S H; Landsman, D

    1995-01-01

    Nucleoproteins belonging to the HMG-1/2 family possess homologous domains approximately 75 amino acids in length. These domains, termed HMG-1 boxes, are highly structured, compact, and mediate the interaction between HMG-1 box-containing proteins and DNA in a variety of biological contexts. Homology model building experiments on HMG-1 box sequences 'threaded' through the 1H-NMR structure of an HMG-1 box from rat indicate that the domain does not have rigid sequence requirements for its formation. Energy calculations indicate that the structure of all HMG-1 box domains is stabilized primarily through hydrophobic interactions. We have found structural relationships in the absence of statistically significant sequence similarity, identifying several candidate proteins which could possibly assume the same three-dimensional conformation as the rat HMG-1 box motif. The threading technique provides a method by which significant structural similarities in a diverse protein family can be efficiently detected, and the 'structural alignment' derived by this method provides a rational basis through which phylogenetic relationships and the precise sites of interaction between HMG-1 box proteins and DNA can be deduced. Images PMID:7731789

  6. A non-leaky Artemis-deficient mouse that accurately models the human severe combined immune deficiency phenotype, including resistance to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zheng; Dunn, Elizabeth; Singh, Kanal; Khan, Imran S; Yannone, Steven M; Cowan, Morton J

    2009-01-01

    Two Artemis-deficient (mArt(-/-)) mouse models, generated independently on 129/SvJ backgrounds, have the expected T(-)B(-)NK(+) severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) phenotype but fail to mimic the human disease because of CD4(+) T cell leakiness. Moreover, immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is achieved more readily in these leaky mouse models than in Artemis-deficient humans. To develop a more clinically relevant animal model, we backcrossed the mArt(-/-) mutation onto the C57Bl/6 (B6) background (99.9%), which resulted in virtually no CD4(+) T cell leakiness compared with 129/SvJ mArt(+/-) mice (0.3% +/- 0.25% vs 19.5% +/- 15.1%, P < .001). The nonleaky mouse also was uniquely resistant to engraftment using allogeneic mismatched hematopoietic stem cells, comparable to what is seen in human Artemis deficiency. The genetic background also influenced Artemis-associated radiation sensitivity, with differing degrees of x-ray hypersensitivity evident in 129/SvJ and B6 backgrounds with both the mArt(-/-) and mArt(+/-) genotypes. Our results indicate that immunogenic and DNA repair phenotypes associated with Artemis deficiency are significantly altered by genetic background, which has important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of SCID. Moreover, the B6 mArt(-/-) mouse provides a more accurate model for the human disease and a more appropriate system for studying human Artemis deficiency and for developing improved transplantation and gene therapy regimens for the treatment of children with SCID.

  7. Leaky intestine and impaired microbiome in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoping; Yi, Jianxun; Zhang, Yong-Guo; Zhou, Jingsong; Sun, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that intestinal homeostasis and the microbiome play essential roles in neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons and muscle atrophy. Currently, there is no effective treatment. Most patients die within 3-5 years due to respiratory paralysis. Although the death of motor neurons is a hallmark of ALS, other organs may also contribute to the disease progression. We examined the gut of an ALS mouse model, G93A, which expresses mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD1(G93A)), and discovered a damaged tight junction structure and increased permeability with a significant reduction in the expression levels of tight junction protein ZO-1 and the adherens junction protein E-cadherin. Furthermore, our data demonstrated increased numbers of abnormal Paneth cells in the intestine of G93A mice. Paneth cells are specialized intestinal epithelial cells that can sense microbes and secrete antimicrobial peptides, thus playing key roles in host innate immune responses and shaping the gut microbiome. A decreased level of the antimicrobial peptides defensin 5 alpha was indeed found in the ALS intestine. These changes were associated with a shifted profile of the intestinal microbiome, including reduced levels of Butyrivibrio Fibrisolvens, Escherichia coli, and Fermicus, in G93A mice. The relative abundance of bacteria was shifted in G93A mice compared to wild-type mice. Principal coordinate analysis indicated a difference in fecal microbial communities between ALS and wild-type mice. Taken together, our study suggests a potential novel role of the intestinal epithelium and microbiome in the progression of ALS.

  8. Characterization of leaky faults

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao

    1990-05-01

    Leaky faults provide a flow path for fluids to move underground. It is very important to characterize such faults in various engineering projects. The purpose of this work is to develop mathematical solutions for this characterization. The flow of water in an aquifer system and the flow of air in the unsaturated fault-rock system were studied. If the leaky fault cuts through two aquifers, characterization of the fault can be achieved by pumping water from one of the aquifers, which are assumed to be horizontal and of uniform thickness. Analytical solutions have been developed for two cases of either a negligibly small or a significantly large drawdown in the unpumped aquifer. Some practical methods for using these solutions are presented. 45 refs., 72 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Altered gut microbiome in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness causes neuroinflammation and intestinal injury via leaky gut and TLR4 activation

    PubMed Central

    Dattaroy, Diptadip; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Ryan, Caitlin N.; Chan, Luisa S.; Testerman, Traci; Burch, James; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Horner, Ronnie; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Lasley, Stephen M.; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Many of the symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI) that include neurological abnormalities, neuroinflammation, chronic fatigue and gastrointestinal disturbances have been traced to Gulf War chemical exposure. Though the association and subsequent evidences are strong, the mechanisms that connect exposure to intestinal and neurological abnormalities remain unclear. Using an established rodent model of Gulf War Illness, we show that chemical exposure caused significant dysbiosis in the gut that included increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes and Tenericutes, and decreased abundance of Bacteroidetes. Several gram negative bacterial genera were enriched in the GWI-model that included Allobaculum sp. Altered microbiome caused significant decrease in tight junction protein Occludin with a concomitant increase in Claudin-2, a signature of a leaky gut. Resultant leaching of gut caused portal endotoxemia that led to upregulation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in the small intestine and the brain. TLR4 knock out mice and mice that had gut decontamination showed significant decrease in tyrosine nitration and inflammatory mediators IL1β and MCP-1 in both the small intestine and frontal cortex. These events signified that gut dysbiosis with simultaneous leaky gut and systemic endotoxemia-induced TLR4 activation contributes to GW chemical-induced neuroinflammation and gastrointestinal disturbances. PMID:28328972

  10. Altered gut microbiome in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness causes neuroinflammation and intestinal injury via leaky gut and TLR4 activation.

    PubMed

    Alhasson, Firas; Das, Suvarthi; Seth, Ratanesh; Dattaroy, Diptadip; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Ryan, Caitlin N; Chan, Luisa S; Testerman, Traci; Burch, James; Hofseth, Lorne J; Horner, Ronnie; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Lasley, Stephen M; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Many of the symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI) that include neurological abnormalities, neuroinflammation, chronic fatigue and gastrointestinal disturbances have been traced to Gulf War chemical exposure. Though the association and subsequent evidences are strong, the mechanisms that connect exposure to intestinal and neurological abnormalities remain unclear. Using an established rodent model of Gulf War Illness, we show that chemical exposure caused significant dysbiosis in the gut that included increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes and Tenericutes, and decreased abundance of Bacteroidetes. Several gram negative bacterial genera were enriched in the GWI-model that included Allobaculum sp. Altered microbiome caused significant decrease in tight junction protein Occludin with a concomitant increase in Claudin-2, a signature of a leaky gut. Resultant leaching of gut caused portal endotoxemia that led to upregulation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in the small intestine and the brain. TLR4 knock out mice and mice that had gut decontamination showed significant decrease in tyrosine nitration and inflammatory mediators IL1β and MCP-1 in both the small intestine and frontal cortex. These events signified that gut dysbiosis with simultaneous leaky gut and systemic endotoxemia-induced TLR4 activation contributes to GW chemical-induced neuroinflammation and gastrointestinal disturbances.

  11. A Black Box Model of Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, David P.; Level, Dale

    1985-01-01

    Defines communication and presents a new verbal-pictorial model that views the communication process as a series of steps or functions performed by the participants. Discusses components and strength of the model. (PD)

  12. Modeling of RTF Glove-Box and Stripper System

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-28

    The glove box-stripper system for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) has been modeled to determine its steady-state performance. To permit comparison, simulations of modified cases were compared with a standard or base case. This paper discusses tests conducted, results obtained and makes recommendations.

  13. Scattering Matrices and Conductances of Leaky Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnueli, A.

    1994-04-01

    Leaky tori are two-dimensional surfaces that extend to infinity but which have finite area. It is a tempting idea to regard them as models of mesoscopic systems connected to very long leads. Because of this analogy-scattering matrices on leaky tori are potentially interesting, and indeed-the scattering matrix on one such object-"the" leaky torus-was studied by M. Gutzwiller, who showed that it has chaotic behavior. M. Antoine, A. Comtet and S. Ouvry generalized Gutzwiller‧s result by calculating the scattering matrix in the presence of a constant magnetic field B perpendicular to the surface. Motivated by these results-we generalize them further. We define scattering matrices for spinless electrons on a general leaky torus in the presence of a constant magnetic field "perpendicular" to the surface. From the properties of these matrices we show the following: (a) For integer values of B, Tij (the transition probability from cusp i to cusp j), and hence also the Büttiker conductances of the surfaces, are B-independent (this cannot be interpreted as a kind of Aharonov-Bohm effect since a magnetic force is acting on the electrons). (b) The Wigner time-delay is a monotonically increasing function of B.

  14. A tool box for implementing supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, Florian; Ohl, Thorsten; Porod, Werner; Speckner, Christian

    2012-10-01

    We present a framework for performing a comprehensive analysis of a large class of supersymmetric models, including spectrum calculation, dark matter studies and collider phenomenology. To this end, the respective model is defined in an easy and straightforward way using the Mathematica package SARAH. SARAH then generates model files for CalcHep which can be used with micrOMEGAs as well as model files for WHIZARD and O'Mega. In addition, Fortran source code for SPheno is created which facilitates the determination of the particle spectrum using two-loop renormalization group equations and one-loop corrections to the masses. As an additional feature, the generated SPheno code can write out input files suitable for use with HiggsBounds to apply bounds coming from the Higgs searches to the model. Combining all programs provides a closed chain from model building to phenomenology. Program summary Program title: SUSY Phenomenology toolbox. Catalog identifier: AEMN_v1_0. Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMN_v1_0.html. Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 140206. No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1319681. Distribution format: tar.gz. Programming language: Autoconf, Mathematica. Computer: PC running Linux, Mac. Operating system: Linux, Mac OS. Classification: 11.6. Nature of problem: Comprehensive studies of supersymmetric models beyond the MSSM is considerably complicated by the number of different tasks that have to be accomplished, including the calculation of the mass spectrum and the implementation of the model into tools for performing collider studies, calculating the dark matter density and checking the compatibility with existing collider bounds (in particular, from the Higgs searches). Solution method: The

  15. Multi-chimera states and transitions in the Leaky Integrate-and-Fire model with nonlocal and hierarchical connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigkri-DeSmedt, N. D.; Hizanidis, J.; Hövel, P.; Provata, A.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of nonlocal and fractal connectivity are investigated in a network of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) elements. The idea of fractal coupling originates from the hierarchical topology of networks formed by neuronal axons, which transmit the electrical signals in the brain. If a number of LIF elements with finite refractory period are nonlocally coupled, multi-chimera states emerge whose multiplicity depends both on the coupling strength and on the refractory period. We provide evidence that the introduction of a hierarchical topology in the coupling induces novel complex spatial and temporal structures, such as nested chimera states and transitions between multi-chimera states with different multiplicities. These results demonstrate new complex patterns, as well as transitions between different multi-chimera states arising from the combination of nonlinear dynamics with the hierarchical coupling.

  16. Reliability of neuronal information conveyed by unreliable neuristor-based leaky integrate-and-fire neurons: a model study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2015-01-01

    We conducted simulations on the neuronal behavior of neuristor-based leaky integrate-and-fire (NLIF) neurons. The phase-plane analysis on the NLIF neuron highlights its spiking dynamics – determined by two nullclines conditional on the variables on the plane. Particular emphasis was placed on the operational noise arising from the variability of the threshold switching behavior in the neuron on each switching event. As a consequence, we found that the NLIF neuron exhibits a Poisson-like noise in spiking, delimiting the reliability of the information conveyed by individual NLIF neurons. To highlight neuronal information coding at a higher level, a population of noisy NLIF neurons was analyzed in regard to probability of successful information decoding given the Poisson-like noise of each neuron. The result demonstrates highly probable success in decoding in spite of large variability – due to the variability of the threshold switching behavior – of individual neurons. PMID:25966658

  17. Earthquake Risk Modelling - Opening the black box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon, John E.; Simic, Milan; Franco, Guillermo; Shen-Tu, Bingming

    2010-05-01

    Assessing the risk from natural catastrophes such as earthquakes involves the detailed study of the seismic sources and site conditions that contribute to the earthquake hazard in the region of interest, the distribution and particular characteristics of the exposures through the study of building stock and its vulnerabilities, and the application of specific financial terms for particular portfolios. The catastrophe modelling framework encompasses these relatively complex considerations while also including a measure of uncertainty. This paper describes succinctly the structure and modules included in a probabilistic catastrophe risk model and presents several examples of risk modelling for realistic scenarios such as the expected earthquakes in the Marmara Sea region of Turkey and the results from modelling the 2009 L'Aquila (Abruzzo) earthquake.

  18. Leaky Fermi accelerators.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kushal; Gelfreich, Vassili; Rom-Kedar, Vered; Turaev, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    A Fermi accelerator is a billiard with oscillating walls. A leaky accelerator interacts with an environment of an ideal gas at equilibrium by exchange of particles through a small hole on its boundary. Such interaction may heat the gas: we estimate the net energy flow through the hole under the assumption that the particles inside the billiard do not collide with each other and remain in the accelerator for a sufficiently long time. The heat production is found to depend strongly on the type of Fermi accelerator. An ergodic accelerator, i.e., one that has a single ergodic component, produces a weaker energy flow than a multicomponent accelerator. Specifically, in the ergodic case the energy gain is independent of the hole size, whereas in the multicomponent case the energy flow may be significantly increased by shrinking the hole size.

  19. Neural Networks in Antenna Engineering - Beyond Black-Box Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    NEURAL NETWORKS IN ANTENNA ENGINEERING – BEYOND BLACK-BOX MODELING Amalendu Patnaik1, Dimitrios Anagnostou2, *Christos G. Christodoulou2...apatnaik@ieee.org 2Electrical and Computer Engineering University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA E-mail: danagn@ece.unm.edu...christos@ece.unm.edu Abstract - Recently neural networks have been applied in antenna modeling where the role of the network is not just for black

  20. POD Model Reconstruction for Gray-Box Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Zak, Michail

    2007-01-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is the mathematical basis of a method of constructing low-order mathematical models for the "gray-box" fault-detection algorithm that is a component of a diagnostic system known as beacon-based exception analysis for multi-missions (BEAM). POD has been successfully applied in reducing computational complexity by generating simple models that can be used for control and simulation for complex systems such as fluid flows. In the present application to BEAM, POD brings the same benefits to automated diagnosis. BEAM is a method of real-time or offline, automated diagnosis of a complex dynamic system.The gray-box approach makes it possible to utilize incomplete or approximate knowledge of the dynamics of the system that one seeks to diagnose. In the gray-box approach, a deterministic model of the system is used to filter a time series of system sensor data to remove the deterministic components of the time series from further examination. What is left after the filtering operation is a time series of residual quantities that represent the unknown (or at least unmodeled) aspects of the behavior of the system. Stochastic modeling techniques are then applied to the residual time series. The procedure for detecting abnormal behavior of the system then becomes one of looking for statistical differences between the residual time series and the predictions of the stochastic model.

  1. Assimilating Ferry Box data into the Aegean Sea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korres, G.; Ntoumas, M.; Potiris, M.; Petihakis, G.

    2014-12-01

    Operational monitoring and forecasting of marine environmental conditions is a necessary tool for the effective management and protection of the marine ecosystem. It requires the use of multi-variable real-time measurements combined with advanced physical and ecological numerical models. Towards this, a FerryBox system was originally installed and operated in the route Piraeus-Heraklion in 2003 for one year. Early 2012 the system was upgraded and moved to a new high-speed ferry traveling daily in the same route as before. This route is by large traversing the Cretan Sea being the largest and deepest basin (2500 m) in the south Aegean Sea. The HCMR Ferry Box is today the only one in the Mediterranean and thus it can be considered as a pilot case. The analysis of FerryBox SST and SSS in situ data revealed the presence of important regional and sub-basin scale physical phenomena, such as wind-driven coastal upwelling and the presence of a mesoscale cyclone to the north of Crete. In order to assess the impact of the FerryBox SST data in constraining the Aegean Sea hydrodynamic model which is part of the POSEIDON forecasting system, the in situ data were assimilated using an advanced multivariate assimilation scheme based on the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter, a simplified square-root extended Kalman filter that operates with low-rank error covariance matrices as a way to reduce the computational burden. Thus during the period mid-August 2012-mid January 2013 in addition to the standard assimilating parameters, daily SST data along the ferryboat route from Piraeus to Heraklion were assimilated into the model. Inter-comparisons between the control run of the system (model run that uses only the standard data set of observations) and the experiment where the observational data set is augmented with the FerryBox SST data produce interesting results. Apart from the improvement of the SST error, the additional assimilation of daily of FerryBox SST

  2. Quantized mode of a leaky cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, S. M.; Nienhuis, G.

    2000-12-01

    We use Thomson's classical concept of mode of a leaky cavity to develop a quantum theory of cavity damping. This theory generalizes the conventional system-reservoir theory of high-Q cavity damping to arbitrary Q. The small system now consists of damped oscillators corresponding to the natural modes of the leaky cavity rather than undamped oscillators associated with the normal modes of a fictitious perfect cavity. The formalism unifies semiclassical Fox-Li modes and the normal modes traditionally used for quantization. It also lays the foundations for a full quantum description of excess noise. The connection with Siegman's semiclassical work is straightforward. In a wider context, this theory constitutes a radical departure from present models of dissipation in quantum mechanics: unlike conventional models, system and reservoir operators no longer commute with each other. This noncommutability is an unavoidable consequence of having to use natural cavity modes rather than normal modes of a fictitious perfect cavity.

  3. COMPUTER MODEL AND SIMULATION OF A GLOVE BOX PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    C. FOSTER; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    The development of facilities to deal with the disposition of nuclear materials at an acceptable level of Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) is a significant issue facing the nuclear community. One solution is to minimize the worker's exposure though the use of automated systems. However, the adoption of automated systems for these tasks is hampered by the challenging requirements that these systems must meet in order to be cost effective solutions in the hazardous nuclear materials processing environment. Retrofitting current glove box technologies with automation systems represents potential near-term technology that can be applied to reduce worker ORE associated with work in nuclear materials processing facilities. Successful deployment of automation systems for these applications requires the development of testing and deployment strategies to ensure the highest level of safety and effectiveness. Historically, safety tests are conducted with glove box mock-ups around the finished design. This late detection of problems leads to expensive redesigns and costly deployment delays. With wide spread availability of computers and cost effective simulation software it is possible to discover and fix problems early in the design stages. Computer simulators can easily create a complete model of the system allowing a safe medium for testing potential failures and design shortcomings. The majority of design specification is now done on computer and moving that information to a model is relatively straightforward. With a complete model and results from a Failure Mode Effect Analysis (FMEA), redesigns can be worked early. Additional issues such as user accessibility, component replacement, and alignment problems can be tackled early in the virtual environment provided by computer simulation. In this case, a commercial simulation package is used to simulate a lathe process operation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Lathe process operation is indicative of

  4. Comparison of postbuckling model and finite element model with compression strength of corrugated boxes

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Urbanik; Edmond P. Saliklis

    2002-01-01

    Conventional compression strength formulas for corrugated fiberboard boxes are limited to geometry and material that produce an elastic postbuckling failure. Inelastic postbuckling can occur in squatty boxes and trays, but a mechanistic rationale for unifying observed strength data is lacking. This study employs a finite element model, instead of actual experiments, to...

  5. Box-Cox Mixed Logit Model for Travel Behavior Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orro, Alfonso; Novales, Margarita; Benitez, Francisco G.

    2010-09-01

    To represent the behavior of travelers when they are deciding how they are going to get to their destination, discrete choice models, based on the random utility theory, have become one of the most widely used tools. The field in which these models were developed was halfway between econometrics and transport engineering, although the latter now constitutes one of their principal areas of application. In the transport field, they have mainly been applied to mode choice, but also to the selection of destination, route, and other important decisions such as the vehicle ownership. In usual practice, the most frequently employed discrete choice models implement a fixed coefficient utility function that is linear in the parameters. The principal aim of this paper is to present the viability of specifying utility functions with random coefficients that are nonlinear in the parameters, in applications of discrete choice models to transport. Nonlinear specifications in the parameters were present in discrete choice theory at its outset, although they have seldom been used in practice until recently. The specification of random coefficients, however, began with the probit and the hedonic models in the 1970s, and, after a period of apparent little practical interest, has burgeoned into a field of intense activity in recent years with the new generation of mixed logit models. In this communication, we present a Box-Cox mixed logit model, original of the authors. It includes the estimation of the Box-Cox exponents in addition to the parameters of the random coefficients distribution. Probability of choose an alternative is an integral that will be calculated by simulation. The estimation of the model is carried out by maximizing the simulated log-likelihood of a sample of observed individual choices between alternatives. The differences between the predictions yielded by models that are inconsistent with real behavior have been studied with simulation experiments.

  6. Dynamic stability analysis of fractional order leaky integrator echo state neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahnehkolaei, Seyed Mehdi Abedi; Alfi, Alireza; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2017-06-01

    The Leaky integrator echo state neural network (Leaky-ESN) is an improved model of the recurrent neural network (RNN) and adopts an interconnected recurrent grid of processing neurons. This paper presents a new proof for the convergence of a Lyapunov candidate function to zero when time tends to infinity by means of the Caputo fractional derivative with order lying in the range (0, 1). The stability of Fractional-Order Leaky-ESN (FO Leaky-ESN) is then analyzed, and the existence, uniqueness and stability of the equilibrium point are provided. A numerical example demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  7. Operation and modeling of the FORTE trigger box

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.

    1996-06-01

    The fast on-orbit recording of transient events satellite (FORTE) will carry a multiple-narrow-band trigger designed to detect impulsive VHF signals embedded in a high-noise background. The FORTE trigger boxes consist of eight VHF channels spaced across twenty MHz of bandwidth. A trigger is generated when a sufficiently bright signal is seen in a user-defined number of these channels within a specified coincidence window. In addition, the trigger circuitry incorporates a feature to reject events caused by the actuation of narrow-band carriers. This report describes the trigger`s operating principles and their implementation in the satellite hardware. We then discuss a computer model which can be used to simulate the performance of the trigger circuit.

  8. Box models for the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: an update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple 3-box model of the atmosphere/ocean system is used to describe the various stages in the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. In Stage I, which probably lasted until redbeds began to form about 2.0 Ga ago, the Earth's surface environment was generally devoid of free O2, except possibly in localized regions of high productivity in the surface ocean. In Stage II, which may have lasted for less than 150 Ma, the atmosphere and surface ocean were oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained anoxic. In Stage III, which commenced with the disappearance of banded iron formations around 1.85 Ga ago and has lasted until the present, all three surface reservoirs contained appreciable amounts of free O2. Recent and not-so-recent controversies regarding the abundance of oxygen in the Archean atmosphere are identified and discussed. The rate of O2 increase during the Middle and Late Proterozoic is identified as another outstanding question.

  9. Accuracy Analysis of a Box-wing Theoretical SRP Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoya; Hu, Xiaogong; Zhao, Qunhe; Guo, Rui

    2016-07-01

    For Beidou satellite navigation system (BDS) a high accuracy SRP model is necessary for high precise applications especially with Global BDS establishment in future. The BDS accuracy for broadcast ephemeris need be improved. So, a box-wing theoretical SRP model with fine structure and adding conical shadow factor of earth and moon were established. We verified this SRP model by the GPS Block IIF satellites. The calculation was done with the data of PRN 1, 24, 25, 27 satellites. The results show that the physical SRP model for POD and forecast for GPS IIF satellite has higher accuracy with respect to Bern empirical model. The 3D-RMS of orbit is about 20 centimeters. The POD accuracy for both models is similar but the prediction accuracy with the physical SRP model is more than doubled. We tested 1-day 3-day and 7-day orbit prediction. The longer is the prediction arc length, the more significant is the improvement. The orbit prediction accuracy with the physical SRP model for 1-day, 3-day and 7-day arc length are 0.4m, 2.0m, 10.0m respectively. But they are 0.9m, 5.5m and 30m with Bern empirical model respectively. We apply this means to the BDS and give out a SRP model for Beidou satellites. Then we test and verify the model with Beidou data of one month only for test. Initial results show the model is good but needs more data for verification and improvement. The orbit residual RMS is similar to that with our empirical force model which only estimate the force for along track, across track direction and y-bias. But the orbit overlap and SLR observation evaluation show some improvement. The remaining empirical force is reduced significantly for present Beidou constellation.

  10. Augmented twin-nonlinear two-box behavioral models for multicarrier LTE power amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Hammi, Oualid

    2014-01-01

    A novel class of behavioral models is proposed for LTE-driven Doherty power amplifiers with strong memory effects. The proposed models, labeled augmented twin-nonlinear two-box models, are built by cascading a highly nonlinear memoryless function with a mildly nonlinear memory polynomial with cross terms. Experimental validation on gallium nitride based Doherty power amplifiers illustrates the accuracy enhancement and complexity reduction achieved by the proposed models. When strong memory effects are observed, the augmented twin-nonlinear two-box models can improve the normalized mean square error by up to 3 dB for the same number of coefficients when compared to state-of-the-art twin-nonlinear two-box models. Furthermore, the augmented twin-nonlinear two-box models lead to the same performance as previously reported twin-nonlinear two-box models while requiring up to 80% less coefficients.

  11. Fast exchange fluxes around the pyruvate node: a leaky cell model to explain the gain and loss of unlabelled and labelled metabolites in a tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Quek, Lake-Ee; Liu, Menghan; Joshi, Sanket; Turner, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Glucose and glutamine are the two dominant metabolic substrates in cancer cells. In (13)C tracer experiments, however, it is necessary to account for all significant input substrates, as some natural (unlabelled) substrate in the medium, often derived from serum, can be metabolised by cells despite not showing signs of net consumption. Using [U-(13)C6]-glucose tracers and measuring extracellular metabolite enrichments by GC-MS, we found that pancreatic cells HPDE and PANC-1 secrete lactate, pyruvate, TCA cycle metabolites and non-essential amino acids synthesised from glucose. Focusing our investigations on pyruvate exchange in HEK293 cells, we observed that the four metabolites pools, intracellular and extracellular lactate and pyruvate, had similar (13)C enrichment trajectories. This indicated that these metabolites can mix rapidly. Using a hybrid (13)C-MFA, we followed to show that the lactate exchange flux had increased when extracellular lactate concentration was increased by 10-fold. By allowing rapid exchange fluxes around the pyruvate node, (13)C-MFA revealed that PANC-1 cells cultured in [U-(13)C6]-glucose doubled the conversion of unlabelled substrates to pyruvate when treated with TNF-α. The current work established the possibility that a cell's range of significant input substrates may be broader than anticipated. Metabolite exchange can affect intracellular enrichments. In particular, we showed that pyruvate was more strongly connected to lactate than to upstream glycolytic intermediates and that a fast lactate exchange may alter the outcome of flux analyses. Nevertheless, the leaky cell model may be an opportunity in disguise-the ability to continuously monitor metabolism using only the enrichments of extracellular metabolites.

  12. Leaky cable intrusion detection sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Buried Line Field Disturbance Sensors used for the purpose of outdoor perimeter intrusion detection are unique in the sense that they are covert and terrain following. Considerable effort has been spent in recent years to develop an effective Buried Line Sensor using leaky (or ported) cable technology. To date, a modular CW (Continuous Wave) approach to designing such a sensor has proven to be the most effective compromise in terms of cost, performance and installation. Proper design of a leaky cable sensor requires an in-depth knowledge of the coupling performance and attenuation characteristics of the sensor cable to be used. The ''Forward Wave'' (codirectional) method of detection is discussed. This paper contains theoretical and experimental expressions developed to demonstrate operation in terms of cost, performance and ease of installation.

  13. Leaky Random Oracle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Kazuki; Miyagawa, Satoshi; Ohta, Kazuo

    This work focuses on a vulnerability of hash functions due to sloppy usages or implementations in the real world. If our cryptographic research community succeeded in the development of a perfectly secure random function as the random oracle, it might be broken in some sense by invalid uses. In this paper, we propose a new variant of the random oracle model in order to analyze the security of cryptographic protocols under the situation of an invalid use of hash functions. Our model allows adversaries to obtain contents of the hash list of input and output pairs arbitrarily. Also, we analyze the security of several prevailing protocols (FDH, OAEP, Cramer-Shoup cryptosystem, Kurosawa-Desmedt cryptosystem, NAXOS) in our model. As the result of analyses, we clarify that FDH and Cramer-Shoup cryptosystem are still secure but others are insecure in our model. This result shows the separation between our model and the standard model.

  14. An analytical model for flow induced by a constant-head pumping in a leaky unconfined aquifer system with considering unsaturated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ye-Chen; Li, Ming-Hsu; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2017-09-01

    A new mathematical model is developed to describe the flow in response to a constant-head pumping (or constant-head test, CHT) in a leaky unconfined aquifer system of infinite lateral extent with considering unsaturated flow. The model consists of an unsaturated zone on the top, an unconfined aquifer in the middle, and a second aquifer (aquitard) at the bottom. The unsaturated flow is described by Richard's equation, and the flows in unconfined aquifer and second layer are governed by the groundwater flow equation. The well partially penetrates the unconfined aquifer with a constant head in the well due to CHT. The governing equations of the model are linearized by the perturbation method and Gardner's exponential model is adopted to describe the soil retention curves. The solution of the model for drawdown distribution is obtained by applying the methods of Laplace transform and Weber transform. Then the solution for the wellbore flowrate is derived from the drawdown solution with Darcy's law. The issue of the equivalence of normalized drawdown predicted by the present solution for constant-head pumping and Tartakovsky and Neuman's (2007) solution for constant-rate pumping is discussed. On the basis of the wellbore flowrate solution, the results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that the wellbore flowrate is very sensitive to the changes in the radial hydraulic conductivity and the thickness of the saturated zone. Moreover, the results predicted from the present wellbore flowrate solution indicate that this new solution can reduce to Chang's et al. (2010a) solution for homogenous aquifers when the dimensionless unsaturated exponent approaches 100. The unsaturated zone can be considered as infinite extent in the vertical direction if the thickness ratio of the unsaturated zone to the unconfined aquifer is equal to or greater than one. As for the leakage effect, it can be ignored when the vertical hydraulic conductivity ratio (i.e., the vertical hydraulic

  15. Analytical modeling of concrete box beams reinforced by GFRP rebars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Pang, S.S.

    1998-12-31

    An FRP rebar reinforced concrete box beam has been studied in this paper. Static analysis has been performed on the beams subjected to tension, bending, and torsion, based on a conceptual box beam structure. Linear vibration analysis has been conducted to predict the natural frequencies of the structures. Three dimensional finite element analysis has also been carried out to predict the stress, strain, deflection, and natural frequencies of the box beam structures. The results show that an FRP rebar deforms more compatibly with surrounding concrete than a steel rebar does. The results suggest that the concrete beams with FRP reinforcement are much more likely to be subject to compression failure (breakage of concrete on compression side) when compared to the box beams reinforced with steel rebars under the same loading conditions.

  16. Introducing Elitist Black-Box Models: When Does Elitist Behavior Weaken the Performance of Evolutionary Algorithms?

    PubMed

    Doerr, Carola; Lengler, Johannes

    2016-10-04

    Black-box complexity theory provides lower bounds for the runtime of black-box optimizers like evolutionary algorithms and other search heuristics and serves as an inspiration for the design of new genetic algorithms. Several black-box models covering different classes of algorithms exist, each highlighting a different aspect of the algorithms under considerations. In this work we add to the existing black-box notions a new elitist black-box model, in which algorithms are required to base all decisions solely on (the relative performance of) a fixed number of the best search points sampled so far. Our elitist model thus combines features of the ranking-based and the memory-restricted black-box models with an enforced usage of truncation selection. We provide several examples for which the elitist black-box complexity is exponentially larger than that of the respective complexities in all previous black-box models, thus showing that the elitist black-box complexity can be much closer to the runtime of typical evolutionary algorithms. We also introduce the concept of [Formula: see text]-Monte Carlo black-box complexity, which measures the time it takes to optimize a problem with failure probability at most [Formula: see text]. Even for small [Formula: see text], the [Formula: see text]-Monte Carlo black-box complexity of a function class [Formula: see text] can be smaller by an exponential factor than its typically regarded Las Vegas complexity (which measures the expected time it takes to optimize [Formula: see text]).

  17. Economic analysis of open space box model utilization in spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Atif F.; Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    It is a known fact that the amount of data about space that is stored is getting larger on an everyday basis. However, the utilization of Big Data and related tools to perform ETL (Extract, Transform and Load) applications will soon be pervasive in the space sciences. We have entered in a crucial time where using Big Data can be the difference (for terrestrial applications) between organizations underperforming and outperforming their peers. The same is true for NASA and other space agencies, as well as for individual missions and the highly-competitive process of mission data analysis and publication. In most industries, conventional opponents and new candidates alike will influence data-driven approaches to revolutionize and capture the value of Big Data archives. The Open Space Box Model is poised to take the proverbial "giant leap", as it provides autonomic data processing and communications for spacecraft. We can find economic value generated from such use of data processing in our earthly organizations in every sector, such as healthcare, retail. We also can easily find retailers, performing research on Big Data, by utilizing sensors driven embedded data in products within their stores and warehouses to determine how these products are actually used in the real world.

  18. Countability of Planck Boxes in Quantum Branching Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2002-04-01

    Two popular paradigms of cosmological quantum branching are Many World (MW) model of parallel universes (Everett, Deutsch) and inflationary quantum foam (IQF) model (Guth, Linde). Taking Planck L,T units as physically smallest, our Big Bang miniverse with size 10E28 cm and duration 10E18 sec has some 10E244 (N) elementary 4D Planck Boxes (PB) in its entire spacetime history. Using combinatorics, N! (about 10E10E247) is upper estimate for number of all possible 4D states, i.e. scale of "eternal return" (ER; Nietzsche, Eliade) for such miniverses. To count all states in full Megaverse (all up and down branches of infinite tree of all MW and/or IQF miniverses) we recall that all countable infinities have same (aleph-naught) cardinality (Cantor). Using Godel-type numbering, count PB in our miniverse by primes. This uses first N primes. Both MW and IQF models presume splitting of miniverses as springing (potentially) from each PB, making each PB infinitely rich, inexhaustible and unique. Next branching level is counted by integers p1Ep2, third level by p1Ep2Ep3 integers, etc, ad infinitum. To count in up and down directions from "our" miniverse, different branching subsets of powers of primes can be used at all levels of tower exponentiation. Thus, all PB in all infinitude of MW and/or IQF branches can be uniquely counted by never repeating integers (tower exponents of primes), offering escape from grim ER scenarios.

  19. Breakthroughs in Low-Profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-21

    Scientific Applications & Research Associates, Inc. 6300 Gateway Drive Cypress, CA 90630-4844 21 Jun 2016 Data Item: A002 - Progress, Status...NUMBER Scientific Applications & Research Associates, Inc. 6300 Gateway Drive Cypress, CA 90630-4844...demonstrating (via 3D models) a method to incorporate HPM-capable leaky-waveguides into an extended but still fairly-compact package, in which the

  20. Modelling photochemical pollutants in a deep urban street canyon: Application of a coupled two-box model approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2016-10-01

    Air pollution associated with road transport is a major environmental issue in urban areas. Buildings in urban areas are the artificial obstacles to atmospheric flow and cause reduced ventilation for street canyons. For a deep street canyon, there is evidence of the formation of multiple segregated vortices, which generate flow regimes such that pollutants exhibit a significant contrast between these vortices. This results in poor air ventilation conditions at pedestrian level, thereby leading to elevated pollutant levels and potential breaches of air quality limits. The hypothesis of a well-mixed deep street canyon in the practical one-box model approach is shown to be inappropriate. This study implements a simplified simulation of the canyon volume: a coupled two-box model with a reduced chemical scheme to represent the key photochemical processes with timescales similar to and smaller than the turbulent mixing timescale. The two-box model captures the significant pollutant contrast between the lower and upper parts of a deep street canyon, particularly for NO2. Core important parameters (i.e. heterogeneity coefficient, exchange velocity and box height ratio) in the two-box model approach were investigated through sensitivity tests. The two-box model results identify the emission regimes and the meteorological conditions under which NO2 in the lower canyon (i.e. the region of interest for the assessment of human health effects) is in breach of air quality standards. Higher NO2 levels were observed for the cases with higher heterogeneity coefficients (the two boxes are more segregated), with lower exchange velocities (worse ventilation conditions), or with smaller box height ratios (reduced dilution possibly due to secondary smaller eddies in the lower canyon). The performance of a one-box model using the same chemical scheme is also evaluated against the two-box model. The one-box model was found to systematically underestimate NO2 levels compared with those in

  1. Big Box, Little Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This article presents activities for young children in child care settings using boxes of various sizes. Suggestions include making shape sorters and sensory boxes for infants and toddlers, and constructing personal collection boxes, book boxes, games, and playhouses for older children. (Author/KB)

  2. Influence of Hydraulic Fracturing on Overlying Aquifers in the Presence of Leaky Abandoned Wells.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Joshua W; James, Scott C; Yelderman, Joe C

    2016-11-01

    The association between hydrocarbon-rich reservoirs and organic-rich source rocks means unconventional oil and gas plays usually occur in mature sedimentary basins-where large-scale conventional development has already taken place. Abandoned wells in proximity to hydraulic fracturing could be affected by increased fluid pressures and corresponding newly generated fractures that directly connect (frac hit) to an abandoned well or to existing fractures intersecting an abandoned well. If contaminants migrate to a pathway hydraulically connected to an abandoned well, upward leakage may occur. Potential effects of hydraulic fracturing on upward flow through a particular type of leaky abandoned well-abandoned oil and gas wells converted into water wells were investigated using numerical modeling. Several factors that affect flow to leaky wells were considered including proximity of a leaky well to hydraulic fracturing, flowback, production, and leaky well abandonment methods. The numerical model used historical records and available industry data for the Eagle Ford Shale play in south Texas. Numerical simulations indicate that upward contaminant migration could occur through leaky converted wells if certain spatial and hydraulic conditions exist. Upward flow through leaky converted wells increased with proximity to hydraulic fracturing, but decreased when flowback and production occurred. Volumetric flow rates ranged between 0 and 0.086 m(3) /d for hydraulic-fracturing scenarios. Potential groundwater impacts should be paired with plausible transport mechanisms, and upward flow through leaky abandoned wells could be unrelated to hydraulic fracturing. The results also underscore the need to evaluate historical activities.

  3. Box Canyon Model Watershed Project : Annual Report 1997/1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Box Canyon Watershed Project. This project will concentrate on watershed protection and enhancement from an upland perspective and will complement current instream restoration efforts implemented through the Kalispel Resident Fish Project. Primary focus of this project is the Cee Cee Ah Creek watershed due to its proximity to the Reservation, importance as a traditional fishery, and potential for bull trout and west-slope cutthroat trout recovery.

  4. Misidentification caused by leaky surface wave in high-frequency surface wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lingli; Xia, Jianghai; Pan, Yudi

    2014-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method analyses high-frequency surface waves to determine shear (S)-wave velocities of near-surface materials, which are usually unconsolidated and possess higher Poisson's ratios. One of key steps using the MASW method to obtain the near-surface S-wave velocities is to pick correct phase velocities in dispersive images. A high-frequency seismic survey conducted over near-surface materials with a higher Poisson's ratio will often result in data that contains non-geometric wave, which will raise an additional energy in the dispersion image. Failure to identify it may result in misidentification. In this paper, we have presented a description about leaky surface wave and the influence caused by the existence of leaky waves in a high-frequency seismic record. We first introduce leaky wave and non-geometric wave. Next, we use two synthetic tests to demonstrate that non-geometric wave is leaky wave and show the properties about leaky surface wave by eigenfunctions using Chen's algorithm. We show that misidentification may occur in picking the dispersion curves of normal Rayleigh wave modes because the leaky-wave energy normally connects energy of fundamental and/or higher modes. Meanwhile, we use a real-world example to demonstrate the influence of leaky wave. We also propose that muting and filtering should been applied to raw seismic records prior to generating dispersive images to prevent misidentifying leaky surface waves as modal surface waves by a real-world example. Finally, we use a three-layer model with a low-velocity half-space to illustrate that leaky surface waves appear on condition that the phase velocities are higher than maximum S-wave velocity of the earth model when solving the Rayleigh equation.

  5. Using box models to quantify zonal distributions and emissions of halocarbons in the background atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, J. W.; Nance, J. D.; Dutton, G. S.; Montzka, S. A.; Hall, B. D.; Miller, B.; Butler, J. H.; Mondeel, D. J.; Siso, C.; Moore, F. L.; Hintsa, E. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Rigby, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) of NOAA's Global Monitoring Division started measurements of the major chlorofluorocarbons and nitrous oxide in 1977 from flask samples collected at five remote sites around the world. Our program has expanded to over 40 compounds at twelve sites, which includes six in situ instruments and twelve flask sites. The Montreal Protocol for Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and its subsequent amendments has helped to decrease the concentrations of many of the ozone depleting compounds in the atmosphere. Our goal is to provide zonal emission estimates for these trace gases from multi-box models and their estimated atmospheric lifetimes in this presentation and make the emission values available on our web site. We plan to use our airborne measurements to calibrate the exchange times between the boxes for 5-box and 12-box models using sulfur hexafluoride where emissions are better understood.

  6. Modeling Close-In Airblast from ANFO Cylindrical and Box-Shaped Charges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    ANFO ) were detonated at various heights above a heavy steel plate. The plate was instrumented with twelve PCB piezoelectric pressure sensors with a...MODELING CLOSE-IN AIRBLAST FROM ANFO CYLINDRICAL AND BOX-SHAPED CHARGES Bob Britt, Tyler Oesch, Bob Walker, Dave Hyde, and Will McMahon...pressures) through a series of experiments and numerical simulations. Cylindrical and box-shaped charges of ammonium nitrate with fuel oil ( ANFO ) were

  7. SimpleBox 4.0: Improving the model while keeping it simple….

    PubMed

    Hollander, Anne; Schoorl, Marian; van de Meent, Dik

    2016-04-01

    Chemical behavior in the environment is often modeled with multimedia fate models. SimpleBox is one often-used multimedia fate model, firstly developed in 1986. Since then, two updated versions were published. Based on recent scientific developments and experience with SimpleBox 3.0, a new version of SimpleBox was developed and is made public here: SimpleBox 4.0. In this new model, eight major changes were implemented: removal of the local scale and vegetation compartments, addition of lake compartments and deep ocean compartments (including the thermohaline circulation), implementation of intermittent rain instead of drizzle and of depth dependent soil concentrations, adjustment of the partitioning behavior for organic acids and bases as well as of the value for enthalpy of vaporization. In this paper, the effects of the model changes in SimpleBox 4.0 on the predicted steady-state concentrations of chemical substances were explored for different substance groups (neutral organic substances, acids, bases, metals) in a standard emission scenario. In general, the largest differences between the predicted concentrations in the new and the old model are caused by the implementation of layered ocean compartments. Undesirable high model complexity caused by vegetation compartments and a local scale were removed to enlarge the simplicity and user friendliness of the model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermodynamic modeling of small scale biomass gasifiers: Development and assessment of the ''Multi-Box'' approach.

    PubMed

    Vakalis, Stergios; Patuzzi, Francesco; Baratieri, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Modeling can be a powerful tool for designing and optimizing gasification systems. Modeling applications for small scale/fixed bed biomass gasifiers have been interesting due to their increased commercial practices. Fixed bed gasifiers are characterized by a wide range of operational conditions and are multi-zoned processes. The reactants are distributed in different phases and the products from each zone influence the following process steps and thus the composition of the final products. The present study aims to improve the conventional 'Black-Box' thermodynamic modeling by means of developing multiple intermediate 'boxes' that calculate two phase (solid-vapor) equilibriums in small scale gasifiers. Therefore the model is named ''Multi-Box''. Experimental data from a small scale gasifier have been used for the validation of the model. The returned results are significantly closer with the actual case study measurements in comparison to single-stage thermodynamic modeling.

  9. A box model for representing estuarine physical processes in Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Whitney, Michael M.; Bryan, Frank O.; Tseng, Yu-heng

    2017-04-01

    Appropriately treating riverine freshwater discharge into the oceans in Earth system models is a challenging problem. Commonly, the river runoff is discharged into the ocean models with zero salinity and arbitrarily distributed either horizontally or vertically over several grid cells. Those approaches entirely neglect estuarine physical processes that modify river inputs before they reach the open ocean. In order to realistically represent riverine freshwater inputs in Earth system models, a physically based Estuary Box Model (EBM) is developed to parameterize the mixing processes in estuaries. The EBM represents the estuary exchange circulation with a two-layer box structure. It takes as input the river volume flux from the land surface model and the subsurface salinity at the estuary mouth from the ocean model. It delivers the estuarine outflow salinity and net volume flux into and out of the estuary to the ocean model. An offline test of the EBM forced with observed conditions for the Columbia River system shows good agreement with observations of outflow salinity and high-resolution simulations of the exchange flow volume flux. To illustrate the practicality of use of the EBM in an Earth system model, the EBM is implemented for all coastal grid cells with river runoff in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Compared to the standard version of CESM, which treats runoff as an augmentation to precipitation, the EBM increases sea surface salinity and reduces stratification near river mouths. The EBM also leads to significant regional and remote changes in CESM ocean surface salinities.

  10. Thermohaline Circulation Stability: A Box Model Study. Part II: Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Stone, Peter H.

    2005-02-01

    A thorough analysis of the stability of a coupled version of an interhemispheric three-box model of thermohaline circulation (THC) is presented. This study follows a similarly structured analysis of an uncoupled version of the same model presented in Part I of this paper. The model consists of a northern high-latitude box, a tropical box, and a southern high-latitude box, which can be thought of as corresponding to the northern, tropical, and southern Atlantic Ocean, respectively. This paper examines how the strength of THC changes when the system undergoes forcings representing global warming conditions.Since a coupled model is used, a direct representation of the radiative forcing is possible because the main atmospheric physical processes responsible for freshwater and heat fluxes are formulated separately. Each perturbation to the initial equilibrium is characterized by the total radiative forcing realized, by the rate of increase, and by the north-south asymmetry. Although only weakly asymmetric or symmetric radiative forcings are representative of physically reasonable conditions, general asymmetric forcings are considered in order to get a more complete picture of the mathematical properties of the system. The choice of suitably defined metrics makes it possible to determine the boundary dividing the set of radiative forcing scenarios that lead the system to equilibria characterized by a THC pattern similar to the present one, from those that drive the system to equilibria where the THC is reversed. This paper also considers different choices for the atmospheric transport parameterizations and for the ratio between the high-latitude and tropical radiative forcing. It is generally found that fast forcings are more effective than slow forcings in disrupting the present THC pattern, forcings that are stronger in the northern box are also more effective in destabilizing the system, and very slow forcings do not destabilize the system whatever their asymmetry

  11. Laser-Generated Leaky Rayleigh Waves at Fluid-Coating-Substrate Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2015-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of laser-generated leaky Rayleigh waves at fluid-coating-substrate interfaces have been investigated quantitatively. Based on the plane strain and fluid-solid interaction theories, a finite-element model is developed to simulate the laser-generated leaky Rayleigh waves at the interfaces of fluid and several metal-plate configurations, such as single plates (aluminum plate and brass plate), and coating-substrate systems (aluminum-brass system and brass-aluminum system). In addition, in order to study the influences of water loading on the attenuation characteristics of the leaky Rayleigh waves, the leaky Rayleigh waves at the interfaces between these solid structures and air are also calculated for comparison.

  12. A Simple Multistage Closed-(Box+Reservoir) Model of Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caimmi, R.

    2011-12-01

    Simple closed-box (CB) models of chemical evolution are extended on two respects, namely (i) simple closed-(box+reservoir) (CBR) models allowing gas outflow from the box into the reservoir (Hartwick 1976) or gas inflow into the box from the reservoir (Caimmi 2007) with rate proportional to the star formation rate, and (ii) simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir) (MCBR) models allowing different stages of evolution characterized by different inflow or outflow rates. The theoretical differential oxygen abundance distribution (TDOD) predicted by the model maintains close to a continuous broken straight line. An application is made where a fictitious sample is built up from two distinct samples of halo stars and taken as representative of the inner Galactic halo. The related empirical differential oxygen abundance distribution (EDOD) is represented, to an acceptable extent, as a continuous broken line for two viable [O/H]-[Fe/H] empirical relations. The slopes and the intercepts of the regression lines are determined, and then used as input parameters to MCBR models. Within the errors (mpsigma), regression line slopes correspond to a large inflow during the earlier stage of evolution and to low or moderate outflow during the subsequent stages. A possible inner halo - outer (metal-poor) bulge connection is also briefly discussed. Quantitative results cannot be considered for applications to the inner Galactic halo, unless selection effects and disk contamination are removed from halo samples, and discrepancies between different oxygen abundance determination methods are explained.

  13. Preliminary analysis on hybrid Box-Jenkins - GARCH modeling in forecasting gold price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaziz, Siti Roslindar; Azizan, Noor Azlinna; Ahmad, Maizah Hura; Zakaria, Roslinazairimah; Agrawal, Manju; Boland, John

    2015-02-01

    Gold has been regarded as a valuable precious metal and the most popular commodity as a healthy return investment. Hence, the analysis and prediction of gold price become very significant to investors. This study is a preliminary analysis on gold price and its volatility that focuses on the performance of hybrid Box-Jenkins models together with GARCH in analyzing and forecasting gold price. The Box-Cox formula is used as the data transformation method due to its potential best practice in normalizing data, stabilizing variance and reduces heteroscedasticity using 41-year daily gold price data series starting 2nd January 1973. Our study indicates that the proposed hybrid model ARIMA-GARCH with t-innovation can be a new potential approach in forecasting gold price. This finding proves the strength of GARCH in handling volatility in the gold price as well as overcomes the non-linear limitation in the Box-Jenkins modeling.

  14. Magnetorotational dynamo instability in statistical models of shearing box turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2014-10-01

    A large scale dynamo generating a strong azimuthal field is a fundamental component of the turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). The dynamo appears to be inherently time-dependent, producing well-defined butterfly diagrams, and is never kinematic even in its earliest stages, since without the magnetic field the MRI does not exist. In this talk we consider the dynamo in MRI turbulence in its simplest possible form, studying the zero net-flux unstratified shearing box. With the aim of isolating the core dynamo process, we remove as much of the nonlinearity as possible from the system, studying the statistics of driven linear fluctuations in a vertically dependent mean-field that evolves self-consistently due to Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. We find that homogeneous background turbulence becomes unstable above some critical parameter to a mean-field dynamo instability with a strong dependence on magnetic Prandtl number. This instability saturates to either time-independent or time-periodic states with characteristics that strongly resemble features of fully developed MRI turbulence. We discuss the driving and saturation terms in this MRI dynamo and the relation of these to the underlying nonmodal linear dynamics. This work was supported by Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and U.S. DOE (DE-AC02- 09CH11466).

  15. Magical Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Students get excited when they realize that they can transform a flat sheet of paper into a box. By using different sizes of paper, they can make different sizes of boxes and put a box inside a box, inside a box. These magical boxes within boxes can contain unwanted emotions or special treasures. The project described in this article incorporates…

  16. Magical Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Students get excited when they realize that they can transform a flat sheet of paper into a box. By using different sizes of paper, they can make different sizes of boxes and put a box inside a box, inside a box. These magical boxes within boxes can contain unwanted emotions or special treasures. The project described in this article incorporates…

  17. Leaky enteric coating on ranitidine hydrochloride beads: dissolution and prediction of plasma data.

    PubMed

    Bendas, Ehab R; Ayres, James W

    2008-08-01

    The present research is based on the hypothesis that leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations are able to provide sustained input for drugs that have an absorption window, such as ranitidine hydrochloride, without jeopardizing their bioavailability. Leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations are defined as enteric-coated pellets that allow some of the drug to be released from the formulation in gastric fluid. Different approaches to making leaky enteric-coated pellets were investigated using extrusion-spheronization followed by spray coating. Leaky enteric coats were formulated using a commonly used enteric polymer, Eudragit L 30 D-55, combined with soluble compounds including lactose, PEG 8000 and surfactants (Span 60 (hydrophobic) or Tween 80 (hydrophilic)). The rate of drug release from the formulations in simulated gastric fluid can be tailored by varying the additive's amount or type. All leaky enteric-coated formulations studied completely released the drugs within 30 min after changing dissolution medium to phosphate buffer, pH 6. Predictions of plasma concentration-time profiles of the model drug ranitidine hydrochloride from leaky enteric-coated pellets in fasted conditions and from immediate-release formulations were performed using computer simulations. Simulation results are consistent with a hypothesis that leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations provide sustained input for drugs shown to have an absorption window without decreasing bioavailability. The sustained input results from the combined effects of the formulation and GI transit effects on pellets. The present research demonstrates a new application of knowledge about gastrointestinal transit effects on drug formulations. It also shows that enteric-coating polymers have new applications in areas other than the usual enteric-coated formulations. The hypothesis that a leaky enteric-coated pellets formulation may maintain or increase the bioavailability of drugs that have a window of absorption

  18. Box-wing model approach for solar radiation pressure modelling in a multi-GNSS scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Guillermo; Jesús García, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    The solar radiation pressure force is the largest orbital perturbation after the gravitational effects and the major error source affecting GNSS satellites. A wide range of approaches have been developed over the years for the modelling of this non gravitational effect as part of the orbit determination process. These approaches are commonly divided into empirical, semi-analytical and analytical, where their main difference relies on the amount of knowledge of a-priori physical information about the properties of the satellites (materials and geometry) and their attitude. It has been shown in the past that the pre-launch analytical models fail to achieve the desired accuracy mainly due to difficulties in the extrapolation of the in-orbit optical and thermic properties, the perturbations in the nominal attitude law and the aging of the satellite's surfaces, whereas empirical models' accuracies strongly depend on the amount of tracking data used for deriving the models, and whose performances are reduced as the area to mass ratio of the GNSS satellites increases, as it happens for the upcoming constellations such as BeiDou and Galileo. This paper proposes to use basic box-wing model for Galileo complemented with empirical parameters, based on the limited available information about the Galileo satellite's geometry. The satellite is modelled as a box, representing the satellite bus, and a wing representing the solar panel. The performance of the model will be assessed for GPS, GLONASS and Galileo constellations. The results of the proposed approach have been analyzed over a one year period. In order to assess the results two different SRP models have been used. Firstly, the proposed box-wing model and secondly, the new CODE empirical model, ECOM2. The orbit performances of both models are assessed using Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements, together with the evaluation of the orbit prediction accuracy. This comparison shows the advantages and disadvantages of

  19. A comparison of classical mechanics models and finite element simulation of elastically tailored wing boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Pickings, Richard D.; Chang, Stephen; Holl, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Structural tailoring concepts were developed to create wings with elastically produced camber for the purpose of increasing lift during takeoff conditions. Simple models based upon enhancements to the thin walled composite beam theory of Rehfield were developed to investigate prospects for elastic tailoring of the chordwise deformation of wing structures. The purpose here is to provide a comparison of the theoretical results with a finite element model for the bending method of producing camber. Finite element correlation studies were completed for two cases: a bonded unstiffened structural box, and a bolted unstiffened structural box. Results from these studies show an error of less than one percent for the bonded case and less than six percent for the bolted case in predicting camber curvature for the structural box. Examination of the results shows that the theory is very accurate for the cases studied and will provide an excellent basis for conducting further tailoring studies.

  20. Adjustable box-wing model for solar radiation pressure impacting GPS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Solano, C. J.; Hugentobler, U.; Steigenberger, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the major uncertainty sources affecting Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite orbits is the direct solar radiation pressure. In this paper a new model for the solar radiation pressure on GPS satellites is presented that is based on a box-wing satellite model, and assumes nominal attitude. The box-wing model is based on the physical interaction between solar radiation and satellite surfaces, and can be adjusted to fit the GPS tracking data. To compensate the effects of solar radiation pressure, the International GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers employ a variety of approaches, ranging from purely empirical models based on in-orbit behavior, to physical models based on pre-launch spacecraft structural analysis. It has been demonstrated, however, that the physical models fail to predict the real orbit behavior with sufficient accuracy, mainly due to deviations from nominal attitude, inaccurately known optical properties, or aging of the satellite surfaces. The adjustable box-wing model presented in this paper is an intermediate approach between the physical/analytical models and the empirical models. The box-wing model fits the tracking data by adjusting mainly the optical properties of the satellite's surfaces. In addition, the so called Y-bias and a parameter related to a rotation lag angle of the solar panels around their rotation axis (about 1.5° for Block II/IIA and 0.5° for Block IIR) are estimated. This last parameter, not previously identified for GPS satellites, is a key factor for precise orbit determination. For this study GPS orbits are generated based on one year (2007) of tracking data, with the processing scheme derived from the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE). Two solutions are computed, one using the adjustable box-wing model and one using the CODE empirical model. Using this year of data the estimated parameters and orbits are analyzed. The performance of the models is comparable, when looking at orbit overlap and orbit

  1. Three-dimensional mesh resolution control in finite difference groundwater flow models through boxed spatial zooming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, Ferenc

    2008-04-01

    SummaryThe iterative composite mesh simulation (CMS) technique operates a coupled system of point centered finite difference groundwater flow models. It allows for high lateral and vertical mesh resolution at the sites of interest, whereas a coarser mesh may be applied in other parts of the formation. The boxed spatial zooming method utilizes a "box-in-box" architecture to build the coupled 3D system of embedded (nested) parent and child meshes exhibiting different vertical and lateral extensions and resolutions. A mesh interface simulator is used to equate the heads and balance the fluxes along the common vertical plains and shared lateral layers (interfaces) linking the meshes. This multi mesh simulation method is used by software FLOW and has been successfully tested in multi-aquifer systems against selected unsteady and steady state well flow problems with available analytical solutions. The base compatibility with MODFLOW databases supports wider use of the FLOW simulator.

  2. A white-box model of S-shaped and double S-shaped single-species population growth

    PubMed Central

    Kalmykov, Lev V.

    2015-01-01

    Complex systems may be mechanistically modelled by white-box modeling with using logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata. Mathematical models of complex systems are of three types: black-box (phenomenological), white-box (mechanistic, based on the first principles) and grey-box (mixtures of phenomenological and mechanistic models). Most basic ecological models are of black-box type, including Malthusian, Verhulst, Lotka–Volterra models. In black-box models, the individual-based (mechanistic) mechanisms of population dynamics remain hidden. Here we mechanistically model the S-shaped and double S-shaped population growth of vegetatively propagated rhizomatous lawn grasses. Using purely logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata we create a white-box model. From a general physical standpoint, the vegetative propagation of plants is an analogue of excitation propagation in excitable media. Using the Monte Carlo method, we investigate a role of different initial positioning of an individual in the habitat. We have investigated mechanisms of the single-species population growth limited by habitat size, intraspecific competition, regeneration time and fecundity of individuals in two types of boundary conditions and at two types of fecundity. Besides that, we have compared the S-shaped and J-shaped population growth. We consider this white-box modeling approach as a method of artificial intelligence which works as automatic hyper-logical inference from the first principles of the studied subject. This approach is perspective for direct mechanistic insights into nature of any complex systems. PMID:26038717

  3. A white-box model of S-shaped and double S-shaped single-species population growth.

    PubMed

    Kalmykov, Lev V; Kalmykov, Vyacheslav L

    2015-01-01

    Complex systems may be mechanistically modelled by white-box modeling with using logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata. Mathematical models of complex systems are of three types: black-box (phenomenological), white-box (mechanistic, based on the first principles) and grey-box (mixtures of phenomenological and mechanistic models). Most basic ecological models are of black-box type, including Malthusian, Verhulst, Lotka-Volterra models. In black-box models, the individual-based (mechanistic) mechanisms of population dynamics remain hidden. Here we mechanistically model the S-shaped and double S-shaped population growth of vegetatively propagated rhizomatous lawn grasses. Using purely logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata we create a white-box model. From a general physical standpoint, the vegetative propagation of plants is an analogue of excitation propagation in excitable media. Using the Monte Carlo method, we investigate a role of different initial positioning of an individual in the habitat. We have investigated mechanisms of the single-species population growth limited by habitat size, intraspecific competition, regeneration time and fecundity of individuals in two types of boundary conditions and at two types of fecundity. Besides that, we have compared the S-shaped and J-shaped population growth. We consider this white-box modeling approach as a method of artificial intelligence which works as automatic hyper-logical inference from the first principles of the studied subject. This approach is perspective for direct mechanistic insights into nature of any complex systems.

  4. The Particle/Wave-in-a-Box Model in Dutch Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekzema, Dick; van den Berg, Ed; Schooten, Gert; van Dijk, Leo

    2007-01-01

    The combination of mathematical and conceptual difficulties makes teaching quantum physics at secondary schools a precarious undertaking. With many of the conceptual difficulties being unavoidable, simplifying the mathematics becomes top priority. The particle/wave-in-a-box provides a teaching model which includes many aspects of serious …

  5. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF A GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY TO HYPOXIA: AN ANALYSIS USING BOX MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of hypoxia and the physical factors affecting development and maintenance of hypoxia were examined for Pensacola Bay, Florida (USA) by conducting monthly water quality surveys for 3 years and by constructing salt-and-water balance box models using the resulting data. W...

  6. The Particle/Wave-in-a-Box Model in Dutch Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekzema, Dick; van den Berg, Ed; Schooten, Gert; van Dijk, Leo

    2007-01-01

    The combination of mathematical and conceptual difficulties makes teaching quantum physics at secondary schools a precarious undertaking. With many of the conceptual difficulties being unavoidable, simplifying the mathematics becomes top priority. The particle/wave-in-a-box provides a teaching model which includes many aspects of serious …

  7. The Analysis of Organizational Diagnosis on Based Six Box Model in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamid, Rahimi; Siadat, Sayyed Ali; Reza, Hoveida; Arash, Shahin; Ali, Nasrabadi Hasan; Azizollah, Arbabisarjou

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The analysis of organizational diagnosis on based six box model at universities. Research method: Research method was descriptive-survey. Statistical population consisted of 1544 faculty members of universities which through random strafed sampling method 218 persons were chosen as the sample. Research Instrument were organizational…

  8. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF A GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY TO HYPOXIA: AN ANALYSIS USING BOX MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of hypoxia and the physical factors affecting development and maintenance of hypoxia were examined for Pensacola Bay, Florida (USA) by conducting monthly water quality surveys for 3 years and by constructing salt-and-water balance box models using the resulting data. W...

  9. Thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic and its simulation with a box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanova, E. A.; Polonsky, A. B.; Sannikov, V. F.

    2017-05-01

    Features of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation response to periodic, stochastic, and instantaneous forcing are studied using a four-box model. The present-day circulation is shown to be characterized by a stable quasi-periodic oscillatory mode that manifests itself as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. The thermohaline catastrophe is unlikely in the modern climate epoch.

  10. Jeweled Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2009-01-01

    While an empty cardboard box from a ream of copy paper may be the most coveted box among teachers in the author's school, for other people, brass boxes from India, Khokhlova lacquer boxes from Russia, and puzzle boxes from Japan are more the type that are collected and admired. Whether it is used for storage or decoration, a box can evoke a sense…

  11. Jeweled Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2009-01-01

    While an empty cardboard box from a ream of copy paper may be the most coveted box among teachers in the author's school, for other people, brass boxes from India, Khokhlova lacquer boxes from Russia, and puzzle boxes from Japan are more the type that are collected and admired. Whether it is used for storage or decoration, a box can evoke a sense…

  12. Unlocking the black box: teaching mathematical modeling with popular culture.

    PubMed

    Lofgren, Eric T

    2016-10-01

    Mathematical modeling is an important tool in biological research, allowing for the synthesis of results from many studies into an understanding of a system. Despite this, the need for extensive subject matter knowledge and complex mathematics often leaves modeling as an esoteric subspecialty. A 2-fold approach can be used to make modeling more approachable for students and those interested in obtaining a functional knowledge of modeling. The first is the use of a popular culture disease system-a zombie epidemic-to allow for exploration of the concepts of modeling using a flexible framework. The second is the use of available interactive and non-calculus-based tools to allow students to work with and implement models to cement their understanding. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Analysis of resusupention of Cs-137 in Fukushima with box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuta; Hatano, Yuko; Kita, Kazuyuki; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kajino, Mizuo; Ishizuka, Masahide

    2017-04-01

    We use the atmospheric concentration of Cs-137 measured continuously at Namie, Fukushima and compare the observational results with a two-box model. Resuspension, deposition and the vertical diffusion are considered in the model. The values of five parameters in the model are estimated by the fitting of the data, such as the resuspension rate, the dry/wet deposition rate, and the exchange rate between the mixed layer and the higher atmosphere.

  14. A Simulation-Based Black-Box Microcontroller Model for EME Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, Yamarita; Musolino, Francesco; Fiori, Franco

    This paper describes a black-box model of mixed analog-digital VLSI circuits for the prediction of microcontroller electromagnetic emissions without disclosure of manufacturer data. The model is based on small-signal simulations performed at the analog and digital building-block level, considering also layout and technology parameters, and modeling the parasitic substrate coupling paths and the interconnects. The developed model allows system designers to predict the impact of microcontroller operation on the system-level EMEs by carrying out low-time consuming simulations in the early design phases of their products thus minimizing unnecessary costs and scheduling delays. In this paper, the black-box model of an 8-bit microcontroller is described and it is employed to predict the conducted emission delivered through the input-output ports.

  15. EPA EcoBox

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This tool box of ecological risk assessment (Eco-box) includes over 400+ links to tools, models, and databases found within EPA and our Government partners designed that can aid risk assessors with performing exposure assessments.

  16. Box model and 1D longitudinal model of flow and transport in Bosten Lake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, WenPeng; Dong, XinGuang

    2015-05-01

    Bosten Lake in the southeast of Yanqi Catchment, China, supports the downstream agricultural and natural environments. Over the last few decades the intensive agricultural activities in Yanqi Catchment resulted in decreased lake levels and deteriorated lake water quality. A two-box model is constructed to understand the evolution of lake level and salinity between 1958 and 2008. The two-box model of the lake indicates that the evaporation does have the same trend as the observed lake area and the annual average evaporation agrees with the value obtained from the Penman-Monteith approach. To achieve a correct salt balance, the ratio of outflow concentration and average lake concentration has to be around 0.7. This is due to the incomplete mixing of the lake caused by short-circuiting between tributary inflow and the main outflow via the pump stations abstracting water from the lake. This short-circuiting is investigated in more detail by a 1D numerical flow and transport model of the lake calibrated with observations of lake level and lake concentrations. The distributed model reproduces the correct time-varying outflow concentration. It is used for the assessment of two basic management options: increasing river discharge (by water saving irrigation, reduction of phreatic evaporation or reduction of agricultural area) and diverting saline drainage water to the desert. Increasing river discharge to the lake by 20% reduces the east basin salt concentration by 0.55 kg/m3, while capturing all the drainage water and discharging it to depressions instead of the lake reduces the east basin salt concentration by 0.63 kg/m3. A combination of increasing river inflow and decreasing drainage salt flux is sufficient to bring future lake TDS below the required 1 kg/m3, to keep a lake level that sustains the lake ecosystem, and to supply more water for downstream development and ecosystem rehabilitation.

  17. Polydispersed Gravity Currents Along a V-Shaped Valley: Experiments and Box Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriaux, C. A. M. D.; Besson, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Turbidity currents, which occur at the continental margins and transport sediments along submarines canyons are particulate gravity currents made of poorly sorted particles. In such currents, the flow is to a large extent controlled by the grain size distribution of the particles at the source. Here we present the combined results of a box model and lock-exchange experiments of particulate gravity currents at small volumetric concentrations of particles (< 4%) flowing along a V-shaped valley, for which we looked at the grain size distributions along the deposit. The currents were made of 1) Silicon Carbide (SiC), 2) Glass Beads (GBs), 3) combined poorly sorted SiC/GBs, and 4) moderately sorted combined SiC/GBs. Experimental particles sizes were in the range 3-100 microns. We used 20 particle size classes to characterize the distributions. First we show that a box model that solves for the deposition of all the particle size classes, remarkably describes the speed of the currents, the mass deposited by the currents, and the material density of the deposit for those currents initially made of SiC and GBs. Last but not least, the box model also reconstructs the mass based size distributions along the deposits characterized by various fining. Yet, the reconstructed distributions differ with the shape of the particles. In the presence of only round GBs particles, the mass based size distributions given by the box compare extremely well with the experimental counterparts. In the presence of SiC, there is a systematic shift towards the smaller grain sizes of the mass based size distributions given by the box compared to the experimental ones. Several hypotheses to explain this shift are currently being investigated. The present work was supported by the Fundaçao para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT, Portugal) under Project Pest-OE/CTE /LA0019/2013-2014.

  18. Laser mode control using leaky plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjević, B. Z.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    The evolution and propagation of a non-Gaussian laser pulse in matched parabolic channels as well as leaky channels are investigated. It has previously been shown for a Gaussian pulse that matched guiding can be achieved using such channels. In the low power regime, analytical work demonstrates that, for multi-mode pulses, there is significant transverse beating. The interaction between different modes may have an adverse effect on the laser pulse as it propagates through the primary channel, in which plasma wakefield acceleration of the electron beam is to occur, and this effect can be shown in numerical simulations of high-power laser-plasma interactions. To improve guiding of the pulse, we propose using leaky channels. Higher order mode content is minimized through the leaky channel, while the fundamental mode remains well-guided. In addition to numerical simulations, it can be qualitatively shown, through the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method and the Source Dependent Expansion (SDE) analysis, that in finite channels, higher order modes either leak out or transfer energy to the fundamental. In conclusion, an idealized plasma filter based on leaky channels is found to filter out the higher order modes and leave a near-Gaussian profile before the pulse enters the primary channel.

  19. An analytical solution of groundwater level fluctuation in a U-shaped leaky coastal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fu-Kuo; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Wang, Shu-chuan

    2017-04-01

    Tide-induced groundwater level fluctuations in coastal aquifers have attracted much attention in past years, especially for the issues associated with the impact of the coastline shape, multi-layered leaky aquifer system, and anisotropy of aquifers. In this study, a homogeneous but anisotropic multi-layered leaky aquifer system with U-shaped coastline is considered, where the subsurface system consisting of an unconfined aquifer, a leaky confined aquifer, and a semi-permeable layer between them. The analytical solution of the model obtained herein may be considered as an extended work of two solutions; one was developed by Huang et al. (Huang et al. Tide-induced groundwater level fluctuation in a U-shaped coastal aquifer, J. Hydrol. 2015; 530: 291-305) for two-dimensional interacting tidal waves bounded by three water-land boundaries while the other was by Li and Jiao (Li and Jiao. Tidal groundwater level fluctuations in L-shaped leaky coastal aquifer system, J. Hydrol. 2002; 268: 234-243) for two-dimensional interacting tidal waves of leaky coastal aquifer system adjacent to a cross-shore estuary. In this research, the effects of leakage and storativity of the semi-permeable layer on the amplitude and phase shift of the tidal head fluctuation, and the influence of anisotropy of the aquifer are all examined for the U-shaped leaky coastal aquifer. Some existing solutions in literatures can be regarded as the special cases of the present solution if the aquifer system is isotropic and non-leaky. The results obtained will be beneficial to coastal development and management for water resources.

  20. [Construction and application of black-box model for glucoamylase production by Aspergillus niger].

    PubMed

    Li, Lianwei; Lu, Hongzhong; Xia, Jianye; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2015-07-01

    Carbon-limited continuous culture was used to study the relationship between the growth of Aspergillus niger and the production of glucoamylase. The result showed that when the specific growth rate was lower than 0.068 h(-1), the production of glucoamylase was growth-associated, when the specific growth rate was higher than 0.068 h(-1), the production of glucoamylase was not growth-associated. Based on the result of continuous culture, the Monod dynamics model of glucose consumption of A. niger was constructed, Combining Herbert-Pirt equation of glucose and oxygen consumption with Luedeking-Piret equation of enzyme production, the black-box model of Aspergillus niger for enzyme production was established. The exponential fed-batch culture was designed to control the specific growth rate at 0.05 h(-1) by using this model and the highest yield for glucoamylase production by A. niger reached 0.127 g glucoamylase/g glucose. The black-box model constructed in this study successfully described the glucoamylase production by A. niger and the result of the model fitted the measured value well. The black-box model could guide the design and optimization of glucoamylase production by A. niger.

  1. Non-Lipschitz lp-regularization and box constrained model for image restoration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojun; Ng, Michael K; Zhang, Chao

    2012-12-01

    Nonsmooth nonconvex regularization has remarkable advantages for the restoration of piecewise constant images. Constrained optimization can improve the image restoration using a priori information. In this paper, we study regularized nonsmooth nonconvex minimization with box constraints for image restoration. We present a computable positive constant θ for using nonconvex nonsmooth regularization, and show that the difference between each pixel and its four adjacent neighbors is either 0 or larger than θ in the recovered image. Moreover, we give an explicit form of θ for the box-constrained image restoration model with the non-Lipschitz nonconvex l(p)-norm regularization. Our theoretical results show that any local minimizer of this imaging restoration problem is composed of constant regions surrounded by closed contours and edges. Numerical examples are presented to validate the theoretical results, and show that the proposed model can recover image restoration results very well.

  2. Isotope effects accompanying evaporation of water from leaky containers.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, Kazimierz; Chmura, Lukasz

    2008-03-01

    Laboratory experiments aimed at quantifying isotope effects associated with partial evaporation of water from leaky containers have been performed under three different settings: (i) evaporation into dry atmosphere, performed in a dynamic mode, (ii) evaporation into dry atmosphere, performed in a static mode, and (iii) evaporation into free laboratory atmosphere. The results demonstrate that evaporative enrichment of water stored in leaky containers can be properly described in the framework of the Craig-Gordon evaporation model. The key parameter controlling the degree of isotope enrichment is the remaining fraction of water in the leaking containers. Other factors such as temperature, relative humidity, or extent of kinetic fractionation play only minor roles. Satisfactory agreement between observed and predicted isotope enrichments for both (18)O and (2)H in experiments for the case of evaporation into dry atmosphere could be obtained only when molecular diffusivity ratios of isotope water molecules as suggested recently by Cappa et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 108, 4525-4535, (2003).] were adopted. However, the observed and modelled isotope enrichments for (2)H and (18)O could be reconciled also for the ratios of molecular diffusivities obtained by Merlivat [J. Chem. Phys., 69, 2864-2871 (1978).], if non-negligible transport resistance in the viscous liquid sub-layer adjacent to the evaporating surface is considered. The evaporation experiments revealed that the loss of mass of water stored in leaky containers in the order of 1%, will lead to an increase of the heavy isotope content in this water by ca. 0.35 and 1.1 per thousand, for delta (18)O and delta (2)H, respectively.

  3. Aeroelastic effects of a simple rectangular wing-box model with varying rib orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, M. S.; Chun, O. T.; Harmin, M. Y.; Romli, F. I.

    2016-10-01

    A simple rectangular wing-box model with varying individual rib orientations has been analysed with the interest on studying their impact on flutter and divergence instabilities. The varying rib orientations offer an alteration in bending-torsional coupling characteristics, resulting in significant effect on aeroelastic behaviour of the wing. Substantial improvement is found in comparison with the baseline and parallel ribs orientation configurations, which leads to the possibility of significant weight reduction.

  4. NUMERICAL MODELING OF UNSTEADY FLOW AROUND A BOX CULVERT AND ITS VERIFICATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, Alhinai; Hosoda, Takashi; Shirai, Hidekazu

    This paper deals with a numerical model to simulate flow through a box culvert, which represents flow during flash floods under highways in Oman. We firstly show the typical flow patterns with the transition from free surface flows to pressurized flows and overflows over a culvert, based on hydraulic experiments. Then, a numerical model applicable to the full/partial full pressurized flows is tested to simulate the typical flow patterns under the conditions of experiments.It is pointed out that although the numerical model used here can simulate the simple flow patterns to some extents, the model should be improved further to get better results.

  5. Spatial variance in multimedia mass balance models: comparison of LOTOS-EUROS and SimpleBox for PCB-153.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Anne; Sauter, Ferd; den Hollander, Henri; Huijbregts, Mark; Ragas, Ad; van de Meent, Dik

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether nested generic box models can be used to predict spatial variance. An inter-comparison study was performed for the nested box model SimpleBox, and the spatially resolved model LOTOS-EUROS, using PCB-153 emissions in Europe as an example. We compared the two models concerning (1) average environmental concentrations, (2) spatial concentration variances, (3) spatial concentration patterns (maps), and (4) agreement with measured concentrations for the air and soil compartments. In SimpleBox, the spatial concentration variances and patterns were calculated subsequently for each separate grid cell surrounded by a regional and a continental shell with homogeneous, averaged circumstances. Average European PCB-153 concentrations calculated by LOTOS-EUROS and SimpleBox for the period 1981-2000 agree well for the air and soil compartments. Moreover, the predicted concentrations of both models are in line with the measured PCB-153 concentrations in Europe during that period. For PCB-153, the prediction of spatial concentration variances with the nested multimedia fate model SimpleBox performs adequately in most cases, except for the lower concentration boundary in the air compartment. It is concluded that SimpleBox can be used to predict the spatial maximum and average concentrations of PCB-153 in the air and soil compartments. The proposed method has to be tested systematically for different types of compounds, emission scenarios, environmental compartments and spatial scales in order to allow conclusions about the general applicability of the method.

  6. Does box model training improve surgical dexterity and economy of movement during virtual reality laparoscopy? A randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Clevin, Lotte; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic box model trainers have been used in training curricula for a long time, however data on their impact on skills acquisition is still limited. Our aim was to validate a low cost box model trainer as a tool for the training of skills relevant to laparoscopic surgery. Randomised, controlled trial (Canadian Task Force Classification I). University Hospital. Sixteen gynaecologic residents with limited laparoscopic experience were randomised to a group that received a structured box model training curriculum, and a control group. Performance before and after the training was assessed in a virtual reality laparoscopic trainer (LapSim and was based on objective parameters, registered by the computer system (time, error, and economy of motion scores). Group A showed significantly greater improvement in all performance parameters compared with the control group: economy of movement (p=0.001), time (p=0.001) and tissue damage (p=0.036), confirming the positive impact of box-trainer curriculum on laparoscopic skills acquisition. Structured laparoscopic skill training on a low cost box model trainer improves performance as assessed using the VR system. Trainees who used the box model trainer showed significant improvement compared to the control group. Box model trainers are valid tools for laparoscopic skills training and should be implemented in the comprehensive training curricula in gynaecology.

  7. Testing the performance of current dust emission schemes from a box and climate model perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; King, James; Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David; Washington, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Dust emission schemes in climate models are relatively simple and are tuned to represent observed background aerosol concentrations many of which are many thousands of kilometres from source regions. Representations of dust emission in the models were developed from idealised experiments such as those conducted in wind tunnels. Improvement of current model dust emission schemes is hampered by a paucity of observations from key dust sources. The Dust Observations for Models project (DO4Models) was aiming on gathering data from source regions at a scale appropriate to climate model grid box resolution. Here we present (1) the results of 1D box model simulations using three commonly used parameterizations for the horizontal and vertical dust emission flux, and (2) HadGEM3 regional climate model simulations using the current model setup for dust emissions. We are comparing both models with Do4Model field campaign data retrieved over a typical dust source. The box model performance is tested using observed soil moisture content, aerodynamic surface roughness, shear velocity, and soil properties. Results for the first part of the field campaign suggest that all current dust emission schemes do not capture the observed emission flux well. The saltation flux is hugely overestimated, whereas the vertical flux is moderately overestimated. The choice of the sand transport, soil moisture correction and roughness correction scheme is important but insufficient to bring modeled fluxes into agreement with observed dust fluxes. Potential reasons for the diagnosed mismatch are discussed and the impact of spatial averaging over the 11 field sites within the g12x12km grid is evaluated. Furthermore, it is tried to answer the question whether the application of the dispersed soil size distribution increases the performance of the emission schemes over the typically used undisturbed soil size distribution provided from soil database HadGEM3 is tested with regard to its capability to

  8. Long-term box modelling of 137Cs in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.; Ortega, M.; Merino, J.; Masqué, P.

    2002-06-01

    Environmental radiotracers can be used to understand the underlying processes of the environment where they are found. Amongst others, 137Cs, which is a soluble element in sea water, is transported with water masses in the oceans. A numerical model, in which the Mediterranean Sea was divided into 40 boxes (10 regions of 4 layers each), was developed to better understand the distribution and behaviour of 137Cs in the Mediterranean Sea. It was run with a realistic source term, including global fallout, the Chernobyl accident, the nuclear industry and river runoff, and was used to predict 137Cs concentrations during the period 1954-1994. 137Cs surface water predicted concentrations ranged from 0 to 36 Bq·m -3. In most boxes the most prominent feature was the existence of two 137Cs predicted concentration maxima, corresponding to maximum air concentrations due to nuclear weapons fallout (1963) and the Chernobyl accident (1986). Maximum concentrations were predicted in surface waters in all regions, generally decreasing as mean water depth increased. Largest spatial concentration gradients were predicted during, and shortly after, the global fallout maxima. After the global fallout maximum was reached, predicted concentrations decreased, first rapidly and later on more slowly, reaching relatively low levels immediately before the Chernobyl accident. The maximum 137Cs predicted concentrations due to the Chernobyl accident in surface waters of each box showed widely different values because the deposition pattern was highly irregular. Levels reached values similar to those predicted immediately before the Chernobyl accident more rapidly than in the case of the global fallout maxima. In order to perform model validation, results were compared with annual mean values in each box and, in general, were found to be in good agreement. The main achievements of the model and its limitations are discussed.

  9. Pandora: an eleven-box geochemical model of the world ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, T.H.; Broecker, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the impacts on the CO/sub 2/ content of the atmosphere caused by possible differences between the operation of the glacial and the interglacial ocean-atmosphere systems, an 11-box global ocean model was developed which operates something like the real system. The individual reservoirs in this model are identified as (1) northern Atlantic, (2) surface Atlantic, (3) intermediate North Atlantic, (4) deep Atlantic, (5) intermediate South Atlantic, (6) surface Antarctic, (7) deep Antarctic, (8) intermediate Indopacific, (9) surface Indopacific, (10) deep Indopacific, and (11) northern Pacific. This report discusses the basic model structure. 5 figs., 1 tab. (ACR)

  10. Leaky Waves in Metamaterials for Antenna Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Approximate formula (Equation (127)) vs numerical results. 6 Conclusions, Publications, and Significant Events In this final report, we first review ... dielectric constant, which makes the discussion more general . Tamir and Kou claim that there are eight different leaky-wave fields guided by an asymmetric...discusses the proposed new Sommerfeld integral path and addresses two numerical issues associated with Sommerfeld integral that are generally overlooked by

  11. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  12. Effect of image capture device on the accuracy of black-box printer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Jason; Sun, Jian; Ju, Yanling; Kashti, Tamar; Frank, Tal; Kella, Dror; Fischer, Mani; Ulichney, Robert; Adams, Guy; Allebach, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In the process of electrophotograpic (EP) printing, the deposition of toner to the printer-addressable pixel is greatly influenced by the neighboring pixels of the digital halftone. To account for these effects, printer models can either be embedded in the halftoning algorithm, or used to predict the printed halftone image at the input to an algorithm that is used to assess print quality. Most recently,1 we developed a series of six new models to accurately account for local neighborhood effects and the influence of a 45 x 45 neighborhood of pixels on the central printer-addressable pixel. We refer to all these models as black-box models, since they are based solely on measuring what is on the printed page, and do not incorporate any information about the marking process itself. In this paper, we will compare black-box models developed with three different capture devices: an Epson Expression 10000XL (Epson America, Inc., Long Beach, CA, USA) flatbed scanner operated at 2400 dpi with an active field of view of 309.88 mm x 436.88 mm, a QEA PIAS-II (QEA, Inc., Billerica, MA, USA) camera with resolution 7663.4 dpi and a field of view of 2.4 mm x 3.2 mm, and Dr. CID, a 1:1 magnification 3.35 micron true resolution Dyson Relay lens-based 3 Mpixel USB CMOS imaging device2 with resolution 7946.8 dpi and a field of view of 4.91 mm 6.55 mm developed at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories { Bristol. Our target printer is an HP Indigo 5000 Digital Press (HP Indigo, Ness Ziona, Israel). In this paper, we will compare the accuracy of the black-box model predictions of print microstructure using models trained from images captured with these three devices.

  13. Modelling and optimization of a recombinant BHK-21 cultivation process using hybrid grey-box systems.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A; Cunha, A E; Clemente, J J; Moreira, J L; Cruz, H J; Alves, P M; Carrondo, M J T; Oliveira, R

    2005-08-22

    In this work a model-based optimization study of fed-batch BHK-21 cultures expressing the human fusion glycoprotein IgG1-IL2 was performed. It was concluded that due to the complexity of the BHK metabolism it is rather difficult to develop a kinetic model with sufficient accuracy for optimization studies. Many kinetic expressions and a large number of parameters are involved resulting in a complex identification problem. For this reason, an alternative more cost-effective methodology based on hybrid grey-box models was adopted. Several model structures combining the a priori reliable first principles knowledge with black-box models were investigated using data from batch and fed-batch experiments. It has been reported in previous studies that the BHK metabolism exhibits modulation particularities when compared to other mammalian cell lines. It was concluded that these mechanisms were effectively captured by the hybrid model, this being of crucial importance for the successful optimization of the process operation. A method was proposed to monitor the risk of hybrid model unreliability and to constraint the optimization results to acceptable risk levels. From the optimization study it was concluded that the process productivity may be considerably increased if the glutamine and glucose concentrations are maintained at low levels during the growth phase and then glutamine feeding is increased.

  14. Finite element cochlea box model - Mechanical and electrical analysis of the cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, Milica; Teal, Paul D.; Isailovic, Velibor; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    The primary role of the cochlea is to transform external sound stimuli into mechanical vibrations and then to neural impulses which are sent to the brain. A simplified cochlea box model was developed using the finite element method. Firstly, a mechanical model of the cochlea was analyzed. The box model consists of the basilar membrane and two fluid chambers - the scala vestibuli and scala tympani. The third chamber, the scala media, was neglected in the mechanical analysis. The best agreement with currently available analytical and experimental results was obtained when behavior of the fluid in the chambers was described using the wave acoustic equation and behavior of the basilar membrane was modeled with Newtonian dynamics. The obtained results show good frequency mapping. The second approach was to use an active model of the cochlea in which the Organ of Corti was included. The operation of the Organ of Corti involves the generation of current, caused by mechanical vibration. This current in turn causes a force applied to the basilar membrane, creating in this way an active feedback mechanism. A state space representation of the electro-mechanical model from existing literature was implemented and a first comparison with the finite element method is presented.

  15. Preventing gut leakiness by oats supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzian, A; Choudhary, S; Holmes, E W; Yong, S; Banan, A; Jakate, S; Fields, J Z

    2001-11-01

    Only 30% of alcoholics develop liver disease (ALD) suggesting that additional factors are needed. Endotoxin is one such factor, but its etiology is unclear. Since the gut is the main source of endotoxin, we sought to determine whether an increase in intestinal permeability (leaky gut) is required for alcohol-induced endotoxemia and liver injury and whether the gut leakiness is preventable. For 10 weeks, rats received by gavage increasing alcohol doses (to 8 g/kg/day) and either oats (10 g/kg) or chow b.i.d. Intestinal permeability was then assessed by urinary excretion of lactulose and mannitol. Liver injury was evaluated histologically, biochemically (liver fat content), and by serum aminotransferase. Alcohol caused gut leakiness that was associated with both endotoxemia and liver injury. Oats prevented these changes. We conclude that chronic gavage of alcohol in rats is a simple experimental model that mimics key aspects of ALD, including endotoxemia and liver injury, and can be useful to study possible mechanisms of endotoxemia in ALD. Since preventing the gut leakiness by oats also prevented the endotoxemia and ameliorated liver damage in rat, our results suggest that alcohol-induced gut leakiness 1) may cause alcohol-induced endotoxemia and liver injury and 2) may be the critical cofactor in the 30% of alcoholics who develop ALD. Further studies are needed to determine whether ALD in humans can be prevented by preventing alcohol-induced gut leakiness, studies that should lead to the development of useful therapeutic agents for the prevention of ALD.

  16. Tidal and residual circulations in coupled restricted and leaky lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyondet, Thomas; Koutitonsky, Vladimir G.

    2008-04-01

    Finite element numerical modelling based on field data is used to study the tidal and tidally induced residual circulation dynamics of a coupled "restricted" and "leaky" coastal lagoon system located in the Magdalen Islands, Gulf of Saint-Lawrence. Havre-aux-Maisons Lagoon (HML) is of a "restricted" nature with a neutral inlet in terms of tidal asymmetry. Grande-Entrée Lagoon (GEL) is of a "leaky" nature with a marked ebb dominance at the inlet due to direct interactions between the main astronomical tidal constituents. The imbalance caused by the different tidal filtering characteristics of both inlets combines with the internal morphological asymmetries of the system to produce a residual throughflow from HML to GEL. The residual circulation is also characterized by strongest values at both inlets, very weak residual currents in HML deep basin and a dipole of residual eddies over the deeper areas of GEL. Further investigations including numerical tracer experiments will be necessary to achieve a full understanding of the long term circulation of this lagoonal system.

  17. Neural and Neural Gray-Box Modeling for Entry Temperature Prediction in a Hot Strip Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, José Angel; Torres-Alvarado, Miguel; Cavazos, Alberto; Leduc, Luis

    2011-10-01

    In hot strip mills, initial controller set points have to be calculated before the steel bar enters the mill. Calculations rely on the good knowledge of rolling variables. Measurements are available only after the bar has entered the mill, and therefore they have to be estimated. Estimation of process variables, particularly that of temperature, is of crucial importance for the bar front section to fulfill quality requirements, and the same must be performed in the shortest possible time to preserve heat. Currently, temperature estimation is performed by physical modeling; however, it is highly affected by measurement uncertainties, variations in the incoming bar conditions, and final product changes. In order to overcome these problems, artificial intelligence techniques such as artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic have been proposed. In this article, neural network-based systems, including neural-based Gray-Box models, are applied to estimate scale breaker entry temperature, given its importance, and their performance is compared to that of the physical model used in plant. Several neural systems and several neural-based Gray-Box models are designed and tested with real data. Taking advantage of the flexibility of neural networks for input incorporation, several factors which are believed to have influence on the process are also tested. The systems proposed in this study were proven to have better performance indexes and hence better prediction capabilities than the physical models currently used in plant.

  18. Soil carbon: A leaky sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Mark A.

    2017-07-01

    Ambitious greenhouse-gas emissions cuts are needed to limit the global mean annual temperature increase to 1.5 °C above preindustrial levels. A study now finds that the land sink for CO2 appears much smaller than is currently factored into climate models, suggesting that emissions cuts may need to be even more ambitious than currently estimated.

  19. Evaluation of numerical models by FerryBox and Fixed Platform in-situ data in the southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, M.; Janssen, F.; Siddorn, J.; Petersen, W.; Dick, S.

    2015-02-01

    FerryBoxes installed on ships of opportunity (SoO) provide high-frequency surface biogeochemical measurements along selected tracks on a regular basis. Within the European FerryBox Community, several FerryBoxes are operated by different institutions. Here we present a comparison of model simulations applied to the North Sea with FerryBox temperature and salinity data from a transect along the southern North Sea and a more detailed analysis at three different positions located off the English East coast, at the Oyster Ground and in the German Bight. In addition to the FerryBox data, data from a Fixed Platform of the MARNET network are applied. Two operational hydrodynamic models have been evaluated for different time periods: results of BSHcmod v4 are analysed for 2009-2012, while simulations of FOAM AMM7 NEMO have been available from MyOcean data base for 2011 and 2012. The simulation of water temperatures is satisfying; however, limitations of the models exist, especially near the coast in the southern North Sea, where both models are underestimating salinity. Statistical errors differ between the models and the measured parameters, as the root mean square error (rmse) accounts for BSHcmod v4 to 0.92 K, for AMM7 only to 0.44 K. For salinity, BSHcmod is slightly better than AMM7 (0.98 and 1.1 psu, respectively). The study results reveal weaknesses of both models, in terms of variability, absolute levels and limited spatial resolution. In coastal areas, where the simulation of the transition zone between the coasts and the open ocean is still a demanding task for operational modelling, FerryBox data, combined with other observations with differing temporal and spatial scales serve as an invaluable tool for model evaluation and optimization. The optimization of hydrodynamical models with high frequency regional datasets, like the FerryBox data, is beneficial for their subsequent integration in ecosystem modelling.

  20. SOLUTIONS APPROXIMATING SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A LEAKY AQUIFER RECEIVING WASTEWATER INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state ...

  1. SOLUTIONS APPROXIMATING SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A LEAKY AQUIFER RECEIVING WASTEWATER INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state ...

  2. On the Finite Lifetimes of Poloidal Alfven Waves: Box vs. Dipole Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, E.

    2016-12-01

    Poloidal Alfven waves with high azimuthal wave number (m >> 1) in the Earth's magnetosphere are one-dimensional waves that propagate along the magnetic field with radial magnetic field and azimuthal electric field perturbations. It is of great importance to understand the dynamics of the poloidal mode waves since such polarization enables the waves to interact with ring current particles and accelerate or decelerate them via drift-bounce resonances. We investigate the characteristics of poloidal mode using MHD wave models with high grid resolution. Comparisons among a 3-D simple box model, 2-D and 3-D dipole models advance our knowledge of the wave modes in more realistic conditions. To examine the time-dependent behavior of local wave fields, we impose various standing poloidal Alfven waves with different azimuthal wave numbers and harmonics, and follow their evolution in time. Our results show that, unlike the toroidal field line resonances, poloidal Alfven waves are highly transient phenomena such that the initial poloidal wave energy is transferred to the toroidal mode energy. The transient time scale in dipolar geometry turns out to be much shorter than that in the box model. Our results indicate that the geometric effect on time-dependent behavior of poloidal modes is significant, which should be incorporated into wave-particle interaction. It also suggests that prolonged poloidal mode oscillations are unlikely unless there occurs continuous wave excitation via the wave-particle interaction.

  3. MEP and planetary climates: insights from a two-box climate model containing atmospheric dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jupp, Tim E.; Cox, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    A two-box model for equator-to-pole planetary heat transport is extended to include simple atmospheric dynamics. The surface drag coefficient CD is treated as a free parameter and solutions are calculated analytically in terms of the dimensionless planetary parameters η (atmospheric thickness), ω (rotation rate) and ξ (advective capability). Solutions corresponding to maximum entropy production (MEP) are compared with solutions previously obtained from dynamically unconstrained two-box models. As long as the advective capability ξ is sufficiently large, dynamically constrained MEP solutions are identical to dynamically unconstrained MEP solutions. Consequently, the addition of a dynamical constraint does not alter the previously obtained MEP results for Earth, Mars and Titan, and an analogous result is presented here for Venus. The rate of entropy production in an MEP state is shown to be independent of rotation rate if the advective capability ξ is sufficiently large (as for the four examples in the solar system), or if the rotation rate ω is sufficiently small. The model indicates, however, that the dynamical constraint does influence the MEP state when ξ is small, which might be the case for some extrasolar planets. Finally, results from the model developed here are compared with previous numerical simulations in which the effect of varying surface drag coefficient on entropy production was calculated. PMID:20368254

  4. MEP and planetary climates: insights from a two-box climate model containing atmospheric dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jupp, Tim E; Cox, Peter M

    2010-05-12

    A two-box model for equator-to-pole planetary heat transport is extended to include simple atmospheric dynamics. The surface drag coefficient CD is treated as a free parameter and solutions are calculated analytically in terms of the dimensionless planetary parameters eta (atmospheric thickness), omega (rotation rate) and xi (advective capability). Solutions corresponding to maximum entropy production (MEP) are compared with solutions previously obtained from dynamically unconstrained two-box models. As long as the advective capability xi is sufficiently large, dynamically constrained MEP solutions are identical to dynamically unconstrained MEP solutions. Consequently, the addition of a dynamical constraint does not alter the previously obtained MEP results for Earth, Mars and Titan, and an analogous result is presented here for Venus. The rate of entropy production in an MEP state is shown to be independent of rotation rate if the advective capability xi is sufficiently large (as for the four examples in the solar system), or if the rotation rate omega is sufficiently small. The model indicates, however, that the dynamical constraint does influence the MEP state when xi is small, which might be the case for some extrasolar planets. Finally, results from the model developed here are compared with previous numerical simulations in which the effect of varying surface drag coefficient on entropy production was calculated.

  5. cluster-in-a-box: Statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2016-10-01

    Cluster-in-a-box provides a statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters and consists of three modules grouped in two scripts. The first (cluster_distribution) generates the cluster based on the number of stars, input initial mass function, spatial distribution and age distribution. The second (cluster_emission) takes an input file of observations, determines the mass-intensity correlation and generates outflow emission for all low-mass Class 0 and I sources. The output is stored as a FITS image where the flux density is determined by the desired resolution, pixel scale and cluster distance.

  6. Comparisons between box and global model simulations of chemical oxidation in the tropical marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne; Stone, Daniel; Vaughan, Stewart; Ingham, Trevor; Whalley, Lisa; Evans, Mat; Read, Katie; Lee, James; Moller, Sarah; Carpenter, Lucy; Lewis, Alastair

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric oxidation processes during the daytime are dominated by the OH radical, particularly in the tropical marine boundary layer, where the warm, humid conditions and high solar irradiation lead to high OH production rates. Atmospheric models have shown that such high OH production rates in tropical regions lead to a significant fraction of global methane oxidation in tropical regions. Understanding the processes controlling OH concentrations, and thus the extent of methane oxidation, in tropical regions is therefore essential to our understanding of the global oxidising capacity and for accurate climate change predictions. Long-term measurements of OH, and the closely coupled HO2 radical, were made using the FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (16.85 N, 24.87 W) on the island of Sao Vicente as part of the Seasonal Oxidant Study (SOS) in the tropical Atlantic during three distinct seasonal periods in February-March, June and September 2009 (Vaughan et al., ACP, 12, 2149, 2012). In this paper we describe model simulations of OH and HO2 radicals with both a heavily constrained box model using the Dynamically Simple Model of Atmospheric Chemical Complexity (DSMACC), based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2, extended with a halogen chemistry scheme), and the three-dimensional global chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem (v9-01-03, including recent updates to include bromine chemistry). The box model calculations indicate that solar photolysis of ozone is responsible for over 80 % of midday radical production, with photolysis of HCHO contributing a further 9 % of the total midday radical production. Radical losses at midday are dominated by CH3O2 + HO2 (26 %), uptake of HO2 onto aerosol surfaces (21 %) and HO2+ HO2 (18 %). Both model approaches result in an overprediction of OH and HO2, potentially arising from incomplete consideration of radical sinks. However, the two model approaches differ in the

  7. Parameters of stochastic diffusion processes estimated from observations of first-hitting times: Application to the leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2007-10-01

    A theoretical model has to stand the test against the real world to be of any practical use. The first step is to identify parameters in the model estimated from experimental data. In many applications where renewal point data are available, models of first-hitting times of underlying diffusion processes arise. Despite the seemingly simplicity of the model, the problem of how to estimate parameters of the underlying stochastic process has resisted solution. The few attempts have either been unreliable, difficult to implement, or only valid in subsets of the relevant parameter space. Here we present an estimation method that overcomes these difficulties, is computationally easy and fast to implement, and also works surprisingly well on small data sets. The method is illustrated on simulated and experimental data. Two common neuronal models—the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck and Feller models—are investigated.

  8. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  9. Holographic Metasurface Leaky Wave Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandi, Sivaseetharaman

    Artificially engineered two-dimensional materials, which are widely known as metasurfaces, are employed as ground planes in various antenna applications. Due to their nature to exhibit desirable electromagnetic behavior, they are also used to design waveguiding structures, absorbers, frequency selective surfaces, angular-independent surfaces, etc. Metasurfaces usually consist of electrically small conductive planar patches arranged in a periodic array on a dielectric covered ground plane. Holographic Artificial Impedance Surfaces (HAISs) are one such metasurfaces that are capable of forming a pencil beam in a desired direction, when excited with surface waves. HAISs are inhomogeneous surfaces that are designed by modulating its surface impedance. This surface impedance modulation creates a periodical discontinuity that enables a part of the surface waves to leak out into the free space leading to far-field radiation. The surface impedance modulation is based on the holographic principle. This dissertation is concentrated on designing HAISs with Desired polarization for the pencil beam Enhanced bandwidth Frequency scanning Conformity to curved surfaces HAIS designs considered in this work include both one and two dimensional modulations. All the designs and analyses are supported by mathematical models and HFSS simulations.

  10. Effects Of Leaky Sewers On Groundwater Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Oswald, S. E.; Schirmer, M.

    2007-12-01

    The impact of urban areas on groundwater quality has become an emerging research field in hydrogeology. Urban subsurface infrastructures like sewer networks are often leaky, so untreated wastewater may enter the urban aquifer. The transport of wastewater into the groundwater is still not well understood under field conditions. In the research platform WASSER Leipzig (Water And Sewershed Study of Environmental Risk in Leipzig- Germany) the effects of leaky sewers on the groundwater quality are investigated. The research is focused on the occurrence and transport of so-called "xenobiotics" such as pharmaceuticals and personal care product additives. Xenobiotics may pose a threat on human health, but can also be considered a marker for an urban impact on water resources. A new test site was established in Leipzig to quantify mass fluxes of xenobiotics into the groundwater from a leaky sewer. Corresponding to the leaks which were detected by closed circuit television inspections, monitoring wells were installed up- and downstream of the sewer. Concentrations of eight xenobiotics (technical-nonylphenol, bisphenol-a, caffeine, galaxolide, tonalide, carbamazepine, phenazone, ethinylestradiol) obtained from first sampling programmes were found to be highly heterogeneous, but a relation between the position of the sampling points and the sewer could not be clearly identified. However, concentrations of sodium, chloride, potassium and nitrate increased significantly downstream of the sewer which may be due to wastewater exfiltration, since no other source is known on the water flowpath from the upstream to the downstream wells. Because of the highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of xenobiotics at the test site, a monitoring concept was developed comprising both high-resolution sampling and an integral approach to obtain representative average concentrations. Direct-push techniques were used to gain insight into the fine-scale spatial distribution of the target compounds

  11. A random effects meta-analysis model with Box-Cox transformation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Maruo, Kazushi; Partlett, Christopher; Riley, Richard D

    2017-07-19

    In a random effects meta-analysis model, true treatment effects for each study are routinely assumed to follow a normal distribution. However, normality is a restrictive assumption and the misspecification of the random effects distribution may result in a misleading estimate of overall mean for the treatment effect, an inappropriate quantification of heterogeneity across studies and a wrongly symmetric prediction interval. We focus on problems caused by an inappropriate normality assumption of the random effects distribution, and propose a novel random effects meta-analysis model where a Box-Cox transformation is applied to the observed treatment effect estimates. The proposed model aims to normalise an overall distribution of observed treatment effect estimates, which is sum of the within-study sampling distributions and the random effects distribution. When sampling distributions are approximately normal, non-normality in the overall distribution will be mainly due to the random effects distribution, especially when the between-study variation is large relative to the within-study variation. The Box-Cox transformation addresses this flexibly according to the observed departure from normality. We use a Bayesian approach for estimating parameters in the proposed model, and suggest summarising the meta-analysis results by an overall median, an interquartile range and a prediction interval. The model can be applied for any kind of variables once the treatment effect estimate is defined from the variable. A simulation study suggested that when the overall distribution of treatment effect estimates are skewed, the overall mean and conventional I (2) from the normal random effects model could be inappropriate summaries, and the proposed model helped reduce this issue. We illustrated the proposed model using two examples, which revealed some important differences on summary results, heterogeneity measures and prediction intervals from the normal random effects model

  12. Internal Structural Design of the Common Research Model Wing Box for Aeroelastic Tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2015-01-01

    This work explores the use of alternative internal structural designs within a full-scale wing box structure for aeroelastic tailoring, with a focus on curvilinear spars, ribs, and stringers. The baseline wing model is a fully-populated, cantilevered wing box structure of the Common Research Model (CRM). Metrics of interest include the wing weight, the onset of dynamic flutter, and the static aeroelastic stresses. Twelve parametric studies alter the number of internal structural members along with their location, orientation, and curvature. Additional evaluation metrics are considered to identify design trends that lead to lighter-weight, aeroelastically stable wing designs. The best designs of the individual studies are compared and discussed, with a focus on weight reduction and flutter resistance. The largest weight reductions were obtained by removing the inner spar, and performance was maintained by shifting stringers forward and/or using curvilinear ribs: 5.6% weight reduction, a 13.9% improvement in flutter speed, but a 3.0% increase in stress levels. Flutter resistance was also maintained using straight-rotated ribs although the design had a 4.2% lower flutter speed than the curved ribs of similar weight and stress levels were higher. For some configurations, the differences between curved and straight ribs were smaller, which provides motivation for future optimization-based studies to fully exploit the trade-offs.

  13. Comparison of Lagrangian and Steady State Box Model Runs With Measurement Data Obtained During GABRIEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, A.; Fischer, H.; Gurk, C.; Bozem, H.; Schiller, C.; Parchatka, U.; Martinez-Harder, M.; Kubistin, D.; Harder, H.; Williams, J.; Königstedt, R.; Ganzeveld, L.; Lelieveld, J.

    2006-12-01

    Results of a comparison of different Lagrangian and steady state box model runs with measurement data obtained during the GABRIEL campaign over the tropical rainforest in October 2005 (Suriname) are presented and discussed. Lagrangian modelling of boundary layer (BL) CO (0-1 km a.s.l.) constrained by measured O3, methanol, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone, NO, HCHO, H2O2, organic peroxide, OH, HO2, H2O and radiation was used to derive the horizontal gradient (~ 8 pptv/km) of this compound from the ocean to the rainforest (east to west). It is significantly smaller than those derived from the measurements (16-48 pptv/km), indicating that photochemical production from organic precursors alone cannot explain the observed strong gradient. The results were cross- checked with a steady state and a Lagrangian box model study for HCHO. It appears that HCHO is significantly overestimated by the models, which include dry deposition, but not exchange with the free troposphere (FT). Sensitivity runs show that only an unlikely combination of several modified parameters (OH minus 25%, NO minus 5 pptv, Cl minus 75%, vdep = vdep(HNO3)) comes close to the observed values. The relatively short calculated lifetime of HCHO (50-100 min) implies significant BL-FT exchange even on small timescales if heterogeneous loss of HCHO on aerosol particles is considered to be unimportant. The mixing-in from above of FT air affected by biomass burning would increase the CO and lower the HCHO mixing ratios, leading to a better agreement of models and measurements. The deposition velocity for H2O2 over ocean and rainforest is deduced from box model results constrained by HOx and radiation measurements and assuming BL-FT exchange adequate to the results for CO. The Lagrangian model is used to check if the horizontal gradient observed for organic peroxides can be reproduced assuming that their deposition velocity is smaller than that of H2O2. Finally O3 formation

  14. Numerical modeling of field tests in unsaturated fractured basalt at the Box Canyon site

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.

    1998-05-01

    A TOUGH2 model of a ponded infiltration test has been developed and used to predict the results of a field experiment conducted in the vadose zone of the fractured Snake River Plain basalts, at the Box Canyon site in southeastern idaho. The key question addressed is how fracture-pattern characteristics and connectivity affect the pattern of liquid infiltration. The numerical model, a two-dimensional vertical cross-section, uses half-meter discretization for the shallow field site, which extends about 20 m from the ground surface to an underlying perched water body. The model includes explicit but highly simplified representations of major fractures and other important hydrological features. It adequately reproduces the majority of the field observations, confirming the notion that infiltration is largely fracture-controlled.

  15. The atmospheric chemistry box model CAABA/MECCA-3.0gmdd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.; Baumgaertner, A.; Gromov, S.; Harder, H.; Jöckel, P.; Kerkweg, A.; Kubistin, D.; Regelin, E.; Riede, H.; Sandu, A.; Taraborrelli, D.; Tost, H.; Xie, Z.-Q.

    2011-01-01

    We present version 3.0gmdd of the atmospheric chemistry box model CAABA/MECCA. In addition to a complete update of the rate coefficients to the most recent recommendations, a number of new features have been added: chemistry in multiple aerosol size bins; automatic multiple simulations reaching steady-state conditions; Monte-Carlo simulations with randomly varied rate coefficients within their experimental uncertainties; calculations along Lagrangian trajectories; mercury chemistry; more detailed isoprene chemistry; tagging of isotopically labeled species. Further changes have been implemented to make the code more user-friendly and to facilitate the analysis of the model results. Like earlier versions, CAABA/MECCA-3.0gmdd is a community model published under the GNU General Public License (GPL).

  16. The atmospheric chemistry box model CAABA/MECCA-3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.; Baumgaertner, A.; Gromov, S.; Harder, H.; Jöckel, P.; Kerkweg, A.; Kubistin, D.; Regelin, E.; Riede, H.; Sandu, A.; Taraborrelli, D.; Tost, H.; Xie, Z.-Q.

    2011-05-01

    We present version 3.0 of the atmospheric chemistry box model CAABA/MECCA. In addition to a complete update of the rate coefficients to the most recent recommendations, a number of new features have been added: chemistry in multiple aerosol size bins; automatic multiple simulations reaching steady-state conditions; Monte-Carlo simulations with randomly varied rate coefficients within their experimental uncertainties; calculations along Lagrangian trajectories; mercury chemistry; more detailed isoprene chemistry; tagging of isotopically labeled species. Further changes have been implemented to make the code more user-friendly and to facilitate the analysis of the model results. Like earlier versions, CAABA/MECCA-3.0 is a community model published under the GNU General Public License.

  17. Carrying BioMath education in a Leaky Bucket.

    PubMed

    Powell, James A; Kohler, Brynja R; Haefner, James W; Bodily, Janice

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a project-based mathematical lab implemented in our Applied Mathematics in Biology course. The Leaky Bucket Lab allows students to parameterize and test Torricelli's law and develop and compare their own alternative models to describe the dynamics of water draining from perforated containers. In the context of this lab students build facility in a variety of applied biomathematical tools and gain confidence in applying these tools in data-driven environments. We survey analytic approaches developed by students to illustrate the creativity this encourages as well as prepare other instructors to scaffold the student learning experience. Pedagogical results based on classroom videography support the notion that the Biology-Applied Math Instructional Model, the teaching framework encompassing the lab, is effective in encouraging and maintaining high-level cognition among students. Research-based pedagogical approaches that support the lab are discussed.

  18. Simpson's Paradox in the Interpretation of "Leaky Pipeline" Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Paul H.; Walton, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional "leaky pipeline" plots are widely used to inform gender equality policy and practice. Herein, we demonstrate how a statistical phenomenon known as Simpson's paradox can obscure trends in gender "leaky pipeline" plots. Our approach has been to use Excel spreadsheets to generate hypothetical "leaky…

  19. Simpson's Paradox in the Interpretation of "Leaky Pipeline" Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Paul H.; Walton, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional "leaky pipeline" plots are widely used to inform gender equality policy and practice. Herein, we demonstrate how a statistical phenomenon known as Simpson's paradox can obscure trends in gender "leaky pipeline" plots. Our approach has been to use Excel spreadsheets to generate hypothetical "leaky…

  20. Leaky wave lenses for spoof plasmon collimation.

    PubMed

    Panaretos, Anastasios H; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-06-27

    We theoretically demonstrate the feasibility of collimating radiating spoof plasmons using a leaky wave lens approach. Spoof plasmons are surface waves excited along reactance surfaces realized through metallic corrugations. By employing a periodic perturbation to the geometric profile of this type of reactance surface, it becomes feasible to convert the excited spoof plasmons into free-space radiating leaky wave modes. It is demonstrated that by structurally modifying such a corrugated surface through the introduction of a non-uniform sinusoidally modulated reactance profile, then a tapered wavenumber, with a real part less than that of free space, can be established along the surface. In this way the radiating properties of the structure (amplitude and phase) can be locally controlled thereby creating a radiating effect similar to that of a non-uniform current distribution. By properly engineering the space dependent wavenumber along the corrugated surface, different regions of the structure will emit spoof plasmon energy at different angles with varying intensity. The combined effect is the emission of an electromagnetic wave exhibiting a converging wave-front that eventually collimates spoof plasmon energy at some desired focal point.

  1. DO4Models: Testing the Performance of Current Dust Emission Schemes from a Box and Climate Model Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Washington, R.; King, J.; Wiggs, G.; Thomas, D. S. G.; Menut, L.

    2014-12-01

    Dust emission schemes in climate models are relatively simple and are tuned to represent observed background aerosol concentrations. Representations of dust emission in the models were developed from idealized experiments such as those conducted in wind tunnels. Improvement of current model dust emission schemes is hampered by a paucity of observations from key dust sources. The Dust Observations for Models project (DO4Models) was aiming on gathering data from source regions at a scale appropriate to climate model grid box resolution. Here we present (1) the results of 1D box model simulations using three commonly used parameterizations for the horizontal and vertical dust emission flux, (2) using a newly proposed stochastic dust emission scheme for turbulent wind conditions, and (3) HadGEM3 regional climate model simulations using the current model setup for dust emissions. We are comparing box and RCM model results with DO4Models field campaign data retrieved over a typical dust source in Botswana during two consecutive dry seasons (2011 and 2012). The box model performance is further tested using observed soil moisture content, aerodynamic surface stress, shear velocity, and soil size properties. The results suggest that current dust emission schemes do not capture the observed emission flux well. The saltation flux is hugely overestimated, whereas the vertical flux is moderately overestimated. The choice of the sand transport, soil moisture and roughness correction scheme is important but insufficient to bring modeled fluxes into agreement with observed dust fluxes. The stochastic scheme does not suffer from this flux disparity, but cannot be used in cases of strong surface saltation. Potential reasons for the diagnosed mismatch are discussed and the impact of spatial averaging over the 11 field sites within the 12x12km grid is evaluated. HadGEM3 is tested with regard to its capability to reproduce the observed meteorological conditions. Very good agreement

  2. Nitric oxide protects endothelium from cadmium mediated leakiness.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Priya, M Krishna; Swaminathan, Akila; Siamwala, Jamila H; Sinha, Swaraj; Veeriah, Vimal; Sonar, Punam; Jadhav, Vivek; Jaffar Ali, B M; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium targets the vascular endothelium causing endothelial dysfunction and leakiness of endothelial barrier. Nitric oxide plays a major role in mediating endothelial functions including angiogenesis, migration and permeability. The present study investigates the nitric oxide effects on cadmium induced endothelial leakiness. Results of ex vivo and in vitro permeability assays showed that even a sub-lethal dose of cadmium chloride (1 µM) was sufficient to induce leakiness of endothelial cells. Cadmium drastically altered the actin polymerisation pattern and membrane tension of these cells compared to controls. Addition of nitric oxide donor Spermine NONOate (SP) significantly blunted cadmium-mediated effects and recover endothelial cells integrity. Cadmium-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane leakiness are associated with the low nitric oxide availability and high reactive oxygen species generation. In brief, we show the protective role of nitric oxide against cadmium-mediated endothelial leakiness. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  3. Marine ecosystem modeling beyond the box: using GIS to study carbon fluxes in a coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wijnbladh, Erik; Jönsson, Bror Fredrik; Kumblad, Linda

    2006-12-01

    Studies of carbon fluxes in marine ecosystems are often done by using box model approaches with basin size boxes, or highly resolved 3D models, and an emphasis on the pelagic component of the ecosystem. Those approaches work well in the ocean proper, but can give rise to considerable problems when applied to coastal systems, because of the scale of certain ecological niches and the fact that benthic organisms are the dominant functional group of the ecosystem. In addition, 3D models require an extensive modeling effort. In this project, an intermediate approach based on a high resolution (20x20 m) GIS data-grid has been developed for the coastal ecosystem in the Laxemar area (Baltic Sea, Sweden) based on a number of different site investigations. The model has been developed in the context of a safety assessment project for a proposed nuclear waste repository, in which the fate of hypothetically released radionuclides from the planned repository is estimated. The assessment project requires not only a good understanding of the ecosystem dynamics at the site, but also quantification of stocks and flows of matter in the system. The data-grid was then used to set up a carbon budget describing the spatial distribution of biomass, primary production, net ecosystem production and thus where carbon sinks and sources are located in the area. From these results, it was clear that there was a large variation in ecosystem characteristics within the basins and, on a larger scale, that the inner areas are net producing and the outer areas net respiring, even in shallow phytobenthic communities. Benthic processes had a similar or larger influence on carbon fluxes as advective processes in inner areas, whereas the opposite appears to be true in the outer basins. As many radionuclides are expected to follow the pathways of organic matter in the environment, these findings enhance our abilities to realistically describe and predict their fate in the ecosystem.

  4. Travel distance estimation from visual motion by leaky path integration.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Markus; Jenkin, Michael; Harris, Laurence R

    2007-06-01

    Visual motion can be a cue to travel distance when the motion signals are integrated. Distance estimates from visually simulated self-motion are imprecise, however. Previous work in our labs has given conflicting results on the imprecision: experiments by Frenz and Lappe had suggested a general underestimation of travel distance, while results from Redlick, Jenkin and Harris had shown an overestimation of travel distance. Here we describe a collaborative study that resolves the conflict by tracing it to differences in the tasks given to the subjects. With an identical set of subjects and identical visual motion simulation we show that underestimation of travel distance occurs when the task involves a judgment of distance from the starting position, and that overestimation of travel distance occurs when the task requires a judgment of the remaining distance to a particular target position. We present a leaky integrator model that explains both effects with a single mechanism. In this leaky integrator model we introduce the idea that, depending on the task, either the distance from start, or the distance to target is used as a state variable. The state variable is updated during the movement by integration over the space covered by the movement, rather than over time. In this model, travel distance mis-estimation occurs because the integration leaks and because the transformation of visual motion to travel distance involves a gain factor. Mis-estimates in both tasks can be explained with the same leak rate and gain in both conditions. Our results thus suggest that observers do not simply integrate traveled distance and then relate it to the task. Instead, the internally represented variable is either distance from the origin or distance to the goal, whichever is relevant.

  5. The two-box model of climate: limitations and applications to planetary habitability and maximum entropy production studies.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Ralph D

    2010-05-12

    The 'two-box model' of planetary climate is discussed. This model has been used to demonstrate consistency of the equator-pole temperature gradient on Earth, Mars and Titan with what would be predicted from a principle of maximum entropy production (MEP). While useful for exposition and for generating first-order estimates of planetary heat transports, it has too low a resolution to investigate climate systems with strong feedbacks. A two-box MEP model agrees well with the observed day : night temperature contrast observed on the extrasolar planet HD 189733b.

  6. The model of local mode analysis for structural acoustics of box structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, King-Wah

    Structure-borne noise is a new noise pollution problem emerging from railway concrete box structures in Hong Kong. Its low frequency noise with intermittent effect can cause considerable nuisance to neighborhoods. The tonal noise peaks in this low frequency range should be one of the important factors in structure-borne noise analysis. In the acoustic field, the deterministic analysis of all the resonant modes of vibration is generally considered as not practical. Many acoustic experts use the statistical energy analysis as the main tool for the noise investigation whereas the application of the experimental modal analysis in the structural acoustic problem is comparatively rare. In the past, most studies mainly focused on the structure-borne noise measurement and analysis. The detail study of the cause of structure-borne noise is lack, especially for the rectangular concrete box structure. In this dissertation, an experimental and analytical approach is adopted to study a typical concrete box model. This thesis aims at confirming the importance of modal analysis in the structure-borne noise study and then at identifying the local vibration modes along the cross-section of box structure. These local modes are responsible for the structure-borne noise radiation. The findings of this study suggest that the web of viaduct cross-section is not as rigid as assumed in the conventional viaduct design and the web face is likely to be more flexible in the vertical displacement of the concrete viaduct. Two types of local vibration modes along the cross-section are identified: the centre mode and the web mode. At the top panel of the viaduct, the centre mode has movement in the middle but not at the edges. The web mode has movement at the edges with the middle fixed. The combined centre and web mode has been found to be important in the structural acoustics of the concrete box structure. In the actual concrete viaduct, the coincidence frequency is especially low (often around

  7. FerryBox within the Coastal Observatory COSYNA: Examples of observations and potential benefit for data assimilation in hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, W.; Staneva, J.; Grayek, S.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Stanev, E.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the Coastal Observation System for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA) is to obtain a synoptic description of the key state variables of coastal seas and their physical, chemical and ecological drivers and responses in the German Bight (North Sea). The system consists of a network of in situ observations, remote sensing, and coastal predictions systems. The modules of in-situ measurements will be briefly described. One of these major components for continuous observations are FerryBox systems aboard different types of ships as well as at fixed stations on shore. The long-term experiences with FerryBox systems for monitoring typical coastal processes will be presented by means of examples of observation. The benefit of FerryBox data compared to other observations will be critical assessed. Short term processes such as algal blooms or freshwater intrusions with subsequent higher nutrient loads at certain locations can be successfully monitored due to the high density of FerryBox measurements in space and time. From the same reason FerryBox data can be ideally combined with hydrodynamic models using data assimilation techniques. The potential of FerryBox sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) measurements for the improvement of model state estimates in the German Bight will be shown critically assessed. Model-data comparison shows that the reanalysis produced by data assimilation fairly well represents the physical properties in the German Bight. The overall root-mean-square errors between temperature and salinity fields of reanalysis and observation are significantly reduced after the assimilation of the FerryBox data. Furthermore, seasonal variation in temperature is well reproduced and the predicted synoptic variation is significantly correlated with its counterpart from the mooring measured temperature.

  8. An Enhanced Box-Wing Solar Radiation pressure model for BDS and initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qunhe; Wang, Xiaoya; Hu, Xiaogong; Guo, Rui; Shang, Lin; Tang, Chengpan; Shao, Fan

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure forces are the largest non-gravitational perturbations acting on GNSS satellites, which is difficult to be accurately modeled due to the complicated and changing satellite attitude and unknown surface material characteristics. By the end of 2015, there are more than 50 stations of the Multi-GNSS Experiment(MGEX) set-up by the IGS. The simple box-plate model relies on coarse assumptions about the dimensions and optical properties of the satellite due to lack of more detailed information. So, a physical model based on BOX-WING model is developed, which is more sophisticated and more detailed physical structure has been taken into account, then calculating pressure forces according to the geometric relations between light rays and surfaces. All the MGEX stations and IGS core stations had been processed for precise orbit determination tests with GPS and BDS observations. Calculation range covers all the two kinds of Eclipsing and non-eclipsing periods in 2015, and we adopted the un-differential observation mode and more accurate values of satellite phase centers. At first, we tried nine parameters model, and then eliminated the parameters with strong correlation between them, came into being five parameters of the model. Five parameters were estimated, such as solar scale, y-bias, three material coefficients of solar panel, x-axis and z-axis panels. Initial results showed that, in the period of yaw-steering mode, use of Enhanced ADBOXW model results in small improvement for IGSO and MEO satellites, and the Root-Mean-Square(RMS) error value of one-day arc orbit decreased by about 10%~30% except for C08 and C14. The new model mainly improved the along track acceleration, up to 30% while in the radial track was not obvious. The Satellite Laser Ranging(SLR) validation showed, however, that this model had higher prediction accuracy in the period of orbit-normal mode, compared to GFZ multi-GNSS orbit products, as well with relative post

  9. Modelling segregation effects of heterogeneous emissions on ozone levels in idealised urban street canyons: using photochemical box models.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2014-05-01

    Air quality models include representations of pollutant emissions, which necessarily entail spatial averaging to reflect the model grid size; such averaging may result in significant uncertainties and/or systematic biases in the model output. This study investigates such uncertainties, considering ozone concentrations in idealised street canyons within the urban canopy. A photochemical model with grid-averaged emissions of street canyons is compared with a multiple-box model considering each canyon independently. The results reveal that the averaged, 'one-box' model may significantly underestimate true (independent canyon mean) ozone concentrations for typical urban areas, and that the performance of the averaged model is improved for more 'green' and/or less trafficked areas. Our findings also suggest that the trends of 2005-2020 in emissions, in isolation, reduce the error inherent in the averaged-emissions treatment. These new findings may be used to evaluate uncertainties in modelled urban ozone concentrations when grid-averaged emissions are adopted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interpretable inference on the mixed effect model with the Box-Cox transformation.

    PubMed

    Maruo, K; Yamaguchi, Y; Noma, H; Gosho, M

    2017-03-10

    We derived results for inference on parameters of the marginal model of the mixed effect model with the Box-Cox transformation based on the asymptotic theory approach. We also provided a robust variance estimator of the maximum likelihood estimator of the parameters of this model in consideration of the model misspecifications. Using these results, we developed an inference procedure for the difference of the model median between treatment groups at the specified occasion in the context of mixed effects models for repeated measures analysis for randomized clinical trials, which provided interpretable estimates of the treatment effect. From simulation studies, it was shown that our proposed method controlled type I error of the statistical test for the model median difference in almost all the situations and had moderate or high performance for power compared with the existing methods. We illustrated our method with cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) data in an AIDS clinical trial, where the interpretability of the analysis results based on our proposed method is demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Why the Particle-in-a-Box Model Works Well for Cyanine Dyes but Not for Conjugated Polyenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-01-01

    We investigate why the particle-in-a-box (PB) model works well for calculating the absorption wavelengths of cyanine dyes and why it does not work for conjugated polyenes. The PB model is immensely useful in the classroom, but owing to its highly approximate character there is little reason to expect that it can yield quantitative agreement with…

  12. Why the Particle-in-a-Box Model Works Well for Cyanine Dyes but Not for Conjugated Polyenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-01-01

    We investigate why the particle-in-a-box (PB) model works well for calculating the absorption wavelengths of cyanine dyes and why it does not work for conjugated polyenes. The PB model is immensely useful in the classroom, but owing to its highly approximate character there is little reason to expect that it can yield quantitative agreement with…

  13. Improved method for calibration of exchange flows for a physical transport box model of Tampa Bay, FL USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results for both sequential and simultaneous calibration of exchange flows between segments of a 10-box, one-dimensional, well-mixed, bifurcated tidal mixing model for Tampa Bay are reported. Calibrations were conducted for three model options with different mathematical expressi...

  14. The two-box model of climate: limitations and applications to planetary habitability and maximum entropy production studies

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2010-01-01

    The ‘two-box model’ of planetary climate is discussed. This model has been used to demonstrate consistency of the equator–pole temperature gradient on Earth, Mars and Titan with what would be predicted from a principle of maximum entropy production (MEP). While useful for exposition and for generating first-order estimates of planetary heat transports, it has too low a resolution to investigate climate systems with strong feedbacks. A two-box MEP model agrees well with the observed day : night temperature contrast observed on the extrasolar planet HD 189733b. PMID:20368253

  15. Potential and timescales for oxygen depletion in coastal upwelling systems: A box-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. S.; Hales, B.; Siedlecki, S.; Samelson, R. M.

    2016-05-01

    A simple box model is used to examine oxygen depletion in an idealized ocean-margin upwelling system. Near-bottom oxygen depletion is controlled by a competition between flushing with oxygenated offshore source waters and respiration of particulate organic matter produced near the surface and retained near the bottom. Upwelling-supplied nutrients are consumed in the surface box, and some surface particles sink to the bottom where they respire, consuming oxygen. Steady states characterize the potential for hypoxic near-bottom oxygen depletion; this potential is greatest for faster sinking rates, and largely independent of production timescales except in that faster production allows faster sinking. Timescales for oxygen depletion depend on upwelling and productivity differently, however, as oxygen depletion can only be reached in meaningfully short times when productivity is rapid. Hypoxia thus requires fast production, to capture upwelled nutrients, and fast sinking, to deliver the respiration potential to model bottom waters. Combining timescales allows generalizations about tendencies toward hypoxia. If timescales of sinking are comparable to or smaller than the sum of those for respiration and flushing, the steady state will generally be hypoxic, and results indicate optimal timescales and conditions exist to generate hypoxia. For example, the timescale for approach to hypoxia lengthens with stronger upwelling, since surface particle and nutrient are shunted off-shelf, in turn reducing subsurface respiration and oxygen depletion. This suggests that if upwelling winds intensify with climate change the increased forcing could offer mitigation of coastal hypoxia, even as the oxygen levels in upwelled source waters decline.

  16. Sequential box models for indoor air quality: Application to airliner cabin air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. Barry; Spengler, John D.; Halfpenny, Paul F.

    In this paper we present the development and application of a model for indoor air quality. The model represents a departure from the standard box models typically used for indoor environments which has applicability in residences and office buildings. The model has been developed for a physical system consisting of sequential compartments which communicate only with adjacent compartments. Each compartment may contain various source and sink terms for a pollutant as well as leakage, and air transfer from adjacent compartments. The mathematical derivation affords rapid calculation of equilibrium concentrations in an essentially unlimited number of compartments. The model has been applied to air quality in the passenger cabin of three commercial aircraft. Simulations have been performed for environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) under two scenarios, CO 2 and water vapor. Additionally, concentrations in one aircraft have been simulated under conditions different from the standard configuration. Results of the simulations suggest the potential for elevated concentrations of ETS in smoking sections of non-air-recirculating aircraft and throughout the aircraft when air is recirculated. Concentrations of CO 2 and water vapor are consistent with expected results. We conclude that this model may be a useful tool in understanding indoor air quality in general and on aircraft in particular.

  17. Molecular modeling and expression analysis of a MADS-box cDNA from mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Sánchez, Magda A; Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A; Hernandez-Navarro, Eduardo; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria; Martínez-Téllez, Miguel A; Casas-Flores, Sergio; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Islas-Osuna, Maria A

    2014-08-01

    MADS-box genes are a large family of transcription factors initially discovered for their role during development of flowers and fruits. The MADS-box transcription factors from animals have been studied by X-ray protein crystallography but those from plants remain to be studied. In this work, a MADS-box cDNA from mango encoding a protein of 254 residues was obtained and compared. Based on phylogenetic analysis, it is proposed that the MADS-box transcription factor expressed in mango fruit (MiMADS1) belongs to the SEP clade of MADS-box proteins. MiMADS1 mRNA steady-state levels did not changed during mango fruit development and were up-regulated, when mango fruits reached physiological maturity as assessed by qRT-PCR. Thus, MiMADS1 could have a role during development and ripening of this fruit. The theoretical structural model of MiMADS1 showed the DNA-binding domain folding bound to a double-stranded DNA. Therefore, MiMADS1 is an interesting model for understanding DNA-binding for transcriptional regulation.

  18. Automatic Black-Box Model Order Reduction using Radial Basis Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanson, M B; Lee, J F; White, D A

    2011-07-15

    Finite elements methods have long made use of model order reduction (MOR), particularly in the context of fast freqeucny sweeps. In this paper, we discuss a black-box MOR technique, applicable to a many solution methods and not restricted only to spectral responses. We also discuss automated methods for generating a reduced order model that meets a given error tolerance. Numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness and wide applicability of the method. With the advent of improved computing hardware and numerous fast solution techniques, the field of computational electromagnetics are progressed rapidly in terms of the size and complexity of problems that can be solved. Numerous applications, however, require the solution of a problem for many different configurations, including optimization, parameter exploration, and uncertainly quantification, where the parameters that may be changed include frequency, material properties, geometric dimensions, etc. In such cases, thousands of solutions may be needed, so solve times of even a few minutes can be burdensome. Model order reduction (MOR) may alleviate this difficulty by creating a small model that can be evaluated quickly. Many MOR techniques have been applied to electromagnetic problems over the past few decades, particularly in the context of fast frequency sweeps. Recent works have extended these methods to allow more than one parameter and to allow the parameters to represent material and geometric properties. There are still limitations with these methods, however. First, they almost always assume that the finite element method is used to solve the problem, so that the system matrix is a known function of the parameters. Second, although some authors have presented adaptive methods (e.g., [2]), the order of the model is often determined before the MOR process begins, with little insight about what order is actually needed to reach the desired accuracy. Finally, it not clear how to efficiently extend most

  19. Boxed In!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Early years practitioners know what parents are reminded of every Christmas Day--it does not matter how long families spend carefully selecting the presents, the children are likely to spend longer playing with the empty boxes! Children are fascinated with boxes and practitioners can capitalise on this and support early mathematical development…

  20. Bento Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasio, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Bento boxes are common objects in Japanese culture, designed to hold enough lunch for one person. They have individual compartments and sometimes multiple tiers for rice, vegetables, and other side dishes. They are made of materials ranging from wood, cloth, aluminum, or plastic. In general, the greater the number of foods, the better the box is…

  1. Bento Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasio, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Bento boxes are common objects in Japanese culture, designed to hold enough lunch for one person. They have individual compartments and sometimes multiple tiers for rice, vegetables, and other side dishes. They are made of materials ranging from wood, cloth, aluminum, or plastic. In general, the greater the number of foods, the better the box is…

  2. Characterization of Anisotropic Leaky Mode Modulators for Holovideo.

    PubMed

    Gneiting, Scott; Kimball, Jacob; Henrie, Andrew; McLaughlin, Stephen; DeGraw, Taylor; Smalley, Daniel

    2016-03-19

    Holovideo displays are based on light-bending spatial light modulators. One such spatial light modulator is the anisotropic leaky mode modulator. This modulator is particularly well suited for holographic video experimentation as it is relatively simple and inexpensive to fabricate. Some additional advantages of leaky mode devices include: large aggregate bandwidth, polarization separation of signal light from noise, large angular deflection and frequency control of color. In order to realize these advantages, it is necessary to be able to adequately characterize these devices as their operation is strongly dependent on waveguide and transducer parameters. To characterize the modulators, the authors use a commercial prism coupler as well as a custom characterization apparatus to identify guided modes, calculate waveguide thickness and finally to map the device's frequency input and angular output of leaky mode modulators. This work gives a detailed description of the measurement and characterization of leaky mode modulators suitable for full-color holographic video.

  3. Breakthroughs in Low-Profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-15

    performance, behavior, and design of innovative High Power Microwave (HPM, GW-class) antennas of the forward-traveling, fast-wave, leaky-wave class...wavelength. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Leaky-wave Antennas. High Power Microwaves (HPM) Antennas. Low-profile Conformal Antennas. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...theory built upon equivalent circuit methods and wave matrix theory, which provided useful formalisms upon which we continue to build. During the

  4. Breakthroughs in Low-Profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    the performance, behavior, and design of innovative High Power Microwave (HPM, GW-class) antennas of the forward-traveling, fast-wave, leaky-wave...current status of the research. Our primary technical activities this period included further investigation of designs with innovative apertures and...presentation of our work at the 17th annual DEPS conference. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Leaky-wave Antennas. High Power Microwaves (HPM) Antennas. Low-profile

  5. Interfacing MATLAB and Python Optimizers to Black-Box Environmental Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. S.; Leung, K.; Tolson, B.

    2009-12-01

    A common approach for utilizing environmental models in a management or policy-analysis context is to incorporate them into a simulation-optimization framework - where an underlying process-based environmental model is linked with an optimization search algorithm. The optimization search algorithm iteratively adjusts various model inputs (i.e. parameters or design variables) in order to minimize an application-specific objective function computed on the basis of model outputs (i.e. response variables). Numerous optimization algorithms have been applied to the simulation-optimization of environmental systems and this research investigated the use of optimization libraries and toolboxes that are readily available in MATLAB and Python - two popular high-level programming languages. Inspired by model-independent calibration codes (e.g. PEST and UCODE), a small piece of interface software (known as PIGEON) was developed. PIGEON allows users to interface Python and MATLAB optimizers with arbitrary black-box environmental models without writing any additional interface code. An initial set of benchmark tests (involving more than 20 MATLAB and Python optimization algorithms) were performed to validate the interface software - results highlight the need to carefully consider such issues as numerical precision in output files and enforcement (or not) of parameter limits. Additional benchmark testing considered the problem of fitting isotherm expressions to laboratory data - with an emphasis on dual-mode expressions combining non-linear isotherms with a linear partitioning component. With respect to the selected isotherm fitting problems, derivative-free search algorithms significantly outperformed gradient-based algorithms. Attempts to improve gradient-based performance, via parameter tuning and also via several alternative multi-start approaches, were largely unsuccessful.

  6. Finite element model updating of a prestressed concrete box girder bridge using subproblem approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. W.; Omenzetter, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the implementation of an updating procedure for the finite element model (FEM) of a prestressed concrete continuous box-girder highway off-ramp bridge. Ambient vibration testing was conducted to excite the bridge, assisted by linear chirp sweepings induced by two small electrodynamic shakes deployed to enhance the excitation levels, since the bridge was closed to traffic. The data-driven stochastic subspace identification method was executed to recover the modal properties from measurement data. An initial FEM was developed and correlation between the experimental modal results and their analytical counterparts was studied. Modelling of the pier and abutment bearings was carefully adjusted to reflect the real operational conditions of the bridge. The subproblem approximation method was subsequently utilized to automatically update the FEM. For this purpose, the influences of bearing stiffness, and mass density and Young's modulus of materials were examined as uncertain parameters using sensitivity analysis. The updating objective function was defined based on a summation of squared values of relative errors of natural frequencies between the FEM and experimentation. All the identified modes were used as the target responses with the purpose of putting more constrains for the optimization process and decreasing the number of potentially feasible combinations for parameter changes. The updated FEM of the bridge was able to produce sufficient improvements in natural frequencies in most modes of interest, and can serve for a more precise dynamic response prediction or future investigation of the bridge health.

  7. A Multilayered Box Model for Calculating Preliminary RemediationGoals in Soil Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao; Javandel, Iraj

    2004-05-21

    In the process of screening a soil against a certain contaminant, we define the health-risk based preliminary remediation goal (PRG) as the contaminant concentration above which some remedial action may be required. PRG is thus the first standard (or guidance) for judging a site. An over-estimated PRG (a too-large value) may cause us to miss some contaminated sites that can threaten human health and the environment. An under-estimated PRG (a too-small value), on the other hand, may lead to unnecessary cleanup and waste tremendous resources. The PRGs for soils are often calculated on the assumption that the contaminant concentration in soil does not change with time. However, that concentration usually decreases with time as a result of different chemical and transport mechanisms. The static assumption thus exaggerates the long-term exposure dose and results in a too-small PRG. We present a box model that considers all important transport processes and obeys the law of mass conservation. We can use the model as a tool to estimate the transient contaminant concentrations in air, soil and groundwater. Using these concentrations in conjunction with appropriate health risk parameters, we may estimate the PRGs for different contaminants. As an example, we calculated the tritium PRG for residential soils. The result is quite different from, but within the range of, the two versions of the corresponding PRG previously recommended by the U.S. EPA.

  8. Lagrangian Simulations of polar ozone loss: from box model to 3-d CTM CLaMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooss, J.; Konopka, P.; Gunther, G.; Walter, R.; Müller, R.

    2005-12-01

    Since the discovery of the ozone hole in 1985, simulations of polar ozone loss improved persistently over the years. Especially using the Lagrangian view in which chemical processes are simulated for air parcels that move in location has been demonstrated to be a successful method. We describe the development of Lagrangian simulations of polar ozone loss starting with chemical box model simulations along particular trajectories up to the 3-dimensional version of the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). Besides chemistry and Lagrangian advection CLaMS contains sophisticated modules for mixing and denitrification. We show CLaMS simulations for the Arctic winters 2002/03, 2004/05 and for the Antarctic winter 2003. The focus will be on chemical ozone loss and denitrification. The processes involved in denitrification, especially the nucleation of NAT particles are not fully understood. From comparisons of the simulated denitrification with observations we conclude that the sensitivity of denitrification on key assumptions is largest at the time of onset of the denitrification. Further we show that besides possible inconsistencies in the ozone loss rates in early winter the ozone depletion over the winter is simulated in agreement with the observations. Overall, CLaMS simulations reproduce the inhomogeneity of chemical ozone loss within the polar vortex well.

  9. Effect of gasoline formulation on the formation of photosmog: a box model study.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Herald; Becker, Karl H; Wiesen, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Based on exhaust gas analyses from the combustion of five different types of gasoline in a passenger car operated on a chassis dynamometer, box model simulations of the irradiation of exhaust/NOx/air mixtures using an established chemical mechanism for a standardized photosmog scenario were performed. The fuel matrix used covered wide fractional ranges for paraffinic, olefinic, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Two fuels also contained methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). The different O3 profiles calculated for each run were compared and interpreted. The O3 levels obtained were strongly influenced by the exhaust gas concentrations of aromatic and olefinic hydrocarbons. The higher exhaust content of these compounds caused higher O3 production in the smog system investigated. The conclusion of the present study is that the composition of gasoline cannot be taken directly for the estimation of the emissions' O3 creation potential from its combustion. Variation of the dilution in the different calculations showed evidence for an additional influence of transport effects. Accordingly, further detailed exhaust gas analyses followed by more complex modeling studies are necessary for a proper characterization of the relationship between fuel blend and gasoline combustion products.

  10. An exact solution to a line-sink in a leaky aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusyev, M. A.; Haitjema, H. M.

    2007-12-01

    element models of leaky aquifer systems.

  11. Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

    2002-05-16

    An automated fault detection and diagnosis tool for HVAC systems is being developed, based on an integrated, life-cycle, approach to commissioning and performance monitoring. The tool uses component-level HVAC equipment models implemented in the SPARK equation-based simulation environment. The models are configured using design information and component manufacturers' data and then fine-tuned to match the actual performance of the equipment by using data measured during functional tests of the sort using in commissioning. This paper presents the results of field tests of mixing box and VAV fan system models in an experimental facility and a commercial office building. The models were found to be capable of representing the performance of correctly operating mixing box and VAV fan systems and detecting several types of incorrect operation.

  12. Black box modeling of PIDs implemented in PLCs without structural information: a support vector regression approach.

    PubMed

    Salat, Robert; Awtoniuk, Michal

    In this report, the parameters identification of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm implemented in a programmable logic controller (PLC) using support vector regression (SVR) is presented. This report focuses on a black box model of the PID with additional functions and modifications provided by the manufacturers and without information on the exact structure. The process of feature selection and its impact on the training and testing abilities are emphasized. The method was tested on a real PLC (Siemens and General Electric) with the implemented PID. The results show that the SVR maps the function of the PID algorithms and the modifications introduced by the manufacturer of the PLC with high accuracy. With this approach, the simulation results can be directly used to tune the PID algorithms in the PLC. The method is sufficiently universal in that it can be applied to any PI or PID algorithm implemented in the PLC with additional functions and modifications that were previously considered to be trade secrets. This method can also be an alternative for engineers who need to tune the PID and do not have any such information on the structure and cannot use the default settings for the known structures.

  13. Targeting Forkhead box O1 from the concept to metabolic diseases: lessons from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiyong; White, Morris F

    2011-02-15

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors have been implicated in regulating the metabolism, cellular proliferation, stress resistance, apoptosis, and longevity. Through the insulin receptor substrate → phosphoinositide 3-kinase → Akt signal cascade, FOXO integrates insulin action with the systemic nutrient and energy homeostasis. Activation of FOXO1 in liver induces gluconeogenesis via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK)/glucose 6-phosphate pathway, and disrupts mitochondrial metabolism and lipid metabolism via heme oxygenase 1/sirtuin 1/Ppargc1α pathway. In skeletal muscle, FOXO1 activation underpins the carbohydrate/lipid switch during fasting state. Inhibition of FOXO1 under physiological conditions accounts for maintenance of skeletal muscle mass/function and adipose differentiation. In pancreatic β-cells, nuclear translocation of FOXO1 antagonizes pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 and attenuates β-cells proliferation and insulin secretion. Regardless, FOXO1 promotes the proliferation of β-cells through induction of Cyclin D1 in low nutrition, and elicits antioxidant mechanism to protect against β-cell failure during oxidative insults. In the brain, FOXO1 controls food intake through transcriptional regulation of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein, and carboxypeptidase E. In this article, we review the role of FOXO1 in the regulation of metabolism and energy expenditure based on recent findings from mouse models, and discuss the therapeutic value of targeting FOXO1 in metabolic diseases.

  14. Targeting Forkhead Box O1 from the Concept to Metabolic Diseases: Lessons from Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors have been implicated in regulating the metabolism, cellular proliferation, stress resistance, apoptosis, and longevity. Through the insulin receptor substrate → phosphoinositide 3-kinase → Akt signal cascade, FOXO integrates insulin action with the systemic nutrient and energy homeostasis. Activation of FOXO1 in liver induces gluconeogenesis via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK)/glucose 6-phosphate pathway, and disrupts mitochondrial metabolism and lipid metabolism via heme oxygenase 1/sirtuin 1/Ppargc1α pathway. In skeletal muscle, FOXO1 activation underpins the carbohydrate/lipid switch during fasting state. Inhibition of FOXO1 under physiological conditions accounts for maintenance of skeletal muscle mass/function and adipose differentiation. In pancreatic β-cells, nuclear translocation of FOXO1 antagonizes pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 and attenuates β-cells proliferation and insulin secretion. Regardless, FOXO1 promotes the proliferation of β-cells through induction of Cyclin D1 in low nutrition, and elicits antioxidant mechanism to protect against β-cell failure during oxidative insults. In the brain, FOXO1 controls food intake through transcriptional regulation of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein, and carboxypeptidase E. In this article, we review the role of FOXO1 in the regulation of metabolism and energy expenditure based on recent findings from mouse models, and discuss the therapeutic value of targeting FOXO1 in metabolic diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 649–661. PMID:20615072

  15. Modeling and new equipment definition for the vibration isolation box equipment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sani, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Our MSAD-funded research project is to provide numerical modeling support for the VIBES (Vibration Isolation Box Experiment System) which is an IML2 flight experiment being built by the Japanese research team of Dr. H. Azuma of the Japanese National Aerospace Laboratory. During this reporting period, the following have been accomplished: A semi-consistent mass finite element projection algorithm for 2D and 3D Boussinesq flows has been implemented on Sun, HP And Cray Platforms. The algorithm has better phase speed accuracy than similar finite difference or lumped mass finite element algorithms, an attribute which is essential for addressing realistic g-jitter effects as well as convectively-dominated transient systems. The projection algorithm has been benchmarked against solutions generated via the commercial code FIDAP. The algorithm appears to be accurate as well as computationally efficient. Optimization and potential parallelization studies are underway. Our implementation to date has focused on execution of the basic algorithm with at most a concern for vectorization. The initial time-varying gravity Boussinesq flow simulation is being set up. The mesh is being designed and the input file is being generated. Some preliminary 'small mesh' cases will be attempted on our HP9000/735 while our request to MSAD for supercomputing resources is being addressed. The Japanese research team for VIBES was visited, the current set up and status of the physical experiment was obtained and ongoing E-Mail communication link was established.

  16. Enhanced and directional emission of semiconductor nanowires tailored through leaky/guided modes.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Domínguez, R; Grzela, G; Rivas, J Gómez; Sánchez-Gil, J A

    2013-11-07

    Photoluminescence from finite semiconductor nanowires is theoretically investigated, exploring and predicting their antenna-like properties for light emission in a variety of configurations of interest in Nanophotonics. The theoretical analysis is based on the leaky/guided mode dispersion relation for infinite nanowires, which govern the local density of available electromagnetic states. Light emission from finite nanowires is then numerically investigated in various scenarios with regard to its enhancement and directionality. A simple analytical model is derived that, upon tuning leaky/guided mode coupling through dipole position/orientation and nanowire length, allows us to predict their antenna-like behavior and thus to tailor photoluminescence (including magnetic dipole transitions) at will, with regard to both enhancement/inhibition and associated radiation patterns.

  17. Film Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students created three-dimensional designs for 35mm film packages to improve graphic arts learning. Describes how the students examined and created film boxes using QuarkXPress software. (CMK)

  18. Film Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students created three-dimensional designs for 35mm film packages to improve graphic arts learning. Describes how the students examined and created film boxes using QuarkXPress software. (CMK)

  19. Uncertainty quantification of box model and CFD predictions for night-time ventilation in Stanford's Y2E2 building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorle, Catherine; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    Robust design of natural ventilation systems remains a challenging task, because the simplifications and assumptions introduced in models that predict natural ventilation performance can result in non negligible uncertainty in the results. The objective of this work is to investigate the predictive capability of two models with very different levels of fidelity: a box model and a CFD simulation. We consider night-flush ventilation in the Y2E2 building and compare the results with available temperature measurements. The box model solves for the average air and thermal mass temperatures, representing heat sources and sinks as integral values. The uncertainty in the input parameters is propagated using a non-intrusive polynomial chaos method. The mean result predicts a too fast cooling rate with a maximum air temperature difference of 0.6K, but the measurements are within the predicted 95% confidence interval. The CFD simulation represents a much higher level of detail in the building model, but it also predicts a too high cooling rate with a maximum air temperature difference of 0.9K. Further work will focus on quantifying the uncertainty in the CFD simulation and on using CFD results to determine inputs for the box model, such as discharge and heat transfer coefficients.

  20. Andromeda chained to the box - dynamical models for M31: bulge and bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaña Díaz, Matias; Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Erwin, Peter; Portail, Matthieu; Opitsch, Michael; Saglia, Roberto; Bender, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Andromeda is our nearest neighbouring disc galaxy and a prime target for detailed modelling of the evolutionary processes that shape galaxies. We analyse the nature of M31's triaxial bulge with an extensive set of N-body models, which include box/peanut (B/P) bulges as well as initial classical bulges (ICBs). Comparing with Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6 μm data, only one model matches simultaneously all the morphological properties of M31's bulge, and requires an ICB and a B/P bulge with 1/3 and 2/3 of the total bulge mass, respectively. We find that our pure B/P bulge models do not show concentrations high enough to match the Sérsic index (n) and the effective radius of M31's bulge. Instead, the best model requires an ICB component with mass MICB = 1.1 × 1010 M⊙ and 3D half-mass radius rhalfICB = 0.53 kpc (140 arcsec). The B/P bulge component has a mass of MB/P = 2.2 × 1010 M⊙ and a half-mass radius of rhalfB/P = 1.3 kpc (340 arcsec). The model's B/P bulge extends to rB/P = 3.2 kpc (840 arcsec) in the plane of the disc as does M31's bulge. In this composite bulge model, the ICB component explains the velocity dispersion drop observed in the centre within R < 190 pc (50 arcsec), while the B/P bulge component reproduces the observed rapid rotation and the kinematic twist of the observed zero velocity line. This model's pattern speed is Ωp = 38 km s-1 kpc-1, placing corotation at rcor = 5.8 kpc (1500 arcsec). The outer Lindblad resonance (OLR) is then at rOLR = 10.4 kpc, near the 10 kpc ring of M31, suggesting that this structure may be related to the bar's OLR. By comparison with an earlier snapshot, we estimate that M31's thin bar extends to rbarthin ˜ 4.0 kpc (1000 arcsec) in the disc plane, and in projection extends to Rbarthin ˜ 2.3 kpc (600 arcsec).

  1. Numerical simulation of the leaky dielectric microdroplet generation in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Reza; Manshadi, Mohammad Karim Dehghan

    2016-07-01

    Microdroplet generation has a vast range of applications in the chemical, biomedical, and biological sciences. Several devices are applied to produce microdroplets, such as Co-flow, T-junction and Flow-focusing. The important point in the producing process is controlling the separated fluid volume in these devices. On the other hand, a large number of liquids, especially aqueous one, are influenced by electric or magnetic fields. As a consequence, an electric field could be used in order to affect the separated fluid volume. In this study, effects of an electric field on the microdroplet generation in a Co-flow device are investigated numerically. Furthermore, effects of some electrical properties such as permittivity on the separating process of microdroplets are studied. Leaky dielectric and perfect dielectric models are used in this investigation. According to the results, in the microdroplet generating process, leaky dielectric fluids show different behaviors, when an electric field is applied to the device. In other words, in a constant electric field strength, the volume of generated microdroplets can increase or decrease, in comparison with the condition without the electric field. However, for perfect dielectric fluids, droplet volume always decreases with increasing the electric field strength. In order to validate the numerical method of this study, deformation of a leaky dielectric droplet in an electric field is investigated. Results are compared with Taylor theoretical model.

  2. Nonlinear electrohydrodynamics of leaky dielectric drops in the Quincke regime: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debasish; Saintillan, David

    2015-11-01

    The deformation of leaky dielectric drops in a dielectric fluid medium when subject to a uniform electric field is a classic electrohydrodynamic phenomenon best described by the well-known Melcher-Taylor leaky dielectric model. In this work, we develop a three-dimensional boundary element method for the full leaky dielectric model to systematically study the deformation and dynamics of liquid drops in strong electric fields. We compare our results with existing numerical studies, most of which have been constrained to axisymmetric drops or have neglected interfacial charge convection by the flow. The leading effect of convection is to enhance deformation of prolate drops and suppress deformation of oblate drops, as previously observed in the axisymmetric case. The inclusion of charge convection also enables us to investigate the dynamics in the Quincke regime, in which experiments exhibit a symmetry-breaking bifurcation leading to a tank-treading regime. Our simulations confirm the existence of this bifurcation for highly viscous drops, and also reveal the development of sharp interfacial charge gradients driven by convection near the drop's equator. American Chemical Society, Petroleum Research Fund.

  3. Openings between Defective Endothelial Cells Explain Tumor Vessel Leakiness

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Hiroya; Baluk, Peter; Morikawa, Shunichi; McLean, John W.; Thurston, Gavin; Roberge, Sylvie; Jain, Rakesh K.; McDonald, Donald M.

    2000-01-01

    Leakiness of blood vessels in tumors may contribute to disease progression and is key to certain forms of cancer therapy, but the structural basis of the leakiness is unclear. We sought to determine whether endothelial gaps or transcellular holes, similar to those found in leaky vessels in inflammation, could explain the leakiness of tumor vessels. Blood vessels in MCa-IV mouse mammary carcinomas, which are known to be unusually leaky (functional pore size 1.2–2 μm), were compared to vessels in three less leaky tumors and normal mammary glands. Vessels were identified by their binding of intravascularly injected fluorescent cationic liposomes and Lycopersicon esculentum lectin and by CD31 (PECAM) immunoreactivity. The luminal surface of vessels in all four tumors had a defective endothelial monolayer as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. In MCa-IV tumors, 14% of the vessel surface was lined by poorly connected, overlapping cells. The most superficial lining cells, like endothelial cells, had CD31 immunoreactivity and fenestrae with diaphragms, but they had a branched phenotype with cytoplasmic projections as long as 50 μm. Some branched cells were separated by intercellular openings (mean diameter 1.7 μm; range, 0.3–4.7 μm). Transcellular holes (mean diameter 0.6 μm) were also present but were only 8% as numerous as intercellular openings. Some CD31-positive cells protruded into the vessel lumen; others sprouted into perivascular tumor tissue. Tumors in RIP-Tag2 mice had, in addition, tumor cell-lined lakes of extravasated erythrocytes. We conclude that some tumor vessels have a defective cellular lining composed of disorganized, loosely connected, branched, overlapping or sprouting endothelial cells. Openings between these cells contribute to tumor vessel leakiness and may permit access of macromolecular therapeutic agents to tumor cells. PMID:10751361

  4. Using A Time-Dependent Dynamical Box Model to Understand Intermediate Water Records of Radiocarbon and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, S.; Adkins, J. F.; Thompson, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    The circulation of Intermediate Waters influences global oceanic heat and carbon transport and changes in their distributions are also tied to glacial-interglacial climate transitions. In the modern ocean, temperature dominates interior density gradients and thus, to a large extent controls the deep circulation. Our chief tool for understanding the rate of this deep circulation comes from radiocarbon. Coupled radiocarbon and U/Th dates on deep-sea Desmophyllum dianthus corals allows for the reconstruction of past Intermediate Water circulation rates. Additionally, clumped isotope-based temperature estimates yield insight into the physical mechanisms contributing to circulation variability. We present deep-sea coral radiocarbon and clumped isotope temperature records from the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean, which show a high amount of variability during Heinrich Stadial 2 and the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Radiocarbon data from the north and south are very consistent with each other, and other datasets from similar depths broadly agree. We further explore the ocean dynamics behind our observations using a time-dependent dynamical box model. This model consists of an ACC channel, an Atlantic basin, and a Pacific basin. There are multiple layers representing different density classes and the volume of the boxes responds to realistic residual-mean Southern Ocean dynamics. Our model has a surface buoyancy flux, wind forcing and transfer of mass between the basins in the ACC region, diffusive upwelling in the basins, and North Atlantic Deep Water formation. The model solves for the circulation and stratification in addition to the volumes of the boxes. We use this model with added biogeochemistry to explore the mechanisms driving Intermediate Water signals observed during Marine Isotope Stage 2 and the deglaciation. Our box model is able to offer an independent and dynamical perspective to help understand these paleo records.

  5. A look inside 'black box' hydrograph separation models: A study at the hydrohill catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, C.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Gu, W.

    2001-01-01

    Runoff sources and dominant flowpaths are still poorly understood in most catchments; consequently, most hydrograph separations are essentially 'black box' models where only external information is used. The well-instrumented 490 m2 Hydrohill artificial grassland catchment located near Nanjing (China) was used to examine internal catchment processes. Since groundwater levels never reach the soil surface at this site, two physically distinct flowpaths can unambiguously be defined: surface and subsurface runoff. This study combines hydrometric, isotopic and geochemical approaches to investigating the relations between the chloride, silica, and oxygen isotopic compositions of subsurface waters and rainfall. During a 120 mm storm over a 24 h period in 1989, 55% of event water input infiltrated and added to soil water storage; the remainder ran off as infiltration-excess overland flow. Only about 3-5% of the pre-event water was displaced out of the catchment by in-storm rainfall. About 80% of the total flow was quickflow, and 10% of the total flow was pre-event water, mostly derived from saturated flow from deeper soils. Rain water with high ??18O values from the beginning of the storm appeared to be preferentially stored in shallow soils. Groundwater at the end of the storm shows a wide range of isotopic and chemical compositions, primarily reflecting the heterogeneous distribution of the new and mixed pore waters. High chloride and silica concentrations in quickflow runoff derived from event water indicate that these species are not suitable conservative tracers of either water sources or flowpaths in this catchment. Determining the proportion of event water alone does not constrain the possible hydrologic mechanisms sufficiently to distinguish subsurface and surface flowpaths uniquely, even in this highly controlled artificial catchment. We reconcile these findings with a perceptual model of stormflow sources and flowpaths that explicitly accounts for water, isotopic

  6. Dynamic and multi-pharmacophore modeling for designing polo-box domain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Senese, Silvia; Yang, Qianfan; Lee, Keun Woo; Torres, Jorge Z

    2014-01-01

    The polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a critical regulator of cell division that is overexpressed in many types of tumors. Thus, a strategy in the treatment of cancer has been to target the kinase activity (ATPase domain) or substrate-binding domain (Polo-box Domain, PBD) of Plk1. However, only few synthetic small molecules have been identified that target the Plk1-PBD. Here, we have applied an integrative approach that combines pharmacophore modeling, molecular docking, virtual screening, and in vitro testing to discover novel Plk1-PBD inhibitors. Nine Plk1-PBD crystal structures were used to generate structure-based hypotheses. A common pharmacophore model (Hypo1) composed of five chemical features was selected from the 9 structure-based hypotheses and used for virtual screening of a drug-like database consisting of 159,757 compounds to identify novel Plk1-PBD inhibitors. The virtual screening technique revealed 9,327 compounds with a maximum fit value of 3 or greater, which were selected and subjected to molecular docking analyses. This approach yielded 93 compounds that made good interactions with critical residues within the Plk1-PBD active site. The testing of these 93 compounds in vitro for their ability to inhibit the Plk1-PBD, showed that many of these compounds had Plk1-PBD inhibitory activity and that compound Chemistry_28272 was the most potent Plk1-PBD inhibitor. Thus Chemistry_28272 and the other top compounds are novel Plk1-PBD inhibitors and could be used for the development of cancer therapeutics.

  7. Uncoupling protein-1 is not leaky.

    PubMed

    Shabalina, Irina G; Ost, Mario; Petrovic, Natasa; Vrbacky, Marek; Nedergaard, Jan; Cannon, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The activity of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) is rate-limiting for nonshivering thermogenesis and diet-induced thermogenesis. Characteristically, this activity is inhibited by GDP experimentally and presumably mainly by cytosolic ATP within brown-fat cells. The issue as to whether UCP1 has a residual proton conductance even when fully saturated with GDP/ATP (as has recently been suggested) has not only scientific but also applied interest, since a residual proton conductance would make overexpressed UCP1 weight-reducing even without physiological/pharmacological activation. To examine this question, we have here established optimal conditions for studying the bioenergetics of wild-type and UCP1-/- brown-fat mitochondria, analysing UCP1-mediated differences in parallel preparations of brown-fat mitochondria from both genotypes. Comparing different substrates, we find that pyruvate (or palmitoyl-L-carnitine) shows the largest relative coupling by GDP. Comparing albumin concentrations, we find the range 0.1-0.6% optimal; higher concentrations are inhibitory. Comparing basic medium composition, we find 125 mM sucrose optimal; an ionic medium (50-100 mM KCl) functions for wild-type but is detrimental for UCP1-/- mitochondria. Using optimal conditions, we find no evidence for a residual proton conductance (not a higher post-GDP respiration, a lower membrane potential or an altered proton leak at highest common potential) with either pyruvate or glycerol-3-phosphate as substrates, nor by a 3-4-fold alteration of the amount of UCP1. We could demonstrate that certain experimental conditions, due to respiratoty inhibition, could lead to the suggestion that UCP1 possesses a residual proton conductance but find that under optimal conditions our experiments concur with implications from physiological observations that in the presence of inhibitory nucleotides, UCP1 is not leaky.

  8. Coupled leaky mode theory for light absorption in 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiling; Cao, Linyou

    2012-06-18

    We present an intuitive, simple theoretical model, coupled leaky mode theory (CLMT), to analyze the light absorption of 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures. This model correlates the light absorption of nanostructures to the optical coupling between incident light and leaky modes of the nanostructure. Unlike conventional methods such as Mie theory that requests specific physical features of nanostructures to evaluate the absorption, the CLMT model provides an unprecedented capability to analyze the absorption using eigen values of the leaky modes. Because the eigenvalue shows very mild dependence on the physical features of nanostructures, we can generally apply one set of eigenvalues calculated using a real, constant refractive index to calculations for the absorption of various nanostructures with different sizes, different materials, and wavelength-dependent complex refractive index. This CLMT model is general, simple, yet reasonably accurate, and offers new intuitive physical insights that the light absorption of nanostructures is governed by the coupling efficiency between incident light and leaky modes of the structure.

  9. Shallow Boomerang-shaped Influenza Hemagglutinin G13A Mutant Structure Promotes Leaky Membrane Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alex L.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that an angled boomerang-shaped structure of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) fusion domain is critical for virus entry into host cells by membrane fusion. Because the acute angle of ∼105° of the wild-type fusion domain promotes efficient non-leaky membrane fusion, we asked whether different angles would still support fusion and thus facilitate virus entry. Here, we show that the G13A fusion domain mutant produces a new leaky fusion phenotype. The mutant fusion domain structure was solved by NMR spectroscopy in a lipid environment at fusion pH. The mutant adopted a boomerang structure similar to that of wild type but with a shallower kink angle of ∼150°. G13A perturbed the structure of model membranes to a lesser degree than wild type but to a greater degree than non-fusogenic fusion domain mutants. The strength of G13A binding to lipid bilayers was also intermediate between that of wild type and non-fusogenic mutants. These membrane interactions provide a clear link between structure and function of influenza fusion domains: an acute angle is required to promote clean non-leaky fusion suitable for virus entry presumably by interaction of the fusion domain with the transmembrane domain deep in the lipid bilayer. A shallower angle perturbs the bilayer of the target membrane so that it becomes leaky and unable to form a clean fusion pore. Mutants with no fixed boomerang angle interacted with bilayers weakly and did not promote any fusion or membrane perturbation. PMID:20826788

  10. Grey box modelling and advanced control scheme for building heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassar, Surinder

    This dissertation is aimed at generating new knowledge on Recurrent Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems (RenFIS) and to explore its application in building automation. Inferential sensing is an attractive approach for modeling the behavior of dynamic processes. Inferential sensor based control strategies are applied to optimize the control of residential heating systems and demonstrate significant energy saving and comfort improvement. Despite the rapidly decreasing cost and improving accuracy of most temperature sensors, it is normally impractical to use a lot of sensors to measure the average air temperature because the wiring and instrumentation can be very expensive to install and maintain. To design a reliable inferential sensor, of fundamental importance is to build a simple and robust dynamic model of the system to be controlled. This dissertation presents the development of an innovative algorithm that is suitable for the robust black-box model. The algorithm is derived from ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System) and is referred to as RenFIS. Like all other modeling techniques, RenFIS performance is sensitive to the training data. In this study, RenFIS is used to model two different heating systems, hot water heating system and forced warm-air heating system. The training data is collected under different operational conditions. RenFIS gives better performance if trained with the data set representing overall qualities of the whole universe of the experimental data. The robustness analysis is conducted by introducing simulated noise to the training data. Results show that RenFIS is less sensitive than ANFIS to the quality of training data. The RenFIS based inferential sensor is then applied to design an inferential control algorithm that can improve the operation of residential heating systems. In current practice, the control of heating systems is based on the measurement of air temperature at one point within the building. The inferential control

  11. Simulation of atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) during polar springtime using the MECCA box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z.-Q.; Sander, R.; Pöschl, U.; Slemr, F.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) during polar springtime are closely correlated with bromine-catalyzed tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs). To study gas- and aqueous-phase reaction kinetics and speciation of mercury during AMDEs, we have included mercury chemistry into the box model MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere), which enables dynamic simulation of bromine activation and ODEs. We found that the reaction of Hg with Br atoms dominates the loss of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM). To explain the experimentally observed synchronous depletion of GEM and O3, the reaction rate of Hg+BrO has to be much lower than that of Hg+Br. The synchronicity is best reproduced with rate coefficients at the lower limit of the literature values for both reactions, i.e. kHg+Br≍3×10-13 and kHg+BrO≤1×10-15 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively. Throughout the simulated AMDEs, \\chem{BrHgOBr} was the most abundant reactive mercury species, both in the gas phase and in the aqueous phase. The aqueous-phase concentrations of BrHgOBr, HgBr2, and HgCl2 were several orders of magnitude larger than that of Hg(SO3)22-. Considering chlorine chemistry outside depletion events (i.e. without bromine activation), the concentration of total divalent mercury in sea-salt aerosol particles (mostly HgCl42-) was much higher than in dilute aqueous droplets (mostly Hg(SO3)22-), and did not exhibit a diurnal cycle (no correlation with HO2 radicals).

  12. Simulation of atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) during polar springtime using the MECCA box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z.-Q.; Sander, R.; Pöschl, U.; Slemr, F.

    2008-07-01

    Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) during polar springtime are closely correlated with bromine-catalyzed tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs). To study gas- and aqueous-phase reaction kinetics and speciation of mercury during AMDEs, we have included mercury chemistry into the box model MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere), which enables dynamic simulation of bromine activation and ODEs. We found that the reaction of Hg with Br atoms dominates the loss of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM). To explain the experimentally observed synchronous destruction of Hg and O3, the reaction rate of Hg+BrO has to be much lower than that of Hg+Br. The synchronicity is best reproduced with rate coefficients at the lower limit of the literature values for both reactions, i.e. kHg+Br≍3×10-13 and kHg+BrO≤1×10-15cm3 mol-1 s-1, respectively. Throughout the simulated AMDEs, BrHgOBr was the most abundant reactive mercury species, both in the gas phase and in the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase concentrations of BrHgOBr, HgBr2, and HgCl2 were several orders of magnitude larger than that of Hg(SO3)2-2. Considering chlorine chemistry outside depletion events (i.e. without bromine activation), the concentration of total divalent mercury in sea-salt aerosol particles (mostly HgCl2) was much higher than in dilute aqueous droplets (mostly Hg(SO3)2-2), and did not exhibit a diurnal cycle (no correlation with HO2 radicals).

  13. Predictive habitat models derived from nest-box occupancy for the endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel in the southern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ford, W. Mark; Evans, A.M.; Odom, Richard H.; Rodrigue, Jane L.; Kelly, C.A.; Abaid, Nicole; Diggins, Corinne A.; Newcomb, Doug

    2016-01-01

    In the southern Appalachians, artificial nest-boxes are used to survey for the endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel (CNFS; Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus), a disjunct subspecies associated with high elevation (>1385 m) forests. Using environmental parameters diagnostic of squirrel habitat, we created 35 a priori occupancy models in the program PRESENCE for boxes surveyed in western North Carolina, 1996-2011. Our best approximating model showed CNFS denning associated with sheltered landforms and montane conifers, primarily red spruce Picea rubens. As sheltering decreased, decreasing distance to conifers was important. Area with a high probability (>0.5) of occupancy was distributed over 18662 ha of habitat, mostly across 10 mountain ranges. Because nest-box surveys underrepresented areas >1750 m and CNFS forage in conifers, we combined areas of high occupancy with conifer GIS coverages to create an additional distribution model of likely habitat. Regionally, above 1385 m, we determined that 31795 ha could be occupied by CNFS. Known occupied patches ranged from

  14. Evaluation of numerical models by FerryBox and fixed platform in situ data in the southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, M.; Janssen, F.; Siddorn, J.; Petersen, W.; Dick, S.

    2015-11-01

    For understanding and forecasting of hydrodynamics in coastal regions, numerical models have served as an important tool for many years. In order to assess the model performance, we compared simulations to observational data of water temperature and salinity. Observations were available from FerryBox transects in the southern North Sea and, additionally, from a fixed platform of the MARNET network. More detailed analyses have been made at three different stations, located off the English eastern coast, at the Oyster Ground and in the German Bight. FerryBoxes installed on ships of opportunity (SoO) provide high-frequency surface measurements along selected tracks on a regular basis. The results of two operational hydrodynamic models have been evaluated for two different time periods: BSHcmod v4 (January 2009 to April 2012) and FOAM AMM7 NEMO (April 2011 to April 2012). While they adequately simulate temperature, both models underestimate salinity, especially near the coast in the southern North Sea. Statistical errors differ between the two models and between the measured parameters. The root mean square error (RMSE) of water temperatures amounts to 0.72 °C (BSHcmod v4) and 0.44 °C (AMM7), while for salinity the performance of BSHcmod is slightly better (0.68 compared to 1.1). The study results reveal weaknesses in both models, in terms of variability, absolute levels and limited spatial resolution. Simulation of the transition zone between the coasts and the open sea is still a demanding task for operational modelling. Thus, FerryBox data, combined with other observations with differing temporal and spatial scales, can serve as an invaluable tool not only for model evaluation, but also for model optimization by assimilation of such high-frequency observations.

  15. Prediction of PM 10 concentrations at urban traffic intersections using semi-empirical box modelling with instantaneous velocity and acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-di; Lu, Wei-Zhen; Xue, Yu

    2009-12-01

    At urban traffic intersections, vehicles frequently stop with idling engines during the red-light period and speed up rapidly during the green-light period. The changes of driving patterns (i.e., idle, acceleration, deceleration and cruising patterns) generally produce uncertain emission. Additionally, the movement of pedestrians and the influence of wind further result in the random dispersion of pollutants. It is, therefore, too complex to simulate the effects of such dynamics on the resulting emission using conventional deterministic causal models. For this reason, a modified semi-empirical box model for predicting the PM 10 concentrations on roadsides is proposed in this paper. The model constitutes three parts, i.e., traffic, emission and dispersion components. The traffic component is developed using a generalized force traffic model to obtain the instantaneous velocity and acceleration when vehicles move through intersections. Hence the distribution of vehicle emission in street canyon during the green-light period is calculated. Then the dispersion component is investigated using a semi-empirical box model combining average wind speed, box height and background concentrations. With these considerations, the proposed model is applied and evaluated using measured data at a busy traffic intersection in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. In order to test the performance of the model, two situations, i.e., the data sets within a sunny day and between two sunny days, were selected to examine the model performance. The predicted values are generally well coincident with the observed data during different time slots except several values are overestimated or underestimated. Moreover, two types of vehicles, i.e., buses and petrol cars, are separately taken into account in the study. Buses are verified to contribute most to the emission in street canyons, which may be useful in evaluating the impact of vehicle emissions on the ambient air quality when there is a significant change

  16. Solutions approximating solute transport in a leaky aquifer receiving wastewater injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Shyun

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state groundwater flow field is assumed, where the injected fluids move horizontally in the pumped aquifer and vertically in the aquitard. The unpumped aquifer is assumed to remain in hydrostatic condition due to its large transmissivity. Descriptions of groundwater velocities are based on appropriate leaky aquifer well hydraulics. The model assumes that contaminants are transmitted in the pumped aquifer by radial advection, and in the aquitard by vertical one-dimensional advection and longitudinal dispersion. Two coupled linear differential equations are formulated to deal with this transport problem; they involve variable coefficients dependent on Bessel functions. The unpumped aquifer is incorporated into the model as a boundary condition. Semianalytical transient solutions for concentration distributions in the pumped aquifer and the aquitard can be obtained by numerically inverting the Laplace domain solutions of the model with the Crump [1976] method. However, the steady state solutions of the model are determined in closed forms. In general, the modeling approach neglecting longitudinal dispersion in the pumped aquifer and lateral dispersion in the aquitard does not introduce significant error to the modelling results, as shown by the good agreement between numerical solutions including these two transport mechanisms and the solutions of the proposed model. Within the context of the assumed hydrogeological conditions, the proposed model appears to be a valid approximation to the problem of interest. Type curves for concentration evaluated at the well bore and the top of the aquitard are given, which can be employed to estimate whether the unpumped aquifer would be polluted as the

  17. Exploding Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney; Jan

    2011-01-01

    How do you teach the "same old, same old" in an interesting and inexpensive way? Art teachers are forever looking for new angles on the good-old elements and principles. And, as budgets tighten, they are trying to be as frugal as possible while still holding their students' attention. Enter exploding boxes! In conceptualizing the three types of…

  18. Exploding Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney; Jan

    2011-01-01

    How do you teach the "same old, same old" in an interesting and inexpensive way? Art teachers are forever looking for new angles on the good-old elements and principles. And, as budgets tighten, they are trying to be as frugal as possible while still holding their students' attention. Enter exploding boxes! In conceptualizing the three types of…

  19. The effects of air gap reflections during air-coupled leaky Lamb wave inspection of thin plates.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zichuan; Jiang, Wentao; Cai, Maolin; Wright, William M D

    2016-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic inspection using leaky Lamb waves offers attractive possibilities for non-contact testing of plate materials and structures. A common method uses an air-coupled pitch-catch configuration, which comprises a transmitter and a receiver positioned at oblique angles to a thin plate. It is well known that the angle of incidence of the ultrasonic bulk wave in the air can be used to preferentially generate specific Lamb wave modes in the plate in a non-contact manner, depending on the plate dimensions and material properties. Multiple reflections of the ultrasonic waves in the air gap between the transmitter and the plate can produce additional delayed waves entering the plate at angles of incidence that are different to those of the original bulk wave source. Similarly, multiple reflections of the leaky Lamb waves in the air gap between the plate and an inclined receiver may then have different angles of incidence and propagation delays when arriving at the receiver and hence the signal analysis may become complex, potentially leading to confusion in the identification of the wave modes. To obtain a better understanding of the generation, propagation and detection of leaky Lamb waves and the effects of reflected waves within the air gaps, a multiphysics model using finite element methods was established. This model facilitated the visualisation of the propagation of the reflected waves between the transducers and the plate, the subsequent generation of additional Lamb wave signals within the plate itself, their leakage into the adjacent air, and the reflections of the leaky waves in the air gap between the plate and receiver. Multiple simulations were performed to evaluate the propagation and reflection of signals produced at different transducer incidence angles. Experimental measurements in air were in good agreement with simulation, which verified that the multiphysics model can provide a convenient and accurate way to interpret the signals in

  20. Polar Ozone Loss Rates: Comparison Of Match Observations With Simulations Of 3-D Chemical Transport Model And Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, O. P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Lefevre, F.; Marchand, M.; Pazmino, A.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2005-12-01

    Model simulations of ozone loss rates during recent arctic and Antarctic winters are compared with the observed ozone loss rates from the match technique. Arctic winters 1994/1995, 1999/2000, 2002/2003 and the Antarctic winter 2003 were considered for the analysis. We use a high resolution chemical transport model MIMOSA-CHIM and REPROBUS box model for the calculation of ozone loss rates. Trajectory model calculations show that the ozone loss rates are dependent on the initialization fields. On the one hand when chemical fields are initialized by UCAM (University of Cambridge SLIMCAT model simulated fields) the loss rates were underestimated by a factor of two whereas on the other hand when it is initialized by UL (University of Leeds) fields the model loss rates are in a very good agreement with match loss rates at lower levels. The study shows a very good agreement between MIMOSA-CHIM simulation and match observation in 1999/2000 winter at both levels, 450 and 500 K, except slight underestimation in March at 500 K. But in January we have a very good agreement. This is also true for 1994/1995 when we consider simulated ozone loss rate in view of the ECMWF wind deficiency assuming that match observations were not made on isolated trajectories. Sensitivity tests, by changing JCl2O2 value, particle number density and heating rates, performed for the arctic winter 1999/2000 shows that we need to improve our understanding of particle number density and heating rate calculation mechanism. Burkholder JCl2O2 has improved the comparison of MIMOSA-CHIM model results with observations (Tripathi et al., 2005). In the same study the comparison results were shown to improved by changing heating rates and number density through NAT particle sedimentation.

  1. A Grey Box Neural Network Model of Basal Ganglia for Gait Signal of Patients with Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pourhedayat, Abbas; Sarbaz, Yashar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease which affects movement control system of the brain. HD symptoms lead to patient’s gait change and influence stride time intervals. In this study, we present a grey box mathematical model to simulate HD disorders. This model contains main physiological findings about BG. Methods: We used artificial neural networks (ANN) and predetermined data to model healthy state behavior, and then we trained patients with HD with this model. All blocks and relations between them were designed based on physiological findings. Results: According to the physiological findings, increasing or decreasing model connection weights are indicative of change in secretion of respective neurotransmitters. Our results show the simulating ability of the model in normal condition and different disease stages. Conclusion: Fine similarity between the presented model and BG physiological structure with its high ability in simulating HD disorders, introduces this model as a powerful tool to analyze HD behavior. PMID:27303605

  2. Material and Thickness Grading for Aeroelastic Tailoring of the Common Research Model Wing Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work quantifies the potential aeroelastic benefits of tailoring a full-scale wing box structure using tailored thickness distributions, material distributions, or both simultaneously. These tailoring schemes are considered for the wing skins, the spars, and the ribs. Material grading utilizes a spatially-continuous blend of two metals: Al and Al+SiC. Thicknesses and material fraction variables are specified at the 4 corners of the wing box, and a bilinear interpolation is used to compute these parameters for the interior of the planform. Pareto fronts detailing the conflict between static aeroelastic stresses and dynamic flutter boundaries are computed with a genetic algorithm. In some cases, a true material grading is found to be superior to a single-material structure.

  3. Breakthroughs in Low-Profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-21

    BREAKTHROUGHS IN LOW-PROFILE LEAKY-WAVE HPM ANTENNAS Prepared by: Robert A. Koslover (PI) Scientific Applications...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Scientific Applications...wave antennas. The theory built upon equivalent circuit methods and wave matrix theory, which provided useful formalisms upon which we continue to

  4. Leaky coaxial cable signal transmission for remote facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Crutcher, R.I.

    1993-03-01

    To develop reliable communications methods to meet the rigorous requirements for nuclear hot cells and similar environments, including control of cranes, transporters, and advanced servomanipulators, the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted extensive tests of numerous technologies to determine their applicability to remote operations. To alleviate the need for large bundles of cables that must accommodate crane/transporter motion relative to the boundaries of the cell, several transmission techniques are available, including slotted-line radio-frequency couplers, infrared beams, fiber-optic cables, free-space microwave, and inductively coupled leaky coaxial cable. This paper discusses the general characteristics, mode of operation, and proposed implementation of leaky coaxial cable technology in a waste-handling facility scheduled to be built in the near future at ORNL. In addition, specific system hardware based around the use of leaky coaxial cable is described in detail. Finally, data from a series of radiation exposure tests conducted by the CFRP on several samples of the basic leaky coaxial cable and associated connectors are presented.

  5. Leaky coaxial cable signal transmission for remote facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Crutcher, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    To develop reliable communications methods to meet the rigorous requirements for nuclear hot cells and similar environments, including control of cranes, transporters, and advanced servomanipulators, the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted extensive tests of numerous technologies to determine their applicability to remote operations. To alleviate the need for large bundles of cables that must accommodate crane/transporter motion relative to the boundaries of the cell, several transmission techniques are available, including slotted-line radio-frequency couplers, infrared beams, fiber-optic cables, free-space microwave, and inductively coupled leaky coaxial cable. This paper discusses the general characteristics, mode of operation, and proposed implementation of leaky coaxial cable technology in a waste-handling facility scheduled to be built in the near future at ORNL. In addition, specific system hardware based around the use of leaky coaxial cable is described in detail. Finally, data from a series of radiation exposure tests conducted by the CFRP on several samples of the basic leaky coaxial cable and associated connectors are presented.

  6. Middle School Girls and the "Leaky Pipeline" to Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Mary; Grossman, Diane; Carter, Suzanne; Martin, Karyn; Deyton, Patricia; Hammer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Why do girls perform so well academically yet lose ground as professional women? This diminishing number of women up the leadership hierarchy is often referred to as the "leaky pipeline," and attributed to many factors: external ones such as work environments not conducive to work/life balance, and internal ones such as women's own…

  7. Leaky Gut As a Danger Signal for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Qinghui; Kirby, Jay; Reilly, Christopher M.; Luo, Xin M.

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial lining, together with factors secreted from it, forms a barrier that separates the host from the environment. In pathologic conditions, the permeability of the epithelial lining may be compromised allowing the passage of toxins, antigens, and bacteria in the lumen to enter the blood stream creating a “leaky gut.” In individuals with a genetic predisposition, a leaky gut may allow environmental factors to enter the body and trigger the initiation and development of autoimmune disease. Growing evidence shows that the gut microbiota is important in supporting the epithelial barrier and therefore plays a key role in the regulation of environmental factors that enter the body. Several recent reports have shown that probiotics can reverse the leaky gut by enhancing the production of tight junction proteins; however, additional and longer term studies are still required. Conversely, pathogenic bacteria that can facilitate a leaky gut and induce autoimmune symptoms can be ameliorated with the use of antibiotic treatment. Therefore, it is hypothesized that modulating the gut microbiota can serve as a potential method for regulating intestinal permeability and may help to alter the course of autoimmune diseases in susceptible individuals. PMID:28588585

  8. Breakthroughs In Low-profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    Some of the challenges and possible solutions are discussed here. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Leaky-wave Antennas. High Power Microwaves (HPM) Antennas. Low...discover, identify, investigate, characterize, quantify, and document the performance, behavior, and design of innovative High Power Microwave (HPM, GW...first quarter, we prepared and established useful equations and algorithms for predicting reflections and transmission of incident TE waves from

  9. Einstein's boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsen, Travis

    2005-02-01

    At the 1927 Solvay conference, Albert Einstein presented a thought experiment intended to demonstrate the incompleteness of the quantum mechanical description of reality. In the following years, the experiment was modified by Einstein, de Broglie, and several other commentators into a simple scenario involving the splitting in half of the wave function of a single particle in a box. This paper collects together several formulations of this thought experiment from the literature, analyzes and assesses it from the point of view of the Einstein-Bohr debates, the EPR dilemma, and Bell's theorem, and argues for "Einstein's Boxes" taking its rightful place alongside similar but historically better known quantum mechanical thought experiments such as EPR and Schrödinger's Cat.

  10. Air quality at Santiago, Chile: a box modeling approach—I. Carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorquera, Héctor

    Ambient monitored data at Santiago, Chile, are analyzed using box models with the goal of assessing contributions of different economic activities to air pollution levels. The period analyzed is 1990-2000, characterized by the introduction of air pollution emissions standards, shift to unleaded gasoline and compressed natural gas, and steady growth of the private and public fleet and the associated fuel consumption growth. The box models explicitly include the seasonal behavior of meteorological variables; the results show that dispersion conditions in fall and winter seasons are 20-30% of the summertime values. This result explains the poor air quality in those seasons and shows that significant emissions reductions are required in order to improve air quality in wintertime. Emissions of CO, NO x and SO 2 are estimated from data on fuel consumption in the city; the estimated parameters are thus fleet-average or industry-average emission factors. In terms of contributions to ambient concentrations, older cars and diesel vehicles are the major contributors to CO and NO x impacts, with more than 60% and 50%, respectively. Ambient concentrations of SO 2 are largely dominated by stationary sources, although long range contributions are not negligible. By contrast, CO and NO x pollution is dominated by local sources within the city boundaries. The box models can be used for forecasting purposes, and they can predict annual average concentrations within 20% of the observed values. The methodology requires data on ambient air quality measurements and fuel consumption statistics, and produces quantitative results, which can be combined with economic models to analyze environmental regulation and public policies.

  11. A multiscale finite element model validation method of composite cable-stayed bridge based on Probability Box theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Rumian; Zong, Zhouhong; Niu, Jie; Liu, Qiqi; Zheng, Peijuan

    2016-05-01

    Modeling and simulation are routinely implemented to predict the behavior of complex structures. These tools powerfully unite theoretical foundations, numerical models and experimental data which include associated uncertainties and errors. A new methodology for multi-scale finite element (FE) model validation is proposed in this paper. The method is based on two-step updating method, a novel approach to obtain coupling parameters in the gluing sub-regions of a multi-scale FE model, and upon Probability Box (P-box) theory that can provide a lower and upper bound for the purpose of quantifying and transmitting the uncertainty of structural parameters. The structural health monitoring data of Guanhe Bridge, a composite cable-stayed bridge with large span, and Monte Carlo simulation were used to verify the proposed method. The results show satisfactory accuracy, as the overlap ratio index of each modal frequency is over 89% without the average absolute value of relative errors, and the CDF of normal distribution has a good coincidence with measured frequencies of Guanhe Bridge. The validated multiscale FE model may be further used in structural damage prognosis and safety prognosis.

  12. Modeling indoor air pollution from cookstove emissions in developing countries using a Monte Carlo single-box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael; Lam, Nick; Brant, Simone; Gray, Christen; Pennise, David

    2011-06-01

    A simple Monte Carlo single-box model is presented as a first approach toward examining the relationship between emissions of pollutants from fuel/cookstove combinations and the resulting indoor air pollution (IAP) concentrations. The model combines stove emission rates with expected distributions of kitchen volumes and air exchange rates in the developing country context to produce a distribution of IAP concentration estimates. The resulting distribution can be used to predict the likelihood that IAP concentrations will meet air quality guidelines, including those recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO). The model can also be used in reverse to estimate the probability that specific emission factors will result in meeting air quality guidelines. The modeled distributions of indoor PM2.5 concentration estimated that only 4% of homes using fuelwood in a rocket-style cookstove, even under idealized conditions, would meet the WHO Interim-1 annual PM2.5 guideline of 35 μg m-3. According to the model, the PM2.5 emissions that would be required for even 50% of homes to meet this guideline (0.055 g MJ-delivered-1) are lower than those for an advanced gasifier fan stove, while emissions levels similar to liquefied petroleum gas (0.018 g MJ-delivered-1) would be required for 90% of homes to meet the guideline. Although the predicted distribution of PM concentrations (median = 1320 μg m-3) from inputs for traditional wood stoves was within the range of reported values for India (108-3522 μg m-3), the model likely overestimates IAP concentrations. Direct comparison with simultaneously measured emissions rates and indoor concentrations of CO indicated the model overestimated IAP concentrations resulting from charcoal and kerosene emissions in Kenyan kitchens by 3 and 8 times respectively, although it underestimated the CO concentrations resulting from wood-burning cookstoves in India by approximately

  13. Long-range atmospheric transport of three toxaphene congeners across Europe. Modeling by chained single-box FATEMOD program.

    PubMed

    Paasivirta, Jaakko; Sinkkonen, Seija; Nikiforov, Vladimir; Kryuchkov, Fedor; Kolehmainen, Erkki; Laihia, Katri; Valkonen, Arto; Lahtinen, Manu

    2009-03-01

    Since toxaphene (polychlorocamphene, polychloropinene, or strobane) mixtures were applied for massive insecticide use in the 1960s to replace the use of DDT, some of their congeners have been found at high latitudes far away from the usage areas. Especially polychlorinated bornanes have demonstrated dominating congeners transported by air up to the Arctic areas. Environmental fate modeling has been applied to monitor this phenomenon using parallel zones of atmosphere around the globe as interconnected environments. These zones, shown in many meteorological maps, however, may not be the best way to configure atmospheric transport in air trajectories. The latter could also be covered by connecting a chain of simple model boxes. We aim to study this alternative approach by modeling the trajectory chain using catchment boxes of our FATEMOD model. Polychlorobornanes analyzed in biota of the Barents Sea offered one case to study this modeling alternative, while toxaphene has been and partly still is used massively at southern East Europe and around rivers flowing to the Aral Sea. Pure model substances of three polychlorobornanes (toxaphene congeners P26, P50, and P62) were synthesized, their environmentally important thermal properties measured by differential scanning calorimetry, as evaluated from literature data, and their temperature dependences estimated by the QSPR programs VPLEST, WATSOLU, and TDLKOW. The evaluated property parameters were used to model their atmospheric long-range transport from toxaphene heavy usage areas in Ukraine and Aral/SyrDarja/AmuDarja region areas, through East Europe and Northern Norway (Finnmarken) to the Barents Sea. The time period used for the emission model was June 1997. Usual weather conditions in June were applied in the model, which was constructed by chaining FATEMOD model boxes of the catchment's areas along assumed maximal air flow trajectories. Analysis of the three chlorobornanes in toxaphene mixtures function as a basis

  14. Antiapoptotic Effect of Recombinant HMGB1 A-box Protein via Regulation of microRNA-21 in Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiang; Zhang, Hua-Yong; Zhong, Bei-Long; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Hua

    2016-04-01

    The ~80 amino acid A box DNA-binding domain of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein antagonizes proinflammatory responses during myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. The exact role of microRNA-21 (miR-21) is unknown, but its altered levels are evident in I/R injury. This study examined the roles of HMGB1 A-box and miR-21 in rat myocardial I/R injury model. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six equal groups: (1) Sham; (2) I/R; (3) Ischemic postconditioning (IPost); (4) AntagomiR-21 post-treatment; (5) Recombinant HMGB1 A-box pretreatment; and (6) Recombinant HMGB1 A-box + antagomiR-21 post-treatment. Hemodynamic indexes, arrhythmia scores, ischemic area and infarct size, myocardial injury, and related parameters were studied. Expression of miR-21 was detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay was used to quantify apoptosis. Left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP), maximal rate of pressure rise (+dp/dtmax), and decline (-dp/dtmax) showed clear reduction upon treatment with recombinant HMGB1 A-box. Arrhythmia was relieved and infarct area decreased in the group pretreated with recombinant HMGB1 A-box, compared with other groups. Circulating lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels increased in response to irreversible cellular injury, while creatine kinase MB isoenzymes (CK-MB) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were reduced in the I/R group, which was reversed following recombinant HMGB1 A-box treatment. Interestingly, pretreatment with recombinant HMGB1 A-box showed the most dramatic reductions in miR-21 levels, compared with other groups. Significantly reduced apoptotic index (AI) was seen in recombinant HMGB1 A-box pretreatment group and recombinant HMGB1 A-box + antagomiR-21 post-treatment group, with the former showing a more

  15. Multicompartmental fate of persistent substances. Comparison of predictions from multi-media box models and a multicompartment chemistry-atmospheric transport model.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Gerhard; Klöpffer, Walter; Semeena, V S; Schmidt, Elisabeth; Leip, Adrian

    2007-05-01

    Modelling of the fate of environmental chemicals can be done by relatively simple multi-media box models or using complex atmospheric transport models. It was the aim of this work to compare the results obtained for both types of models using a small set of non-ionic and non-polar or moderately polar organic chemicals, known to be distributed over long distances. Predictions of multimedia exposure models of different types, namely three multimedia mass-balance box models (MBMs), two in the steady state and one in the non-steady state mode, and one non-steady state multicompartment chemistry-atmospheric transport model (MCTM), are compared for the first time. The models used are SimpleBox, Chemrange, the MPI-MBM and the MPI-MCTM. The target parameters addressed are compartmental distributions (i.e. mass fractions in the compartments), overall environmental residence time (i.e. overall persistence and eventually including other final sinks, such as loss to the deep sea) and a measure for the long-range transport potential. These are derived for atrazine, benz-[a]-pyrene, DDT, alpha and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane, methyl parathion and various modes of substance entry into the model world. Compartmental distributions in steady state were compared. Steady state needed 2-10 years to be established in the MCTM. The highest fraction of the substances in air is predicted by the MCTM. Accordingly, the other models predict longer substance persistence in most cases. The results suggest that temperature affects the compartmental distribution more in the box models, while it is only one among many climate factors acting in the transport model. The representation of final sinks in the models, e.g. burial in the sediment, is key for model-based compartmental distribution and persistence predictions. There is a tendency of MBMs to overestimate substance sinks in air and to underestimate atmospheric transport velocity as a consequence of the neglection of the temporal and spatial

  16. Hydroxyl radicals in the tropical troposphere over the Suriname rainforest: comparison of measurements with the box model MECCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubistin, D.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Sander, R.; Bozem, H.; Eerdekens, G.; Fischer, H.; Gurk, C.; Klüpfel, T.; Königstedt, R.; Parchatka, U.; Schiller, C. L.; Stickler, A.; Taraborrelli, D.; Williams, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2008-08-01

    As a major source region of the hydroxyl radical OH, the Tropics largely control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere on a global scale. However, emissions of hydrocarbons from the tropical rainforest that react rapidly with OH can potentially deplete the amount of OH and thereby reduce the oxidation capacity. The airborne GABRIEL field campaign in equatorial South America (Suriname) in October 2005 investigated the influence of the tropical rainforest on the HOx budget (HOx=OH+HO2). The first observations of OH and HO2 over a tropical rainforest are compared to steady state concentrations calculated with the atmospheric chemistry box model MECCA. The important precursors and sinks for HOx chemistry, measured during the campaign, are used as constraining parameters for the simulation of OH and HO2. Significant underestimations of HOx are found by the model over land during the afternoon, with mean ratios of observation to model of 12.2±3.5 and 4.1±1.4 for OH and HO2, respectively. The discrepancy between measurements and simulation results is correlated to the abundance of isoprene. While for low isoprene mixing ratios (above ocean or at altitudes >3 km), observation and simulation agree fairly well, for mixing ratios >200 pptV (<3 km over the rainforest) the model tends to underestimate the HOx observations as a function of isoprene. Box model simulations have been performed with the condensed chemical mechanism of MECCA and with the detailed isoprene reaction scheme of MCM, resulting in similar results for HOx concentrations. Simulations with constrained HO2 concentrations show that the conversion from HO2 to OH in the model is too low. However, by neglecting the isoprene chemistry in the model, observations and simulations agree much better. An OH source similar to the strength of the OH sink via isoprene chemistry is needed in the model to resolve the discrepancy. A possible explanation is that the oxidation of isoprene by OH not only dominates the

  17. Hydroxyl radicals in the tropical troposphere over the Suriname rainforest: comparison of measurements with the box model MECCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubistin, D.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Sander, R.; Bozem, H.; Eerdekens, G.; Fischer, H.; Gurk, C.; Klüpfel, T.; Königstedt, R.; Parchatka, U.; Schiller, C. L.; Stickler, A.; Taraborrelli, D.; Williams, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2010-10-01

    As a major source region of the hydroxyl radical OH, the Tropics largely control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere on a global scale. However, emissions of hydrocarbons from the tropical rainforest that react rapidly with OH can potentially deplete the amount of OH and thereby reduce the oxidation capacity. The airborne GABRIEL field campaign in equatorial South America (Suriname) in October 2005 investigated the influence of the tropical rainforest on the HOx budget (HOx = OH + HO2). The first observations of OH and HO2 over a tropical rainforest are compared to steady state concentrations calculated with the atmospheric chemistry box model MECCA. The important precursors and sinks for HOx chemistry, measured during the campaign, are used as constraining parameters for the simulation of OH and HO2. Significant underestimations of HOx are found by the model over land during the afternoon, with mean ratios of observation to model of 12.2 ± 3.5 and 4.1 ± 1.4 for OH and HO2, respectively. The discrepancy between measurements and simulation results is correlated to the abundance of isoprene. While for low isoprene mixing ratios (above ocean or at altitudes >3 km), observation and simulation agree fairly well, for mixing ratios >200 pptV (<3 km over the rainforest) the model tends to underestimate the HOx observations as a function of isoprene. Box model simulations have been performed with the condensed chemical mechanism of MECCA and with the detailed isoprene reaction scheme of MCM, resulting in similar results for HOx concentrations. Simulations with constrained HO2 concentrations show that the conversion from HO2 to OH in the model is too low. However, by neglecting the isoprene chemistry in the model, observations and simulations agree much better. An OH source similar to the strength of the OH sink via isoprene chemistry is needed in the model to resolve the discrepancy. A possible explanation is that the oxidation of isoprene by OH not only dominates

  18. Box-modeling of bone and tooth phosphate oxygen isotope compositions as a function of environmental and physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Langlois, C; Simon, L; Lécuyer, Ch

    2003-12-01

    A time-dependent box model is developed to calculate oxygen isotope compositions of bone phosphate as a function of environmental and physiological parameters. Input and output oxygen fluxes related to body water and bone reservoirs are scaled to the body mass. The oxygen fluxes are evaluated by stoichiometric scaling to the calcium accretion and resorption rates, assuming a pure hydroxylapatite composition for the bone and tooth mineral. The model shows how the diet composition, body mass, ambient relative humidity and temperature may control the oxygen isotope composition of bone phosphate. The model also computes how bones and teeth record short-term variations in relative humidity, air temperature and delta18O of drinking water, depending on body mass. The documented diversity of oxygen isotope fractionation equations for vertebrates is accounted for by our model when for each specimen the physiological and diet parameters are adjusted in the living range of environmental conditions.

  19. Evaluation of CVD diamond coating layer using leaky Rayleigh wave.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Hak-Joon; Wang, Wen-Wu; Yang, Dong-Ju; Kim, Young H; Kwon, Sung D; Takagi, T; Uchimoto, T; Abe, T

    2006-12-22

    In the present study, the possibility of using leaky Rayleigh waves as a nondestructive tool for the evaluation of CVD diamond coating layer is explored experimentally. For this purpose, a set of CVD diamond coated specimens are prepared and the leaky Rayleigh waves are measured in an immersion, pulse-echo setup. For the proper analysis of the acquired signals we propose a novel signal analysis approach, namely the "time trace angular scan (TTAS)" image. Then, the proposed approach together with the backward radiation profiles are applied for the analysis of signals acquired in the initial experiments. The TTAS image shows the entire information on both time-of-arrival and angle of incidence of the signals for the proper "time-angle windowing." Then, the backward radiation profile of the windowed signals provides adequate parameters from which nondestructive evaluation of the coated specimens is carried out.

  20. Disodium cromoglycate protects dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers from leakiness.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Julia; Ventura Machado, Rafael; Minatel, Elaine; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    In dystrophin-deficient fibers of mdx mice and in Duchenne dystrophy, the lack of dystrophin leads to sarcolemma breakdown and muscle degeneration. We verified that cromolyn, a mast-cell stabilizer agent, stabilized dystrophic muscle fibers using Evans blue dye as a marker of sarcolemma leakiness. Mdx mice (n=8; 14 days of age) received daily intraperitoneal injections of cromolyn (50 mg/kg body weight) for 15 days. Untreated mdx mice (n=8) were injected with saline. Cryostat cross-sections of the sternomastoid, tibialis anterior, and diaphragm muscles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Cromolyn dramatically reduced Evans blue dye-positive fibers in all muscles (P<0.05; Student's t-test) and led to a significant increase in the percentage of fibers with peripheral nuclei. This study supports the protective effects of cromolyn in dystrophic muscles and further indicates its action against muscle fiber leakiness in muscles that are differently affected by the lack of dystrophin.

  1. Excitation of leaky modes in a system of coupled waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Usievich, B A; Nurligareev, J Kh; Sychugov, V A; Golant, K M

    2007-06-30

    A system of coupled single-mode waveguides with the number M of guided modes lower than the number N of single-mode waveguides is studied. Leaky modes in this system are investigated in detail. It is shown, in particular, that these modes can be excited by light incident on the side surface of the system when the reflection coefficient vanishes. It is found that the angular dependence of the coefficient of reflection from the side surface of the system can be used to refine the dispersion curve for leaky modes. It is shown that light incident at a grazing angle can propagate in the system in the direction considerably different from the propagation direction of a beam incident from a substrate, even in the case of a small difference in the refractive indices. (fiber and integrated optics)

  2. The residence time of an active versus a passive tracer in the Gulf of Aqaba: A box model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jacob; Gildor, Hezi

    A simple box model of the Gulf of Aqaba, northern Red Sea, was used in order to study the effects of large scale processes in the Gulf and Red Sea (e.g. changes in thermohaline circulation or heat input from the Red Sea) as well as the influence of human activities (e.g. tourism, urbanization and mariculture) on the nutrient budget of the Gulf. The model employs available data from the literature together with General Circulation Model output data for monthly average temperature and salinity in the upper 200 m of the northern Red Sea, and monthly average meteorological data from the northern Gulf of Aqaba for heat flux and evaporation calculations. The model was shown to be most sensitive to changes in the thermohaline flux of Red Sea water through the Tiran Strait. Simulations of temperature and salinity best agreed with measurements when an annually varying thermohaline flux (0.045 Sv in January and 0.005 Sv in July) with decoupling of the thermohaline flow from the intermediate boxes during the summer (April-October) was employed. Additionally, periodic decrease of heat input from the Red Sea associated with regional weather patterns caused prolonged vertical mixing periods during the winters and shortening the residence time of phosphate in the Gulf. Hence, warming of Red Sea water would result in shorter periods of vertical mixing in the Gulf during the winter and accumulation of phosphate in the deep reservoir. The increase in deep reservoir phosphate can also be caused by an increase in the export flux of particulate organic matter to the deep reservoir. Hence, even a small increase in net primary production perhaps resulting from external nutrient input to the Gulf will result in nutrient accumulation in the deep reservoir. According to our model a return to pre-perturbation levels of phosphate in the Gulf would take on the order of 10 2 years.

  3. Salt-Pond Box Model (SPOOM) and Its Application to the Napa-Sonoma Salt Ponds, San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lionberger, Megan L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Buchanan, Paul A.; Meyer, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A box model to simulate water volume and salinity of a salt pond has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to obtain water and salinity budgets. The model, SPOOM, uses the principle of conservation of mass to calculate daily pond volume and salinity and includes a salt crystallization and dissolution algorithm. Model inputs include precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, and water transfers. Salinity and water-surface-elevation data were collected monthly in the Napa-Sonoma Salt-Pond Complex from February 1999 through September 2001 and were used to calibrate and validate the model. The months when water transfers occurred were known but the magnitudes were unknown, so the magnitudes of water transfers were adjusted in the model to calibrate simulated pond volumes to measured pond volumes for three ponds. Modeled salinity was then compared with measured salinity, which remained a free parameter, in order to validate the model. Comparison showed good correlation between modeled and measured salinity. Deviations can be attributed to lack of water-transfer information. Water and salinity budgets obtained through modeling will be used to help interpret ecological data from the ponds. This model has been formulated to be applicable to the Napa-Sonoma salt ponds, but can be applied to other salt ponds.

  4. In-service parametric modelling a rail vehicle's axle-box hydraulic damper for high-speed transit problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. L.; Yu, D. S.; Zhou, Z.

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high-speed operation of modern rail vehicles and severe in-service environment of their hydraulic dampers, it has become important to establish more practical and accurate damper models and apply those models in high-speed transit problem studies. An improved full parametric model with actual in-service parameters, such as variable viscous damping, comprehensive stiffness and small mounting clearance was established for a rail vehicle's axle-box hydraulic damper. A subtle variable oil property model was built and coupled to the modelling process, which included modelling of the dynamic flow losses and the relief-valve system dynamics. The experiments validated the accuracy and robustness of the established full in-service parametric model and simulation which captured the damping characteristics over an extremely wide range of excitation speeds. Further simulations were performed using the model to uncover the effects of key in-service parameter variations on the nominal damping characteristics of the damper. The obtained in-service parametric model coupled all of the main factors that had significant impacts on the damping characteristics, so that the model could be useful in more extensive parameter effects analysis, optimal specification and product design optimisation of hydraulic dampers for track-friendliness, ride comfort and other high-speed transit problems.

  5. A black box mathematical model to calculate auto- and heterotrophic biomass yields based on Gibbs energy dissipation.

    PubMed

    Hoijnen, J J; van Loosdrecht, M C; Tijhuis, L

    1992-12-05

    On the basis of the estimated Gibbs energy dissipation per C-mol biomass produced and a convenient black box description of microbial growth, a general equation for the calculation of the yield of biomass on electron donor has been obtained. This black box model defines four formal electron donating reactions for biomass, carbon source, electron donor, and electron acceptor. The proposed description leads to a simple equation which gives the biomass yield on electron donor for chemotrophic growth systems under carbon and energy limitation for which biomass is the only anabolic product. The variables involved are the degrees of reduction and the Gibbs energy characteristics of the four compounds, and the required Gibbs energy dissipation per C-mol produced of biomass. It appears that biomass yields on electron donor for auto- and heterotrophic growth under aerobic, denitrifying, and fermentative conditions can be estimated with 10-15% error in a range of Y(DX)-values of 0.01-0.80 C-mol/(C)-mol electron donor. Also, simple regularities in the Gibbs energy and enthalpy of organic substrates are found. Furthermore, simple relations are derived to calculate the thermodynamic maximal biomass yield, conditions required for growth to occur, heat production, biomass yield on electron acceptor, and anaerobic product yield. Finally a new definition of thermodynamic efficiency is derived. (c) 1992 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Impedance-matching analysis in IR leaky-wave antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, Navaneeth; Xu, Yuancheng; Lail, Brian A.

    2015-08-01

    Planar leaky-wave antennas (LWA) that are capable of full-space scanning have long since been the pursuit for applications including, but not limited to, integration onto vehicles and into cameras for wide-angle of view beam-steering. Such a leaky-wave surface (LWS) was designed for long-wave infrared frequencies with frequency scanning capability. The LWS is based on a microstrip patch array design of a leaky-wave impedance surface and is made up of gold microstrip patches on a grounded zinc sulphide substrate. A 1D composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial made by periodically stacking a unit cell of the LWS in the longitudinal direction to form a LWA was designed. This paper deals with loading the LWA with a nickel bolometer to collect leaky-wave signals. The LWA radiates a backward leaking wave at 30 degrees at 28.3THz and scans through broadside for frequencies 20THz through 40THz. The paper deals with effectively placing the bolometer in order for the collected signal to exhibit the designed frequency regime. An effective way to maximize the power coupling into the load from the antenna is also explored. The benefit of such a metamaterial/holographic antennacoupled detector is its ability to provide appreciable capture cross-sections while delivering smart signals to subwavelength sized detectors. Due to their high-gain, low-profile, fast response time of the detector and ease of fabrication, this IR LWA-coupled bolometer harbors great potential in the areas of high resolution, uncooled, infrared imaging.

  7. Breakthroughs In Low-profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-19

    High Power Microwaves (HPM) Antennas. Low-profile Conformal Antennas. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER...performance, behavior, and design of innovative High Power Microwave (HPM, GW-class) antennas of the forward-traveling, fast-wave, leaky-wave class...peak power handling. In particular, this design perspective steered us to a notable success during this period, with the design of a CAWSEA that can

  8. Holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces for dual-sensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun Bo; Li, Lian Lin; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces have huge potentials to develop new type imaging systems due to their abilities of controlling electromagnetic waves. Here, we propose a new method for dual-sensor imaging based on cross-like holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces which are composed of hybrid isotropic and anisotropic surface impedance textures. The holographic leaky-wave radiations are generated by special impedance modulations of surface waves excited by the sensor ports. For one independent sensor, the main leaky-wave radiation beam can be scanned by frequency in one-dimensional space, while the frequency scanning in the orthogonal spatial dimension is accomplished by the other sensor. Thus, for a probed object, the imaging plane can be illuminated adequately to obtain the two-dimensional backward scattered fields by the dual-sensor for reconstructing the object. The relativity of beams under different frequencies is very low due to the frequency-scanning beam performance rather than the random beam radiations operated by frequency, and the multi-illuminations with low relativity are very appropriate for multi-mode imaging method with high resolution and anti- noise. Good reconstruction results are given to validate the proposed imaging method. PMID:26658471

  9. Holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces for dual-sensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun Bo; Li, Lian Lin; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-12-10

    Metasurfaces have huge potentials to develop new type imaging systems due to their abilities of controlling electromagnetic waves. Here, we propose a new method for dual-sensor imaging based on cross-like holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces which are composed of hybrid isotropic and anisotropic surface impedance textures. The holographic leaky-wave radiations are generated by special impedance modulations of surface waves excited by the sensor ports. For one independent sensor, the main leaky-wave radiation beam can be scanned by frequency in one-dimensional space, while the frequency scanning in the orthogonal spatial dimension is accomplished by the other sensor. Thus, for a probed object, the imaging plane can be illuminated adequately to obtain the two-dimensional backward scattered fields by the dual-sensor for reconstructing the object. The relativity of beams under different frequencies is very low due to the frequency-scanning beam performance rather than the random beam radiations operated by frequency, and the multi-illuminations with low relativity are very appropriate for multi-mode imaging method with high resolution and anti- noise. Good reconstruction results are given to validate the proposed imaging method.

  10. Monoclonal Anti-HMGB1 (High Mobility Group Box Chromosomal Protein 1) Antibody Protection in Two Experimental Arthritis Models

    PubMed Central

    Schierbeck, Hanna; Lundbäck, Peter; Palmblad, Karin; Klevenvall, Lena; Erlandsson-Harris, Helena; Andersson, Ulf; Ottosson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    High mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) is a DNA-binding nuclear protein that can be released from dying cells and activated myeloid cells. Extracellularly, HMGB1 promotes inflammation. Experimental studies demonstrate HMGB1 to be a pathogenic factor in many inflammatory conditions including arthritis. HMGB1-blocking therapies in arthritis models alleviate disease and confer significant protection against cartilage and bone destruction. So far, the most successful HMGB1-targeted therapies have been demonstrated with HMGB1-specific polyclonal antibodies and with recombinant A box protein, a fragment of HMGB1. The present study is the first to evaluate the potential of a monoclonal anti-HMGB1 antibody (2G7, mouse IgG2b) to ameliorate arthritis. Effects of repeated injections of this antibody have now been studied in two conceptually different models of arthritis: collagen type II–induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice and in a spontaneous arthritis disease in mice with combined deficiencies for genes encoding for the enzyme DNase type II and interferon type I receptors. These mice are unable to degrade phagocytozed DNA in macrophages and develop chronic, destructive polyarthritis. Therapeutic intervention in CIA and prophylactic administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in the spontaneous arthritis model significantly ameliorated the clinical courses. Anti-HMGB1 mAb therapy also partially prevented joint destruction, as demonstrated by histological examination. The beneficial antiarthritic effects by the anti-HMGB1 mAb in two diverse models of arthritis represent additional proof-of-concept, indicating that HMGB1 may be a valid target molecule to consider for development of future clinical therapy. PMID:21666956

  11. Thinking Inside the box: A way to Improve the Dialog Between Experimentalist and Modeler in Watershed Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, J.; McDonnell, J. J.; Vache, K.

    2005-12-01

    The dialog between experimentalist and modeler in catchment hydrology continues to be minimal, despite clear needs to achieve this to quantify and reduce uncertainty in our predictions at the watershed scale. We present a general framework to facilitate communication between experimentalist and modeler for decisions on model structure and for new ways to test models and quantify uncertainty, parameter identifiabilty and parameter uncertainty. Our model and experimental objective function is to describe the combination of flow in the channel and its geographic and time source components-a necessary precursor to new generations of water quantity-quality models for exploring scenarios of landuse and climate change on watershed hydrology. We do this via a multi-box model framework. Our approach necessitates a fundamental change in the mindset of the experimentalist entering the catchment-one that largely replaces detailed at-a-point measures with a goal of defining the appropriate box assemblage of his/her watershed and then sampling for pattern and sampling for modeling. We explore how one might go about implementing such a procedure in an ungauged basin where time for field work is limited to days rather than months or years. We use the well-studied Maimai watershed as a hypothetical ungauged basin where we pretend to start with no data and add different sub-sets of the available data to constrain different model formulations. Model simulations are validated against known flow, streamwater residence time and soil water residence time data. This allowed us to identify the most uncorrelated information that can be gathered by the experimentalist in the field. We discuss the marginal value of different data sources and the tradeoffs between time spent completing time series for a few variables and locations to spatially distributed snapshots of different variables aimed at increasing data complementarity. We argue that this improved dialog between experimentalist and

  12. Leader neurons in leaky integrate and fire neural network simulations.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Cyrille

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we highlight the topological properties of leader neurons whose existence is an experimental fact. Several experimental studies show the existence of leader neurons in population bursts of activity in 2D living neural networks (Eytan and Marom, J Neurosci 26(33):8465-8476, 2006; Eckmann et al., New J Phys 10(015011), 2008). A leader neuron is defined as a neuron which fires at the beginning of a burst (respectively network spike) more often than we expect by chance considering its mean firing rate. This means that leader neurons have some burst triggering power beyond a chance-level statistical effect. In this study, we characterize these leader neuron properties. This naturally leads us to simulate neural 2D networks. To build our simulations, we choose the leaky integrate and fire (lIF) neuron model (Gerstner and Kistler 2002; Cessac, J Math Biol 56(3):311-345, 2008), which allows fast simulations (Izhikevich, IEEE Trans Neural Netw 15(5):1063-1070, 2004; Gerstner and Naud, Science 326:379-380, 2009). The dynamics of our lIF model has got stable leader neurons in the burst population that we simulate. These leader neurons are excitatory neurons and have a low membrane potential firing threshold. Except for these two first properties, the conditions required for a neuron to be a leader neuron are difficult to identify and seem to depend on several parameters involved in the simulations themselves. However, a detailed linear analysis shows a trend of the properties required for a neuron to be a leader neuron. Our main finding is: A leader neuron sends signals to many excitatory neurons as well as to few inhibitory neurons and a leader neuron receives only signals from few other excitatory neurons. Our linear analysis exhibits five essential properties of leader neurons each with different relative importance. This means that considering a given neural network with a fixed mean number of connections per neuron, our analysis gives us a way of

  13. Molecular envelope and atomic model of an anti-terminated glyQS T-box regulator in complex with tRNAGly.

    PubMed

    Chetnani, Bhaskar; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2017-07-27

    A T-box regulator or riboswitch actively monitors the levels of charged/uncharged tRNA and participates in amino acid homeostasis by regulating genes involved in their utilization or biosynthesis. It has an aptamer domain for cognate tRNA recognition and an expression platform to sense the charge state and modulate gene expression. These two conserved domains are connected by a variable linker that harbors additional secondary structural elements, such as Stem III. The structural basis for specific tRNA binding is known, but the structural basis for charge sensing and the role of other elements remains elusive. To gain new structural insights on the T-box mechanism, a molecular envelope was calculated from small angle X-ray scattering data for the Bacillus subtilis glyQS T-box riboswitch in complex with an uncharged tRNAGly. A structural model of an anti-terminated glyQS T-box in complex with its cognate tRNAGly was derived based on the molecular envelope. It shows the location and relative orientation of various secondary structural elements. The model was validated by comparing the envelopes of the wild-type complex and two variants. The structural model suggests that in addition to a possible regulatory role, Stem III could aid in preferential stabilization of the T-box anti-terminated state allowing read-through of regulated genes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Evaluation of an I-box wind tunnel model for assessment of behavioral responses of blow flies.

    PubMed

    Moophayak, Kittikhun; Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Kurahashi, Hiromu; Vogtsberger, Roy C; Sukontason, Kom

    2013-11-01

    The behavioral response of flies to olfactory cues remains the focus of many investigations, and wind tunnels have sometimes been employed for assessment of this variable in the laboratory. In this study, our aim was to design, construct, and operate a new model of I-box wind tunnel with improved efficacy, highlighting the use of a new wind tunnel model to investigate the behavioral response of the medically important blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius). The I-box dual-choice wind tunnel designed for this study consists of seven conjoined compartments that resulted in a linear apparatus with clear glass tunnel of 30 × 30 × 190 cm ended both sides with wooden "fan compartments" which are equipped with adjustable fans as wind source. The clear glass tunnel consisted of two "stimulus compartments" with either presence or absence (control) of bait; two "trap compartments" where flies were attracted and allowed to reside; and one central "release compartment" where flies were introduced. Wind tunnel experiments were carried out in a temperature-controlled room, with a room light as a light source and a room-ventilated fan as odor-remover from tunnel out. Evaluation of testing parameters revealed that the highest attractive index was achieved with the use of 300 g of 1-day tainted pork scrap (pork meat mixed with offal) as bait in wind tunnel settings wind speed of 0.58 m/s, during 1.00-5.00 PM with light intensity of 341.33 lux from vertical light and 135.93 lux from horizontal light for testing a group of 60 flies. In addition, no significant response of well-fed and 24 h staved flies to this bait under these conditions was found. Results of this study supported this new wind tunnel model as a suitable apparatus for investigation of behavioral response of blow flies to bait chemical cues in the laboratory.

  15. The role for gut permeability in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes--a solid or leaky concept?

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence, both functional and morphological, supports the concept of increased intestinal permeability as an intrinsic characteristic of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in both humans and animal models of the disease. Often referred to as a 'leaky gut', its mechanistic impact on the pathogenesis of T1D remains unclear. Hypotheses that this defect influences immune responses against antigens (both self and non-self) predominate, yet others argue hyperglycemia and insulitis may contribute to increased gut permeability in T1D. To address these complicated issues, we herein review the many conceptual role(s) for a leaky gut in the pathogenesis of T1D and suggest ways that if true, therapeutic interventions aimed at the gut-pancreas axis may prove promising for future therapeutic interventions.

  16. The Role for Gut Permeability in the Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes – A Solid or Leaky Concept?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence, both functional and morphological, supports the concept of increased intestinal permeability as an intrinsic characteristic of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in both humans and animal models of the disease. Often referred to as a “leaky gut”, its mechanistic impact on the pathogenesis of T1D remains unclear. Hypotheses that this defect influences immune responses against antigens (both self and non-self) predominate, yet others argue hyperglycemia and insulitis may contribute to increased gut permeability in T1D. To address these complicated issues, we herein review the many conceptual role(s) for a leaky gut in the pathogenesis of T1D and suggest ways that if true, therapeutic interventions aimed at the gut-pancreas axis may prove promising for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:26269193

  17. Bayesian inference for multivariate meta-analysis Box-Cox transformation models for individual patient data with applications to evaluation of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungduk; Chen, Ming-Hui; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Shah, Arvind K; Lin, Jianxin

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we propose a class of Box-Cox transformation regression models with multidimensional random effects for analyzing multivariate responses for individual patient data in meta-analysis. Our modeling formulation uses a multivariate normal response meta-analysis model with multivariate random effects, in which each response is allowed to have its own Box-Cox transformation. Prior distributions are specified for the Box-Cox transformation parameters as well as the regression coefficients in this complex model, and the deviance information criterion is used to select the best transformation model. Because the model is quite complex, we develop a novel Monte Carlo Markov chain sampling scheme to sample from the joint posterior of the parameters. This model is motivated by a very rich dataset comprising 26 clinical trials involving cholesterol-lowering drugs where the goal is to jointly model the three-dimensional response consisting of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) (LDL-C, HDL-C, TG). Because the joint distribution of (LDL-C, HDL-C, TG) is not multivariate normal and in fact quite skewed, a Box-Cox transformation is needed to achieve normality. In the clinical literature, these three variables are usually analyzed univariately; however, a multivariate approach would be more appropriate because these variables are correlated with each other. We carry out a detailed analysis of these data by using the proposed methodology.

  18. Expectation Maximization Algorithm for Box-Cox Transformation Cure Rate Model and Assessment of Model Mis-specication under Weibull Lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Pal, Suvra; Balakrishnan, N

    2017-05-16

    In this paper, we develop likelihood inference based on the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm for the Box- Cox transformation cure rate model assuming the lifetimes to follow a Weibull distribution. A simulation study is carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed estimation method. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we also study the effect of model mis-specification on the estimate of cure rate. Finally, we analyze a well-known data on melanoma with the model and the inferential method developed here.

  19. A Central Limit Theorem for Products of Random Matrices and GOE Statistics for the Anderson Model on Long Boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadel, Christian; Virág, Bálint

    2016-05-01

    We consider products of random matrices that are small, independent identically distributed perturbations of a fixed matrix T_0. Focusing on the eigenvalues of T_0 of a particular size we obtain a limit to a SDE in a critical scaling. Previous results required T_0 to be a (conjugated) unitary matrix so it could not have eigenvalues of different modulus. From the result we can also obtain a limit SDE for the Markov process given by the action of the random products on the flag manifold. Applying the result to random Schrödinger operators we can improve some results by Valko and Virag showing GOE statistics for the rescaled eigenvalue process of a sequence of Anderson models on long boxes. In particular, we solve a problem posed in their work.

  20. Modeling and optimization of trihalomethanes formation potential of surface water (a drinking water source) using Box-Behnken design.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar P; Rai, Premanjali; Pandey, Priyanka; Sinha, Sarita

    2012-01-01

    The present research aims to investigate the individual and interactive effects of chlorine dose/dissolved organic carbon ratio, pH, temperature, bromide concentration, and reaction time on trihalomethanes (THMs) formation in surface water (a drinking water source) during disinfection by chlorination in a prototype laboratory-scale simulation and to develop a model for the prediction and optimization of THMs levels in chlorinated water for their effective control. A five-factor Box-Behnken experimental design combined with response surface and optimization modeling was used for predicting the THMs levels in chlorinated water. The adequacy of the selected model and statistical significance of the regression coefficients, independent variables, and their interactions were tested by the analysis of variance and t test statistics. The THMs levels predicted by the model were very close to the experimental values (R(2) = 0.95). Optimization modeling predicted maximum (192 μg/l) TMHs formation (highest risk) level in water during chlorination was very close to the experimental value (186.8 ± 1.72 μg/l) determined in laboratory experiments. The pH of water followed by reaction time and temperature were the most significant factors that affect the THMs formation during chlorination. The developed model can be used to determine the optimum characteristics of raw water and chlorination conditions for maintaining the THMs levels within the safe limit.

  1. A gray-box neural network-based model identification and fault estimation scheme for nonlinear dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Cen, Zhaohui; Wei, Jiaolong; Jiang, Rui

    2013-12-01

    A novel gray-box neural network model (GBNNM), including multi-layer perception (MLP) neural network (NN) and integrators, is proposed for a model identification and fault estimation (MIFE) scheme. With the GBNNM, both the nonlinearity and dynamics of a class of nonlinear dynamic systems can be approximated. Unlike previous NN-based model identification methods, the GBNNM directly inherits system dynamics and separately models system nonlinearities. This model corresponds well with the object system and is easy to build. The GBNNM is embedded online as a normal model reference to obtain the quantitative residual between the object system output and the GBNNM output. This residual can accurately indicate the fault offset value, so it is suitable for differing fault severities. To further estimate the fault parameters (FPs), an improved extended state observer (ESO) using the same NNs (IESONN) from the GBNNM is proposed to avoid requiring the knowledge of ESO nonlinearity. Then, the proposed MIFE scheme is applied for reaction wheels (RW) in a satellite attitude control system (SACS). The scheme using the GBNNM is compared with other NNs in the same fault scenario, and several partial loss of effect (LOE) faults with different severities are considered to validate the effectiveness of the FP estimation and its superiority.

  2. A model for the proton spectrum and cosmic ray anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, C.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of the origin of the cosmic rays is still uncertain. As a theory, it should explain the support of particles and energy, the mechanism of acceleration and propagation as well as some important features obtained directly from cosmic ray experiments, such as the power spectrum and the knee. There are two kinds of models for interpreting the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. One is the leaky box model. Another model suggests that the cut-off rigidity of the main sources causes the knee. The present paper studies the spectrum and the anisotropy of cosmic rays in an isotropic diffuse model with explosive discrete sources in an infinite galaxy.

  3. Evaluation of bike boxes at signalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Dill, Jennifer; Monsere, Christopher M; McNeil, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a before-after study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, Oregon. The bike boxes, also known as advanced stop lines or advanced stop boxes, were installed to increase visibility of cyclists and reduce conflicts between motor vehicles and cyclists, particularly in potential "right-hook" situations. Before and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green bike boxes, three intersections with uncolored bike boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured through surveys of cyclists passing through five of the bike box intersections and of motorists working downtown, where the boxes were concentrated. Both the observations and survey of motorists found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Overall, 73% of the stopping motor vehicles did not encroach at all into the bike box. Both motor vehicle and bicycle encroachment in the pedestrian crosswalk fell significantly at the bike box locations compared to the control intersections. The bike boxes had mixed effects on the motorists' encroachment in the bicycle lane. The number of observed conflicts at the bike box locations decreased, while the total number of cyclists and motor vehicles turning right increased. Negative-binomial models based upon the data predict fewer conflicts with the boxes, particularly as right-turning motor vehicle volumes increase. Observations of yielding behavior at two bike box and one control intersection found an improvement in motorists yielding to cyclists at the bike box locations. Differences in the traffic volumes and location contexts make firm conclusions about the effects of green coloring of the boxes difficult. Higher shares of surveyed motorists felt that the bike boxes made driving safer rather than more dangerous, even when the sample was narrowed to respondents who were not also cyclists. Over three-quarters of the surveyed cyclists thought that the boxes made the intersection safer

  4. Determination of sample size for higher volatile data using new framework of Box-Jenkins model with GARCH: A case study on gold price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslindar Yaziz, Siti; Zakaria, Roslinazairimah; Hura Ahmad, Maizah

    2017-09-01

    The model of Box-Jenkins - GARCH has been shown to be a promising tool for forecasting higher volatile time series. In this study, the framework of determining the optimal sample size using Box-Jenkins model with GARCH is proposed for practical application in analysing and forecasting higher volatile data. The proposed framework is employed to daily world gold price series from year 1971 to 2013. The data is divided into 12 different sample sizes (from 30 to 10200). Each sample is tested using different combination of the hybrid Box-Jenkins - GARCH model. Our study shows that the optimal sample size to forecast gold price using the framework of the hybrid model is 1250 data of 5-year sample. Hence, the empirical results of model selection criteria and 1-step-ahead forecasting evaluations suggest that the latest 12.25% (5-year data) of 10200 data is sufficient enough to be employed in the model of Box-Jenkins - GARCH with similar forecasting performance as by using 41-year data.

  5. On looking into the Black Box: Prospects and Limits in the Search for Mental Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    to identify input-output relationships [Rouse, 1977; van Bussel, 1980; van Heusden , 1980]. All four of the above studies resulted in hypothesized...8217 abilities to "capture" mental models are constrained by humans’ lack of abilities to verbalize their models. Van Heusden [1980. found that subjects...Independent studies by Rouse [1977], van Bussel [1980], and van Heusden [19801 have concluded, via empirical modeling methods, that humans’ models

  6. Ultrasonic characterization of functionally gradient materials with leaky Rayleigh wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Koichiro; Takenouchi, Naoki; Awaji, Hideo; Nishikawa, Tadahiro

    1999-12-02

    Young's modulus of functionally gradient Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni ceramics, which was formed by centrifugal casting and has gradient of the elastic properties along a particular direction on the surface, is estimated by velocity measurement of the leaky Rayleigh and longitudinal waves. Those velocities were measured every 1mm with a line focused PVDF transducer, of which central frequency, focal length and width are 36MHz, 5mm and 8mm. Thus measured Young's modulus varies from 370GPa (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich side) to 200GPa (Ni rich side)

  7. Feasibility of graphene CRLH metamaterial waveguides and leaky wave antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Derrick A.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Hon, Philip W. C.; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2016-07-07

    The feasibility of composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial waveguides based upon graphene plasmons is demonstrated via numerical simulation. Designs are presented that operate in the terahertz frequency range along with their various dimensions. Dispersion relations, radiative and free-carrier losses, and free-carrier based tunability are characterized. Finally, the radiative characteristics are evaluated, along with its feasibility for use as a leaky-wave antenna. While CRLH waveguides are feasible in the terahertz range, their ultimate utility will require precise nanofabrication, and excellent quality graphene to mitigate free-carrier losses.

  8. Leaky Rayleigh wave ultrasonic backscattering enhancements: Experimental tests of theory for tilted solid cylinders and cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipson, Karen

    Backscattering enhancements due to acoustic wave coupling into leaky Rayleigh waves on solid elastic cubes and cylinders submerged in water are investigated. A quantitative ray description of the launching and propagation of the leaky Rayleigh waves is verified to be useful. Leaky Rayleigh waves are launched on the surface of an elastic object if the acoustic wavevector's projection along the surface matches the wavevector associated with leaky Rayleigh wave propagation. Once launched, leaky Rayleigh waves on the surface of an elastic object will be partially reflected at the object's truncations, and under certain conditions the reflection process may result in a reversal of the leaky wavevector on the surface so that the leaky radiation is oriented in the backscattering direction. Furthermore, the radiated wavefront can have a vanishing Gaussian curvature which produces a far-field caustic. The leaky wave pressure on the surface of the scatterer is approximated by convolving the incident pressure with an appropriate function describing the response of the surface to a localized pressure input, and the method of images is used to approximate the reflection processes. The resulting reflected pressure field on or near the target's surface is then propagated to the far field using the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral. Tone burst experiments confirm that this approach provides reasonable predictions for a variety of cases including the retroreflection of leaky waves around a comer on the face of a cube, the retroreflection of meridional leaky waves along the length of a cylinder, and the retroreflection of leaky waves launched diagonally across the flat face of a cylinder. The frequency dependence of these mechanisms for backscattering from a cylinder was also investigated using a pressure source capable of producing an impulsive pressure, and the observed time returns for end-reflected helical waves agree with theoretical predictions. For the high frequencies

  9. Comparison of Measurements of Hydroxyl Radicals in the Tropical Troposphere during GABRIEL with the Box Model MECCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubistin, D.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Sander, R.; Bartenbach, S.; Bozem, H.; Colomb, A.; Eerdekens, G.; Fischer, H.; Ganzeveld, L.; Gebhardt, S.; Gurk, C.; Hofmann, R.; Kluepfel, T.; Koenigstedt, R.; Parchatka, U.; Schiller, C.; Stickler, A.; Williams, J.; Yassaa, N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2006-12-01

    Hydroxyl radicals play a major role in the chemistry of the troposphere and dominate its oxidation capacity during daytime. Their main source in the unpolluted troposphere is the photolysis of O3 and following reactions with water vapour. The largest contribution to the global oxidation capacity occurs in the tropical region. The GABRIEL campaign, Oct 2005, took place in equatorial South America (Suriname) to gain basic understanding of the dominant processes over the tropical rainforest and their influence on the HOx budget. Global models predict that the emissions of hydrocarbons from the rainforest reduce the amount of HOx and therefore the selfcleaning capacity significantly. The poster concentrates on understanding the HOx budget and its interdependence with other species measured during the campaign. Since OH and HO2 have very short lifetimes, MECCA, a box model, is applied in steady state mode and used for detailed analysis. Hereby all measured species like radiation, O3, isoprene, NO, HCHO, CO, hydrocarbons are used as constraint parameters to model OH and HO2.

  10. Evaluation Of Sensitivity Of Mass-independent Oxygen Isotopes In Aerosol Nitrate To Environmental Factors Using A Photochemical Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, G.; Wilkins, G.; Jackson, T.; Brothers, L.; McCabe, J.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    An existing photochemical box model for use in polluted marine boundary layers was modified to allow for the explicit tracking of the mass-independent isotopic composition of oxygen in aerosol nitrate as well as other atmospheric species such as OH and H2O2. This modified model was then used to study the sensitivity of the mass-independent isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate(HNO3) to variables such as relative humidity, temperature ozone and NOx concentrations. Here we present the results of these studies and compare model predictions of the mass-independent oxygen isotopic composition of aerosol nitrate to measurements taken in fine (<1micron) and coarse (>1 micron) aerosol samples taken in a variety of locations, from coastal urban environments, the tropics (Ecuador), inland California (Riverside), and Antarctica. Regarding Antarctica, we comment on the isotopic composition of OH there and the ramifications of these findings for the isotopic composition of other oxygen bearing compounds in the Antarctic atmosphere.

  11. On Looking into the Black Box: Prospects and Limits in the Search for Mental Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, William B.; Morris, Nancy M.

    This paper explores a wide range of issues associated with research on mental models. Based on a functional perspective, mental models are defined as the mechanisms whereby humans generate descriptions of system purpose and form, explanations of system functioning and observed system states, and predictions of future system states. Specifically,…

  12. On Looking into the Black Box: Prospects and Limits in the Search for Mental Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, William B.; Morris, Nancy M.

    This paper explores a wide range of issues associated with research on mental models. Based on a functional perspective, mental models are defined as the mechanisms whereby humans generate descriptions of system purpose and form, explanations of system functioning and observed system states, and predictions of future system states. Specifically,…

  13. Inside the prison black box: toward a life course importation model of inmate behavior.

    PubMed

    Delisi, Matt; Trulson, Chad R; Marquart, James W; Drury, Alan J; Kosloski, Anna E

    2011-12-01

    The importation model is a venerable theoretical explanation for inmate misconduct but it has not been extended in nearly 50 years. The current study advances a life course importation model of inmate behavior where life events in childhood cascade to predict antisocial behavior during adolescence and misconduct occurring during periods of confinement. Based on data from 2,520 institutionalized male delinquents, ordinary least squares, logistic, and negative binomial regression models indicated that family background variables were largely predictive of multiple facets of delinquent careers. Negative binomial regression models of institutional misconduct indicated that proximal delinquent career variables were more consistently associated with misconduct than distal family background factors. Because institutional behavior can be understood as the importing of family deprivation experiences and chronic delinquency, the life course importation model is a useful conceptual framework to study crime over the life course, even including periods of confinement.

  14. On Looking into the Black Box: Prospects and Limits in the Search for Mental Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, W. B.; Morris, N. M.

    1984-01-01

    To place the arguments advanced in this paper in alternative points of view with regard to mental models are reviewed. Use of the construct in areas such as neural information processing, manual control, decision making, problem solving, and cognitive science are discussed. Also reviewed are several taxonomies of mental models. The available empirical evidence for answering questions concerning the nature and usage of mental models is then discussed. A variety of studies are reviewed where the type and form of humans' knowledge have been manipulated. Also considered are numerous transfer of training studies whose results provide indirect evidence of the nature of mental models. The alternative perspectives considered and the spectrum of empirical evidence are combined to suggest a framework within which research on mental models can be viewed. By considering interactions of dimensions of this framework, the most salient unanswered questions can be identified.

  15. NASA's Climate in a Box: Desktop Supercomputing for Open Scientific Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, G. S.; Seablom, M. S.; Lee, T. J.; McConaughy, G. R.; Syed, R.; Oloso, A.; Kemp, E. M.; Greenseid, J.; Smith, R.

    2009-12-01

    NASA's High Performance Computing Portfolio in cooperation with its Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction program intends to make its climate and earth science models more accessible to a larger community. A key goal of this effort is to open the model development and validation process to the scientific community at large such that a natural selection process is enabled and results in a more efficient scientific process. One obstacle to others using NASA models is the complexity of the models and the difficulty in learning how to use them. This situation applies not only to scientists who regularly use these models but also non-typical users who may want to use the models such as scientists from different domains, policy makers, and teachers. Another obstacle to the use of these models is that access to high performance computing (HPC) accounts, from which the models are implemented, can be restrictive with long wait times in job queues and delays caused by an arduous process of obtaining an account, especially for foreign nationals. This project explores the utility of using desktop supercomputers in providing a complete ready-to-use toolkit of climate research products to investigators and on demand access to an HPC system. One objective of this work is to pre-package NASA and NOAA models so that new users will not have to spend significant time porting the models. In addition, the prepackaged toolkit will include tools, such as workflow, visualization, social networking web sites, and analysis tools, to assist users in running the models and analyzing the data. The system architecture to be developed will allow for automatic code updates for each user and an effective means with which to deal with data that are generated. We plan to investigate several desktop systems, but our work to date has focused on a Cray CX1. Currently, we are investigating the potential capabilities of several non-traditional development environments. While most NASA and NOAA models are

  16. On Looking into the Black Box: Prospects and Limits in the Search for Mental Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, W. B.; Morris, N. M.

    1984-01-01

    To place the arguments advanced in this paper in alternative points of view with regard to mental models are reviewed. Use of the construct in areas such as neural information processing, manual control, decision making, problem solving, and cognitive science are discussed. Also reviewed are several taxonomies of mental models. The available empirical evidence for answering questions concerning the nature and usage of mental models is then discussed. A variety of studies are reviewed where the type and form of humans' knowledge have been manipulated. Also considered are numerous transfer of training studies whose results provide indirect evidence of the nature of mental models. The alternative perspectives considered and the spectrum of empirical evidence are combined to suggest a framework within which research on mental models can be viewed. By considering interactions of dimensions of this framework, the most salient unanswered questions can be identified.

  17. Putting the Earth System in a numerical box? The evolution from climate modeling toward global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Amy

    Since the 1980s, climate modeling has undergone major transformations. The most prominent of these are the proliferation of coupled models and the integration within models of a growing number of environments and feedbacks. Climate modelers now increasingly define their object in terms of an "Earth System" instead of a "climate system". In addition to this proliferation of coupled models, the carbon cycle and its feedback on various environments, from the atmosphere to the ocean and to vegetation cover, has become a prominent component of climate modeling. These transformations derive from the IPCC's overall methodology, and are closely bound up with both a heightened awareness of the risks of climate change, as well as an issue of crucial political importance: the question of socio-economic/climate integration. In this article I follow, from a roughly chronological point of view, the major steps of this evolution and its links with the evolution of the political agenda. What can we say about this seemingly irreversible tendency to incorporate everything into models and to take account of everything that influences the Earth's climate? Could we correlate it to the strong tendency toward globalization? How is the notion of climate itself affected? These are the main questions of the paper.

  18. The puzzle box as a simple and efficient behavioral test for exploring impairments of general cognition and executive functions in mouse models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Nada M-B; Fuss, Johannes; Trusel, Massimo; Galsworthy, Michael J; Bobsin, Kristin; Colacicco, Giovanni; Deacon, Robert M J; Riva, Marco A; Kellendonk, Christoph; Sprengel, Rolf; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Gass, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in executive functions are key features of schizophrenia. Rodent behavioral paradigms used so far to find animal correlates of such deficits require extensive effort and time. The puzzle box is a problem-solving test in which mice are required to complete escape tasks of increasing difficulty within a limited amount of time. Previous data have indicated that it is a quick but highly reliable test of higher-order cognitive functioning. We evaluated the use of the puzzle box to explore executive functioning in five different mouse models of schizophrenia: mice with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus lesions, mice treated sub-chronically with the NMDA-receptor antagonist MK-801, mice constitutively lacking the GluA1 subunit of AMPA-receptors, and mice over-expressing dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum. All mice displayed altered executive functions in the puzzle box, although the nature and extent of the deficits varied between the different models. Deficits were strongest in hippocampus-lesioned and GluA1 knockout mice, while more subtle deficits but specific to problem solving were found in the medial prefrontal-lesioned mice, MK-801-treated mice, and in mice with striatal overexpression of D2 receptors. Data from this study demonstrate the utility of the puzzle box as an effective screening tool for executive functions in general and for schizophrenia mouse models in particular.

  19. Hierarchical linear model: thinking outside the traditional repeated-measures analysis-of-variance box.

    PubMed

    Lininger, Monica; Spybrook, Jessaca; Cheatham, Christopher C

    2015-04-01

    Longitudinal designs are common in the field of athletic training. For example, in the Journal of Athletic Training from 2005 through 2010, authors of 52 of the 218 original research articles used longitudinal designs. In 50 of the 52 studies, a repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. A possible alternative to this approach is the hierarchical linear model, which has been readily accepted in other medical fields. In this short report, we demonstrate the use of the hierarchical linear model for analyzing data from a longitudinal study in athletic training. We discuss the relevant hypotheses, model assumptions, analysis procedures, and output from the HLM 7.0 software. We also examine the advantages and disadvantages of using the hierarchical linear model with repeated measures and repeated-measures analysis of variance for longitudinal data.

  20. Hierarchical Linear Model: Thinking Outside the Traditional Repeated-Measures Analysis-of-Variance Box

    PubMed Central

    Lininger, Monica; Spybrook, Jessaca; Cheatham, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal designs are common in the field of athletic training. For example, in the Journal of Athletic Training from 2005 through 2010, authors of 52 of the 218 original research articles used longitudinal designs. In 50 of the 52 studies, a repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. A possible alternative to this approach is the hierarchical linear model, which has been readily accepted in other medical fields. In this short report, we demonstrate the use of the hierarchical linear model for analyzing data from a longitudinal study in athletic training. We discuss the relevant hypotheses, model assumptions, analysis procedures, and output from the HLM 7.0 software. We also examine the advantages and disadvantages of using the hierarchical linear model with repeated measures and repeated-measures analysis of variance for longitudinal data. PMID:25875072

  1. Simple Statistical Model to Quantify Maximum Expected EMC in Spacecraft and Avionics Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Bremner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This study shows cumulative distribution function (CDF) comparisons of composite a fairing electromagnetic field data obtained by computational electromagnetic 3D full wave modeling and laboratory testing. Test and model data correlation is shown. In addition, this presentation shows application of the power balance and extention of this method to predict the variance and maximum exptected mean of the E-field data. This is valuable for large scale evaluations of transmission inside cavities.

  2. [Application of the musculo-skeletal modelling software lhpFusionBox to a paleoanthropological problem: the Spyrou Neandertal moves!].

    PubMed

    Chapman, Tara; Semal, Patrick; Moiseev, Fedor; Louryan, Stéphane; Rooze, Marcel; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2013-01-01

    LhpFusionBox is a program originally designed for biomechanical and clinical studies relating to the musculoskeletal system of anatomically modern humans (AMH). The program has recently been adapted for paleontological purposes and used to reconstruct and biomechanically analyse a fossil hominid. There is no complete Neandertal skeleton in the fossil record. The aim of the study was to reconstruct a complete three-dimensional (3D) model of a Neandertal using the relatively complete Spy II Neandertal and to conduct biomechanical feasibility studies on the knee and hamstring moment arms of the skeleton. Different Neandertal specimens were scaled to the size of Spy II to replace incomplete or missing bones. Biomechanical feasibility studies performed on the knee seem to show that Neandertal and AMHh gait is similar and Neandertals were shown to have larger moment arms in the hamstring muscles, which would have given them a mechanical advantage. The complete Neandertal was printed in 3D and used as the base to create the artistic model of "Spyrou" housed at l'Espace de l'Homme de Spy (EHoS) museum. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  3. Response surface modeling of acid activation of raw diatomite using in sunflower oil bleaching by: Box-Behnken experimental design.

    PubMed

    Larouci, M; Safa, M; Meddah, B; Aoues, A; Sonnet, P

    2015-03-01

    The optimum conditions for acid activation of diatomite for maximizing bleaching efficiency of the diatomite in sun flower oil treatment were studied. Box-Behnken experimental design combining with response surface modeling (RSM) and quadratic programming (QP) was employed to obtain the optimum conditions of three independent variables (acid concentration, activation time and solid to liquid) for acid activation of diatomite. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by means of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95 % confidence limits (α = 0.05). The optimum values of the selected variables were obtained by solving the quadratic regression model, as well as by analyzing the response surface contour plots. The experimental conditions at this global point were determined to be acid concentration = 8.963 N, activation time = 11.9878 h, and solid to liquid ratio = 221.2113 g/l, the corresponding bleaching efficiency was found to be about 99 %.

  4. Pathology of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on Weisbord six box model and its relation with mental health

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Jahangir; Taheri, Behjat; Sadeghpour, Masoumeh; Sadeghpour, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this research was to study the pathology of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on Weisbord six box model and to find its relation with mental health. Materials and Methods: The research method followed was a descriptive survey. The statistical society consisted of all staffs of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences consisting of professors in the year 2012 (personnel of deputy of treatment, deputy of training, cultural-student deputy, supporting deputy, deputy of food and drugs, health deputy, and deputy of research). The number of subjects in the mentioned society was 1647, sample size was 332 Based on Cochrane's formula. They were selected by random sampling method in proportion with the statistical society. The measurement instruments included organizational pathology questionnaire (ODQ) with 35 questions and the questionnaire of mental health standard [General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)] with 28 questions. The validity of the questionnaires obtained from reviews by faculties and experts, and the reliability of the questionnaire assessed through Cronbach's coefficient were 0.86, 0.85, and 0.76, respectively. To analyze data, the statistical methods such as single-variance t-test, regression analysis, correlation coefficient, Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) were used. Findings: The findings of research demonstrated that the organizational damage based on six box model was seen only in the reward component at the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Mental health of persons in the sample group of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences was in the suitable status. There was a meaningful and positive interrelation between mental health and attitude toward the organizational damages in the dimensions of communications, useful merchandises, and attitude to change. However, no meaningful interrelation was seen between aims, structure, leadership, and reward and mental health. There was no

  5. The Mechanics of Coulomb Wedges: Comparison Between a Numerical Model (Boundary Element Method) and a Sand-Box Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Castello, M.; Cooke, M.

    2006-12-01

    Fold and thrust belts have been successfully modelled using either physical or numerical methods in recent years. The two methods have well-known advantages and drawbacks for investigating contractional processes. In this work we have applied the Boundary Element Method code in order to closely reproduce successive snapshots of deformation accumulated within a sand-box experiment. Our numerical models provide a quantitative mechanical analysis of the deformation observed in analogue models of non-cohesive Coulomb wedges during an underthrusting/accretion transition. Model results show that the total work done by the contracting wedge increases during the underthrusting stage up to a critical value when the propagation of a frontal thrust significantly reduces the work required for further deformation. This transition occurs when the energetic cost of developing a new forethrust is less than the benefit of growing this new fault. The elastic numerical model predicts the location of the maximum shear stress on the basal dècollement just prior to the propagation of the sole thrust as well as the energetically most viable position for the nucleation of new forethrust ramp. These positions do not coincide. Furthermore, the forethrust within the sandbox experiment develops at the energetically favoured position rather than the location of greatest shear stress suggesting that the new thrust ramps develop first ahead and then link down and backward to the propagating basal dècollement. As a result, the most efficient location for a new thrust ramp is where gravitational, frictional, internal and propagation work terms are optimally combined. The trade-off between the dominant frictional and internal work terms is fuelled by overburden weight, which reduces slip on thrust ramps until the internal work stored in the surrounding deforming material reaches a critical value. The correlation of our numerical results with analogue experiments validates use of the principle of

  6. A grey box model of glucose fermentation and syntrophic oxidation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    de Los Ángeles Fernandez, Maria; de Los Ángeles Sanromán, Maria; Marks, Stanislaw; Makinia, Jacek; Gonzalez Del Campo, Araceli; Rodrigo, Manuel; Fernandez, Francisco Jesus

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the fermentative and oxidative processes taking place in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) fed with glucose were studied and modeled. The model accounting for the bioelectrochemical processes was based on ordinary, Monod-type differential equations. The model parameters were estimated using experimental results obtained from three H-type MFCs operated at open or closed circuits and fed with glucose or ethanol. The experimental results demonstrate that similar fermentation processes were carried out under open and closed circuit operation, with the most important fermentation products being ethanol (with a yield of 1.81molmol(-1) glucose) and lactic acid (with a yield of 1.36molmol(-1) glucose). A peak in the electricity generation was obtained when glucose and fermentation products coexisted in the liquid bulk. However, almost 90% of the electricity produced came from the oxidation of ethanol.

  7. Underwater wireless optical communication using a blue-light leaky feeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Sun, Bin; Kong, Meiwei; Lin, Aobo; Sarwar, Rohail; Han, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Ning

    2017-08-01

    A novel concept of using a leaky plastic optical fiber (POF) as the leaky feeder for underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The leaky POF can potentially improve the UWOC coverage. Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) is employed in the demonstration to increase spectral efficiency and robustness to modal dispersion of the leaky POF with a large core. A bit rate of 224.61 Mb/s (net bit rate: 183.69 Mb/s) at the two discrete radiation points along a 10-m leaky POF feeder is achieved using 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM)-OFDM modulation. Over a 30-cm underwater channel, the mean bit errors (BERs) measured at the two points are 3.37×10-5 and 3.35×10-3, respectively, which are below the FEC threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  8. Opening the Black Box of Clinical Collaboration in Integrated Care Models for Frail, Elderly Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Stampa, Matthieu; Vedel, Isabelle; Bergman, Howard; Novella, Jean-Luc; Lechowski, Laurent; Ankri, Joel; Lapointe, Liette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to understand better the clinical collaboration process among primary care physicians (PCPs), case managers (CMs), and geriatricians in integrated models of care. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study with semistructured interviews. A purposive sample of 35 PCPs, 7 CMs, and 4 geriatricians was selected in…

  9. Opening the Black Box of Clinical Collaboration in Integrated Care Models for Frail, Elderly Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Stampa, Matthieu; Vedel, Isabelle; Bergman, Howard; Novella, Jean-Luc; Lechowski, Laurent; Ankri, Joel; Lapointe, Liette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to understand better the clinical collaboration process among primary care physicians (PCPs), case managers (CMs), and geriatricians in integrated models of care. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study with semistructured interviews. A purposive sample of 35 PCPs, 7 CMs, and 4 geriatricians was selected in…

  10. The Evolution of Software Pricing: From Box Licenses to Application Service Provider Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontis, Nick; Chung, Honsan

    2000-01-01

    Describes three different pricing models for software. Findings of this case study support the proposition that software pricing is a complex and subjective process. The key determinant of alignment between vendor and user is the nature of value in the software to the buyer. This value proposition may range from increased cost reduction to…

  11. Evaluation of a Lagrangian box model using field measurements from EASE (Eastern Atlantic Summer Experiment) 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. J.; Shallcross, D. E.; Law, K. S.; Wild, J. O. F.; Simmonds, P. G.; Spain, T. G.; Berrisford, P.; Methven, J.; Lewis, A. C.; McQuaid, J. B.; Pilling, M. J.; Bandy, B. J.; Penkett, S. A.; Pyle, J. A.

    The Cambridge Tropospheric Trajectory model of Chemistry and Transport (CiTTyCAT), a Lagrangian chemistry model, has been evaluated using atmospheric chemical measurements collected during the East Atlantic Summer Experiment 1996 (EASE '96). This field campaign was part of the UK Natural Environment Research Council's (NERC) Atmospheric Chemistry Studies in the Oceanic Environment (ACSOE) programme, conducted at Mace Head, Republic of Ireland, during July and August 1996. The model includes a description of gas-phase tropospheric chemistry, and simple parameterisations for surface deposition, mixing from the free troposphere and emissions. The model generally compares well with the measurements and is used to study the production and loss of O 3 under a variety of conditions. The mean difference between the hourly O 3 concentrations calculated by the model and those measured is 0.6 ppbv with a standard deviation of 8.7 ppbv. Three specific air-flow regimes were identified during the campaign - westerly, anticyclonic (easterly) and south westerly. The westerly flow is typical of background conditions for Mace Head. However, on some occasions there was evidence of long-range transport of pollutants from North America. In periods of anticyclonic flow, air parcels had collected emissions of NO x and VOCs immediately before arriving at Mace Head, leading to O 3 production. The level of calculated O 3 depends critically on the precise details of the trajectory, and hence on the emissions into the air parcel. In several periods of south westerly flow, low concentrations of O 3 were measured which were consistent with deposition and photochemical destruction inside the tropical marine boundary layer.

  12. Numerical Weather Prediction Models on Linux Boxes as tools in meteorological education in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyongyosi, A. Z.; Andre, K.; Salavec, P.; Horanyi, A.; Szepszo, G.; Mille, M.; Tasnadi, P.; Weidiger, T.

    2012-04-01

    Education of Meteorologist in Hungary - according to the Bologna Process - has three stages: BSc, MSc and PhD, and students graduating at each stage get the respective degree (BSc, MSc and PhD). The three year long base BSc course in Meteorology can be chosen by undergraduate students in the fields of Geosciences, Environmental Sciences and Physics. BasicsFundamentals in Mathematics (Calculus), Physics (General and Theoretical) Physics and Informatics are emphasized during their elementary education. The two year long MSc course - in which about 15 to 25 students are admitted each year - can be studied only at our the Eötvös Loránd uUniversity in the our country. Our aim is to give a basic education in all fields of Meteorology. Main topics are: Climatology, Atmospheric Physics, Atmospheric Chemistry, Dynamic and Synoptic Meteorology, Numerical Weather Prediction, modeling Modeling of surfaceSurface-atmosphere Iinteractions and Cclimate change. Education is performed in two branches: Climate Researcher and Forecaster. Education of Meteorologist in Hungary - according to the Bologna Process - has three stages: BSc, MSc and PhD, and students graduating at each stage get the respective degree. The three year long BSc course in Meteorology can be chosen by undergraduate students in the fields of Geosciences, Environmental Sciences and Physics. Fundamentals in Mathematics (Calculus), (General and Theoretical) Physics and Informatics are emphasized during their elementary education. The two year long MSc course - in which about 15 to 25 students are admitted each year - can be studied only at the Eötvös Loránd University in our country. Our aim is to give a basic education in all fields of Meteorology: Climatology, Atmospheric Physics, Atmospheric Chemistry, Dynamic and Synoptic Meteorology, Numerical Weather Prediction, Modeling of Surface-atmosphere Interactions and Climate change. Education is performed in two branches: Climate Researcher and Forecaster

  13. Invariant box-parameterization of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Thomas J.; Wagner, DJ

    1998-10-19

    The model-independent 'box' parameterization of neutrino oscillations is examined. The invariant boxes are the classical amplitudes of the individual oscillating terms. Being observables, the boxes are independent of the choice of parameterization of the mixing matrix. Emphasis is placed on the relations among the box parameters due to mixing-matrix unitarity, and on the reduction of the number of boxes to the minimum basis set. Using the box algebra, we show that CP-violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. General analyses of neutrino oscillations among n{>=}3 flavors can readily determine the boxes, which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements.

  14. The Messy Aerosol Submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): Description and a Box Model Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl)chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealized marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HClCl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse particles. MADE3 and PartMC- MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes about 2 micrometers) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distribution, and also in terms of aerosol composition. Considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems suitable for application within a global model.

  15. The MESSy aerosol submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): description and a box model test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, V.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl)/chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealised marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HCl/Cl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse particles. MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes ≲ 2 μm) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distribution, and also in terms of aerosol composition. Considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems suitable for application within a global model.

  16. Estimating iron and aluminum removal rates in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean using a box model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacz, Artur P.; Chai, Fei; Dugdale, Richard C.; Measures, Christopher I.

    2011-03-01

    Iron limitation plays an important role in maintaining the high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) condition in the equatorial upwelling zone. The rate and depth of upwelling control Fe supply to the euphotic zone. This study constrains the transport fluxes and budget of two trace metals, Fe and Al, in the upper ocean. They are co-delivered to the eastern equatorial Pacific surface waters via the Equatorial Undercurrent and upwelling but show distinct biogeochemical cycling processes. We combine the results of the in situ measurements of dissolved Fe and Al (dFe and dAl) with the modeled velocity fields to calculate the physical fluxes. The model calculations are evaluated with the conservation of heat, volume transport, NO 3 and Si(OH) 4 budgets for the equatorial Pacific. The vertical flux due to upwelling provides averaged dFe and dAl supply rates of 1.45 μmol m -2 d -1 and 11.51 μmol m -2 d -1, respectively. The sum of the net physical fluxes in the eastern equatorial Pacific for dFe and dAl are 0.41 μmol m -2 d -1 and 2.77 μmol m -2 d -1, respectively. These estimates are equal to the net biological and chemical removal rates of dFe and dAl. The calculated dFe:C net removal ratio is in the range of 3-9 μmol:mol, which agrees with most other estimates. This suggests that the majority of net dFe removal is due to biological uptake in the upper water column. The results of this box model approach illustrate the usefulness of combining the modeled outputs and in situ measurements, which provide additional constraints on Fe transport and cycling in the equatorial Pacific and possibly other HNLC regions.

  17. Probabilistic Analysis of Onion Routing in a Black-box Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    model of anonymous communication that abstracts the essential properties of onion routing in the presence of an active adversary that controls a portion...users by exploit- ing knowledge of their probabilistic behavior. In particular, we show that a user u’s anonymity is worst either when the other...users always choose the destination u is least likely to visit or when the other users always choose the destination u chooses. This worst-case anonymity

  18. Low-order black-box models for control system design in large power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kamwa, I.; Trudel, G.; Gerin-Lajoie, L.

    1996-02-01

    The paper studies two multi-input multi-output (MIMO) procedures for the identification of low-order state-space models of power systems, by probing the network in open loop with low-energy pulses or random signals. Although such data may result from actual measurements, the development assumes simulated responses from a transient stability program, hence benefiting from the existing large base of stability models. While pulse data is processed using the eigensystem realization algorithm, the analysis of random responses is done by means of subspace identification methods. On a prototype Hydro-Quebec power system, including SVCs, DC lines, series compensation, and more than 1,100 buses, it is verified that the two approaches are equivalent only when strict requirements are imposed on the pulse length and magnitude. The 10th-order equivalent models derived by random-signal probing allow for effective tuning of decentralized power system stabilizers (PSSs) able to damp both local and very slow inter-area modes.

  19. Low-order black-box models for control system design in large power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kamwa, I.; Trudel, G.; Gerin-Lajoie, L.

    1995-12-31

    The paper studies two multi-input multi-output (MIMO) procedures for the identification of low-order state-space models of power systems, by probing the network in open loop with low-energy pulses or random signals. Although such data may result from actual measurements, the development assumes simulated responses from a transient stability program, hence benefiting form the existing large base of stability models. While pulse data is processed using the eigensystem realization algorithm, the analysis of random responses is done by means of subspace identification methods. On a prototype Hydro-Quebec power system, including SVCs, DC lines, series compensation, and more than 1,100 buses, it is verified that the two approaches are equivalent only when strict requirements are imposed on the pulse length and magnitude. The 10th-order equivalent models derived by random-signal probing allow for effective tuning of decentralized power system stabilizers (PSSs) able to damp both local and very slow inter-area modes.

  20. Thinking outside the boxes: Using current reading models to assess and treat developmental surface dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Law, Caroline; Cupples, Linda

    2017-03-01

    Improving the reading performance of children with developmental surface dyslexia has proved challenging, with limited generalisation of reading skills typically reported after intervention. The aim of this study was to provide tailored, theoretically motivated intervention to two children with developmental surface dyslexia. Our objectives were to improve their reading performance, and to evaluate the utility of current reading models in therapeutic practice. Detailed reading and cognitive profiles for two male children with developmental surface dyslexia were compared to the results obtained by age-matched control groups. The specific area of single-word reading difficulty for each child was identified within the dual route model (DRM) of reading, following which a theoretically motivated intervention programme was devised. Both children showed significant improvements in single-word reading ability after training, with generalisation effects observed for untrained words. However, the assessment and intervention results also differed for each child, reinforcing the view that the causes and consequences of developmental dyslexia, even within subtypes, are not homogeneous. Overall, the results of the interventions corresponded more closely with the DRM than other current reading models, in that real word reading improved in the absence of enhanced nonword reading for both children.

  1. The Y-Box Binding Protein 1 Suppresses Alzheimer’s Disease Progression in Two Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Bobkova, N. V.; Lyabin, D. N.; Medvinskaya, N. I.; Samokhin, A. N.; Nekrasov, P. V.; Nesterova, I. V.; Aleksandrova, I. Y.; Tatarnikova, O. G.; Bobylev, A. G.; Vikhlyantsev, I. M.; Kukharsky, M. S.; Ustyugov, A. A.; Polyakov, D. N.; Eliseeva, I. A.; Kretov, D. A.; Guryanov, S. G.; Ovchinnikov, L. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a member of the family of DNA- and RNA binding proteins. It is involved in a wide variety of DNA/RNA-dependent events including cell proliferation and differentiation, stress response, and malignant cell transformation. Previously, YB-1 was detected in neurons of the neocortex and hippocampus, but its precise role in the brain remains undefined. Here we show that subchronic intranasal injections of recombinant YB-1, as well as its fragment YB-11−219, suppress impairment of spatial memory in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice with Alzheimer’s type degeneration and improve learning in transgenic 5XFAD mice used as a model of cerebral amyloidosis. YB-1-treated OBX and 5XFAD mice showed a decreased level of brain β-amyloid. In OBX animals, an improved morphological state of neurons was revealed in the neocortex and hippocampus; in 5XFAD mice, a delay in amyloid plaque progression was observed. Intranasally administered YB-1 penetrated into the brain and could enter neurons. In vitro co-incubation of YB-1 with monomeric β-amyloid (1–42) inhibited formation of β-amyloid fibrils, as confirmed by electron microscopy. This suggests that YB-1 interaction with β-amyloid prevents formation of filaments that are responsible for neurotoxicity and neuronal death. Our data are the first evidence for a potential therapeutic benefit of YB-1 for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26394155

  2. Prediction of inertial effects due to bone conduction in a 2D box model of the cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpin, Alice A.; Elliott, Stephen J.; Ni, Guangjian

    2015-12-01

    A 2D box model of the cochlea has been used to predict the basilar membrane, BM, velocity and the fluid flow caused by two components of bone conduction: due to inertia of the middle ear and due to inertia of the cochlear fluids. A finite difference approach has been used with asymmetric fluid chambers, that enables an investigation of the effect of varying window stiffness, due to otosclerosis for example. The BM is represented as a series of locally reacting single degree of freedom systems, with graded stiffness along the cochlea to represent the distribution of natural frequencies and with a damping representative of the passive cochlea. The velocity distributions along the passive BM are similar for harmonic excitation via the middle ear inertia or via the fluid inertia, but the variation of the BM velocity magnitude with excitation frequency is different in the two cases. Excitation via the middle ear is suppressed if the oval window is assumed to be blocked, but the excitation via the cochlear fluids is still possible. By assuming a combined excitation due to both middle ear and fluid excitation, the difference between the overall response can be calculated with a flexible and a blocked oval window, which gives a reasonable prediction of Carhart's notch.

  3. Parameter studies using an IDL model of the FORTE trigger box

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.

    1996-06-01

    The author presents the results of parameter studies designed to estimate the optimum settings for the trigger circuit which will be used by the fast on-orbit recording of transient events (FORTE) satellite. Real broadband data recorded by the Los Alamos Blackbeard experiment was processed by a computer model that simulated the action of the FORTE trigger. The probability of detection and false-event rate was determined for a variety of trigger-parameter settings, and the results are presented in the report. The result of the study is a well-defined set of parameters chosen to give the best possible triggering performance.

  4. Beware the black box: investigating the sensitivity of FEA simulations to modelling factors in comparative biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Christopher W; McCurry, Matthew R; Clausen, Phillip D; McHenry, Colin R

    2013-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational technique of growing popularity in the field of comparative biomechanics, and is an easily accessible platform for form-function analyses of biological structures. However, its rapid evolution in recent years from a novel approach to common practice demands some scrutiny in regards to the validity of results and the appropriateness of assumptions inherent in setting up simulations. Both validation and sensitivity analyses remain unexplored in many comparative analyses, and assumptions considered to be 'reasonable' are often assumed to have little influence on the results and their interpretation. HERE WE REPORT AN EXTENSIVE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS WHERE HIGH RESOLUTION FINITE ELEMENT (FE) MODELS OF MANDIBLES FROM SEVEN SPECIES OF CROCODILE WERE ANALYSED UNDER LOADS TYPICAL FOR COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS: biting, shaking, and twisting. Simulations explored the effect on both the absolute response and the interspecies pattern of results to variations in commonly used input parameters. Our sensitivity analysis focuses on assumptions relating to the selection of material properties (heterogeneous or homogeneous), scaling (standardising volume, surface area, or length), tooth position (front, mid, or back tooth engagement), and linear load case (type of loading for each feeding type). Our findings show that in a comparative context, FE models are far less sensitive to the selection of material property values and scaling to either volume or surface area than they are to those assumptions relating to the functional aspects of the simulation, such as tooth position and linear load case. Results show a complex interaction between simulation assumptions, depending on the combination of assumptions and the overall shape of each specimen. Keeping assumptions consistent between models in an analysis does not ensure that results can be generalised beyond the specific set of assumptions used. Logically, different comparative datasets would

  5. Beware the black box: investigating the sensitivity of FEA simulations to modelling factors in comparative biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    McCurry, Matthew R.; Clausen, Phillip D.; McHenry, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational technique of growing popularity in the field of comparative biomechanics, and is an easily accessible platform for form-function analyses of biological structures. However, its rapid evolution in recent years from a novel approach to common practice demands some scrutiny in regards to the validity of results and the appropriateness of assumptions inherent in setting up simulations. Both validation and sensitivity analyses remain unexplored in many comparative analyses, and assumptions considered to be ‘reasonable’ are often assumed to have little influence on the results and their interpretation. Here we report an extensive sensitivity analysis where high resolution finite element (FE) models of mandibles from seven species of crocodile were analysed under loads typical for comparative analysis: biting, shaking, and twisting. Simulations explored the effect on both the absolute response and the interspecies pattern of results to variations in commonly used input parameters. Our sensitivity analysis focuses on assumptions relating to the selection of material properties (heterogeneous or homogeneous), scaling (standardising volume, surface area, or length), tooth position (front, mid, or back tooth engagement), and linear load case (type of loading for each feeding type). Our findings show that in a comparative context, FE models are far less sensitive to the selection of material property values and scaling to either volume or surface area than they are to those assumptions relating to the functional aspects of the simulation, such as tooth position and linear load case. Results show a complex interaction between simulation assumptions, depending on the combination of assumptions and the overall shape of each specimen. Keeping assumptions consistent between models in an analysis does not ensure that results can be generalised beyond the specific set of assumptions used. Logically, different comparative datasets

  6. Support vector machines for spike pattern classification with a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron

    PubMed Central

    Ambard, Maxime; Rotter, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Spike pattern classification is a key topic in machine learning, computational neuroscience, and electronic device design. Here, we offer a new supervised learning rule based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) to determine the synaptic weights of a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron model for spike pattern classification. We compare classification performance between this algorithm and other methods sharing the same conceptual framework. We consider the effect of postsynaptic potential (PSP) kernel dynamics on patterns separability, and we propose an extension of the method to decrease computational load. The algorithm performs well in generalization tasks. We show that the peak value of spike patterns separability depends on a relation between PSP dynamics and spike pattern duration, and we propose a particular kernel that is well-suited for fast computations and electronic implementations. PMID:23181017

  7. Leaky Bodies, Bawdy Books: Gonorrhea and Reading in Eighteenth-Century Britain.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darren N

    In eighteenth-century Britain, reading lewd books was understood to exacerbate gonorrhea. That pathology corresponded to a specific physiological model, which historians describe as the leaky male body. This article demonstrates how the connection between reading and gonorrhea correlated to three phenomena: 1) the neuro-sexual economy of bodily fluids; 2) the effects of reading on the sensible mind and body; and 3) the crossover of erotic and medical literatures. Aware of the physiological power of imagination, authors intentionally wrote to elicit strong physiological and sexual responses in readers. Concerns about the pathological and moral consequences of reading provocative material similarly informed criticisms of both the outright pornographic and the ostensibly medical. Partly in response to such criticisms, medical authors developed a more careful, decorous, and objective tone for writing about sexual topics. Ultimately, the culture of sensibility receded, as did anxieties about involuntary leaks of bodily fluids caused by reading.

  8. The effect of plasma actuator on the depreciation of the aerodynamic drag on box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinaldi, Budiarso, Julian, James; Rabbani M., N.

    2016-06-01

    Recent active control research advances have provided many benefits some of which in the field of transportation by land, sea as well as by air. Flow engineering by using active control has proven advantages in energy saving significantly. One of the active control equipment that is being developed, especially in the 21st century, is a plasma actuator, with the ability to modify the flow of fluid by the approach of ion particles makes these actuators a very powerful and promising tool. This actuator can be said to be better to the previously active control such as suction, blowing and synthetic jets because it is easier to control, more flexible because it has no moving parts, easy to be manufactured and installed, and consumes a small amount of energy with maximum capability. Plasma actuator itself is the composition of a material composed of copper and a dielectric sheet, where the copper sheets act as an electricity conductor and the dielectric sheet as electricity insulator. Products from the plasma actuators are ion wind which is the result of the suction of free air around the actuator to the plasma zone. This study investigates the ability of plasma actuators in lowering aerodynamic drag which is commonly formed in the models of vehicles by varying the shape of geometry models and the flow speed.

  9. Box Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Project offers grades 3-8 students hands-on design practice creating built environments to solve a society-based architectural problem. Students plan buildings, draw floor plans, and make scale models of the structures that are then used in related interdisciplinary activities. (Author)

  10. Thin-Film Electronic Structure: Beyond the ``Particle in a Box" Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T.

    2007-03-01

    The quantization of electronic states in thin metallic films is now well-established, having been observed in a number of systems including films on metal as well as semiconductor substrates. The impact of this quantization on the films' physical properties has been demonstrated in several studies, including the dependence on thickness of films' thermal stabilities, work functions, and superconductivity transition temperatures. In the simplest model, the electrons are confined to the film by the substrate and vacuum interfaces, which work as ``mirrors'' to reflect the electrons back into the film, resulting in discrete standing-wave states. In this picture, the substrate forms a reflecting barrier due to a mismatch of electronic structures between it and the overlayer, and the main result is the formation of discrete energy subbands. In this talk, photoemission results will be presented from a variety of thin-film systems that show more interesting electronic structures due to interactions with the substrate and interface. The systems studied highlight different effects, including interfacial scattering and diffraction, hybridization of film and substrate states, and the formation of a composite quantum well from a thin metallic film on a semiconductor. In the latter case, the semiconductor depletion region forms part of the system via coherent coupling between film and substrate electronic states. In collaboration with S. J. Tang, N. J. Speer, D. Ricci, M. Upton, L. Basile, S.-L. Chang, Y.-R. Lee, and T.-C. Chiang.

  11. Opening the black box of clinical skills assessment via observation: a conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Jennifer R; Conforti, Lisa; Bernabeo, Elizabeth; Iobst, William; Holmboe, Eric

    2011-10-01

    This study was intended to develop a conceptual framework of the factors impacting on faculty members' judgements and ratings of resident doctors (residents) after direct observation with patients. In 2009, 44 general internal medicine faculty members responsible for out-patient resident teaching in 16 internal medicine residency programmes in a large urban area in the eastern USA watched four videotaped scenarios and two live scenarios of standardised residents engaged in clinical encounters with standardised patients. After each, faculty members rated the resident using a mini-clinical evaluation exercise and were individually interviewed using a semi-structured interview. Interviews were videotaped, transcribed and analysed using grounded theory methods. Four primary themes that provide insights into the variability of faculty assessments of residents' performance were identified: (i) the frames of reference used by faculty members when translating observations into judgements and ratings are variable; (ii) high levels of inference are used during the direct observation process; (iii) the methods by which judgements are synthesised into numerical ratings are variable, and (iv) factors external to resident performance influence ratings. From these themes, a conceptual model was developed to describe the process of observation, interpretation, synthesis and rating. It is likely that multiple factors account for the variability in faculty ratings of residents. Understanding these factors informs potential new approaches to faculty development to improve the accuracy, reliability and utility of clinical skills assessment. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  12. From field data to numerical models: application of the Box-Model to infer the dynamics of PDC generated during the AD 79 eruption of Somma-Vesuvio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadini, Alessandro; Neri, Augusto; Cioni, Raffaello; Bevilacqua, Andrea; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Gurioli, Lucia

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a validation procedure for a physical and numerical model of Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDC) using feedbacks from well-known deposits emplaced by specific single eruptive units. The study is specifically focused on the PDCs generated during the overall famous AD 79 eruption of the Somma-Vesuvio volcano. To this purpose, values of the maximum runout, volumes and Total Grain Size Distributions have been estimated for two eruptive units (i.e. EU3pf and EU4; Cioni et al. 2000) of the AD 79 eruption. These units have been used to define the input volcanological parameters for testing the Box-Model of Dade and Huppert (1995), when reproducing one specific end-member of the complex spectrum of PDCs, that is the more dilute, turbulent part of the PDCs reconstructed in the Somma-Vesuvio record (stratified flows with concentration of solid particles in volume up to about 5%). The Box-Model is a kinematic approach, which calculates the flow density and velocity along time and the kinetic energy of the flow front. This can be compared with the potential energy needed to overcome topographic obstacles to estimate flow invasion across complex topographies. Validation of the model has been performed with respect to: i) the degree of overlapping between inundation areas given by the model and by field data; ii) the thickness of the deposit versus the thickness of the model output with distance; iii) the mass fractions of the different grain size classes with distance in the real deposit versus the model output. Several simulations have been performed considering i) polydisperse (with 10 grain size classes) and monodisperse (with the Mdφ values) systems; ii) a direct version (where the initial volume is released and the invasion area is computed) and an inverse version (where the initial collapsing volume is a function of an inundation area defined by the user); iii) axisymmetrical and asymmetrical collapses. Results allow to obtain first

  13. Moving the Watershed Ecosystem Approach Beyond the Black Box with Sensor Technologies and New Conceptual Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. W.; McGuire, K. J.; Ross, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The small watershed ecosystem as a unit of experimental manipulation and analysis has been a hallmark of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest for 60 years. Water and nutrient budgets of headwater catchments have been instrumental in advancing our understanding of the response of forested ecosystems to disturbances such as air pollution and land management. A limitation in the practice of this approach is that point-scale measurements are compiled to create catchment scale estimates of fluxes and stores, thus losing process information that could be gained from spatial patterns that depend on position along hydrologic or biogeochemical pathways. Beginning in 2007, high frequency measurements of water table fluctuation, made possible by inexpensive sensor technology, highlighted the previously underappreciated role of groundwater in these steep headwater catchments. Hydropedologic units (HPUs), identified by morphological differences in soil profiles, and reflecting distinct groundwater regimes, were defined and arranged along a generalized toposequence to describe a conceptual model which partitions spatial variation into predictable, repeatable landscape units. Stratification of point scale measurements of soil and water quality elucidates spatial patterns of variation and allows identification of hot spots, or zones of the catchment where certain processes prevail. Specific HPUs are associated with high rates of dissolved organic matter production, nitrification, denitrification and delivery of mineral weathering products to the surface. Moving beyond the small watershed, contrasting spatial patterns in surface water chemistry at the basin scale suggest differing prevalence of various HPUs among headwater catchments. Comparison of water quality patterns with HPU distribution allows identification of catchment properties responsible for regulation of water quality at the point to the catchment to the basin scales.

  14. Conceptual Model of the Geometry and Physics of Water Flow in a Fractured Basalt Vadose Zone: Box Canyon Site, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, Boris; Doughty, Christine; Steiger, Michael; Long, Jane C.S.; Wood, Tom; Jacobsen, Janet; Lore, Jason; Zawislanski, Peter T.

    1999-03-01

    A conceptual model of the geometry and physics of water flow in a fractured basalt vadose zone was developed based on the results of lithological studies and a series of ponded infiltration tests conducted at the Box Canyon site near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho. The infiltration tests included one two-week test in 1996, three two-day tests in 1997, and one four-day test in 1997. For the various tests, initial infiltration rates ranged from 4.1 cm/day to 17.7 cm/day and then decreased with time, presumably due to mechanical or microbiological clogging of fractures and vesicularbasalt in the near-surface zone, as well as the effect of entrapped air. The subsurface moisture redistribution was monitored with tensiometers, neutron logging, time domain reflectrometry and ground penetrating radar. A conservative tracer, potassium bromide, was added to the pond water at a concentration of 3 g/L to monitor water flow with electrical resistivity probes and water sampling. Analysis of the data showed evidence of preferential flow rather than the propagation of a uniform wetting front. We propose a conceptual model describing the saturation-desaturation behavior of the basalt, in which rapid preferential flow through vertical column-bounding fractures occurs from the surface to the base of the basalt flow. After the rapid wetting of column-bounding fractures, a gradual wetting of other fractures and the basalt matrix occurs. Fractures that are saturated early in the tests may become desaturated thereafter, which we attribute to the redistribution of water between fractures and matrix. Lateral movement of water was also observed within a horizontal central fracture zone and rubble zone, which could have important implications for contaminant accumulation at contaminated sites.

  15. Arthroscopic skills assessment and use of box model for training in arthroscopic surgery using Sawbones – “FAST” workstation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Saumitra; Radi, Mohamed Abdel; Ramadan, Islam Karam-allah; Said, Hatem Galal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic skills training outside the operative room may decrease risks and errors by trainee surgeons. There is a need of simple objective method for evaluating proficiency and skill of arthroscopy trainees using simple bench model of arthroscopic simulator. The aim of this study is to correlate motor task performance to level of prior arthroscopic experience and establish benchmarks for training modules. Methods: Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed a set of tasks to assess a) arthroscopic triangulation, b) navigation, c) object handling and d) meniscus trimming using SAWBONES “FAST” arthroscopy skills workstation. Time to completion and the errors were computed. The subjects were divided into four levels; “Novice”, “Beginner”, “Intermediate” and “Advanced” based on previous arthroscopy experience, for analyses of performance. Results: The task performance under transparent dome was not related to experience of the surgeon unlike opaque dome, highlighting the importance of hand-eye co-ordination required in arthroscopy. Median time to completion for each task improved as the level of experience increased and this was found to be statistically significant (p < .05) e.g. time for maze navigation (Novice – 166 s, Beginner – 135.5 s, Intermediate – 100 s, Advance – 97.5 s) and the similar results for all tasks. Majority (>85%) of subjects across all the levels reported improvement in performance with sequential tasks. Conclusion: Use of the arthroscope requires visuo-spatial coordination which is a skill that develops with practice. This simple box model can reliably differentiate the arthroscopic skills based on experience and can be used to monitor progression of skills of trainees in institutions. PMID:27801643

  16. Investigation of Processes Controlling Mercury Cycling at Midlatitudinal Marine and Inland Sites: Improvements and Applications of A Mercury Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ye, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a hazardous pollutant due to the bioaccumulation in food chain. It is emitted to the atmosphere primarily as elemental form, and the long lifetime of which allows global transport. Oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) generates reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) which plays an important role in the atmospheric mercury cycle by enhancing the rate of mercury deposition to ecosystem. The present study aimed to investigate the midlatitudinal atmospheric Hg cycling. To achieve that, a mercury chemistry box model was improved by employing the most up-to-date kinetic data for gaseous and aqueous reactions, and was applied to summertime clear sky conditions at three specific sites: Appledore Island (marine site), Thompson Farm (coastal site), and Pack Monadnock (inland site). The model was evaluated using observational data of RGM and pHg (particulate mercury) concentrations from these sites. The simulation results for all three sites showed that HgO, which is produced from oxidation of GEM by O3 and OH, contributed the most (>82%) to the total RGM production. Even in the marine boundary layer, halogen species (mainly Br) only contributed less than 12% to total RGM. The importance of reactions in most updated halogen chemistry has been evaluated. Gas and particle partitioning played an important role in coastal and inland environments. Some abnormally high RGM peaks were found at Appledore Island which may be explained by transport and air-sea exchange. Specific reactions and other processes controlling the diurnal cycles of RGM and pHg at the three sites are still being investigated.

  17. Response surface modeling of Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Pistacia vera L.: Box-Behnken experimental design.

    PubMed

    Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Demirel, Sevgi; Vanderbei, Robert J

    2009-11-15

    A three factor, three-level Box-Behnken experimental design combining with response surface modeling (RSM) and quadratic programming (QP) was employed for maximizing Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Antep pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) shells based on 17 different experimental data obtained in a lab-scale batch study. Three independent variables (initial pH of solution (pH(0)) ranging from 2.0 to 5.5, initial concentration of Pb(II) ions (C(0)) ranging from 5 to 50 ppm, and contact time (t(C)) ranging from 5 to 120 min) were consecutively coded as x(1), x(2) and x(3) at three levels (-1, 0 and 1), and a second-order polynomial regression equation was then derived to predict responses. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by means of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence limits (alpha=0.05). The standardized effects of the independent variables and their interactions on the dependent variable were also investigated by preparing a Pareto chart. The optimum values of the selected variables were obtained by solving the quadratic regression model, as well as by analysing the response surface contour plots. The optimum coded values of three test variables were computed as x(1)=0.125, x(2)=0.707, and x(3)=0.107 by using a LOQO/AMPL optimization algorithm. The experimental conditions at this global point were determined to be pH(0)=3.97, C(0)=43.4 ppm, and t(C)=68.7 min, and the corresponding Pb(II) removal efficiency was found to be about 100%.

  18. An artificial dielectric leaky-wave-antenna for millimeter range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishvakarma, B. R.; Sharma, R. P.

    A new, artificial dielectric leaky-wave antenna for the millimeter range is proposed and its radiation characteristics and scanning capability are examined. The antenna has beam scanning of 40 deg when the frequency is varied from 70 to 90 GHz. The scanning rate is higher in the lower frequency ranges, and the scanning angle increases with the thickness of the AD slab. The beam width does not vary much with frequency, indicating that there is no significant beam shape deterioration over a relatively large sweep angle and frequency range. The antenna gain increases linearly with increasing frequency. An AD antenna using a ferrite medium makes it possible to steer the beamwith frequency as well as biasing magnetic field, rendering the antenna suitable for very precise beam steering.

  19. Anti-high mobility group box 1 antibody exerts neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Liu, Keyue; Agari, Takashi; Yasuhara, Takao; Morimoto, Jun; Okazaki, Mihoko; Takeuchi, Hayato; Toyoshima, Atsuhiko; Sasada, Susumu; Shinko, Aiko; Kondo, Akihiko; Kameda, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato; Borlongan, Cesario V; Nishibori, Masahiro; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    The high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) exists as an architectural nuclear protein in the normal state, but displays an inflammatory cytokine-like activity in the extracellular space under pathological condition. Inflammation in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been documented. In this study, we investigated the involvement of HMGB1 in the pathology and the neuroprotective effects of neutralizing anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on an animal model of PD. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were initially injected with 6-hydroxydopmaine (6-OHDA, 20 μg/4 μl) into the right striatum, then anti-HMGB1 mAb (1 mg/kg), or control mAb was intravenously administered immediately, at 6 and 24 h after 6-OHDA injection. The treatment with anti-HMGB1 mAb significantly preserved dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta and dopaminergic terminals inherent in the striatum, and attenuated PD behavioral symptoms compared to the control mAb-treated group. HMGB1 was retained in the nucleus of neurons and astrocytes by inhibiting the proinflammation-induced oxidative stress in the anti-HMGB1 mAb-treated group, whereas HMGB1 translocation was observed in neurons at 1 day and astrocytes at 7 days after 6-OHDA injection in the control mAb-treated group. Anti-HMGB1 mAb inhibited the activation of microglia, disruption of blood-brain-barrier (BBB), and the expression of inflammation cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6. These results suggested that HMGB1 released from neurons and astrocytes was at least partly involved in the mechanism and pathway of degeneration of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-OHDA exposure. Intravenous administration of anti-HMGB1 mAb stands as a novel therapy for PD possibly acting through the suppression of neuroinflammation and the attenuation of disruption of BBB associated with the disease.

  20. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-05-14

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1{beta} was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1{beta} was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1{beta}. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1{beta} expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  1. Analysis of hypoxia in the western interior parts of the Ariake Sea, Japan, using a box model.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Masumi; Seguchi, Masahiro; Ishitani, Tetuhiro; Isnansetyo, Alim

    2011-08-01

    To clarify the mechanism of hypoxia in the western interior parts of the Ariake Sea (WIAS), field observation data collected in the period of 1972-2004 were analyzed using a two-layer box model. Monthly averages of advection velocity, vertical diffusion coefficient (K(z)), and biochemical oxygen consumption rate (R) in WIAS were evaluated quantitatively during the above period. The estimated advection velocity comparatively corresponded to the observed residual flow pattern of bay head in summer and winter. The estimated K(z) was relatively high (0.6-5.3 cm(2) s( -1)) from September to March but lower (0.2-0.4 cm(2) s( -1)) from April to August. The estimated R ranged from 0.30 to 0.46 mg L( -1) day( -1) during May to August. In summer, the temporal variation of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the lower layer was controlled largely by K ( z ) and R. Monthly variations of K(z), R, and degree of density stratification (P) in the 1970s, the 1980s, and the 1990s-early 2000s were analyzed. P, K ( z ), and R were not significantly different among the calculated periods (p = 0.93, 0.23, and 0.49). However, the variations of R in summer between the 1970s and the other calculated periods changed. DO consumption period was longer in the 1980s and the 1990s-early 2000s than in the 1970s. R in the 1980s was highest among the calculated periods. The increase in R in the 1980s was caused by the increase in organic matter load originating from red tide phytoplankton due to a decrease in the suspension feeders.

  2. The Wintertime Fate of N2O5: Observations and Box Model Analysis for the 2015 WINTER Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffie, E. E.; Fibiger, D. L.; Dubé, W.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Thornton, J. A.; Shah, V.; Jaegle, L.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Schroder, J. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a regulated secondary pollutant that degrades regional air quality and impacts the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Anthropogenic NOx emissions and chemistry are an important regional O3 source during midlatitude summer, but may destroy O3 during winter. The majority of previous field studies have focused on understanding reactive NOx-O3 relationships under summertime conditions. However, outstanding scientific uncertainties remain regarding the influence of NOx on wintertime O3, in part because the relevant atmospheric chemistry occurs largely at night, and in part because it involves multiphase processes. The winter tropospheric O3 and NOx budgets depend critically on the efficiency of N2O5 uptake to aerosol and the subsequent branching of its reaction products between soluble nitrate (HNO3) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2). The fate of tropospheric N2O5 can lead to net O3 destruction through HNO3 production, or transport and regeneration from N2O5 and ClNO2, which serve as NOx reservoirs. The WINTER campaign has provided the first aircraft measurements to constrain these critically important processes during the winter season. The Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emission, and Reactivity (WINTER) campaign conducted 13 research flights over the eastern US in February and March 2015. A wide variety of environments were sampled during 11 nighttime flights over continental and marine environments. Reactive nitrogen and ozone measurements were collected with a cavity ring down spectrometer, while HNO3 and ClNO2 were measured with chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Analysis of these data with a chemical box model provides quantitative determinations of the N2O5 aerosol reactive uptake coefficient and production yield of ClNO2. The analysis determines the range and variability in these quantities, and their relationship to air mass composition and meteorology.

  3. The MESSy aerosol submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): description and a box model test

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, V.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation; version: MADE3v2.0b), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse mode particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl) / chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealised marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HCl / Cl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, the aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse mode particles. MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes ≲ 2 μm) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distributions (sizes ≳ 2 μm), and also in terms of aerosol composition. Finally, considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems

  4. Expression of tissue factor and forkhead box transcription factor O-1 in a rat model for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chaosheng; Wu, Dawen; Yang, Minxia; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Caiyun; Zhong, Zhanghua; Lian, Ningfang; Chen, Hua; Wu, Shuang

    2016-11-01

    Few reports have examined tissue factor (TF) and forkhead box transcription factor O-1 (FoxO1) expression in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) animal models. To investigate the role of TF and FoxO1 and their interactions during CTEPH pathogenesis in a rat model. Autologous blood clots were repeatedly injected into the pulmonary arteries through right jugular vein to induce a rat model of CTEPH. Hemodynamic parameters, histopathology, and TF and FoxO1expression levels were detected. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance and vessel wall area/total area (WA/TA) ratio in the experiment group increased significantly than sham group (P < 0.05). The cardiac output in the 1-, 2-, and 4-week groups decreased significantly (P < 0.05) when compared to sham group. TF mRNA expression levels in the experiment group increased significantly than sham group (P < 0.05). FoxO1 mRNA and protein expression levels were lower in the experiment group than sham group (P < 0.05). The mPAP had a positive correlation with WA/TA ratio (r = 0.45, P = 0.01). TF mRNA expression had a positive correlation with WA/TA ratio (r = 0.374, P = 0.035) and a positive correlation with mPAP (r = 0.48, P= 0.005). FoxO1 mRNA expression had a negative correlation trend with the WA/TA ratio (r = -0.297, P = 0.099) and a negative correlation trend with mPAP (r = -0.34, P = 0.057). TF mRNA expression had a negative correlation with FoxO1 mRNA expression (r = -0.62, P < 0.001). A rat model of CTEPH can be successfully established by the injection of autologous blood clots into the pulmonary artery. TF and FoxO1 may play a key role in vascular remodeling during CTEPH pathogenesis.

  5. The MESSy aerosol submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): description and a box model test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, V.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation; version: MADE3v2.0b), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse mode particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl) / chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealised marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HCl / Cl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, the aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse mode particles. MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes ≲ 2 μm) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distributions (sizes ≳ 2 μm), and also in terms of aerosol composition. Considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems suitable for

  6. Submarine groundwater discharge to a small estuary estimated from radon and salinity measurements and a box model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crusius, J.; Koopmans, D.; Bratton, J.F.; Charette, M.A.; Kroeger, K.D.; Henderson, P.; Ryckman, L.; Halloran, K.; Colman, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge was quantified by a variety of methods in Salt Pond, adjacent to Nauset Marsh on Cape Cod, USA. Discharge estimates based on radon and salinity took advantage of the presence of the narrow channel connecting Salt Pond to Nauset Marsh, which allowed constructing whole-pond mass balances as water flowed in and out due to tidal fluctuations. A box model was used to estimate discharge separately to Salt Pond and to the channel by simulating the timing and magnitude of variations in the radon and salinity data in the channel. Discharge to the pond is estimated to be 2200??1100 m3 d-1, while discharge to the channel is estimated to be 300??150m3 d-1, for a total discharge of 2500??1250 m3 d-1 to the Salt Pond system. This translates to an average groundwater flow velocity of 3??1.5 cm d -1. Seepage meter flow estimates are broadly consistent with this figure, provided discharge is confined to shallow sediments (water depth <1 m). The radon data can be modeled assuming all groundwater fluxes to both the channel and to the pond are fresh, with no need to invoke a saline component. The absence of a saline component in the radon flux may be due to removal of radon from saline groundwater by recent advection of seawater or it may to due to the presence of impermeable sediments in the center of the pond that limit seawater recirculation. This groundwater flux estimated from the radon and salinity data is comparable to a value of 3200-4500 m3 d-1 predicted by a recent hydrologic model (Masterson, 2004; Colman and Masterson, 20041). Additional work is needed to determine if the measured rate of discharge is representative of the long-term average, and to determine the rate of groundwater discharge seaward of Salt Pond. Data also suggest a TDN flux from groundwater to Salt Pond of ???2.6 mmol m-2 d-1, a figure comparable to fluxes observed in other eutrophic settings.

  7. A box model study on photochemical interactions between VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, K.; Kanaya, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Akimoto, H.

    2003-09-01

    A new chemical scheme is developed for the multiphase photochemical box model SEAMAC (size-SEgregated Aerosol model for Marine Air Chemistry) to investigate photochemical interactions between volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Based primarily on critically evaluated kinetic and photochemical rate parameters as well as a protocol for chemical mechanism development, the new scheme has achieved a near-explicit treatment of oxidative degradation of up to C3-hydrocarbons CH4, C2H6, C3H8, C2H4, C3H6, and C2H2) initiated by reactions with OH radicals, Cl- and Br-atoms, and O3. Rate constants and product yields for reactions involving halogen species are taken from the literature where available, but the majority of them need to be estimated. In particular, addition reactions of halogen atoms with alkenes will result in the formation of halogenated organic intermediates, whose photochemical loss rates are carefully evaluated in the present work. Model calculations with the new chemical scheme reveal that the oceanic emissions of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and alkenes (especially C3H6) are important factors for regulating reactive halogen chemistry in the MBL by promoting the conversion of Br atoms into HBr or more stable brominated intermediates in the organic form. The latter include brominated hydroperoxides, bromoacetaldehyde, and bromoacetone, which sequester bromine from reactive inorganic pool. The total mixing ratio of brominated organic species thus produced is likely to reach 10-20% or more of that of inorganic gaseous bromine species over wide regions over the ocean. On the other hand, the reaction between Br atoms and C2H2 is unimportant for determining the degree of bromine activation in the remote MBL. It is suggested that peroxyacetic acid formed via CH3CHO oxidation is one of the important chemical agents for triggering autocatalytic halogen release from sea-salt aerosols. These results imply that

  8. Predictive habitat models derived from nest-box occupancy for the endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel in the southern Appalachians

    Treesearch

    W. Mark Ford; Andrew M. Evans; Richard H. Odom; Jane L. Rodrigue; Christine A. Kelly; Nicole Abaid; Corinne A. Diggins; Douglas. Newcomb

    2015-01-01

    In the southern Appalachians, artificial nest-boxes are used to survey for the endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel (CNFS; Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus), a disjunct subspecies associated with high elevation (>1385 m) forests. Using environmental parameters diagnostic of squirrel habitat, we created 35 a priori occupancy...

  9. The Box and the Circle--Two Systems of Life: A Model for Understanding Native-Non-Native Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Jann

    Working as a family systems therapist with Native and non-Native families, the author observed two opposing social systems. Non-native families systems typify "The Box System," whereas native family systems portray "The Circle System." A few characteristics of the Circle System are: (1) a focus on life and peacefulness; (2) females and children…

  10. Glycosylation of Skp1 affects its conformation and promotes binding to a model f-box protein.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, M Osman; Schafer, Christopher M; Powell, John T; Rodgers, Karla K; Mooers, Blaine H M; West, Christopher M

    2014-03-18

    In the social amoeba Dictyostelium, Skp1 is hydroxylated on proline 143 and further modified by three cytosolic glycosyltransferases to yield an O-linked pentasaccharide that contributes to O2 regulation of development. Skp1 is an adapter in the Skp1/cullin1/F-box protein family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that targets specific proteins for polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. To investigate the biochemical consequences of glycosylation, untagged full-length Skp1 and several of its posttranslationally modified isoforms were expressed and purified to near homogeneity using recombinant and in vitro strategies. Interaction studies with the soluble mammalian F-box protein Fbs1/Fbg1/OCP1 revealed preferential binding to the glycosylated isoforms of Skp1. This difference correlated with the increased α-helical and decreased β-sheet content of glycosylated Skp1s based on circular dichroism and increased folding order based on small-angle X-ray scattering. A comparison of the molecular envelopes of fully glycosylated Skp1 and the apoprotein indicated that both isoforms exist as an antiparallel dimer that is more compact and extended in the glycosylated state. Analytical gel filtration and chemical cross-linking studies showed a growing tendency of less modified isoforms to dimerize. Considering that regions of free Skp1 are intrinsically disordered and Skp1 can adopt distinct folds when bound to F-box proteins, we propose that glycosylation, which occurs adjacent to the F-box binding site, influences the spectrum of energetically similar conformations that vary inversely in their propensity to dock with Fbs1 or another Skp1. Glycosylation may thus influence Skp1 function by modulating F-box protein binding in cells.

  11. Combining a hybrid genetic algorithm and a heat transfer model to optimise an insulated box for use in the transport of perishables.

    PubMed

    East, A R; Smale, N J

    2008-03-04

    Temperature sensitive products are often transported in non-refrigerated systems, protected from environmental temperatures by thermal insulation and the provision of a source of cold inside the package. This work presents a method for optimising the design of thermally insulated boxes for lowest cost (while ensuring that product temperatures are maintained within set limits) by combining a heat transfer model with genetic algorithm optimisation. An example optimisation problem is presented in which a temperature sensitive product is transported across the US and must be maintained between -1 and 8 degrees C. Independent optimisation operations successfully identified solutions that were very similar, though not identical, thereby providing confidence in the approach to determine optimal solutions to complex problems. The system developed provides a rapid method to optimise the design of an insulated box for minimum cost while maintaining the product in the appropriate temperature range.

  12. Uncertainty estimation of a complex water quality model: The influence of Box-Cox transformation on Bayesian approaches and comparison with a non-Bayesian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, Gabriele; Mannina, Giorgio

    In urban drainage modelling, uncertainty analysis is of undoubted necessity. However, uncertainty analysis in urban water-quality modelling is still in its infancy and only few studies have been carried out. Therefore, several methodological aspects still need to be experienced and clarified especially regarding water quality modelling. The use of the Bayesian approach for uncertainty analysis has been stimulated by its rigorous theoretical framework and by the possibility of evaluating the impact of new knowledge on the modelling predictions. Nevertheless, the Bayesian approach relies on some restrictive hypotheses that are not present in less formal methods like the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE). One crucial point in the application of Bayesian method is the formulation of a likelihood function that is conditioned by the hypotheses made regarding model residuals. Statistical transformations, such as the use of Box-Cox equation, are generally used to ensure the homoscedasticity of residuals. However, this practice may affect the reliability of the analysis leading to a wrong uncertainty estimation. The present paper aims to explore the influence of the Box-Cox equation for environmental water quality models. To this end, five cases were considered one of which was the “real” residuals distributions (i.e. drawn from available data). The analysis was applied to the Nocella experimental catchment (Italy) which is an agricultural and semi-urbanised basin where two sewer systems, two wastewater treatment plants and a river reach were monitored during both dry and wet weather periods. The results show that the uncertainty estimation is greatly affected by residual transformation and a wrong assumption may also affect the evaluation of model uncertainty. The use of less formal methods always provide an overestimation of modelling uncertainty with respect to Bayesian method but such effect is reduced if a wrong assumption is made regarding the

  13. Characterization of Defects in Composite Material Using Rapidly Acquired Leaky Lamb Wave Dispersion Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Mal, A.; Chang, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The phenomenon of Leaky Lamb Wave (LLW) in composite materials was first observed in 1982 using a Schlieren system. It has been studied extensively by numerous investigators and successfully shown to be an effective quantitative NDE tool.

  14. Calculation of leaky Lamb waves with a semi-analytical finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Inoue, Daisuke

    2014-08-01

    A semi-analytical finite element method (SAFE) has been widely used for calculating dispersion curves and mode shapes of guided waves as well as transient waves in a bar like structures. Although guided wave inspection is often conducted for water-loaded plates and pipes, most of the SAFE techniques have not been extended to a plate with leaky media. This study describes leaky Lamb wave calculation with the SAFE. We formulated a new solution using a feature that a single Lamb wave mode generates a harmonic plane wave in leaky media. Dispersion curves obtained with the SAFE agreed well with the previous theoretical studies, which represents that the SAFE calculation was conducted with sufficient accuracy. Moreover, we discussed dispersion curves, attenuation curves, and displacement distributions for total transmission modes and leaky plate modes in a single side and both two side water-loaded plate.

  15. Characterization of Defects in Composite Material Using Rapidly Acquired Leaky Lamb Wave Dispersion Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Mal, A.; Chang, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The phenomenon of Leaky Lamb Wave (LLW) in composite materials was first observed in 1982 using a Schlieren system. It has been studied extensively by numerous investigators and successfully shown to be an effective quantitative NDE tool.

  16. A GIS-based multi-source and multi-box modeling approach (GMSMB) for air pollution assessment--a North American case study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Zhen; Chen, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a GIS-based multi-source and multi-box modeling approach (GMSMB) to predict the spatial concentration distributions of airborne pollutant on local and regional scales. In this method, an extended multi-box model combined with a multi-source and multi-grid Gaussian model are developed within the GIS framework to examine the contributions from both point- and area-source emissions. By using GIS, a large amount of data including emission sources, air quality monitoring, meteorological data, and spatial location information required for air quality modeling are brought into an integrated modeling environment. It helps more details of spatial variation in source distribution and meteorological condition to be quantitatively analyzed. The developed modeling approach has been examined to predict the spatial concentration distribution of four air pollutants (CO, NO(2), SO(2) and PM(2.5)) for the State of California. The modeling results are compared with the monitoring data. Good agreement is acquired which demonstrated that the developed modeling approach could deliver an effective air pollution assessment on both regional and local scales to support air pollution control and management planning.

  17. Progress on characterization and optimization of leaky-mode modulators for holographic video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Daniel E.; McLaughlin, Stephen; Leach, Christopher; Kimball, Jacob; Bove, V. Michael; Jolly, Sundeep

    2015-10-01

    We give a summary of the progress we have made in the fabrication of guided wave devices for use in holographic video displays. This progress includes identifying anisotropic leaky-mode modulators as a platform for holographic display, the development of a characterization apparatus to extract key parameters from leaky-mode devices, and the identification of optimized waveguide parameters for frequency-controlled color display.

  18. Responses of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neurons to a Plurality of Stimuli in Their Receptive Fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Bundesen, Claus; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental question concerning the way the visual world is represented in our brain is how a cortical cell responds when its classical receptive field contains a plurality of stimuli. Two opposing models have been proposed. In the response-averaging model, the neuron responds with a weighted average of all individual stimuli. By contrast, in the probability-mixing model, the cell responds to a plurality of stimuli as if only one of the stimuli were present. Here we apply the probability-mixing and the response-averaging model to leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, to describe neuronal behavior based on observed spike trains. We first estimate the parameters of either model using numerical methods, and then test which model is most likely to have generated the observed data. Results show that the parameters can be successfully estimated and the two models are distinguishable using model selection.

  19. A Time-Dependent SPICE Model for Single Electron Box and Its Application to Logic Gates at Low and High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gooraji, Farzad Ahmadi; Sharifi, Mohammad Javad; Bahrepour, Davoud

    2011-05-25

    In this paper, for the first time, a circuit model for single electron box (SEB) is introduced. The main feature of the proposed model is mapping the master equation, which explains the behavior of a single electron device, to a novel circuit model. The proposed model can be utilized in a circuit simulator such as SPICE. The proposed circuit model is a time dependent model which can be used in order to calculate the intrinsic time latency of the SEB. In addition, it is able to calculate the operation of a gate circuit in high temperatures. The correct operation of the proposed model is studied by utilizing the model for simulating two digital logic gates based on the SEB. The obtained results are compared with SIMON.

  20. Final report on LDRD project :leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas; Ongstand, Andrea; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Montano, Victoria A.

    2005-11-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ''Leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits''. Leaky-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) offer new possibilities for integration of microcavity lasers to create optical microsystems. A leaky-mode VCSEL output-couples light laterally, in the plane of the semiconductor wafer, which allows the light to interact with adjacent lasers, modulators, and detectors on the same wafer. The fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs based on effective index modification was proposed and demonstrated at Sandia in 1999 but was not adequately developed for use in applications. The aim of this LDRD has been to advance the design and fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs to the point where initial applications can be attempted. In the first and second years of this LDRD we concentrated on overcoming previous difficulties in the epitaxial growth and fabrication of these advanced VCSELs. In the third year, we focused on applications of leaky-mode VCSELs, such as all-optical processing circuits based on gain quenching.

  1. An effective box trap for capturing lynx

    Treesearch

    Jay A. Kolbe; John R. Squires; Thomas W. Parker

    2003-01-01

    We designed a box trap for capturing lynx (Lynx lynx) that is lightweight, safe, effective, and less expensive than many commercial models. It can be constructed in approximately 3-4 hours from readily available materials. We used this trap to capture 40 lynx 89 times (96% of lynx entering traps) and observed no trapping related injuries. We compare our box...

  2. Emission and fate assessment of methyl tertiary butyl ether in the Boston area airshed using a simple multimedia box model: comparison with urban air measurements.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Katsuya; Arey, J Samuel; Gschwend, Philip M

    2003-12-01

    Expected urban air concentrations of the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) were calculated using volatile emissions estimates and screening transport models, and these predictions were compared with Boston, MA, area urban air measurements. The total volatile flux of MTBE into the Boston primary metropolitan statistical area (PMSA) airshed was calculated based on estimated automobile nontailpipe emissions and the Universal Quasi-Chemical Functional-Group Activity Coefficient computed abundance of MTBE in gasoline vapor. The fate of MTBE in the Boston PMSA was assessed using both the European Union System for the Evaluation of Substances, which is a steady-state multimedia box model, and a simple airshed box model. Both models were parameterized based on the meteorological conditions observed during air sampling in the Boston area. Measured average urban air concentrations of 0.1 and 1 microg/m3 MTBE during February and September of 2000, respectively, were comparable to corresponding model predictions of 0.3 and 1 microg/m3 and could be essentially explained from estimated temperature-dependent volatile emissions rates, observed average wind speed (the airshed flushing rate), and reaction with ambient tropospheric hydroxyl radical (*OH), within model uncertainty. These findings support the proposition that one can estimate gasoline component source fluxes and use simple multimedia models to screen the potential impact of future proposed gasoline additives on urban airsheds.

  3. Response surface methodology (RSM) modeling of microwave-assisted extraction of natural dye from Swietenia mahagony: A comparation between Box-Behnken and central composite design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuma, Heri Septya; Sudrajat, Robby Ginanjar Margo; Susanto, David Febrilliant; Gala, Selfina; Mahfud, Mahfud

    2015-12-01

    The increasing demand of non-toxic and environmentally friendly dyes, colorants that come from natural source have risen as an alternative of sintetic poisonous dyes. In this research natural dye from S. mahagony was extracted using microwave-assisted extraction method under different operating condition such as extraction time (10-30min), plant material to solvent ratio (0.03-0.05g/mL) and microwave power level (100-380 watt). Box-Behnken method and central composite design (CCD) method is widely used for modeling response surface methodology (RSM), both methods show good prediction performance. In this study response surface methodology was performed to optimize the process, both methods were performed by the help Statgraphics Centurion 16 to evaluate the effects of different operating parameters. Finally, both methods were statistically compared by root mean square error (RMSE) and absolute average deviation (AAD) based on validation data set. Further, result suggests that CCD has better performance as compared to Box-Behnken method. The maximum yield obtained for Box-Behnken is 3.7647% (380 watt, 0.0339g/mL, 28.8899min) and 3.7506% (379.986 watt, 0.0378g/mL, 30min) for central composite design method.

  4. New constraints on neutron star models of gamma-ray bursts. II - X-ray observations of three gamma-ray burst error boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boer, M.; Hurley, K.; Pizzichini, G.; Gottardi, M.

    1991-01-01

    Exosat observations are presented for 3 gamma-ray-burst error boxes, one of which may be associated with an optical flash. No point sources were detected at the 3-sigma level. A comparison with Einstein data (Pizzichini et al., 1986) is made for the March 5b, 1979 source. The data are interpreted in the framework of neutron star models and derive upper limits for the neutron star surface temperatures, accretion rates, and surface densities of an accretion disk. Apart from the March 5b, 1979 source, consistency is found with each model.

  5. New constraints on neutron star models of gamma-ray bursts. II - X-ray observations of three gamma-ray burst error boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boer, M.; Hurley, K.; Pizzichini, G.; Gottardi, M.

    1991-01-01

    Exosat observations are presented for 3 gamma-ray-burst error boxes, one of which may be associated with an optical flash. No point sources were detected at the 3-sigma level. A comparison with Einstein data (Pizzichini et al., 1986) is made for the March 5b, 1979 source. The data are interpreted in the framework of neutron star models and derive upper limits for the neutron star surface temperatures, accretion rates, and surface densities of an accretion disk. Apart from the March 5b, 1979 source, consistency is found with each model.

  6. An Improved Box Theater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huster, Michael E.

    2011-09-01

    While designing an optics lab for a conceptual physics course, I came across a "box theater" activity. The box theater is a pinhole camera obscura made from a box that students put over their heads and shoulders. I use the activity as a capstone experience to explain optical systems. (Classroom demonstrations of the camera obscura have been described by others.2) First, the students build and experiment with a camera obscura made from a plastic cup and a convex lens with a focal length of 7.5 cm, and then "wear" the box theater. The difficulty with the box theater is the dimness of the image. A cloth drape has to be hung from the bottom of the box around the shoulders of the students to prevent light leakage, and the students have to wait a few minutes for their eyes to adjust to the darkness.

  7. GLOVE BOX ATTACHMENT

    DOEpatents

    Butts, H.L.

    1962-02-13

    This invention comprises a housing unit to be fitted between a glove box port and a glove so that a slidable plate within the housing seals off the glove box port for evacuation of the glove box without damage to the glove. The housing and the glove may be evacuated without damage to the glove since movement of the glove is restricted during evacuation by the slidable plate. (AEC)

  8. Dc to ac field conversion due to leaky-wave excitation in a plasma slab behind an ionization front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, V. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a way for generating coherent tunable electromagnetic radiation through dc to ac field conversion by an ionization front. The conversion is caused by the excitation of leaky waves behind the transversely limited ionization front propagating in a uniform electrostatic field. This differs significantly from the well-known dc-to-ac-radiation-converter models which consider Doppler-like frequency conversion by a transversely unlimited ionization front propagating in a spatially periodic electric field. We explore the dispersion properties and excitation of these leaky waves radiated through the transverse plasma boundary at the Cherenkov angle to the direction of propagation of a superluminal ionization front as dependent on the parameters of the plasma produced and on the speed of the ionization front. It is shown that not only the center frequency but also the duration and waveform of the generated pulse may significantly depend on the speed of the ionization front. The results indicate the possibility of using such converters based on planar photoconductive antennas to create sources of microwave and terahertz radiation with controllable waveforms that are transformed from video to radio pulse when the angle of incident ionizing radiation is tuned.

  9. Math in the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make an origami paper box and explores the algebra, geometry, and other mathematics that unfolds. A set of origami steps that transforms the paper into an open box can hold mathematical surprises for both students and teachers. An origami lesson can engage students in an open-ended exploration of the relationship…

  10. Math in the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make an origami paper box and explores the algebra, geometry, and other mathematics that unfolds. A set of origami steps that transforms the paper into an open box can hold mathematical surprises for both students and teachers. An origami lesson can engage students in an open-ended exploration of the relationship…

  11. Thinking outside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanshawe, Simon; Sriskandarajah, Dhananjayan

    2010-01-01

    Britain is not only more diverse than ever before, but that diversity itself is growing more diverse. Britain's simplistic "tick-box" approach to identity is in danger of inhibiting the very equality it seeks to promote. To question the tick-box is not to accuse local authorities of "political correctness gone mad". The notion…

  12. Straw in a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Richard; Schneider, Joel; Smallberg, Ralph; Wetzel, John

    2006-01-01

    A problem on a state's high school exit exam asked for the longest straw that would fit in a box. The examiners apparently wanted the length of a diagonal of the box, but the figure accompanying the question suggested otherwise--that the radius of the straw be considered. This article explores that more general problem.

  13. Boxing with neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.J. |; Weiler, T.J.

    1999-06-01

    We develop a characterization of neutrino oscillations based on the coefficients of the oscillating terms. These coefficients are individually observable; although they are quartic in the elements of the unitary mixing matrix, they are independent of the conventions chosen for the angle and phase parametrization of the mixing matrix. We call these reparametrization-invariant observables {open_quotes}boxes{close_quotes} because of their geometric relation to the mixing matrix, and because of their association with the Feynman box diagram that describes oscillations in field theory. The real parts of the boxes are the coefficients for the {ital CP}- or {ital T}-even oscillation modes, while the imaginary parts are the coefficients for the {ital CP}- or {ital T}-odd oscillation modes. Oscillation probabilities are linear in the boxes, so measurements can straightforwardly determine values for the boxes (which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements). We examine the effects of unitarity on the boxes and discuss the reduction of the number of boxes to a minimum basis set. For the three-generation case, we explicitly construct the basis. Using the box algebra, we show that {ital CP} violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. The framework presented here will facilitate general analyses of neutrino oscillations among n{ge}3 flavors. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Thinking outside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanshawe, Simon; Sriskandarajah, Dhananjayan

    2010-01-01

    Britain is not only more diverse than ever before, but that diversity itself is growing more diverse. Britain's simplistic "tick-box" approach to identity is in danger of inhibiting the very equality it seeks to promote. To question the tick-box is not to accuse local authorities of "political correctness gone mad". The notion…

  15. Ca2+ flux and beating in leaky heart cells.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S

    1980-01-01

    Previous work has shown that beating heart muscle cells with leaky sarcolemmae take up Ca2+ from the medium at a rate of 5.4 nmol/min/mg of protein while beating at a rate of 44 b.p.m. In the present work, we have used fragments of myocardium (MF), composed of such cells, to measure Ca2+ effux velocity and to compare influx and efflux rates to contraction frequency. The MF were estimated to be three cells thick, five cells wide, and three cells long, on the average. With MF suspended in fresh Pi-buffered medium containing 8.7 mumol/liter total Ca2+, the initial velocity of Ca2+ uptake (Vi) was much greater than the initial velocity of efflux (Vo). Vi, but not Vo, covaried with beating as a function of temperature and also showed ATP dependence. Thus, uptake, but not efflux, is a controlled process coupled to beating under these conditions. When cells were preloaded with Ca2+ and resuspended in Ca2+-depleted medium (total Ca2+ about 1 mumol/liter), approximating the steady state condition, Vi was reduced while Vo increased proportionally. These data suggest that contraction-activating Ca2+ is derived from extracellular sources during the pre-steady state conditions used here. Derivation from intracellular sites could occur in the steady state. The pre-steady state results conflict with mechanical behavior studies by us and others and, with Ca2+ flux in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The steady state results suggest that this conflict may be due to differences in Ca2+ loading and [Ca2+]i/[Ca2+]o.

  16. CYP2E1 potentiates binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness, steatohepatitis and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Banerjee, Atrayee; Jang, Sehwan; Yoo, Seong-Ho; Yun, Jun-Won; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) contributes to increased oxidative stress and steatosis in chronic alcohol-exposure models. However, its role in binge ethanol-induced gut leakiness and hepatic injury is unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the role of CYP2E1 in binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and the mechanisms of steatohepatitis. Female wild-type (WT) and Cyp2e1-null mice were treated with three doses of binge ethanol (WT-EtOH or Cyp2e1-null-EtOH) (6 g/kg oral gavage at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (negative control). Intestinal histology of only WT-EtOH exhibited epithelial alteration and blebbing of lamina propria while liver histology obtained at 6 h after the last ethanol dose showed elevated steatosis with scattered inflammatory foci. These were accompanied by increased levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic enterobacteria and triglycerides. All these changes including the intestinal histology and hepatic apoptosis, determined by TUNEL assay, were significantly reversed when WT-EtOH mice were treated with the specific inhibitor of CYP2E1 chlormethiazole and the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, both of which suppressed the oxidative markers including intestinal CYP2E1. WT-EtOH also exhibited elevated amounts of serum TNF-α, hepatic cytokines, CYP2E1 and lipid peroxidation with decreased levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase and suppressed aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity. Increased hepatocyte apoptosis with elevated levels of pro-apoptotic proteins and decreased levels of active (phosphorylated) p-AKT, p-AMPK and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α), all of which are involved in fat metabolism and inflammation, were observed in WT-EtOH. These changes were significantly attenuated in the corresponding Cyp2e1-null-EtOH mice. These data indicate that both intestinal and hepatic CYP2E1 induced by binge alcohol seem critical in the binge alcohol-mediated increased nitroxidative stress, gut leakage, endotoxemia, and

  17. CYP2E1 potentiates binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness, steatohepatitis, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Banerjee, Atrayee; Jang, Sehwan; Yoo, Seong-Ho; Yun, Jun-Won; Gonzalez, Frank J; Keshavarzian, Ali; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-12-01

    Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) contributes to increased oxidative stress and steatosis in chronic alcohol-exposure models. However, its role in binge ethanol-induced gut leakiness and hepatic injury is unclear. This study was aimed at investigating the role of CYP2E1 in binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and the mechanisms of steatohepatitis. Female wild-type (WT) and Cyp2e1-null mice were treated with three doses of binge ethanol (WT-EtOH or Cyp2e1-null-EtOH) (6g/kg oral gavage at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (negative control). Intestinal histology of only WT-EtOH exhibited epithelial alteration and blebbing of lamina propria, and liver histology obtained at 6h after the last ethanol dose showed elevated steatosis with scattered inflammatory foci. These were accompanied by increased levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic enterobacteria, and triglycerides. All these changes, including the intestinal histology and hepatic apoptosis, determined by TUNEL assay, were significantly reversed when WT-EtOH mice were treated with the specific inhibitor of CYP2E1 chlormethiazole and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, both of which suppressed oxidative markers including intestinal CYP2E1. WT-EtOH also exhibited elevated amounts of serum TNF-α, hepatic cytokines, CYP2E1, and lipid peroxidation, with decreased levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase and suppressed aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity. Increased hepatocyte apoptosis with elevated levels of proapoptotic proteins and decreased levels of active (phosphorylated) p-AKT, p-AMPK, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, all of which are involved in fat metabolism and inflammation, were observed in WT-EtOH. These changes were significantly attenuated in the corresponding Cyp2e1-null-EtOH mice. These data indicate that both intestinal and hepatic CYP2E1 induced by binge alcohol seems critical in binge alcohol-mediated increased nitroxidative stress, gut leakage, and endotoxemia; altered fat

  18. Impact of leaky wells on nitrate cross-contamination in a layered aquifer system: Methodology for and demonstration of quantitative assessment and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Eun-Hee; Lee, Eunhee; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-10-01

    Poorly constructed wells can cause deterioration of groundwater quality by carrying surface contaminants into a deep subsurface aquifer system. In this study, the impact of leaky wells on groundwater contamination was quantitatively evaluated in a layered aquifer system of the Gosan agricultural fields, Jeju Island, Korea, where degradation in groundwater quality by nitrate has been reported. We introduce a leaky-well module and a double-domain integration method to compute nitrate cross-contamination through a layered aquifer system. The simulation results clearly revealed that the leaky wells rapidly degraded the water quality of the underlying aquifer by acting as a direct pathway for nitrate-rich shallow groundwater. The model results predicted that in order to decrease the NO3-N concentration at the regional groundwater wells below the maximum contamination level (MCL), the maximum allowable fertilizer amount of Gosan would be 45-65% of the currently applied fertilizer level, whereas sealing of the regional groundwater wells would rapidly decrease the NO3-N concentration below the MCL without reducing fertilizer usage. Our study demonstrated that the well conditions and hydrogeological system play major roles in the occurrence of nitrate in the underlying aquifer in Gosan; therefore, a proper groundwater management plan against nitrate contamination should be established on the basis of a comprehensive understanding of the hydrogeologic system of the area.

  19. Leaky wave detection at air-solid interfaces by laser interferometry

    PubMed

    Mattei; Adler

    2000-03-01

    A recently developed optical heterodyne interferometer is proved to be sensitive to detect ultrasonic waves leaking out from metals (and from non-metals as well) several centimeters away from the metal surface in air. This measurement is based on the detection of the optical index variation in air due to the leaky wave. Experiments were carried out using both ultrasonic leaky Rayleigh and leaky Lamb waves in the low-megahertz region. Optical measurements of these leaky wave velocities in semi-infinite materials and plates, which are related to elastic constants of the materials, showed a good correlation to the predicted values. Optical measurements of the amplitude of the leaky waves were used to obtain attenuation coefficients, which correlate to the structural integrity of the materials. Surface and near-surface defects were also detected. This optical method can be used for metals with low-reflectivity surfaces. Thus, it can be used for non-polished surfaces and can be extended for non-contact, non-destructive evaluation applications.

  20. Approximate Green's function representations for the analysis of SAW and leaky wave devices.

    PubMed

    Peach, Robert C

    2009-10-01

    The Green's function or boundary element method (BEM) is the preferred technique for rigorous SAW device analysis. However, because of its computational cost, its principal application is the analysis of mode propagation in periodic structures to determine parameters that can then be used in simplified coupling of modes (COM) or P-matrix models. In this paper, rigorous representations are derived that express the Green's function in terms of a continuous superposition of modes. The derivations include detailed analysis of the Green's function properties as a function of both frequency and wavenumber, and representations are obtained for both the slowness and spatial domains. Approximate forms are then generated by replacing the continuous mode superposition by a discrete one. The Green's function can be approximated to any required degree of accuracy, and the resulting approximations are applicable to any type of wave on any type of substrate. The long-range spatial components in the approximate forms are represented by exponential terms. The separable properties of these terms allow this class of approximation to be applied to general SAW and leaky wave device analysis in such a way that the computational effort increases only linearly with device size.

  1. Hypernitrosylated ryanodine receptor calcium release channels are leaky in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Reiken, Steven; Carlson, Christian; Mongillo, Marco; Liu, Xiaoping; Rothman, Lisa; Matecki, Stefan; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2009-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and early death resulting from dystrophin deficiency. Loss of dystrophin results in disruption of a large dystrophin glycoprotein complex, leading to pathological calcium (Ca2+)-dependent signals that damage muscle cells. We have identified a structural and functional defect in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy that contributes to altered Ca2+ homeostasis in dystrophic muscles. RyR1 isolated from mdx skeletal muscle showed an age-dependent increase in S-nitrosylation coincident with dystrophic changes in the muscle. RyR1 S-nitrosylation depleted the channel complex of FKBP12 (also known as calstabin-1, for calcium channel stabilizing binding protein), resulting in 'leaky' channels. Preventing calstabin-1 depletion from RyR1 with S107, a compound that binds the RyR1 channel and enhances the binding affinity of calstabin-1 to the nitrosylated channel, inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, reduced biochemical and histological evidence of muscle damage, improved muscle function and increased exercise performance in mdx mice. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak via RyR1 due to S-nitrosylation of the channel and calstabin-1 depletion contributes to muscle weakness in muscular dystrophy, and that preventing the RyR1-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak may provide a new therapeutic approach.

  2. Chimeras in leaky integrate-and-fire neural networks: effects of reflecting connectivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigkri-DeSmedt, Nefeli Dimitra; Hizanidis, Johanne; Schöll, Eckehard; Hövel, Philipp; Provata, Astero

    2017-07-01

    The effects of attracting-nonlocal and reflecting connectivity are investigated in coupled Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) elements, which model the exchange of electrical signals between neurons. Earlier investigations have demonstrated that repulsive-nonlocal and hierarchical network connectivity can induce complex synchronization patterns and chimera states in systems of coupled oscillators. In the LIF system we show that if the elements are nonlocally linked with positive diffusive coupling on a ring network, the system splits into a number of alternating domains. Half of these domains contain elements whose potential stays near the threshold and they are interrupted by active domains where the elements perform regular LIF oscillations. The active domains travel along the ring with constant velocity, depending on the system parameters. When we introduce reflecting coupling in LIF networks unexpected complex spatio-temporal structures arise. For relatively extensive ranges of parameter values, the system splits into two coexisting domains: one where all elements stay near the threshold and one where incoherent states develop, characterized by multi-leveled mean phase velocity profiles.

  3. Use of Identification Equations for a Model of the Black-Box Type in the Case of its Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshinskii, A. I.; Markova, A. V.; Rubtsova, L. N.; Sorokin, V. V.; Ganin, P. G.

    2016-11-01

    A chemical-engineering system represented in the form of a black box with an input and an output is considered. The heat and mass transfer in this system was defined with the use of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients of definite order. A method of use of "unstable" equations for the description of practical problems is proposed. The term instability was taken to mean that a differential operator has eigenvalues with a positive real part. The coefficients of an equation were determined on the basis of an analysis of the curve of response of the system to a disturbance in the form of a step. A concrete example of realization of the algorithm proposed is considered.

  4. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  5. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  6. Glove box shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    1981-02-17

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box. 2 figs.

  7. Continuous leaky-wave scanning using periodically modulated spoof plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Gu Sheng; Ma, Hui Feng; Cai, Ben Geng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    The plasmonic waveguide made of uniform corrugated metallic strip can support and guide spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) with high confinements. Here, we propose periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide composed of non-uniform corrugated metallic strip to convert SSPPs to radiating waves, in which the main beam of radiations can steer continuously as the frequency changes. To increase the radiation efficiency of the periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide at the broadside, an asymmetrical plasmonic waveguide is further presented to reduce the reflections and realize continuous leaky-wave scanning. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the radiation efficiency can be improved greatly and the main beam of leaky-wave radiations can steer from the backward quadrant to the forward quadrant, passing through the broadside direction, which generally is difficult to be realized by the common leaky-wave antennas. PMID:27404740

  8. Genetic and biochemical characterization of periplasmic-leaky mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaroni, J C; Portalier, R C

    1981-01-01

    Periplasmic-leaky mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 were isolated after nitrosoguanidine-induced mutagenesis. They released periplasmic enzymes into the extracellular medium. Excretion of alkaline phosphatase, which started immediately in the early exponential phase of growth, could reach up to 90% of the total enzyme production in the stationary phase. Leaky mutants were sensitive to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, cholic acid, and the antibiotics rifampin, chloramphenicol, mitomycin C, and ampicillin. Furthermore, they were resistant to colicin E1 and partially resistant to phage TuLa. Their genetic characterization showed that the lky mutations mapped between the suc and gal markers, near or in the tolPAB locus. A biochemical analysis of cell envelope components showed that periplasmic-leaky mutants contained reduced amounts of major outer membrane protein OmpF and increased amounts of a 16,000-dalton outer membrane protein. Images PMID:7009581

  9. Leaky lamb waves of a piezoelectric plate subjected to conductive fluid loading: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Chun; Kuo, Shi Hoa

    2006-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel experimental method for measuring the propagating characteristics of leaky Lamb waves in a piezoelectric plate surrounded by a fluid. It is a differential type of measurement and is very sensitive to the velocity change and wave attenuation of leaky Lamb waves induced by fluid-loading effects. Experimental measurements on an X-cut LiNbO3 plate immersed in a dielectric and conductive fluid have been carried out. The velocity change and wave attenuation of the leaky Lamb waves caused by dielectric and conductive loadings of the fluid have been experimentally determined. The measured data have been compared with the theoretical ones that are calculated from a partial wave analysis. For the wave velocity, very good agreements between the experimental and theoretical results are observed. For the wave attenuation, there are some discrepancies, but an important characteristic in the relationship between wave attenuation and fluid conductivity as predicted by the theory have been verified experimentally.

  10. Analysis and Synthesis of Leaky-Wave Devices in Planar Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Ros, Alejandro Javier

    The work developed along this doctoral thesis has been focused on the analysis and synthesis of microwave devices in planar technology. In particular, several types of devices based on the radiation mechanism of leaky waves have been studied. Typically, the radiation properties in leaky-wave devices are determined by the complex propagation constant of the leaky mode, wherein the phase constant is responsible for the pointing angle and the leakage rate for the intensity of the radiated fields. In this manner, by controlling both amplitude and phase of the leaky mode, an effective control over the device's radiation diagram can be obtained. Moreover, with the purpose of efficiently obtaining the leaky mode's radiation properties as function of the main geometrical parameters of the structure, several modal tools based on the transverse resonance analysis of the structure have been performed. In order to demonstrate this simultaneous control over the complex propagation constant in planar technology, several types of leaky-wave devices, including antennas (LWAs), multiplexors and near-field focusing systems, have been designed and manufactured in the technology of substrate integrated waveguide (SIW). This recently proposed technology, allows the design of devices based on classical waveguide technology with standard manufacturing techniques used for printed circuit board (PCB) designs. In this way, most of the parts that form a communication system can be integrated into a single substrate, thus reducing its cost and providing a more robust and compact device, which has less losses compared to other planar technologies such as the microstrip. El trabajo llevado a cabo durante la realizacion de esta tesis doctoral, se ha centrado en el analisis y sintesis de dispositivos de microondas en tecnologia planar. En concreto, se han estudiado diferentes tipos de dispositivos basados en radiacion por ondas de fuga "leaky waves", en los cuales las propiedades de radiacion

  11. Box Model of a Series of Salt Ponds, as Applied to the Alviso Salt Pond Complex, South San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lionberger, Megan A.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Shellenbarger, Gregory; Orlando, James L.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the development and application of a box model to simulate water level, salinity, and temperature of the Alviso Salt Pond Complex in South San Francisco Bay. These ponds were purchased for restoration in 2003 and currently are managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to maintain existing wildlife habitat and prevent a build up of salt during the development of a long-term restoration plan. The model was developed for the purpose of aiding pond managers during the current interim management period to achieve these goals. A previously developed box model of a salt pond, SPOOM, which calculates daily pond volume and salinity, was reconfigured to simulate multiple connected ponds and a temperature subroutine was added. The updated model simulates rainfall, evaporation, water flowing between the ponds and the adjacent tidal slough network, and water flowing from one pond to the next by gravity and pumps. Theoretical and measured relations between discharge and corresponding differences in water level are used to simulate most flows between ponds and between ponds and sloughs. The principle of conservation of mass is used to calculate daily pond volume and salinity. The model configuration includes management actions specified in the Interim Stewardship Plan for the ponds. The temperature subroutine calculates hourly net heat transfer to or from a pond resulting in a rise or drop in pond temperature and daily average, minimum, and maximum pond temperatures are recorded. Simulated temperature was compared with hourly measured data from pond 3 of the Napa?Sonoma Salt Pond Complex and monthly measured data from pond A14 of the Alviso Salt-Pond Complex. Comparison showed good agreement of measured and simulated pond temperature on the daily and monthly time scales.

  12. Applications of the Box-Wilson design model for bio-hydrogen production using Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 (ATCC 13564).

    PubMed

    Alalayah, W M; Kalil, M S; Kadhum, A A H; Jahim, J; Zaharim, A; Alauj, N M; El-Shafie, A

    2010-07-15

    Box-Wilson design (BWD) model was applied to determine the optimum values of influencing parameters in anaerobic fermentation to produce hydrogen using Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 (ATCC 13564). The main focus of the study was to find the optimal relationship between the hydrogen yield and three variables including initial substrate concentration, initial medium pH and reaction temperature. Microbial growth kinetic parameters for hydrogen production under anaerobic conditions were determined using the Monod model with incorporation of a substrate inhibition term. The values of micro(max) (maximum specific growth rate) and K, (saturation constant) were 0.398 h(-1) and 5.509 g L(-1), respectively, using glucose as the substrate. The experimental substrate and biomass-concentration profiles were in good agreement with those obtained by the kinetic-model predictions. By varying the conditions of the initial substrate concentration (1-40 g L(-1)), reaction temperature (25-40 degrees C) and initial medium pH (4-8), the model predicted a maximum hydrogen yield of 3.24 mol H2 (mol glucose)(-1). The experimental data collected utilising this design was successfully fitted to a second-order polynomial model. An optimum operating condition of 10 g L(-1) initial substrate concentration, 37 degrees C reaction temperature and 6.0 +/- 0.2 initial medium pH gave 80% of the predicted maximum yield of hydrogen where as the experimental yield obtained in this study was 77.75% exhibiting a close accuracy between estimated and experimental values. This is the first report to predict bio-hydrogen yield by applying Box-Wilson Design in anaerobic fermentation while optimizing the effects of environmental factors prevailing there by investigating the effects of environmental factors.

  13. Voice box (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The larynx, or voice box, is located in the neck and performs several important functions in the body. The larynx is involved in swallowing, breathing, and voice production. Sound is produced when the air which ...

  14. Climate in a Box

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Climate in a Box Project is exploring the utility of supercomputers in providing a complete, pre-packaged, ready-to-use toolkit of climate research products and on-demand access to a high-pe...

  15. Modeling Hematologic and Biochemical Parameters with Spatiotemporal Analysis for the Free-Ranging Eastern Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) in Illinois and Tennessee, a Potential Biosentinel.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Terrell C; Allender, Matthew C; Archer, Grace; Phillips, Christopher A; Byrd, John; Moore, A Russell

    2016-09-01

    Box turtles are long-lived, inhabit both aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and have relatively small home ranges making them a suitable candidate as a sentinel. To characterize their changes in response to environmental health, assessment of observed variation of this species is required. Thus, a comparative health assessment was employed in 825 Eastern box turtles in east central Illinois and Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to establish a baseline health assessment with regard to sex, age class, season, and location, identify temporal trends, and map parameters. Hematological and plasma biochemical variables measured included packed cell volume, total solids, white blood cell and differential counts, calcium, phosphorus, aspartate aminotransferase, bile acids, creatine kinase, and uric acid. These variables were reduced to four principle components that explained 68.8 % of the cumulative variance. The top model included the main effects of year, location, and sex, but no interactions. Spatial analysis of turtles in Tennessee demonstrated increased WBC and decreased PCV in 2011 associated with a clear-cut silviculture site. The results of this health assessment can serve as a baseline of population health in future studies and aid in the utility of this species as a sentinel.

  16. Nonneurologic emergencies in boxing.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Domenic F

    2009-10-01

    Professional boxing has done an admirable job in promoting safety standards in its particular sport. However, injuries occur during the normal course of competition and, unfortunately, an occasional life-threatening emergency may arise. Although most common medical emergencies in boxing are injuries from closed head trauma, in this article those infrequent but potentially catastrophic nonneurologic conditions are reviewed along with some less serious emergencies that the physician must be prepared to address.

  17. Freedom to box.

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, N

    1998-01-01

    The british Medical Association wants to criminalise all boxing. This article examines the logic of the arguments it uses and finds them wanting. The move from medical evidence about the risk of brain damage to the conclusion that boxing should be banned is not warranted. The BMA's arguments are a combination of inconsistent paternalism and legal moralism. Consistent application of the principles implicit in the BMA's arguments would lead to absurd consequences and to severe limitations being put on individual freedom. PMID:9549684

  18. [Boxing: traumatology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel-Alain; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Perez, Georges; Senegas, Xavier; Furgoni, Julien; Pineau, Jean-Claude; Louquet, Jean-Louis; Henrion, Roger

    2010-10-01

    In 1986, a surgeon who, as an amateur boxer himself was concerned with boxers' health, approached a pioneering Parisian neuroimaging unit. Thus began a study in close cooperation with the French Boxing Federation, spanning 25 years. In a first series of 52 volunteer boxers (13 amateurs and 39 professionals), during which MRI gradually replaced computed tomography, ten risk factors were identified, which notably included boxing style: only one of 40 "stylists" with a good boxing technique had cortical atrophy (4.5 %), compared to 15 % of "sloggers". Changes to the French Boxing Federation rules placed the accent on medical prevention. The second series, of 247 boxers (81 amateurs and 266 professionals), showed a clear improvement, as lesions were suspected in 14 individuals, of which only 4 (1.35 %) were probably due to boxing. The third and fourth series were part of a protocol called "Brain-Boxing-Ageing", which included 76 boxers (11 having suffered KOs) and 120 MRI scans, with reproducible CT and MRI acquisitions (9 sequences with 1.5 T then 3 T, and CT). MRI anomalies secondary to boxing were found in 11 % of amateurs and 38 % of professionals (atrophy, high vascular T2 signal areas, 2 cases of post-KO subdural bleeding). CT revealed sinus damage in 13 % of the amateurs and 19 % of the professionals. The risk of acute and chronic facial and brain damage was underline, along with detailed precautionary measures (organization of bouts, role of the referee and ringside doctor, and application of French Boxing Federation rules).

  19. Infectious disease and boxing.

    PubMed

    King, Osric S

    2009-10-01

    There are no unique boxing diseases but certain factors contributing to the spread of illnesses apply strongly to the boxer, coach, and the training facility. This article examines the nature of the sport of boxing and its surrounding environment, and the likelihood of spread of infection through airborne, contact, or blood-borne routes of transmission. Evidence from other sports such as running, wrestling, and martial arts is included to help elucidate the pathophysiologic elements that could be identified in boxers.

  20. Automatic box loader

    DOEpatents

    Eldridge, Harry H.; Jones, Robert A.; Lindner, Gordon M.; Hight, Paul H.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for repetitively forming an assembly consisting of a single layer of tubes and a row of ferromagnetic armatures underlying the same, electromagnetically conveying the resulting assembly to a position overlying a storage box, and depositing the assembly in the box. The system includes means for simultaneously depositing a row of the armatures on the inclined surface of a tube retainer. Tubes then are rolled down the surface to form a single tube layer bridging the armatures. A magnet assembly carrying electromagnets respectively aligned with the armatures is advanced close to the tube layer, and in the course of this advance is angularly displaced to bring the pole pieces of the electromagnets into parallelism with the tube layer. The magnets then are energized to pick up the assembly. The loaded magnet assembly is retracted to a position overlying the box, and during this retraction is again displaced to bring the pole pieces of the electromagnets into a horizontal plane. Means are provided for inserting the loaded electromagnets in the box and then de-energizing the electromagnets to deposit the assembly therein. The system accomplishes the boxing of fragile tubes at relatively high rates. Because the tubes are boxed as separated uniform layers, subsequent unloading operations are facilitated.

  1. Rate Dynamics of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neurons with Strong Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Nordlie, Eilen; Tetzlaff, Tom; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2010-01-01

    Firing-rate models provide a practical tool for studying the dynamics of trial- or population-averaged neuronal signals. A wealth of theoretical and experimental studies has been dedicated to the derivation or extraction of such models by investigating the firing-rate response characteristics of ensembles of neurons. The majority of these studies assumes that neurons receive input spikes at a high rate through weak synapses (diffusion approximation). For many biological neural systems, however, this assumption cannot be justified. So far, it is unclear how time-varying presynaptic firing rates are transmitted by a population of neurons if the diffusion assumption is dropped. Here, we numerically investigate the stationary and non-stationary firing-rate response properties of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons receiving input spikes through excitatory synapses with alpha-function shaped postsynaptic currents for strong synaptic weights. Input spike trains are modeled by inhomogeneous Poisson point processes with sinusoidal rate. Average rates, modulation amplitudes, and phases of the period-averaged spike responses are measured for a broad range of stimulus, synapse, and neuron parameters. Across wide parameter regions, the resulting transfer functions can be approximated by a linear first-order low-pass filter. Below a critical synaptic weight, the cutoff frequencies are approximately constant and determined by the synaptic time constants. Only for synapses with unrealistically strong weights are the cutoff frequencies significantly increased. To account for stimuli with larger modulation depths, we combine the measured linear transfer function with the nonlinear response characteristics obtained for stationary inputs. The resulting linear–nonlinear model accurately predicts the population response for a variety of non-sinusoidal stimuli. PMID:21212832

  2. Cable Tester Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Cables are very important electrical devices that carry power and signals across multiple instruments. Any fault in a cable can easily result in a catastrophic outcome. Therefore, verifying that all cables are built to spec is a very important part of Electrical Integration Procedures. Currently, there are two methods used in lab for verifying cable connectivity. (1) Using a Break-Out Box and an ohmmeter this method is time-consuming but effective for custom cables and (2) Commercial Automated Cable Tester Boxes this method is fast, but to test custom cables often requires pre-programmed configuration files, and cables used on spacecraft are often uniquely designed for specific purposes. The idea is to develop a semi-automatic continuity tester that reduces human effort in cable testing, speeds up the electrical integration process, and ensures system safety. The JPL-Cable Tester Box is developed to check every single possible electrical connection in a cable in parallel. This system indicates connectivity through LED (light emitting diode) circuits. Users can choose to test any pin/shell (test node) with a single push of a button, and any other nodes that are shorted to the test node, even if they are in the same connector, will light up with the test node. The JPL-Cable Tester Boxes offers the following advantages: 1. Easy to use: The architecture is simple enough that it only takes 5 minutes for anyone to learn how operate the Cable Tester Box. No pre-programming and calibration are required, since this box only checks continuity. 2. Fast: The cable tester box checks all the possible electrical connections in parallel at a push of a button. If a cable normally takes half an hour to test, using the Cable Tester Box will improve the speed to as little as 60 seconds to complete. 3. Versatile: Multiple cable tester boxes can be used together. As long as all the boxes share the same electrical potential, any number of connectors can be tested together.

  3. ENERGY STAR Certified Set Top Boxes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes that are effective as of September 1, 2011 or the Version 4.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes that are effective as of December 19, 2014. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProductGroup&pgw_code=ST

  4. Evaluating Anthropogenic Carbon Emissions in the Urban Salt Lake Valley through Inverse Modeling: Combining Long-term CO2 Observations and an Emission Inventory using a Multiple-box Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catharine, D.; Strong, C.; Lin, J. C.; Cherkaev, E.; Mitchell, L.; Stephens, B. B.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    The rising level of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), driven by anthropogenic emissions, is the leading cause of enhanced radiative forcing. Increasing societal interest in reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions call for a computationally efficient method of evaluating anthropogenic CO2 source emissions, particularly if future mitigation actions are to be developed. A multiple-box atmospheric transport model was constructed in conjunction with a pre-existing fossil fuel CO2 emission inventory to estimate near-surface CO2 mole fractions and the associated anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Salt Lake Valley (SLV) of northern Utah, a metropolitan area with a population of 1 million. A 15-year multi-site dataset of observed CO2 mole fractions is used in conjunction with the multiple-box model to develop an efficient method to constrain anthropogenic emissions through inverse modeling. Preliminary results of the multiple-box model CO2 inversion indicate that the pre-existing anthropogenic emission inventory may over-estimate CO2 emissions in the SLV. In addition, inversion results displaying a complex spatial and temporal distribution of urban emissions, including the effects of residential development and vehicular traffic will be discussed.

  5. Exact results for power spectrum and susceptibility of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron with two-state noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droste, Felix; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The response properties of excitable systems driven by colored noise are of great interest, but are usually mathematically only accessible via approximations. For this reason, dichotomous noise, a rare example of a colored noise leading often to analytically tractable problems, has been extensively used in the study of stochastic systems. Here, we calculate exact expressions for the power spectrum and the susceptibility of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron driven by asymmetric dichotomous noise. While our results are in excellent agreement with simulations, they also highlight a limitation of using dichotomous noise as a simple model for more complex fluctuations: Both power spectrum and susceptibility exhibit an undamped periodic structure, the origin of which we discuss in detail.

  6. Exact results for power spectrum and susceptibility of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron with two-state noise.

    PubMed

    Droste, Felix; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The response properties of excitable systems driven by colored noise are of great interest, but are usually mathematically only accessible via approximations. For this reason, dichotomous noise, a rare example of a colored noise leading often to analytically tractable problems, has been extensively used in the study of stochastic systems. Here, we calculate exact expressions for the power spectrum and the susceptibility of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron driven by asymmetric dichotomous noise. While our results are in excellent agreement with simulations, they also highlight a limitation of using dichotomous noise as a simple model for more complex fluctuations: Both power spectrum and susceptibility exhibit an undamped periodic structure, the origin of which we discuss in detail.

  7. Auto- and Crosscorrelograms for the Spike Response of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neurons with Slow Synapses

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Bote, Ruben; Parga, Nestor

    2006-01-20

    An analytical description of the response properties of simple but realistic neuron models in the presence of noise is still lacking. We determine completely up to the second order the firing statistics of a single and a pair of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons receiving some common slowly filtered white noise. In particular, the auto- and cross-correlation functions of the output spike trains of pairs of cells are obtained from an improvement of the adiabatic approximation introduced previously by Moreno-Bote and Parga [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 028102 (2004)]. These two functions define the firing variability and firing synchronization between neurons, and are of much importance for understanding neuron communication.

  8. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular modeling of glycyrrhizin derivatives as potent high-mobility group box-1 inhibitors with anti-heart-failure activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Du, Dan; Yan, Jun; Ren, Jinhong; Lv, Haining; Li, Yong; Xu, Song; Wang, Yadan; Ma, Shuanggang; Qu, Jing; Tang, Weibin; Hu, Zhuowei; Yu, Shishan

    2013-01-10

    Novel glycyrrhizin (GL) derivatives were designed and synthesized by introducing various amine or amino acid residues into the carbohydrate chain and at C-30. Their inhibitory effects on high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) were evaluated using a cell-based lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) release study. Compounds 10, 12, 18-20, 23, and 24, which had substituents introduced at C-30, demonstrated moderate HMGB1 inhibition with ED₅₀ values ranging from 337 to 141 μM, which are values comparable to that of the leading GL compound (1) (ED₅₀ = 70 μM). Compounds 23 and 24 emerged as novel and interesting HMGB1 inhibitors. These compounds were able to extend the survival of mice with chronic heart failure (CHF) and acute heart failure (AHF), respectively. In addition, molecular modeling studies were performed to support the biological data.

  9. Increased Sensitivity to Binge Alcohol-Induced Gut Leakiness and Inflammatory Liver Disease in HIV Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Atrayee; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Jang, Sehwan; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-mediated advanced liver injury in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effect of binge alcohol on the inflammatory liver disease in HIV transgenic rats as a model for simulating human conditions. Female wild-type (WT) or HIV transgenic rats were treated with three consecutive doses of binge ethanol (EtOH) (3.5 g/kg/dose oral gavages at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (Control). Blood and liver tissues were collected at 1 or 6-h following the last dose of ethanol or dextrose for the measurements of serum endotoxin and liver pathology, respectively. Compared to the WT, the HIV rats showed increased sensitivity to alcohol-mediated gut leakiness, hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evidenced with the significantly elevated levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic triglycerides, histological fat accumulation and F4/80 staining. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that hepatic levels of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), leptin and the downstream target monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly up-regulated in the HIV-EtOH rats, compared to all other groups. Subsequent experiments with primary cultured cells showed that both hepatocytes and hepatic Kupffer cells were the sources of the elevated MCP-1 in HIV-EtOH rats. Further, TLR4 and MCP-1 were found to be upregulated by leptin. Collectively, these results show that HIV rats, similar to HIV-infected people being treated with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), are more susceptible to binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and inflammatory liver disease than the corresponding WT, possibly due to additive or synergistic interaction between binge alcohol exposure and HIV infection. Based on these results, HIV transgenic rats can be used as a surrogate model to study the molecular mechanisms of many disease states caused by heavy alcohol intake in HIV-infected people on HAART. PMID:26484872

  10. Increased Sensitivity to Binge Alcohol-Induced Gut Leakiness and Inflammatory Liver Disease in HIV Transgenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Atrayee; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Jang, Sehwan; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-mediated advanced liver injury in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effect of binge alcohol on the inflammatory liver disease in HIV transgenic rats as a model for simulating human conditions. Female wild-type (WT) or HIV transgenic rats were treated with three consecutive doses of binge ethanol (EtOH) (3.5 g/kg/dose oral gavages at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (Control). Blood and liver tissues were collected at 1 or 6-h following the last dose of ethanol or dextrose for the measurements of serum endotoxin and liver pathology, respectively. Compared to the WT, the HIV rats showed increased sensitivity to alcohol-mediated gut leakiness, hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evidenced with the significantly elevated levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic triglycerides, histological fat accumulation and F4/80 staining. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that hepatic levels of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), leptin and the downstream target monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly up-regulated in the HIV-EtOH rats, compared to all other groups. Subsequent experiments with primary cultured cells showed that both hepatocytes and hepatic Kupffer cells were the sources of the elevated MCP-1 in HIV-EtOH rats. Further, TLR4 and MCP-1 were found to be upregulated by leptin. Collectively, these results show that HIV rats, similar to HIV-infected people being treated with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), are more susceptible to binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and inflammatory liver disease than the corresponding WT, possibly due to additive or synergistic interaction between binge alcohol exposure and HIV infection. Based on these results, HIV transgenic rats can be used as a surrogate model to study the molecular mechanisms of many disease states caused by heavy alcohol intake in HIV-infected people on HAART.

  11. Do4Models: Performance of current climate model dust emission schemes from a 1D box model perspective using field campaign data to constrain the simulated dust emission flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; King, James; Wiggs, Giles; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Dust emission schemes in climate models are relatively simple and are often tuned to represent observed background aerosol concentrations many of which are thousands of kilometres from source regions. Parameterisations of dust emission in numerical models were developed from idealised experiments such as those conducted in wind tunnels. Improvement of current model dust emission schemes has been difficult to achieve because of the paucity of observations from key dust sources. The Dust Observations for Models project (DO4Models) aims to gather data from source regions at a scale appropriate to climate model grid box resolution. Here we present the results of 1D box model simulations in which three commonly used parameterisations for the horizontal and vertical dust emission flux (Marticorena and Bergametti 1995, Alfaro and Gomez 2001, Shao et al. 2004) are applied and compared with Do4Models field campaign data retrieved over a typical salt pan dust source (Sua Pan, Botswana). The sensitivity of the schemes to input parameters such as soil moisture content, aerodynamic surface roughness length, shear velocity, soil texture class, and particle size is tested with particular regard to the representation of horizontal-to-vertical-mass-flux ratio. The effects of spatial averaging over 11 field sites is evaluated as is the average dust emission flux of a typical 12x12km model grid box. It is analysed whether the full range of surface processes (temporal changes in roughness, moisture, and soil conditions) is represented sufficiently well after averaging yet. Furthermore, the application of the dispersed soil size distribution on the performance of the emission schemes compared to the typically used undisturbed soil size distribution provided from soil databases is examined. Preliminary results suggest that the current schemes do not describe the observed emission process well. The scheme after Shao et al. (2004) provides the most accurate horizontal flux estimate so far

  12. Genetically engineered mouse models for functional studies of SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weihua; Wei, Wenyi; Sun, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The SCF (SKP1 (S-phase-kinase-associated protein 1), Cullin-1, F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligases, the founding member of Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in mammals. Each individual SCF E3 ligase consists of one adaptor protein SKP1, one scaffold protein cullin-1 (the first family member of the eight cullins), one F-box protein out of 69 family members, and one out of two RING (Really Interesting New Gene) family proteins RBX1/ROC1 or RBX2/ROC2/SAG/RNF7. Various combinations of these four components construct a large number of SCF E3s that promote the degradation of many key regulatory proteins in cell-context, temporally, and spatially dependent manners, thus controlling precisely numerous important cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, gene transcription, signal transduction, DNA replication, maintenance of genome integrity, and tumorigenesis. To understand how the SCF E3 ligases regulate these cellular processes and embryonic development under in vivo physiological conditions, a number of mouse models with transgenic (Tg) expression or targeted deletion of components of SCF have been established and characterized. In this review, we will provide a brief introduction to the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, followed by a comprehensive overview on the existing Tg and knockout (KO) mouse models of the SCF E3s, and discuss the role of each component in mouse embryogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, as well as other pathogenic processes associated with human diseases. We will end with a brief discussion on the future directions of this research area and the potential applications of the knowledge gained to more effective therapeutic interventions of human diseases. PMID:23528706

  13. AC field induced-charge electroosmosis over leaky dielectric blocks embedded in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-02-01

    An effective electrical boundary condition is formulated to describe AC field-driven induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) phenomena at the interface between a liquid and a leaky dielectric solid. Since most materials in reality possess finite dielectric and conductive properties, i.e. leaky dielectric, the present boundary condition can be used to describe the induced zeta potential on a leaky dielectric surface with consideration of both bond charges (due to polarization) and free charges (due to conduction). Two well-known limiting cases, i.e. the perfectly dielectric and the perfectly conducting wall boundary conditions can be recovered from the present formulation. Utilizing the derived boundary condition, we obtain analytical solutions in closed form for the AC field-driven induced-charge electroosmosis (ICEO) over two symmetric leaky dielectric blocks embedded in the walls of an infinitely long microchannel. Two important factors for the induced zeta potential are identified to respectively account for the polarization charges and the free charges, and their effects on AC field-driven ICEO oscillating flow patterns are analyzed. It is found that the flow patterns exhibit two counter-rotating vortices, which can be deformed, relocated, eliminated and even reverse their rotating directions. It is very promising that such temporary evolution of flow patterns can possibly induce chaotic advection which can enhance microfluidic mixing.

  14. Linking the "Leaky Edges" of the Outside with the Individual Inside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, David Lee

    2007-01-01

    Throughout seven years of teaching in urban schools, the author discovered that the most effective ways to teach difficult literary texts was to refer to students' out-of-school activities. In other words, to connect the "leaky edges of the "social outside"" with the "individual inside" is to create a curriculum of…

  15. Mode structure in the far field radiation of a leaky-wave multiple quantum well laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nekorkin, S M; Zvonkov, B N; Karzanova, Maria V; Dikareva, Natalia V; Aleshkin, V Ya; Dubinov, A A

    2012-10-31

    The radiation patterns of a leaky-wave InGaAs/GaAs/InGaP laser are studied. In the subthreshold regime, several peaks are found, corresponding to the emission of fundamental and excited modes. The dependences of the amplitude, position and width of the peaks on the pump current are investigated and explained. (measurement of laser radiation parameters)

  16. Analysis of radial movement of an unconfined leaky aquifer due to well pumping and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang

    2007-09-01

    Radial movement of an unconfined leaky aquifer was studied with respect to hydraulic forces that are induced by well recharge and discharge. New analytic solutions in the velocity and displacement fields were found and applied to describe transient movement in an unconfined leaky aquifer. Linear momentum and mass balance of saturated porous sediments, the Darcy-Gersevanov law, and the analytic solution of hydraulic drawdown for unsteady flow within the unconfined leaky aquifer were introduced to find the new solutions. Analytic results indicate that the nonlinear relation between the initial hydraulic head (h0) and the well function has an insignificant effect on the aquifer transient movement when the drawdown s<0.02 h 0. When the well function is simplified with different assumptions and pumping conditions, the new solutions correspondingly reduce to cases that are similar to the Hantush-Jacob, Muskat, and Theis transient movement of a confined leaky aquifer. It was found that large leakance is important in slowing radial movement and reducing aquifer deformation. Flow velocity in the aquifer is more responsive to leakance than to cumulative displacement within the aquifer. The zones and boundary with tensile stress can be located using the same approach applied to a confined aquifer for risk assessment of earth fissuring.

  17. Real-Time Characterization of Materials Degradation Using Leaky Lamb Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiuh, S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Leaky Lamb wave (LLW) propagation in composite materials has been studied extensively since it was first observed in 1982. The wave is induced using a pitch-catch arrangement and the plate wave modes are detected by searching minima in the reflected spectra.

  18. Linking the "Leaky Edges" of the Outside with the Individual Inside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, David Lee

    2007-01-01

    Throughout seven years of teaching in urban schools, the author discovered that the most effective ways to teach difficult literary texts was to refer to students' out-of-school activities. In other words, to connect the "leaky edges of the "social outside"" with the "individual inside" is to create a curriculum of…

  19. Box-modeling of the impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and benthic remineralization on the nitrogen cycle of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Pahlow, M.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-09-01

    Both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralization influence the marine nitrogen cycle, and hence ultimately also marine primary production. The biological and biogeochemical relations of the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) to nitrogen deposition, benthic denitrification and phosphate regeneration are analysed in a prognostic box model of the oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in the ETSP. In the model, atmospheric nitrogen deposition based on estimates for the years 2000-2009 is offset by half by reduced N2 fixation, with the other half transported out of the model domain. Both model- and data-based benthic denitrification are found to trigger nitrogen fixation, partly compensating for the NO3- loss. Since phosphate is the ultimate limiting nutrient in the model, enhanced sedimentary phosphate regeneration under suboxic conditions stimulates primary production and subsequent export production and NO3- loss in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). A sensitivity analysis of the local response to both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralization indicates dominant stabilizing feedbacks in the ETSP, which tend to keep a balanced nitrogen inventory, i.e., nitrogen input by atmospheric deposition is counteracted by decreasing nitrogen fixation; NO3- loss via benthic denitrification is partly compensated by increased nitrogen fixation; enhanced nitrogen fixation stimulated by phosphate regeneration is partly removed by the stronger water-column denitrification. Even though the water column in our model domain acts as a NO3- source, the ETSP including benthic denitrification might become a NO3- sink.

  20. Bundle sheath leakiness and light limitation during C4 leaf and canopy CO2 uptake.

    PubMed

    Kromdijk, Johannes; Schepers, Hans E; Albanito, Fabrizio; Fitton, Nuala; Carroll, Faye; Jones, Michael B; Finnan, John; Lanigan, Gary J; Griffiths, Howard

    2008-12-01

    Perennial species with the C(4) pathway hold promise for biomass-based energy sources. We have explored the extent that CO(2) uptake of such species may be limited by light in a temperate climate. One energetic cost of the C(4) pathway is the leakiness () of bundle sheath tissues, whereby a variable proportion of the CO(2), concentrated in bundle sheath cells, retrodiffuses back to the mesophyll. In this study, we scale from leaf to canopy level of a Miscanthus crop (Miscanthus x giganteus hybrid) under field conditions and model the likely limitations to CO(2) fixation. At the leaf level, measurements of photosynthesis coupled to online carbon isotope discrimination showed that leaves within a 3.3-m canopy (leaf area index = 8.3) show a progressive increase in both carbon isotope discrimination and as light decreases. A similar increase was observed at the ecosystem scale when we used eddy covariance net ecosystem CO(2) fluxes, together with isotopic profiles, to partition photosynthetic and respiratory isotopic flux densities (isofluxes) and derive canopy carbon isotope discrimination as an integrated proxy for at the canopy level. Modeled values of canopy CO(2) fixation using leaf-level measurements of suggest that around 32% of potential photosynthetic carbon gain is lost due to light limitation, whereas using determined independently from isofluxes at the canopy level the reduction in canopy CO(2) uptake is estimated at 14%. Based on these results, we identify as an important limitation to CO(2) uptake of crops with the C(4) pathway.

  1. Invariant box[endash]parameterization of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, T.J. ); Wagner, D. )

    1998-10-01

    The model-independent [open quotes]box[close quotes] parameterization of neutrino oscillations is examined. The invariant boxes are the classical amplitudes of the individual oscillating terms. Being observables, the boxes are independent of the choice of parameterization of the mixing matrix. Emphasis is placed on the relations among the box parameters due to mixing[endash]matrix unitarity, and on the reduction of the number of boxes to the minimum basis set. Using the box algebra, we show that CP-violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. General analyses of neutrino oscillations among n[ge]3 flavors can readily determine the boxes, which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements. [copyright] [ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Invariant box{endash}parameterization of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, T.J.; Wagner, D.

    1998-10-01

    The model-independent {open_quotes}box{close_quotes} parameterization of neutrino oscillations is examined. The invariant boxes are the classical amplitudes of the individual oscillating terms. Being observables, the boxes are independent of the choice of parameterization of the mixing matrix. Emphasis is placed on the relations among the box parameters due to mixing{endash}matrix unitarity, and on the reduction of the number of boxes to the minimum basis set. Using the box algebra, we show that CP-violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. General analyses of neutrino oscillations among n{ge}3 flavors can readily determine the boxes, which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Constraining a hybrid volatility basis-set model for aging of wood-burning emissions using smog chamber experiments: a box-model study based on the VBS scheme of the CAMx model (v5.40)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarelli, Giancarlo; El Haddad, Imad; Bruns, Emily; Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; Möhler, Ottmar; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, novel wood combustion aging experiments performed at different temperatures (263 and 288 K) in a ˜ 7 m3 smog chamber were modelled using a hybrid volatility basis set (VBS) box model, representing the emission partitioning and their oxidation against OH. We combine aerosol-chemistry box-model simulations with unprecedented measurements of non-traditional volatile organic compounds (NTVOCs) from a high-resolution proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and with organic aerosol measurements from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Due to this, we are able to observationally constrain the amounts of different NTVOC aerosol precursors (in the model) relative to low volatility and semi-volatile primary organic material (OMsv), which is partitioned based on current published volatility distribution data. By comparing the NTVOC / OMsv ratios at different temperatures, we determine the enthalpies of vaporization of primary biomass-burning organic aerosols. Further, the developed model allows for evaluating the evolution of oxidation products of the semi-volatile and volatile precursors with aging. More than 30 000 box-model simulations were performed to retrieve the combination of parameters that best fit the observed organic aerosol mass and O : C ratios. The parameters investigated include the NTVOC reaction rates and yields as well as enthalpies of vaporization and the O : C of secondary organic aerosol surrogates. Our results suggest an average ratio of NTVOCs to the sum of non-volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds of ˜ 4.75. The mass yields of these compounds determined for a wide range of atmospherically relevant temperatures and organic aerosol (OA) concentrations were predicted to vary between 8 and 30 % after 5 h of continuous aging. Based on the reaction scheme used, reaction rates of the NTVOC mixture range from 3.0 × 10-11 to 4. 0 × 10-11 cm3 molec-1 s-1. The average enthalpy of vaporization of secondary organic aerosol

  4. Oats supplementation prevents alcohol-induced gut leakiness in rats by preventing alcohol-induced oxidative tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yueming; Forsyth, Christopher B; Banan, Ali; Fields, Jeremy Z; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2009-06-01

    We reported previously that oats supplementation prevents gut leakiness and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) in our rat model of alcoholic liver disease. Because oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of both alcohol-induced gut leakiness and ASH, and because oats have antioxidant properties, we tested the hypothesis that oats protect by preventing alcohol-induced oxidative damage to the intestine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged for 12 weeks with alcohol (starting dose of 1 g/kg increasing to 6 g/kg/day over the first 2 weeks) or dextrose, with or without oats supplementation (10 g/kg/day). Oxidative stress and injury were assessed by measuring colonic mucosal inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) (by immunohistochemistry), nitric oxide (colorimetric assay), and protein carbonylation and nitrotyrosination (immunoblotting). Colonic barrier integrity was determined by assessing the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton (immunohistochemistry) and the integrity of tight junctions (electron microscopy). Oats supplementation prevented alcohol-induced up-regulation of iNOS, nitric oxide overproduction in the colonic mucosa, and increases in protein carbonyl and nitrotyrosine levels. This protection was associated with prevention of ethanol (EtOH)-induced disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and disruption of tight junctions. We conclude that oats supplementation attenuates EtOH-induced disruption of intestinal barrier integrity, at least in part, by inhibiting EtOH-induced increases in oxidative stress and oxidative tissue damage. This inhibition prevents alcohol-induced disruption of the cytoskeleton and tight junctions. This study suggests that oats may be a useful therapeutic agent--a nutraceutical--for the prevention of alcohol-induced oxidative stress and organ dysfunction.

  5. Antioxidant therapeutics: Pandora's box.

    PubMed

    Day, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has favored the utilization of dioxygen (O2) in the development of complex multicellular organisms. O2 is actually a toxic mutagenic gas that is highly oxidizing and combustible. It is thought that plants are largely to blame for polluting the earth's atmosphere with O2 owing to the development of photosynthesis by blue-green algae over 2 billion years ago. The rise of the plants and atmospheric O2 levels placed evolutionary stress on organisms to adapt or become extinct. This implies that all the surviving creatures on our planet are mutants that have adapted to the "abnormal biology" of O2. Much of the adaptation to the presence of O2 in biological systems comes from well-coordinated antioxidant and repair systems that focus on converting O2 to its most reduced form, water (H2O), and the repair and replacement of damaged cellular macromolecules. Biological systems have also harnessed O2's reactive properties for energy production, xenobiotic metabolism, and host defense and as a signaling messenger and redox modulator of a number of cell signaling pathways. Many of these systems involve electron transport systems and offer many different mechanisms by which antioxidant therapeutics can alternatively produce an antioxidant effect without directly scavenging oxygen-derived reactive species. It is likely that each agent will have a different set of mechanisms that may change depending on the model of oxidative stress, organ system, or disease state. An important point is that all biological processes of aerobes have coevolved with O2 and this creates a Pandora's box for trying to understand the mechanism(s) of action of antioxidants being developed as therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of heterogeneity on the interpretation of pumping test data in leaky aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copty, Nadim K.; Trinchero, Paolo; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Sarioglu, Murat Savas; Findikakis, Angelos N.

    2008-11-01

    Pumping tests are routinely interpreted from the analysis of drawdown data and their derivatives. These interpretations result in a small number of apparent parameter values which lump the underlying heterogeneous structure of the aquifer. Key questions in such interpretations are (1) what is the physical meaning of those lumped parameters and (2) whether it is possible to infer some information about the spatial variability of the hydraulic parameters. The system analyzed in this paper consists of an aquifer separated from a second recharging aquifer by means of an aquitard. The natural log transforms of the transmissivity, ln T, and the vertical conductance of the aquitard, ln C, are modeled as two independent second-order stationary spatial random functions (SRFs). The Monte Carlo approach is used to simulate the time-dependent drawdown at a suite of observation points for different values of the statistical parameters defining the SRFs. Drawdown data at each observation point are independently used to estimate hydraulic parameters using three existing methods: (1) the inflection-point method, (2) curve-fitting, and (3) the double inflection-point method. The resulting estimated parameters are shown to be space dependent and vary with the interpretation method since each method gives different emphasis to different parts of the time-drawdown data. Moreover, the heterogeneity in the pumped aquifer or the aquitard influences the estimates in distinct manners. Finally, we show that, by combining the parameter estimates obtained from the different analysis procedures, information about the heterogeneity of the leaky aquifer system may be inferred.

  7. Understanding the leaky engineering pipeline: Motivation and job adaptability of female engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswathiamma, Manjusha Thekkedathu

    This dissertation is a mixed-method study conducted using qualitative grounded theory and quantitative survey and correlation approaches. This study aims to explore the motivation and adaptability of females in the engineering profession and to develop a theoretical framework for both motivation and adaptability issues. As a result, this study endeavors to design solutions for the low enrollment and attenuation of female engineers in the engineering profession, often referred to as the "leaky female engineering pipeline." Profiles of 123 female engineers were studied for the qualitative approach, and 98 completed survey responses were analyzed for the quantitative approach. The qualitative, grounded-theory approach applied the constant comparison method; open, axial, and selective coding was used to classify the information in categories, sub-categories, and themes for both motivation and adaptability. The emergent themes for decisions motivating female enrollment include cognitive, emotional, and environmental factors. The themes identified for adaptability include the seven job adaptability factors: job satisfaction, risk- taking attitude, career/skill development, family, gender stereotyping, interpersonal skills, and personal benefit, as well as the self-perceived job adaptability factor. Illeris' Three-dimensional Learning Theory was modified as a model for decisions motivating female enrollment. This study suggests a firsthand conceptual parallelism of McClusky's Theory of Margin for the adaptability of female engineers in the profession. Also, this study attempted to design a survey instrument to measure job adaptability of female engineers. The study identifies two factors that are significantly related to job adaptability: interpersonal skills (< p = 0.01) and family (< p = 0.05); gender stereotyping and personal benefit are other factors that are also significantly (< p = 0.1) related.

  8. Leaky Sinks: Should (Paleo)erosion Rates and Floodplain Sedimentation Rates Covary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, J. K.; Brocard, G. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Sediments in floodplain are the only available terrestrial record of past environmental conditions in some settings. The information gleaned from these floodplain sediments - specifically rates of sedimentation - are often used as indirect indicators of past erosion rates. Ultimately, erosion and the deposition rates must match to satisfy mass balance. However, over short-timescales storage creates unsteadiness in this balance, and over long-timescales floodplains act as `leaky sinks.' A global compilation of Holocene floodplain accumulation rates suggests rates measured over the last 100 years are faster than those averaged over 1000 years, which in turn are faster than those for the last 10000 years. The apparent acceleration in sedimentation rates appears globally synchronous, despite diachronous human and land use histories and can pre-date significant human land use. The pattern of rate increase in sedimentation over time (inverse power law) and rates of erosion that match over short and long timescales point to the rate increase indicating infilling behavior of all floodplains and not specifically tied to the supply of (anthropogenic) sediment. The apparent synchrony of accelerating floodplain accumulation is consistent with a model that could include but does not require increased anthropogenic erosion or more, recent flooding episodes. In this presentation, we will present our progress and prospects of developing a new technique to quantify paleoerosion rates in floodplain sediments along the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. We use meteoric cosmogenic 10Be concentrations to observe changed in erosion rate at multiple radiocarbon-dated intervals. Due to sea level rise providing accommodation space, this floodplain sedimentation record spans the last 20,000 years. During this time, sedimentation rates and potentially El Nino hurricane-forced erosion have fluctuated in concert with meteoric 10Be concentrations. This work was supported by the U.S. National

  9. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens.

    PubMed

    Geier, Christoph B; Piller, Alexander; Linder, Angela; Sauerwein, Kai M T; Eibl, Martha M; Wolf, Hermann M

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency.

  10. 6. VIEW OF INTERIOR GLOVE BOX DURING CONSTRUCTION. GLOVE BOXES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF INTERIOR GLOVE BOX DURING CONSTRUCTION. GLOVE BOXES CONTAINED ALL PRODUCTION OPERATIONS AND WERE INTERCONNECTED BY CONVEYORS. (9/21/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and Repossessed Uranium in Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  12. Thinking "Inside" the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a test to determine whether they could incorporate a discovery box into a preschool setting was successful. It stimulated the students' natural inquiry processes while promoting understanding of healthy foods and allowing for practice of fine-motor skills. It was easily incorporated into the curriculum and classroom space.…

  13. Hydrophobic, Porous Battery Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Boxes made of porous, hydrophobic polymers developed to contain aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte solutions of zinc/air batteries while allowing air to diffuse in as needed for operation. Used on other types of batteries for in-cabin use in which electrolytes aqueous and from which gases generated during operation must be vented without allowing electrolytes to leak out.

  14. EPA ExpoBox

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases, mode

  15. Drawing inside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ranella

    2007-01-01

    When working with very young children and/or students with special needs, it is beneficial for teachers to think "outside the box" in order to preserve and enhance a child's natural curiosity. In an effort to teach young children to control their drawing tools, they are often presented with coloring book-type pages and instructed to "stay inside…

  16. Mystery Box Marvels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Joel; Centurio, Tina

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the first week of school could very well set the stage for the rest of the school year. Setting high standards for science activities based in inquiry can start on the first day of science class and develop as the year unfolds. With the use of simple, readily available, inexpensive materials, an efficient mystery box lesson can be…

  17. Shoe Box Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandifer, Cody

    2009-01-01

    Students' eyes grow wide with wonder as they get a motor to work or make a bulb light for the first time. As these daunting feats of electrical engineering remind us, teaching electricity is invariably rewarding and worthwhile. In this inquiry-based science project, elementary students work in pairs to design and wire a shoe box "room" that meets…

  18. The Idea Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Young Children, Washington, DC.

    Five pamphlets offer helpful ideas and instructions on teacher planning, learning environments, teaching with nature, a creative curriculum, and ideas for administrators in "The Idea Box," compiled by members of the Austin Association for the Education of Young Children. Each pamphlet contains useful information for working with young children.…

  19. Teaching with Box Tops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiser, Lynne; D'Zamko, Mary Elizabeth

    1984-01-01

    Using environmental materials (such as the phone book and placemats from fast food restaurants) can be a motivating way to teach learning disabled students skills and concepts, as shown in an approach to reading, math, science and nutrition, and social studies instruction using a JELL-O brand gelatin box. (CL)

  20. Thinking "Inside" the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a test to determine whether they could incorporate a discovery box into a preschool setting was successful. It stimulated the students' natural inquiry processes while promoting understanding of healthy foods and allowing for practice of fine-motor skills. It was easily incorporated into the curriculum and classroom space.…

  1. Teaching with Box Tops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiser, Lynne; D'Zamko, Mary Elizabeth

    1984-01-01

    Using environmental materials (such as the phone book and placemats from fast food restaurants) can be a motivating way to teach learning disabled students skills and concepts, as shown in an approach to reading, math, science and nutrition, and social studies instruction using a JELL-O brand gelatin box. (CL)

  2. Shoe Box Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandifer, Cody

    2009-01-01

    Students' eyes grow wide with wonder as they get a motor to work or make a bulb light for the first time. As these daunting feats of electrical engineering remind us, teaching electricity is invariably rewarding and worthwhile. In this inquiry-based science project, elementary students work in pairs to design and wire a shoe box "room" that meets…

  3. Mystery Box Marvels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Joel; Centurio, Tina

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the first week of school could very well set the stage for the rest of the school year. Setting high standards for science activities based in inquiry can start on the first day of science class and develop as the year unfolds. With the use of simple, readily available, inexpensive materials, an efficient mystery box lesson can be…

  4. Drawing inside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ranella

    2007-01-01

    When working with very young children and/or students with special needs, it is beneficial for teachers to think "outside the box" in order to preserve and enhance a child's natural curiosity. In an effort to teach young children to control their drawing tools, they are often presented with coloring book-type pages and instructed to "stay inside…

  5. Cereal Box Totems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, AnnMarie

    2002-01-01

    Presents a multicultural project used with fourth-grade students in which they created a three-dimensional totem pole using leftover cereal boxes. Discusses in detail how to create the totem pole. Explains that students learned about Northwest American Indians in class. (CMK)

  6. "Can" the Black Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lestingi, Francis S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the use of the "Arcane (mysterious) Can" which is a "tin" can which is permanently sealed, both air- and water-tight, by means of a home canning device. The canning procedure permits the use of a large variety of materials which can not be utilized in the ordinary mystery box. This Can activity is valuable for…

  7. Box-modelling of the impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and benthic remineralisation on the nitrogen cycle of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bei; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralisation influence the marine nitrogen cycle, and hence ultimately also marine primary production. The biological and biogeochemical relations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) among nitrogen deposition, benthic denitrification and phosphorus regeneration are analysed in a prognostic box model of the oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in the ETSP. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition ( ≈ 1.5 Tg N yr-1 for the years 2000-2009) is offset by half in the model by reduced N2 fixation, with the other half transported out of the model domain. Model- and data-based benthic denitrification in our model domain are responsible for losses of 0.19 and 1.0 Tg Tg N yr-1, respectively, and both trigger nitrogen fixation, partly compensating for the NO3- loss. Model- and data-based estimates of enhanced phosphate release via sedimentary phosphorus regeneration under suboxic conditions are 0.062 and 0.11 Tg N yr-1, respectively. Since phosphate is the ultimate limiting nutrient in the model, even very small additional phosphate inputs stimulate primary production and subsequent export production and NO3- loss in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). A sensitivity analysis of the local response to both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralisation indicates dominant stabilising feedbacks in the ETSP, which tend to keep a balanced nitrogen inventory; i.e. nitrogen input by atmospheric deposition is counteracted by decreasing nitrogen fixation; NO3- loss via benthic denitrification is partly compensated for by increased nitrogen fixation; enhanced nitrogen fixation stimulated by phosphate regeneration is partly counteracted by stronger water-column denitrification. Even though the water column in our model domain acts as a NO3- source, the ETSP including benthic denitrification might be a NO3- sink.

  8. Ocular complications of boxing.

    PubMed

    Bianco, M; Vaiano, A S; Colella, F; Coccimiglio, F; Moscetti, M; Palmieri, V; Focosi, F; Zeppilli, P; Vinger, P F

    2005-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence of ocular injuries in a large population of boxers over a period of 16 years, in particular, the most severe lesions that may be vision threatening. Clinical records of the medical archive of the Italian Boxing Federation were analysed. A total of 1032 boxers were examined from February 1982 to October 1998. A complete ophthalmological history was available for 956, who formed the study population (a total of 10 697 examinations). The following data were collected: age when started boxing; duration of competitive boxing career (from the date of the first bout); weight category; a thorough ocular history. The following investigations were carried out: measurement of visual acuity and visual fields, anterior segment inspection, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, and examination of ocular fundus. Eighty age matched healthy subjects, who had never boxed, formed the control group. Of the 956 boxers examined, 428 were amateur (44.8%) and 528 professional (55.2%). The median age at first examination was 23.1 (4.3) years (range 15-36). The prevalence of conjunctival, corneal, lenticular, vitreal, ocular papilla, and retinal alterations in the study population was 40.9% compared with 3.1% in the control group (p< or =0.0001). The prevalence of serious ocular findings (angle, lens, macula, and peripheral retina alterations) was 5.6% in boxers and 3.1% in controls (NS). Boxing does not result in a higher prevalence of severe ocular lesions than in the general population. However, the prevalence of milder lesions (in particular with regard to the conjunctiva and cornea) is noteworthy, justifying the need for adequate ophthalmological surveillance.

  9. Ocular complications of boxing

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, M; Vaiano, A; Colella, F; Coccimiglio, F; Moscetti, M; Palmieri, V; Focosi, F; Zeppilli, P; Vinger, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of ocular injuries in a large population of boxers over a period of 16 years, in particular, the most severe lesions that may be vision threatening. Methods: Clinical records of the medical archive of the Italian Boxing Federation were analysed. A total of 1032 boxers were examined from February 1982 to October 1998. A complete ophthalmological history was available for 956, who formed the study population (a total of 10 697 examinations). The following data were collected: age when started boxing; duration of competitive boxing career (from the date of the first bout); weight category; a thorough ocular history. The following investigations were carried out: measurement of visual acuity and visual fields, anterior segment inspection, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, and examination of ocular fundus. Eighty age matched healthy subjects, who had never boxed, formed the control group. Results: Of the 956 boxers examined, 428 were amateur (44.8%) and 528 professional (55.2%). The median age at first examination was 23.1 (4.3) years (range 15–36). The prevalence of conjunctival, corneal, lenticular, vitreal, ocular papilla, and retinal alterations in the study population was 40.9% compared with 3.1% in the control group (p⩽0.0001). The prevalence of serious ocular findings (angle, lens, macula, and peripheral retina alterations) was 5.6% in boxers and 3.1% in controls (NS). Conclusions: Boxing does not result in a higher prevalence of severe ocular lesions than in the general population. However, the prevalence of milder lesions (in particular with regard to the conjunctiva and cornea) is noteworthy, justifying the need for adequate ophthalmological surveillance. PMID:15665199

  10. Quantifying Model-Form Uncertainties in Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations: An Open-Box, Physics-Based, Bayesian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Heng; Wu, Jinlong; Wang, Jianxun; Sun, Rui; Roy, Christopher J.

    2015-11-01

    For many practical flows, the turbulence models are the most important source of uncertainty in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) predictions. In this work, we develop an open-box, physics-informed Bayesian framework for quantifying the model-form uncertainties in RANS simulations. Uncertainties are introduced directly to the Reynolds stresses and are represented with compact parameterization accounting for empirical prior knowledge and physical constraints (e.g., realizability, smoothness, and symmetry). An iterative ensemble Kalman method is used to incorporate the prior information with available observation data in a Bayesian framework to posterior distributions of the Reynolds stresses and other quantities of interest. Two representative cases, the flow over periodic hills and the flow in a square duct, are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed framework. Simulation results suggest that the obtained posterior mean has significantly better agreement with the benchmark data compared to the baseline simulation, even with very sparse observations. At most locations, the posterior distribution adequately represents the model-form uncertainties.

  11. Hermit Points on a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard; Grinstead, Charles; Grindstead, Marshall; Bergstrand, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Suppose that we are given a rectangular box in 3-space. Given any two points on the surface of this box, we can define the surface distance between them to be the length of the shortest path between them on the surface of the box. This paper determines the pairs of points of maximum surface distance for all boxes. It is often the case that these…

  12. Hermit Points on a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard; Grinstead, Charles; Grindstead, Marshall; Bergstrand, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Suppose that we are given a rectangular box in 3-space. Given any two points on the surface of this box, we can define the surface distance between them to be the length of the shortest path between them on the surface of the box. This paper determines the pairs of points of maximum surface distance for all boxes. It is often the case that these…

  13. Making Connections with Memory Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley, April

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the use of children's literature within the social studies classroom on the topic of memory boxes. Includes discussions of four books: (1) "The Littlest Angel" (Charles Tazewell); (2) "The Hundred Penny Box" (Sharon Bell Mathis); (3) "Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge" (Mem Fox); and (4) "The Memory Box" (Mary Bahr). (CMK)

  14. Making Connections with Memory Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley, April

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the use of children's literature within the social studies classroom on the topic of memory boxes. Includes discussions of four books: (1) "The Littlest Angel" (Charles Tazewell); (2) "The Hundred Penny Box" (Sharon Bell Mathis); (3) "Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge" (Mem Fox); and (4) "The Memory Box" (Mary Bahr). (CMK)

  15. Multicultural and Nonsexist Prop Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutte, Gloria S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how prop boxes enhance learning and are resources in multicultural and nonsexist primary education, focusing on play, experimentation, and cooperation. Examines integration of prop boxes into the curricula and activities, and presents examples of generic and specific multicultural prop boxes that incorporate art, music, foods,…

  16. Using dynamic N-mixture models to test cavity limitation on northern flying squirrel demographic parameters using experimental nest box supplementation.

    PubMed

    Priol, Pauline; Mazerolle, Marc J; Imbeau, Louis; Drapeau, Pierre; Trudeau, Caroline; Ramière, Jessica

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic N-mixture models have been recently developed to estimate demographic parameters of unmarked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. We propose an application of the Dail and Madsen (2011: Biometrics, 67, 577-587) dynamic N-mixture model in a manipulative experiment using a before-after control-impact design (BACI). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis of cavity limitation of a cavity specialist species, the northern flying squirrel, using nest box supplementation on half of 56 trapping sites. Our main purpose was to evaluate the impact of an increase in cavity availability on flying squirrel population dynamics in deciduous stands in northwestern Québec with the dynamic N-mixture model. We compared abundance estimates from this recent approach with those from classic capture-mark-recapture models and generalized linear models. We compared apparent survival estimates with those from Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models. Average recruitment rate was 6 individuals per site after 4 years. Nevertheless, we found no effect of cavity supplementation on apparent survival and recruitment rates of flying squirrels. Contrary to our expectations, initial abundance was not affected by conifer basal area (food availability) and was negatively affected by snag basal area (cavity availability). Northern flying squirrel population dynamics are not influenced by cavity availability at our deciduous sites. Consequently, we suggest that this species should not be considered an indicator of old forest attributes in our study area, especially in view of apparent wide population fluctuations across years. Abundance estimates from N-mixture models were similar to those from capture-mark-recapture models, although the latter had greater precision. Generalized linear mixed models produced lower abundance estimates, but revealed the same relationship between abundance and snag basal area. Apparent survival estimates from N-mixture models were higher and less precise

  17. Using dynamic N-mixture models to test cavity limitation on northern flying squirrel demographic parameters using experimental nest box supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Priol, Pauline; Mazerolle, Marc J; Imbeau, Louis; Drapeau, Pierre; Trudeau, Caroline; Ramière, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic N-mixture models have been recently developed to estimate demographic parameters of unmarked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. We propose an application of the Dail and Madsen (2011: Biometrics, 67, 577–587) dynamic N-mixture model in a manipulative experiment using a before-after control-impact design (BACI). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis of cavity limitation of a cavity specialist species, the northern flying squirrel, using nest box supplementation on half of 56 trapping sites. Our main purpose was to evaluate the impact of an increase in cavity availability on flying squirrel population dynamics in deciduous stands in northwestern Québec with the dynamic N-mixture model. We compared abundance estimates from this recent approach with those from classic capture–mark–recapture models and generalized linear models. We compared apparent survival estimates with those from Cormack–Jolly–Seber (CJS) models. Average recruitment rate was 6 individuals per site after 4 years. Nevertheless, we found no effect of cavity supplementation on apparent survival and recruitment rates of flying squirrels. Contrary to our expectations, initial abundance was not affected by conifer basal area (food availability) and was negatively affected by snag basal area (cavity availability). Northern flying squirrel population dynamics are not influenced by cavity availability at our deciduous sites. Consequently, we suggest that this species should not be considered an indicator of old forest attributes in our study area, especially in view of apparent wide population fluctuations across years. Abundance estimates from N-mixture models were similar to those from capture–mark–recapture models, although the latter had greater precision. Generalized linear mixed models produced lower abundance estimates, but revealed the same relationship between abundance and snag basal area. Apparent survival estimates from N-mixture models were higher and

  18. Shocks in a box: An analogue model of subduction earthquake cycles with application to seismotectonic forearc evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenau, M.; Lohrmann, J.; Oncken, O.

    2009-04-01

    We introduce and test an experimental approach to simulate elastoplastic megathrust earthquake cycles using an analogue model and apply it to study the seismotectonic evolution of subduction zones. The quasi-two-dimensional analogue model features rate- and state-dependent elastic-frictional plastic and viscoelastic material properties and is scaled for gravity, inertia, elasticity, friction and viscosity. The experiments are monitored with a high-resolution strain analysis tool based on digital image correlation (particle imaging velocimetry, PIV) providing deformation time-series comparable to seismologic, geodetic and geologic observations. In order to separate elastic and non-elastic effects inherent the experimental deformation patterns, we integrate elastic dislocation modeling (EDM) into a hybrid approach: We use the analogue earthquake slip and interseismic locking distribution as EDM dislocation input and forward model the co- and interseismic elastic response. The residual, which remains when the EDM prediction is subtracted from the experimental deformation pattern, highlights the accumulation of permanent deformation in the model. The setup generates analogue earthquake sequences with realistic source mechanisms, elastic forearc response and recurrence patterns and reproduces principal earthquake scaling relations. By applying the model to an accretionary type plate margin we demonstrate how strain localization at the rupture peripheries may lead to a seismotectonically segmented forearc including a tectonically stable shelf and coastal high (< 20 % of plate convergence accommodated by internal shortening) overlying the area of large megathrust earthquake slip. 50 - 75 % of plate convergence is accommodated by internal shortening in the slope region where earthquake slip tapers out towards the trench. The inner forearc region remains undeformed and represents a basin.

  19. Denali in a box: analog experiments modeled after a natural setting provide insight on gentle restraining bend deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendick, Anne; Bemis, Sean; Toeneboehn, Kevin; Cooke, Michele; Benowitz, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    Despite restraining bends along strike-slip faults creating zones of focused uplift, the relative contributions from parameters such as fault geometry and scale, obliquity, rheological contrasts, and deformation rates are not well-constrained. Similarities between simple analog models (conducted with homogenous materials) and natural restraining bend systems (typically associated with heterogeneous crust) suggest that there are first-order controls on restraining bend deformation that operate independent of heterogeneity in the upper crust. To investigate these controls we examine the Mount McKinley restraining bend (MMRB) of the Denali fault system in south-central Alaska. The MMRB is associated with an ~18 degree bend in the Denali fault and exhibits strongly asymmetric topography and rock uplift. The viscous relaxation time and the ratio of crustal thickness to the restraining bend stepover distance are scaled within the analog model to that of the MMRB. We compare uplift patterns, localization of deformation, formation of new faults, and displacement fields for the model set up and the natural bend to understand the influence of different variables on the overall system to determine what controls the deformation. As shown in previous analog model studies, asymmetric topography characteristically forms with restraining bend angles of <20°. In our model, a continuous, through-going fault within the restraining bend accompanies a narrow zone of deformation on one side of the bend and a broader zone of deformation the opposite side. However, the active thrust faults of the MMRB are purely dip-slip, whereas the thrust faults formed in the model appear to be oblique-slip. The geometry and slip rates of active faults in the MMRB, as well as preliminary thermochronometric data, suggest that the restraining bend itself is migrating relative to previously deformed deposits. Conventional understanding of restraining bends is that fixed bends produce the highest

  20. Leaky waveguides for low ҡ-measurement: From structure design to loss evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächter, Christoph; Rizzo, Riccardo; Michelotti, Francesco; Munzert, Peter; Danz, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    For high quality optical coatings the knowledge of the losses of the deposited materials is essential. A precise measurement of low Im(n+iκ)<= 10-6 at an intended operation wavelength and with low intensity can be achieved in waveguide configurations, whereby leaky waveguide configurations allow one to analyze losses of high- and low-index media of H-L-stacks as well due to resonances in the angle-dependent reflection curve. Numerical investigations reveal that different leaky wave schemes, e.g. Bragg-, Bloch- and Antiresonant-Reflecting waveguides, comply differently with practical requests. Loss figure evaluation requires peculiar attention due to measurement accuracy and ambiguities, thus suitable constraints for layer data and a proper merit-function construction have to be used.

  1. Effect of perfectly matched layer reflection coefficient on modal analysis of leaky waveguide modes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Hung-chun

    2011-01-17

    The reflection coefficient is one important parameter of the perfectly matched layer (PML). Here we investigate its effect on the modal analysis of leaky waveguide modes by examining three different leaky waveguide structures, i.e., the holey fiber, the air-core terahertz pipe waveguide, and the gain-guided and index-antiguided slab waveguide. Numerical results reveal that the typical values 10(-8) ~10(-12) are inadequate for obtaining the imaginary part of the complex propagation constant, and the suggested reflection coefficient would be much smaller, for example, 10(-50) or 10(-100). With such a small coefficient, both the computational window size and the PML thickness can be significantly reduced without loss of stability. Moreover, in some cases, the modal field profiles can only be accurately obtained with such a small coefficient.

  2. Numerical analysis of leaky Lamb wave propagation using a semi-analytical finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Inoue, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion curves and wave structures for leaky Lamb waves were numerically analyzed with a semi-analytical finite element method. Solving governing equations derived for a leaky plate mode and a total transmission mode provided dispersion curves of fundamental Lamb modes and Scholte waves with several differences. The Scholte waves in the non-dispersive region were modes with large vibration in the vicinity of a single interface between a plate surface and fluid. Moreover, in low frequency-thickness product (fd) range in the dispersion curves, the Scholte waves became highly dispersive modes. Wave structures obtained for the Scholte wave in the SAFE calculations implied that the high dispersion in the low fd range is caused by the fact that wave energy of Scholte wave penetrates deeper in the plate in lower fd range and that the the opposite boundary of the plate affects the Scholte wave.

  3. Sinusoidally Modulated Graphene Leaky-Wave Antenna for Electronic Beamscanning at THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquius-Morote, Marc; Gomez-Diaz, Juan Sebastian; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the concept, analysis and design of a sinusoidally-modulated graphene leaky-wave antenna with beam scanning capabilities at a fixed frequency. The antenna operates at terahertz frequencies and is composed of a graphene sheet transferred onto a back-metallized substrate and a set of polysilicon DC gating pads located beneath it. In order to create a leaky-mode, the graphene surface reactance is sinusoidally-modulated via graphene's field effect by applying adequate DC bias voltages to the different gating pads. The pointing angle and leakage rate can be dynamically controlled by adjusting the applied voltages, providing versatile beamscanning capabilities. The proposed concept and achieved performance, computed using realistic material parameters, are extremely promising for beamscanning at THz frequencies, and could pave the way to graphene-based reconfigurable transceivers and sensors.

  4. Bound states within the radiation continuum in diffraction gratings and the role of leaky modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    We discuss resonant states with diverging Q factor within the radiation continuum based on the anomalous interaction of leaky guided modes and diffracted waves in suitably designed reflection gratings. We show that these trapped optical states can be understood within the framework of leaky-wave theory, which unveils their generation process and dynamics. Our findings reveal an interesting mechanism to realize embedded eigenstates in periodic structures, shedding light on their electromagnetic properties, and offering the possibility to quantitatively predict their occurrence and systematically design optimal structures that support them. The realization of extraordinary optical trapping in open structures may be important for applications that require strongly confined and enhanced fields and high selectivity in angle and frequency.

  5. Dirac leaky-wave antennas for continuous beam scanning from photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Memarian, Mohammad; Eleftheriades, George V

    2015-01-05

    Leaky-Wave Antennas (LWAs) enable directive and scannable radiation patterns, which are highly desirable attributes at terahertz, infrared and optical frequencies. However, a LWA is generally incapable of continuous beam scanning through broadside, due to an open stopband in its dispersion characteristic. This issue is yet to be addressed at frequencies beyond microwaves, mainly as existing microwave solutions (for example, transmission line metamaterials) are unavailable at these higher frequencies. Here we report leaky-wave radiation from the interface of a photonic crystal (PC) with a Dirac-type dispersion and air. The resulting Dirac LWA (DLWA) can radiate at broadside, chiefly owing to the closed Γ-point bandgap of the Dirac PC. Thus, the DLWA can continuously scan a directive beam over a wide range of angles by varying the frequency. These DLWAs can be designed at microwave as well as terahertz to optical frequencies, with feasible dimensions and low losses.

  6. Paired leaky mode spatial light modulators with a 28° total deflection angle.

    PubMed

    Qaderi, Kamran; Leach, Christopher; Smalley, Daniel E

    2017-04-01

    In this Letter, we present a paired set of waveguide spatial light modulators (SLMs) capable of a maximum light deflection nearing 28° for red. This deflection, which is several times larger than the angular sweep of current, state-of-the-art modulators, is made possible by the unilateral, near-collinear waveguide nature of the leaky mode interaction. The ability to double angular output in this way, which is either not possible or not practical in other SLMs, is possible in leaky mode devices, thanks to the absence of zero-order light and the lack of high-order outputs. This combined structure has angular deflection high enough to enable color holographic video monitors that do not require angular magnification. Furthermore, the low cost and high angular deflection of these devices may make it possible to make large arrays for flat-screen video holography.

  7. Leaky domino-modes in regular arrays of substantially thick metal nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilov, Pavel M.; Simovski, Constantin R.

    2016-07-01

    In previous works, an efficient light trapping performed by arrays of metal nanoantennas whose building block was a slightly tapered (trapezoidal) substantially thick nanostrip was revealed. This light trapping implied a broad spectrum of solar light concentrated in a subwavelength depth of the semiconductor substrate. This is a very advantageous feature allowing our structure to enhance thin-film solar cells. However, the physics of the broadband resonant absorption in the substrate was not investigated. In the present paper, we show that our arrays support so-called leaky domino-modes, responsible for such the light trapping. These modes are multipole oscillations of the array of substantially thick nanostrips. In this work we have thoroughly studied these leaky modes relating them to resonances of high-order multipole moments and to broadband light-trapping effect.

  8. The analytic solution of the firm's cost-minimization problem with box constraints and the Cobb-Douglas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayón, L.; Grau, J. M.; Ruiz, M. M.; Suárez, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most well-known problems in the field of Microeconomics is the Firm's Cost-Minimization Problem. In this paper we establish the analytical expression for the cost function using the Cobb-Douglas model and considering maximum constraints for the inputs. Moreover we prove that it belongs to the class C1.

  9. The Electronic Battle Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, Denis; Turcotte, Guy; Lebel, Eric; Gilbert, Annie

    2000-08-01

    The Electronic Battle Box is an integrated suite of planning and decision-aid tools specially designed to facilitate Canadian Armed Force Officers during their training and during their tasks of preparing and conducting military operations. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, the Directorate of Army Doctrine (DAD), the Directorate of Land Requirements (DLR), the G4 staff of 1Cdn Div HQ and CGI Information and Management Consultants Inc. Distributed on CD-ROM, the Electronic Battle Box contains efficient and user-friendly tools that significantly reduce the planning time for military operations and ensure staff officers a better focus on significant tasks. Among the tools are an OrBat Browser and an Equipment Browser allowing to view and edit military organizations, a Task Browser providing facilities to prepare plans using Gantt charts, a Logistic Planner allowing to estimate supply requirements applying complex calculations, and Road, Air and Rail Movement Planners. EBB also provides staff officers with a large set of doctrinal documents in an electronic format. This paper provides an overview of the various tools of the Electronic Battle Box.

  10. Learning with Box Kernels.

    PubMed

    Melacci, Stefano; Gori, Marco

    2013-04-12

    Supervised examples and prior knowledge on regions of the input space have been profitably integrated in kernel machines to improve the performance of classifiers in different real-world contexts. The proposed solutions, which rely on the unified supervision of points and sets, have been mostly based on specific optimization schemes in which, as usual, the kernel function operates on points only. In this paper, arguments from variational calculus are used to support the choice of a special class of kernels, referred to as box kernels, which emerges directly from the choice of the kernel function associated with a regularization operator. It is proven that there is no need to search for kernels to incorporate the structure deriving from the supervision of regions of the input space, since the optimal kernel arises as a consequence of the chosen regularization operator. Although most of the given results hold for sets, we focus attention on boxes, whose labeling is associated with their propositional description. Based on different assumptions, some representer theorems are given which dictate the structure of the solution in terms of box kernel expansion. Successful results are given for problems of medical diagnosis, image, and text categorization.

  11. Learning with box kernels.

    PubMed

    Melacci, Stefano; Gori, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Supervised examples and prior knowledge on regions of the input space have been profitably integrated in kernel machines to improve the performance of classifiers in different real-world contexts. The proposed solutions, which rely on the unified supervision of points and sets, have been mostly based on specific optimization schemes in which, as usual, the kernel function operates on points only. In this paper, arguments from variational calculus are used to support the choice of a special class of kernels, referred to as box kernels, which emerges directly from the choice of the kernel function associated with a regularization operator. It is proven that there is no need to search for kernels to incorporate the structure deriving from the supervision of regions of the input space, because the optimal kernel arises as a consequence of the chosen regularization operator. Although most of the given results hold for sets, we focus attention on boxes, whose labeling is associated with their propositional description. Based on different assumptions, some representer theorems are given that dictate the structure of the solution in terms of box kernel expansion. Successful results are given for problems of medical diagnosis, image, and text categorization.

  12. Spreading of Thin Droplets of Perfect and Leaky Dielectric Liquids on Inclined Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Andrew; Kumar, Satish

    2016-07-05

    The spreading of droplets may be influenced by electric fields, a situation that is relevant to applications such as coating, printing, and microfluidics. In this work we study the effects of an electric field on the gravity-driven spreading of two-dimensional droplets down an inclined plane. We consider both perfect and leaky dielectric liquids, as well as perfectly and partially wetting systems. In addition to the effects of electric fields, we examine the use of thermocapillary forces to suppress the growth of the capillary ridge near the droplet front. Lubrication theory is applied to generate a set of coupled partial differential equations for interfacial height and charge, which are then solved numerically with a finite-difference method. Electric fields increase the height of the capillary ridge in both perfect and leaky dielectric droplets due to electrostatic pressure gradients that drive liquid into the ridge. In leaky dielectrics, large interfacial charge gradients in the contact-line region create shear stresses that also enhance ridge growth and the formation of trailing minor ridges. The coalescence of these ridges can significantly affect the long-time thinning rate of leaky dielectric droplets. In partially wetting liquids, electric fields promote the splitting of smaller droplets from the primary droplet near the receding contact line due to the interplay between electrostatic forces and disjoining pressure. Cooling from below and heating from above generates thermocapillary forces that counteract the effects of electric fields and suppress the growth of the capillary ridge. The results of this work have important implications for manipulating the spreading of droplets down inclined surfaces.

  13. Robust sound onset detection using leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with depressing synapses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leslie S; Fraser, Dagmar S

    2004-09-01

    A biologically inspired technique for detecting onsets in sound is presented. Outputs from a cochlea-like filter are spike coded, in a way similar to the auditory nerve (AN). These AN-like spikes are presented to a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron through a depressing synapse. Onsets are detected with essentially zero latency relative to these AN spikes. Onset detection results for a tone burst, musical sounds and the DARPA/NIST TIMIT speech corpus are presented.

  14. Response of a grounded dielectric slab to an impulse line source using leaky modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Dean G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes how expansions in leaky (or improper) modes may be used to represent the continuous spectrum in an open radiating waveguide. The technique requires a thorough knowledge of the life history of the improper modes as they migrate from improper to proper Riemann surfaces. The method is illustrated by finding the electric field resulting from an impulsively forced current located in the free space above a grounded dielectric slab.

  15. Material Perturbations to Enhance Performance of the Thiele Half-Width Leaky Mode Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-19

    purposely suppressing the dominant mode in his antenna design by cutting sev transverse slots in the top conductor (see Figure 1) [3]. Recently, Dr Gary...78. J.L. Gomez-Tornero, A.T. Martinez, D.C. Rebenaque, M. Gugliemi, and A. Alvarez- Melcon, “ Design of tapered leaky-wave antennas in hybrid waveguide ...behavior for a microstrip antenna . It will be shown how the analysis can be used to extract the desired bandwidth of the radiation regime. The second

  16. Fabrication of bundle-structured tube-leaky optical fibers for infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Bundled glass tubular fibers were fabricated by glass drawing technique for endoscopic infrared-thermal imaging. The bundle fibers were made of borosilicate glass and have a structure like a photonic crystal fiber having multiple hollow cores. Fabricated fibers have a length of 90 cm and each pixel sizes are less than 80 μm. By setting the thickness of glass wall to a quarter-wavelength optical thickness, light is confined in the air core as a leaky mode with a low loss owing to the interference effect of the thin glass wall and this type of hollow-core fibers is known as tube leaky fibers. The transmission losses of bundled fibers were firstly measured and it was found that bundled tube-leaky fibers have reasonably low transmission losses in spite of the small pixel size. Then thermal images were delivered by the bundled fibers combining with an InSb infrared camera. Considering applications with rigid endoscopes, an imaging system composed of a 30-cm long fiber bundle and a half-ball lens with a diameter of 2 mm was fabricated. By using this imaging system, a metal wire with a thickness of 200 μm was successfully observed and another test showed that the minimum detected temperature was 32.0 °C and the temperature resolution of the system was around 0.7 °C.

  17. Frequency dependent steering with backward leaky waves via photonic crystal interface layer.

    PubMed

    Colak, Evrim; Caglayan, Humeyra; Cakmak, Atilla O; Villa, Alessandro D; Capolino, Filippo; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2009-06-08

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) with a surface defect layer (made of dimers) is studied in the microwave regime. The dispersion diagram is obtained with the Plane Wave Expansion Method. The dispersion diagram reveals that the dimer-layer supports a surface mode with negative slope. Two facts are noted: First, a guided (bounded) wave is present, propagating along the surface of the dimer-layer. Second, above the light line, the fast traveling mode couple to the propagating spectra and as a result a directive (narrow beam) radiation with backward characteristics is observed and measured. In this leaky mode regime, symmetrical radiation patterns with respect to the normal to the PC surface are attained. Beam steering is observed and measured in a 70 degrees angular range when frequency ranges in the 11.88-13.69 GHz interval. Thus, a PC based surface wave structure that acts as a frequency dependent leaky wave antenna is presented. Angular radiation pattern measurements are in agreement with those obtained via numerical simulations that employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD). Finally, the backward radiation characteristics that in turn suggest the existence of a backward leaky mode in the dimer-layer are experimentally verified using a halved dimer-layer structure.

  18. Introducing leaky-well concept for stormwater quantity control in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahammed, Faisal; Hewa, Guna Alankarage; Argue, John R.

    2013-03-01

    Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh with rapid and unplanned urbanization, is subjected to annual average rainfall of 2,076 mm. The intensity of rainfall during 10 years recurrence interval and 1 h duration of the city is 98 mm/h. The stormwater drainage systems of the city are often unable to manage peak runoff volume and hence urban flooding is common after medium to heavy rainfall events. A proposal to introduce leaky-wells using water sensitive urban design (WSUD) principles was investigated for Dhaka's drainage network to transfer the present unsatisfactory situation into one which is sustainable. The regime in balance strategy was considered to control the stormwater for 100 years recurrence interval. We applied scaling theory to 57 years (1953-2009) daily rainfall data for the estimation of sub-daily rainfall intensity values. It was found that two leaky-wells; each with depth H = 2.0 m and diameter D = 2.0 m, in 500 m2 allotment can improve the situation. The emptying (drain) time of the proposed device is around 1.25 days, which meets the standard criterion. Groundwater table, soil hydraulic conductivity and topographic slope of Dhaka also support for installations of leaky-wells.

  19. Keeping track of the distance from home by leaky integration along veering paths.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Markus; Stiels, Maren; Frenz, Harald; Loomis, Jack M

    2011-07-01

    When humans use vision to gauge the travel distance of an extended forward movement, they often underestimate the movement's extent. This underestimation can be explained by leaky path integration, an integration of the movement to obtain distance. Distance underestimation occurs because this integration is imperfect and contains a leak that increases with distance traveled. We asked human observers to estimate the distance from a starting location for visually simulated movements in a virtual environment. The movements occurred along curved paths that veered left and right around a central forward direction. In this case, the distance that has to be integrated (i.e., the beeline distance between origin and endpoint) and the distance that is traversed (the path length along the curve) are distinct. We then tested whether the leak accumulated with distance from the origin or with traversed distance along the curved path. Leaky integration along the path makes the seemingly counterintuitive prediction that the estimated origin-to-endpoint distance should decrease with increasing veering, because the length of the path over which the integration occurs increases, leading to a larger leak effect. The results matched the prediction: movements of identical origin-to-endpoint distance were judged as shorter when the path became longer. We conclude that leaky path integration from visual motion is performed along the traversed path even when a straight beeline distance is calculated.

  20. Leaky modes and the first arrivals in cased boreholes with poorly bonded conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XiuMei; Wang, XiuMing; Zhang, HaiLan

    2016-02-01

    The generation mechanism of the first arrivals in the cased boreholes for the poorly bonded conditions is investigated. Based on the analyses of the Riemann surface structure of the characteristic function, the dispersion features, excitation spectra and contributions of modes excited in the cased boreholes with different cementing types are studied. The phase velocity dispersion studies of leaky modes show that high-order modes form "plateau" regions with one approximate velocity denoted by v separated by their cutoff frequencies, in which the phase velocity changes little with a considerable frequency range, while the group velocity keeps a relatively constant high value. Usually, the operation frequency range of a specific cementing evaluation acoustic logging tool is covered by such a "plateau" region. Mode excitation and contribution analyses show that the first arrivals in the cased boreholes for the poorly bonded conditions are the contributions from leaky modes, where the traveling velocity of the first arrivals processed by slowness time coherence (STC) method is equal to the approximated velocity v. Analyses on generation of leaky modes in the cased boreholes supplement the understanding of the generation mechanism of the first arrivals.

  1. From Leaky Pipeline to Irrigation System: Minority Education through the Lens of Community-Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    James, Rosalina; Starks, Helene; Segrest, Valerie; Burke, Wylie

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher education has long made efforts to increase underrepresented minority participation in biomedical research and health fields. However, relatively few minority trainees complete advanced degrees or proceed to independent research careers, a loss referred to as the “leaky pipeline.” Minority trainees may take alternate pathways to climbing the academic ladder, exiting to pursue multiple disciplinary or community-serving roles. Objective The authors propose a model for understanding minority departures from the education pipeline as a basis for nurturing careers that support community goals for health. Methods Concepts of the traditional pipeline training model are compared with a model that aligns with CBPR principles and practices. The article describes an irrigation model that incorporates informal learning from academic and community knowledge bases to prepare trainees for CBPR and interdisciplinary research. Students serve as agents that foster individual, institutional and social change needed to address health problems while attending to root causes of disparities. Conclusions Viewing minority students as agents for community engagement allows institutions to reassess the role training can play in diversifying participation in higher education and research. An irrigation model supports development of an infrastructure that optimizes success at all post-secondary levels, and enhances CBPR capacity wherever trainees live, work, and learn. Linking formal education to informal learning in context of community-based participatory research experiences can also reduce community mistrust of research while nurturing productive research partnerships with communities to address health disparities. PMID:23221293

  2. Use of poisson regression and box-jenkins models to evaluate the short-term effects of environmental noise levels on daily emergency admissions in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Tobias, A; Díaz, J; Saez, M; Alberdi, J C

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between environmental factors and hospital admissions has usually been analysed without taking into account the influence of a factor closely related to traffic in big cities, that is, environmental noise levels. We analysed the relationship between environmental noise and emergency admissions, for all causes and specific causes in Madrid (Spain), for the study period 1995-1997, using two statistical methods for the analysis of epidemiological time series data: Poisson autoregressive models and Box Jenkins (ARIMA) methodology. Both methods produce a clear association between emergency admissions for all and specific causes and environmental noise levels. We found very similar results from both methods for all and circulatory causes, but slightly different for respiratory causes. Around 5% of all emergency admissions can be attributed to high noise levels, with a lower figure for specific causes. Current levels of environmental noise have a considerable epidemiological impact on emergency admissions in Madrid. A reduction of environmental noise levels could be accompanied by a possible reduction in the number of emergency admissions.

  3. A Calculus for Boxes and Traits in a Java-Like Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettini, Lorenzo; Damiani, Ferruccio; de Luca, Marco; Geilmann, Kathrin; Schäfer, Jan

    The box model is a component model for the object-oriented paradigm, that defines components (the boxes) with clear encapsulation boundaries. Having well-defined boundaries is crucial in component-based software development, because it enables to argue about the interference and interaction between a component and its context. In general, boxes contain several objects and inner boxes, of which some are local to the box and cannot be accessed from other boxes and some can be accessible by other boxes. A trait is a set of methods divorced from any class hierarchy. Traits can be composed together to form classes or other traits. We present a calculus for boxes and traits. Traits are units of fine-grained reuse, whereas boxes can be seen as units of coarse-grained reuse. The calculus is equipped with an ownership type system and allows us to combine coarse- and fine-grained reuse of code by maintaining encapsulation of components.

  4. Career Development of Women in Academia: Traversing the Leaky Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasser, Courtney E.; Shaffer, Katharine S.

    2014-01-01

    Women's experiences in academia are laden with a fundamental set of issues pertaining to gender inequalities. A model reflecting women's career development and experiences around their academic pipeline (or career in academia) is presented. This model further conveys a new perspective on the experiences of women academicians before, during and…

  5. Small, Lightweight, Collapsible Glove Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    A small, lightweight, collapsible glove box enables its user to perform small experiments and other tasks. Originally intended for use aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS), this glove box could also be attractive for use on Earth in settings in which work space or storage space is severely limited and, possibly, in which it is desirable to minimize weight. The development of this glove box was prompted by the findings that in the original space-shuttle or ISS setting, (1) it was necessary to perform small experiments in a large general-purpose work station, so that, in effect, they occupied excessive space; and it took excessive amounts of time to set up small experiments. The design of the glove box reflects the need to minimize the space occupied by experiments and the time needed to set up experiments, plus the requirement to limit the launch weight of the box and the space needed to store the box during transport into orbit. To prepare the glove box for use, the astronaut or other user has merely to insert hands through the two fabric glove ports in the side walls of the box and move two hinges to a locking vertical position (see figure). The user could do this while seated with the glove box on the user fs lap. When stowed, the glove box is flat and has approximately the thickness of two pieces of 8-in. (.20 cm) polycarbonate.

  6. Systems-wide Experimental and Modeling Analysis of Insulin Signaling through Forkhead Box Protein O1 (FOXO1) in Human Adipocytes, Normally and in Type 2 Diabetes*

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Meenu Rohini; Nyman, Elin; Kjølhede, Preben; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major aspect of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which results from impaired insulin signaling in target cells. Signaling to regulate forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) may be the most important mechanism for insulin to control transcription. Despite this, little is known about how insulin regulates FOXO1 and how FOXO1 may contribute to insulin resistance in adipocytes, which are the most critical cell type in the development of insulin resistance. We report a detailed mechanistic analysis of insulin control of FOXO1 in human adipocytes obtained from non-diabetic subjects and from patients with T2D. We show that FOXO1 is mainly phosphorylated through mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B at Ser473 and that this mechanism is unperturbed in T2D. We also demonstrate a cross-talk from the MAPK branch of insulin signaling to stimulate phosphorylation of FOXO1. The cellular abundance and consequently activity of FOXO1 are halved in T2D. Interestingly, inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin reduces the abundance of FOXO1 to the levels in T2D. This suggests that the reduction of the concentration of FOXO1 is a consequence of attenuation of mTORC1, which defines much of the diabetic state in human adipocytes. We integrate insulin control of FOXO1 in a network-wide mathematical model of insulin signaling dynamics based on compatible data from human adipocytes. The diabetic state is network-wide explained by attenuation of an mTORC1-to-insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) feedback and reduced abundances of insulin receptor, GLUT4, AS160, ribosomal protein S6, and FOXO1. The model demonstrates that attenuation of the mTORC1-to-IRS1 feedback is a major mechanism of insulin resistance in the diabetic state. PMID:27226562

  7. Systems-wide Experimental and Modeling Analysis of Insulin Signaling through Forkhead Box Protein O1 (FOXO1) in Human Adipocytes, Normally and in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Meenu Rohini; Nyman, Elin; Kjølhede, Preben; Cedersund, Gunnar; Strålfors, Peter

    2016-07-22

    Insulin resistance is a major aspect of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which results from impaired insulin signaling in target cells. Signaling to regulate forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) may be the most important mechanism for insulin to control transcription. Despite this, little is known about how insulin regulates FOXO1 and how FOXO1 may contribute to insulin resistance in adipocytes, which are the most critical cell type in the development of insulin resistance. We report a detailed mechanistic analysis of insulin control of FOXO1 in human adipocytes obtained from non-diabetic subjects and from patients with T2D. We show that FOXO1 is mainly phosphorylated through mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B at Ser(473) and that this mechanism is unperturbed in T2D. We also demonstrate a cross-talk from the MAPK branch of insulin signaling to stimulate phosphorylation of FOXO1. The cellular abundance and consequently activity of FOXO1 are halved in T2D. Interestingly, inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin reduces the abundance of FOXO1 to the levels in T2D. This suggests that the reduction of the concentration of FOXO1 is a consequence of attenuation of mTORC1, which defines much of the diabetic state in human adipocytes. We integrate insulin control of FOXO1 in a network-wide mathematical model of insulin signaling dynamics based on compatible data from human adipocytes. The diabetic state is network-wide explained by attenuation of an mTORC1-to-insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) feedback and reduced abundances of insulin receptor, GLUT4, AS160, ribosomal protein S6, and FOXO1. The model demonstrates that attenuation of the mTORC1-to-IRS1 feedback is a major mechanism of insulin resistance in the diabetic state.

  8. Surface reflectance drives nest box temperature profiles and thermal suitability for target wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Jessica A.; Briscoe, Natalie J.; Lentini, Pia E.; Handasyde, Kathrine A.; Lumsden, Linda F.; Robert, Kylie A.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal properties of tree hollows play a major role in survival and reproduction of hollow-dependent fauna. Artificial hollows (nest boxes) are increasingly being used to supplement the loss of natural hollows; however, the factors that drive nest box thermal profiles have received surprisingly little attention. We investigated how differences in surface reflectance influenced temperature profiles of nest boxes painted three different colors (dark-green, light-green, and white: total solar reflectance 5.9%, 64.4%, and 90.3% respectively) using boxes designed for three groups of mammals: insectivorous bats, marsupial gliders and brushtail possums. Across the three different box designs, dark-green (low reflectance) boxes experienced the highest average and maximum daytime temperatures, had the greatest magnitude of variation in daytime temperatures within the box, and were consistently substantially warmer than light-green boxes (medium reflectance), white boxes (high reflectance), and ambient air temperatures. Results from biophysical model simulations demonstrated that variation in diurnal temperature profiles generated by painting boxes either high or low reflectance colors could have significant ecophysiological consequences for animals occupying boxes, with animals in dark-green boxes at high risk of acute heat-stress and dehydration during extreme heat events. Conversely in cold weather, our modelling indicated that there are higher cumulative energy costs for mammals, particularly smaller animals, occupying light-green boxes. Given their widespread use as a conservation tool, we suggest that before boxes are installed, consideration should be given to the effect of color on nest box temperature profiles, and the resultant thermal suitability of boxes for wildlife, particularly during extremes in weather. Managers of nest box programs should consider using several different colors and installing boxes across a range of both orientations and shade profiles (i

  9. Finite element corroboration of buckling phenomena observed in corrugated boxes

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Urbanik; Edmond P. Saliklis

    2003-01-01

    Conventional compression strength formulas for corrugated fiberboard boxes are limited to geometry and material that produce an elastic postbuckling failure. Inelastic postbuckling can occur in squatty boxes and trays, but a mechanistic rationale for unifying observed strength data is lacking. This study combines a finite element model with a parametric design of the...

  10. One-Dimensional Oscillator in a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amore, Paolo; Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a quantum-mechanical model of two particles that interact by means of a harmonic potential and are confined to a one-dimensional box with impenetrable walls. We apply perturbation theory to the cases of different and equal masses and analyse the symmetry of the states in the latter case. We compare the approximate perturbation results…

  11. One-Dimensional Oscillator in a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amore, Paolo; Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a quantum-mechanical model of two particles that interact by means of a harmonic potential and are confined to a one-dimensional box with impenetrable walls. We apply perturbation theory to the cases of different and equal masses and analyse the symmetry of the states in the latter case. We compare the approximate perturbation results…

  12. Projection optics box

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Malsbury, Terry; Hudyma, Russell M.; Parker, John M.

    2000-01-01

    A projection optics box or assembly for use in an optical assembly, such as in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system using 10-14 nm soft x-ray photons. The projection optics box utilizes a plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors, each mounted on a precision actuator, and which reflects an optical image, such as from a mask, in the EUVL system onto a point of use, such as a target or silicon wafer, the mask, for example, receiving an optical signal from a source assembly, such as a developed from laser system, via a series of highly reflective mirrors of the EUVL system. The plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors are mounted in a housing assembly comprised of a series of bulkheads having wall members secured together to form a unit construction of maximum rigidity. Due to the precision actuators, the mirrors must be positioned precisely and remotely in tip, tilt, and piston (three degrees of freedom), while also providing exact constraint.

  13. Comparative Performance Evaluation of Rainfall-runoff Models, Six of Black-box Type and One of Conceptual Type, From The Galway Flow Forecasting System (gffs) Package, Applied On Two Irish Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, M.; O'Connor, K. M.; Shamseldin, A. Y.

    The "Galway Real-Time River Flow Forecasting System" (GFFS) is a software pack- age developed at the Department of Engineering Hydrology, of the National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. It is based on a selection of lumped black-box and con- ceptual rainfall-runoff models, all developed in Galway, consisting primarily of both the non-parametric (NP) and parametric (P) forms of two black-box-type rainfall- runoff models, namely, the Simple Linear Model (SLM-NP and SLM-P) and the seasonally-based Linear Perturbation Model (LPM-NP and LPM-P), together with the non-parametric wetness-index-based Linearly Varying Gain Factor Model (LVGFM), the black-box Artificial Neural Network (ANN) Model, and the conceptual Soil Mois- ture Accounting and Routing (SMAR) Model. Comprised of the above suite of mod- els, the system enables the user to calibrate each model individually, initially without updating, and it is capable also of producing combined (i.e. consensus) forecasts us- ing the Simple Average Method (SAM), the Weighted Average Method (WAM), or the Artificial Neural Network Method (NNM). The updating of each model output is achieved using one of four different techniques, namely, simple Auto-Regressive (AR) updating, Linear Transfer Function (LTF) updating, Artificial Neural Network updating (NNU), and updating by the Non-linear Auto-Regressive Exogenous-input method (NARXM). The models exhibit a considerable range of variation in degree of complexity of structure, with corresponding degrees of complication in objective func- tion evaluation. Operating in continuous river-flow simulation and updating modes, these models and techniques have been applied to two Irish catchments, namely, the Fergus and the Brosna. A number of performance evaluation criteria have been used to comparatively assess the model discharge forecast efficiency.

  14. Atmospheric photochemical reactivity and ozone production at two sites in Hong Kong: Application of a Master Chemical Mechanism-photochemical box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Z. H.; Guo, H.; Lam, S. H. M.; Saunders, S. M.; Wang, T.

    2014-09-01

    A photochemical box model incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism (v3.2), constrained with a full suite of measurements, was developed to investigate the photochemical reactivity of volatile organic compounds at a semirural site (Mount Tai Mo Shan (TMS)) and an urban site (Tsuen Wan (TW)) in Hong Kong. The levels of ozone (O3) and its precursors, and the magnitudes of the reactivity of O3 precursors, revealed significant differences in the photochemistry at the two sites. Simulated peak hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) mixing ratios were similar at TW and TMS (p = 0.05), while the simulated hydroxyl radical (OH) mixing ratios were much higher at TW (p < 0.05), suggesting different cycling processes between OH and HO2 at the two sites. The higher OH at TW was due to high-NO mixing ratios, which shifted the HOx (OH + HO2) balance toward OH by the propagation of HO2 and alkyl peroxy radicals (RO2) with NO. HOx production was dominated by O3 photolysis at TMS, but at TW, both HCHO and O3 photolyses were found to be major contributors. By contrast, radical-radical reactions governed HOx radical losses at TMS, while at TW, the OH + NO2 reaction was found to dominate in the morning and the radical-radical reactions at noon. Overall, the conversion of NO to NO2 by HO2 dictated the O3 production at the two sites, while O3 destruction was dominated by the OH + NO2 reaction at TW, and at TMS, O3 photolysis and the O3 + HO2 reaction were the major mechanisms. The longer OH chain length at TMS indicated that more O3 was produced for each radical that was generated at this site.

  15. Cell penetrable-mouse forkhead box P3 suppresses type 1 T helper cell-mediated immunity in a murine model of delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Qihong; Yin, Lei; Wu, Weijiang; Xia, Sheng; Shao, Qixiang

    2017-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), which is a transcription factor, has a primary role in the development and function of regulatory T cells, and thus contributes to homeostasis of the immune system. A previous study generated a cell-permeable fusion protein of mouse FOXP3 conjugated to a protein transduction domain (PTD-mFOXP3) that successfully blocked differentiation of type 17 T helper cells in vitro and alleviated experimental arthritis in mice. In the present study, the role of PTD-mFOXP3 in type 1 T helper (Th1) cell-mediated immunity was investigated and the possible mechanisms for its effects were explored. Under Th1 polarization conditions, cluster of differentiation 4+ T cells were treated with PTD-mFOXP3 and analyzed by flow cytometry in vitro, which revealed that PTD-mFOXP3 blocked Th1 differentiation in vitro. Mice models of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions were generated by subcutaneous sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to the ears of mice. PTD-mFOXP3, which was administered via local subcutaneous injection, significantly reduced DTH-induced inflammation, including ear swelling (ear swelling, P<0.001; pinnae weight, P<0.05 or P<0.01 with 0.25 and 1.25 mg/kg PTD-mFOXP3, respectively), infiltration of T cells, and expression of interferon-γ at local inflammatory sites (mRNA level P<0.05) compared with the DTH group. The results of the present study demonstrated that PTD-mFOXP3 may attenuate DTH reactions by suppressing the infiltration and activity of Th1 cells.

  16. Effects of passive dendritic tree properties on the firing dynamics of a leaky-integrate-and-fire neuron.

    PubMed

    Saparov, Abulhair; Schwemmer, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    We study the effects of dendritic tree topology and biophysical properties on the firing dynamics of a leaky-integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron that explicitly includes spiking dynamics. We model the dendrites as a multi-compartment tree with passive dynamics. Owing to the simplicity of the system, we obtain the full analytical solution for the model which we use to derive a lower dimensional return map that captures the complete dynamics of the system. Using the map, we explore how biophysical properties and dendritic tree architecture affect firing dynamics. As was first reported in earlier work by one of the authors, we also find that the addition of the dendritic tree can induce bistability between periodic firing and quiescence. However, we go beyond their results by systematically examining how dendritic tree topology affects the appearance of this bistable behavior. We find that the structure of the dendritic tree can have significant quantitative effects on the bifurcation structure of the system, with branchier topologies tending to promote bistable behavior over unbranched chain topologies. We also show that this effect occurs even when the input conductance at the soma is held fixed, indicating that the topology of the dendritic tree is mainly responsible for this quantitative change in the bifurcation structure. Lastly, we demonstrate how our framework can be used to explore the effect of biophysical properties on the firing dynamics of a neuron with a more complex dendritic tree topology.

  17. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  18. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  19. Leaky ryanodine receptors contribute to diaphragmatic weakness during mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Matecki, Stefan; Dridi, Haikel; Jung, Boris; Saint, Nathalie; Reiken, Steven R.; Scheuermann, Valérie; Mrozek, Ségolène; Umanskaya, Alisa; Petrof, Basil J.; Jaber, Samir; Marks, Andrew R.; Lacampagne, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction (VIDD) refers to the diaphragm muscle weakness that occurs following prolonged controlled mechanical ventilation (MV). The presence of VIDD impedes recovery from respiratory failure. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms accounting for VIDD are still not fully understood. Here, we show in human subjects and a mouse model of VIDD that MV is associated with rapid remodeling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) in the diaphragm. The RyR1 macromolecular complex was oxidized, S-nitrosylated, Ser-2844 phosphorylated, and depleted of the stabilizing subunit calstabin1, following MV. These posttranslational modifications of RyR1 were mediated by both oxidative stress mediated by MV and stimulation of adrenergic signaling resulting from the anesthesia. We demonstrate in the murine model that such abnormal resting SR Ca2+ leak resulted in reduced contractile function and muscle fiber atrophy for longer duration of MV. Treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists or with S107, a small molecule drug that stabilizes the RyR1–calstabin1 interaction, prevented VIDD. Diaphragmatic dysfunction is common in MV patients and is a major cause of failure to wean patients from ventilator support. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge of RyR1 alterations as a proximal mechanism underlying VIDD (i.e., loss of function, muscle atrophy) and identifies RyR1 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27457930

  20. 2. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE, WOODEN BOXES. BOXES ARE LOCATED APPROXIMATELY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE, WOODEN BOXES. BOXES ARE LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 10 YARDS TO THE RIGHT AND DOWNSLOPE OF THE ADIT IN ID-31-F-1. CAMERA IS POINTED EAST-SOUTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Upper Nottingham Mine, West face of Florida Mountain, head of Jacobs Gulch, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  1. Properties of Transmission and Leaky Modes in a Plasmonic Waveguide Constructed by Periodic Subwavelength Metallic Hollow Blocks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin Jei; Wu, Chien Jang; Shen, Jian Qi; Hou, Da Jun; Lo, Wen Chen

    2015-09-25

    Based on the concept of low-frequency spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof SPPs), a kind of leaky mode is proposed in a waveguide made of a subwavelength metal-block array with open slots. Numerical results reveal that a new transmission mode is found in the periodic subwavelength metal open blocks. This modal field is located inside the interior of a hollow block compared with that in a solid metal block array. The dispersion curve shows that such a new SPPs mode has a negative slope, crossing the light line, and then going into a zone of leaky mode at higher frequencies. The leaky mode has a wider frequency bandwidth, and this can lead to a radiation scanning angle of 53° together with high radiation efficiency. Based on the individual characteristics exhibited by a frequency-dependent radiation pattern for the present leaky mode, the waveguide structure can have potential applications such as frequency dividers and demultiplexers. Experimental verification of such a leaky mode at microwave has been performed, and the experimental results are found to be consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  2. Properties of Transmission and Leaky Modes in a Plasmonic Waveguide Constructed by Periodic Subwavelength Metallic Hollow Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jei Wu, Jin; Jang Wu, Chien; Qi Shen, Jian; Hou, Da Jun; Chen Lo, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Based on the concept of low-frequency spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof SPPs), a kind of leaky mode is proposed in a waveguide made of a subwavelength metal-block array with open slots. Numerical results reveal that a new transmission mode is found in the periodic subwavelength metal open blocks. This modal field is located inside the interior of a hollow block compared with that in a solid metal block array. The dispersion curve shows that such a new SPPs mode has a negative slope, crossing the light line, and then going into a zone of leaky mode at higher frequencies. The leaky mode has a wider frequency bandwidth, and this can lead to a radiation scanning angle of 53° together with high radiation efficiency. Based on the individual characteristics exhibited by a frequency-dependent radiation pattern for the present leaky mode, the waveguide structure can have potential applications such as frequency dividers and demultiplexers. Experimental verification of such a leaky mode at microwave has been performed, and the experimental results are found to be consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  3. Properties of Transmission and Leaky Modes in a Plasmonic Waveguide Constructed by Periodic Subwavelength Metallic Hollow Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Jei Wu, Jin; Jang Wu, Chien; Qi Shen, Jian; Hou, Da Jun; Chen Lo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Based on the concept of low-frequency spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof SPPs), a kind of leaky mode is proposed in a waveguide made of a subwavelength metal-block array with open slots. Numerical results reveal that a new transmission mode is found in the periodic subwavelength metal open blocks. This modal field is located inside the interior of a hollow block compared with that in a solid metal block array. The dispersion curve shows that such a new SPPs mode has a negative slope, crossing the light line, and then going into a zone of leaky mode at higher frequencies. The leaky mode has a wider frequency bandwidth, and this can lead to a radiation scanning angle of 53° together with high radiation efficiency. Based on the individual characteristics exhibited by a frequency-dependent radiation pattern for the present leaky mode, the waveguide structure can have potential applications such as frequency dividers and demultiplexers. Experimental verification of such a leaky mode at microwave has been performed, and the experimental results are found to be consistent with the theoretical analysis. PMID:26403387

  4. Leaky gut, microbiota, and cancer: an incoming hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Saggioro, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Multigenic disease development is dependent on both missing and overactivated pathways, just as the homeostasis of our body systems is the product of many complex, redundant mechanisms. The goal of finding a common factor in the disease pathogenesis is difficult, as genetic and pathophysiological data are still incomplete, and the individual variability is enormous. Nevertheless, the examination of the role of human microbiota in illnesses using animal models of human diseases reared in defined (gnotobiotic) conditions could allow insight into the unusual complexity of the mechanisms involved in the initiation and maintenance of chronic diseases, including cancer. Although the most important findings in this fascinating field are still to come, a hypothesis, which is more than speculative, can be made, as it is clear that our bacterial companions affect our fates more than previously assumed.

  5. DLESE Teaching Box Pilot Project: Developing a Replicable Model for Collaboratively Creating Innovative Instructional Sequences Using Exemplary Resources in the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingroff, M.

    2004-12-01

    Before the advent of digital libraries, it was difficult for teachers to find suitable high-quality resources to use in their teaching. Digital libraries such as DLESE have eased the task by making high quality resources more easily accessible and providing search mechanisms that allow teachers to 'fine tune' the criteria over which they search. Searches tend to return lists of resources with some contextualizing information. However, teachers who are teaching 'out of discipline' or who have minimal training in science often need additional support to know how to use and sequence them. The Teaching Box Pilot Project was developed to address these concerns, bringing together educators, scientists, and instructional designers in a partnership to build an online framework to fully support innovative units of instruction about the Earth system. Each box integrates DLESE resources and activities, teaching tips, standards, concepts, teaching outcomes, reviews, and assessment information. Online templates and best practice guidelines are being developed that will enable teachers to create their own boxes or customize existing ones. Two boxes have been developed so far, one on weather for high school students, and one on the evidence for plate tectonics for middle schoolers. The project has met with significant enthusiasm and interest, and we hope to expand it by involving individual teachers, school systems, pre-service programs, and universities in the development and use of teaching boxes. A key ingredient in the project's success has been the close collaboration between the partners, each of whom has brought unique experiences, perspectives, knowledge, and skills to the project. This first effort involved teachers in the San Francisco Bay area, the University of California Museum of Paleontology, San Francisco State University, U.S. Geological Survey, and DLESE. This poster will allow participants to explore one of the teaching boxes. We will discuss how the boxes were

  6. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets.

    PubMed

    Cartes, David A; Ray, Laura R; Collier, Robert D

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. ["Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection," Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields.

  7. A General Solution for Groundwater Flow in Estuarine Leaky Aquifer System with Considering Aquifer Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chia; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the urban and industrial developments near the coastal area are rapid and therefore the associated population grows dramatically. More and more water demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on heavy pumping in coastal area. The decline of groundwater table may result in the problems of seawater intrusion and/or land subsidence. Since the 1950s, numerous studies focused on the effect of tidal fluctuation on the groundwater flow in the coastal area. Many studies concentrated on the developments of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) analytical solutions describing the tide-induced head fluctuations. For example, Jacob (1950) derived an analytical solution of 1D groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with a boundary condition subject to sinusoidal oscillation. Jiao and Tang (1999) derived a 1D analytical solution of a leaky confined aquifer by considered a constant groundwater head in the overlying unconfined aquifer. Jeng et al. (2002) studied the tidal propagation in a coupled unconfined and confined costal aquifer system. Sun (1997) presented a 2D solution for groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary. Tang and Jiao (2001) derived a 2D analytical solution in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water. This study aims at developing a general analytical solution describing the head fluctuations in a 2D estuarine aquifer system consisted of an unconfined aquifer, a confined aquifer, and an aquitard between them. Both the confined and unconfined aquifers are considered to be anisotropic. The predicted head fluctuations from this solution will compare with the simulation results from the MODFLOW program. In addition, the solutions mentioned above will be shown to be special cases of the present solution. Some hypothetical cases regarding the head fluctuation in costal aquifers will be made to investigate the dynamic effects of water table fluctuation, hydrogeological conditions, and

  8. More box codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    A new investigation shows that, starting from the BCH (21,15;3) code represented as a 7 x 3 matrix and adding a row and column to add even parity, one obtains an 8 x 4 matrix (32,15;8) code. An additional dimension is obtained by specifying odd parity on the rows and even parity on the columns, i.e., adjoining to the 8 x 4 matrix, the matrix, which is zero except for the fourth column (of all ones). Furthermore, any seven rows and three columns will form the BCH (21,15;3) code. This box code has the same weight structure as the quadratic residue and BCH codes of the same dimensions. Whether there exists an algebraic isomorphism to either code is as yet unknown.

  9. ACYSYS in a box

    SciTech Connect

    Briegel, C.; Finstrom, D.; Hendricks, B.; King, C.; Lackey, S.; Neswold, R.; Nicklaus, D.; Patrick, J.; Petrov, A.; Rechenmacher, R.; Schumann, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    The Accelerator Control System at Fermilab has evolved to enable this relatively large control system to be encapsulated into a 'box' such as a laptop. The goal was to provide a platform isolated from the 'online' control system. This platform can be used internally for making major upgrades and modifications without impacting operations. It also provides a standalone environment for research and development including a turnkey control system for collaborators. Over time, the code base running on Scientific Linux has enabled all the salient features of the Fermilab's control system to be captured in an off-the-shelf laptop. The anticipated additional benefits of packaging the system include improved maintenance, reliability, documentation, and future enhancements.

  10. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema

    Christophersen, Jon

    2016-07-12

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  11. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Christophersen, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  12. Fast box-counting algorithm on GPU.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J; Ruiz de Miras, J

    2012-12-01

    The box-counting algorithm is one of the most widely used methods for calculating the fractal dimension (FD). The FD has many image analysis applications in the biomedical field, where it has been used extensively to characterize a wide range of medical signals. However, computing the FD for large images, especially in 3D, is a time consuming process. In this paper we present a fast parallel version of the box-counting algorithm, which has been coded in CUDA for execution on the Graphic Processing Unit (GPU). The optimized GPU implementation achieved an average speedup of 28 times (28×) compared to a mono-threaded CPU implementation, and an average speedup of 7 times (7×) compared to a multi-threaded CPU implementation. The performance of our improved box-counting algorithm has been tested with 3D models with different complexity, features and sizes. The validity and accuracy of the algorithm has been confirmed using models with well-known FD values. As a case study, a 3D FD analysis of several brain tissues has been performed using our GPU box-counting algorithm.

  13. Leaky unstable modes and electromagnetic radiation amplification by an anisotropic plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.

    2015-09-15

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and a photoionized plasma slab with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution is studied. It is shown that the fields of leaky modes are amplified due to the development of aperiodic instability in the slab, which leads to an increase in both the reflected and transmitted fields. The transmitted field can significantly increase only if the slab thickness does not exceed the ratio of the speed of light to the electron plasma frequency, whereas there is no upper bound on the slab thickness for the reflected signal to be amplified.

  14. JCMmode: an adaptive finite element solver for the computation of leaky modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschiedrich, Lin W.; Burger, Sven; Klose, Roland; Schaedle, Achim; Schmidt, Frank

    2005-03-01

    We present our simulation tool JCMmode for calculating propagating modes of an optical waveguide. As ansatz functions we use higher order, vectorial elements (Nedelec elements, edge elements). Further we construct transparent boundary conditions to deal with leaky modes even for problems with inhomogeneous exterior domains as for integrated hollow core Arrow waveguides. We have implemented an error estimator which steers the adaptive mesh refinement. This allows the precise computation of singularities near the metal's corner of a Plasmon-Polariton waveguide even for irregular shaped metal films on a standard personal computer.

  15. Diamond photonic crystal slab: leaky modes and modified photoluminescence emission of surface-deposited quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ondič, Lukáš; Babchenko, Oleg; Varga, Marián; Kromka, Alexander; Ctyroký, Jiří; Pelant, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Detailed analysis of a band diagram of a photonic crystal (PhC) slab prepared on a nano-diamond layer is presented. Even though the PhC is structurally imperfect, the existence of leaky modes, determined both theoretically and experimentally in the broad spectral region, implies that an efficient light interaction with a material periodicity occurs in the sample. It is shown that the luminescence emission spectrum of a light source placed directly on the PhC surface can be modified by employing the optical modes of the studied structure. We stress also the impact of intrinsic optical losses of the nano-diamond on this modification.

  16. Can the progressive increase of C₄ bundle sheath leakiness at low PFD be explained by incomplete suppression of photorespiration?

    PubMed

    Kromdijk, Johannes; Griffiths, Howard; Schepers, Hans E

    2010-11-01

    The ability to concentrate CO₂ around Rubisco allows C₄ crops to suppress photorespiration. However, as phosphoenolpyruvate regeneration requires ATP, the energetic efficiency of the C₄ pathway at low photosynthetic flux densities (PFD) becomes a balancing act between primary fixation and concentration of CO₂ in mesophyll (M) cells, and CO₂ reduction in bundle sheath (BS) cells. At low PFD, retro-diffusion of CO₂ from BS cells, relative to the rate of bicarbonate fixation in M cells (termed leakiness φ), is known to increase. This paper investigates whether this increase in ϕ could be explained by incomplete inhibition of photorespiration. The PFD response of φ was measured at various O₂ partial pressures in young Zea mays plants grown at 250 (LL) and 750 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹ PFD (HL). φ increased at low PFD and was positively correlated with O₂ partial pressure. Low PFD during growth caused BS conductance and interveinal distance to be lower in the LL plants, compared to the HL plants, which correlated with lower φ. Model analysis showed that incomplete inhibition of photorespiration, especially in the HL plants, and an increase in the relative contribution of mitochondrial respiration at low PFD could explain the observed increases in φ.

  17. An efficient hexagonal switched beam antenna structure based on Fabry-Perot cavity leaky-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymen El Cafsi, Mohamed; Nedil, Mourad; Osman, Lotfi; Gharsallah, Ali

    2015-11-01

    A novel design of switched beam antenna (SBA) system based on Fabry-Perot cavity leaky-wave antenna (FPC LWA) is designed and fabricated for base station operating in the unlicensed ISM central frequency band at 5.8 GHz of the wireless local area network (WLAN) standard. The proposed SBA is designed with hexagonal shape of FPC LWA Arrays in order to get 360° of coverage. The single element of FPC LWA array is composed of a patch antenna and covered by a Partially Reflective Surface (PRS), which is composed of a Metal Strip Grating and printed on a high permittivity Superstrate. First, the Transmission Line Model of FPC LWA is introduced to analyse and calculate the far-field components in E- and H planes by using the Transverse Equivalent Network. This approach is then compared with other full wave's commercial software such as Ansoft HFSS and CST Microwave Studio. Second, a parametric study is performed to evaluate the effect of the angle formed by the two successive FPC LWA on the radiation efficiency of the activate sector. To examine the performance of the proposed SBA, experimental prototype was fabricated and measured. As a result, multiple orthogonal beams (six beams) of 10 dBi of gain with low Side Lobes Level and 360° of coverage are produced. This SBA structure is suitable for WLAN communication systems.

  18. Being Creative "Inside the Box"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomascoff, Rocky

    2011-01-01

    Artist Joseph Cornell (1903-1972) created wonderful environments inside boxes using mostly found objects. They were often Surrealistic in nature. Some boxes were designed with glass fronts, and others were meant to be interactive with the viewer, wherein the objects could be handled. With Joseph Cornell in mind, the author introduces an art…

  19. Cardboard Boxes: Learning Concepts Galore!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Laverne; Wilmoth, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Mrs. Keenan, a preschool teacher, observed her 3-year-old granddaughter Riley pull, tug, and stack piles of holiday boxes on the floor. She remembered that her child care director had suggested using boxes as a curriculum theme, but she hadn't given much thought about the idea until now. She said to herself, "I wonder if my children would be as…

  20. What Makes a Better Box?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Richard; Everett, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Every morning, many Americans start their day with a bowl of cereal. Some spend time while they eat breakfast reading the back of the cereal box, but few consider its size, shape, and construction, or realize that it was designed by an engineer. This article describes a lesson in which students design, build, and critique cereal boxes. The lesson…