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Sample records for leaky buildings isolation

  1. Neural and Cognitive Modeling with Networks of Leaky Integrator Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graben, Peter beim; Liebscher, Thomas; Kurths, Jürgen

    After reviewing several physiological findings on oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and their possible explanations by dynamical modeling, we present neural networks consisting of leaky integrator units as a universal paradigm for neural and cognitive modeling. In contrast to standard recurrent neural networks, leaky integrator units are described by ordinary differential equations living in continuous time. We present an algorithm to train the temporal behavior of leaky integrator networks by generalized back-propagation and discuss their physiological relevance. Eventually, we show how leaky integrator units can be used to build oscillators that may serve as models of brain oscillations and cognitive processes.

  2. Isolating The Building Thermal Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrje, D. T.; Dutt, G. S.; Gadsby, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The evaluation of the thermal integrity of building envelopes by infrared scanning tech-niques is often hampered in mild weather because temperature differentials across the envelope are small. Combining the infrared scanning with positive or negative building pressures, induced by a "blower door" or the building ventilation system, considerably extends the periods during which meaningful diagnostics can be conducted. Although missing or poorly installed insulation may lead to a substantial energy penalty, it is the search for air leakage sites that often has the largest potential for energy savings. Infrared inspection of the attic floor with air forced from the occupied space through ceiling by-passes, and inspecting the interior of the building when outside air is being sucked through the envelope reveals unexpected leakage sites. Portability of the diagnostic equipment is essential in these surveys which may include access into some tight spaces. A catalog of bypass heat losses that have been detected in residential housing using the combined infrared pressure differential technique is included to point out the wide variety of leakage sites which may compromise the benefits of thermal insulation and allow excessive air infiltration. Detection and suppression of such leaks should be key items in any building energy audit program. Where a calibrated blower door is used to pressurize or evacuate the house, the leakage rate can be quantified and an excessively tight house recognized. Houses that are too tight may be improved with a minimal energy penalty by forced ventilation,preferably with a heat recuperator and/or by providing combustion air directly to the furnace.

  3. Characterization of leaky faults

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao

    1990-05-01

    Leaky faults provide a flow path for fluids to move underground. It is very important to characterize such faults in various engineering projects. The purpose of this work is to develop mathematical solutions for this characterization. The flow of water in an aquifer system and the flow of air in the unsaturated fault-rock system were studied. If the leaky fault cuts through two aquifers, characterization of the fault can be achieved by pumping water from one of the aquifers, which are assumed to be horizontal and of uniform thickness. Analytical solutions have been developed for two cases of either a negligibly small or a significantly large drawdown in the unpumped aquifer. Some practical methods for using these solutions are presented. 45 refs., 72 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Isolated galaxies: residual of primordial building blocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletta, G.; Rodighiero, G.; Bettoni, D.; Moles, M.; Varela, J.

    2006-09-01

    Context: .The mass assembly is believed to be the dominant process of early galaxy formation. This mechanism of galaxy building can proceed either by repeated major mergers with other systems, or by means of accretion of matter from the surrounding regions. Aims: .In this paper we compare the properties of local disk galaxies that appear isolated, i.e., not tidally affected by other galaxies during the last few Gyr within the volume given by cz≤ 5000 km s-1, with those galaxies at z values from 0.25 to 5. Methods: .Effective radii for 203 isolated galaxies and 1645 galaxies from the RC3 have been collected and the two samples have been analyzed statistically. A similar comparison has been made with half light radii studied at high z from the literature. Results: .We found that isolated galaxies are, in general, smaller than other present epoch galaxies from the RC3. We notice the lack of systems larger than 7 kpc among them. Their size distribution appears to be similar to that of galaxies at 1.4 ≤ z ≤ 2. The models of the merging history also indicate that the isolated galaxies did stop their merging process at about that redshift, evolving passively since then. The galaxy density seems to have remained unchanged since that epoch Conclusions: .Isolated galaxies appear to be the end products of the merging process, as proposed by the hierarchical accretion scenario at around z=1.4. For this class of galaxies, this was the last significant merging event in their lives, and they have evolved passively since then. This is confirmed by the analytical estimate of the merging fraction with z and by the comparison with sizes of distant galaxies.

  5. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  6. Multi-axial active isolation for seismic protection of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming

    Structural control technology has been widely accepted as an effective means for the protection of structures against seismic hazards. Passive base isolation is one of the common structural control techniques used to enhance the performance of structures subjected to severe earthquake excitations. Isolation bearings employed at the base of a structure naturally increase its flexibility, but concurrently result in large base displacements. The combination of base isolation with active control, i.e., active base isolation, creates the possibility of achieving a balanced level of control performance, reducing both floor accelerations as well as base displacements. Many theoretical papers have been written by researchers regarding active base isolation, and a few experiments have been performed to verify these theories; however, challenges in appropriately scaling the structural system and modeling the complex nature of control-structure interaction have limited the applicability of these results. Moreover, most experiments only focus on the implementation of active base isolation under unidirectional excitations. Earthquakes are intrinsically multi-dimensional, resulting in out-of-plane responses, including torsional responses. Therefore, an active isolation system for buildings using multi-axial active control devices against multi-directional excitations must be considered. The focus of this dissertation is the development and experimental verification of active isolation strategies for multi-story buildings subjected to bi-directional earthquake loadings. First, a model building is designed to match the characteristics of a representative full-scale structure. The selected isolation bearings feature low friction and high vertical stiffness, providing stable behavior. In the context of the multi-dimensional response control, three, custom-manufactured actuators are employed to mitigate both in-plane and out-of-plane responses. To obtain a high-fidelity model of the

  7. Diseases associated with leaky hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; Reyes, Edison P.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo; Martínez, Agustín D.; González, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Hemichannels (HCs) and gap junction channels (GJCs) formed by protein subunits called connexins (Cxs) are major pathways for intercellular communication. While HCs connect the intracellular compartment with the extracellular milieu, GJCs allow the interchange of molecules between cytoplasm of two contacting cells. Under physiological conditions, HCs are mostly closed, but they can open under certain stimuli allowing the release of autocrine and paracrine molecules. Moreover, some pathological conditions, like ischemia or other inflammation conditions, significantly increase HCs activity. In addition, some mutations in Cx genes associated with human diseases, such as deafness or cataracts, lead to the formation of more active HCs or “leaky HCs.” In this article we will revise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the appearance of leaky HCs, and the consequences of their expression in different cellular systems and animal models, in seeking a common pattern or pathological mechanism of disease. PMID:26283912

  8. Numerical simulation of seismic response of a base isolated building with low shear modulus rubber isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes seismic-response simulations of a base-isolated building subjected to actual earthquakes using the 3-D computer program, SISEC, developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The isolation system consists of six medium shape factor, high damping, and low shear modulus rubber bearings. To ensure the accuracy of analytical simulation, recorded data of full-size reinforced concrete structures located in Sendai, Japan are used as the benchmarks for comparisons of numerical simulations with observations. Results obtained from both analytical simulations and earthquake observations indicate that the advantage of base isolation in mitigating the acceleration of superstructure is very pronounced. For the two representative earthquakes, one had the strongest ground motion and the other one had similar magnitudes as the rest of the earthquakes recorded at the test site, the simulated accelerations at the roof level of the isolated building are about 20% to 30% of the ordinary building accelerations. Also, results reveal that for both ordinary and base-isolated buildings the computed accelerations agree reasonably well with those recorded.

  9. Numerical simulation of seismic response of a base isolated building with low shear modulus rubber isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes seismic-response simulations of a base-isolated building subjected to actual earthquakes using the 3-D computer program, SISEC, developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The isolation system consists of six medium shape factor, high damping, and low shear modulus rubber bearings. To ensure the accuracy of analytical simulation, recorded data of full-size reinforced concrete structures located in Sendai, Japan are used as the benchmarks for comparisons of numerical simulations with observations. Results obtained from both analytical simulations and earthquake observations indicate that the advantage of base isolation in mitigating the acceleration of superstructure is very pronounced. For the two representative earthquakes, one had the strongest ground motion and the other one had similar magnitudes as the rest of the earthquakes recorded at the test site, the simulated accelerations at the roof level of the isolated building are about 20% to 30% of the ordinary building accelerations. Also, results reveal that for both ordinary and base-isolated buildings the computed accelerations agree reasonably well with those recorded.

  10. Spring tube braces for seismic isolation of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayel, V.; Yuksel, Ercan; Gokce, T.; Sahin, F.

    2017-01-01

    A new low-cost seismic isolation system based on spring tube bracings has been proposed and studied at the Structural and Earthquake Engineering Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. Multiple compression-type springs are positioned in a special cylindrical tube to obtain a symmetrical response in tension and compression-type axial loading. An isolation floor, which consists of pin-ended steel columns and spring tube bracings, is constructed at the foundation level or any intermediate level of the building. An experimental campaign with three stages was completed to evaluate the capability of the system. First, the behavior of the spring tubes subjected to axial displacement reversals with varying frequencies was determined. In the second phase, the isolation floor was assessed in the quasi-static tests. Finally, a ¼ scaled 3D steel frame was tested on the shake table using actual acceleration records. The transmitted acceleration to the floor levels is greatly diminished because of the isolation story, which effects longer period and higher damping. There are no stability and self-centering problems in the isolation floor.

  11. Secondary metabolites from Penicillium corylophilum isolated from damp buildings.

    PubMed

    McMullin, David R; Nsiama, Tienabe K; Miller, J David

    2014-01-01

    Indoor exposure to the spores and mycelial fragments of fungi that grow on damp building materials can result in increased non-atopic asthma and upper respiratory disease. The mechanism appears to involve exposure to low doses of fungal metabolites. Penicillium corylophilum is surprisingly common in damp buildings in USA, Canada and western Europe. We examined isolates of P. corylophilum geographically distributed across Canada in the first comprehensive study of secondary metabolites of this fungus. The sesquiterpene phomenone, the meroterpenoids citreohybridonol and andrastin A, koninginin A, E and G, three new alpha pyrones and four new isochromans were identified from extracts of culture filtrates. This is the first report of koninginins, meroterpenoids and alpha pyrones from P. corylophilum. These secondary metabolite data support the removal of P. corylophilum from Penicillium section Citrina and suggest that further taxonomic studies are required on this species.

  12. Retrofitting Heritage Buildings by Strengthening or Using Seismic Isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Moshe; Bloch, Jacob; Ribakov, Yuri

    2008-07-01

    Many heritage buildings in the Mediterranean area include stone domes as a structural and architectural element. Present stage of these buildings often requires strengthening or retrofitting in order to increase their seismic resistance. Strengthening is possible by casting above existing dome a thin reinforced concrete shell with a support ring. It yields reduction of stresses and strains in the dome. This paper deals with examples of actual restoration and strengthening of three structures in Georgia, two of them damaged by an earthquake in 1991, (a temple in Nikortzminda and a synagogue in Oni, built in 11th and 19r century, respectively) and a mosque in Akhaltzikhe, built in 18th century. Retrofitting of these structures was aimed at preservation of initial geometry and appearance by creating composite (stone—reinforced concrete, or stone—shotcrete) structures, which were partially or fully hidden. Further improving of seismic response may be achieved by using hybrid seismic isolation decreasing the seismic forces and adding damping. A brief description of the design procedure for such cases is presented.

  13. Retrofitting Heritage Buildings by Strengthening or Using Seismic Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Danieli, Moshe; Bloch, Jacob; Ribakov, Yuri

    2008-07-08

    Many heritage buildings in the Mediterranean area include stone domes as a structural and architectural element. Present stage of these buildings often requires strengthening or retrofitting in order to increase their seismic resistance. Strengthening is possible by casting above existing dome a thin reinforced concrete shell with a support ring. It yields reduction of stresses and strains in the dome. This paper deals with examples of actual restoration and strengthening of three structures in Georgia, two of them damaged by an earthquake in 1991, (a temple in Nikortzminda and a synagogue in Oni, built in 11{sup th} and 19{sup r} century, respectively) and a mosque in Akhaltzikhe, built in 18th century. Retrofitting of these structures was aimed at preservation of initial geometry and appearance by creating composite (stone--reinforced concrete, or stone--shotcrete) structures, which were partially or fully hidden. Further improving of seismic response may be achieved by using hybrid seismic isolation decreasing the seismic forces and adding damping. A brief description of the design procedure for such cases is presented.

  14. Improving Station Performance by Building Isolation Walls in the Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yan; Horn, Nikolaus; Leohardt, Roman

    2014-05-01

    Conrad Observatory is situated far away from roads and industrial areas on the Trafelberg in Lower Austria. At the end of the seismic tunnel, the main seismic instrument of the Observatory with a station code CONA is located. This station is one of the most important seismic stations in the Austrian Seismic Network (network code OE). The seismic observatory consists of a 145m long gallery and an underground laboratory building with several working areas. About 25 meters away from the station CONA, six temporary seismic stations were implemented for research purposes. Two of them were installed with the same equipment as CONA, while the remaining four stations were set up with digitizers having lower noise and higher resolution (Q330HR) and sensors with the same type (STS-2). In order to prevent possible disturbances by air pressure and temperature fluctuation, three walls were built inside of the tunnel. The first wall is located ca 63 meters from the tunnel entrance, while a set of double walls with a distance of 1.5 meters is placed about 53 meters from the first isolation wall but between the station CONA and the six temporary stations. To assess impact of the isolation walls on noise reduction and detection performance, investigations are conducted in two steps. The first study is carried out by comparing the noise level and detection performance between the station CONA behind the double walls and the stations in front of the double walls for verifying the noise isolation by the double walls. To evaluate the effect of the single wall, station noise level and detection performance were studied by comparing the results before and after the installation of the wall. Results and discussions will be presented. Additional experiment is conducted by filling insulation material inside of the aluminium boxes of the sensors (above and around the sensors). This should help us to determine an optimal insulation of the sensors with respect to pressure and temperature

  15. Analysis of the seismic performance of isolated buildings according to life-cycle cost.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yu; Han, Jian-Ping; Li, Yong-Tao

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an indicator of seismic performance based on life-cycle cost of a building. It is expressed as a ratio of lifetime damage loss to life-cycle cost and determines the seismic performance of isolated buildings. Major factors are considered, including uncertainty in hazard demand and structural capacity, initial costs, and expected loss during earthquakes. Thus, a high indicator value indicates poor building seismic performance. Moreover, random vibration analysis is conducted to measure structural reliability and evaluate the expected loss and life-cycle cost of isolated buildings. The expected loss of an actual, seven-story isolated hospital building is only 37% of that of a fixed-base building. Furthermore, the indicator of the structural seismic performance of the isolated building is much lower in value than that of the structural seismic performance of the fixed-base building. Therefore, isolated buildings are safer and less risky than fixed-base buildings. The indicator based on life-cycle cost assists owners and engineers in making investment decisions in consideration of structural design, construction, and expected loss. It also helps optimize the balance between building reliability and building investment.

  16. Analysis of the Seismic Performance of Isolated Buildings according to Life-Cycle Cost

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yu; Han, Jian-ping; Li, Yong-tao

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an indicator of seismic performance based on life-cycle cost of a building. It is expressed as a ratio of lifetime damage loss to life-cycle cost and determines the seismic performance of isolated buildings. Major factors are considered, including uncertainty in hazard demand and structural capacity, initial costs, and expected loss during earthquakes. Thus, a high indicator value indicates poor building seismic performance. Moreover, random vibration analysis is conducted to measure structural reliability and evaluate the expected loss and life-cycle cost of isolated buildings. The expected loss of an actual, seven-story isolated hospital building is only 37% of that of a fixed-base building. Furthermore, the indicator of the structural seismic performance of the isolated building is much lower in value than that of the structural seismic performance of the fixed-base building. Therefore, isolated buildings are safer and less risky than fixed-base buildings. The indicator based on life-cycle cost assists owners and engineers in making investment decisions in consideration of structural design, construction, and expected loss. It also helps optimize the balance between building reliability and building investment. PMID:25653677

  17. Genetic and biochemical characterization of periplasmic-leaky mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaroni, J C; Portalier, R C

    1981-01-01

    Periplasmic-leaky mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 were isolated after nitrosoguanidine-induced mutagenesis. They released periplasmic enzymes into the extracellular medium. Excretion of alkaline phosphatase, which started immediately in the early exponential phase of growth, could reach up to 90% of the total enzyme production in the stationary phase. Leaky mutants were sensitive to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, cholic acid, and the antibiotics rifampin, chloramphenicol, mitomycin C, and ampicillin. Furthermore, they were resistant to colicin E1 and partially resistant to phage TuLa. Their genetic characterization showed that the lky mutations mapped between the suc and gal markers, near or in the tolPAB locus. A biochemical analysis of cell envelope components showed that periplasmic-leaky mutants contained reduced amounts of major outer membrane protein OmpF and increased amounts of a 16,000-dalton outer membrane protein. Images PMID:7009581

  18. Laser mode control using leaky plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjević, B. Z.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    The evolution and propagation of a non-Gaussian laser pulse in matched parabolic channels as well as leaky channels are investigated. It has previously been shown for a Gaussian pulse that matched guiding can be achieved using such channels. In the low power regime, analytical work demonstrates that, for multi-mode pulses, there is significant transverse beating. The interaction between different modes may have an adverse effect on the laser pulse as it propagates through the primary channel, in which plasma wakefield acceleration of the electron beam is to occur, and this effect can be shown in numerical simulations of high-power laser-plasma interactions. To improve guiding of the pulse, we propose using leaky channels. Higher order mode content is minimized through the leaky channel, while the fundamental mode remains well-guided. In addition to numerical simulations, it can be qualitatively shown, through the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method and the Source Dependent Expansion (SDE) analysis, that in finite channels, higher order modes either leak out or transfer energy to the fundamental. In conclusion, an idealized plasma filter based on leaky channels is found to filter out the higher order modes and leave a near-Gaussian profile before the pulse enters the primary channel.

  19. Scattering Matrices and Conductances of Leaky Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnueli, A.

    1994-04-01

    Leaky tori are two-dimensional surfaces that extend to infinity but which have finite area. It is a tempting idea to regard them as models of mesoscopic systems connected to very long leads. Because of this analogy-scattering matrices on leaky tori are potentially interesting, and indeed-the scattering matrix on one such object-"the" leaky torus-was studied by M. Gutzwiller, who showed that it has chaotic behavior. M. Antoine, A. Comtet and S. Ouvry generalized Gutzwiller‧s result by calculating the scattering matrix in the presence of a constant magnetic field B perpendicular to the surface. Motivated by these results-we generalize them further. We define scattering matrices for spinless electrons on a general leaky torus in the presence of a constant magnetic field "perpendicular" to the surface. From the properties of these matrices we show the following: (a) For integer values of B, Tij (the transition probability from cusp i to cusp j), and hence also the Büttiker conductances of the surfaces, are B-independent (this cannot be interpreted as a kind of Aharonov-Bohm effect since a magnetic force is acting on the electrons). (b) The Wigner time-delay is a monotonically increasing function of B.

  20. Successful performance of a base-isolated hospital building during the 17 January 1994 northridge earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the response records and thereby the performance of the base-isolated University of Southern California (USC) hospital building during the Ms = 6-8 Northridge (California) earthquake of 17 January 1994. The data retrieved from the building is the first set of data from any base-isolated building that (a) was tested to acceleration levels at the free-field similar to the zero period acceleration (ZPA) level postulated in the seismic design criteria of the building and (b) exhibits levels of relative displacement excursions which puts the isolators into the nonlinear range. The variation of the fundamental frequency as a function of changing instantaneous stiffness of the isolators is identifiable. During the shaking, the isolators (a) performed well and, having attained up to 10% hysteretic damping, effectively dissipated the incoming energy of motions and (b) reduced the drift ratios of the superstructure of the building to a maximum of 10% of the allowable, which should explain the fact that there was no damage to the structure or its contents. The primary conclusion of this study is that this base-isolated building performed well during the Northridge earthquake of 17 January 1994 when only approximately 10% of the displacement capability of the isolators were utilized. Therefore, there is every reason to believe that the building will perform well during future earthquakes in the region.

  1. Carrying BioMath education in a Leaky Bucket.

    PubMed

    Powell, James A; Kohler, Brynja R; Haefner, James W; Bodily, Janice

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a project-based mathematical lab implemented in our Applied Mathematics in Biology course. The Leaky Bucket Lab allows students to parameterize and test Torricelli's law and develop and compare their own alternative models to describe the dynamics of water draining from perforated containers. In the context of this lab students build facility in a variety of applied biomathematical tools and gain confidence in applying these tools in data-driven environments. We survey analytic approaches developed by students to illustrate the creativity this encourages as well as prepare other instructors to scaffold the student learning experience. Pedagogical results based on classroom videography support the notion that the Biology-Applied Math Instructional Model, the teaching framework encompassing the lab, is effective in encouraging and maintaining high-level cognition among students. Research-based pedagogical approaches that support the lab are discussed.

  2. Leaky Waves in Metamaterials for Antenna Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Approximate formula (Equation (127)) vs numerical results. 6 Conclusions, Publications, and Significant Events In this final report, we first review ... dielectric constant, which makes the discussion more general . Tamir and Kou claim that there are eight different leaky-wave fields guided by an asymmetric...discusses the proposed new Sommerfeld integral path and addresses two numerical issues associated with Sommerfeld integral that are generally overlooked by

  3. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  4. Effects Of Leaky Sewers On Groundwater Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Oswald, S. E.; Schirmer, M.

    2007-12-01

    The impact of urban areas on groundwater quality has become an emerging research field in hydrogeology. Urban subsurface infrastructures like sewer networks are often leaky, so untreated wastewater may enter the urban aquifer. The transport of wastewater into the groundwater is still not well understood under field conditions. In the research platform WASSER Leipzig (Water And Sewershed Study of Environmental Risk in Leipzig- Germany) the effects of leaky sewers on the groundwater quality are investigated. The research is focused on the occurrence and transport of so-called "xenobiotics" such as pharmaceuticals and personal care product additives. Xenobiotics may pose a threat on human health, but can also be considered a marker for an urban impact on water resources. A new test site was established in Leipzig to quantify mass fluxes of xenobiotics into the groundwater from a leaky sewer. Corresponding to the leaks which were detected by closed circuit television inspections, monitoring wells were installed up- and downstream of the sewer. Concentrations of eight xenobiotics (technical-nonylphenol, bisphenol-a, caffeine, galaxolide, tonalide, carbamazepine, phenazone, ethinylestradiol) obtained from first sampling programmes were found to be highly heterogeneous, but a relation between the position of the sampling points and the sewer could not be clearly identified. However, concentrations of sodium, chloride, potassium and nitrate increased significantly downstream of the sewer which may be due to wastewater exfiltration, since no other source is known on the water flowpath from the upstream to the downstream wells. Because of the highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of xenobiotics at the test site, a monitoring concept was developed comprising both high-resolution sampling and an integral approach to obtain representative average concentrations. Direct-push techniques were used to gain insight into the fine-scale spatial distribution of the target compounds

  5. Modeling the behavior of an earthquake base-isolated building.

    SciTech Connect

    Coveney, V. A.; Jamil, S.; Johnson, D. E.; Kulak, R. F.; Uras, R. A.

    1997-11-26

    Protecting a structure against earthquake excitation by supporting it on laminated elastomeric bearings has become a widely accepted practice. The ability to perform accurate simulation of the system, including FEA of the bearings, would be desirable--especially for key installations. In this paper attempts to model the behavior of elastomeric earthquake bearings are outlined. Attention is focused on modeling highly-filled, low-modulus, high-damping elastomeric isolator systems; comparisons are made between standard triboelastic solid model predictions and test results.

  6. Simpson's Paradox in the Interpretation of "Leaky Pipeline" Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Paul H.; Walton, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional "leaky pipeline" plots are widely used to inform gender equality policy and practice. Herein, we demonstrate how a statistical phenomenon known as Simpson's paradox can obscure trends in gender "leaky pipeline" plots. Our approach has been to use Excel spreadsheets to generate hypothetical "leaky…

  7. Leaky wave lenses for spoof plasmon collimation.

    PubMed

    Panaretos, Anastasios H; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-06-27

    We theoretically demonstrate the feasibility of collimating radiating spoof plasmons using a leaky wave lens approach. Spoof plasmons are surface waves excited along reactance surfaces realized through metallic corrugations. By employing a periodic perturbation to the geometric profile of this type of reactance surface, it becomes feasible to convert the excited spoof plasmons into free-space radiating leaky wave modes. It is demonstrated that by structurally modifying such a corrugated surface through the introduction of a non-uniform sinusoidally modulated reactance profile, then a tapered wavenumber, with a real part less than that of free space, can be established along the surface. In this way the radiating properties of the structure (amplitude and phase) can be locally controlled thereby creating a radiating effect similar to that of a non-uniform current distribution. By properly engineering the space dependent wavenumber along the corrugated surface, different regions of the structure will emit spoof plasmon energy at different angles with varying intensity. The combined effect is the emission of an electromagnetic wave exhibiting a converging wave-front that eventually collimates spoof plasmon energy at some desired focal point.

  8. Response of high-rise and base-isolated buildings to a hypothetical mw 7.0 blind thrust earthquake.

    PubMed

    Heaton, T H; Hall, J F; Wald, D J; Halling, M W

    1995-01-13

    High-rise flexible-frame buildings are commonly considered to be resistant to shaking from the largest earthquakes. In addition, base isolation has become increasingly popular for critical buildings that should still function after an earthquake. How will these two types of buildings perform if a large earthquake occurs beneath a metropolitan area? To answer this question, we simulated the near-source ground motions of a M(w) 7.0 thrust earthquake and then mathematically modeled the response of a 20-story steel-frame building and a 3-story base-isolated building. The synthesized ground motions were characterized by large displacement pulses (up to 2 meters) and large ground velocities. These ground motions caused large deformation and possible collapse of the frame building, and they required exceptional measures in the design of the base-isolated building if it was to remain functional.

  9. Breakthroughs in Low-Profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-15

    BREAKTHROUGHS IN LOW-PROFILE LEAKY-WAVE HPM ANTENNAS Prepared by: Robert A. Koslover Scientific Applications & Research...Profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas Progress, Status, & Management Report (Quarterly Report #5) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N00014-13-C-0352 5b...performance FAWSEA and CAWSEA antennas suitable for designation as “standard” or “recommended.” The configurations described are scalable with

  10. Isolation and Identification of Aspergillus fumigatus Mycotoxins on Growth Medium and Some Building Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Susanna M.; Kärki, Riikka; Auriola, Seppo; Toivola, Mika; Laatsch, Hartmut; Laatikainen, Reino; Hyvärinen, Anne; von Wright, Atte

    2002-01-01

    Genotoxic and cytotoxic compounds were isolated and purified from the culture medium of an indoor air mold, Aspergillus fumigatus. One of these compounds was identified as gliotoxin, a known fungal secondary metabolite. Growth of A. fumigatus and gliotoxin production on some building materials were also studied. Strong growth of the mold and the presence of gliotoxin were detected on spruce wood, gypsum board, and chipboard under saturation conditions. PMID:12324333

  11. Development of a novel multi-layer MRE isolator for suppression of building vibrations under seismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Sun, Shuaishuai; Tian, Tongfei; Li, Weihua; Du, Haiping; Alici, Gursel; Nakano, Masami

    2016-03-01

    Protecting civil engineering structures from uncontrollable events such as earthquakes while maintaining their structural integrity and serviceability is very important; this paper describes the performance of a stiffness softening magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) isolator in a scaled three storey building. In order to construct a closed-loop system, a scaled three storey building was designed and built according to the scaling laws, and then four MRE isolator prototypes were fabricated and utilised to isolate the building from the motion induced by a scaled El Centro earthquake. Fuzzy logic was used to output the current signals to the isolators, based on the real-time responses of the building floors, and then a simulation was used to evaluate the feasibility of this closed loop control system before carrying out an experimental test. The simulation and experimental results showed that the stiffness softening MRE isolator controlled by fuzzy logic could suppress structural vibration well.

  12. The relationship between 'wild' and 'building' isolates of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans.

    PubMed

    Palfreyman, John W; Gartland, Jill S; Sturrock, Craig J; Lester, Doug; White, Nia A; Low, Gordon A; Bech-Andersen, Joergen; Cooke, David E L

    2003-11-21

    Molecular and morphological parameters of Serpula lacrymans isolates from various sites in the built environment in Europe and Australia were compared to similar parameters of 'wild' isolates from India, the Sumava Mountains (Czech Republic) and Mount Shasta (USA). The Indian, Czech Republic and all of the building isolates bar one showed identity in both molecular and morphological features. The Australian and the USA isolates (BF-050 and USA'94 respectively) showed specific morphological differences and could be separated on the basis of randomly amplified polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase chain reaction (RAPD PCR) with the USA isolate being least closely related to the S. lacrymans type strain of FPRL12C. ITS sequence data revealed two base differences between FPRL12C and BF-050 in the 673 sequenced, nine differences between FPRL12C and USA'94 and 16 differences between USA'94 and the closely related organism Serpula himantioides. The possible evolutionary relationships between the various isolates are discussed along with suggestions for the origin of S. lacrymans as a scourge of the built environment in many temperate areas of the world.

  13. A modified Kelvin impact model for pounding simulation of base-isolated building with adjacent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Kun; Li, Li; Zhu, Hongping

    2009-09-01

    Base isolation can effectively reduce the seismic forces on a superstructure, particularly in low- to medium-rise buildings. However, under strong near-fault ground motions, pounding may occur at the isolation level between the base-isolated building (BIB) and its surrounding retaining walls. To effectively investigate the behavior of the BIB pounding with adjacent structures, after assessing some commonly used impact models, a modified Kelvin impact model is proposed in this paper. Relevant parameters in the modified Kelvin model are theoretically derived and numerically verified through a simple pounding case. At the same time, inelasticity of the isolated superstructure is introduced in order to accurately evaluate the potential damage to the superstructure caused by the pounding of the BIB with adjacent structures. The reliability of the modified Kelvin impact model is validated through numerical comparisons with other impact models. However, the difference between the numerical results from the various impact analytical models is not significant. Many numerical simulations of BIBs are conducted to investigate the influence of various design parameters and conditions on the peak inter-story drifts and floor accelerations during pounding. It is shown that pounding can substantially increase floor accelerations, especially at the ground floor where impacts occur. Higher modes of vibration are excited during poundings, increasing the inter-story drifts instead of keeping a nearly rigid-body motion of the superstructure. Furthermore, higher ductility demands can be imposed on lower floors of the superstructure. Moreover, impact stiffness seems to play a significant role in the acceleration response at the isolation level and the inter-story drifts of lower floors of the superstructure. Finally, the numerical results show that excessive flexibility of the isolation system used to minimize the floor accelerations may cause the BIB to be more susceptible to pounding

  14. Effects of amoebae on the growth of microbes isolated from moisture-damaged buildings.

    PubMed

    Yli-Pirilä, Terhi; Kusnetsov, Jaana; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Seuri, Markku; Nevalainen, Aino

    2006-04-01

    Dampness, moisture, and mold in buildings are associated with adverse health outcomes. In addition to fungi and bacteria, amoebae have been found in moisture-damaged building materials. Amoebae and a growing list of bacteria have been shown to have mutual effects on each other's growth, but the interactions between amoebae and microbes common in moisture-damaged buildings have not been reported. We co-cultivated the amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga with bacteria and fungi isolated from moisture-damaged buildings in laboratory conditions for up to 28 days. The microbes selected were the bacteria Streptomyces californicus, Bacillus cereus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, and the fungi Stachybotrys chartarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Penicillium spinulosum. Fungi and bacteria generally benefited from the presence of the amoebae, whereas the growth of amoebae was hindered by Streptomyces californicus, Stachybotrys chartarum, and Bacillus cereus. Pseudomonas fluorescens slightly enhanced amoebae viability. Amoebae were indifferent to the presence of Aspergillus versicolor and Penicillium spinulosum. Thus, our results show that amoebae can alter the survival and growth of some microbes in moisture-damaged buildings.

  15. Displacement response analysis of base-isolated buildings subjected to near-fault ground motions with velocity pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiumei; Li, Xiaojun; Yang, Yu; Liu, Aiwen; Li, Yaqi

    2016-04-01

    In order to study the influence of the velocity pulse to seismic displacement response of base-isolated buildings and the differences of the influent of the two types of near-fault ground motions with velocity pulse to seismic response of base-isolated buildings, the seismic responses are analyzed by three dimensional finite element models for three base-isolated buildings, 4 stories, 9 stories and 14 stories. In this study, comparative analyses were done for the seismic displacement responses of the base-isolated structures under 6 near-fault ground motion records with velocity pulse and no velocity pulse, in which, 6 artificial ground motion time histories with same elastic response spectrum as the 6 near-fault ground motion records are used as the ground motion with no velocity pulse. This study indicates that under the ground motions with velocity pulse the seismic displacement response of base-isolated buildings is significantly increased than the ground motions with no velocity pulse. To the median-low base-isolated buildings, the impact of forward directivity pulses is bigger than fling-step pulses. To the high base-isolated buildings, the impact of fling-step pulses is bigger than forward directivity pulses. The fling-step pulses lead to large displacement response in the lower stories. This work has been supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.51408560)

  16. Uncoupling protein-1 is not leaky.

    PubMed

    Shabalina, Irina G; Ost, Mario; Petrovic, Natasa; Vrbacky, Marek; Nedergaard, Jan; Cannon, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The activity of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) is rate-limiting for nonshivering thermogenesis and diet-induced thermogenesis. Characteristically, this activity is inhibited by GDP experimentally and presumably mainly by cytosolic ATP within brown-fat cells. The issue as to whether UCP1 has a residual proton conductance even when fully saturated with GDP/ATP (as has recently been suggested) has not only scientific but also applied interest, since a residual proton conductance would make overexpressed UCP1 weight-reducing even without physiological/pharmacological activation. To examine this question, we have here established optimal conditions for studying the bioenergetics of wild-type and UCP1-/- brown-fat mitochondria, analysing UCP1-mediated differences in parallel preparations of brown-fat mitochondria from both genotypes. Comparing different substrates, we find that pyruvate (or palmitoyl-L-carnitine) shows the largest relative coupling by GDP. Comparing albumin concentrations, we find the range 0.1-0.6% optimal; higher concentrations are inhibitory. Comparing basic medium composition, we find 125 mM sucrose optimal; an ionic medium (50-100 mM KCl) functions for wild-type but is detrimental for UCP1-/- mitochondria. Using optimal conditions, we find no evidence for a residual proton conductance (not a higher post-GDP respiration, a lower membrane potential or an altered proton leak at highest common potential) with either pyruvate or glycerol-3-phosphate as substrates, nor by a 3-4-fold alteration of the amount of UCP1. We could demonstrate that certain experimental conditions, due to respiratoty inhibition, could lead to the suggestion that UCP1 possesses a residual proton conductance but find that under optimal conditions our experiments concur with implications from physiological observations that in the presence of inhibitory nucleotides, UCP1 is not leaky.

  17. Ca2+ flux and beating in leaky heart cells.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S

    1980-01-01

    Previous work has shown that beating heart muscle cells with leaky sarcolemmae take up Ca2+ from the medium at a rate of 5.4 nmol/min/mg of protein while beating at a rate of 44 b.p.m. In the present work, we have used fragments of myocardium (MF), composed of such cells, to measure Ca2+ effux velocity and to compare influx and efflux rates to contraction frequency. The MF were estimated to be three cells thick, five cells wide, and three cells long, on the average. With MF suspended in fresh Pi-buffered medium containing 8.7 mumol/liter total Ca2+, the initial velocity of Ca2+ uptake (Vi) was much greater than the initial velocity of efflux (Vo). Vi, but not Vo, covaried with beating as a function of temperature and also showed ATP dependence. Thus, uptake, but not efflux, is a controlled process coupled to beating under these conditions. When cells were preloaded with Ca2+ and resuspended in Ca2+-depleted medium (total Ca2+ about 1 mumol/liter), approximating the steady state condition, Vi was reduced while Vo increased proportionally. These data suggest that contraction-activating Ca2+ is derived from extracellular sources during the pre-steady state conditions used here. Derivation from intracellular sites could occur in the steady state. The pre-steady state results conflict with mechanical behavior studies by us and others and, with Ca2+ flux in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The steady state results suggest that this conflict may be due to differences in Ca2+ loading and [Ca2+]i/[Ca2+]o.

  18. Breakthroughs In Low-profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-19

    WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Scientific ...BREAKTHROUGHS IN LOW-PROFILE LEAKY-WAVE HPM ANTENNAS Prepared by: Robert A. Koslover Scientific Applications & Research...Antennas,” a 37-month Basic Research effort sponsored by the US Office of Naval Research (ONR). This work includes fundamental theoretical

  19. Middle School Girls and the "Leaky Pipeline" to Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Mary; Grossman, Diane; Carter, Suzanne; Martin, Karyn; Deyton, Patricia; Hammer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Why do girls perform so well academically yet lose ground as professional women? This diminishing number of women up the leadership hierarchy is often referred to as the "leaky pipeline," and attributed to many factors: external ones such as work environments not conducive to work/life balance, and internal ones such as women's own…

  20. Leaky coaxial cable signal transmission for remote facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Crutcher, R.I.

    1993-03-01

    To develop reliable communications methods to meet the rigorous requirements for nuclear hot cells and similar environments, including control of cranes, transporters, and advanced servomanipulators, the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted extensive tests of numerous technologies to determine their applicability to remote operations. To alleviate the need for large bundles of cables that must accommodate crane/transporter motion relative to the boundaries of the cell, several transmission techniques are available, including slotted-line radio-frequency couplers, infrared beams, fiber-optic cables, free-space microwave, and inductively coupled leaky coaxial cable. This paper discusses the general characteristics, mode of operation, and proposed implementation of leaky coaxial cable technology in a waste-handling facility scheduled to be built in the near future at ORNL. In addition, specific system hardware based around the use of leaky coaxial cable is described in detail. Finally, data from a series of radiation exposure tests conducted by the CFRP on several samples of the basic leaky coaxial cable and associated connectors are presented.

  1. Leaky coaxial cable signal transmission for remote facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Crutcher, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    To develop reliable communications methods to meet the rigorous requirements for nuclear hot cells and similar environments, including control of cranes, transporters, and advanced servomanipulators, the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted extensive tests of numerous technologies to determine their applicability to remote operations. To alleviate the need for large bundles of cables that must accommodate crane/transporter motion relative to the boundaries of the cell, several transmission techniques are available, including slotted-line radio-frequency couplers, infrared beams, fiber-optic cables, free-space microwave, and inductively coupled leaky coaxial cable. This paper discusses the general characteristics, mode of operation, and proposed implementation of leaky coaxial cable technology in a waste-handling facility scheduled to be built in the near future at ORNL. In addition, specific system hardware based around the use of leaky coaxial cable is described in detail. Finally, data from a series of radiation exposure tests conducted by the CFRP on several samples of the basic leaky coaxial cable and associated connectors are presented.

  2. Leader neurons in leaky integrate and fire neural network simulations.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Cyrille

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we highlight the topological properties of leader neurons whose existence is an experimental fact. Several experimental studies show the existence of leader neurons in population bursts of activity in 2D living neural networks (Eytan and Marom, J Neurosci 26(33):8465-8476, 2006; Eckmann et al., New J Phys 10(015011), 2008). A leader neuron is defined as a neuron which fires at the beginning of a burst (respectively network spike) more often than we expect by chance considering its mean firing rate. This means that leader neurons have some burst triggering power beyond a chance-level statistical effect. In this study, we characterize these leader neuron properties. This naturally leads us to simulate neural 2D networks. To build our simulations, we choose the leaky integrate and fire (lIF) neuron model (Gerstner and Kistler 2002; Cessac, J Math Biol 56(3):311-345, 2008), which allows fast simulations (Izhikevich, IEEE Trans Neural Netw 15(5):1063-1070, 2004; Gerstner and Naud, Science 326:379-380, 2009). The dynamics of our lIF model has got stable leader neurons in the burst population that we simulate. These leader neurons are excitatory neurons and have a low membrane potential firing threshold. Except for these two first properties, the conditions required for a neuron to be a leader neuron are difficult to identify and seem to depend on several parameters involved in the simulations themselves. However, a detailed linear analysis shows a trend of the properties required for a neuron to be a leader neuron. Our main finding is: A leader neuron sends signals to many excitatory neurons as well as to few inhibitory neurons and a leader neuron receives only signals from few other excitatory neurons. Our linear analysis exhibits five essential properties of leader neurons each with different relative importance. This means that considering a given neural network with a fixed mean number of connections per neuron, our analysis gives us a way of

  3. Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

    1994-03-01

    Scenario developments is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review, and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence is this aspect of the PA will be through the use of a systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

  4. Design of isolated buildings with S-FBI system subjected to near-fault earthquakes using NSGA-II algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbulut, O. E.; Silwal, B.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the optimum design parameters of a superelastic friction base isolator (S-FBI) system through a multi-objective genetic algorithm and performance-based evaluation approach. The S-FBI system consists of a flat steel- PTFE sliding bearing and a superelastic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) device. Sliding bearing limits the transfer of shear across the isolation interface and provides damping from sliding friction. SMA device provides restoring force capability to the isolation system together with additional damping characteristics. A three-story building is modeled with S-FBI isolation system. Multiple-objective numerical optimization that simultaneously minimizes isolation-level displacements and superstructure response is carried out with a genetic algorithm (GA) in order to optimize S-FBI system. Nonlinear time history analyses of the building with S-FBI system are performed. A set of 20 near-field ground motion records are used in numerical simulations. Results show that S-FBI system successfully control response of the buildings against near-fault earthquakes without sacrificing in isolation efficacy and producing large isolation-level deformations.

  5. Isolation of an antimicrobial compound produced by bacteria associated with reef-building corals

    PubMed Central

    Tapiolas, Dianne; Motti, Cherie A.; Foret, Sylvain; Tebben, Jan; Willis, Bette L.; Bourne, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial communities associated with healthy corals produce antimicrobial compounds that inhibit the colonization and growth of invasive microbes and potential pathogens. To date, however, bacteria-derived antimicrobial molecules have not been identified in reef-building corals. Here, we report the isolation of an antimicrobial compound produced by Pseudovibrio sp. P12, a common and abundant coral-associated bacterium. This strain was capable of metabolizing dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a sulfur molecule produced in high concentrations by reef-building corals and playing a role in structuring their bacterial communities. Bioassay-guided fractionation coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), identified the antimicrobial as tropodithietic acid (TDA), a sulfur-containing compound likely derived from DMSP catabolism. TDA was produced in large quantities by Pseudovibrio sp., and prevented the growth of two previously identified coral pathogens, Vibrio coralliilyticus and V. owensii, at very low concentrations (0.5 μg/mL) in agar diffusion assays. Genome sequencing of Pseudovibrio sp. P12 identified gene homologs likely involved in the metabolism of DMSP and production of TDA. These results provide additional evidence for the integral role of DMSP in structuring coral-associated bacterial communities and underline the potential of these DMSP-metabolizing microbes to contribute to coral disease prevention. PMID:27602265

  6. Disodium cromoglycate protects dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers from leakiness.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Julia; Ventura Machado, Rafael; Minatel, Elaine; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    In dystrophin-deficient fibers of mdx mice and in Duchenne dystrophy, the lack of dystrophin leads to sarcolemma breakdown and muscle degeneration. We verified that cromolyn, a mast-cell stabilizer agent, stabilized dystrophic muscle fibers using Evans blue dye as a marker of sarcolemma leakiness. Mdx mice (n=8; 14 days of age) received daily intraperitoneal injections of cromolyn (50 mg/kg body weight) for 15 days. Untreated mdx mice (n=8) were injected with saline. Cryostat cross-sections of the sternomastoid, tibialis anterior, and diaphragm muscles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Cromolyn dramatically reduced Evans blue dye-positive fibers in all muscles (P<0.05; Student's t-test) and led to a significant increase in the percentage of fibers with peripheral nuclei. This study supports the protective effects of cromolyn in dystrophic muscles and further indicates its action against muscle fiber leakiness in muscles that are differently affected by the lack of dystrophin.

  7. Excitation of leaky modes in a system of coupled waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Usievich, B A; Nurligareev, J Kh; Sychugov, V A; Golant, K M

    2007-06-30

    A system of coupled single-mode waveguides with the number M of guided modes lower than the number N of single-mode waveguides is studied. Leaky modes in this system are investigated in detail. It is shown, in particular, that these modes can be excited by light incident on the side surface of the system when the reflection coefficient vanishes. It is found that the angular dependence of the coefficient of reflection from the side surface of the system can be used to refine the dispersion curve for leaky modes. It is shown that light incident at a grazing angle can propagate in the system in the direction considerably different from the propagation direction of a beam incident from a substrate, even in the case of a small difference in the refractive indices. (fiber and integrated optics)

  8. Breakthroughs In Low-profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Scientific Applications...BREAKTHROUGHS IN LOW-PROFILE LEAKY-WAVE HPM ANTENNAS Prepared by: Robert A. Koslover Scientific Applications & Research...improved and are working on “standard” designs and scripts for the RAWSEA, such as those we documented earlier for the (Flat) FAWSEA and (Curved) CAWSEA

  9. Breakthroughs in Low-Profile Leaky-Wave HPM Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    Conformal Antennas. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON (Monitor...quarter included: (1) our presentation of “Advances in Low-Profile Leaky- Wave Conformable Antennas for HPM Applications” at the 17 th Annual Directed...that we recommend to fit typical cylindrical apertures. So we are very enthusiastic about the additional platform- conformal opportunities that

  10. Impedance-matching analysis in IR leaky-wave antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, Navaneeth; Xu, Yuancheng; Lail, Brian A.

    2015-08-01

    Planar leaky-wave antennas (LWA) that are capable of full-space scanning have long since been the pursuit for applications including, but not limited to, integration onto vehicles and into cameras for wide-angle of view beam-steering. Such a leaky-wave surface (LWS) was designed for long-wave infrared frequencies with frequency scanning capability. The LWS is based on a microstrip patch array design of a leaky-wave impedance surface and is made up of gold microstrip patches on a grounded zinc sulphide substrate. A 1D composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial made by periodically stacking a unit cell of the LWS in the longitudinal direction to form a LWA was designed. This paper deals with loading the LWA with a nickel bolometer to collect leaky-wave signals. The LWA radiates a backward leaking wave at 30 degrees at 28.3THz and scans through broadside for frequencies 20THz through 40THz. The paper deals with effectively placing the bolometer in order for the collected signal to exhibit the designed frequency regime. An effective way to maximize the power coupling into the load from the antenna is also explored. The benefit of such a metamaterial/holographic antennacoupled detector is its ability to provide appreciable capture cross-sections while delivering smart signals to subwavelength sized detectors. Due to their high-gain, low-profile, fast response time of the detector and ease of fabrication, this IR LWA-coupled bolometer harbors great potential in the areas of high resolution, uncooled, infrared imaging.

  11. Holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces for dual-sensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun Bo; Li, Lian Lin; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces have huge potentials to develop new type imaging systems due to their abilities of controlling electromagnetic waves. Here, we propose a new method for dual-sensor imaging based on cross-like holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces which are composed of hybrid isotropic and anisotropic surface impedance textures. The holographic leaky-wave radiations are generated by special impedance modulations of surface waves excited by the sensor ports. For one independent sensor, the main leaky-wave radiation beam can be scanned by frequency in one-dimensional space, while the frequency scanning in the orthogonal spatial dimension is accomplished by the other sensor. Thus, for a probed object, the imaging plane can be illuminated adequately to obtain the two-dimensional backward scattered fields by the dual-sensor for reconstructing the object. The relativity of beams under different frequencies is very low due to the frequency-scanning beam performance rather than the random beam radiations operated by frequency, and the multi-illuminations with low relativity are very appropriate for multi-mode imaging method with high resolution and anti- noise. Good reconstruction results are given to validate the proposed imaging method. PMID:26658471

  12. Holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces for dual-sensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun Bo; Li, Lian Lin; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-12-10

    Metasurfaces have huge potentials to develop new type imaging systems due to their abilities of controlling electromagnetic waves. Here, we propose a new method for dual-sensor imaging based on cross-like holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces which are composed of hybrid isotropic and anisotropic surface impedance textures. The holographic leaky-wave radiations are generated by special impedance modulations of surface waves excited by the sensor ports. For one independent sensor, the main leaky-wave radiation beam can be scanned by frequency in one-dimensional space, while the frequency scanning in the orthogonal spatial dimension is accomplished by the other sensor. Thus, for a probed object, the imaging plane can be illuminated adequately to obtain the two-dimensional backward scattered fields by the dual-sensor for reconstructing the object. The relativity of beams under different frequencies is very low due to the frequency-scanning beam performance rather than the random beam radiations operated by frequency, and the multi-illuminations with low relativity are very appropriate for multi-mode imaging method with high resolution and anti- noise. Good reconstruction results are given to validate the proposed imaging method.

  13. Earthquake Resilient Tall Reinforced Concrete Buildings at Near-Fault Sites Using Base Isolation and Rocking Core Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calugaru, Vladimir

    This dissertation pursues three main objectives: (1) to investigate the seismic response of tall reinforced concrete core wall buildings, designed following current building codes, subjected to pulse type near-fault ground motion, with special focus on the relation between the characteristics of the ground motion and the higher-modes of response; (2) to determine the characteristics of a base isolation system that results in nominally elastic response of the superstructure of a tall reinforced concrete core wall building at the maximum considered earthquake level of shaking; and (3) to demonstrate that the seismic performance, cost, and constructability of a base-isolated tall reinforced concrete core wall building can be significantly improved by incorporating a rocking core-wall in the design. First, this dissertation investigates the seismic response of tall cantilever wall buildings subjected to pulse type ground motion, with special focus on the relation between the characteristics of ground motion and the higher-modes of response. Buildings 10, 20, and 40 stories high were designed such that inelastic deformation was concentrated at a single flexural plastic hinge at their base. Using nonlinear response history analysis, the buildings were subjected to near-fault seismic ground motions as well as simple close-form pulses, which represented distinct pulses within the ground motions. Euler-Bernoulli beam models with lumped mass and lumped plasticity were used to model the buildings. Next, this dissertation investigates numerically the seismic response of six seismically base-isolated (BI) 20-story reinforced concrete buildings and compares their response to that of a fixed-base (FB) building with a similar structural system above ground. Located in Berkeley, California, 2 km from the Hayward fault, the buildings are designed with a core wall that provides most of the lateral force resistance above ground. For the BI buildings, the following are investigated

  14. Ultrasonic Lateral Displacement Sensor for Health Monitoring in Seismically Isolated Buildings.

    PubMed

    Matsuya, Iwao; Matsumoto, Fumiya; Ihara, Ikuo

    2015-07-13

    An ultrasonic lateral displacement sensor utilizing air-coupled ultrasound transducers is proposed. The normally-distributed far field of an ultrasound transducer in a lateral direction is taken advantage of for measuring lateral displacement. The measurement system is composed of several air-coupled ultrasound transducers as a receiver and several transmitters. The transmitters are immobilized at a fixed point, whereas the receiver set-up is separately arranged on the opposite side. In order to improve measurement accuracy, a correction method that utilizes polynomial approximation is introduced. The difference between the corrected lateral displacement and the reference displacement is estimated to be 0.2 mm at maximum for the two transmitters system. A good responsiveness is demonstrated by conducting a dynamic response experiment. When five transmitters are arranged, their measurement range is easily extended up to ±60 mm with an accuracy of 0.7 mm. In both cases, the fluctuations to the measurement ranges show less than 1%. These results indicate that the developed sensor system is useful for measuring relative lateral displacement of a seismically isolated building in the field of structural health monitoring.

  15. Ultrasonic Lateral Displacement Sensor for Health Monitoring in Seismically Isolated Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Matsuya, Iwao; Matsumoto, Fumiya; Ihara, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic lateral displacement sensor utilizing air-coupled ultrasound transducers is proposed. The normally-distributed far field of an ultrasound transducer in a lateral direction is taken advantage of for measuring lateral displacement. The measurement system is composed of several air-coupled ultrasound transducers as a receiver and several transmitters. The transmitters are immobilized at a fixed point, whereas the receiver set-up is separately arranged on the opposite side. In order to improve measurement accuracy, a correction method that utilizes polynomial approximation is introduced. The difference between the corrected lateral displacement and the reference displacement is estimated to be 0.2 mm at maximum for the two transmitters system. A good responsiveness is demonstrated by conducting a dynamic response experiment. When five transmitters are arranged, their measurement range is easily extended up to ±60 mm with an accuracy of 0.7 mm. In both cases, the fluctuations to the measurement ranges show less than 1%. These results indicate that the developed sensor system is useful for measuring relative lateral displacement of a seismically isolated building in the field of structural health monitoring. PMID:26184220

  16. Response of high-rise and base-isolated buildings to a hypothetical M w 7.0 blind thrust earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heaton, T.H.; Hall, J.F.; Wald, D.J.; Halling, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    High-rise flexible-frame buildings are commonly considered to be resistant to shaking from the largest earthquakes. In addition, base isolation has become increasingly popular for critical buildings that should still function after an earthquake. How will these two types of buildings perform if a large earthquake occurs beneath a metropolitan area? To answer this question, we simulated the near-source ground motions of a Mw 7.0 thrust earthquake and then mathematically modeled the response of a 20-story steel-frame building and a 3-story base-isolated building. The synthesized ground motions were characterized by large displacement pulses (up to 2 meters) and large ground velocities. These ground motions caused large deformation and possible collapse of the frame building, and they required exceptional measures in the design of the base-isolated building if it was to remain functional.

  17. Isotope effects accompanying evaporation of water from leaky containers.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, Kazimierz; Chmura, Lukasz

    2008-03-01

    Laboratory experiments aimed at quantifying isotope effects associated with partial evaporation of water from leaky containers have been performed under three different settings: (i) evaporation into dry atmosphere, performed in a dynamic mode, (ii) evaporation into dry atmosphere, performed in a static mode, and (iii) evaporation into free laboratory atmosphere. The results demonstrate that evaporative enrichment of water stored in leaky containers can be properly described in the framework of the Craig-Gordon evaporation model. The key parameter controlling the degree of isotope enrichment is the remaining fraction of water in the leaking containers. Other factors such as temperature, relative humidity, or extent of kinetic fractionation play only minor roles. Satisfactory agreement between observed and predicted isotope enrichments for both (18)O and (2)H in experiments for the case of evaporation into dry atmosphere could be obtained only when molecular diffusivity ratios of isotope water molecules as suggested recently by Cappa et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 108, 4525-4535, (2003).] were adopted. However, the observed and modelled isotope enrichments for (2)H and (18)O could be reconciled also for the ratios of molecular diffusivities obtained by Merlivat [J. Chem. Phys., 69, 2864-2871 (1978).], if non-negligible transport resistance in the viscous liquid sub-layer adjacent to the evaporating surface is considered. The evaporation experiments revealed that the loss of mass of water stored in leaky containers in the order of 1%, will lead to an increase of the heavy isotope content in this water by ca. 0.35 and 1.1 per thousand, for delta (18)O and delta (2)H, respectively.

  18. Leaky Rayleigh wave ultrasonic backscattering enhancements: Experimental tests of theory for tilted solid cylinders and cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipson, Karen

    Backscattering enhancements due to acoustic wave coupling into leaky Rayleigh waves on solid elastic cubes and cylinders submerged in water are investigated. A quantitative ray description of the launching and propagation of the leaky Rayleigh waves is verified to be useful. Leaky Rayleigh waves are launched on the surface of an elastic object if the acoustic wavevector's projection along the surface matches the wavevector associated with leaky Rayleigh wave propagation. Once launched, leaky Rayleigh waves on the surface of an elastic object will be partially reflected at the object's truncations, and under certain conditions the reflection process may result in a reversal of the leaky wavevector on the surface so that the leaky radiation is oriented in the backscattering direction. Furthermore, the radiated wavefront can have a vanishing Gaussian curvature which produces a far-field caustic. The leaky wave pressure on the surface of the scatterer is approximated by convolving the incident pressure with an appropriate function describing the response of the surface to a localized pressure input, and the method of images is used to approximate the reflection processes. The resulting reflected pressure field on or near the target's surface is then propagated to the far field using the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral. Tone burst experiments confirm that this approach provides reasonable predictions for a variety of cases including the retroreflection of leaky waves around a comer on the face of a cube, the retroreflection of meridional leaky waves along the length of a cylinder, and the retroreflection of leaky waves launched diagonally across the flat face of a cylinder. The frequency dependence of these mechanisms for backscattering from a cylinder was also investigated using a pressure source capable of producing an impulsive pressure, and the observed time returns for end-reflected helical waves agree with theoretical predictions. For the high frequencies

  19. Ultrasonic characterization of functionally gradient materials with leaky Rayleigh wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Koichiro; Takenouchi, Naoki; Awaji, Hideo; Nishikawa, Tadahiro

    1999-12-02

    Young's modulus of functionally gradient Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni ceramics, which was formed by centrifugal casting and has gradient of the elastic properties along a particular direction on the surface, is estimated by velocity measurement of the leaky Rayleigh and longitudinal waves. Those velocities were measured every 1mm with a line focused PVDF transducer, of which central frequency, focal length and width are 36MHz, 5mm and 8mm. Thus measured Young's modulus varies from 370GPa (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich side) to 200GPa (Ni rich side)

  20. Modestobacter lapidis sp. nov. and Modestobacter muralis sp. nov., isolated from a deteriorated sandstone historic building in Salamanca, Spain.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Martha E; Goodfellow, Michael; Busarakam, Kanungnid; Riesco, Raul

    2015-08-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to establish the taxonomic status of two Modestobacter strains isolated from the surface of deteriorated sandstone of a historic building in Salamanca, Spain. The strains, isolates MDVD1(T) and MON 3.1(T), were found to have chemotaxonomic and morphological properties consistent with their classification in the genus Modestobacter and to form distinct phyletic lines in the Modestobacter 16S rRNA gene tree. Isolate MDVD1(T) was found to be closely related to the type strain of Modestobacter versicolor (98.7 % similarity) and isolate MON 3.1(T) to the type strain of Modestobacter multiseptatus (98.6 % similarity). The isolates were distinguished readily from one another and from the Modestobacter type strains by a broad range of phenotypic properties, by qualitative and quantitative differences in fatty acid profiles and by BOX fingerprint patterns. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that the isolates be classified in the genus Modestobacter as Modestobacter lapidis sp. nov. and Modestobacter muralis sp. nov., with isolates MON 3.1(T) (CECT 8844(T) = DSM 100206(T)) and MDVD1(T) (CECT 8845(T) = DSM 100205(T)) as the respective type strains.

  1. Vibration control and isolation design for the Electrical Engineering/Computer Science Building, University of Minnesota--Minneapolis, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, David L.

    1992-02-01

    Design of the Electrical Engineering/Computer Science Building at the University of Minnesota included development of a very low vibration environment for research in submicron processes in microelectronics. The new facility which opened in 1988 has 325,000 gross square feet of space on six floors and cost approximately $DLR35 million. The vibration control process consisted of: (1) establishing permissible vibration levels for extremely sensitive equipment, (2) monitoring site vibration, (3) isolating the microelectronics lab, (4) analyzing expected floor motion in the structure using finite element methods, and (5) isolating the HVAC mechanical equipment. The permissible floor vibration for the facility was 100 (mu) in/sec for the microelectronics floor and 1,000 (mu) in/sec for the remainder of the facility. Since there were several large engineering buildings and a main vehicular thoroughfare directly adjacent, vibration measurements taken at the site during the design phase showed the maximum ground surface and floor motion to be 1,350 (mu) in/sec and motion in the bedrock level at only 40 (mu) in/sec. A two-foot thick, solid, reinforced concrete floor was designed for the microelectronics lab, supported on three-foot diameter caissons down to bedrock, spaced on nine-foot centers and isolated from the soil. A computerized structural vibration analysis was completed with a finite element model of a typical bay of the entire building to predict response of the building to ambient and equipment excitation. The results of these predictions along with the building performance test data show the floor motion to be less than permissible levels.

  2. Optimal Performance of Buildings Isolated By Shape-Memory-Alloy-Rubber-Bearing (SMARB) Under Random Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumanta; Mishra, Sudib K.

    2014-05-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-based bearing has been proposed recently for improved base isolation by optimal choice of its transformation strength. Presently, superior performances of the Shape-Memory-Alloy-Rubber-Bearing (SMARB) over the elastomeric bearing are established in mitigating seismic vibration under constraint on maximum isolator displacement. The optimal transformation strengths are proposed through constrained optimization based on stochastic responses. Numerical simulation reveals that Lead Rubber Bearings (LRB) either fails to provide feasible parameters or leads to large floor acceleration, compromising the isolation efficiency. Contrarily, optimal SMARB can efficiently enforce such constraint without greatly affecting the isolation efficiency. Evidence of robustness of SMARB over LRB is also established.

  3. Bringing It to the Teachers: Building a Professional Network among Teachers in Isolated Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Fiona M.; Dixon, Roselyn M.; Verenikina, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Teachers in isolated schools are often under-resourced and overwhelmed with additional pressures. Teaching in an isolated community can sometimes challenge teachers' skills and knowledge, particularly when additional pressures such as behavioural issues associated with students with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) like behaviours are present.…

  4. An artificial dielectric leaky-wave-antenna for millimeter range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishvakarma, B. R.; Sharma, R. P.

    A new, artificial dielectric leaky-wave antenna for the millimeter range is proposed and its radiation characteristics and scanning capability are examined. The antenna has beam scanning of 40 deg when the frequency is varied from 70 to 90 GHz. The scanning rate is higher in the lower frequency ranges, and the scanning angle increases with the thickness of the AD slab. The beam width does not vary much with frequency, indicating that there is no significant beam shape deterioration over a relatively large sweep angle and frequency range. The antenna gain increases linearly with increasing frequency. An AD antenna using a ferrite medium makes it possible to steer the beamwith frequency as well as biasing magnetic field, rendering the antenna suitable for very precise beam steering.

  5. Influence of Hydraulic Fracturing on Overlying Aquifers in the Presence of Leaky Abandoned Wells.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Joshua W; James, Scott C; Yelderman, Joe C

    2016-11-01

    The association between hydrocarbon-rich reservoirs and organic-rich source rocks means unconventional oil and gas plays usually occur in mature sedimentary basins-where large-scale conventional development has already taken place. Abandoned wells in proximity to hydraulic fracturing could be affected by increased fluid pressures and corresponding newly generated fractures that directly connect (frac hit) to an abandoned well or to existing fractures intersecting an abandoned well. If contaminants migrate to a pathway hydraulically connected to an abandoned well, upward leakage may occur. Potential effects of hydraulic fracturing on upward flow through a particular type of leaky abandoned well-abandoned oil and gas wells converted into water wells were investigated using numerical modeling. Several factors that affect flow to leaky wells were considered including proximity of a leaky well to hydraulic fracturing, flowback, production, and leaky well abandonment methods. The numerical model used historical records and available industry data for the Eagle Ford Shale play in south Texas. Numerical simulations indicate that upward contaminant migration could occur through leaky converted wells if certain spatial and hydraulic conditions exist. Upward flow through leaky converted wells increased with proximity to hydraulic fracturing, but decreased when flowback and production occurred. Volumetric flow rates ranged between 0 and 0.086 m(3) /d for hydraulic-fracturing scenarios. Potential groundwater impacts should be paired with plausible transport mechanisms, and upward flow through leaky abandoned wells could be unrelated to hydraulic fracturing. The results also underscore the need to evaluate historical activities.

  6. In-situ Mechanical Manipulation of Wellbore Cements as a Solution to Leaky Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupresan, D.; Radonjic, M.; Heathman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement provides casing support, zonal isolation, and casing protection from corrosive fluids, which are essential for wellbore integrity. Cements can undergo one or more forms of failure such as debonding at cement/formation and cement/casing interface, fracturing and defects within cement matrix. Failures and defects within cement will ultimately lead to fluids migration, resulting in inter-zonal fluid migration and premature well abandonment. There are over 27,000 abandoned oil and gas wells only in The Gulf of Mexico (some of them dating from the late 1940s) with no gas leakage monitoring. Cement degradation linked with carbon sequestration can potentially lead to contamination of fresh water aquifers with CO2. Gas leaks can particularly be observed in deviated wells used for hydraulic fracking (60% leakage rate as they age) as high pressure fracturing increases the potential for migration pathways. Experimental method utilized in this study enables formation of impermeable seals at interfaces present in a wellbore by mechanically manipulating wellbore cement. Preliminary measurements obtained in bench scale experiments demonstrate that an impermeable cement/formation and cement/casing interface can be obtained. In post-modified cement, nitrogen gas flow-through experiments showed complete zonal isolation and no permeability in samples with pre-engineered microannulus. Material characterization experiments of modified cement revealed altered microstructural properties of cement as well as changes in mineralogical composition. Calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), the dominant mineral in hydrated cement which provides low permeability of cement, was modified as a result of cement pore water displacement, resulting in more dense structures. Calcium hydroxide (CH), which is associated with low resistance of cement to acidic fluids and therefore detrimental in most wellbore cements, was almost completely displaced and/or integrated in CSH as a result of

  7. Travel distance estimation from visual motion by leaky path integration.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Markus; Jenkin, Michael; Harris, Laurence R

    2007-06-01

    Visual motion can be a cue to travel distance when the motion signals are integrated. Distance estimates from visually simulated self-motion are imprecise, however. Previous work in our labs has given conflicting results on the imprecision: experiments by Frenz and Lappe had suggested a general underestimation of travel distance, while results from Redlick, Jenkin and Harris had shown an overestimation of travel distance. Here we describe a collaborative study that resolves the conflict by tracing it to differences in the tasks given to the subjects. With an identical set of subjects and identical visual motion simulation we show that underestimation of travel distance occurs when the task involves a judgment of distance from the starting position, and that overestimation of travel distance occurs when the task requires a judgment of the remaining distance to a particular target position. We present a leaky integrator model that explains both effects with a single mechanism. In this leaky integrator model we introduce the idea that, depending on the task, either the distance from start, or the distance to target is used as a state variable. The state variable is updated during the movement by integration over the space covered by the movement, rather than over time. In this model, travel distance mis-estimation occurs because the integration leaks and because the transformation of visual motion to travel distance involves a gain factor. Mis-estimates in both tasks can be explained with the same leak rate and gain in both conditions. Our results thus suggest that observers do not simply integrate traveled distance and then relate it to the task. Instead, the internally represented variable is either distance from the origin or distance to the goal, whichever is relevant.

  8. Misidentification caused by leaky surface wave in high-frequency surface wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lingli; Xia, Jianghai; Pan, Yudi

    2014-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method analyses high-frequency surface waves to determine shear (S)-wave velocities of near-surface materials, which are usually unconsolidated and possess higher Poisson's ratios. One of key steps using the MASW method to obtain the near-surface S-wave velocities is to pick correct phase velocities in dispersive images. A high-frequency seismic survey conducted over near-surface materials with a higher Poisson's ratio will often result in data that contains non-geometric wave, which will raise an additional energy in the dispersion image. Failure to identify it may result in misidentification. In this paper, we have presented a description about leaky surface wave and the influence caused by the existence of leaky waves in a high-frequency seismic record. We first introduce leaky wave and non-geometric wave. Next, we use two synthetic tests to demonstrate that non-geometric wave is leaky wave and show the properties about leaky surface wave by eigenfunctions using Chen's algorithm. We show that misidentification may occur in picking the dispersion curves of normal Rayleigh wave modes because the leaky-wave energy normally connects energy of fundamental and/or higher modes. Meanwhile, we use a real-world example to demonstrate the influence of leaky wave. We also propose that muting and filtering should been applied to raw seismic records prior to generating dispersive images to prevent misidentifying leaky surface waves as modal surface waves by a real-world example. Finally, we use a three-layer model with a low-velocity half-space to illustrate that leaky surface waves appear on condition that the phase velocities are higher than maximum S-wave velocity of the earth model when solving the Rayleigh equation.

  9. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains isolated from moisture-damaged buildings produced surfactin and a substance toxic to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, Raimo; Andersson, Maria A; Grigoriev, Pavel; Teplova, Vera V; Saris, Nils-Erik L; Rainey, Frederick A; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2004-04-01

    Fungicidic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains isolated from the indoor environment of moisture-damaged buildings contained heat-stable, methanol-soluble substances that inhibited motility of boar spermatozoa within 15 min of exposure and killed feline lung cells in high dilution in 1 day. Boar sperm cells lost motility, cellular ATP, and NADH upon contact to the bacterial extract (0.2 microg dry wt/ml). Two bioactive substances were purified from biomass of the fungicidal isolates. One partially characterized substance, 1,197 Da, was moderately hydrophobic and contained leucine, proline, serine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and tyrosine, in addition to chromophore(s) absorbing at 365 nm. In boar sperm and human neural cells (Paju), the compound depolarized the transmembrane potentials of mitochondria (Delta Psi(m)) and the plasma membrane (Delta Psi(p)) after a 20-min exposure and formed cation-selective channels in lipid membranes, with a selectivity K(+):Na(+):Ca(2+) of 26:15:3.5. The other substance was identified as a plasma-membrane-damaging lipopeptide surfactin. Plate-grown biomass of indoor Bacillus amyloliquefaciens contained ca. 7% of dry weight of the two substances, 1,197 Da and surfactin, in a ratio of 1:6 (w:w). The in vitro observed simultaneous collapse of both cytosolic and mitochondrial ATP in the affected mammalian cell, induced by the 1,197-Da cation channel, suggests potential health risks for occupants of buildings contaminated with such toxins.

  10. Calculation of leaky Lamb waves with a semi-analytical finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Inoue, Daisuke

    2014-08-01

    A semi-analytical finite element method (SAFE) has been widely used for calculating dispersion curves and mode shapes of guided waves as well as transient waves in a bar like structures. Although guided wave inspection is often conducted for water-loaded plates and pipes, most of the SAFE techniques have not been extended to a plate with leaky media. This study describes leaky Lamb wave calculation with the SAFE. We formulated a new solution using a feature that a single Lamb wave mode generates a harmonic plane wave in leaky media. Dispersion curves obtained with the SAFE agreed well with the previous theoretical studies, which represents that the SAFE calculation was conducted with sufficient accuracy. Moreover, we discussed dispersion curves, attenuation curves, and displacement distributions for total transmission modes and leaky plate modes in a single side and both two side water-loaded plate.

  11. Characterization of Defects in Composite Material Using Rapidly Acquired Leaky Lamb Wave Dispersion Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Mal, A.; Chang, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The phenomenon of Leaky Lamb Wave (LLW) in composite materials was first observed in 1982 using a Schlieren system. It has been studied extensively by numerous investigators and successfully shown to be an effective quantitative NDE tool.

  12. Mechanical Expansion of Steel Tubing as a Solution to Leaky Wellbores

    PubMed Central

    Radonjic, Mileva; Kupresan, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Wellbore cement, a procedural component of wellbore completion operations, primarily provides zonal isolation and mechanical support of the metal pipe (casing), and protects metal components from corrosive fluids. These are essential for uncompromised wellbore integrity. Cements can undergo multiple forms of failure, such as debonding at the cement/rock and cement/metal interfaces, fracturing, and defects within the cement matrix. Failures and defects within the cement will ultimately lead to fluid migration, resulting in inter-zonal fluid migration and premature well abandonment. Currently, there are over 1.8 million operating wells worldwide and over one third of these wells have leak related problems defined as Sustained Casing Pressure (SCP)1. The focus of this research was to develop an experimental setup at bench-scale to explore the effect of mechanical manipulation of wellbore casing-cement composite samples as a potential technology for the remediation of gas leaks. The experimental methodology utilized in this study enabled formation of an impermeable seal at the pipe/cement interface in a simulated wellbore system. Successful nitrogen gas flow-through measurements demonstrated that an existing microannulus was sealed at laboratory experimental conditions and fluid flow prevented by mechanical manipulation of the metal/cement composite sample. Furthermore, this methodology can be applied not only for the remediation of leaky wellbores, but also in plugging and abandonment procedures as well as wellbore completions technology, and potentially preventing negative impacts of wellbores on subsurface and surface environments. PMID:25490436

  13. Hypernitrosylated ryanodine receptor calcium release channels are leaky in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Reiken, Steven; Carlson, Christian; Mongillo, Marco; Liu, Xiaoping; Rothman, Lisa; Matecki, Stefan; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2009-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and early death resulting from dystrophin deficiency. Loss of dystrophin results in disruption of a large dystrophin glycoprotein complex, leading to pathological calcium (Ca2+)-dependent signals that damage muscle cells. We have identified a structural and functional defect in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy that contributes to altered Ca2+ homeostasis in dystrophic muscles. RyR1 isolated from mdx skeletal muscle showed an age-dependent increase in S-nitrosylation coincident with dystrophic changes in the muscle. RyR1 S-nitrosylation depleted the channel complex of FKBP12 (also known as calstabin-1, for calcium channel stabilizing binding protein), resulting in 'leaky' channels. Preventing calstabin-1 depletion from RyR1 with S107, a compound that binds the RyR1 channel and enhances the binding affinity of calstabin-1 to the nitrosylated channel, inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, reduced biochemical and histological evidence of muscle damage, improved muscle function and increased exercise performance in mdx mice. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak via RyR1 due to S-nitrosylation of the channel and calstabin-1 depletion contributes to muscle weakness in muscular dystrophy, and that preventing the RyR1-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak may provide a new therapeutic approach.

  14. Leaky enteric coating on ranitidine hydrochloride beads: dissolution and prediction of plasma data.

    PubMed

    Bendas, Ehab R; Ayres, James W

    2008-08-01

    The present research is based on the hypothesis that leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations are able to provide sustained input for drugs that have an absorption window, such as ranitidine hydrochloride, without jeopardizing their bioavailability. Leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations are defined as enteric-coated pellets that allow some of the drug to be released from the formulation in gastric fluid. Different approaches to making leaky enteric-coated pellets were investigated using extrusion-spheronization followed by spray coating. Leaky enteric coats were formulated using a commonly used enteric polymer, Eudragit L 30 D-55, combined with soluble compounds including lactose, PEG 8000 and surfactants (Span 60 (hydrophobic) or Tween 80 (hydrophilic)). The rate of drug release from the formulations in simulated gastric fluid can be tailored by varying the additive's amount or type. All leaky enteric-coated formulations studied completely released the drugs within 30 min after changing dissolution medium to phosphate buffer, pH 6. Predictions of plasma concentration-time profiles of the model drug ranitidine hydrochloride from leaky enteric-coated pellets in fasted conditions and from immediate-release formulations were performed using computer simulations. Simulation results are consistent with a hypothesis that leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations provide sustained input for drugs shown to have an absorption window without decreasing bioavailability. The sustained input results from the combined effects of the formulation and GI transit effects on pellets. The present research demonstrates a new application of knowledge about gastrointestinal transit effects on drug formulations. It also shows that enteric-coating polymers have new applications in areas other than the usual enteric-coated formulations. The hypothesis that a leaky enteric-coated pellets formulation may maintain or increase the bioavailability of drugs that have a window of absorption

  15. Final report on LDRD project :leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas; Ongstand, Andrea; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Montano, Victoria A.

    2005-11-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ''Leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits''. Leaky-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) offer new possibilities for integration of microcavity lasers to create optical microsystems. A leaky-mode VCSEL output-couples light laterally, in the plane of the semiconductor wafer, which allows the light to interact with adjacent lasers, modulators, and detectors on the same wafer. The fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs based on effective index modification was proposed and demonstrated at Sandia in 1999 but was not adequately developed for use in applications. The aim of this LDRD has been to advance the design and fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs to the point where initial applications can be attempted. In the first and second years of this LDRD we concentrated on overcoming previous difficulties in the epitaxial growth and fabrication of these advanced VCSELs. In the third year, we focused on applications of leaky-mode VCSELs, such as all-optical processing circuits based on gain quenching.

  16. Inflammatory responses in mice after intratracheal instillation of spores of Streptomyces californicus isolated from indoor air of a moldy building.

    PubMed

    Jussila, J; Komulainen, H; Huttunen, K; Roponen, M; Hälinen, A; Hyvärinen, A; Kosma, V M; Pelkonen, J; Hirvonen, M R

    2001-02-15

    Microbial growth in buildings is associated with respiratory symptoms in the occupants. However, the specific effects of the microbes and the way they provoke clinical manifestations are poorly understood. In the current study, mice were exposed via intratracheal instillation to single doses of the spores of Streptomyces californicus, isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building (2.2 x 10(7), 1.1 x 10(8), and 3.3 x 10(8) spores), or lipopolysaccharide (50 microg). Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 24 h later. The time course of the effects was explored with the dose of 1.1 x 10(8) spores for up to 7 days. The microbial spores elevated proinflammatory cytokine (i.e., TNFalpha and IL-6) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in serum in a dose- and time-dependent manner and evoked expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in BAL cells. Both TNFalpha and IL-6 responses peaked at 6 h after instillation, but TNFalpha leveled off more quickly than IL-6. The cytokine surge was followed by inflammatory cell recruitment into airways. Moreover, the spores increased dose- and time-dependently total protein, albumin, hemoglobin, and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations in BALF during the first 24 h. Histopathological examination of lungs confirmed the inflammatory changes. With the exception of macrophage and lymphocyte numbers, all parameters returned to control level at 7 days. In summary, these observations indicate that the spores of S. californicus are capable of provoking an acute inflammation in mouse lungs and can cause cytotoxicity. Thus, S. californicus can be considered as a species with potential to cause adverse health effects in occupants of moisture-damaged buildings.

  17. Spores of Aspergillus versicolor isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building provoke acute inflammation in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Nevalainen, Aino; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-12-01

    Microbial growth in moisture-damaged buildings has been associated with respiratory health effects, and the spores of the mycotoxin producing fungus Aspergillus versicolor are frequently present in the indoor air. To characterize the potential of these spores to cause harmful respiratory effects, mice were exposed via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of the spores of A. versicolor (1 x 10(5), 1 x 10(6), 5 x 10(6), 1 x 10(7), or 1 x 10(8) spores), isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building. Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 24 h later by assessment of biochemical markers and histopathology. The time course of the effects was investigated with the dose of 5 x 10(6) spores for up to 28 days. The exposure to the spores increased transiently proinflammatory cytokine levels (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] alpha and interleukin [IL]-6) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The cytokine responses were dose and time dependent. The highest cytokine concentrations were measured at 6 h after the dose, and they returned to the control level by 3 days. Moreover, the spores of A. versicolor recruited inflammatory cells into airways: Neutrophils peaked transiently at 24 h, macrophages at 3 days, and lymphocytes at 7 days after the dosing. The inflammatory cell response did not completely disappear during the subsequent 28 days, though no histopathological changes were seen at that time point. The spores did not induce expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lavaged cells. Only the highest spore dose (1 x 10(8)) markedly increased serum IL-6, increased vascular leakage, and caused cytotoxicity (i.e., increased levels of albumin, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], and hemoglobin in BALF) in the airways. In summary, the spores of A. versicolor caused acute inflammation in mouse lungs. This indicates that they have potential to provoke adverse health effects in the occupants of moisture-damaged buildings.

  18. Nonlinear identification of base-isolated buildings by reverse path method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liyu; Mita, Akira

    2009-03-01

    The performance of reverse path methods applied to identify the underlying linear model of base-isolated structures is investigated. The nonlinear rubber bearings are considered as nonlinear components attached to an underlying linear model. The advantage of reverse path formulation is that it can separate the linearity and nonlinearity of the structure, extract the nonlinearity and identify the underlying linear structure. The difficulty lies in selecting the nonlinearity function of the hysteretic force due to its multi-valued property and path-dependence. In the thesis, the hysteretic force is approximated by the polynomial series of displacement and velocity. The reverse path formulation is solved by Nonlinear Identification through Feedback of Output (NIFO) methods using least-square solution. Numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the identification performance.

  19. Design/build/mockup of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Knight, C.J.; Michelbacher, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    A glovebox was designed, fabricated, and mocked-up for the WIPP Gas Generation Experiments (GGE) being conducted at ANL-W. GGE will determine the gas generation rates from materials in contact handled transuranic waste at likely long term repository temperature and pressure conditions. Since the customer`s schedule did not permit time for performing R&D of the support systems, designing the glovebox, and fabricating the glovebox in a serial fashion, a parallel approach was undertaken. As R&D of the sampling system and other support systems was initiated, a specification was written concurrently for contracting a manufacturer to design and build the glovebox and support equipment. The contractor understood that the R&D being performed at ANL-W would add additional functional requirements to the glovebox design. Initially, the contractor had sufficient information to design the glovebox shell. Once the shell design was approved, ANL-W built a full scale mockup of the shell out of plywood and metal framing; support systems were mocked up and resultant information was forwarded to the glovebox contractor to incorporate into the design. This approach resulted in a glovebox being delivered to ANL-W on schedule and within budget.

  20. Simulation of gaseous pollutant dispersion around an isolated building using the k-ω SST (shear stress transport) turbulence model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hesheng; Thé, Jesse

    2017-05-01

    in the literature. Comparison between the performances of [Formula: see text] and AERMOD shows that the CFD simulation is superior to Gaussian-type model for pollutant dispersion in the near wake of obstacles. AERMOD can perform as a screening tool for near-field gas dispersion due to its expeditious calculation and the ability to handle complicated cases. The utilization of [Formula: see text] to simulate gaseous pollutant dispersion around an isolated building is appropriate and is expected to be suitable for complex urban environment.

  1. Mycobacterium terrae isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building induces sustained biphasic inflammatory response in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Huttunen, Kati; Roponen, Marjut; Iivanainen, Eila; Torkko, Pirjo; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-11-01

    Occupants in moisture-damaged buildings suffer frequently from respiratory symptoms. This may be partly due to the presence of abnormal microbial growth or the altered microbial flora in the damaged buildings. However, the specific effects of the microbes on respiratory health and the way they provoke clinical manifestations are poorly understood. In the present study, we exposed mice via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of Mycobacterium terrae isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building (1 X 10(7), 5 X 10(7), or 1 X 10(8) microbes). Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 2 hr later. The time course of the effects was assessed with the dose of 1 X 10(8) bacterial cells for up to 28 days. M. terrae caused a sustained biphasic inflammation in mouse lungs. The characteristic features for the first phase, which lasted from 6 hr to 3 days, were elevated proinflammatory cytokine [i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). TNF-alpha was produced in the lungs more intensively than was IL-6. Neutrophils were the most abundant cells in the airways during the first phase, although their numbers in BALF remained elevated up to 21 days. The characteristics of the second phase, which lasted from 7 to 28 days, were elevated TNF-alpha levels in BALF, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in BAL cells, and recruitment of mononuclear cells such as lymphocytes and macrophages into the airways. Moreover, total protein, albumin, and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were elevated in both phases in BALF. The bacteria were detected in lungs up to 28 days. In summary, these observations indicate that M. terrae is capable of provoking a sustained, biphasic inflammation in mouse lungs and can cause a moderate degree of cytotoxicity. Thus, M. terrae can be considered a species with potential to adversely affect the health of the occupants of moisture

  2. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  3. Leaky lamb waves of a piezoelectric plate subjected to conductive fluid loading: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Chun; Kuo, Shi Hoa

    2006-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel experimental method for measuring the propagating characteristics of leaky Lamb waves in a piezoelectric plate surrounded by a fluid. It is a differential type of measurement and is very sensitive to the velocity change and wave attenuation of leaky Lamb waves induced by fluid-loading effects. Experimental measurements on an X-cut LiNbO3 plate immersed in a dielectric and conductive fluid have been carried out. The velocity change and wave attenuation of the leaky Lamb waves caused by dielectric and conductive loadings of the fluid have been experimentally determined. The measured data have been compared with the theoretical ones that are calculated from a partial wave analysis. For the wave velocity, very good agreements between the experimental and theoretical results are observed. For the wave attenuation, there are some discrepancies, but an important characteristic in the relationship between wave attenuation and fluid conductivity as predicted by the theory have been verified experimentally.

  4. Continuous leaky-wave scanning using periodically modulated spoof plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Gu Sheng; Ma, Hui Feng; Cai, Ben Geng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    The plasmonic waveguide made of uniform corrugated metallic strip can support and guide spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) with high confinements. Here, we propose periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide composed of non-uniform corrugated metallic strip to convert SSPPs to radiating waves, in which the main beam of radiations can steer continuously as the frequency changes. To increase the radiation efficiency of the periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide at the broadside, an asymmetrical plasmonic waveguide is further presented to reduce the reflections and realize continuous leaky-wave scanning. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the radiation efficiency can be improved greatly and the main beam of leaky-wave radiations can steer from the backward quadrant to the forward quadrant, passing through the broadside direction, which generally is difficult to be realized by the common leaky-wave antennas. PMID:27404740

  5. Analysis and Synthesis of Leaky-Wave Devices in Planar Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Ros, Alejandro Javier

    The work developed along this doctoral thesis has been focused on the analysis and synthesis of microwave devices in planar technology. In particular, several types of devices based on the radiation mechanism of leaky waves have been studied. Typically, the radiation properties in leaky-wave devices are determined by the complex propagation constant of the leaky mode, wherein the phase constant is responsible for the pointing angle and the leakage rate for the intensity of the radiated fields. In this manner, by controlling both amplitude and phase of the leaky mode, an effective control over the device's radiation diagram can be obtained. Moreover, with the purpose of efficiently obtaining the leaky mode's radiation properties as function of the main geometrical parameters of the structure, several modal tools based on the transverse resonance analysis of the structure have been performed. In order to demonstrate this simultaneous control over the complex propagation constant in planar technology, several types of leaky-wave devices, including antennas (LWAs), multiplexors and near-field focusing systems, have been designed and manufactured in the technology of substrate integrated waveguide (SIW). This recently proposed technology, allows the design of devices based on classical waveguide technology with standard manufacturing techniques used for printed circuit board (PCB) designs. In this way, most of the parts that form a communication system can be integrated into a single substrate, thus reducing its cost and providing a more robust and compact device, which has less losses compared to other planar technologies such as the microstrip. El trabajo llevado a cabo durante la realizacion de esta tesis doctoral, se ha centrado en el analisis y sintesis de dispositivos de microondas en tecnologia planar. En concreto, se han estudiado diferentes tipos de dispositivos basados en radiacion por ondas de fuga "leaky waves", en los cuales las propiedades de radiacion

  6. Preventing gut leakiness by oats supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzian, A; Choudhary, S; Holmes, E W; Yong, S; Banan, A; Jakate, S; Fields, J Z

    2001-11-01

    Only 30% of alcoholics develop liver disease (ALD) suggesting that additional factors are needed. Endotoxin is one such factor, but its etiology is unclear. Since the gut is the main source of endotoxin, we sought to determine whether an increase in intestinal permeability (leaky gut) is required for alcohol-induced endotoxemia and liver injury and whether the gut leakiness is preventable. For 10 weeks, rats received by gavage increasing alcohol doses (to 8 g/kg/day) and either oats (10 g/kg) or chow b.i.d. Intestinal permeability was then assessed by urinary excretion of lactulose and mannitol. Liver injury was evaluated histologically, biochemically (liver fat content), and by serum aminotransferase. Alcohol caused gut leakiness that was associated with both endotoxemia and liver injury. Oats prevented these changes. We conclude that chronic gavage of alcohol in rats is a simple experimental model that mimics key aspects of ALD, including endotoxemia and liver injury, and can be useful to study possible mechanisms of endotoxemia in ALD. Since preventing the gut leakiness by oats also prevented the endotoxemia and ameliorated liver damage in rat, our results suggest that alcohol-induced gut leakiness 1) may cause alcohol-induced endotoxemia and liver injury and 2) may be the critical cofactor in the 30% of alcoholics who develop ALD. Further studies are needed to determine whether ALD in humans can be prevented by preventing alcohol-induced gut leakiness, studies that should lead to the development of useful therapeutic agents for the prevention of ALD.

  7. A biological plausible Generalized Leaky Integrate-and-Fire neuron model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenzhong; Guo, Lilin; Adjouadi, Malek

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces a new Generalized Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (GLIF) neuron model. Unlike Normal Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (NLIF) models, the leaking resistor in the GLIF model equation is assumed to be variable, and an additional term would have the bias current added to the model equation in order to improve the accuracy. Adjusting the parameters defined for the leaking resistor and bias current, a GLIF model could be accurately matched to any Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model and be able to reproduce plausible biological neuron behaviors.

  8. Experimental realization of a variable index transmission line metamaterial as an acoustic leaky-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Layman, Christopher N.; Martin, Theodore P.; Nicholas, Michael; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2013-05-01

    Development and experimental realization of an acoustic leaky wave antenna are presented. The antenna uses a one-dimensional composite right/left hand transmission line approach to tune radiation angle continually from backfire-to-endfire, including broadside, as a function of input frequency. An array of acoustically loaded membranes and open channels form a structure with negative, zero, or positive refractive index, depending on excitation frequency. The fast-wave radiation band of the antenna is determined using acoustic circuit analysis. Based on the designs specified by circuit and finite element analysis, an acoustic leaky wave antenna was fabricated, and the radiation direction measured at discrete frequencies.

  9. A modeling investigation of the impact of street and building configurations on personal air pollutant exposure in isolated deep urban canyons.

    PubMed

    Ng, Wai-Yin; Chau, Chi-Kwan

    2014-01-15

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of different configurations for two building design elements, namely building permeability and setback, proposed for mitigating air pollutant exposure problems in isolated deep canyons by using an indirect exposure approach. The indirect approach predicted the exposures of three different population subgroups (i.e. pedestrians, shop vendors and residents) by multiplying the pollutant concentrations with the duration of exposure within a specific micro-environment. In this study, the pollutant concentrations for different configurations were predicted using a computational fluid dynamics model. The model was constructed based on the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the standard k-ε turbulence model. Fifty-one canyon configurations with aspect ratios of 2, 4, 6 and different building permeability values (ratio of building spacing to the building façade length) or different types of building setback (recess of a high building from the road) were examined. The findings indicated that personal exposures of shop vendors were extremely high if they were present inside a canyon without any setback or separation between buildings and when the prevailing wind was perpendicular to the canyon axis. Building separation and building setbacks were effective in reducing personal air exposures in canyons with perpendicular wind, although their effectiveness varied with different configurations. Increasing the permeability value from 0 to 10% significantly lowered the personal exposures on the different population subgroups. Likewise, the personal exposures could also be reduced by the introduction of building setbacks despite their effects being strongly influenced by the aspect ratio of a canyon. Equivalent findings were observed if the reduction in the total development floor area (the total floor area permitted to be developed within a particular site area) was also considered. These findings were employed to

  10. Significance of stiffening of high damping rubber bearings on the response of base-isolated buildings under near-fault earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhan, Cenk; Gazi, Hatice; Kurtuluş, Hakan

    2016-10-01

    High Damping Rubber Bearings (HDRBs) are among various types of laterally flexible isolation system elements that effectively protect structures from detrimental effects of earthquakes by lengthening their fundamental periods. However, large isolator displacements resulting in strains larger than 100% may come into scene in case of near-fault ground motions containing long-period and large-amplitude velocity and/or displacement pulses. This is particularly important when HDRBs are used since the post-yield stiffness of an HDRB increases due to inherent strain hardening characteristics when a threshold isolator displacement limit is exceeded. Therefore, it may be critical to consider the stiffening of HDRBs in modeling of these elements for accurate seismic response evaluation of the buildings equipped with HDRBs that are located in near-fault regions. In this study, the significance of stiffening of HDRBs on the response of base-isolated buildings is investigated by conducting nonlinear time history analyses of benchmark six-story base-isolated buildings which employ HDRBs that are represented by non-stiffening or stiffening models under both historical and synthetic near-fault ground motions of various magnitudes and fault distances. The structural response parameters included in the comparisons are base displacements, story drifts, and floor accelerations. It is found that, the significance of stiffening of HDRBs on the response of base-isolated buildings under near-fault earthquakes becomes more prominent as the earthquake magnitude increases and the fault distance decreases and thus suggestions for modifications to seismic code regulations are made accordingly.

  11. Analysis of radial movement of an unconfined leaky aquifer due to well pumping and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang

    2007-09-01

    Radial movement of an unconfined leaky aquifer was studied with respect to hydraulic forces that are induced by well recharge and discharge. New analytic solutions in the velocity and displacement fields were found and applied to describe transient movement in an unconfined leaky aquifer. Linear momentum and mass balance of saturated porous sediments, the Darcy-Gersevanov law, and the analytic solution of hydraulic drawdown for unsteady flow within the unconfined leaky aquifer were introduced to find the new solutions. Analytic results indicate that the nonlinear relation between the initial hydraulic head (h0) and the well function has an insignificant effect on the aquifer transient movement when the drawdown s<0.02 h 0. When the well function is simplified with different assumptions and pumping conditions, the new solutions correspondingly reduce to cases that are similar to the Hantush-Jacob, Muskat, and Theis transient movement of a confined leaky aquifer. It was found that large leakance is important in slowing radial movement and reducing aquifer deformation. Flow velocity in the aquifer is more responsive to leakance than to cumulative displacement within the aquifer. The zones and boundary with tensile stress can be located using the same approach applied to a confined aquifer for risk assessment of earth fissuring.

  12. Mode structure in the far field radiation of a leaky-wave multiple quantum well laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nekorkin, S M; Zvonkov, B N; Karzanova, Maria V; Dikareva, Natalia V; Aleshkin, V Ya; Dubinov, A A

    2012-10-31

    The radiation patterns of a leaky-wave InGaAs/GaAs/InGaP laser are studied. In the subthreshold regime, several peaks are found, corresponding to the emission of fundamental and excited modes. The dependences of the amplitude, position and width of the peaks on the pump current are investigated and explained. (measurement of laser radiation parameters)

  13. Real-Time Characterization of Materials Degradation Using Leaky Lamb Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiuh, S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Leaky Lamb wave (LLW) propagation in composite materials has been studied extensively since it was first observed in 1982. The wave is induced using a pitch-catch arrangement and the plate wave modes are detected by searching minima in the reflected spectra.

  14. How to Say "No" to a Nonword: A Leaky Competing Accumulator Model of Lexical Decision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufau, Stephane; Grainger, Jonathan; Ziegler, Johannes C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a leaky competing accumulator (LCA) model of the lexical decision task that can be used as a response/decision module for any computational model of word recognition. The LCA model uses evidence for a word, operationalized as some measure of lexical activity, as input to the "YES" decision node. Input to the "NO" decision node is…

  15. SOLUTIONS APPROXIMATING SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A LEAKY AQUIFER RECEIVING WASTEWATER INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state ...

  16. AC field induced-charge electroosmosis over leaky dielectric blocks embedded in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-02-01

    An effective electrical boundary condition is formulated to describe AC field-driven induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) phenomena at the interface between a liquid and a leaky dielectric solid. Since most materials in reality possess finite dielectric and conductive properties, i.e. leaky dielectric, the present boundary condition can be used to describe the induced zeta potential on a leaky dielectric surface with consideration of both bond charges (due to polarization) and free charges (due to conduction). Two well-known limiting cases, i.e. the perfectly dielectric and the perfectly conducting wall boundary conditions can be recovered from the present formulation. Utilizing the derived boundary condition, we obtain analytical solutions in closed form for the AC field-driven induced-charge electroosmosis (ICEO) over two symmetric leaky dielectric blocks embedded in the walls of an infinitely long microchannel. Two important factors for the induced zeta potential are identified to respectively account for the polarization charges and the free charges, and their effects on AC field-driven ICEO oscillating flow patterns are analyzed. It is found that the flow patterns exhibit two counter-rotating vortices, which can be deformed, relocated, eliminated and even reverse their rotating directions. It is very promising that such temporary evolution of flow patterns can possibly induce chaotic advection which can enhance microfluidic mixing.

  17. Linking the "Leaky Edges" of the Outside with the Individual Inside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, David Lee

    2007-01-01

    Throughout seven years of teaching in urban schools, the author discovered that the most effective ways to teach difficult literary texts was to refer to students' out-of-school activities. In other words, to connect the "leaky edges of the "social outside"" with the "individual inside" is to create a curriculum of…

  18. If you build it will they come? Addressing social isolation within a technology-based HIV intervention for young black men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn E; Pike, Emily C; Baltierra, Nina; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2014-01-01

    The rate of HIV infections among young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) continues to rise at an alarming pace. YBMSM are particularly vulnerable to social isolation and a lack of social support due to experiences with racism and homophobia, which may have implications for sexual risk behaviors. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of social isolation and sense of community among YBMSM, the need for and receptivity to social networking features designed to reduce social isolation and build community within an Internet- and mobile phone-based primary and secondary HIV prevention intervention for YBMSM and to identify strategies to develop these features. Focus groups were conducted with 22 YBMSM aged 20-30 years at three sites in North Carolina. Data from the focus groups were thematically analyzed using NVivo. Feelings of social isolation and lack of a sense of community were strongly endorsed by participants with homophobia, lack of opportunities for social engagement, and a focus on sex rather than friendship in interpersonal relationships with other YBMSM cited as contributing factors. Participants were receptive to a social networking intervention designed to reduce social isolation and build community. Recommendations offered by participants to increase acceptability and usability of such features included: availability of information about healthy relationships, the ability to connect with other YBMSM and health care providers, and ensuring the site had ongoing facilitation by the study team as well as monitoring for inappropriate content. The development of a social networking feature of an HIV prevention intervention may present an opportunity to reduce social isolation, build community, and reduce risky sexual behaviors among YBMSM. The findings from this study are being used to inform the development of a social networking feature for an existing Internet- and mobile phone-based primary and secondary HIV prevention intervention for

  19. If you build it will they come? Addressing social isolation within a technology-based HIV intervention for young black men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Pike, Emily C.; Baltierra, Nina; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.

    2014-01-01

    The rate of HIV infections among young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) continues to rise at an alarming pace. YBMSM are particularly vulnerable to social isolation and a lack of social support due to experiences with racism and homophobia, which may have implications for sexual risk behaviors. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of social isolation and sense of community among YBMSM, the need for and receptivity to social networking features designed to reduce social isolation and build community within an internet and mobile phone-based primary and secondary HIV prevention intervention for YBMSM and to identify strategies to develop these features. Focus groups were conducted with 22 YBMSM ages 20–30 at three sites in North Carolina. Data from the focus groups were thematically analyzed using NVivo. Feelings of social isolation and lack of a sense of community were strongly endorsed by participants with homophobia, lack of opportunities for social engagement, and a focus on sex rather than friendship in interpersonal relationships with other YBMSM cited as contributing factors. Participants were receptive to a social networking intervention designed to reduce social isolation and build community. Recommendations offered by participants to increase acceptability and usability of such features included: availability of information about healthy relationships, the ability to connect with other YBMSM and health care providers, and ensuring the site had ongoing facilitation by the study team as well as monitoring for inappropriate content. The development of a social networking feature of an HIV prevention intervention may present an opportunity to reduce social isolation, build community and reduce risky sexual behaviors among YBMSM. The findings from this study are being used to inform the development of a social networking feature for an existing internet and mobile phone-based primary and secondary HIV prevention intervention for YBMSM

  20. An exact solution to a line-sink in a leaky aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusyev, M. A.; Haitjema, H. M.

    2007-12-01

    By use of Wirtinger calculus we obtained an exact solution for a line-sink in a leaky aquifer by integrating the potential for a well in a leaky aquifer. The potential for a well in a leaky aquifer is the modified Bessel function of the second kind and zero order K0, which can be represented by an infinite series. Theoretically, this series expansion for the well is exact, although numerical evaluation will only give exact results within some finite distance from the well, depending on machine accuracy. For a double precision machine this distance is about to 18λ, whereby λ is the "leakage factor" or "characteristic leakage length" which depends on the aquifer properties. Earlier solutions that were based on an approximation to the function K0 limited the domain of validity even more; from 2λ to 8λ away from the well. As a result, these earlier (approximate) solutions for a well in a leaky aquifer limited the length of the line-sink along which it could be integrated to approximately λ. It appears that our use of the infinite series (exact representation of K0), makes it possible to formulate a solution for a line-sink of any length, thus avoiding to need to break up line-sinks into smaller sections as has been done to date. Formulating our solution in terms of the complex variable z and its conjugate \\bar{z}, using Wirtinger calculus, also allows us to calculate the exact integrated steady-state flow induced by the line-sink across an arbitrarily placed line element. This feature is often necessary in the context of the analytic element method in order to satisfy boundary conditions in terms of integrated fluxes, such as no-flow boundaries or leaky walls. The capability to accurately calculate such integrated fluxes across line elements is also important in order to obtain the integrated leakage over a domain by applying water balance rather than (numerically) integrating the leakage directly. The new solution is particularly suitable for use in analytic

  1. A Review of the Ginzburg-Syrovatskii's Galactic Cosmic-Ray Propagation Model and its Leaky-Box Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Phenomenological models of galactic cosmic-ray propagation are based on a diffusion equation known as the Ginzburg-Syrovatskii s equation, or variants (or limits) of this equation. Its one-dimensional limit in a homogeneous volume, known as the leaky-box limit or model, is sketched here. The justification, utility, limitations, and a typical numerical implementation of the leaky-box model are examined in some detail.

  2. Dirac leaky-wave antennas for continuous beam scanning from photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Memarian, Mohammad; Eleftheriades, George V

    2015-01-05

    Leaky-Wave Antennas (LWAs) enable directive and scannable radiation patterns, which are highly desirable attributes at terahertz, infrared and optical frequencies. However, a LWA is generally incapable of continuous beam scanning through broadside, due to an open stopband in its dispersion characteristic. This issue is yet to be addressed at frequencies beyond microwaves, mainly as existing microwave solutions (for example, transmission line metamaterials) are unavailable at these higher frequencies. Here we report leaky-wave radiation from the interface of a photonic crystal (PC) with a Dirac-type dispersion and air. The resulting Dirac LWA (DLWA) can radiate at broadside, chiefly owing to the closed Γ-point bandgap of the Dirac PC. Thus, the DLWA can continuously scan a directive beam over a wide range of angles by varying the frequency. These DLWAs can be designed at microwave as well as terahertz to optical frequencies, with feasible dimensions and low losses.

  3. Leaky waveguides for low ҡ-measurement: From structure design to loss evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächter, Christoph; Rizzo, Riccardo; Michelotti, Francesco; Munzert, Peter; Danz, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    For high quality optical coatings the knowledge of the losses of the deposited materials is essential. A precise measurement of low Im(n+iκ)<= 10-6 at an intended operation wavelength and with low intensity can be achieved in waveguide configurations, whereby leaky waveguide configurations allow one to analyze losses of high- and low-index media of H-L-stacks as well due to resonances in the angle-dependent reflection curve. Numerical investigations reveal that different leaky wave schemes, e.g. Bragg-, Bloch- and Antiresonant-Reflecting waveguides, comply differently with practical requests. Loss figure evaluation requires peculiar attention due to measurement accuracy and ambiguities, thus suitable constraints for layer data and a proper merit-function construction have to be used.

  4. A leaky-integrator model as a control mechanism underlying flexible decision making during task switching.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Akinori; Sasaki, Ryo; Oizumi, Masafumi; Uka, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    The ability to switch between tasks is critical for animals to behave according to context. Although the association between the prefrontal cortex and task switching has been well documented, the ultimate modulation of sensory-motor associations has yet to be determined. Here, we modeled the results of a previous study showing that task switching can be accomplished by communication from distinct populations of sensory neurons. We proposed a leaky-integrator model where relevant and irrelevant information were stored separately in two integrators and task switching was achieved by leaking information from the irrelevant integrator. The model successfully explained both the behavioral and neuronal data. Additionally, the leaky-integrator model showed better performance than an alternative model, where irrelevant information was discarded by decreasing the weight on irrelevant information, when animals initially failed to commit to a task. Overall, we propose that flexible switching is, in part, achieved by actively controlling the amount of leak of relevant and irrelevant information.

  5. Spreading of Thin Droplets of Perfect and Leaky Dielectric Liquids on Inclined Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Andrew; Kumar, Satish

    2016-07-05

    The spreading of droplets may be influenced by electric fields, a situation that is relevant to applications such as coating, printing, and microfluidics. In this work we study the effects of an electric field on the gravity-driven spreading of two-dimensional droplets down an inclined plane. We consider both perfect and leaky dielectric liquids, as well as perfectly and partially wetting systems. In addition to the effects of electric fields, we examine the use of thermocapillary forces to suppress the growth of the capillary ridge near the droplet front. Lubrication theory is applied to generate a set of coupled partial differential equations for interfacial height and charge, which are then solved numerically with a finite-difference method. Electric fields increase the height of the capillary ridge in both perfect and leaky dielectric droplets due to electrostatic pressure gradients that drive liquid into the ridge. In leaky dielectrics, large interfacial charge gradients in the contact-line region create shear stresses that also enhance ridge growth and the formation of trailing minor ridges. The coalescence of these ridges can significantly affect the long-time thinning rate of leaky dielectric droplets. In partially wetting liquids, electric fields promote the splitting of smaller droplets from the primary droplet near the receding contact line due to the interplay between electrostatic forces and disjoining pressure. Cooling from below and heating from above generates thermocapillary forces that counteract the effects of electric fields and suppress the growth of the capillary ridge. The results of this work have important implications for manipulating the spreading of droplets down inclined surfaces.

  6. Robust sound onset detection using leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with depressing synapses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leslie S; Fraser, Dagmar S

    2004-09-01

    A biologically inspired technique for detecting onsets in sound is presented. Outputs from a cochlea-like filter are spike coded, in a way similar to the auditory nerve (AN). These AN-like spikes are presented to a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron through a depressing synapse. Onsets are detected with essentially zero latency relative to these AN spikes. Onset detection results for a tone burst, musical sounds and the DARPA/NIST TIMIT speech corpus are presented.

  7. Material Perturbations to Enhance Performance of the Thiele Half-Width Leaky Mode Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-19

    purposely suppressing the dominant mode in his antenna design by cutting sev transverse slots in the top conductor (see Figure 1) [3]. Recently, Dr Gary...78. J.L. Gomez-Tornero, A.T. Martinez, D.C. Rebenaque, M. Gugliemi, and A. Alvarez- Melcon, “ Design of tapered leaky-wave antennas in hybrid waveguide ...behavior for a microstrip antenna . It will be shown how the analysis can be used to extract the desired bandwidth of the radiation regime. The second

  8. Introducing leaky-well concept for stormwater quantity control in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahammed, Faisal; Hewa, Guna Alankarage; Argue, John R.

    2013-03-01

    Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh with rapid and unplanned urbanization, is subjected to annual average rainfall of 2,076 mm. The intensity of rainfall during 10 years recurrence interval and 1 h duration of the city is 98 mm/h. The stormwater drainage systems of the city are often unable to manage peak runoff volume and hence urban flooding is common after medium to heavy rainfall events. A proposal to introduce leaky-wells using water sensitive urban design (WSUD) principles was investigated for Dhaka's drainage network to transfer the present unsatisfactory situation into one which is sustainable. The regime in balance strategy was considered to control the stormwater for 100 years recurrence interval. We applied scaling theory to 57 years (1953-2009) daily rainfall data for the estimation of sub-daily rainfall intensity values. It was found that two leaky-wells; each with depth H = 2.0 m and diameter D = 2.0 m, in 500 m2 allotment can improve the situation. The emptying (drain) time of the proposed device is around 1.25 days, which meets the standard criterion. Groundwater table, soil hydraulic conductivity and topographic slope of Dhaka also support for installations of leaky-wells.

  9. Numerical simulation of the leaky dielectric microdroplet generation in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Reza; Manshadi, Mohammad Karim Dehghan

    2016-07-01

    Microdroplet generation has a vast range of applications in the chemical, biomedical, and biological sciences. Several devices are applied to produce microdroplets, such as Co-flow, T-junction and Flow-focusing. The important point in the producing process is controlling the separated fluid volume in these devices. On the other hand, a large number of liquids, especially aqueous one, are influenced by electric or magnetic fields. As a consequence, an electric field could be used in order to affect the separated fluid volume. In this study, effects of an electric field on the microdroplet generation in a Co-flow device are investigated numerically. Furthermore, effects of some electrical properties such as permittivity on the separating process of microdroplets are studied. Leaky dielectric and perfect dielectric models are used in this investigation. According to the results, in the microdroplet generating process, leaky dielectric fluids show different behaviors, when an electric field is applied to the device. In other words, in a constant electric field strength, the volume of generated microdroplets can increase or decrease, in comparison with the condition without the electric field. However, for perfect dielectric fluids, droplet volume always decreases with increasing the electric field strength. In order to validate the numerical method of this study, deformation of a leaky dielectric droplet in an electric field is investigated. Results are compared with Taylor theoretical model.

  10. Keeping track of the distance from home by leaky integration along veering paths.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Markus; Stiels, Maren; Frenz, Harald; Loomis, Jack M

    2011-07-01

    When humans use vision to gauge the travel distance of an extended forward movement, they often underestimate the movement's extent. This underestimation can be explained by leaky path integration, an integration of the movement to obtain distance. Distance underestimation occurs because this integration is imperfect and contains a leak that increases with distance traveled. We asked human observers to estimate the distance from a starting location for visually simulated movements in a virtual environment. The movements occurred along curved paths that veered left and right around a central forward direction. In this case, the distance that has to be integrated (i.e., the beeline distance between origin and endpoint) and the distance that is traversed (the path length along the curve) are distinct. We then tested whether the leak accumulated with distance from the origin or with traversed distance along the curved path. Leaky integration along the path makes the seemingly counterintuitive prediction that the estimated origin-to-endpoint distance should decrease with increasing veering, because the length of the path over which the integration occurs increases, leading to a larger leak effect. The results matched the prediction: movements of identical origin-to-endpoint distance were judged as shorter when the path became longer. We conclude that leaky path integration from visual motion is performed along the traversed path even when a straight beeline distance is calculated.

  11. Leaky modes and the first arrivals in cased boreholes with poorly bonded conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XiuMei; Wang, XiuMing; Zhang, HaiLan

    2016-02-01

    The generation mechanism of the first arrivals in the cased boreholes for the poorly bonded conditions is investigated. Based on the analyses of the Riemann surface structure of the characteristic function, the dispersion features, excitation spectra and contributions of modes excited in the cased boreholes with different cementing types are studied. The phase velocity dispersion studies of leaky modes show that high-order modes form "plateau" regions with one approximate velocity denoted by v separated by their cutoff frequencies, in which the phase velocity changes little with a considerable frequency range, while the group velocity keeps a relatively constant high value. Usually, the operation frequency range of a specific cementing evaluation acoustic logging tool is covered by such a "plateau" region. Mode excitation and contribution analyses show that the first arrivals in the cased boreholes for the poorly bonded conditions are the contributions from leaky modes, where the traveling velocity of the first arrivals processed by slowness time coherence (STC) method is equal to the approximated velocity v. Analyses on generation of leaky modes in the cased boreholes supplement the understanding of the generation mechanism of the first arrivals.

  12. Nonlinear electrohydrodynamics of leaky dielectric drops in the Quincke regime: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debasish; Saintillan, David

    2015-11-01

    The deformation of leaky dielectric drops in a dielectric fluid medium when subject to a uniform electric field is a classic electrohydrodynamic phenomenon best described by the well-known Melcher-Taylor leaky dielectric model. In this work, we develop a three-dimensional boundary element method for the full leaky dielectric model to systematically study the deformation and dynamics of liquid drops in strong electric fields. We compare our results with existing numerical studies, most of which have been constrained to axisymmetric drops or have neglected interfacial charge convection by the flow. The leading effect of convection is to enhance deformation of prolate drops and suppress deformation of oblate drops, as previously observed in the axisymmetric case. The inclusion of charge convection also enables us to investigate the dynamics in the Quincke regime, in which experiments exhibit a symmetry-breaking bifurcation leading to a tank-treading regime. Our simulations confirm the existence of this bifurcation for highly viscous drops, and also reveal the development of sharp interfacial charge gradients driven by convection near the drop's equator. American Chemical Society, Petroleum Research Fund.

  13. Chemical tricks to stabilize silanones and their heavier homologues with E=O bonds (E=Si-Pb): from elusive species to isolable building blocks.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yun; Yao, Shenglai; Driess, Matthias

    2013-04-15

    In contrast to the well-established chemistry of ketones (R2C=O), the reactivity of the elusive heavier congeners R2E=O (E=Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) is far less explored because of the high polarity of the E=O bonds and hence their tendency to oligomerize with no activation barrier. Very recently, great advances have been achieved in the synthesis of isolable compounds with E=O bonds, including the investigation of donor-stabilized isolable silanones and the first stable "genuine" germanone. These compounds show drastically different reactivities compared to ketones and represent versatile building blocks in silicon-oxygen and germanium-oxygen chemistry. This and other exciting achievements are described in this Minireview.

  14. Properties of Transmission and Leaky Modes in a Plasmonic Waveguide Constructed by Periodic Subwavelength Metallic Hollow Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jei Wu, Jin; Jang Wu, Chien; Qi Shen, Jian; Hou, Da Jun; Chen Lo, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Based on the concept of low-frequency spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof SPPs), a kind of leaky mode is proposed in a waveguide made of a subwavelength metal-block array with open slots. Numerical results reveal that a new transmission mode is found in the periodic subwavelength metal open blocks. This modal field is located inside the interior of a hollow block compared with that in a solid metal block array. The dispersion curve shows that such a new SPPs mode has a negative slope, crossing the light line, and then going into a zone of leaky mode at higher frequencies. The leaky mode has a wider frequency bandwidth, and this can lead to a radiation scanning angle of 53° together with high radiation efficiency. Based on the individual characteristics exhibited by a frequency-dependent radiation pattern for the present leaky mode, the waveguide structure can have potential applications such as frequency dividers and demultiplexers. Experimental verification of such a leaky mode at microwave has been performed, and the experimental results are found to be consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  15. Properties of Transmission and Leaky Modes in a Plasmonic Waveguide Constructed by Periodic Subwavelength Metallic Hollow Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Jei Wu, Jin; Jang Wu, Chien; Qi Shen, Jian; Hou, Da Jun; Chen Lo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Based on the concept of low-frequency spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof SPPs), a kind of leaky mode is proposed in a waveguide made of a subwavelength metal-block array with open slots. Numerical results reveal that a new transmission mode is found in the periodic subwavelength metal open blocks. This modal field is located inside the interior of a hollow block compared with that in a solid metal block array. The dispersion curve shows that such a new SPPs mode has a negative slope, crossing the light line, and then going into a zone of leaky mode at higher frequencies. The leaky mode has a wider frequency bandwidth, and this can lead to a radiation scanning angle of 53° together with high radiation efficiency. Based on the individual characteristics exhibited by a frequency-dependent radiation pattern for the present leaky mode, the waveguide structure can have potential applications such as frequency dividers and demultiplexers. Experimental verification of such a leaky mode at microwave has been performed, and the experimental results are found to be consistent with the theoretical analysis. PMID:26403387

  16. CFD simulation of pollutant dispersion around isolated buildings: on the role of convective and turbulent mass fluxes in the prediction accuracy.

    PubMed

    Gousseau, P; Blocken, B; van Heijst, G J F

    2011-10-30

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to predict wind flow and pollutant dispersion around buildings. The two most frequently used approaches are solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). In the present study, we compare the convective and turbulent mass fluxes predicted by these two approaches for two configurations of isolated buildings with distinctive features. We use this analysis to clarify the role of these two components of mass transport on the prediction accuracy of RANS and LES in terms of mean concentration. It is shown that the proper simulation of the convective fluxes is essential to predict an accurate concentration field. In addition, appropriate parameterization of the turbulent fluxes is needed with RANS models, while only the subgrid-scale effects are modeled with LES. Therefore, when the source is located outside of recirculation regions (case 1), both RANS and LES can provide accurate results. When the influence of the building is higher (case 2), RANS models predict erroneous convective fluxes and are largely outperformed by LES in terms of prediction accuracy of mean concentration. These conclusions suggest that the choice of the appropriate turbulence model depends on the configuration of the dispersion problem under study. It is also shown that for both cases LES predicts a counter-gradient mechanism of the streamwise turbulent mass transport, which is not reproduced by the gradient-diffusion hypothesis that is generally used with RANS models.

  17. A General Solution for Groundwater Flow in Estuarine Leaky Aquifer System with Considering Aquifer Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chia; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the urban and industrial developments near the coastal area are rapid and therefore the associated population grows dramatically. More and more water demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on heavy pumping in coastal area. The decline of groundwater table may result in the problems of seawater intrusion and/or land subsidence. Since the 1950s, numerous studies focused on the effect of tidal fluctuation on the groundwater flow in the coastal area. Many studies concentrated on the developments of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) analytical solutions describing the tide-induced head fluctuations. For example, Jacob (1950) derived an analytical solution of 1D groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with a boundary condition subject to sinusoidal oscillation. Jiao and Tang (1999) derived a 1D analytical solution of a leaky confined aquifer by considered a constant groundwater head in the overlying unconfined aquifer. Jeng et al. (2002) studied the tidal propagation in a coupled unconfined and confined costal aquifer system. Sun (1997) presented a 2D solution for groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary. Tang and Jiao (2001) derived a 2D analytical solution in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water. This study aims at developing a general analytical solution describing the head fluctuations in a 2D estuarine aquifer system consisted of an unconfined aquifer, a confined aquifer, and an aquitard between them. Both the confined and unconfined aquifers are considered to be anisotropic. The predicted head fluctuations from this solution will compare with the simulation results from the MODFLOW program. In addition, the solutions mentioned above will be shown to be special cases of the present solution. Some hypothetical cases regarding the head fluctuation in costal aquifers will be made to investigate the dynamic effects of water table fluctuation, hydrogeological conditions, and

  18. Leaky unstable modes and electromagnetic radiation amplification by an anisotropic plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.

    2015-09-15

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and a photoionized plasma slab with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution is studied. It is shown that the fields of leaky modes are amplified due to the development of aperiodic instability in the slab, which leads to an increase in both the reflected and transmitted fields. The transmitted field can significantly increase only if the slab thickness does not exceed the ratio of the speed of light to the electron plasma frequency, whereas there is no upper bound on the slab thickness for the reflected signal to be amplified.

  19. Diamond photonic crystal slab: leaky modes and modified photoluminescence emission of surface-deposited quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ondič, Lukáš; Babchenko, Oleg; Varga, Marián; Kromka, Alexander; Ctyroký, Jiří; Pelant, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Detailed analysis of a band diagram of a photonic crystal (PhC) slab prepared on a nano-diamond layer is presented. Even though the PhC is structurally imperfect, the existence of leaky modes, determined both theoretically and experimentally in the broad spectral region, implies that an efficient light interaction with a material periodicity occurs in the sample. It is shown that the luminescence emission spectrum of a light source placed directly on the PhC surface can be modified by employing the optical modes of the studied structure. We stress also the impact of intrinsic optical losses of the nano-diamond on this modification.

  20. JCMmode: an adaptive finite element solver for the computation of leaky modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschiedrich, Lin W.; Burger, Sven; Klose, Roland; Schaedle, Achim; Schmidt, Frank

    2005-03-01

    We present our simulation tool JCMmode for calculating propagating modes of an optical waveguide. As ansatz functions we use higher order, vectorial elements (Nedelec elements, edge elements). Further we construct transparent boundary conditions to deal with leaky modes even for problems with inhomogeneous exterior domains as for integrated hollow core Arrow waveguides. We have implemented an error estimator which steers the adaptive mesh refinement. This allows the precise computation of singularities near the metal's corner of a Plasmon-Polariton waveguide even for irregular shaped metal films on a standard personal computer.

  1. Inflammatory potential of the spores of Penicillium spinulosum isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-10-01

    Excess moisture and microbial growth have been associated with adverse health effects, especially in the airways, of the inhabitants of moisture-damaged buildings. The spores of Penicillium spp. are commonly present in the indoor air, both in moisture-damaged and in reference buildings, though their numbers seem to be significantly higher in the damaged buildings. To assess the potential of Penicillium spinulosum to evoke harmful respiratory effects, mice were exposed via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of the spores of P. spinulosum, isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building (1×10(5), 1×10(6), 5×10(6), 1×10(7) or 5×10(7) spores). Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 24 h later. The time-course of the effects was investigated with the dose of 5×10(6) spores for 28 days. The fungal spores caused mild transient inflammation. The spore exposure transiently increased proinflammatory cytokine (TNFα and IL-6) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The highest concentrations of both cytokines were measured at 6 h after a single dosage. The spore exposure did not cause expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lavaged cells. Neutrophils were acutely recruited into airways, but the response leveled off in 3 days. Neither cytotoxicity nor major changes in vascular permeability (i.e. increases in albumin, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase or hemoglobin levels in BALF) were observed in the lungs. Considering the profile and magnitude of the changes and the dose of the spores, we conclude that P. spinulosum has a low potential to cause acute respiratory inflammation, nor does it cause direct cytotoxicity.

  2. Resonant absorption in semiconductor nanowires and nanowire arrays: Relating leaky waveguide modes to Bloch photonic crystal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Fountaine, Katherine T.; Whitney, William S.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2014-10-21

    We present a unified framework for resonant absorption in periodic arrays of high index semiconductor nanowires that combines a leaky waveguide theory perspective and that of photonic crystals supporting Bloch modes, as array density transitions from sparse to dense. Full dispersion relations are calculated for each mode at varying illumination angles using the eigenvalue equation for leaky waveguide modes of an infinite dielectric cylinder. The dispersion relations along with symmetry arguments explain the selectivity of mode excitation and spectral red-shifting of absorption for illumination parallel to the nanowire axis in comparison to perpendicular illumination. Analysis of photonic crystal band dispersion for varying array density illustrates that the modes responsible for resonant nanowire absorption emerge from the leaky waveguide modes.

  3. Evaluation of layer thickness in human teeth using higher-order-mode leaky Lamb wave interdigital transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Toda, Shinji; Fujita, Takeshi; Arakawa, Hirohisa; Toda, Kohji

    2005-03-01

    An ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation technique of the layer thickness in human teeth is proposed using a leaky Lamb wave device with two arch-shaped interdigital transducers, operating at a plate/water interface. The use of a higher-order-mode leaky Lamb wave with a phase velocity higher than the longitudinal wave velocity in the human tooth is essential to detect reflected ultrasound beams from the tooth section The layer thickness of dentin, estimated from the measured time interval between two reflected echoes, is in good agreement with the optically measured data.

  4. Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2012-12-15

    A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

  5. Leaky RyR2 channels unleash a brainstem spreading depolarization mechanism of sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Isamu; Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory failure is the most common cause of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Genetic autopsies have detected “leaky” gain-of-function mutations in the ryanodine receptor-2 (RyR2) gene in both SUDEP and sudden cardiac death cases linked to catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that feature lethal cardiac arrhythmias without structural abnormality. Here we find that a human leaky RyR2 mutation, R176Q (RQ), alters neurotransmitter release probability in mice and significantly lowers the threshold for spreading depolarization (SD) in dorsal medulla, leading to cardiorespiratory collapse. Rare episodes of sinus bradycardia, spontaneous seizure, and sudden death were detected in RQ/+ mutant mice in vivo; however, when provoked, cortical seizures frequently led to apneas, brainstem SD, cardiorespiratory failure, and death. In vitro studies revealed that the RQ mutation selectively strengthened excitatory, but not inhibitory, synapses and facilitated SD in both the neocortex as well as brainstem dorsal medulla autonomic microcircuits. These data link defects in neuronal intracellular calcium homeostasis to the vulnerability of central autonomic brainstem pathways to hypoxic stress and implicate brainstem SD as a previously unrecognized site and mechanism contributing to premature death in individuals with leaky RYR2 mutations. PMID:27482086

  6. Nonreciprocal and magnetically scanned miniaturized leaky-wave antennas using coupled transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydin, Nil; Sertel, Kubilay; Volakis, John L.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new class of magnetically scanned leaky wave antennas (LWAs), incorporating ferrite (or possibly magnetoelectric composite), for wide angle beamsteering. Using the ferrite's tunable permeability beamsteering is achieved by controlling the external bias field. This is unlike most leaky-wave antennas requiring frequency modulation to steer the beam. Our first design is based on coupled microstrip lines on a biased ferrite substrate with nonreciprocal radiation properties, specifically a 5 dB contrast between the measured transmit and receive gain in the E-plane was achieved. However, it was found that inhomogeneities in the bias field limited its scanning performance. To alleviate this issue, a new class of miniaturized metamaterial based LWA was considered and presented here. This new design is based on coupled composite right left handed (CRLH) transmission lines (TLs) and has a unit-cell length of only λ0/20. For validation, a 15-unit-cell prototype was manufactured and its TX/RX beams were scanned in the E-plane 80° by changing the bias field within a range of ±50 Oe. We found that the associated antenna gain varied between 3.5 dB and 5 dB at 1.79 GHz as the beam was scanned. In the above design, scanning was realized by changing the distance between the bias source and the LWA. Thus, future work will be focused on LWAs tuned by biasing a magnetodielectric layer placed below the ferrite substrate.

  7. Feasibility of bone assessment with leaky Lamb waves in bone phantoms and a bovine tibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. I.; Yoon, Suk Wang

    2004-06-01

    In this study, the effect of cortical thickness variation on the propagation of leaky Lamb waves is investigated by using an axial transmission technique commonly used to characterize long bones. Three Lucite™ plates with thicknesses of 1, 3, and 5 mm as bone phantoms and one bovine tibia with a cortical thickness of 2 mm were used at various low frequencies. Experimental measurements in bone phantoms show that the peak frequency and amplitude of excited Lamb modes strongly depend on the thickness of the Lucite plate. In the bovine tibia, the S0 and A0 Lamb modes are consistently observed in the frequency-thickness region from 0.2 to 1.0 MHz mm, and can be effectively launched at a frequency of 200 kHz, suggesting 200 kHz to be the optimal signal frequency for in vivo clinical applications. It can be also seen that both modes are affected by the frequency-thickness product, but the effect is greater for the A0 mode. Hence, the A0 Lamb mode seems more sensitive to cortical thickness change due to aging and osteoporosis. This study suggests that the use of leaky Lamb waves is feasible for ultrasonic bone assessment.

  8. Leaky Landfills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda L. Cronin

    1992-01-01

    Provides background information on landfills and describes an activity where students learn how a modern landfill is constructed and develop an understanding of the reasons for several regulations regarding modern landfill construction. Students design and construct working models of three types of landfills. (PR)

  9. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  10. Automated Comparison of Building Energy Simulation Engines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Polly, B.; Horowitz, S.; Booten, B.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation describes the BEopt comparative test suite, which is a tool that facilitates the automated comparison of building energy simulation engines. It also demonstrates how the test suite is improving the accuracy of building energy simulation programs. Building energy simulation programs inform energy efficient design for new homes and energy efficient upgrades for existing homes. Stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from simulation programs. Previous research indicates that software tends to over-predict energy usage for poorly-insulated leaky homes. NREL is identifying, investigating, and resolving software inaccuracy issues. Comparative software testing is one method of many that NREL uses to identify potential software issues.

  11. Exploiting the leaky-wave properties of transmission-line metamaterials for single-microphone direction finding.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Hervé; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-06-01

    A transmission-line acoustic metamaterial is an engineered, periodic arrangement of relatively small unit-cells, the acoustic properties of which can be manipulated to achieve anomalous physical behaviours. These exotic properties open the door to practical applications, such as an acoustic leaky-wave antenna, through the implementation of radiating channels along the metamaterial. In the transmitting mode, such a leaky-wave antenna is capable of steering sound waves in frequency-dependent directions. Used in reverse, the antenna presents a well defined direction-frequency behaviour. In this paper, an acoustic leaky-wave structure is presented in the receiving mode. It is shown that it behaves as a sound source direction-finding device using only one sensor. After a general introduction of the acoustic leaky-wave antenna concept, its radiation pattern and radiation efficiency are expressed in closed form. Then, numerical simulations and experimental assessments of the proposed transmission-line based structure, implementing only one sensor at one termination, are presented. It is shown that such a structure is capable of finding the direction of an incoming sound wave, from backward to forward, based on received sound power spectra. This introduces the concept of sound source localization without resorting to beam-steering techniques based on multiple sensors.

  12. Coupled leaky mode theory for light absorption in 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiling; Cao, Linyou

    2012-06-18

    We present an intuitive, simple theoretical model, coupled leaky mode theory (CLMT), to analyze the light absorption of 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures. This model correlates the light absorption of nanostructures to the optical coupling between incident light and leaky modes of the nanostructure. Unlike conventional methods such as Mie theory that requests specific physical features of nanostructures to evaluate the absorption, the CLMT model provides an unprecedented capability to analyze the absorption using eigen values of the leaky modes. Because the eigenvalue shows very mild dependence on the physical features of nanostructures, we can generally apply one set of eigenvalues calculated using a real, constant refractive index to calculations for the absorption of various nanostructures with different sizes, different materials, and wavelength-dependent complex refractive index. This CLMT model is general, simple, yet reasonably accurate, and offers new intuitive physical insights that the light absorption of nanostructures is governed by the coupling efficiency between incident light and leaky modes of the structure.

  13. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design. PMID:27035269

  14. A biophysical observation model for field potentials of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons

    PubMed Central

    beim Graben, Peter; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2013-01-01

    We present a biophysical approach for the coupling of neural network activity as resulting from proper dipole currents of cortical pyramidal neurons to the electric field in extracellular fluid. Starting from a reduced three-compartment model of a single pyramidal neuron, we derive an observation model for dendritic dipole currents in extracellular space and thereby for the dendritic field potential (DFP) that contributes to the local field potential (LFP) of a neural population. This work aligns and satisfies the widespread dipole assumption that is motivated by the “open-field” configuration of the DFP around cortical pyramidal cells. Our reduced three-compartment scheme allows to derive networks of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) models, which facilitates comparison with existing neural network and observation models. In particular, by means of numerical simulations we compare our approach with an ad hoc model by Mazzoni et al. (2008), and conclude that our biophysically motivated approach yields substantial improvement. PMID:23316157

  15. Evaluation of the resolution of a metamaterial acoustic leaky wave antenna.

    PubMed

    Naify, Christina J; Rogers, Jeffery S; Guild, Matthew D; Rohde, Charles A; Orris, Gregory J

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic antennas have long been utilized to directionally steer acoustic waves in both air and water. Typically, these antennas are comprised of arrays of active acoustic elements, which are electronically phased to steer the acoustic profile in the desired direction. A new technology, known as an acoustic leaky wave antenna (LWA), has recently been shown to achieve directional steering of acoustic waves using a single active transducer coupled to a transmission line passive aperture. The LWA steers acoustic energy by preferential coupling to an input frequency and can be designed to steer from backfire to endfire, including broadside. This paper provides an analysis of resolution as a function of both input frequency and antenna length. Additionally, the resolution is compared to that achieved using an array of active acoustic elements.

  16. Statistics of a leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons driven by dichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankin, Romi; Lumi, Neeme

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons is considered. The effect of temporally correlated random neuronal input is modeled as a colored two-level (dichotomous) Markovian noise. Relying on the Riemann method, exact expressions for the output interspike interval density and for the serial correlation coefficient are derived, and their dependence on noise parameters (such as correlation time and amplitude) is analyzed. Particularly, noise-induced sign reversal and a resonancelike amplification of the kurtosis of the interspike interval distribution are established. The features of spike statistics, analytically revealed in our study, are compared with recently obtained results for a perfect integrate-and-fire neuron model.

  17. A compact time reversal emitter-receiver based on a leaky random cavity

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Trung-Dung; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal acoustics (TRA) has gained widespread applications for communication and measurements. In general, a scattering medium in combination with multiple transducers is needed to achieve a sufficiently large acoustical aperture. In this paper, we report an implementation for a cost-effective and compact time reversal emitter-receiver driven by a single piezoelectric element. It is based on a leaky cavity with random 3-dimensional printed surfaces. The random surfaces greatly increase the spatio-temporal focusing quality as compared to flat surfaces and allow the focus of an acoustic beam to be steered over an angle of 41°. We also demonstrate its potential use as a scanner by embedding a receiver to detect an object from its backscatter without moving the TRA emitter. PMID:27811957

  18. Simultaneous confidence intervals for a steady-state leaky aquifer groundwater flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, S.; Cooley, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Using the optimization method of Vecchia & Cooley (1987), nonlinear Scheffe??-type confidence intervals were calculated tor the parameters and the simulated heads of a steady-state groundwater flow model covering 450 km2 of a leaky aquifer. The nonlinear confidence intervals are compared to corresponding linear intervals. As suggested by the significant nonlinearity of the regression model, linear confidence intervals are often not accurate. The commonly made assumption that widths of linear confidence intervals always underestimate the actual (nonlinear widths was not correct for the head intervals. Results show that nonlinear effects can cause the nonlinear intervals to be offset from, and either larger or smaller than, the linear approximations. Prior information on some transmissivities helps reduce and stabilize the confidence intervals, with the most notable effects occurring for the parameters on which there is prior information and for head values in parameter zones for which there is prior information on the parameters.

  19. Transient analysis of leaky Lamb waves with a semi-analytical finite element method.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Hayashi, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    We previously formulated a semi-analytical finite element technique for Lamb waves in a plate surrounded by fluids and investigated the dispersion curves and wave structures for leaky Lamb waves. Herein, this technique is extended to the calculation of transient responses both in a plate and in fluids for dynamic loading on the plate surface. To gain fundamental insights into guided wave inspection for a water-filled pipe or tank, guided waves generated upon transient loading of a flat plate water-loaded on one side were analyzed. The results show that a quasi-Scholte mode propagating at the plate-water interface is useful for the long-range inspection of a water-loaded plate because of its non-attenuation and minimal dispersion; moreover, this mode has superior generation efficiency in the low-frequency range, while it is localized near the plate-water interface at higher frequencies.

  20. Real-Time Leaky Lamb Wave Spectrum Measurement and Its Application to NDE of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1999-01-01

    Numerous analytical and theoretical studies of the behavior of leaky Lamb waves (LLW) in composite materials were documented in the literature. One of the key issues that are constraining the application of this method as a practical tool is the amount of data that needs to be acquired and the slow process that is involved with such experiments. Recently, a methodology that allows quasi real-time acquisition of LLW dispersion data was developed. At each angle of incidence the reflection spectrum is available in real time from the experimental setup and it can be used for rapid detection of the defects. This technique can be used to rapidly acquire the various plate wave modes along various angles of incidence for the characterization of the material elastic properties. The experimental method and data acquisition technique will be described in this paper. Experimental data was used to examine a series of flaws including porosity and delaminations and demonstrated the efficiency of the developed technique.

  1. Finite element modeling of microstructured optical fibers: leaky modes, twisted geometries, and spatial Kerr solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, André; Zolla, Frédéric; Renversez, Gilles; Ould Agha, Yacoub; Drouart, Fabien

    2008-11-01

    Microstructured optical fibers have much more degrees of freedom concerning the geometries and index contrasts than step-index fibers. This richness opens totally new fields of application for fiber optics. The finite element method appears as an extremely versatile tool to compute the propagation modes in such systems as it allows to take into account arbitrary geometries of the cross section and also anisotropic and inhomogeneous (i.e. not only piecewise constant) dielectric permittivities. In this paper, we review some more advanced features: how to compute leaky modes (crucial for the understanding of such kind of fibers) by using perfectly matched layers, how to use helicoidal coordinate systems to determine the influence of a twist on the modes via a two-dimensional model (using equivalent materials), and how to compute spatial solitons in fibers involving Kerr optical medium by taking into account the refractive index inhomogeneities caused by the nonlinearity.

  2. A biophysical observation model for field potentials of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed

    Beim Graben, Peter; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2012-01-01

    We present a biophysical approach for the coupling of neural network activity as resulting from proper dipole currents of cortical pyramidal neurons to the electric field in extracellular fluid. Starting from a reduced three-compartment model of a single pyramidal neuron, we derive an observation model for dendritic dipole currents in extracellular space and thereby for the dendritic field potential (DFP) that contributes to the local field potential (LFP) of a neural population. This work aligns and satisfies the widespread dipole assumption that is motivated by the "open-field" configuration of the DFP around cortical pyramidal cells. Our reduced three-compartment scheme allows to derive networks of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) models, which facilitates comparison with existing neural network and observation models. In particular, by means of numerical simulations we compare our approach with an ad hoc model by Mazzoni et al. (2008), and conclude that our biophysically motivated approach yields substantial improvement.

  3. Statistics of a leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons driven by dichotomous noise.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Romi; Lumi, Neeme

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons is considered. The effect of temporally correlated random neuronal input is modeled as a colored two-level (dichotomous) Markovian noise. Relying on the Riemann method, exact expressions for the output interspike interval density and for the serial correlation coefficient are derived, and their dependence on noise parameters (such as correlation time and amplitude) is analyzed. Particularly, noise-induced sign reversal and a resonancelike amplification of the kurtosis of the interspike interval distribution are established. The features of spike statistics, analytically revealed in our study, are compared with recently obtained results for a perfect integrate-and-fire neuron model.

  4. Gut-liver axis in liver cirrhosis: How to manage leaky gut and endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hiroshi

    2015-03-27

    A "leaky gut" may be the cutting edge for the passage of toxins, antigens or bacteria into the body, and may play a pathogenic role in advanced liver cirrhosis and its complications. Plasma endotoxin levels have been admitted as a surrogate marker of bacterial translocation and close relations of endotoxemia to hyperdynamic circulation, portal hypertension, renal, cardiac, pulmonary and coagulation disturbances have been reported. Bacterial overgrowth, increased intestinal permeability, failure to inactivate endotoxin, activated innate immunity are all likely to play a role in the pathological states of bacterial translocation. Therapeutic approach by management of the gut-liver axis by antibiotics, probiotics, synbiotics, prebiotics and their combinations may improve the clinical course of cirrhotic patients. Special concern should be paid on anti-endotoxin treatment. Adequate management of the gut-liver axis may be effective for prevention of liver cirrhosis itself by inhibiting the progression of fibrosis.

  5. Claudin-2 as a mediator of leaky gut barrier during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Luettig, J; Rosenthal, R; Barmeyer, C; Schulzke, J D

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial tight junction determines the paracellular water and ion movement in the intestine and also prevents uptake of larger molecules, including antigens, in an uncontrolled manner. Claudin-2, one of the 27 mammalian claudins regulating that barrier function, forms a paracellular channel for small cations and water. It is typically expressed in leaky epithelia like proximal nephron and small intestine and provides a major pathway for the paracellular transport of sodium, potassium, and fluid. In intestinal inflammation (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), immune-mediated diseases (celiac disease), and infections (HIV enteropathy), claudin-2 is upregulated in small and large intestine and contributes to diarrhea via a leak flux mechanism. In parallel to that upregulation, other epithelial and tight junctional features are altered and the luminal uptake of antigenic macromolecules is enhanced, for which claudin-2 may be partially responsible through induction of tight junction strand discontinuities.

  6. Gut-liver axis in liver cirrhosis: How to manage leaky gut and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A “leaky gut” may be the cutting edge for the passage of toxins, antigens or bacteria into the body, and may play a pathogenic role in advanced liver cirrhosis and its complications. Plasma endotoxin levels have been admitted as a surrogate marker of bacterial translocation and close relations of endotoxemia to hyperdynamic circulation, portal hypertension, renal, cardiac, pulmonary and coagulation disturbances have been reported. Bacterial overgrowth, increased intestinal permeability, failure to inactivate endotoxin, activated innate immunity are all likely to play a role in the pathological states of bacterial translocation. Therapeutic approach by management of the gut-liver axis by antibiotics, probiotics, synbiotics, prebiotics and their combinations may improve the clinical course of cirrhotic patients. Special concern should be paid on anti-endotoxin treatment. Adequate management of the gut-liver axis may be effective for prevention of liver cirrhosis itself by inhibiting the progression of fibrosis. PMID:25848468

  7. Output Stream of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neuron Without Diffusion Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidybida, Alexander K.

    2017-01-01

    Probability density function (pdf) of output interspike intervals (ISI) as well as mean ISI is found in exact form for leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron stimulated with Poisson stream. The diffusion approximation is not used. The whole range of possible ISI values is represented as infinite union of disjoint intervals: ]0;∞ [ = ]0;T_2] + sum _{m=0}^∞ ]T_2+m T_3;T_2+(m+1)T_3], where T_2 and T_3 are defined by the LIF's physical parameters. Exact expression for the obtained pdf is different on different intervals and is given as finite sum of multiple integrals. For the first three intervals the integrals are taken which brings about exact expressions with polylogarithm functions. The found distribution can be bimodal for some values of parameters. Conditions, which ensure bimodality are briefly analyzed.

  8. Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor Using a Leaky Lamb Wave for Under-Sodium Viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Young-Sang; Lee, Jae-Han

    2010-02-01

    A plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor using a leaky Lamb wave has been developed for the under-sodium viewing of a reactor core and in-vessel structures of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). An A0 Lamb wave mode is utilized in the waveguide sensor for the single mode generation and the effective radiation capability in a fluid. A radiation beam steering technique is presented which is achieved by the frequency tuning of the excitation pulse in the frequency range of the A0 Lamb wave mode which the group velocity is not dispersive and the phase velocity is dispersive. The long distance propagation ability and C-scan imaging performance have been demonstrated successfully by experimental feasibility tests of the waveguide sensor.

  9. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  10. Support vector machines for spike pattern classification with a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron

    PubMed Central

    Ambard, Maxime; Rotter, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Spike pattern classification is a key topic in machine learning, computational neuroscience, and electronic device design. Here, we offer a new supervised learning rule based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) to determine the synaptic weights of a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron model for spike pattern classification. We compare classification performance between this algorithm and other methods sharing the same conceptual framework. We consider the effect of postsynaptic potential (PSP) kernel dynamics on patterns separability, and we propose an extension of the method to decrease computational load. The algorithm performs well in generalization tasks. We show that the peak value of spike patterns separability depends on a relation between PSP dynamics and spike pattern duration, and we propose a particular kernel that is well-suited for fast computations and electronic implementations. PMID:23181017

  11. The relaxation of a prolate leaky dielectric drop in a uniform DC electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Aditya; Lanauze, Javier; Walker, Lynn

    2015-11-01

    We quantify the relaxation of a prolate leaky dielectric drop upon removal of a uniform DC electric field. Experiments consisting of a castor oil drop suspended in a silicone oil are compared against boundary integral simulations that account for transient charging of the interface. Charge relaxation causes a marked asymmetry in the drop evolution during deformation and relaxation. In particular, during relaxation a prolate to oblate shape transition is observed before the drop recovers its equilibrium spherical shape. Furthermore, the high field strengths utilized in the experiments yield a fast drop relaxation in comparison with the transient development towards the steady deformation. The storage and release of capacitive energy and capillary energy is then quantified during deformation and relaxation, respectively. Finally, we present computational results for a drop that does not relax back to its initial spherical shape upon removal of the field; rather, the drop breaks up.

  12. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams from nanofoil targets: the leaky light-sail regime.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Dromey, B; Geissler, M; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the "leaky light sail," is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10¹⁹  W/cm². 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2 × 10²⁰  W/cm².

  13. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design.

  14. Neuronal Spike Timing Adaptation Described with a Fractional Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Model

    PubMed Central

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M.; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation. PMID:24675903

  15. Neuronal spike timing adaptation described with a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model.

    PubMed

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-03-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation.

  16. Leaky vaccines protect highly exposed recipients at a lower rate: implications for vaccine efficacy estimation and sieve analysis.

    PubMed

    Edlefsen, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    "Leaky" vaccines are those for which vaccine-induced protection reduces infection rates on a per-exposure basis, as opposed to "all-or-none" vaccines, which reduce infection rates to zero for some fraction of subjects, independent of the number of exposures. Leaky vaccines therefore protect subjects with fewer exposures at a higher effective rate than subjects with more exposures. This simple observation has serious implications for analysis methodologies that rely on the assumption that the vaccine effect is homogeneous across subjects. We argue and show through examples that this heterogeneous vaccine effect leads to a violation of the proportional hazards assumption, to incomparability of infected cases across treatment groups, and to nonindependence of the distributions of the competing failure processes in a competing risks setting. We discuss implications for vaccine efficacy estimation, correlates of protection analysis, and mark-specific efficacy analysis (also known as sieve analysis).

  17. Comparison of distributed reacceleration and leaky-box models of cosmic-ray abundances (Z = 3-28)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, John R.; Silberberg, Rein; Tsao, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    A large collection of elemental and isotopic cosmic-ray data has been analyzed using the leaky-box transport model with and without reacceleration in the interstellar medium. Abundances of isotopes and elements with charges Z = 3-28 and energies E = 10 MeV/nucleon-1 TeV/nucleon were explored. Our results demonstrate that reacceleration models make detailed and accurate predictions with the same number of parameters or fewer as standard leaky-box models. Ad hoc fitting parameters in the standard model are replaced by astrophysically significant reacceleration parameters. Distributed reacceleration models explain the peak in secondary-to-primary ratios around 1 GeV/nucleon. They diminish the discrepancy between rigidity-dependent leakage and energy-independent anisotropy. They also offer the possibility of understanding isotopic anomalies at low energy.

  18. The Role for Gut Permeability in the Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes – A Solid or Leaky Concept?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence, both functional and morphological, supports the concept of increased intestinal permeability as an intrinsic characteristic of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in both humans and animal models of the disease. Often referred to as a “leaky gut”, its mechanistic impact on the pathogenesis of T1D remains unclear. Hypotheses that this defect influences immune responses against antigens (both self and non-self) predominate, yet others argue hyperglycemia and insulitis may contribute to increased gut permeability in T1D. To address these complicated issues, we herein review the many conceptual role(s) for a leaky gut in the pathogenesis of T1D and suggest ways that if true, therapeutic interventions aimed at the gut-pancreas axis may prove promising for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:26269193

  19. Dynamic and polychromatic SPR leaky-mode spectroscopy with Teflon AF films on silver for chemo-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorsek, R. P.; Franke, Hilmar; Caron, Serge; Galarneau, Pierre

    1998-12-01

    The reflectivity of a polymer film on top of a thin metal layer is usually recorded for a fixed wavelength and the TM polarization as a function of the angle of incidence. This angular spectrum contains the surface plasmon resonance due to the metal layer and the leaky modes caused by the waveguide resonances of the polymer film. Here we investigated the reflectivity spectrum of such a multilayer for a white light source as a function of the wavelength at a constant angle of incidence. The leaky mode resonances on the wavelength scale have been detected. Dynamic measurements of the reflectivity of such a multilayer at constant angle and constant wavelength have been demonstrated for vapors of Toluene as an example. The realization of compact and simple devices using this technique is possible.

  20. The role for gut permeability in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes--a solid or leaky concept?

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence, both functional and morphological, supports the concept of increased intestinal permeability as an intrinsic characteristic of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in both humans and animal models of the disease. Often referred to as a 'leaky gut', its mechanistic impact on the pathogenesis of T1D remains unclear. Hypotheses that this defect influences immune responses against antigens (both self and non-self) predominate, yet others argue hyperglycemia and insulitis may contribute to increased gut permeability in T1D. To address these complicated issues, we herein review the many conceptual role(s) for a leaky gut in the pathogenesis of T1D and suggest ways that if true, therapeutic interventions aimed at the gut-pancreas axis may prove promising for future therapeutic interventions.

  1. Acoustoelectric effects in reflection of leaky-wave-radiated bulk acoustic waves from piezoelectric crystal-conductive liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Rimeika, Romualdas; Čiplys, Daumantas; Jonkus, Vytautas; Shur, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The leaky surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating along X-axis of Y-cut lithium tantalate crystal strongly radiates energy in the form of an obliquely propagating narrow bulk acoustic wave (BAW) beam. The reflection of this beam from the crystal-liquid interface has been investigated. The test liquids were solutions of potassium nitrate in distilled water and of lithium chloride in isopropyl alcohol with the conductivity varied by changing the solution concentration. The strong dependences of the reflected wave amplitude and phase on the liquid conductivity were observed and explained by the acoustoelectric interaction in the wave reflection region. The novel configuration of an acoustic sensor for liquid media featuring important advantages of separate measuring and sensing surfaces and rigid structure has been proposed. The application of leaky-SAW radiated bulk waves for identification of different brands of mineral water has been demonstrated.

  2. CYP2E1 potentiates binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness, steatohepatitis, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Banerjee, Atrayee; Jang, Sehwan; Yoo, Seong-Ho; Yun, Jun-Won; Gonzalez, Frank J; Keshavarzian, Ali; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-12-01

    Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) contributes to increased oxidative stress and steatosis in chronic alcohol-exposure models. However, its role in binge ethanol-induced gut leakiness and hepatic injury is unclear. This study was aimed at investigating the role of CYP2E1 in binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and the mechanisms of steatohepatitis. Female wild-type (WT) and Cyp2e1-null mice were treated with three doses of binge ethanol (WT-EtOH or Cyp2e1-null-EtOH) (6g/kg oral gavage at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (negative control). Intestinal histology of only WT-EtOH exhibited epithelial alteration and blebbing of lamina propria, and liver histology obtained at 6h after the last ethanol dose showed elevated steatosis with scattered inflammatory foci. These were accompanied by increased levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic enterobacteria, and triglycerides. All these changes, including the intestinal histology and hepatic apoptosis, determined by TUNEL assay, were significantly reversed when WT-EtOH mice were treated with the specific inhibitor of CYP2E1 chlormethiazole and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, both of which suppressed oxidative markers including intestinal CYP2E1. WT-EtOH also exhibited elevated amounts of serum TNF-α, hepatic cytokines, CYP2E1, and lipid peroxidation, with decreased levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase and suppressed aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity. Increased hepatocyte apoptosis with elevated levels of proapoptotic proteins and decreased levels of active (phosphorylated) p-AKT, p-AMPK, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, all of which are involved in fat metabolism and inflammation, were observed in WT-EtOH. These changes were significantly attenuated in the corresponding Cyp2e1-null-EtOH mice. These data indicate that both intestinal and hepatic CYP2E1 induced by binge alcohol seems critical in binge alcohol-mediated increased nitroxidative stress, gut leakage, and endotoxemia; altered fat

  3. CYP2E1 potentiates binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness, steatohepatitis and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Banerjee, Atrayee; Jang, Sehwan; Yoo, Seong-Ho; Yun, Jun-Won; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) contributes to increased oxidative stress and steatosis in chronic alcohol-exposure models. However, its role in binge ethanol-induced gut leakiness and hepatic injury is unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the role of CYP2E1 in binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and the mechanisms of steatohepatitis. Female wild-type (WT) and Cyp2e1-null mice were treated with three doses of binge ethanol (WT-EtOH or Cyp2e1-null-EtOH) (6 g/kg oral gavage at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (negative control). Intestinal histology of only WT-EtOH exhibited epithelial alteration and blebbing of lamina propria while liver histology obtained at 6 h after the last ethanol dose showed elevated steatosis with scattered inflammatory foci. These were accompanied by increased levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic enterobacteria and triglycerides. All these changes including the intestinal histology and hepatic apoptosis, determined by TUNEL assay, were significantly reversed when WT-EtOH mice were treated with the specific inhibitor of CYP2E1 chlormethiazole and the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, both of which suppressed the oxidative markers including intestinal CYP2E1. WT-EtOH also exhibited elevated amounts of serum TNF-α, hepatic cytokines, CYP2E1 and lipid peroxidation with decreased levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase and suppressed aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity. Increased hepatocyte apoptosis with elevated levels of pro-apoptotic proteins and decreased levels of active (phosphorylated) p-AKT, p-AMPK and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α), all of which are involved in fat metabolism and inflammation, were observed in WT-EtOH. These changes were significantly attenuated in the corresponding Cyp2e1-null-EtOH mice. These data indicate that both intestinal and hepatic CYP2E1 induced by binge alcohol seem critical in the binge alcohol-mediated increased nitroxidative stress, gut leakage, endotoxemia, and

  4. Metamaterial-based Fabry-Pérot leaky wave antennas: low profile, high directivity, frequency agility and beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burokur, S. N.; de Lustrac, A.

    2013-04-01

    The analysis and design of subwavelength metamaterial-based Fabry-Pérot (FP) leaky wave antennas (LWAs) are presented. The antennas under investigation are formed by embedding a feeding source in a cavity composed of a Perfect Electrical Conductor (PEC) surface and a metasurface reflector. Several configurations of such antennas are presented to achieve different desired performances such as: high directivity, frequency agility and beam steering.

  5. Influence of inhomogeneous porosity on silicon nanowire Raman enhancement and leaky mode modulated photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ratchford, Daniel; Yeom, Junghoon; Long, James P; Pehrsson, Pehr E

    2015-03-07

    Metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) offers an inexpensive, massively parallel fabrication process for producing silicon nanowires (SiNWs). These nanowires can possess a degree of porosity depending on etch conditions. Because the porosity is often spatially inhomogeneous, there is a need to better understand its nature if applications exploiting the porosity are to be pursued. Here, the resolution afforded by micro-Raman and micro-photoluminescence (PL) is used to elucidate the effects of porosity heterogeneity on the optical properties of individual SiNWs produced in large arrays with MACE, while also determining the spatial character of the heterogeneity. For highly porous SiNWs, there is a dramatic reduction in Raman signal and an increase in PL near the SiNW tips. PL spectra collected along the SiNW length exhibit peaks due to leaky mode resonances. Analysis of the PL resonance peaks, Raman spectrum line shape, SEM images, and EDS spectra indicate that the SiNWs possess both radial and axial heterogeneity wherein, from base to SiNW tip, the SiNWs comprise a shell of increasingly thick porous Si surrounding a tapering core of bulk Si. This work describes how structural porosity variation shapes SiNW optical properties, which will influence the design of new SiNW-based photonic devices and chemical/biological sensors.

  6. Three-dimensional flow in the storative semiconfining layers of a leaky aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, N.

    2008-01-01

    An analytical solution for three-dimensional (3D) flow in the storative semiconfining layers of a leaky aquifer fully penetrated by a production well is developed in this article to provide a method from which accurate hydraulic parameters in the semiconfining layers can be derived from aquifer test data. The analysis of synthetic aquifer test data with the 3D analytical solution in the semiconfining layers provided more accurate optimal hydraulic parameters than those derived using the available quasi-two-dimensional (2D) solution. Differences between the 3D and 2D flow solutions in the semiconfining layers become larger when a no flow boundary condition is imposed at either at the top of the upper semiconfining layer or at the bottom of the lower semiconfining layer or when the hydraulic conductivity ratio of the semiconfining layer to the aquifer is larger than 0.001. In addition, differences between the 3D and 2D flow solutions in the semiconfining layers are illustrated when the thickness ratio of the semiconfining layer to the aquifer is changed. Analysis of water level data from two hypothetical and one real aquifer test showed that the 3D solution in the semiconfining layers provides lower correlation coefficients among hydraulic parameters than the 2D solution. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  7. Composite Materials NDE Using Enhanced Leaky Lamb Wave Dispersion Data Acquisition Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mal, Ajit; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu

    1999-01-01

    The leaky Lamb wave (LLW) technique is approaching a maturity level that is making it an attractive quantitative NDE tool for composites and bonded joints. Since it was first observed in 1982, the phenomenon has been studied extensively, particularly in composite materials. The wave is induced by oblique insonification using a pitch-catch arrangement and the plate wave modes are detected by identifying minima in the reflected spectra to obtain the dispersion data. The wave behavior in multi-orientation laminates has been well documented and corroborated experimentally with high accuracy. The sensitivity of the wave to the elastic constants of the material and to the boundary conditions led to the capability to measure the elastic properties of bonded joints. Recently, the authors significantly enhanced the LLW method's capability by increasing the speed of the data acquisition, the number of modes that can be identified and the accuracy of the data inversion. In spite of the theoretical and experimental progress, methods that employ oblique insonification of composites are still not being applied as standard industrial NDE methods. The authors investigated the issues that are hampering the transition of the LLW to industrial applications and identified 4 key issues. The current capability of the method and the nature of these issues are described in this paper.

  8. Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neuron Circuit Based on Floating-Gate Integrator

    PubMed Central

    Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Lim, Hyungkwang; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Guhyun; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Choi, Byung Joon; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2016-01-01

    The artificial spiking neural network (SNN) is promising and has been brought to the notice of the theoretical neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering research communities. In this light, we propose a new type of artificial spiking neuron based on leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) behavior. A distinctive feature of the proposed FG-LIF neuron is the use of a floating-gate (FG) integrator rather than a capacitor-based one. The relaxation time of the charge on the FG relies mainly on the tunnel barrier profile, e.g., barrier height and thickness (rather than the area). This opens up the possibility of large-scale integration of neurons. The circuit simulation results offered biologically plausible spiking activity (<100 Hz) with a capacitor of merely 6 fF, which is hosted in an FG metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. The FG-LIF neuron also has the advantage of low operation power (<30 pW/spike). Finally, the proposed circuit was subject to possible types of noise, e.g., thermal noise and burst noise. The simulation results indicated remarkable distributional features of interspike intervals that are fitted to Gamma distribution functions, similar to biological neurons in the neocortex. PMID:27242416

  9. Composite materials stiffness determination and defects characterization using enhanced leaky Lamb wave dispersion data acquisition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mal, Ajit K.; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu

    1999-01-01

    The leaky Lamb wave (LLW) technique is approaching a maturity level that is making it an attractive quantitative NDE tool for composites and bonded joints. Since it was first observed in 1982, the phenomenon has been studied extensively, particularly in composite materials. The wave is induced by oblique insonification using a pitch-catch arrangement and the plate wave modes are detected by identifying minima in the reflected spectra to obtain the dispersion data. The wave behavior in multi-orientation laminates has ben well documented and corroborated experimentally with high accuracy. The sensitivity of the wave to the elastic constants of the material and to the boundary conditions led to the capability to measure the elastic properties of bonded joints. Recently, the authors significantly enhanced the LLW method's capability by increasing the speed of the data acquisition, the number of modes that can be identified and the accuracy of the data inversion. In spite of the theoretical and experimental progress, methods that employ oblique insonification of composites are still not being applied as standard industrial NDE methods. The authors investigated the issues that are hampering the transition of the LLW to industrial applications and identified 4 key issues. The current capability of the method and the nature of these issues are described in this paper.

  10. Unusual energy properties of leaky backward Lamb waves in a submerged plate.

    PubMed

    Nedospasov, I A; Mozhaev, V G; Kuznetsova, I E

    2017-05-01

    It is found that leaky backward Lamb waves, i.e. waves with negative energy-flux velocity, propagating in a plate submerged in a liquid possess extraordinary energy properties distinguishing them from any other type of waves in isotropic media. Namely, the total time-averaged energy flux along the waveguide axis is equal to zero for these waves due to opposite directions of the longitudinal energy fluxes in the adjacent media. This property gives rise to the fundamental question of how to define and calculate correctly the energy velocity in such an unusual case. The procedure of calculation based on incomplete integration of the energy flux density over the plate thickness alone is applied. The derivative of the angular frequency with respect to the wave vector, usually referred to as the group velocity, happens to be close to the energy velocity defined by this mean in that part of the frequency range where the backward mode exists in the free plate. The existence region of the backward mode is formally increased for the submerged plate in comparison to the free plate as a result of the liquid-induced hybridization of propagating and nonpropagating (evanescent) Lamb modes. It is shown that the Rayleigh's principle (i.e. equipartition of total time-averaged kinetic and potential energies for time-harmonic acoustic fields) is violated due to the leakage of Lamb waves, in spite of considering nondissipative media.

  11. Concentration history during pumping from a leaky aquifer with stratified initial concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, Daniel J.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Wood, Warren W.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions are employed to examine the concentration history of a dissolved substance in water pumped from a leaky aquifer. Many aquifer systems are characterized by stratification, for example, a sandy layer overlain by a clay layer. To obtain information about separate hydrogeologic units, aquifer pumping tests are often conducted with a well penetrating only one of the layers. When the initial concentration distribution is also stratified (the concentration varies with elevation only), the concentration breakthrough in the pumped well may be interpreted to provide information on aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. To facilitate this interpretation, we present some simple analytical and numerical solutions for limiting cases and illustrate their application to a fractured bedrock/glacial drift aquifer system where the solute of interest is dissolved radon gas. In addition to qualitative information on water source, this method may yield estimates of effective porosity and saturated thickness (or fracture transport aperture) from a single-hole test. Little information about dispersivity is obtained because the measured concentration is not significantly affected by dispersion in the aquifer.

  12. Noisy threshold in neuronal models: connections with the noisy leaky integrate-and-fire model.

    PubMed

    Dumont, G; Henry, J; Tarniceriu, C O

    2016-12-01

    Providing an analytical treatment to the stochastic feature of neurons' dynamics is one of the current biggest challenges in mathematical biology. The noisy leaky integrate-and-fire model and its associated Fokker-Planck equation are probably the most popular way to deal with neural variability. Another well-known formalism is the escape-rate model: a model giving the probability that a neuron fires at a certain time knowing the time elapsed since its last action potential. This model leads to a so-called age-structured system, a partial differential equation with non-local boundary condition famous in the field of population dynamics, where the age of a neuron is the amount of time passed by since its previous spike. In this theoretical paper, we investigate the mathematical connection between the two formalisms. We shall derive an integral transform of the solution to the age-structured model into the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. This integral transform highlights the link between the two stochastic processes. As far as we know, an explicit mathematical correspondence between the two solutions has not been introduced until now.

  13. Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neuron Circuit Based on Floating-Gate Integrator.

    PubMed

    Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Lim, Hyungkwang; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Guhyun; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Choi, Byung Joon; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2016-01-01

    The artificial spiking neural network (SNN) is promising and has been brought to the notice of the theoretical neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering research communities. In this light, we propose a new type of artificial spiking neuron based on leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) behavior. A distinctive feature of the proposed FG-LIF neuron is the use of a floating-gate (FG) integrator rather than a capacitor-based one. The relaxation time of the charge on the FG relies mainly on the tunnel barrier profile, e.g., barrier height and thickness (rather than the area). This opens up the possibility of large-scale integration of neurons. The circuit simulation results offered biologically plausible spiking activity (<100 Hz) with a capacitor of merely 6 fF, which is hosted in an FG metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. The FG-LIF neuron also has the advantage of low operation power (<30 pW/spike). Finally, the proposed circuit was subject to possible types of noise, e.g., thermal noise and burst noise. The simulation results indicated remarkable distributional features of interspike intervals that are fitted to Gamma distribution functions, similar to biological neurons in the neocortex.

  14. Structure of the menisci of leaky dielectric liquids during electrically-assisted evaporation of ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffman, Chase; Martínez-Sánchez, Manuel; Higuera, F. J.; Lozano, Paulo C.

    2016-12-01

    An understanding of the processes enabling field-assisted evaporation of ions from leaky dielectric liquids, i.e., liquids that are substantially less conductive than liquid metals, has historically been elusive in comparison to those of conventional electrohydrodynamic emission modes such as that of the cone-jet. While select ionic liquids have been shown to yield nearly monodisperse beams of molecular ions under certain conditions, the dearth of direct observation (visualization) and theoretical insight has precluded a fundamental appreciation for the inherent mechanics. In this paper, we present a family of equilibrium meniscus structures that shed measurable charge when the meniscus is large in relation to a characteristic emission scale. Such structures reside in a region of parameter space where empirical evidence suggests that steady emission may occur and also where stationary interfaces have not been reported before. In this regime, we show (i) that the macroscopic shape of the meniscus may vary only with the applied electric field; (ii) that the feeding flow is very germane to the emission characteristics, unlike liquid metal ion sources; and (iii) that while the balance of stresses governing the interface shape may in some cases be very similar to that of the classical Taylor cone, the widespread notion of a ubiquitous 49° half-angle is unfounded. Further study of this family may be helpful in elucidating a number of outstanding questions surrounding the pure ion mode.

  15. Acclimation to low light by C4 maize: implications for bundle sheath leakiness.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-05-01

    C4 plants have a biochemical carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) that increases CO2 concentration around ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) in the bundle sheath (BS). Under limiting light, the activity of the CCM generally decreases, causing an increase in leakiness, (Φ), the ratio of CO2 retrodiffusing from the BS relative to C4 carboxylation processes. Maize plants were grown under high and low light regimes (respectively HL, 600 versus LL, 100 μE m(-2)  s(-1) ). Short-term acclimation of Φ was compared from isotopic discrimination (Δ), gas exchange and photochemistry. Direct measurement of respiration in the light, and ATP production rate (JATP ), allowed us use a novel approach to derive Φ, compared with the conventional fitting of measured and predicted Δ. HL grown plants responded to decreasing light intensities with the well-documented increase in Φ. Conversely, LL plants showed a constant Φ, which has not been observed previously. We explain the pattern by two contrasting acclimation strategies: HL plants maintained a high CCM activity at LL, resulting in high CO2 overcycling and increased Φ; LL plants acclimated by down-regulating the CCM, effectively optimizing scarce ATP supply. This surprising plasticity may limit the impact of Φ-dependent carbon losses in leaves becoming shaded within developing canopies.

  16. Influence of inhomogeneous porosity on silicon nanowire Raman enhancement and leaky mode modulated photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratchford, Daniel; Yeom, Junghoon; Long, James P.; Pehrsson, Pehr. E.

    2015-02-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) offers an inexpensive, massively parallel fabrication process for producing silicon nanowires (SiNWs). These nanowires can possess a degree of porosity depending on etch conditions. Because the porosity is often spatially inhomogeneous, there is a need to better understand its nature if applications exploiting the porosity are to be pursued. Here, the resolution afforded by micro-Raman and micro-photoluminescence (PL) is used to elucidate the effects of porosity heterogeneity on the optical properties of individual SiNWs produced in large arrays with MACE, while also determining the spatial character of the heterogeneity. For highly porous SiNWs, there is a dramatic reduction in Raman signal and an increase in PL near the SiNW tips. PL spectra collected along the SiNW length exhibit peaks due to leaky mode resonances. Analysis of the PL resonance peaks, Raman spectrum line shape, SEM images, and EDS spectra indicate that the SiNWs possess both radial and axial heterogeneity wherein, from base to SiNW tip, the SiNWs comprise a shell of increasingly thick porous Si surrounding a tapering core of bulk Si. This work describes how structural porosity variation shapes SiNW optical properties, which will influence the design of new SiNW-based photonic devices and chemical/biological sensors.Metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) offers an inexpensive, massively parallel fabrication process for producing silicon nanowires (SiNWs). These nanowires can possess a degree of porosity depending on etch conditions. Because the porosity is often spatially inhomogeneous, there is a need to better understand its nature if applications exploiting the porosity are to be pursued. Here, the resolution afforded by micro-Raman and micro-photoluminescence (PL) is used to elucidate the effects of porosity heterogeneity on the optical properties of individual SiNWs produced in large arrays with MACE, while also determining the spatial character of the

  17. Rate Dynamics of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neurons with Strong Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Nordlie, Eilen; Tetzlaff, Tom; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2010-01-01

    Firing-rate models provide a practical tool for studying the dynamics of trial- or population-averaged neuronal signals. A wealth of theoretical and experimental studies has been dedicated to the derivation or extraction of such models by investigating the firing-rate response characteristics of ensembles of neurons. The majority of these studies assumes that neurons receive input spikes at a high rate through weak synapses (diffusion approximation). For many biological neural systems, however, this assumption cannot be justified. So far, it is unclear how time-varying presynaptic firing rates are transmitted by a population of neurons if the diffusion assumption is dropped. Here, we numerically investigate the stationary and non-stationary firing-rate response properties of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons receiving input spikes through excitatory synapses with alpha-function shaped postsynaptic currents for strong synaptic weights. Input spike trains are modeled by inhomogeneous Poisson point processes with sinusoidal rate. Average rates, modulation amplitudes, and phases of the period-averaged spike responses are measured for a broad range of stimulus, synapse, and neuron parameters. Across wide parameter regions, the resulting transfer functions can be approximated by a linear first-order low-pass filter. Below a critical synaptic weight, the cutoff frequencies are approximately constant and determined by the synaptic time constants. Only for synapses with unrealistically strong weights are the cutoff frequencies significantly increased. To account for stimuli with larger modulation depths, we combine the measured linear transfer function with the nonlinear response characteristics obtained for stationary inputs. The resulting linear–nonlinear model accurately predicts the population response for a variety of non-sinusoidal stimuli. PMID:21212832

  18. Understanding the leaky engineering pipeline: Motivation and job adaptability of female engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswathiamma, Manjusha Thekkedathu

    This dissertation is a mixed-method study conducted using qualitative grounded theory and quantitative survey and correlation approaches. This study aims to explore the motivation and adaptability of females in the engineering profession and to develop a theoretical framework for both motivation and adaptability issues. As a result, this study endeavors to design solutions for the low enrollment and attenuation of female engineers in the engineering profession, often referred to as the "leaky female engineering pipeline." Profiles of 123 female engineers were studied for the qualitative approach, and 98 completed survey responses were analyzed for the quantitative approach. The qualitative, grounded-theory approach applied the constant comparison method; open, axial, and selective coding was used to classify the information in categories, sub-categories, and themes for both motivation and adaptability. The emergent themes for decisions motivating female enrollment include cognitive, emotional, and environmental factors. The themes identified for adaptability include the seven job adaptability factors: job satisfaction, risk- taking attitude, career/skill development, family, gender stereotyping, interpersonal skills, and personal benefit, as well as the self-perceived job adaptability factor. Illeris' Three-dimensional Learning Theory was modified as a model for decisions motivating female enrollment. This study suggests a firsthand conceptual parallelism of McClusky's Theory of Margin for the adaptability of female engineers in the profession. Also, this study attempted to design a survey instrument to measure job adaptability of female engineers. The study identifies two factors that are significantly related to job adaptability: interpersonal skills (< p = 0.01) and family (< p = 0.05); gender stereotyping and personal benefit are other factors that are also significantly (< p = 0.1) related.

  19. En echelon knolls in the Nosappu Fracture Zone, NW Pacific: A possible leaky transform fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Hirano, N.; Shipboard Scientific Party Kr03-07, .

    2003-12-01

    During JAMSTEC R/V KAIREI cruise KR03-07, we mapped significant en echelon arrays of knolls and ridges on the NNW-trending Nosappu Fracture Zone between Hokkaido and Shatsky Rise, NW Pacific. This fracture zone has been known to be irregular, including a deep-sea channel, the Nakwe Channel, enigmatic for inside the wide oceanic plate. Considering the previously recognized magnetic lineament dislocation, the fracture zone has long (more than 150 km) left-lateral strike-slip component as a ridge-ridge transform fault zone between the Izanagi and Pacific plates during Early Cretaceous. Detail multi-narrowbeam mapping around 37 N latitude, 150 E longitude (covering 78 km x 137 km), indicated many small knolls and ridges that form en echelon arrangement. Some are boomerang, sock or E-letter in shape. The two dominant directions of ridges are recognized, one is parallel to the fracture zone and the other is in left-handed en echelon fashion. Besides these ridges, there are other types of ridges or conical knolls lower than 500 m in relief; one is a group of rather large knolls extending to NE, roughly perpendicular to the fracture zone direction, and the other is independent small knolls, summing up to five or six in number. Another expression of a depression zone was recognized with a moderate angle to the fracture zone in a crank fashion. This may correspond to the so-called _gNakwe Channel_h which has been wrongly mistaken. Such en echelon arrays are involved in a 50 km wide NNW-SSE zone, which is sharply demarcated by fault scarps. These characteristics in the fracture zone area and associated knolls suggest that this part of the Nosappu Fracture Zone might have developed in a fault interaction area which has a left-lateral component of leaky transform faulting close to the spreading ridge.

  20. Is a leaky gut involved in the pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Reyes, Humberto; Zapata, Rodrigo; Hernández, Ismael; Gotteland, Martín; Sandoval, Lorena; Jirón, María Isabel; Palma, Joaquín; Almuna, Ramón; Silva, Juan Jorge

    2006-04-01

    Increased gastrointestinal permeability has been demonstrated in several liver diseases. It may facilitate the absorption of gut-derived endotoxin-stimulating Kupffer cells to release proinflammatory cytokines or other potentially hepatotoxic compounds. We examined gastrointestinal permeability, plasma levels of anti-lipopolysacharides (anti-LPS), and four proinflammatory cytokines in 20 patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) compared with 22 normal pregnant and 29 non-pregnant women. Urinary excretion of sucrose and the urinary lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratio after a standard oral load were used to assess gastrointestinal permeability. Anti-LPS (IgA, IgM, and IgG) were measured in peripheral blood by Human EndoCAb test kit; TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-10 by Quantikine HS human immunoassays. Sucrose urinary excretion was similar in the three groups, indicating normal gastric permeability. The urinary L/M ratio was significantly higher in ICP than in the other groups [median (interquartile range): 0.018% (0.011-0.023) in ICP, 0.012% (0.009-0.016) in normal pregnancies, and 0.009% (0.008-0.012) in non-pregnant women, P < .01]. No significant differences were found in anti-LPS or cytokines plasma levels except slightly higher levels of IL-6 in ICP patients than in non-pregnant women (P < .05). Four of five women with abnormal urinary L/M ratio during ICP continued to show abnormalities in tests up to 2 years after delivery. In conclusion, an increased intestinal permeability was detected in ICP patients during and after pregnancy. A "leaky gut" may participate in the pathogenesis of ICP by enhancing the absorption of bacterial endotoxin and the enterohepatic circulation of cholestatic metabolites of sex hormones and bile salts.

  1. Influence of heterogeneity on the interpretation of pumping test data in leaky aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copty, Nadim K.; Trinchero, Paolo; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Sarioglu, Murat Savas; Findikakis, Angelos N.

    2008-11-01

    Pumping tests are routinely interpreted from the analysis of drawdown data and their derivatives. These interpretations result in a small number of apparent parameter values which lump the underlying heterogeneous structure of the aquifer. Key questions in such interpretations are (1) what is the physical meaning of those lumped parameters and (2) whether it is possible to infer some information about the spatial variability of the hydraulic parameters. The system analyzed in this paper consists of an aquifer separated from a second recharging aquifer by means of an aquitard. The natural log transforms of the transmissivity, ln T, and the vertical conductance of the aquitard, ln C, are modeled as two independent second-order stationary spatial random functions (SRFs). The Monte Carlo approach is used to simulate the time-dependent drawdown at a suite of observation points for different values of the statistical parameters defining the SRFs. Drawdown data at each observation point are independently used to estimate hydraulic parameters using three existing methods: (1) the inflection-point method, (2) curve-fitting, and (3) the double inflection-point method. The resulting estimated parameters are shown to be space dependent and vary with the interpretation method since each method gives different emphasis to different parts of the time-drawdown data. Moreover, the heterogeneity in the pumped aquifer or the aquitard influences the estimates in distinct manners. Finally, we show that, by combining the parameter estimates obtained from the different analysis procedures, information about the heterogeneity of the leaky aquifer system may be inferred.

  2. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens.

    PubMed

    Geier, Christoph B; Piller, Alexander; Linder, Angela; Sauerwein, Kai M T; Eibl, Martha M; Wolf, Hermann M

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency.

  3. Novel Composite Right/Left-Handed Metamaterial-Based Leaky-Wave Transmission-Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Mohammed Reza Mahmoodi

    The focus of this dissertation is on the design procedure as well as analysis of a very interesting category of metamaterial-based structures namely composite right/left-handed (CRLH) Leaky-wave (LW) transmission-lines (TL). As a result several unique CRLH-TLs are designed and presented. Each of the discussed CRLH LW-TLs has exceptional and beneficial characteristics, which is only realizable due to their composite right/left-handed nature and dispersion characteristics. The operation mechanism of CRLH-TL is explained in the first chapter by the overview of the theory behind the CRLH concept. The dispersion diagram of a CRLH unit-cell shows that the phase constant (beta) is a non-linear function of frequency with a beta = 0 point at a non-zero frequency. Furthermore, a CRLH-TL supports left-handed slow-wave (guided-wave) and fast-wave (leaky-wave) modes, where the phase velocity and the group velocity are anti-parallel and phase advanced is achievable, as well as right-handed slow-wave and fast-wave modes, where the two velocities are parallel and phase delay can be observed. The subject of the second chapter is conformal CRLH LW-TLs. The effect of conformation of a planar uniform CRLH LW-TL on a convex and a concave surface are investigated. It is shown when the CRLH LW-TL is operating in the fast-wave region the conformation affects its radiation characteristics and the radiation pattern becomes wider in both convex and concave cases. A dispersion engineering method is introduced to modify the conformal structure such that it provides comparable performance to that of the planar version in terms of radiation characteristics. Then taking advantage of the proposed modification method a multifunctional electronically controlled conformal CRLH LW-TL is introduced in a later part of this chapter. Varactor diodes are introduced in the unit-cells to electronically control its guided and radiation characteristics. This CRLH-TL has the ability to operate partially in the

  4. Flexible or leaky attention in creative people? Distinct patterns of attention for different types of creative thinking.

    PubMed

    Zabelina, Darya; Saporta, Arielle; Beeman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Creativity has been putatively linked to distinct forms of attention, but which aspects of creativity and which components of attention remains unclear. Two experiments examined how divergent thinking and creative achievement relate to visual attention. In both experiments, participants identified target letters (S or H) within hierarchical stimuli (global letters made of local letters), after being cued to either the local or global level. In Experiment 1, participants identified the targets more quickly following valid cues (80% of trials) than following invalid cues. However, this smaller validity effect was associated with higher divergent thinking, suggesting that divergent thinking was related to quicker overcoming of invalid cues, and thus to flexible attention. Creative achievement was unrelated to the validity effect. Experiment 2 examined whether divergent thinking (or creative achievement) is related to "leaky attention," so that when cued to one level of a stimulus, some information is still processed, or leaks in, from the non-cued level. In this case, the cued stimulus level always contained a target, and the non-cued level was congruent, neutral, or incongruent with the target. Divergent thinking did not relate to stimulus congruency. In contrast, high creative achievement was related to quicker responses to the congruent than to the incongruent stimuli, suggesting that real-world creative achievement is indeed associated with leaky attention, whereas standard laboratory tests of divergent thinking are not. Together, these results elucidate distinct patterns of attention for different measures of creativity. Specifically, creative achievers may have leaky attention, as suggested by previous literature, whereas divergent thinkers have selective yet flexible attention.

  5. The Andes hantavirus NSs protein is expressed from the viral small mRNA by a leaky scanning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Solis, Loretto; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P; Pino, Karla; Tischler, Nicole D; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2012-02-01

    The small mRNA (SmRNA) of all Bunyaviridae encodes the nucleocapsid (N) protein. In 4 out of 5 genera in the Bunyaviridae, the smRNA encodes an additional nonstructural protein denominated NSs. In this study, we show that Andes hantavirus (ANDV) SmRNA encodes an NSs protein. Data show that the NSs protein is expressed in the context of an ANDV infection. Additionally, our results suggest that translation initiation from the NSs initiation codon is mediated by ribosomal subunits that have bypassed the upstream N protein initiation codon through a leaky scanning mechanism.

  6. Demonstration of a directional sonic prism in two dimensions using an air-acoustic leaky wave antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Naify, Christina J. Rohde, Charles A.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.; Guild, Matthew D.

    2015-09-28

    Analysis and experimental demonstration of a two-dimensional acoustic leaky wave antenna is presented for use in air. The antenna is comprised of a two-dimensional waveguide patterned with radiating acoustic shunts. When excited using a single acoustic source within the waveguide, the antenna acts as a sonic prism that exhibits frequency steering. This design allows for control of acoustic steering angle using only a single source transducer and a patterned aperture. Aperture design was determined using transmission line analysis and finite element methods. The designed antenna was fabricated and the steering angle measured. The performance of the measured aperture was within 9% of predicted angle magnitudes over all examined frequencies.

  7. The Andes Hantavirus NSs Protein Is Expressed from the Viral Small mRNA by a Leaky Scanning Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Solis, Loretto; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Pino, Karla; Tischler, Nicole D.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    The small mRNA (SmRNA) of all Bunyaviridae encodes the nucleocapsid (N) protein. In 4 out of 5 genera in the Bunyaviridae, the smRNA encodes an additional nonstructural protein denominated NSs. In this study, we show that Andes hantavirus (ANDV) SmRNA encodes an NSs protein. Data show that the NSs protein is expressed in the context of an ANDV infection. Additionally, our results suggest that translation initiation from the NSs initiation codon is mediated by ribosomal subunits that have bypassed the upstream N protein initiation codon through a leaky scanning mechanism. PMID:22156529

  8. Leaky rivers: Implications of the loss of longitudinal fluvial disconnectivity in headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Beckman, Natalie D.

    2014-01-01

    critical component of disconnectivity at all spatial scales examined. Land uses such as timber harvest, flow regulation, and placer mining that result in reduced wood recruitment or removal of instream wood appear to create an alternative stable state in which channels are unable to retain wood because of reduced debris roughness. The net effect of reduced longitudinal disconnectivity is increased transport of fine sediment and organic matter and reduced biological uptake of nutrients. The altered headwater streams become leaky with respect to fine sediments and nutrients.

  9. Impact-Driven Pressure Management for Leaky CO2 Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholzer, J. T.; Cihan, A.; Zhou, Q.

    2011-12-01

    Large-scale pressure buildup in response to carbon dioxide injection in the subsurface may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization can impact caprock integrity, induce micro-seismicity in critically stressed faults, drive CO2 and/or brine up conductive features into shallow groundwater resources, and affect existing subsurface activities such as oil and gas production. It has recently been suggested that pressure management schemes involving the extraction of native fluids from storage formations may be used to control subsurface pressure increases caused by CO2 injection, thereby limiting the possibility of unwanted effects such as brine leakage to shallow freshwater aquifers and also reducing the potentially large Areas of Review, which in the U.S. EPA's regulation for CO2 sequestration projects are the subsurface domains that need to be characterized for local conductive features in order to obtain a permit. Our study presents application of a newly developed analytical solution to evaluate the effectiveness of fluid extraction in managing pressure buildup caused by CO2 injection and storage. We use a hypothetical yet complex example case with multiple leaky wells and a critically stressed fault. Different pressure management schemes involving (passive) pressure relief wells, active extraction wells, combinations of both, disposal of brine, and/or re-injection of brine were tested with respect to predefined performance criteria, such as the maximum allowable pressure near the conductive fault. Options for optimal well placement were also evaluated, comparing near-field arrays of extraction wells (i.e., near the injection wells) with far-field arrays (e.g., near the fault). Far-field well placement allows for a significant reduction in the brine extraction rates needed to keep pressure increase below the target performance criterion. Based on these findings, we developed the concept of "impact-driven pressure

  10. Double-layer PVDF transducer and V(z) measurement system for measuring leaky Lamb waves in a piezoelectric plate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Chun; Kuo, Shi Hoa

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a new experimental measurement method for leaky Lamb waves propagating in a piezoelectric plate immersed in a conductive fluid. The measurement system is a low-frequency version of lens-less acoustic microscopy which has been developed based on a line-focus double-layer PVDF transducer. The transducer and its defocusing measurement system can perform V(z) measurements on a sample plate immersed in a fluid, and therefore can obtain the leaky Lamb wave velocities with high accuracy. An X-cut LiNbO(3) plate is investigated with this experimental measurement system to find out its fluid-loading effects, especially the conductive loading effects by water of various conductivities. Angular dependence of this conductive loading effect along different propagating directions on the X-cut LiNbO(3) plate is measured. It is found out the conductive loading effects are strongly dependent on the piezoelectric coupling factor. Theoretical calculations based on partial wave theory have also been carried out and compared with experimental data. Good agreements have been observed.

  11. Dc to ac field conversion due to leaky-wave excitation in a plasma slab behind an ionization front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, V. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a way for generating coherent tunable electromagnetic radiation through dc to ac field conversion by an ionization front. The conversion is caused by the excitation of leaky waves behind the transversely limited ionization front propagating in a uniform electrostatic field. This differs significantly from the well-known dc-to-ac-radiation-converter models which consider Doppler-like frequency conversion by a transversely unlimited ionization front propagating in a spatially periodic electric field. We explore the dispersion properties and excitation of these leaky waves radiated through the transverse plasma boundary at the Cherenkov angle to the direction of propagation of a superluminal ionization front as dependent on the parameters of the plasma produced and on the speed of the ionization front. It is shown that not only the center frequency but also the duration and waveform of the generated pulse may significantly depend on the speed of the ionization front. The results indicate the possibility of using such converters based on planar photoconductive antennas to create sources of microwave and terahertz radiation with controllable waveforms that are transformed from video to radio pulse when the angle of incident ionizing radiation is tuned.

  12. Creativity and sensory gating indexed by the P50: selective versus leaky sensory gating in divergent thinkers and creative achievers.

    PubMed

    Zabelina, Darya L; O'Leary, Daniel; Pornpattananangkul, Narun; Nusslock, Robin; Beeman, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Creativity has previously been linked with atypical attention, but it is not clear what aspects of attention, or what types of creativity are associated. Here we investigated specific neural markers of a very early form of attention, namely sensory gating, indexed by the P50 ERP, and how it relates to two measures of creativity: divergent thinking and real-world creative achievement. Data from 84 participants revealed that divergent thinking (assessed with the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking) was associated with selective sensory gating, whereas real-world creative achievement was associated with "leaky" sensory gating, both in zero-order correlations and when controlling for academic test scores in a regression. Thus both creativity measures related to sensory gating, but in opposite directions. Additionally, divergent thinking and real-world creative achievement did not interact in predicting P50 sensory gating, suggesting that these two creativity measures orthogonally relate to P50 sensory gating. Finally, the ERP effect was specific to the P50 - neither divergent thinking nor creative achievement were related to later components, such as the N100 and P200. Overall results suggest that leaky sensory gating may help people integrate ideas that are outside of focus of attention, leading to creativity in the real world; whereas divergent thinking, measured by divergent thinking tests which emphasize numerous responses within a limited time, may require selective sensory processing more than previously thought.

  13. Improvement of the reverse tetracycline transactivator by single amino acid substitutions that reduce leaky target gene expression to undetectable levels.

    PubMed

    Roney, Ian J; Rudner, Adam D; Couture, Jean-François; Kærn, Mads

    2016-06-21

    Conditional gene expression systems that enable inducible and reversible transcriptional control are essential research tools and have broad applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. The reverse tetracycline transcriptional activator is a canonical system for engineered gene expression control that enables graded and gratuitous modulation of target gene transcription in eukaryotes from yeast to human cell lines and transgenic animals. However, the system has a tendency to activate transcription even in the absence of tetracycline and this leaky target gene expression impedes its use. Here, we identify single amino-acid substitutions that greatly enhance the dynamic range of the system in yeast by reducing leaky transcription to undetectable levels while retaining high expression capacity in the presence of inducer. While the mutations increase the inducer concentration required for full induction, additional sensitivity-enhancing mutations can compensate for this effect and confer a high degree of robustness to the system. The novel transactivator variants will be useful in applications where tight and tunable regulation of gene expression is paramount.

  14. Contribution of multiple isolating barriers to reproductive isolation between a pair of phytophagous ladybird beetles.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Kei W; Katakura, Haruo

    2009-10-01

    Reproductive isolation between species may often be attained by multiple isolating barriers, but the components are rarely studied in animal taxa. To elucidate the nature of multiple isolating barriers, we quantified the strength of three premating barriers, including ecologically based ones (seasonal, habitat, and sexual), two postmating-prehatching barriers (reduced egg hatchability and conspecific sperm precedence [CSP]), and one posthatching barrier, including four components of F(1) hybrid reduced fitness, between two phytophagous ladybird beetles, Henosepilachna vigintioctomaculata and H. pustulosa. We detected five positive barriers (habitat isolation, sexual isolation, reduced egg hatchability, CSP, and reduced egg hatchability in backcrosses of F(1) hybrids). None of these barriers entirely prevents gene exchange when it acts alone, but jointly they generate nearly complete reproductive isolation even between sympatric populations. Host fidelity contributed most strongly to reproductive isolation by reducing interspecific hybridization through several important types of ecological isolation, including microspatial, habitat, and seasonal isolation. The existence of multiple isolating barriers likely helps keep reproductive isolation stable and robust, by complementing changes in the strength of leaky barriers. This complementarity of multiple isolating barriers yields the concept of robustness of reproductive isolation, which is important when considering the long-term maintenance of species boundaries in coexisting species pairs.

  15. Atlantic ITCZ: A Wall or a Leaky Barrier for African Aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, A.; Zhang, C.

    2012-12-01

    the cross-ITCZ transport is responsible. North of the ITCZ, dust is lofted and transported southward above shallow convection. To its south, smoke is transported northward at the base of the circulation where wet deposition, cloud processes, and external mixing occur. To show that dust is able to penetrate and cross the ITCZ, we used NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model to create seasonal trajectory frequency climatologies originating from the Sahara Desert. The trajectory climatologies agree with the seasonal occurrence probabilities in both the southward extent and transport altitudes of possible dust transport. The transport across the ITCZ is evident. We find that almost 15% of the trajectories initiated over the Sahara Desert cross the ITCZ at 8°N, the approximate location of maximum ITCZ rainfall. We present schematics for the three regimes to illustrate the transport and mixing mechanisms. As dust and smoke are advected by the dominant zonal wind, they continue to mix during the westward transport by the shallow meridional circulations in the absence of deep convection. The alternation between deep and shallow convection makes the ITCZ a leaky barrier for African aerosol.

  16. Building Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of developing students' building awareness by exploring logos, or buildings that symbolize a country, to learn about architecture and the cultures in different countries. Explores categories of buildings. Includes examples of logos from around the world. (CMK)

  17. Exact results for power spectrum and susceptibility of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron with two-state noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droste, Felix; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The response properties of excitable systems driven by colored noise are of great interest, but are usually mathematically only accessible via approximations. For this reason, dichotomous noise, a rare example of a colored noise leading often to analytically tractable problems, has been extensively used in the study of stochastic systems. Here, we calculate exact expressions for the power spectrum and the susceptibility of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron driven by asymmetric dichotomous noise. While our results are in excellent agreement with simulations, they also highlight a limitation of using dichotomous noise as a simple model for more complex fluctuations: Both power spectrum and susceptibility exhibit an undamped periodic structure, the origin of which we discuss in detail.

  18. Auto- and Crosscorrelograms for the Spike Response of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neurons with Slow Synapses

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Bote, Ruben; Parga, Nestor

    2006-01-20

    An analytical description of the response properties of simple but realistic neuron models in the presence of noise is still lacking. We determine completely up to the second order the firing statistics of a single and a pair of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons receiving some common slowly filtered white noise. In particular, the auto- and cross-correlation functions of the output spike trains of pairs of cells are obtained from an improvement of the adiabatic approximation introduced previously by Moreno-Bote and Parga [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 028102 (2004)]. These two functions define the firing variability and firing synchronization between neurons, and are of much importance for understanding neuron communication.

  19. Reliability of neuronal information conveyed by unreliable neuristor-based leaky integrate-and-fire neurons: a model study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2015-01-01

    We conducted simulations on the neuronal behavior of neuristor-based leaky integrate-and-fire (NLIF) neurons. The phase-plane analysis on the NLIF neuron highlights its spiking dynamics – determined by two nullclines conditional on the variables on the plane. Particular emphasis was placed on the operational noise arising from the variability of the threshold switching behavior in the neuron on each switching event. As a consequence, we found that the NLIF neuron exhibits a Poisson-like noise in spiking, delimiting the reliability of the information conveyed by individual NLIF neurons. To highlight neuronal information coding at a higher level, a population of noisy NLIF neurons was analyzed in regard to probability of successful information decoding given the Poisson-like noise of each neuron. The result demonstrates highly probable success in decoding in spite of large variability – due to the variability of the threshold switching behavior – of individual neurons. PMID:25966658

  20. Enabling inter- and intra-chip optical wireless interconnect by the aid of hybrid plasmonic leaky-wave optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Vahid; Yousefi, Leila; Mohammad-Taheri, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to provide optical link in Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs). The proposed method uses two hybrid plasmonic leaky-wave optical antennas, operating at the standard optical telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 μm, to provide inter-chip interconnect between two layers in a photonic chip and also intra-chip interconnect between two different photonic ICs. Linearly tapered couplers are designed to couple the optical signal from the silicon waveguide to the hybrid plasmonic antennas. The performance of the proposed optical link is verified using numerical full wave simulation. The proposed structure is planar, and can be fabricated using standard CMOS technology which makes it the superior candidate for realization of future multi-layered Photonic Integrated Circuits.

  1. The Gamma renewal process as an output of the diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Petr; Sacerdote, Laura; Zucca, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Statistical properties of spike trains as well as other neurophysiological data suggest a number of mathematical models of neurons. These models range from entirely descriptive ones to those deduced from the properties of the real neurons. One of them, the diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model, which is based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) stochastic process that is restricted by an absorbing barrier, can describe a wide range of neuronal activity in terms of its parameters. These parameters are readily associated with known physiological mechanisms. The other model is descriptive, Gamma renewal process, and its parameters only reflect the observed experimental data or assumed theoretical properties. Both of these commonly used models are related here. We show under which conditions the Gamma model is an output from the diffusion OU model. In some cases, we can see that the Gamma distribution is unrealistic to be achieved for the employed parameters of the OU process.

  2. Exact results for power spectrum and susceptibility of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron with two-state noise.

    PubMed

    Droste, Felix; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The response properties of excitable systems driven by colored noise are of great interest, but are usually mathematically only accessible via approximations. For this reason, dichotomous noise, a rare example of a colored noise leading often to analytically tractable problems, has been extensively used in the study of stochastic systems. Here, we calculate exact expressions for the power spectrum and the susceptibility of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron driven by asymmetric dichotomous noise. While our results are in excellent agreement with simulations, they also highlight a limitation of using dichotomous noise as a simple model for more complex fluctuations: Both power spectrum and susceptibility exhibit an undamped periodic structure, the origin of which we discuss in detail.

  3. Responses of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neurons to a Plurality of Stimuli in Their Receptive Fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Bundesen, Claus; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental question concerning the way the visual world is represented in our brain is how a cortical cell responds when its classical receptive field contains a plurality of stimuli. Two opposing models have been proposed. In the response-averaging model, the neuron responds with a weighted average of all individual stimuli. By contrast, in the probability-mixing model, the cell responds to a plurality of stimuli as if only one of the stimuli were present. Here we apply the probability-mixing and the response-averaging model to leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, to describe neuronal behavior based on observed spike trains. We first estimate the parameters of either model using numerical methods, and then test which model is most likely to have generated the observed data. Results show that the parameters can be successfully estimated and the two models are distinguishable using model selection.

  4. Different types of noise in leaky integrate-and-fire model of neuronal dynamics with discrete periodical input.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, V; Lánský, P; Rodriguez, R

    2004-03-01

    Different variants of stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire model for the membrane depolarisation of neurons are investigated. The model is driven by a constant input and equidistant pulses of fixed amplitude. These two types of signal are considered under the influence of three types of noise: white noise, jitter on interpulse distance, and noise in the amplitude of pulses. The results of computational experiments demonstrate the enhancement of the signal by noise in subthreshold regime and deterioration of the signal if it is sufficiently strong to carry the information in absence of noise. Our study holds mainly to central neurons that process discrete pulses although an application in sensory system is also available.

  5. A new type of magnetoresistance oscillations: Interaction of a two-dimensional electron gas with leaky interface phonons

    SciTech Connect

    ZUDOV,M.A.; PONOMAREV,I.V.; EFROS,A.L.; DU,R.R.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.

    2000-05-11

    The authors report a new type of oscillations in magnetoresistance observed in high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), in GaAs-AIGaAs heterostructures. Being periodic in 1/B these oscillations appear in weak magnetic field (B < 0.3 T) and only in a narrow temperature range (3 K < T < 7 K). Remarkably, these oscillations can be understood in terms of magneto-phonon resonance originating from the interaction of 2DEG and leaky interface-acoustic phonon modes. The existence of such modes on the GaAs:AIGaAs interface is demonstrated theoretically and their velocities are calculated. It is shown that the electron-phonon scattering matrix element exhibits a peak for the phonons carrying momentum q = 2k{sub F} (k{sub F} is the Fermi wave-vector of 2DEG).

  6. Multi-chimera states and transitions in the Leaky Integrate-and-Fire model with nonlocal and hierarchical connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigkri-DeSmedt, N. D.; Hizanidis, J.; Hövel, P.; Provata, A.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of nonlocal and fractal connectivity are investigated in a network of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) elements. The idea of fractal coupling originates from the hierarchical topology of networks formed by neuronal axons, which transmit the electrical signals in the brain. If a number of LIF elements with finite refractory period are nonlocally coupled, multi-chimera states emerge whose multiplicity depends both on the coupling strength and on the refractory period. We provide evidence that the introduction of a hierarchical topology in the coupling induces novel complex spatial and temporal structures, such as nested chimera states and transitions between multi-chimera states with different multiplicities. These results demonstrate new complex patterns, as well as transitions between different multi-chimera states arising from the combination of nonlinear dynamics with the hierarchical coupling.

  7. Increased Sensitivity to Binge Alcohol-Induced Gut Leakiness and Inflammatory Liver Disease in HIV Transgenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Atrayee; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Jang, Sehwan; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-mediated advanced liver injury in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effect of binge alcohol on the inflammatory liver disease in HIV transgenic rats as a model for simulating human conditions. Female wild-type (WT) or HIV transgenic rats were treated with three consecutive doses of binge ethanol (EtOH) (3.5 g/kg/dose oral gavages at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (Control). Blood and liver tissues were collected at 1 or 6-h following the last dose of ethanol or dextrose for the measurements of serum endotoxin and liver pathology, respectively. Compared to the WT, the HIV rats showed increased sensitivity to alcohol-mediated gut leakiness, hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evidenced with the significantly elevated levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic triglycerides, histological fat accumulation and F4/80 staining. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that hepatic levels of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), leptin and the downstream target monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly up-regulated in the HIV-EtOH rats, compared to all other groups. Subsequent experiments with primary cultured cells showed that both hepatocytes and hepatic Kupffer cells were the sources of the elevated MCP-1 in HIV-EtOH rats. Further, TLR4 and MCP-1 were found to be upregulated by leptin. Collectively, these results show that HIV rats, similar to HIV-infected people being treated with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), are more susceptible to binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and inflammatory liver disease than the corresponding WT, possibly due to additive or synergistic interaction between binge alcohol exposure and HIV infection. Based on these results, HIV transgenic rats can be used as a surrogate model to study the molecular mechanisms of many disease states caused by heavy alcohol intake in HIV-infected people on HAART.

  8. Oats supplementation prevents alcohol-induced gut leakiness in rats by preventing alcohol-induced oxidative tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yueming; Forsyth, Christopher B; Banan, Ali; Fields, Jeremy Z; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2009-06-01

    We reported previously that oats supplementation prevents gut leakiness and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) in our rat model of alcoholic liver disease. Because oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of both alcohol-induced gut leakiness and ASH, and because oats have antioxidant properties, we tested the hypothesis that oats protect by preventing alcohol-induced oxidative damage to the intestine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged for 12 weeks with alcohol (starting dose of 1 g/kg increasing to 6 g/kg/day over the first 2 weeks) or dextrose, with or without oats supplementation (10 g/kg/day). Oxidative stress and injury were assessed by measuring colonic mucosal inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) (by immunohistochemistry), nitric oxide (colorimetric assay), and protein carbonylation and nitrotyrosination (immunoblotting). Colonic barrier integrity was determined by assessing the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton (immunohistochemistry) and the integrity of tight junctions (electron microscopy). Oats supplementation prevented alcohol-induced up-regulation of iNOS, nitric oxide overproduction in the colonic mucosa, and increases in protein carbonyl and nitrotyrosine levels. This protection was associated with prevention of ethanol (EtOH)-induced disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and disruption of tight junctions. We conclude that oats supplementation attenuates EtOH-induced disruption of intestinal barrier integrity, at least in part, by inhibiting EtOH-induced increases in oxidative stress and oxidative tissue damage. This inhibition prevents alcohol-induced disruption of the cytoskeleton and tight junctions. This study suggests that oats may be a useful therapeutic agent--a nutraceutical--for the prevention of alcohol-induced oxidative stress and organ dysfunction.

  9. Building America

    SciTech Connect

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  10. Analysis on the Radiation Property of the Bounded Modes of Periodic Leaky-Wave Structure with Finite-Length Using a Hybrid Method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Junhong; Duan, Jianjie; Zhang, Zhan; Chen, Meie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the radiation property of the one-dimensional periodic leaky-wave structure is analysed using a new hybrid method, which involves the mode expansion method for expanding the periodic aperture field in terms of spatial harmonics and the method of effective radiation sections for transforming the expanded fields into far fields. Using this method, the radiation of each spatial harmonic can be achieved, and the contributions of the harmonics (especially the bounded modes) to the total radiation of the periodic leaky-wave structure can be calculated. The main findings in this paper demonstrate that the bounded modes in a finite length structure have obvious contribution to the far-field radiation, which was considered to be non-radiative and always ignored in the conventional researches. PMID:26987698

  11. Healthy Buildings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, Deborah

    Health problems related to school buildings can be categorized in five major areas: sick-building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and poor indoor air quality due to smoke, chemicals, and other pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these areas,…

  12. Low velocity non-Darcian flow to a well fully penetrating a confined aquifer in the first kind of leaky aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xianmeng; Shao, Junyu; Yin, Maosheng; Liu, Dengfeng; Xue, Xianwu

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we use a finite difference method to solve low velocity non-Darcian flow to a well in the first kind of leaky aquifer system. Flow in the confined aquifer is assumed to be Darcian and horizontal, whereas flow in the aquitard is assumed to be non-Darcian and vertical. The threshold hydraulic gradient existence of non-Darcian flow in low permeability porous media is employed to describe the non-Darcian flow in the aquitard. A numerical solution has been obtained by using a finite difference method. This solution is compared with the previous solution for Darcian flow case in leaky aquifer system. The error has been analyzed. The comparison of this study and Darcian flow case (Hantush and Jacob, 1955) in leaky aquifer system indicates that the error is very small and can be neglected. However, the hydrogeological parameter calculation of leaky aquifer system is remarkably influenced by low velocity non-Darcian flow in aquitard. For the inflection point method (Hantush, 1956), the absolute values of estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility of confined aquifer and vertical hydraulic conductivity of aquitard show negative relationship with the pumping rate. For the type curve-fitting method (Walton, 1962), the estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility and elastic drainable porosity of confined aquifer are very small under small pumping rate. In general, the estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility and elastic drainable porosity of confined aquifer can be controlled under certain level through adjusting pumping rate. The estimated error of vertical hydraulic conductivity of aquitard is quite large no matter which method is used, even up to nearly 300%.

  13. Impact of leaky wells on nitrate cross-contamination in a layered aquifer system: Methodology for and demonstration of quantitative assessment and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Eun-Hee; Lee, Eunhee; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-10-01

    Poorly constructed wells can cause deterioration of groundwater quality by carrying surface contaminants into a deep subsurface aquifer system. In this study, the impact of leaky wells on groundwater contamination was quantitatively evaluated in a layered aquifer system of the Gosan agricultural fields, Jeju Island, Korea, where degradation in groundwater quality by nitrate has been reported. We introduce a leaky-well module and a double-domain integration method to compute nitrate cross-contamination through a layered aquifer system. The simulation results clearly revealed that the leaky wells rapidly degraded the water quality of the underlying aquifer by acting as a direct pathway for nitrate-rich shallow groundwater. The model results predicted that in order to decrease the NO3-N concentration at the regional groundwater wells below the maximum contamination level (MCL), the maximum allowable fertilizer amount of Gosan would be 45-65% of the currently applied fertilizer level, whereas sealing of the regional groundwater wells would rapidly decrease the NO3-N concentration below the MCL without reducing fertilizer usage. Our study demonstrated that the well conditions and hydrogeological system play major roles in the occurrence of nitrate in the underlying aquifer in Gosan; therefore, a proper groundwater management plan against nitrate contamination should be established on the basis of a comprehensive understanding of the hydrogeologic system of the area.

  14. Abnormalities of Thymic Stroma may Contribute to Immune Dysregulation in Murine Models of Leaky Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Caraffi, Stefano; Paganini, Tiziana; Fontana, Elena; Giliani, Silvia; Alt, Frederick W.; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Lymphostromal cross-talk in the thymus is essential to allow generation of a diversified repertoire of T lymphocytes and to prevent autoimmunity by self-reactive T cells. Hypomorphic mutations in genes that control T cell development have been associated with immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation both in humans and in mice. We have studied T cell development and thymic stroma architecture and maturation in two mouse models of leaky severe combined immune deficiency, carrying hypomorphic mutations in rag1 and lig4 genes. Defective T cell development was associated with abnormalities of thymic architecture that predominantly affect the thymic medulla, with reduction of the pool of mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the ability of mTECs to express autoimmune regulator (Aire) is preserved in mutant mice, the frequency of mature mTECs expressing Aire and tissue-specific antigens is severely reduced. Similarly, the ability of CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells is preserved in rag1 and lig4 mutant mice, but their number is greatly reduced. These data indicate that hypomorphic defects in T cell development may cause defective lymphostromal cross-talk and impinge on thymic stromal cells maturation, and thus favor immune dysregulation. PMID:21822418

  15. Effects of passive dendritic tree properties on the firing dynamics of a leaky-integrate-and-fire neuron.

    PubMed

    Saparov, Abulhair; Schwemmer, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    We study the effects of dendritic tree topology and biophysical properties on the firing dynamics of a leaky-integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron that explicitly includes spiking dynamics. We model the dendrites as a multi-compartment tree with passive dynamics. Owing to the simplicity of the system, we obtain the full analytical solution for the model which we use to derive a lower dimensional return map that captures the complete dynamics of the system. Using the map, we explore how biophysical properties and dendritic tree architecture affect firing dynamics. As was first reported in earlier work by one of the authors, we also find that the addition of the dendritic tree can induce bistability between periodic firing and quiescence. However, we go beyond their results by systematically examining how dendritic tree topology affects the appearance of this bistable behavior. We find that the structure of the dendritic tree can have significant quantitative effects on the bifurcation structure of the system, with branchier topologies tending to promote bistable behavior over unbranched chain topologies. We also show that this effect occurs even when the input conductance at the soma is held fixed, indicating that the topology of the dendritic tree is mainly responsible for this quantitative change in the bifurcation structure. Lastly, we demonstrate how our framework can be used to explore the effect of biophysical properties on the firing dynamics of a neuron with a more complex dendritic tree topology.

  16. Reconstruction of the input signal of the leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model from its interspike intervals.

    PubMed

    Seydnejad, Saeid R

    2016-02-01

    Extracting the input signal of a neuron by analyzing its spike output is an important step toward understanding how external information is coded into discrete events of action potentials and how this information is exchanged between different neurons in the nervous system. Most of the existing methods analyze this decoding problem in a stochastic framework and use probabilistic metrics such as maximum-likelihood method to determine the parameters of the input signal assuming a leaky and integrate-and-fire (LIF) model. In this article, the input signal of the LIF model is considered as a combination of orthogonal basis functions. The coefficients of the basis functions are found by minimizing the norm of the observed spikes and those generated by the estimated signal. This approach gives rise to the deterministic reconstruction of the input signal and results in a simple matrix identity through which the coefficients of the basis functions and therefore the neuronal stimulus can be identified. The inherent noise of the neuron is considered as an additional factor in the membrane potential and is treated as the disturbance in the reconstruction algorithm. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated by numerical simulations, and it is shown that input signals with different characteristics can be well recovered by this algorithm.

  17. Translation of the shallot virus X TGB3 gene depends on non-AUG initiation and leaky scanning.

    PubMed

    Lezzhov, Alexander A; Gushchin, Vladimir A; Lazareva, Ekaterina A; Vishnichenko, Valery K; Morozov, Sergey Y; Solovyev, Andrey G

    2015-10-01

    Triple gene block (TGB), a conserved gene module found in the genomes of many filamentous and rod-shaped plant viruses, encodes three proteins, TGB1, TGB2 and TGB3, required for viral cell-to-cell movement through plasmodesmata and systemic transport via the phloem. The genome of Shallot virus X, the type species of the genus Allexivirus, includes TGB1 and TGB2 genes, but contains no canonical ORF for TGB3 protein. However, a TGB3-like protein-encoding sequence lacking an AUG initiator codon has been found in the shallot virus X (ShVX) genome in a position typical for TGB3 genes. This putative TGB3 gene is conserved in all allexiviruses. Here, we carried out sequence analysis to predict possible non-AUG initiator codons in the ShVX TGB3-encoding sequence. We further used an agroinfiltration assay in Nicotiana benthamiana to confirm this prediction. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to demonstrate that the ShVX TGB3 could be translated on a bicistronic mRNA template via a leaky scanning mechanism.

  18. Detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms with novel leaky surface acoustic wave biosensors, DNA ligation and enzymatic signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinghua; Chang, Kai; Lu, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Ding, Yi; Jia, Shuangrong; Zhang, Kejun; Li, Fake; Shi, Jianfeng; Cao, Liang; Deng, Shaoli; Chen, Ming

    2012-03-15

    This manuscript describes a new technique for detecting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by integrating a leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) biosensor, enzymatic DNA ligation and enzymatic signal amplification. In this technique, the DNA target is hybridized with a capture probe immobilized on the surface of a LSAW biosensor. Then, the hybridized sequence is ligated to biotinylated allele-specific detection probe using Taq DNA ligase. The ligation does not take place if there is a single-nucleotide mismatch between the target and the capture probe. The ligated detection probe is transformed into a streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (SA-HRP) terminal group via a biotin-streptavidin complex. Then, the SA-HRP group catalyzes the polymerization of 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB) to form a surface precipitate, thus effectively increasing the sensitivity of detecting surface mass changes and allowing detection of SNPs. Optimal detection conditions were found to be: 0.3 mol/L sodium ion concentration in PBS, pH 7.6, capture probe concentration 0.5 μmol/L and target sequence concentration 1.0 μmol/L. The detection limit was found to be 1 × 10(-12)mol/L. Using this technique, we were able to detect a single-point mutation at nucleotide A2293G in Japanese encephalitis virus.

  19. Leaky guided waves in generic bars: Numerical prediction and experimental validation by means of ultrasonic underwater testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzotti, Matteo; Bartoli, Ivan; Marzani, Alessandro

    2014-02-18

    Guided Ultrasonic Waves (GUWs) are used in several industrial and civil applications for the non-destructive tests and inspection of mechanical waveguides immersed in fluids. As well known, the impedance mismatch at the fluid-structure interface causes the bulk waves traveling inside the waveguide to be partially refracted in the surrounding fluid. The leakage of bulk waves involves continuous energy radiation along the propagation direction, resulting in high attenuation rates and, consequently, reduced inspection ranges. In this work, the dispersion behaviour of leaky guided waves that propagate in immersed waveguides of general cross-section is investigated. To this end, a Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method coupled with a 2.5D Boundary Element method (BEM) is used to extract the wave dispersion equation. The proposed formulation avoids the well known limitations of analytical methods in treating complex geometries as well as those of Finite Element-based methods in representing propagation processes in unbounded domains. Numerical and experimental results are presented, in which the dispersion curves are extracted for different bars of arbitrary shape immersed in water. The results obtained in this paper can be useful for the design of testing conditions in practical applications and to tune experimental set up.

  20. Can the progressive increase of C₄ bundle sheath leakiness at low PFD be explained by incomplete suppression of photorespiration?

    PubMed

    Kromdijk, Johannes; Griffiths, Howard; Schepers, Hans E

    2010-11-01

    The ability to concentrate CO₂ around Rubisco allows C₄ crops to suppress photorespiration. However, as phosphoenolpyruvate regeneration requires ATP, the energetic efficiency of the C₄ pathway at low photosynthetic flux densities (PFD) becomes a balancing act between primary fixation and concentration of CO₂ in mesophyll (M) cells, and CO₂ reduction in bundle sheath (BS) cells. At low PFD, retro-diffusion of CO₂ from BS cells, relative to the rate of bicarbonate fixation in M cells (termed leakiness φ), is known to increase. This paper investigates whether this increase in ϕ could be explained by incomplete inhibition of photorespiration. The PFD response of φ was measured at various O₂ partial pressures in young Zea mays plants grown at 250 (LL) and 750 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹ PFD (HL). φ increased at low PFD and was positively correlated with O₂ partial pressure. Low PFD during growth caused BS conductance and interveinal distance to be lower in the LL plants, compared to the HL plants, which correlated with lower φ. Model analysis showed that incomplete inhibition of photorespiration, especially in the HL plants, and an increase in the relative contribution of mitochondrial respiration at low PFD could explain the observed increases in φ.

  1. Analytical solutions of three-dimensional groundwater flow to a well in a leaky sloping fault-zone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuqing; Zhang, You-Kuan; Liang, Xiuyu

    2016-08-01

    A semi-analytical solution was presented for groundwater flow due to pumping in a leaky sloping fault-zone aquifer surrounded by permeable matrices. The flow in the aquifer was descried by a three-dimensional flow equation, and the flow in the upper and lower matrix blocks are described by a one-dimensional flow equation. A first-order free-water surface equation at the outcrop of the fault-zone aquifer was used to describe the water table condition. The Laplace domain solution was derived using Laplace transform and finite Fourier transform techniques and the semi-analytical solutions in the real time domain were evaluated using the numerical inverse Laplace transform method. The solution was in excellent agreement with Theis solution combined with superposition principle as well as the solution of Huang et al. (2014). It was found that the drawdown increases as the sloping angle of the aquifer increases in early time and the impact of the angle is insignificant after pumping for a long time. The free-water surface boundary as additional source recharges the fault aquifer and significantly affect the drawdown at later time. The surrounding permeable matrices have a strong influence on drawdown but this influence can be neglected when the ratio of the specific storage and the ratio of the hydraulic conductivity of the matrices to those of the fault aquifer are less than 0.001.

  2. The Contribution of Highly Productive but Leaky Wetlands to the Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics of sub-Saharan Africa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, M. J.; Kansiime, F.; Jones, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The tropical wetlands of East Africa represent hotspots of carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange the dynamics of which vary across the site, landscape and regional scale. The wetlands of the Nile headwaters including Lake Victoria, the world's largest tropical lake, are dominated by the emergent macrophyte sedge Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus), which under favourable environmental conditions has been shown to exhibit high rates of photosynthetic carbon dioxide assimilation (≥40 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1); high rates of net primary productivity (≥50 g DM m-2 d-1); and the accumulation of significant peat deposits resulting in carbon stocks (≥640 t C ha-1) that exceed similar estimates from tropical rainforests, often considered to be the primary land based reserve of carbon. However, while these wetlands represent significant carbon pools, they are inherently "leaky" systems due to the lateral loss of particulate and dissolved carbon and this has implications for riverine carbon and GHG emissions which have been shown to increase with wetland extent and upland biomass. This paper utilises a range of empirical and published information to report on the eco-physiological controls on carbon, water and GHG exchange in papyrus dominated wetlands and considers the contribution of these highly productive wetlands to the GHG dynamics of the inland waters of East Africa, and in particular the Lake Victoria basin and the headwaters of the river Nile.

  3. The Contribution of Highly Productive but Leaky Wetlands to the Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics of sub-Saharan Africa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Matthew; Kansiime, Frank; Jones, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The tropical wetlands of East Africa represent hotspots of carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange the dynamics of which vary across the site, landscape and regional scale. The wetlands of the Nile headwaters including Lake Victoria, the world's largest tropical lake, are dominated by the emergent macrophyte sedge Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus), which under favourable environmental conditions has been shown to exhibit high rates of photosynthetic carbon dioxide assimilation (≥40 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1); high rates of net primary productivity (≥50 g DM m-2 d-1); and the accumulation of significant peat deposits resulting in carbon stocks (≥640 t C ha-1) that exceed similar estimates from tropical rainforests, often considered to be the primary land based reserve of carbon. However, while these wetlands represent significant carbon pools, they are inherently "leaky" systems due to the lateral loss of particulate and dissolved carbon and this has implications for riverine carbon and GHG emissions which have been shown to increase with wetland extent and upland biomass. This paper utilises a range of empirical and published information to report on the eco-physiological controls on carbon, water and GHG exchange in papyrus dominated wetlands and considers the contribution of these highly productive wetlands to the GHG dynamics of the inland waters of East Africa, and in particular the Lake Victoria basin and the headwaters of the river Nile.

  4. Spectral Intensities of Antiprotons and the Nested Leaky-box Model for Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, R.; Madziwa-Nussinov, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ˜1-300 GeV by BESS, PAMELA, and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ˜2.3 ± 0.7 million years in the Galactic volume, independent of the energy of cosmic rays, matches the observed intensities. A small additional component of secondary antiprotons in the energy range below 10 GeV, generated in cocoon-like regions surrounding the cosmic-ray sources, seems to be present. We discuss this result in the context of observations of other secondary components such as positrons and boron, and the bounds on anisotropy of cosmic rays. In the nested leaky-box model the spectral intensities of antiprotons and positrons can be interpreted as secondary products of cosmic-ray interactions.

  5. Planarized process for resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of mid-IR quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Kirch, J. D.; Boyle, C.; Sigler, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Zutter, B.; Buelow, P.; Schulte, K.; Kuech, T.; Earles, T.

    2015-03-01

    On-chip resonant leaky-wave coupling of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting at 8.36 μm has been realized by selective regrowth of interelement layers in curved trenches, defined by dry and wet etching. The fabricated structure provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array element and interelement regions. In-phase-mode operation to 5.5 W front-facet emitted power in a near-diffraction-limited far-field beam pattern, with 4.5 W in the main lobe, is demonstrated. A refined fabrication process has been developed to produce phased-locked antiguided arrays of QCLs with planar geometry. The main fabrication steps in this process include non-selective regrowth of Fe:InP in interelement trenches, defined by inductive-coupled plasma (ICP) etching, a chemical polishing (CP) step to planarize the surface, non-selective regrowth of interelement layers, ICP selective etching of interelement layers, and non-selective regrowth of InP cladding layer followed by another CP step to form the element regions. This new process results in planar InGaAs/InP interelement regions, which allows for significantly improved control over the array geometry and the dimensions of element and interelement regions. Such a planar process is highly desirable to realize shorter emitting wavelength (4.6 μm) arrays, where fabrication tolerance for single-mode operation are tighter compared to 8 μm-emitting devices.

  6. Guided-Mode-Leaky-Mode-Guided-Mode Fiber Interferometer and Its High Sensitivity Refractive Index Sensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Li, Chunyue; Zhao, Chengwu; Li, Weizheng

    2016-06-01

    A cascaded symmetrical dual-taper Mach-Zehnder interferometer structure based on guided-mode and leaky-mode interference is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the interference spectrum characteristics of interferometer has been analyzed by the Finite Difference-Beam Propagation Method (FD-BPM). When the diameter of taper waist is 20 μm-30 μm, dual-taper length is 1 mm and taper distance is 4 cm-6 cm, the spectral contrast is higher, which is suitable for sensing. Secondly, experimental research on refractive index sensitivity is carried out. A refractive index sensitivity of 62.78 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) can achieved in the RI range of 1.3333-1.3792 (0%~25% NaCl solution), when the sensor structure parameters meet the following conditions: diameter of taper waist is 24 μm, dual-taper length is 837 μm and taper distance is 5.5 cm. The spectrum contrast is 0.8 and measurement resolution is 1.6 × 10(-5) RIU. The simulation analysis is highly consistent with experimental results. Research shows that the sensor has promising application in low RI fields where high-precision measurement is required due to its high sensitivity and stability.

  7. Guided-Mode-Leaky-Mode-Guided-Mode Fiber Interferometer and Its High Sensitivity Refractive Index Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Li, Chunyue; Zhao, Chengwu; Li, Weizheng

    2016-01-01

    A cascaded symmetrical dual-taper Mach-Zehnder interferometer structure based on guided-mode and leaky-mode interference is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the interference spectrum characteristics of interferometer has been analyzed by the Finite Difference-Beam Propagation Method (FD-BPM). When the diameter of taper waist is 20 μm–30 μm, dual-taper length is 1 mm and taper distance is 4 cm–6 cm, the spectral contrast is higher, which is suitable for sensing. Secondly, experimental research on refractive index sensitivity is carried out. A refractive index sensitivity of 62.78 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) can achieved in the RI range of 1.3333–1.3792 (0%~25% NaCl solution), when the sensor structure parameters meet the following conditions: diameter of taper waist is 24 μm, dual-taper length is 837 μm and taper distance is 5.5 cm. The spectrum contrast is 0.8 and measurement resolution is 1.6 × 10−5 RIU. The simulation analysis is highly consistent with experimental results. Research shows that the sensor has promising application in low RI fields where high-precision measurement is required due to its high sensitivity and stability. PMID:27258281

  8. Visual attractiveness is leaky: the asymmetrical relationship between face and hair

    PubMed Central

    Saegusa, Chihiro; Intoy, Janis; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Predicting personality is crucial when communicating with people. It has been revealed that the perceived attractiveness or beauty of the face is a cue. As shown in the well-known “what is beautiful is good” stereotype, perceived attractiveness is often associated with desirable personality. Although such research on attractiveness used mainly the face isolated from other body parts, the face is not always seen in isolation in the real world. Rather, it is surrounded by one’s hairstyle, and is perceived as a part of total presence. In human vision, perceptual organization/integration occurs mostly in a bottom up, task-irrelevant fashion. This raises an intriguing possibility that task-irrelevant stimulus that is perceptually integrated with a target may influence our affective evaluation. In such a case, there should be a mutual influence between attractiveness perception of the face and surrounding hair, since they are assumed to share strong and unique perceptual organization. In the current study, we examined the influence of a task-irrelevant stimulus on our attractiveness evaluation, using face and hair as stimuli. The results revealed asymmetrical influences in the evaluation of one while ignoring the other. When hair was task-irrelevant, it still affected attractiveness of the face, but only if the hair itself had never been evaluated by the same evaluator. On the other hand, the face affected the hair regardless of whether the face itself was evaluated before. This has intriguing implications on the asymmetry between face and hair, and perceptual integration between them in general. Together with data from a post hoc questionnaire, it is suggested that both implicit non-selective and explicit selective processes contribute to attractiveness evaluation. The findings provide an understanding of attractiveness perception in real-life situations, as well as a new paradigm to reveal unknown implicit aspects of information integration for emotional judgment

  9. Visual attractiveness is leaky: the asymmetrical relationship between face and hair.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Chihiro; Intoy, Janis; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Predicting personality is crucial when communicating with people. It has been revealed that the perceived attractiveness or beauty of the face is a cue. As shown in the well-known "what is beautiful is good" stereotype, perceived attractiveness is often associated with desirable personality. Although such research on attractiveness used mainly the face isolated from other body parts, the face is not always seen in isolation in the real world. Rather, it is surrounded by one's hairstyle, and is perceived as a part of total presence. In human vision, perceptual organization/integration occurs mostly in a bottom up, task-irrelevant fashion. This raises an intriguing possibility that task-irrelevant stimulus that is perceptually integrated with a target may influence our affective evaluation. In such a case, there should be a mutual influence between attractiveness perception of the face and surrounding hair, since they are assumed to share strong and unique perceptual organization. In the current study, we examined the influence of a task-irrelevant stimulus on our attractiveness evaluation, using face and hair as stimuli. The results revealed asymmetrical influences in the evaluation of one while ignoring the other. When hair was task-irrelevant, it still affected attractiveness of the face, but only if the hair itself had never been evaluated by the same evaluator. On the other hand, the face affected the hair regardless of whether the face itself was evaluated before. This has intriguing implications on the asymmetry between face and hair, and perceptual integration between them in general. Together with data from a post hoc questionnaire, it is suggested that both implicit non-selective and explicit selective processes contribute to attractiveness evaluation. The findings provide an understanding of attractiveness perception in real-life situations, as well as a new paradigm to reveal unknown implicit aspects of information integration for emotional judgment.

  10. Inflammatory and cytotoxic responses in mouse lungs exposed to purified toxins from building isolated Penicillium brevicompactum Dierckx and P. chrysogenum Thom.

    PubMed

    Rand, Thomas G; Giles, S; Flemming, J; Miller, J David; Puniani, Eva

    2005-09-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that building-associated Penicillium spores and spore extracts can induce significant inflammatory responses in lung cells and animal models of lung disease. However, because spores and spore extracts comprise mixtures of bioactive constituents often including toxins, it is impossible to resolve which constituent mediates inflammatory responses. This study examined dose-response (0.5 nM, 2.5 nM, 5.0 nM, 12.5 nM/g body weight (BW) animal) and time-course (3, 6, 24 and 48 h post instillation (PI)) relationships associated with inflammatory and cytotoxic responses in mouse lungs intratracheally instilled with pure brevianamide A, mycophenolic acid, and roquefortine C. High doses (5.0 nM and/or 12.5 nM/g BW animal) of brevianamide A and mycophenolic acid, the dominant metabolites of P. brevicompactum, and roquefortine C, the dominant metabolite of P. chrysogenum, induced significant inflammatory responses within 6 h PI, expressed as differentially elevated macrophage, neutrophil, MIP-2, TNF, and IL-6 concentrations in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of intratracheally exposed mice. Macrophage and neutrophil numbers were maximal at 24 h PI; responses of the other inflammatory markers were maximal at 6 h PI. Except for macrophage numbers in mycophenolic acid-treatment animals, cells exhibited significant dose-dependent-like responses; for the chemo-/cytokine markers, dose dependency was lacking except for MIP-2 concentration in brevianamide A-treatment animals. It was also found that brevianamide A induced cytotoxicity expressed as significantly increased LDH concentration in mouse BALF, at concentrations of 12.5 nM/g BW animal and at 6 and 24 h PI. Albumin concentrations, measured as a nonspecific marker of vascular leakage, were significantly elevated in the BALF of mice treated with 12.5 nM/g nM brevianamide A/animal from 6 to 24 h PI and in > or =5.0 nM/g mycophenolic acid-treated animals at 6 to 24 h PI. These results

  11. Conceptual design study of JSFR reactor building

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T.; Katoh, A.; Chikazawa, Y.; Ohya, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Hara, H.; Akiyama, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is planning to adopt the new concepts of reactor building. One is that the steel plate reinforced concrete is adopted for containment vessel and reactor building. The other is the advanced seismic isolation system. This paper describes the detail of new concepts for JSFR reactor building and engineering evaluation of the new concepts. (authors)

  12. Evolution of mammalian endothermic metabolism: leaky membranes as a source of heat

    SciTech Connect

    Else, P.L.; Hulbert, A.J.

    1987-07-01

    O/sub 2/ consumption was measured at 37/degrees/C in tissue slices of liver, kidney, and brain from Amphilbolurus vitticeps and Rattus norvegicus (a reptile and mammal with same weight and body temperature) both in the presence and absence of ouabain. O/sub 2/ consumption of the mammalian tissues was two to four times that of the reptilian tissues and the mammalian tissues used three to six times the energy for Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport than the reptilian tissues. Passive permeability to /sup 42/K/sup +/ was measured at 37/degrees/C in liver and kidney slices, and passive permeability to /sup 22/Na/sup +/ was measured at 37/degrees/C in isolated and cultured liver cells from each species. The mammalian cell membrane was severalfold leakier to both these ions than was the reptilian cell membrane, and thus the membrane pumps must use more energy to maintain the transmembrane ion gradients. It is postulated that this is a general difference between the cells of ectotherms and endotherms and thus partly explains the much higher levels of metabolism found in endothermic mammals.

  13. Laboratory Building

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  14. Field investigation of duct system performance in California light commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Delp, W.W.; Matson, N.E.; Tschudy, E.

    1997-12-09

    This paper discusses field measurements of duct system performance in fifteen systems located in eight northern California buildings. Light commercial buildings, one- and two-story with package roof-top HVAC units, make up approximately 50% of the non-residential building stock in the U.S. Despite this fact little is known about the performance of these package roof-top units and their associated ductwork. These simple systems use similar duct materials and construction techniques as residential systems (which are known to be quite leaky). This paper discusses a study to characterize the buildings, quantify the duct leakage, and analyze the performance of the ductwork in these types of buildings. The study tested fifteen systems in eight different buildings located in northern California. All of these buildings had the ducts located in the cavity between the drop ceiling and the roof deck. In 50% of these buildings, this cavity was functionally outside the building`s air and thermal barriers. The effective leakage area of the ducts in this study was approximately 2.6 times that in residential buildings. This paper looks at the thermal analysis of the ducts, from the viewpoint of efficiency and thermal comfort. This includes the length of a cycle, and whether the fan is always on or if it cycles with the cooling equipment. 66% of the systems had frequent on cycles of less than 10 minutes, resulting in non-steady-state operation.

  15. Evidences for a Leaky Scanning Mechanism for the Synthesis of the Shorter M23 Protein Isoform of Aquaporin-4

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Andrea; Pisani, Francesco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) exists as two major isoforms that differ in the length of the N terminus, the shorter AQP4-M23 and the longer AQP4-M1. Both isoforms form tetramers, which can further aggregate in the plasma membrane to form typical orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) whose dimension depends on the ratio of the M1 and M23. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the M23 isoform can be produced directly by the M1 mRNA. In cells transiently transfected with AQP4-M1 coding sequence we observed besides AQP4-M1 the additional presence of the AQP4-M23 isoform associated with the formation of typical OAPs observable by two-dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE and total internal reflection microscopy. The mutation of the second in-frame methionine M23 in AQP4-M1 (AQP4-M1M23I) prevented the expression of the M23 isoform and the formation of OAPs. We propose “leaky scanning” as a translational mechanism for the expression of AQP4-M23 protein isoform and that the formation of OAPs may occur even in the absence of AQP4-M23 mRNA. This mechanism can have important pathophysiological implications for the cell regulation of the M1/M23 ratio and thus OAP size. In this study we also provide evidence that AQP4-M1 is mobile in the plasma membrane, that it is inserted and not excluded into immobile OAPs, and that it is an important determinant of OAP structure and size. PMID:20007705

  16. A transition to sharp timing in stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire neurons driven by frozen noisy input.

    PubMed

    Taillefumier, Thibaud; Magnasco, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    The firing activity of intracellularly stimulated neurons in cortical slices has been demonstrated to be profoundly affected by the temporal structure of the injected current (Mainen & Sejnowski, 1995 ). This suggests that the timing features of the neural response may be controlled as much by its own biophysical characteristics as by how a neuron is wired within a circuit. Modeling studies have shown that the interplay between internal noise and the fluctuations of the driving input controls the reliability and the precision of neuronal spiking (Cecchi et al., 2000 ; Tiesinga, 2002 ; Fellous, Rudolph, Destexhe, & Sejnowski, 2003 ). In order to investigate this interplay, we focus on the stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire neuron and identify the Hölder exponent H of the integrated input as the key mathematical property dictating the regime of firing of a single-unit neuron. We have recently provided numerical evidence (Taillefumier & Magnasco, 2013 ) for the existence of a phase transition when [Formula: see text] becomes less than the statistical Hölder exponent associated with internal gaussian white noise (H=1/2). Here we describe the theoretical and numerical framework devised for the study of a neuron that is periodically driven by frozen noisy inputs with exponent H>0. In doing so, we account for the existence of a transition between two regimes of firing when H=1/2, and we show that spiking times have a continuous density when the Hölder exponent satisfies H>1/2. The transition at H=1/2 formally separates rate codes, for which the neural firing probability varies smoothly, from temporal codes, for which the neuron fires at sharply defined times regardless of the intensity of internal noise.

  17. Experimental demonstration of directive Si3N4 optical leaky wave antennas with semiconductor perturbations at near infrared frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Guclu, Caner; Huang, Yuwang; Campione, Salvatore; Capolino, Filippo; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2015-02-01

    Directive optical leaky wave antennas (OLWAs) with tunable radiation pattern are promising integrated optical modulation and scanning devices. OLWAs fabricated using CMOS-compatible semiconductor planar waveguide technology have the potential of providing high directivity with electrical tunability for modulation and switching capabilities. We experimentally demonstrate directive radiation from a silicon nitride (Si3N4) waveguide-based OLWA. The OLWA design comprises 50 crystalline Si perturbations buried inside the waveguide, with a period of 1 μm, each with a length of 260 nm and a height of 150 nm, leading to a directive radiation pattern at telecom wavelengths. The measured far-field radiation pattern at the wavelength of 1540 nm is very directive, with the maximum intensity at the angle of 84.4° relative to the waveguide axis and a half-power beam width around 6.2°, which is consistent with our theoretical predictions. The use of semiconductor perturbations facilitates electronic radiation control thanks to the refractive index variation induced by a carrier density change in the perturbations. To assess the electrical modulation capability, we study carrier injection and depletion in Si perturbations, and investigate the Franz-Keldysh effect in germanium as an alternative way. We theoretically show that the silicon wire modulator has a -3 dB modulation bandwidth of 75 GHz with refractive index change of 3×10-4 in depletion mode, and 350 MHz bandwidth with refractive index change of 1.5×10-2 in injection mode. The Franz-Keldysh effect has the potential to generate very fast modulation in radiation control at telecom wavelengths.

  18. Using Time-Varying Evidence to Test Models of Decision Dynamics: Bounded Diffusion vs. the Leaky Competing Accumulator Model.

    PubMed

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Gao, Juan; McClelland, James L; Usher, Marius

    2012-01-01

    When people make decisions, do they give equal weight to evidence arriving at different times? A recent study (Kiani et al., 2008) using brief motion pulses (superimposed on a random moving dot display) reported a primacy effect: pulses presented early in a motion observation period had a stronger impact than pulses presented later. This observation was interpreted as supporting the bounded diffusion (BD) model and ruling out models in which evidence accumulation is subject to leakage or decay of early-arriving information. We use motion pulses and other manipulations of the timing of the perceptual evidence in new experiments and simulations that support the leaky competing accumulator (LCA) model as an alternative to the BD model. While the LCA does include leakage, we show that it can exhibit primacy as a result of competition between alternatives (implemented via mutual inhibition), when the inhibition is strong relative to the leak. Our experiments replicate the primacy effect when participants must be prepared to respond quickly at the end of a motion observation period. With less time pressure, however, the primacy effect is much weaker. For 2 (out of 10) participants, a primacy bias observed in trials where the motion observation period is short becomes weaker or reverses (becoming a recency effect) as the observation period lengthens. Our simulation studies show that primacy is equally consistent with the LCA or with BD. The transition from primacy-to-recency can also be captured by the LCA but not by BD. Individual differences and relations between the LCA and other models are discussed.

  19. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in ZAP70 in a Chinese patient with leaky severe combined immunodeficiency disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Qiao; Zhao, Qin; Chen, Xue-Mei; Xue, Xiu-Hong; Zhou, Li-Na; Ding, Yuan; Tang, Xue-Mei; Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong

    2017-01-26

    In humans, the complete lack of tyrosine kinase ZAP70 function results in combined immunodeficiency (CID), with abnormal thymic development and defective T cell receptor (TCR) signaling of peripheral T cells, characterized by the selective absence of CD8(+) T cells. So far, 15 unique ZAP70 mutations have been identified in approximately 20 patients with CID, with variable clinical presentations. Herein, we report the first case from China of novel compound heterozygous mutations in ZAP70 (c.598-599delCT, p.L200fsX28; c.847 C>T, R283H). The patient suffered from early-onset and recurrent infections, but showed normal growth and development without signs of failure to thrive, thus presenting as leaky SCID. The patient also had clinical manifestations of autoimmunity, such as eczematous skin lesion, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and intractable diarrhea, suggesting compromised T cell tolerogenic functions. Residual ZAP70 expression was identified. Immunological analysis revealed the selective absence of CD8(+) T cells in the periphery and the presence of CD4(+) T cells that failed to respond to phytohemagglutinin. Stimulation with lectin from pokeweed mitogen also failed to stimulate B cell proliferation in the patient. The frequency of Tfhs and Tregs in the patient was lower compared with the normal reference. Compared with the age-matched healthy control, the level of IL-17 was higher and the levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-21 were lower. Infants with selected CD8 deficiency and severe autoimmune disorders or exaggerated inflammation should be screened for ZAP70 deficiency.

  20. Leaky magnetohydrodynamic waveguide model for the acceleration of high-speed solar wind streams in coronal holes

    SciTech Connect

    Davila, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    It is well established observationally that high-speed solar wind streams originate in coronal hole regions in the solor corona. Models of the solar wind flow based on this observation indicate that heat conduction alone cannot account for the observed properties of the wind and that other sources of heat and/or momentum must be sought. One suggested source for this additional momentum is ''wave pressure'' generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Theories of wave-driven winds exist, but they are not consistent with the observed fact that high-speed streams originate in discrete magnetic structures in the solar corona. The waves assumed responsible for acceleration of the high-speed solar wind streams should have periods of approximately a hundred seconds if they are driven by photospheric turbulence. But MHD waves with periods this large have wavelengths lambda> or approx. =d, where d is the characteristic tranverse size of the coronal hole. Current theories for the acceleration of the solar wind by MHD waves are valid only if the wavelength of the disturbance is much smaller than the characteristic transverse size of the coronal structure. This limit is not appropriate for the propagation of disturbances with periods Proughly-equal100 s in the acceleration region of the solar wind. In this paper the effect of coronal hole magnetic structure on the propagation of MHD waves of all periods is considered. It is found that for the wave-period range discussed above the coronal hole structure acts as a ''leaky'' MHD waveguide, i.e., wave flux which enters at the base of the coronal hole is only weakly guided by the coronal hole structure. A significant amount of wave energy leaks through the side of the coronal hole into the surrounding corona.

  1. Probabilistic evaluation of seismic isolation effect with respect to siting of a fusion reactor facility

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Masatoshi; Komura, Toshiyuki; Hirotani, Tsutomu; Ohkawa, Yoshinao; Akutsu, Youich

    1995-12-01

    Annual failure probabilities of buildings and equipment were roughly evaluated for two fusion-reactor-like buildings, with and without seismic base isolation, in order to examine the effectiveness of the base isolation system regarding siting issues. The probabilities are calculated considering nonlinearity and rupture of isolators. While the probability of building failure for both buildings on the same site was almost equal, the function failures for equipment showed that the base-isolated building had higher reliability than the non-isolated building. Even if the base-isolated building alone is located on a higher seismic hazard area, it could compete favorably with the ordinary one in reliability of equipment.

  2. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  3. Responding to Isolation and Educational Disadvantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, Don

    2003-01-01

    Australian rural communities often suffer from psychological isolation in addition to geographic isolation. Human and social capital are powerful antidotes to psychological isolation and are closely dependent on learning. Rural schools can reverse the negative effects of isolation on educational outcomes if they first work on building human and…

  4. Building Skills to Build Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Communities are at the heart of the government's vision for the Big Society. And it's the author's strongly held view that skills should be at the heart of each and every one of those communities. If one grows the skills of an individual then the community will flourish. There is a job to be done in building skills to build communities--skilled…

  5. Design challenges of EO polymer based leaky waveguide deflector for 40 Gs/s all-optical analog-to-digital converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjloum, Massinissa; El Gibari, Mohammed; Li, Hongwu; Daryoush, Afshin S.

    2016-08-01

    Design challenges and performance optimization of an all-optical analog-to-digital converter (AOADC) is presented here. The paper addresses both microwave and optical design of a leaky waveguide optical deflector using electro-optic (E-O) polymer. The optical deflector converts magnitude variation of the applied RF voltage into variation of deflection angle out of a leaky waveguide optical beam using the linear E-O effect (Pockels effect) as part of the E-O polymer based optical waveguide. This variation of deflection angle as result of the applied RF signal is then quantized using optical windows followed by an array of high-speed photodetectors. We optimized the leakage coefficient of the leaky waveguide and its physical length to achieve the best trade-off between bandwidth and the deflected optical beam resolution, by improving the phase velocity matching between lightwave and microwave on one hand and using pre-emphasis technique to compensate for the RF signal attenuation on the other hand. In addition, for ease of access from both optical and RF perspective, a via-hole less broad bandwidth transition is designed between coplanar pads and coupled microstrip (CPW-CMS) driving electrodes. With the best reported E-O coefficient of 350 pm/V, the designed E-O deflector should allow an AOADC operating over 44 giga-samples-per-seconds with an estimated effective resolution of 6.5 bits on RF signals with Nyquist bandwidth of 22 GHz. The overall DC power consumption of all components used in this AOADC is of order of 4 W and is dominated by power consumption in the power amplifier to generate a 20 V RF voltage in 50 Ohm system. A higher sampling rate can be achieved at similar bits of resolution by interleaving a number of this elementary AOADC at the expense of a higher power consumption.

  6. Building Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communication programs use some form of Simultaneous Communication (speaking and signing at the same time). This program includes building blocks such as Conceptually Accurate Signed English (CASE), Finger Spelling, Listening, Manually Coded English (MCE), ...

  7. Our Buildings, Ourselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roodman, David Malin; Lenssen, Nicholas

    1994-01-01

    Reviews in detail environmental impacts associated with buildings. Discusses building construction, internal environments, building life spans, building materials, protection from climate, and amenities. (LZ)

  8. To build capacity, build confidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitson, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    The history of attempts to spread scientific know-how beyond western centres of excellence is littered with failures. Capacity building needs long-term commitment, a critical mass of trainees, and a supportive home environment.

  9. Altered gut microbiome in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness causes neuroinflammation and intestinal injury via leaky gut and TLR4 activation

    PubMed Central

    Dattaroy, Diptadip; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Ryan, Caitlin N.; Chan, Luisa S.; Testerman, Traci; Burch, James; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Horner, Ronnie; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Lasley, Stephen M.; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Many of the symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI) that include neurological abnormalities, neuroinflammation, chronic fatigue and gastrointestinal disturbances have been traced to Gulf War chemical exposure. Though the association and subsequent evidences are strong, the mechanisms that connect exposure to intestinal and neurological abnormalities remain unclear. Using an established rodent model of Gulf War Illness, we show that chemical exposure caused significant dysbiosis in the gut that included increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes and Tenericutes, and decreased abundance of Bacteroidetes. Several gram negative bacterial genera were enriched in the GWI-model that included Allobaculum sp. Altered microbiome caused significant decrease in tight junction protein Occludin with a concomitant increase in Claudin-2, a signature of a leaky gut. Resultant leaching of gut caused portal endotoxemia that led to upregulation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in the small intestine and the brain. TLR4 knock out mice and mice that had gut decontamination showed significant decrease in tyrosine nitration and inflammatory mediators IL1β and MCP-1 in both the small intestine and frontal cortex. These events signified that gut dysbiosis with simultaneous leaky gut and systemic endotoxemia-induced TLR4 activation contributes to GW chemical-induced neuroinflammation and gastrointestinal disturbances. PMID:28328972

  10. Normalization of the increased translocation of endotoxin from gram negative enterobacteria (leaky gut) is accompanied by a remission of chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Coucke, Francis; Leunis, Jean-Claude

    2007-12-01

    There is now evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is accompanied by an increased translocation of endotoxins from gram-negative enterobacteria through the gut wall, as demonstrated by increased prevalences and median values for serum IgM and IgA against the endotoxins of gram-negative enterobacteria. This condition can also be described as increased gut permeability or leaky gut and indicates intestinal mucosal dysfunction (IMD). Here we report a case of a 13 year old girl with CFS who showed very high values for serum IgM against the LPS of some enterobacteria and signs of oxidative and nitrosative stress, activation of the inflammatory response system, and IgG3 subclass deficiency. Upon treatment with specific antioxidants and a "leaky gut diet", which both aim to treat increased gut permeability, and immunoglobins intravenously, the increased translocation of the LPS of gram negative enterobacteria normalized and this normalization was accompanied by a complete remission of the CFS symptoms.

  11. Altered gut microbiome in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness causes neuroinflammation and intestinal injury via leaky gut and TLR4 activation.

    PubMed

    Alhasson, Firas; Das, Suvarthi; Seth, Ratanesh; Dattaroy, Diptadip; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Ryan, Caitlin N; Chan, Luisa S; Testerman, Traci; Burch, James; Hofseth, Lorne J; Horner, Ronnie; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Lasley, Stephen M; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Many of the symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI) that include neurological abnormalities, neuroinflammation, chronic fatigue and gastrointestinal disturbances have been traced to Gulf War chemical exposure. Though the association and subsequent evidences are strong, the mechanisms that connect exposure to intestinal and neurological abnormalities remain unclear. Using an established rodent model of Gulf War Illness, we show that chemical exposure caused significant dysbiosis in the gut that included increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes and Tenericutes, and decreased abundance of Bacteroidetes. Several gram negative bacterial genera were enriched in the GWI-model that included Allobaculum sp. Altered microbiome caused significant decrease in tight junction protein Occludin with a concomitant increase in Claudin-2, a signature of a leaky gut. Resultant leaching of gut caused portal endotoxemia that led to upregulation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in the small intestine and the brain. TLR4 knock out mice and mice that had gut decontamination showed significant decrease in tyrosine nitration and inflammatory mediators IL1β and MCP-1 in both the small intestine and frontal cortex. These events signified that gut dysbiosis with simultaneous leaky gut and systemic endotoxemia-induced TLR4 activation contributes to GW chemical-induced neuroinflammation and gastrointestinal disturbances.

  12. Effectiveness of duct sealing and duct insulation in multi-family buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karins, N.H.; Tuluca, A.; Modera, M.

    1997-07-01

    This research investigated the cost-effectiveness of sealing and insulating the accessible portions of duct systems exposed to unconditioned areas in multifamily housing. Airflow and temperature measurements were performed in 25 apartments served by 10 systems a 9 multi-family properties. The measurements were performed before and after each retrofit, and included apartment airflow (supply and return), duct system temperatures, system fan flow and duct leakage area. The costs for each retrofit were recorded. The data were analyzed and used to develop a prototypical multifamily house. This prototype was used in energy simulations (DOE-2.1E) and air infiltration simulations (COMIS 2.1). The simulations were performed for two climates: New York City and Albany. In each climate, one simulation was performed assuming the basement was tight, and another assuming the basement was leaky. Simulation results and average retrofit costs were used to calculate cost-effectiveness. The results of the analysis indicate that sealing leaks of the accessible ductwork is cost-effective under all conditions simulated (simple payback was between 3 and 4 years). Insulating the accessible ductwork, however, is only cost-effective for buildings with leaky basement, in both climates (simple paybacks were less than 5 years). The simple payback period for insulating the ducts in buildings with tight basements was greater than 10 years, the threshold of cost-effectiveness for this research. 13 refs., 5 figs., 27 tabs.

  13. Building a More Powerful Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erland, Jan

    Technically speaking, brain building is called cognitive skill development and has been in the psychology domain since the early 1960s. Historically, cognitive skill improvement was isolated within progressive coastal school districts and psychologists' private offices. Cognitive skill improvement was used successfully as a treatment in these…

  14. Building Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudzak, Raymond

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a competency-based course in building trades at the secondary level. The curriculum design uses the curriculum infused model for the teaching of basic skills as part of vocational education and demonstrates the relationship of vocationally related skills to communication, mathematics, and science…

  15. Team building

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, C.

    1993-04-01

    Power plants are particularly complicated projects with abundant opportunities for disputes. Efforts are beginning in the power industry to change the way the industry does business. Key elements of a comprehensive team-building approach include partnering, constructability, use of incentives, and the disputes review board.

  16. Building Sinusoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landers, Mara G.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the development and implementation of a measurement-based group activity designed to support students in understanding the connection between angle magnitude and the shape of the sine function. She explains that the benefit of this activity is that it allows students to build their trigonometric knowledge…

  17. Designing an Earthquake-Resistant Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.; King, Donna T.

    2016-01-01

    How do cross-bracing, geometry, and base isolation help buildings withstand earthquakes? These important structural design features involve fundamental geometry that elementary school students can readily model and understand. The problem activity, Designing an Earthquake-Resistant Building, was undertaken by several classes of sixth- grade…

  18. AREA 2: Novel Materials for Robust Repair of Leaky Wellbores in CO2 Storage Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Balhoff, Matthew; Tavassoli, Shayan; Fei Ho, Jostine

    2016-01-31

    cement cores to remove calcium and prevent syneresis during polymer placement. A chelating agent, sodium triphosphate (Na5P3O10), was found to successfully eliminate syneresis without compromising the injectivity of polymer solution during placement. Polymer gel strength is determined by recording the maximum holdback pressure gradients during liquid breakthrough tests after various periods of pretreatment and polymer shut-in time. Cores pretreated with Na5P3O10 successfully held up to an average of 80 psi/ft, which is significantly greater than the expected threshold value of about 0.1-5 psi/ft required to prevent flow in a typical CO2 leakage scenario. The use of such inexpensive, pH-triggered poly-acrylic acid polymer allows long-term robust seal of leaky wellbores under high pH conditions.

  19. Building No. 5, Main Building; Building NO. 9, Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building No. 5, Main Building; Building NO. 9, Guard House (left). Viewed from across corner Lakeside Avenue and Main Street - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  20. 2. PRINTING AND ADVERTISING BUILDING, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, MERCHANDISE BUILDING, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PRINTING AND ADVERTISING BUILDING, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, MERCHANDISE BUILDING, AND GARDEN, VIEW TO SOUTHWEST - Sears Roebuck & Company Mail Order Plant, Bounded by Lexington & Grenshaw Streets, Kedzie Avenue & Independence Boulevard, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  1. Building Buildings with Triangular Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Triangular numbers are used to unravel a new sequence of natural numbers here-to-fore not appearing on the Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences website. Insight is provided on the construction of the sequence using "buildings" as a viewable model of the sequence entries. A step-by-step analysis of the sequence pattern reveals a method for generating…

  2. Building Minds by Block Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montopoli, Linda

    Noting that the process of playing with blocks supports the groundwork for learning in every area of a child's growth, this paper discusses specific uses of building blocks in the early childhood curriculum to develop a child's physical, social, emotional, artistic, language, scientific and mathematics growth. The paper outlines the contributions…

  3. Confidence building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Juan G.

    Many conferences are being held on confidence building in many countries. Usually they are organized and attended by political scientists and science policy specialists. A remarkable exception, in which the main brainstorming was done by “grass roots” geophysicists, nuclear physicists, engineers and ecologists, was a meeting in July at St. John's College in Santa Fe, N. Mex.The aim of the conference Technology-Based Confidence Building: Energy and Environment was to survey programs of international cooperation in pertinent areas of mutual concern to all nations and to identify new initiatives that could contribute to enhanced international stability, with emphasis on cooperation between the U.S. and U.S.S.R.

  4. Intelligent buildings.

    PubMed

    Williams, W E

    1987-01-01

    The maturing of technologies in computer capabilities, particularly direct digital signals, has provided an exciting variety of new communication and facility control opportunities. These include telecommunications, energy management systems, security systems, office automation systems, local area networks, and video conferencing. New applications are developing continuously. The so-called "intelligent" or "smart" building concept evolves from the development of this advanced technology in building environments. Automation has had a dramatic effect on facility planning. For decades, communications were limited to the telephone, the typewritten message, and copy machines. The office itself and its functions had been essentially unchanged for decades. Office automation systems began to surface during the energy crisis and, although their newer technology was timely, they were, for the most part, designed separately from other new building systems. For example, most mainframe computer systems were originally stand-alone, as were word processing installations. In the last five years, the advances in distributive systems, networking, and personal computer capabilities have provided opportunities to make such dramatic improvements in productivity that the Selectric typewriter has gone from being the most advanced piece of office equipment to nearly total obsolescence.

  5. The excitation and detection of a leaky surface electromagnetic wave on a high-index dielectric grating in a prism-coupler geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, I.; Maradudin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A periodically corrugated interface between vacuum and a high-index dielectric medium supports a p-polarized leaky surface electromagnetic wave whose sagittal plane is perpendicular to the generators of the interface. This wave is bound to the surface in the vacuum region, but radiates into the high-index dielectric medium. We study the excitation of this wave by p-polarized light incident from a prism on whose planar base the highindex dielectric medium in the form of a film is bonded. The unilluminated surface of the film is periodically corrugated, and is in contact with vacuum. Peaks and dips in the dependence of several low-order diffraction efficiencies on the angle of incidence (Wood anomalies) are the signatures of the excitation of the surface wave.

  6. Determination of ultrasonic wave velocities and phase velocity dispersion curves of an Inconel 600 plate using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and leaky Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young H; Song, Sung-Jin; Kwon, Sung-Duk; Cheong, Yong-Moo; Jung, Hyun-Kyu

    2004-04-01

    A plate of Inconel 600 was interrogated using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) and the reflected leaky Lamb waves (LLW). It was found that the plate used in the present work has anisotropy in its material properties by the RUS. The longitudinal and the transverse wave velocities of the Inconel 600 plate were determined by the RUS, ultrasonic pulse-echo method and cut-off frequencies of the LLWs. The wave velocities in the direction of thickness determined by the RUS under the assumption of the orthotropic symmetry were quite similar to those obtained by other methods, the pulse-echo method and from cut-off frequencies. The reflected LLW from the plate was measured with varying the incident angle. The dispersion curves obtained from the reflected LLWs show good agreement with the theoretical calculation in general. The mismatches may be caused by anisotropy of the plate.

  7. Determination of the flexoelectric coefficient (e1-e3) in nematic liquid crystal by using fully leaky optical-guided mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guili; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Wenjiang; Zhang, Zhidong; Song, Hong-wei; Xuan, Li

    2016-02-01

    Fully leaky optical-guided mode was employed to determine the difference in the splay and bend flexoelectric coefficient (e1-e3) in negative nematic liquid crystal MS-N01300-000. The experimental curves of reflectivity versus internal angle (angle of incident light to the liquid crystal) were obtained when a laser beam passed through the hybrid-aligned nematic in-plane switching liquid crystal cell; the cell was embedded in pyramid-coupled waveguide with different alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) voltages. The curves of the applied DC with voltage similar to that of AC shift to the left or the right. Experimental results were then compared with theoretical results derived from elastic continuum theory and multi-layer optical theory of liquid crystals. The approximate value of the flexoelectric coefficient (e1-e3) of MS-N01300-000 is 9.0 × 10-11 C/m.

  8. Reactor building assembly and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fennern, L.E.; Caraway, H.A.; Hsu, Li C.

    1993-06-01

    A reactor building assembly is described comprising: a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core for generating heat in the form of steam; a containment vessel enclosing said pressure vessel; a first enclosure surrounding said containment vessel and spaced laterally therefrom to define a first chamber there between, and having a top and a bottom; a second enclosure surrounding said first enclosure and spaced laterally therefrom to define a second chamber there between, and having a top and a bottom; a building inlet for receiving into said second chamber fresh air from outside said second enclosure; a building outlet for discharging stale air from said first chamber; a transfer duct disposed through said first enclosure selectively joining in flow communication said first and second chambers; said building inlet being disposed at said second enclosure top, said building outlet being disposed at said first enclosure top, and said transfer duct being disposed adjacent said first enclosure bottom for allowing said fresh air to flow downwardly by gravity through said second chamber and through said transfer duct into said first chamber for cooling said first chamber, said stale air flowing upwardly by natural buoyancy for discharger from said first chamber through said building outlet; an exhaust stack disposed above said building outlet and in flow communication therewith for channeling upwardly said stale air from said first chamber for discharge into the surrounding environs; and a passive first driving means for increasing flow of said stale air from said building outlet comprising: an isolation pool containing isolation water; an isolation condenser disposed in said isolation pool, and joined in flow communication with said reactor pressure vessel for receiving primary steam therefrom, said primary steam being cooled in said isolation condenser for heating said isolation water to generate secondary steam.

  9. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey - Office Buildings

    EIA Publications

    2010-01-01

    Provides an in-depth look at this building type as reported in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Office buildings are the most common type of commercial building and they consumed more than 17% of all energy in the commercial buildings sector in 2003. This special report provides characteristics and energy consumption data by type of office building (e.g. administrative office, government office, medical office) and information on some of the types of equipment found in office buildings: heating and cooling equipment, computers, servers, printers, and photocopiers.

  10. Frequency response characteristics and response spectra of base-isolated and un-isolated structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G.C.; Namba, H.

    1995-07-06

    The transmissibility of seismic loads through a linear base-isolation system is analyzed using an impedance method. The results show that the system acts like a {open_quotes}low-pass{close_quotes} filter. It attenuates high-frequency loads but passes through low-frequency ones. The filtering effect depends on the vibration frequencies and damping of the isolated structure and the isolation system. This paper demonstrates the benefits and design principles of base isolation by comparing the transmissibilities and response spectra of isolated and un-isolated structures. Parameters of typical isolated buildings and ground motions of the 1994 Northridge earthquake are used for the demonstration.

  11. Building energy analysis tool

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry; Parker, Andrew; Long, Nicholas; Metzger, Ian; Dean, Jesse; Lisell, Lars

    2016-04-12

    A building energy analysis system includes a building component library configured to store a plurality of building components, a modeling tool configured to access the building component library and create a building model of a building under analysis using building spatial data and using selected building components of the plurality of building components stored in the building component library, a building analysis engine configured to operate the building model and generate a baseline energy model of the building under analysis and further configured to apply one or more energy conservation measures to the baseline energy model in order to generate one or more corresponding optimized energy models, and a recommendation tool configured to assess the one or more optimized energy models against the baseline energy model and generate recommendations for substitute building components or modifications.

  12. Building America

    SciTech Connect

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

  13. Self-organization in leaky threshold systems: The influence of near-mean field dynamics and its implications for earthquakes, neurobiology, and forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Rundle, J. B.; Tiampo, K. F.; Klein, W.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Threshold systems are known to be some of the most important nonlinear self-organizing systems in nature, including networks of earthquake faults, neural networks, superconductors and semiconductors, and the World Wide Web, as well as political, social, and ecological systems. All of these systems have dynamics that are strongly correlated in space and time, and all typically display a multiplicity of spatial and temporal scales. Here we discuss the physics of self-organization in earthquake threshold systems at two distinct scales: (i) The “microscopic” laboratory scale, in which consideration of results from simulations leads to dynamical equations that can be used to derive the results obtained from sliding friction experiments, and (ii) the “macroscopic” earthquake fault-system scale, in which the physics of strongly correlated earthquake fault systems can be understood by using time-dependent state vectors defined in a Hilbert space of eigenstates, similar in many respects to the mathematics of quantum mechanics. In all of these systems, long-range interactions induce the existence of locally ergodic dynamics. The existence of dissipative effects leads to the appearance of a “leaky threshold” dynamics, equivalent to a new scaling field that controls the size of nucleation events relative to the size of background fluctuations. At the macroscopic earthquake fault-system scale, these ideas show considerable promise as a means of forecasting future earthquake activity. PMID:11875204

  14. Particulate matter from indoor environments of classroom induced higher cytotoxicity and leakiness in human microvascular endothelial cells in comparison with those collected from corridor.

    PubMed

    Chua, M L; Setyawati, M I; Li, H; Fang, C H Y; Gurusamy, S; Teoh, F T L; Leong, D T; George, S

    2016-09-23

    We investigated the physicochemical properties (size, shape, elemental composition, and endotoxin) of size resolved particulate matter (PM) collected from the indoor and corridor environments of classrooms. A comparative hazard profiling of these PM was conducted using human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Oxidative stress-dependent cytotoxicity responses were assessed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and high content screening (HCS), and disruption of monolayer cell integrity was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and transwell assay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis showed differences in the morphology and elemental composition of PM of different sizes and origins. While the total mass of PM collected from indoor environment was lower in comparison with those collected from the corridor, the endotoxin content was substantially higher in indoor PM (e.g., ninefold higher endotoxin level in indoor PM8.1-20 ). The ability to induce oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity and leakiness in cell monolayer were higher for indoor PM compared to those collected from the corridor. In conclusion, this comparative analysis suggested that indoor PM is relatively more hazardous to the endothelial system possibly because of higher endotoxin content.

  15. Computation of Fresnel holograms and diffraction-specific coherent panoramagrams for full-color holographic displays based on anisotropic leaky-mode modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Sundeep; Dreshaj, Ermal; Bove, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    We have previously introduced a computational architecture suitable for driving full-color holographic display systems based around anisotropic leaky-mode modulators; this architecture appropriately handles single-sideband modulation and frequency-division multiplexing of spectral bands that correspond to the independent red, green, and blue color channels in the display output. In this paper, we describe an implementation for driving the MIT Mark IV holographic display system with such a computational approach, in cases of both pre-computed Fresnel CGHs and real-time, GPU-based diffraction specific coherent panoramagrams. Real-time holographic images of nearly VGA-resolution (468 lines) are generated via three dual-head NVIDIA GPUs via a CUDA-based implementation that encompasses the requisite orthographic view generation from 3-D data sources, parallel vector-based fringe computation per hogel and per color, single-sideband modulation, and frequency-division multiplexing. We present the first results of this scheme in driving the Mark IV display system and review the resulting holographic video output and performance metrics.

  16. On the aquitard-aquifer interface flow and the drawdown sensitivity with a partially penetrating pumping well in an anisotropic leaky confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qinggao; Zhan, Hongbin

    2015-02-01

    A mathematical model for describing groundwater flow to a partially penetrating pumping well of a finite diameter in an anisotropic leaky confined aquifer is developed. The model accounts for the jointed effects of aquitard storage, aquifer anisotropy, and wellbore storage by treating the aquitard leakage as a boundary condition at the aquitard-aquifer interface rather than a volumetric source/sink term in the governing equation, which has never developed before. A new semi-analytical solution for the model is obtained by the Laplace transform in conjunction with separation of variables. Specific attention was paid on the flow across the aquitard-aquifer interface, which is of concern if aquitard and aquifer have different pore water chemistry. Moreover, Laplace-domain and steady-state solutions are obtained to calculate the rate and volume of (total) leakage through the aquitard-aquifer interface due to pump in a partially penetrating well, which is also useful for engineers to manager water resources. The sensitivity analyses for the drawdown illustrate that the drawdown is most sensitive to the well partial penetration. It is apparently sensitive to the aquifer anisotropic ratio over the entire time of pumping. It is moderately sensitive to the aquitard/aquifer specific storage ratio at the intermediate times only. It is moderately sensitive to the aquitard/aquifer vertical hydraulic conductivity ratio and the aquitard/aquifer thickness ratio with the identical influence at late times.

  17. Building 1100--NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Building 1100 is the NASA administrative building. Services located in this building include two banks, a post office, barber shop, cafeteria, snack bar, travel agency, dry cleaners, the NASA Exchange retail store and medical facilities for employees.

  18. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Halle, J.

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  19. Tribal Green Building Toolkit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Tribal Green Building Toolkit (Toolkit) is designed to help tribal officials, community members, planners, developers, and architects develop and adopt building codes to support green building practices. Anyone can use this toolkit!

  20. 9. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, Tin Metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, Tin Metal area of building, looking S. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  1. Modular Buildings Buying Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Suggests that child care program directors who are expanding their programs or opening new child care centers investigate the possibility of renting, leasing, or purchasing a modular building. Discusses the advantages of modular buildings over conventional building construction or rented space in an occupied building. Provides information about…

  2. The Building Commissioning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, John A.; Casault, Rick

    This book discusses building commissioning, which is the process of certifying that a new facility meets the required specifications. As buildings have become more complex, the traditional methods for building start-up and final acceptance have been proven inadequate, and building commissioning has been developed, which often necessitates the use…

  3. Green buildings: Implications for acousticians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    This presentation will deal with the practical implications of green design protocols of the US Green Building Council on interior acoustics of buildings. Three areas of particular consequence to acousticians will be discussed. Ventilation Systems: reduced energy consumption goals dictate reliance on natural cooling and ventilation using ambient air when possible. The consequent large openings in the building envelope to bring fresh air into rooms, and similar sized openings to transfer the mixed air out, can severely compromise the noise isolation of the rooms concerned. Radiant Cooling: the heavy concrete floors of buildings can be used as a thermal flywheel to lessen the cooling load, which forces the concrete ceilings to be exposed to the occupied rooms for heat transfer, and strictly limits the application of acoustical absorption on the ceilings. This challenges the room acoustics design. Green Materials: the LEED protocols require the elimination of potentially harmful finishes, including fibrous materials which may impact air quality or contribute to health problems. Since the backbone of sound absorption is glass and mineral fibres, this further challenges provision of superior room acoustics. Examples and commentary will be provided based on current and recent projects.

  4. A coupled SAFE-2.5D BEM approach for the dispersion analysis of damped leaky guided waves in embedded waveguides of arbitrary cross-section.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, M; Bartoli, I; Marzani, A; Viola, E

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) formulation coupled with a 2.5D Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the computation of the dispersion properties of viscoelastic waveguides with arbitrary cross-section and embedded in unbounded isotropic viscoelastic media. Attenuation of guided modes is described through the imaginary component of the axial wavenumber, which accounts for material damping, introduced via linear viscoelastic constitutive relations, as well as energy loss due to radiation of bulk waves in the surrounding media. Energy radiation is accounted in the SAFE model by introducing an equivalent dynamic stiffness matrix for the surrounding medium, which is derived from a regularized 2.5D boundary element formulation. The resulting dispersive wave equation is configured as a nonlinear eigenvalue problem in the complex axial wavenumber. The eigenvalue problem is reduced to a linear one inside a chosen contour in the complex plane of the axial wavenumber by using a contour integral method. Poles of leaky and evanescent modes are obtained by choosing appropriately the phase of the wavenumbers normal to the interface in compliance with the nature of the waves in the surrounding medium. Finally, the obtained eigensolutions are post-processed to compute the energy velocity and the radiated wavefield in the surrounding domain. The reliability of the method is first validated on existing results for waveguides of circular cross sections embedded in elastic and viscoelastic media. Next, the potential of the proposed numerical framework is shown by computing the dispersion properties for a square steel bar embedded in grout and for an H-shaped steel pile embedded in soil.

  5. 16. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #102, electrical equipment room; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #102, electrical equipment room; the prime power distribution system. Excellent example of endulum-types shock isolation. The grey cabinet and barrel assemble is part of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) retrofill project - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  6. 20. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #105, shockisolated platform for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #105, shock-isolated platform for chillers is easily seen on the right - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  7. The gut-brain barrier in major depression: intestinal mucosal dysfunction with an increased translocation of LPS from gram negative enterobacteria (leaky gut) plays a role in the inflammatory pathophysiology of depression.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Kubera, Marta; Leunis, Jean-Claude

    2008-02-01

    There is now evidence that major depression (MDD) is accompanied by an activation of the inflammatory response system (IRS) and that pro-inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysacharide (LPS) may induce depressive symptoms. The aim of the present study was to examine whether an increased gastrointestinal permeability with an increased translocation of LPS from gram negative bacteria may play a role in the pathophysiology of MDD. Toward this end, the present study examines the serum concentrations of IgM and IgA against LPS of the gram-negative enterobacteria, Hafnia Alvei, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, Morganella Morganii, Pseudomonas Putida, Citrobacter Koseri, and Klebsielle Pneumoniae in MDD patients and normal controls. We found that the prevalences and median values for serum IgM and IgA against LPS of enterobacteria are significantly greater in patients with MDD than in normal volunteers. These differences are significant to the extent that a significant diagnostic performance is obtained, i.e. the area under the ROC curve is 90.1%. The symptom profiles of increased IgM and IgA levels are fatigue, autonomic and gastro-intestinal symptoms and a subjective feeling of infection. The results show that intestinal mucosal dysfunction characterized by an increased translocation of gram-negative bacteria (leaky gut) plays a role in the inflammatory pathophysiology of depression. It is suggested that the increased LPS translocation may mount an immune response and thus IRS activation in some patients with MDD and may induce specific "sickness behaviour" symptoms. It is suggested that patients with MDD should be checked for leaky gut by means of the IgM and IgA panel used in the present study and accordingly should be treated for leaky gut.

  8. Study of intelligent building system based on the internet of things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Liyong; Xu, Renbo

    2017-03-01

    In accordance with the problem such as isolated subsystems, weak system linkage and expansibility of the bus type buildings management system, this paper based on the modern intelligent buildings has studied some related technologies of the intelligent buildings and internet of things, and designed system architecture of the intelligent buildings based on the Internet of Things. Meanwhile, this paper has also analyzed wireless networking modes, wireless communication protocol and wireless routing protocol of the intelligent buildings based on the Internet of Things.

  9. Building Blueprints: Making Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Depicts how Cornell University renovated its civil engineering and architecture building to include space for musical performances, teaching, and rehearsals. The article highlights the facility's contemporary design, which also compliments the form and massing of the original building. (GR)

  10. Building Design & Construction - Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    2003-11-01

    Offers a brief history of green building; presents the results of a specially commissioned survey; and analyzes the chief trends, issues, and published research, based on interviews with dozens of experts and participants in green building.

  11. Building Materials Property Table

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-16

    This information sheet describes a table of some of the key technical properties of many of the most common building materials taken from ASHRAE Fundamentals - 2001, Moisture Control in Buildings, CMHC, NRC/IRC, IEA Annex 24, and manufacturer data.

  12. Buildings interoperability landscape - Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Dave B.; Stephan, Eric G.; Wang, Weimin; Corbin, Charles D.; Widergren, Steven E.

    2015-02-01

    Buildings are an integral part of our nation’s energy economy. The advancement in information and communications technology (ICT) has revolutionized energy management in industrial facilities and large commercial buildings. As ICT costs decrease and capabilities increase, buildings automation and energy management features are transforming the small-medium commercial and residential buildings sectors. A vision of a connected world in which equipment and systems within buildings coordinate with each other to efficiently meet their owners’ and occupants’ needs, and where buildings regularly transact business with other buildings and service providers (such as gas and electric service providers) is emerging. However, while the technology to support this collaboration has been demonstrated at various degrees of maturity, the integration frameworks and ecosystems of products that support the ability to easily install, maintain, and evolve building systems and their equipment components are struggling to nurture the fledging business propositions of their proponents.

  13. Green Building Standards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many organizations have developed model codes or rating systems that communities may use to develop green building programs or revise building ordinances. Some of the major options are listed on this page.

  14. Better Buildings Challenge Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2011-06-01

    The Better Buildings Challenge is a national leadership initiative calling on corporate chief executive officers, university presidents, and state and local leaders to make a significant commitment to building energy efficiency.

  15. Re-conceiving building design quality: A review of building users in their social context

    PubMed Central

    Evans, James; Karvonen, Andrew; Whitley, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Considerable overlap exists between post-occupancy research evaluating building design quality and the concept of ‘social value’, popularised by its recent application to issues of the public realm. To outline this potential research agenda, the paper reviews design quality research on buildings in relation to users and their social context where the term ‘social context’ refers to building user group dynamics, a combination of organisational cultures, management strategies, and social norms and practices. The review is conducted across five key building types, namely housing, workplaces, healthcare, education, and the retail/service sector. Research commonalities and gaps are identified in order to build a more comprehensive picture of the design quality literature and its handling of users in their social context. The key findings concerning each building type are presented visually. It is concluded that the design quality field comprises a patchwork of relatively isolated studies of various building types, with significant potential for theoretical and empirical development through interdisciplinary collaboration. Users tend to be conceived as anonymous and autonomous individuals with little analysis of user identity or interaction. Further, the contextual impact of user group dynamics on the relationship between building design and building user is rarely addressed in the literature. Producing a more nuanced understanding of users in situ is proposed as an important area for future design quality research. PMID:27110217

  16. Re-conceiving building design quality: A review of building users in their social context.

    PubMed

    Watson, Kelly J; Evans, James; Karvonen, Andrew; Whitley, Tim

    2016-05-01

    Considerable overlap exists between post-occupancy research evaluating building design quality and the concept of 'social value', popularised by its recent application to issues of the public realm. To outline this potential research agenda, the paper reviews design quality research on buildings in relation to users and their social context where the term 'social context' refers to building user group dynamics, a combination of organisational cultures, management strategies, and social norms and practices. The review is conducted across five key building types, namely housing, workplaces, healthcare, education, and the retail/service sector. Research commonalities and gaps are identified in order to build a more comprehensive picture of the design quality literature and its handling of users in their social context. The key findings concerning each building type are presented visually. It is concluded that the design quality field comprises a patchwork of relatively isolated studies of various building types, with significant potential for theoretical and empirical development through interdisciplinary collaboration. Users tend to be conceived as anonymous and autonomous individuals with little analysis of user identity or interaction. Further, the contextual impact of user group dynamics on the relationship between building design and building user is rarely addressed in the literature. Producing a more nuanced understanding of users in situ is proposed as an important area for future design quality research.

  17. Green Building Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, David Jean

    2013-12-29

    This project provided support to the Green Building Research Laboratory at Portland State University (PSU) so it could work with researchers and industry to solve technical problems for the benefit of the green building industry. It also helped to facilitate the development of PSU’s undergraduate and graduate-level training in building science across the curriculum.

  18. Concepts in Building Firesafety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, M. David

    The goal of this book is to present in a graphical format the principles of design for building firesafety. The book's more than 270 illustrations represent the core of its coverage of factors affecting fire ignition and spread in buildings, building site planning for fire suppression and occupant rescue operations, protection by building…

  19. Building with Straw.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Santo, Gilbert

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the early use of straw in Africa and Europe as a building material. Provides background information and a basic framework for the straw bale project, and recommends supervision for young students. Lists objectives for building a straw bale bench and provides the building instructions which consist of three sessions. Includes four…

  20. Making Smart Building Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how a positive partnership with the architect can help one who is inexperienced in building design and construction make smart building decisions. Tips address how to prevent change orders, what red flags to look for in a building project, what the administrator should expect from the architect to make the project run smoothly, and what…

  1. A new system for the amplification of biological signals: RecA and complimentary single strand DNA probes on a leaky surface acoustic wave biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Chen, Ming; Luo, Yang; Deng, Kun; Chen, Dong; Fu, Weiling

    2014-10-15

    This research describes a new amplification signals system of the leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) bis-peptide nucleic acid (bis-PNA) biosensor for the simple, sensitive and rapid detection of the target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The system consists of a RecA protein-coated complementary single-stranded DNA (cssDNA) probe complex that amplifies the biological signal to improve the sensitivity of the biosensor. The bis-PNA probe for detecting HPV was first immobilized on a gold surface membrane of the detection channel. After the probe was completely hybridized with the corresponding target DNA, different concentrations of the "RecA protein-complementary single strand DNA probe" were added to react with the bis-PNA/dsDNA complex. The phase shift of the LSAW biosensors, which was measured and found to be most significant when the RecA protein was 45 μg/mL and the ATPγS was 2.5 mmol/L. Compared with other concentrations (P<0.01) of RecA and ATPγS, the value of the phase shift was (11.74 ± 1.03) degrees and the ratio of the phase shift and hybridization time clearly outperformed that of the other concentrations. Compared to the direct hybridization of the bis-PNA probe and the target DNA sequence, the sensitivity was effectively improved and the detection time was significantly shortened. PNA binding adjacent to the area of the target sequence homologous to the probe significantly increased the yield of the hybridization reaction between the PNA/dsDNA complex and the RecA protein-coated cssDNA probe. In this condition, the phase shift was significantly obvious and the detection time was significantly shortened. In conclusion, the combination of the RecA protein-coated cssDNA probe and the LSAW bis-PNA biosensor provides sensitivity and simple and rapid detection of clinical trace pathogenic microorganisms.

  2. Building an Effective Building Trades Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morauer, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Looks at steps needed to create an effective building trades program: (1) identify political and financial obstacles, (2) identify industry needs, (3) identify local assets, and (4) create long- and short-term goals. (JOW)

  3. Green Buildings and Health.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; MacNaughton, Piers; Laurent, Jose Guillermo Cedeno; Flanigan, Skye S; Eitland, Erika Sita; Spengler, John D

    2015-09-01

    Green building design is becoming broadly adopted, with one green building standard reporting over 3.5 billion square feet certified to date. By definition, green buildings focus on minimizing impacts to the environment through reductions in energy usage, water usage, and minimizing environmental disturbances from the building site. Also by definition, but perhaps less widely recognized, green buildings aim to improve human health through design of healthy indoor environments. The benefits related to reduced energy and water consumption are well-documented, but the potential human health benefits of green buildings are only recently being investigated. The objective of our review was to examine the state of evidence on green building design as it specifically relates to indoor environmental quality and human health. Overall, the initial scientific evidence indicates better indoor environmental quality in green buildings versus non-green buildings, with direct benefits to human health for occupants of those buildings. A limitation of much of the research to date is the reliance on indirect, lagging and subjective measures of health. To address this, we propose a framework for identifying direct, objective and leading "Health Performance Indicators" for use in future studies of buildings and health.

  4. 10. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, air condition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, air condition repair shop, S end of building, looking N. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  5. Building L west elevation oblique from cartway (between Buildings L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building L west elevation oblique from cartway (between Buildings L and M), also showing west elevation of Building J - Daniel F. Waters Germantown Dye Works, Building L, 37-55 East Wister Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Building No. 1, left; Building No. 9, Guard House, center; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building No. 1, left; Building No. 9, Guard House, center; Building No. 5, Main Building, right. View from across Main Street - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  7. 1. Complex looking east, Bay State building on left. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Complex looking east, Bay State building on left. Building 1 in middle, roof line and tower of building 2 visible to right, building 2 boiler house on extreme right. - American Screw Company, Stevens Street, Providence, Providence County, RI

  8. 2. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING VIEW IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - VIEW IS LOOKING NORTH 80° WEST "B" FACE ALONG BUILDING "A" FACE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  9. 13. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, tin metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, tin metal shop area, showing construction of window and part of ceiling, E wall of building. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  10. Integrated building design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanguinetti, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    For many years, building design has been a very linear process with owners speaking to architects who then design building shells that they pass along to sub-consultants who must fit their systems into the allotted spaces. While this process has some advantages, it provides little opportunity to optimize systems based on such factors as energy use or occupant comfort. This presentation will focus on the evolution and implications of integrated building design, a method that has provided greater opportunities for interaction between design disciplines and with building users early on in the design process. Integration has resulted in buildings that are more sustainable than typical buildings and that can respond better to the needs of the owner and users. Examples of the application of the process and the resulting buildings will be presented from the view of a design engineer with experience of both processes. Specifically, the potential contribution of an acoustical consultant in the integrated process will be explored.

  11. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  12. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  13. South side. Building 520 is to the right. Building 516 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South side. Building 520 is to the right. Building 516 is to the left. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Green Building Tools for Tribes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tribal green building tools and funding information to support tribal building code adoption, healthy building, siting, energy efficiency, renewable energy, water conservation, green building materials, recycling and adaptation and resilience.

  15. The living building

    SciTech Connect

    McLennan, J.F.

    1998-07-01

    If one is to increase the energy performance of buildings beyond what is now possible, one can no longer afford to think of a building's systems and components as independent of one another. With emerging trends in building technology, it is becoming possible to design buildings (or groups of buildings) that respond to their environments as naturally as do living organisms. The living building integrates advances in glazing technology, photovoltaics, daylight-integrated lighting controls, HVAC and ecological waste management in conjunction with direct digital controls to respond actively to temperature, humidity, heat gain, cooling, lighting levels, and ventilation. This revolutionary building is the building of the future; it maximizes energy savings due to the inherent efficiency of an intelligent, interconnected system in which the envelope, lighting, and HVAC are always aware of and responding to each other's needs. While some of the technologies for such a system are already in use and resulting energy savings documented, it is not until advances such as electrochromic glazing reach the market that the level of integration necessary to produce the living building will be possible. This paper explores the limits of the living building's capacity to learn from environmental forces and regulate itself; the paper then examines emerging technologies that have demonstrated the potential to make such systemic integration and unprecedented energy savings possible.

  16. Steady compression characteristics of laminated MRE isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, N. A. A.; Mazlan, S. A.; Ubaidillah; Sharif, A. H. R.; Kamaruddin, S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper focused on an experimental setup on laminated magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) isolator under steady state compression test. An isotropic type natural rubber (NR) based MRE were fabricated and layered with a steel plate to form a multilayer sandwich structure adopted from the conventional laminated rubber bearing design. A set of static compression test was conducted to explore the potential of semi-active laminated MRE isolator in field-dependent stiffness properties. Stress versus strain relationship was assessed under different magnetic fields application. Based on the examination, the stress altered as the application of magnetic fields. Consequently, the effective stiffness of isolator also influenced by the magnetic fields induction. The experimental results show that the proposed laminated MRE isolator can effectively alter the compression stiffness up to the 14.56%. The preliminary results have confirmed the tunability of the semi-active laminated MRE isolator in which it would be beneficial for improving building isolator in general.

  17. Vision for Future Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-19

    In the last 10 years our lives have changed so quickly, and drastically, that it's hard to imagine what the distant future might bring. Because buildings are large, long-term investments, the building sector has been slower to change. It can take more than 100 years for our cities to be renovated or rebuilt using updated methods and technologies. But to get there, we must start to conceptualize what the functions and capabilities of these future buildings could be, today.

  18. Vision for Future Buildings

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In the last 10 years our lives have changed so quickly, and drastically, that it's hard to imagine what the distant future might bring. Because buildings are large, long-term investments, the building sector has been slower to change. It can take more than 100 years for our cities to be renovated or rebuilt using updated methods and technologies. But to get there, we must start to conceptualize what the functions and capabilities of these future buildings could be, today.

  19. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-02

    DOE2.1E-121SUNOS is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating, cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS).

  20. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  1. Cement fracture surface alteration in reactive-transport experiments; Implications for time-dependent flux of CO2 along leaky wellbores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, N. J.; Wenning, Q. C.; Lopano, C. L.; Hesse, M. A.; Strazisar, B. R.; Bryant, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Long term fate of sequestered CO2 is a function of the storage system's ability to contain the CO2 until long-term trapping mechanisms immobilize it (e.g. dissolution trapping, residual trapping, and mineralization). One significant risk to CO2 containment is a fast-path created by leaky wellbores. Inadequate design, implementation, and well abandonment create leakage pathways along the cement-earth interface or within wellbore material itself. The goal of our work is to characterize pathways in leaking wells using experiments that model key components of the coupled system. Flow and reaction in a cement fracture of variable aperture size are strongly coupled as dissolution/precipitation can alter the flow path by creating or sealing pathways. Understanding under what conditions a flow path might become self-enhancing or self-sealing is paramount to quantifying time-dependent leakage risk in wells. In our experiments we use standard core flow equipment to inject hydrochloric acid (HCl) at constant rate into a fractured cement core created using the Brazilian method. HCl allows us to easily control pH over a range of values and limits calcite precipitation, thus giving us a look at a worst case scenario for acid attack. For a given experiment we fix injected acid concentration and flow rate and measure pressure drop, effluent pH, and concentration of major cations over time. After the experiment, chemical alteration of the fracture surface is characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Results show several types of behavior; nearly all results indicate self-sealing or self-limiting behavior. Experiments show three reaction patterns: (1) formation of distinct reacted channels, (2) broad reaction pathways, and (3) little evidence for reaction on fracture surface. Despite pervasive alteration of the fracture surface in case (1) and (2), no sustained decrease in the pressure drop for a given flow rate is observed and in case (3) pressure always rises until equipment

  2. Build a Solar Greenhouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    Attached solar greenhouses are relatively inexpensive and easy to build; they can provide additional heat to homes all winter as well as fresh vegetables and flowers. This bulletin: (1) describes the characteristics of a solar greenhouse; (2) provides a checklist of five items to consider before building a solar greenhouse; (3) describes the four…

  3. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  4. Building a Better Robot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navah, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Kids love to build robots, letting their imaginations run wild with thoughts of what they might look like and what they could be programmed to do. Yet when students use cereal boxes and found objects to make robots, often the projects look too similar and tend to fall apart. This alternative allows students to "build" robots in a different way,…

  5. Building Global Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas; Buchem, Ilona; Camacho, Mar; Cronin, Catherine; Gordon, Averill; Keegan, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Within the background where education is increasingly driven by the economies of scale and research funding, we propose an alternative online open and connected framework (OOC) for building global learning communities using mobile social media. We critique a three year action research case study involving building collaborative global learning…

  6. Survey of Solar Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Robert; Baker, Steven

    This survey brings together information concerning the growing number of buildings utilizing solar energy and is designed to facilitate the comparison of specific characteristics of the buildings. The 66 U.S. entries are divided into five regions, arranged by state, and roughly by date within each state. Seven entries are from other countries. A…

  7. Building a Data Warehouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elliott

    2002-01-01

    Describes how to build a data warehouse, using the Schools Interoperability Framework (www.sifinfo.org), that supports data-driven decision making and complies with the Freedom of Information Act. Provides several suggestions for building and maintaining a data warehouse. (PKP)

  8. Building Resilience in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Building Resilience in Children Page Content Article Body ​The world ... AAP) to author A Parent’s Guide to Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Your Child Roots ...

  9. Buildings for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asian Regional Inst. for School Building Research, Colombo (Sri Lanka).

    The quarterly review for October and December 1967 of the Asian Regional Institute for School Building Research at Colombo, Ceylon--(1) reviews two main activities of a cost and space utilization study and a report of the workshop of the directors and UNESCO experts on regional educational buildings, (2) describes a method for determining teacher…

  10. Protecting Buildings from People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Security in buildings ranges from simple locks to elaborate electronic systems. Most buildings do not need the level of sophistication it is possible to achieve. A survey of these products, however, is appropriate to appreciate their potential and variety. (Author/MLF)

  11. Facility Focus: Science Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of five custom designs used in university science buildings. Descriptions include renovation to a mechanical engineering lab, construction of a new building for molecular biology, the reconstruction of chemistry labs, the renovation of a vision lab, and a new research and education facility. Includes photos. (RJM)

  12. Reusing Old Manufacturing Buildings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an interesting design challenge for students, one that will certainly let them integrate subject matter and get a sense of pride for doing something useful in their own community. The author would be willing to bet that the average town or city has some old red brick manufacturing building(s) that have seen much better days.…

  13. Behavioral Strategies: Building Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoz, Charles J.

    Using a construction building analogy, this guide provides a plan for building a system of behavior strategies. These strategies are designed to assist behavior analysts of contracted provider agencies in the construction and maintenance of procedures which will help monitor and reduce the frequency of problematic behaviors in individuals with…

  14. Conversion or New Building?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Phil

    1970-01-01

    Examined first is "the overall problem of housing a TV studio complex to see what particular sorts of buildings are required and how they must be related," and then considered are "the relative merits and particular problems of new studio building or a conversion." (LS)

  15. Buildings That Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebenson, John

    1998-01-01

    Teachers can use "built teaching aids" or elements of the school building itself to expand teaching and enhance learning. Possibilities include bulletin boards, display cases, murals painted by local artists, permanent information panels, interior windows to classrooms, flags, and bas-reliefs on building exteriors. Playground pavement…

  16. Building Numbers from Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  17. School Building Day, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Educational Facility Planners, International, Scottsdale, AZ.

    This document presents information and development materials about "School Building Day" (an event spotlighting the school facility and developing support and pride in the community's schools) to help local school districts conduct their own "School Building Day" to be held on April 20th of 2001. Included are lists of suggested…

  18. The sick building syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sumedha M.

    2008-01-01

    The sick building syndrome comprises of various nonspecific symptoms that occur in the occupants of a building. This feeling of ill health increases sickness absenteeism and causes a decrease in productivity of the workers. As this syndrome is increasingly becoming a major occupational hazard, the cause, management and prevention of this condition have been discussed in this article. PMID:20040980

  19. Mycotoxins in crude building materials from water-damaged buildings.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, T; Reijula, K; Johnsson, T; Hemminki, K; Hintikka, E L; Lindroos, O; Kalso, S; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H; Haahtela, T

    2000-05-01

    We analyzed 79 bulk samples of moldy interior finishes from Finnish buildings with moisture problems for 17 mycotoxins, as well as for fungi that could be isolated using one medium and one set of growth conditions. We found the aflatoxin precursor, sterigmatocystin, in 24% of the samples and trichothecenes in 19% of the samples. Trichothecenes found included satratoxin G or H in five samples; diacetoxyscirpenol in five samples; and 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol, verrucarol, or T-2-tetraol in an additional five samples. Citrinine was found in three samples. Aspergillus versicolor was present in most sterigmatocystin-containing samples, and Stachybotrys spp. were present in the samples where satratoxins were found. In many cases, however, the presence of fungi thought to produce the mycotoxins was not correlated with the presence of the expected compounds. However, when mycotoxins were found, some toxigenic fungi usually were present, even if the species originally responsible for producing the mycotoxin was not isolated. We conclude that the identification and enumeration of fungal species present in bulk materials are important to verify the severity of mold damage but that chemical analyses are necessary if the goal is to establish the presence of mycotoxins in moldy materials.

  20. NREL Buildings Research Video

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Through research, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed many strategies and design techniques to ensure both commercial and residential buildings use as little energy as possible and also work well with the surroundings. Here you will find a video that introduces the work of NREL Buildings Research, highlights some of the facilities on the NREL campus, and demonstrates these efficient building strategies. Watch this video to see design highlights of the Science and Technology Facility on the NREL campus—the first Federal building to be LEED® Platinum certified. Additionally, the video demonstrates the energy-saving features of NRELs Thermal Test Facility. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/buildings/about_research_text_version.html

  1. NREL Buildings Research Video

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Through research, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed many strategies and design techniques to ensure both commercial and residential buildings use as little energy as possible and also work well with the surroundings. Here you will find a video that introduces the work of NREL Buildings Research, highlights some of the facilities on the NREL campus, and demonstrates these efficient building strategies. Watch this video to see design highlights of the Science and Technology Facility on the NREL campus—the first Federal building to be LEED® Platinum certified. Additionally, the video demonstrates the energy-saving features of NRELs Thermal Test Facility. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/buildings/about_research_text_version.html

  2. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT BUILDING 121, THE PLANT SECURITY BUILDING. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT BUILDING 121, THE PLANT SECURITY BUILDING. BUILDING 121 WAS ONE OF THE ORIGINAL STRUCTURES AT THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT. IT SHARES A COMMON WALL WITH BUILDING 122, THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL BUILDING. (7/29/52) - Rocky Flats Plant, Security & Armory, West of Third Street, south of Central Avenue, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  3. 5. VIEW SOUTH FROM BUILDING 20 OF BUILDINGS 4, 3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SOUTH FROM BUILDING 20 OF BUILDINGS 4, 3 AND 2; BUILDING 4 AT EXTREME LEFT CENTER; RUNDBOGENSTIL TOWER AT LEFT CENTER; BUILDING 3 AT CENTER; BUILDING 2 RIGHT OF CENTER AND '1876' STACK AT EXTREME RIGHT - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  4. View of east elevation of Building No. 34. Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of east elevation of Building No. 34. Building No. 29 at left rear, Building No. 26 at right rear, and Building No. 24 at right. Looking west - Easter Hill Village, Building No. 34, East side of Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  5. Building the green way.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Charles

    2006-06-01

    Just five or six years ago, the term "green building" evoked visions of barefoot, tie-dyed, granola-munching denizens. There's been a large shift in perception. Of course, green buildings are still known for conserving natural resources by, for example, minimizing on-site grading, using alternative materials, and recycling construction waste. But people now see the financial advantages as well. Well-designed green buildings yield lower utility costs, greater employee productivity, less absenteeism, and stronger attraction and retention of workers than standard buildings do. Green materials, mechanical systems, and furnishings have become more widely available and considerably less expensive than they used to be-often cheaper than their standard counterparts. So building green is no longer a pricey experiment; just about any company can do it on a standard budget by following the ten rules outlined by the author. Reliable building-rating systems like the U.S. Green Building Council's rigorous Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program have done much to underscore the benefits of green construction. LEED evaluates buildings and awards points in several areas, such as water efficiency and indoor environmental quality. Other rating programs include the UK's BREEAM (Building Research Establishment's Environmental Assessment Method) and Australia's Green Star. Green construction is not simply getting more respect; it is rapidly becoming a necessity as corporations push it fully into the mainstream over the next five to ten years. In fact, the author says, the owners of standard buildings face massive obsolescence. To avoid this problem, they should carry out green renovations. Corporations no longer have an excuse for eschewing environmental and economic sustainability. They have at their disposal tools proven to lower overhead costs, improve productivity, and strengthen the bottom line.

  6. Friendly protection of houses by affordable isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzolani, Federico M.; Mandara, Alberto; Froncillo, Salvatore

    2008-07-08

    The paper deals with a case of seismic isolation carried out in Campania (Italy), referring to the construction of a house building. The concerned case is a three-storey reinforced concrete frame building, in which the isolation system has been applied between the basement top and the first floor deck. The paper reports the main steps of this work, starting from the design, carried out according to the latest Italian seismic code, going throughout the construction stage, up to the extensive on-site testing program performed to evaluate the dynamic response of the building. Relevant technological solutions are illustrated and discussed. Both theoretical calculation and experimental measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the solution adopted, not only from the technical point of view, but also in an economic perspective.

  7. Knowledge formalization of intelligent building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žáček, Martin

    2016-06-01

    This article aim is understanding the basic knowledge about an intelligent building. The notion of the intelligent building can be called any building equipped with computer and communication technology, which can automatically respond to internal or external stimuli. The result of the intelligent building is an automated and foreseeing of activities that enable to reduce operating costs and increase comfort. The best way to use the intelligent building is for a low-energy building, a passive building, or for building with high savings. The output of this article is the formalization of basic knowledge of the intelligent building by RDF graph.

  8. 3. East side of Building 1001 (administration building), looking west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. East side of Building 1001 (administration building), looking west - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1001, Independence Street, .45 mile south of intersection of Texas State Highway & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  9. 4. South side of Building 1001 (administration building), looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. South side of Building 1001 (administration building), looking north - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1001, Independence Street, .45 mile south of intersection of Texas State Highway & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  10. 5. North side of Building 1001 (administration building), looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. North side of Building 1001 (administration building), looking southeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1001, Independence Street, .45 mile south of intersection of Texas State Highway & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  11. 9. Interior of Building 1001 (administration building), Room 204, vault, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Interior of Building 1001 (administration building), Room 204, vault, looking east - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1001, Independence Street, .45 mile south of intersection of Texas State Highway & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  12. 6. West side of Building 1001 (administration building), looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. West side of Building 1001 (administration building), looking southeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1001, Independence Street, .45 mile south of intersection of Texas State Highway & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  13. 7. Building 7 interior, west end of building showing tier ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Building 7 interior, west end of building showing tier of skylight windows and modern equipment. View looking west. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), Building No. 7, 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  15. 23. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL INTERFACE "RCL NO. 2" WITH COMPUTER CONTROL DISC DRIVE UNITS IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  16. Black Maria Reconstruction (left foreground); Building No. 1; Main Building; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Black Maria Reconstruction (left foreground); Building No. 1; Main Building; Edison Storage Battery Building (right background) - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  17. VIEW OF MLT BUILDING (LIME KILN BUILDING DIRECTLY BEHIND IT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MLT BUILDING (LIME KILN BUILDING DIRECTLY BEHIND IT WITH GOOD VIEW OF SKIP CAR TRACK) LOOKING EAST. - Solvay Process Company, Lime Kiln Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  18. 24. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER -- MWOC IN OPEARATION AT 1924 ZULU TIME. 26 OCTOBER, 1999. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  19. 13. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING "B" FACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - "B" FACE LOADING DOCK AND PERSONNEL ACCESS RAMP TO FALLOUT SHELTER. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  20. 4. NORTHWEST SIDE LOOKING EAST, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AND HEADQUARTERS BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. NORTHWEST SIDE LOOKING EAST, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AND HEADQUARTERS BUILDING TO LEFT - Santa Fe Land Improvement Company, Office Building, 16915 Avenida de Acacias, Rancho Santa Fe, San Diego County, CA

  1. 4. 150105 PACIFIC AVE. SPRAGUE BUILDING (1889). THIS BUILDING SERVED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 1501-05 PACIFIC AVE. SPRAGUE BUILDING (1889). THIS BUILDING SERVED AS A MODEL FOR MOST OF THE 'JOBBERS' (FOODSTUFF WHOLESALERS) BUILDING IN TACOMA. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  2. Contextual view of building, with building #12 in right background ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of building, with building #12 in right background and building #11 in right foreground. Camera facing east-southeast - Naval Supply Center, Broadway Complex, Administration Storehouse, 911 West Broadway, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  3. 19. BUILDINGS 243247. PRIMER DRYHOUSES. BUILDING LAYOUT. February 16, 1917 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. BUILDINGS 243-247. PRIMER DRYHOUSES. BUILDING LAYOUT. February 16, 1917 - Frankford Arsenal, Building Nos. 242-246A, South side Craig Road between Eakin & Walbach Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. 50. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far left, and building 157, sentry control box at entry to launch pad at far right, looking east - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  5. Building 909, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 909, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. Building 908 at extreme right for context. - Travis Air Force Base, Handling Crew Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  6. 9. FERTILIZER PLANT AND STORAGE BUILDINGS, LOOKING EAST FROM BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FERTILIZER PLANT AND STORAGE BUILDINGS, LOOKING EAST FROM BUILDING 149; LIVESTOCK HOLDING BUILDINGS (HOG AND SHEEP HOTELS) OCCUPIED OPEN AREA IN FOREGROUND - Rath Packing Company, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  7. 28. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING AT INTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - AT INTERIOR OF LEVEL 5, FACE A - SHOWS ANTENNA RECEIVERS, EMITTERS/RECEIVERS, IN GENERAL ARRANGEMENT. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  8. 22. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL ROOM. RECEIVER EQUIPMENT ON RIGHT WITH RF RADIATION MONITOR CABINET. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  9. Smokestack with incinerator building (building 616) to right and unnumbered ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Smokestack with incinerator building (building 616) to right and unnumbered building to right - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Incinerator Smokestack, 560 feet east-northeast of intersection of East Bushnell Avenue, & South Van Valzah Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. 25. BUILDING NO. 271, FUZE ASSEMBLY BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. BUILDING NO. 271, FUZE ASSEMBLY BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST ELEVATIONS. BUILDING NO. 271-L, FIELD OFFICE, VISIBLE ON RIGHT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 200 Area, Shell Component Loading, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  11. 57. BUILDING NO. 1071, ORDNANCE FACILITY (CRYSTALLIZATION BUILDING), LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. BUILDING NO. 1071, ORDNANCE FACILITY (CRYSTALLIZATION BUILDING), LOOKING AT SOUTHEAST SIDE. NOTE ESCAPE CHUTES PROJECTING FROM SIDES OF BUILDING. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  12. 64. BUILDING NO. 3010, ORDNANCE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, LOOKING AT SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. BUILDING NO. 3010, ORDNANCE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, LOOKING AT SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES OF BUILDING. BUILT FOR U.S. NAVY IN 1902. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  13. 49. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far left, and building 160, acid fueling station on far right, looking west - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  14. 47. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far right, and building 160, acid fueling station on far left, looking northeast - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  15. 48. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far right, and building 160, acid fueling station on far left, looking east - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  16. 51. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Overall view of building 156, Warhead Building on far left, acid fueling station and standby generator building on far right, looking northwest - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  17. Buildings Interoperability Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Dave; Stephan, Eric G.; Wang, Weimin; Corbin, Charles D.; Widergren, Steven E.

    2015-12-31

    Through its Building Technologies Office (BTO), the United States Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE-EERE) is sponsoring an effort to advance interoperability for the integration of intelligent buildings equipment and automation systems, understanding the importance of integration frameworks and product ecosystems to this cause. This is important to BTO’s mission to enhance energy efficiency and save energy for economic and environmental purposes. For connected buildings ecosystems of products and services from various manufacturers to flourish, the ICT aspects of the equipment need to integrate and operate simply and reliably. Within the concepts of interoperability lie the specification, development, and certification of equipment with standards-based interfaces that connect and work. Beyond this, a healthy community of stakeholders that contribute to and use interoperability work products must be developed. On May 1, 2014, the DOE convened a technical meeting to take stock of the current state of interoperability of connected equipment and systems in buildings. Several insights from that meeting helped facilitate a draft description of the landscape of interoperability for connected buildings, which focuses mainly on small and medium commercial buildings. This document revises the February 2015 landscape document to address reviewer comments, incorporate important insights from the Buildings Interoperability Vision technical meeting, and capture thoughts from that meeting about the topics to be addressed in a buildings interoperability vision. In particular, greater attention is paid to the state of information modeling in buildings and the great potential for near-term benefits in this area from progress and community alignment.

  18. INL Green Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer Dalton

    2005-05-01

    Green buildings, also known as sustainable buildings, resource efficient buildings, and high performance buildings, are structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reducing solid waste and pollutants, and limiting the depletion of natural resources. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish the mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate green design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. With this in mind, the recommendations described in this strategy are intended to form the INL foundation for green building standards. The recommendations in this strategy are broken down into three levels: Baseline Minimum, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)Certification, and Innovative. Baseline Minimum features should be included in all new occupied buildings no matter what the purpose or size. These features do not require significant research, design, or capital costs and yet they can reduce Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs and produce more environmentally friendly buildings. LEED Certification features are more aggressive than the Baseline Minimums in that they require documentation, studies, and/or additional funding. Combined with the Baseline Minimums, many of the features in this level will need to be implemented to achieve the goal of LEED certification. LEED Silver certification should be the minimum goal for all new buildings (including office buildings, laboratories, cafeterias, and visitor centers) greater than 25,000 square feet or a total cost of $10 million. Innovative features can also contribute to LEED certification, but are less mainstream than those listed in the previous two levels. These features are identified as areas where

  19. Building Brains for Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    34dU UAI:5 L.OVERED August 1993 memorandum 4. TITLE ANg SUBTITLn S. FUNDING NUMBERS Building Brains for Bodies N00014-91-J-4038 6. AUTHOR(S) Rodney...FIrS INSTfIflTE OF TEI( ’IINOL()( ;Y ARTIFI(’IAL INTLLWEII ,N’iE L,11OHXIOtlY A.I. Memo No. 1439 August. 1993 Building Brains for Bodies Rodney A...atioiial Ali enabling technology such as lie brain t hat we will power simply has not previously been available. build- has thle abilityv to revol itt onize

  20. GENERAL VIEW FROM EAST WITH BUILDING (OFFICE) ON RIGHT, BUILDINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW FROM EAST WITH BUILDING (OFFICE) ON RIGHT, BUILDINGS #24 & #26 ON LEFT, ROADWAY BETWEEN - Tyringham Shaker Settlement, Main House & Office, Jerusalem Road, Tyringham, Berkshire County, MA

  1. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  2. Building Technologies Program Key Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-15

    The Building Technologies Program (BTP) employs a balanced approach to making buildings more energy efficient. The three pillars of our program, research and development (R&D), market stimulation, and building and equipment standards, help meet our strategic vision.

  3. Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003

    EIA Publications

    2008-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States.

  4. Buildings Sector Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, Donna J.; Nicholls, Andrew K.; McDonald, Sean C.; Hollomon, Jonathan B.

    2005-08-01

    A joint NREL, ORNL, and PNNL team conducted market analysis to help inform DOE/EERE's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program planning and management decisions. This chapter presents the results of the market analysis for the Buildings sector.

  5. Building a Planetarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Scott M.

    1999-01-01

    School budgets dictate what can and cannot be done in science. Article offers an inexpensive, modified design to build a planetarium. The planetarium provides hands-on experience in plotting and mapping constellations. (CCM)

  6. Building Blueprints: Lyons Pride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the upgraded design of Canisius College's Lyons Hall, Buffalo, New York, from an academic building to a more inclusive facility containing necessary administrative functions. Before and after photos are included. (GR)

  7. Greening Existing Tribal Buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance about improving sustainability in existing tribal casinos and manufactured homes. Many steps can be taken to make existing buildings greener and healthier. They may also reduce utility and medical costs.

  8. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    2005-01-24

    DOE2.1E-121 is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating, cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS). DOE2.1E-121 contains modifications to DOE2.1E which allows 1000 zones to be modeled.

  9. Building for the future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    As the staff of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology settle into their new building in Cambridge, its director Hugh Pelham explains the challenges of living up to its prestigious past. PMID:23741620

  10. Involvement of oxidative stress and mitochondrial/lysosomal cross-talk in olanzapine cytotoxicity in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Aziz; Azarmi, Yadollah; Parvizpur, Alireza; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    1. Olanzapine (OLZ) is a widely used atypical antipsychotic agent for the treatment of schizophrenia and other disorders. Serious hepatotoxicity and elevated liver enzymes have been reported in patients receiving OLZ. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the OLZ hepatotoxicity are unknown. 2. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of OLZ on freshly isolated rat hepatocytes was assessed. Our results showed that the cytotoxicity of OLZ in hepatocytes is mediated by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial potential collapse, lysosomal membrane leakiness, GSH depletion and lipid peroxidation preceding cell lysis. All the aforementioned OLZ-induced cellular events were significantly (p < 0.05) prevented by ROS scavengers, antioxidants, endocytosis inhibitors and adenosine triphosphate generators. Also, the present results demonstrated that CYP450 is involved in OLZ-induced oxidative stress and cytotoxicity mechanism. 3. It is concluded that OLZ hepatotoxicity is associated with both mitochondrial/lysosomal involvement following the initiation of oxidative stress in hepatocytes.

  11. Rapid Building Assessment Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    15  Figure 10. Energy Site manager time for FirstFuel RBA Time versus ASHRAE Level II audit time (in hours) for one building... ASHRAE American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers CVRMSE Root-mean-square deviation DoD Department of Defense DOE...Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers ( ASHRAE ) Level II on-site audits across 16 of the DoD buildings. The results of this project and

  12. High Performance Buildings Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The High Performance Buildings Database is a shared resource for the building industry, a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad. The database includes information on the energy use, environmental performance, design process, finances, and other aspects of each project. Members of the design and construction teams are listed, as are sources for additional information. In total, up to twelve screens of detailed information are provided for each project profile. Projects range in size from small single-family homes or tenant fit-outs within buildings to large commercial and institutional buildings and even entire campuses. The database is a data repository as well. A series of Web-based data-entry templates allows anyone to enter information about a building project into the database. Once a project has been submitted, each of the partner organizations can review the entry and choose whether or not to publish that particular project on its own Web site.

  13. Building Better Buildings: Sustainable Building Activities in California Higher Education Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowell, Arnold; Eichel, Amanda; Alevantis, Leon; Lovegreen, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    This article outlines the activities and recommendations of California's sustainable building task force, discusses sustainable building activities in California's higher education systems, and highlights key issues that California is grappling with in its implementation of sustainable building practices. (EV)

  14. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move or ...

  15. Community Capacity Building

    PubMed Central

    Goytia, Crispin N.; Todaro-Rivera, Lea; Brenner, Barbara; Shepard, Peggy; Piedras, Veronica; Horowitz, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Background: Successful community–academic research partnerships require building the capacity of both community-based organizations (CBOs) and academics to conduct collaborative research of mutual interest and benefit. Yet, information about the needs and goals of research-interested CBOs is lacking. Our partnership aimed to conduct a community research needs assessment and to use results to develop future capacity-building programs for CBOs. Methods: Based on our review of the literature, informal interviews with research-interested CBOs and community-engaged research groups locally and nationally, we developed a needs assessment survey. Key domains of this survey included history and experience with research collaboration, interest in specific research topics, and preference for learning format and structure. We trained community health workers (CHWs) to recruit senior leaders from CBOs in New York City (NYC) and encourage them to complete an on-line survey. Results: Fully 54% (33/61) of CBOs completed the needs assessment. Most (69%) reported involvement with research or evaluation in the last 2 years and 33% had some funding for research. Although 75% had collaborated with academic institutions in the past, 58% did not rate this experience well. The four areas respondents prioritized for skills building were program evaluation, developing needs assessments, building surveys, and understanding statistical analyses. They were less interested in learning to build collaborations with academics. Conclusions: A formal needs assessment of research training and educational needs of CBOs revealed that most had experience, albeit negative, with academic collaborations. CBO leaders wanted to build skills to conduct and analyze assessments and program evaluations. Our community–academic partnership is using these findings to develop a research capacity-building course. Other partnerships should consider conducting such assessments to transform the capacity of CBOs to

  16. 19. VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF BUILDING 374. BUILDING 374, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF BUILDING 374. BUILDING 374, ATTACHED TO BUILDING 371, BECAME OPERATIONAL IN 1978 AS THE NEW RADIOACTIVE WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY, REPLACING BUILDING 774. (6/26/79) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT BUILDING 771 UNDER CONSTRUCTION. BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT BUILDING 771 UNDER CONSTRUCTION. BUILDING 771 WAS ONE OF THE FIRST FOUR MAJOR BUILDINGS AT THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT, BUILDING 771 WAS ORIGINALLY THE PRIMARY FACILITY FOR PLUTONIUM OPERATIONS. (5/29/52) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. Building C west elevation showing south elevation of Building B ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building C west elevation showing south elevation of Building B (on left) and north elevation of Building D (on right). The Germantown Dyeworks complex and smoke stack appear in the background. View looking east - Hinckley Knitting Mills, Building C, 21-35 East Wister Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. General view of buildings: Building No. 6 with smokestack (left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of buildings: Building No. 6 with smokestack (left foreground); Building No. 5 (left background); Base of Water Tower (right foreground); Buildings 4, 3, 2, 1 (center foreground to background) - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  20. 31. SOUTH PLANT NORTHERN EDGE, SHOWING CELL BUILDING (BUILDING 242) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. SOUTH PLANT NORTHERN EDGE, SHOWING CELL BUILDING (BUILDING 242) AT LEFT, LABORATORY (BUILDING 241) AT CENTER AND CAUSTIC FUSION PLANT (BUILDING 254) AT RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  1. 1. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT BUILDING 701. BUILDING 701 WAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT BUILDING 701. BUILDING 701 WAS USED TO DESIGN, BUILD, AND EVALUATE BENCH-SCALE TECHNOLOGIES USED IN ROCKY FLATS WASTE TREATMENT PROCESSES. (1/98) - Rocky Flats Plant, Design Laboratory, Northwest quadrant of Plant, between buildings 776-777 & 771, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 62. BUILDING NO. 1301, ORDNANCE FACILITY (MORTAR POWDER BUILDING), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. BUILDING NO. 1301, ORDNANCE FACILITY (MORTAR POWDER BUILDING), LOOKING AT NORTHWEST FACADE. ACCESS TO ROOF ALLOWS MAINTENANCE OF VENTILATION EQUIPMENT WHICH IS PLACED OUTSIDE BUILDING TO MINIMIZE EXPLOSION HAZARD. NO. 2 VISIBLE ON WALL OF BUILDING STANDS FOR EXPLOSION HAZARD WITH FRAGMENTATION. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  3. Building detection and building parameter retrieval in InSAR phase images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Clémence; Thiele, Antje; Hinz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The high resolution provided by the current satellite SAR missions makes them an attractive solution for the detailed analysis of urban areas. Especially due to their weather and daylight independency, they can be employed when optical sensors come to their limits. Due to the specific oblique side-looking configuration of such SAR sensors, phenomena such as layover, double bounce and shadow appear at building location, which can be better understood with very high resolution (VHR) SAR data. The detection of those areas, as well as the retrieval of building parameters through a detailed analysis of the extracted structures, is a challenging task. Indeed, depending on the acquisition configuration, on building material and surroundings, those patterns are not always consistent in amplitude SAR images. They can be difficult to recognize and distinguish automatically. Considering InSAR phase images instead of amplitude images is very helpful for this task, as InSAR is more depending on the geometry. Therefore, in this paper, we focus on the detection and extraction of building layover in InSAR phase images. Two complementing detectors are proposed, and their results are combined, in order to provide reliable building hypotheses. Based on the extracted segments, further analysis is conducted. Especially, the number of connected facades is analyzed. Characteristically geometrical shapes are finally fitted for each facade to permit the determination of the final building parameters as length, width, and height. Results of this approach are shown for three different datasets, first in terms of correctness and completeness of the extraction, and second in terms of accuracy of the extracted building parameters. For the considered datasets, the completeness and correctness are of about 70% and 90%, respectively. Eliminating clear outliers, the determined parameters present an accuracy up to 4 m (length), 2 m (height) and 3 ° (orientation). In this article isolated, middle to

  4. Optimization of seismic isolation systems via harmony search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melih Nigdeli, Sinan; Bekdaş, Gebrail; Alhan, Cenk

    2014-11-01

    In this article, the optimization of isolation system parameters via the harmony search (HS) optimization method is proposed for seismically isolated buildings subjected to both near-fault and far-fault earthquakes. To obtain optimum values of isolation system parameters, an optimization program was developed in Matlab/Simulink employing the HS algorithm. The objective was to obtain a set of isolation system parameters within a defined range that minimizes the acceleration response of a seismically isolated structure subjected to various earthquakes without exceeding a peak isolation system displacement limit. Several cases were investigated for different isolation system damping ratios and peak displacement limitations of seismic isolation devices. Time history analyses were repeated for the neighbouring parameters of optimum values and the results proved that the parameters determined via HS were true optima. The performance of the optimum isolation system was tested under a second set of earthquakes that was different from the first set used in the optimization process. The proposed optimization approach is applicable to linear isolation systems. Isolation systems composed of isolation elements that are inherently nonlinear are the subject of a future study. Investigation of the optimum isolation system parameters has been considered in parametric studies. However, obtaining the best performance of a seismic isolation system requires a true optimization by taking the possibility of both near-fault and far-fault earthquakes into account. HS optimization is proposed here as a viable solution to this problem.

  5. Looking southeast at building 150 on the left, building 149 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking southeast at building 150 on the left, building 149 (both partially obstructed), and north and west sides of building 144. Behind it is building 143 and in the distance at the right edge of the photograph is building 500. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Trends in Public Library Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Raymond M.

    1987-01-01

    Review of trends in public library buildings covers cycles in building activity; financial support; site selection; expansion, remodeling, or conversion of existing buildings; size of buildings; and such architectural concerns as flexible space, lighting, power, accommodation of computer systems, heat and ventilation, fire protection, security,…

  7. SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    A REPORT OF A PROGRAM HELD AS PART OF THE BUILDING RESEARCH INSTITUTE 1962 SPRING CONFERENCE ON THE SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN. TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE--(1) SOLAR ENERGY DATA APPLICABLE TO BUILDING DESIGN, (2) THERMAL EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON MAN, (3) SOLAR EFFECTS ON ARCHITECTURE, (4) SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING COSTS, (5) SELECTION OF…

  8. Building Air Quality. Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Indoor Air Div.

    Building managers and owners often confront competing demands to reduce operating costs and increase revenues that can siphon funds and resources from other building management concerns such as indoor air quality (IAQ). This resource booklet, designed for use with the "Building Air Quality Guide," provides building owners and managers with an…

  9. Building functional cities.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J Vernon; Venables, Anthony J; Regan, Tanner; Samsonov, Ilia

    2016-05-20

    The literature views many African cities as dysfunctional with a hodgepodge of land uses and poor "connectivity." One driver of inefficient land uses is construction decisions for highly durable buildings made under weak institutions. In a novel approach, we model the dynamics of urban land use with both formal and slum dwellings and ongoing urban redevelopment to higher building heights in the formal sector as a city grows. We analyze the evolution of Nairobi using a unique high-spatial resolution data set. The analysis suggests insufficient building volume through most of the city and large slum areas with low housing volumes near the center, where corrupted institutions deter conversion to formal sector usage.

  10. Seismic instrumentation of buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Çelebi, Mehmet

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on how and why we deploy seismic instruments in and around building structures. The recorded response data from buildings and other instrumented structures can be and are being primarily used to facilitate necessary studies to improve building codes and therefore reduce losses of life and property during damaging earthquakes. Other uses of such data can be in emergency response situations in large urban environments. The report discusses typical instrumentation schemes, existing instrumentation programs, the steps generally followed in instrumenting a structure, selection and type of instruments, installation and maintenance requirements and data retrieval and processing issues. In addition, a summary section on how recorded response data have been utilized is included. The benefits from instrumentation of structural systems are discussed.

  11. Building brains for bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Rodney Allen; Stein, Lynn Andrea

    1994-01-01

    We describe a project to capitalize on newly available levels of computational resources in order to understand human cognition. We will build an integrated physical system including vision, sound input and output, and dextrous manipulation, all controlled by a continuously operating large scale parallel MIMD computer. The resulting system will learn to 'think' by building on its bodily experiences to accomplish progressively more abstract tasks. Past experience suggests that in attempting to build such an integrated system we will have to fundamentally change the way artificial intelligence, cognitive science, linguistics, and philosophy think about the organization of intelligence. We expect to be able to better reconcile the theories that will be developed with current work in neuroscience.

  12. RESRAD-BUILD verification.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Biwer, B. M.; Klett, T.

    2002-01-31

    The results generated by the RESRAD-BUILD code (version 3.0) were verified with hand or spreadsheet calculations using equations given in the RESRAD-BUILD manual for different pathways. For verification purposes, different radionuclides--H-3, C-14, Na-22, Al-26, Cl-36, Mn-54, Co-60, Au-195, Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, and U-238--were chosen to test all pathways and models. Tritium, Ra-226, and Th-228 were chosen because of the special tritium and radon models in the RESRAD-BUILD code. Other radionuclides were selected to represent a spectrum of radiation types and energies. Verification of the RESRAD-BUILD code was conducted with an initial check of all the input parameters for correctness against their original source documents. Verification of the calculations was performed external to the RESRAD-BUILD code with Microsoft{reg_sign} Excel to verify all the major portions of the code. In some cases, RESRAD-BUILD results were compared with those of external codes, such as MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle) and RESRAD. The verification was conducted on a step-by-step basis and used different test cases as templates. The following types of calculations were investigated: (1) source injection rate, (2) air concentration in the room, (3) air particulate deposition, (4) radon pathway model, (5) tritium model for volume source, (6) external exposure model, (7) different pathway doses, and (8) time dependence of dose. Some minor errors were identified in version 3.0; these errors have been corrected in later versions of the code. Some possible improvements in the code were also identified.

  13. Re-Building Greensburg

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, Steven; Wallach, Daniel; Peterson, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Greensburg, KS - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rally residents behind the idea of "greening" Greensburg, inspiring the construction of numerous energy-efficient buildings, some of which generate their own renewable power with solar panels and wind turbines. Many of the town's government buildings use cutting edge energy-saving technologies, saving the local taxpayers' money. Greensburg has demonstrated to the world that any city can reach its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals today using widely available technologies.

  14. Re-Building Greensburg

    ScienceCinema

    Hewitt, Steven; Wallach, Daniel; Peterson, Stephanie

    2016-07-12

    Greensburg, KS - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rally residents behind the idea of "greening" Greensburg, inspiring the construction of numerous energy-efficient buildings, some of which generate their own renewable power with solar panels and wind turbines. Many of the town's government buildings use cutting edge energy-saving technologies, saving the local taxpayers' money. Greensburg has demonstrated to the world that any city can reach its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals today using widely available technologies.

  15. Marine Science Building Dedicated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Officials cut the ribbon during dedication ceremonies of the George A. Knauer Marine Science Building on Oct. 17 at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC). The $2.75 million facility, the first building at the test site funded by the state of Mississippi, houses six science labs, classrooms and office space for 40 faculty and staff. Pictured are, from left, Rear Adm. Thomas Donaldson, commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; SSC Assistant Director David Throckmorton; Dr. George A. Knauer, founder of the Center of Marine Science at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM); Lt. Gov. Amy Tuck; and USM President Dr. Shelby Thames.

  16. Building with straw bales

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, B.; Steen, A.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the outgrowth of The Canelo Project, one of the first straw bale workshops in southeastern Arizona. At the time it started the only straw bale buildings were a few scattered historic structures, mostly in Nebraska, and a handful of simple structures built by modern straw bale pioneers.not the new straw bale structures exceeds 400. Straw bale structures are solid, rugged, inexpensive, energy efficient, and significantly more fireproof than conventional lumber. How structures are build, handling moisture problems and questions, bale sizes and characteristics, bale wall options (load bearing, in-fill systems, hybrid options, wall finishes) are all described in detail.

  17. Modeling Best Practice through Online Learning: Building Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerniglia, Ellen G.

    2011-01-01

    Students may fear that they will feel unsupported and isolated when engaged in online learning. They don't know how they will be able to build relationships with their teacher and classmates solely based on written words, without facial expressions, tone of voice, and other nonverbal communication cues. Traditionally, online learning required…

  18. Building a Straw Bridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Science, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This project is for a team of students (groups of two or three are ideal) to design and construct a model of a single-span bridge, using plastic drinking straws as the building material. All steps of the design, construction, testing and critiquing stages should be recorded by students in a journal. Students may like to include labelled diagrams,…

  19. Building a Better CTO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Geoffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    This article features the new Framework of Essential Skills of the K-12 CTO of the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN). This latest, version 2.0 iteration of the skills framework builds upon work the organization did earlier this decade. This time CoSN, a professional association for district technology leaders, reached out to a variety of…

  20. Plastics in Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeist, Irving, Ed.

    The evaluation and use of plastics in the construction industry are explained. The contributors offer extensive, timely, and thoroughly researched data on the chemistry, properties, functions, engineering behavior, and specific applications of plastics to building requirements. The major subjects discussed in depth are--(1) the role of plastics in…

  1. Building Alliances Series: Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Public-private partnerships done right are a powerful tool for development, providing enduring solutions to some of the greatest challenges. To help familiarize readers with the art of alliance building, the Global Development Alliance (GDA) office has created a series of practical guides that highlight proven practices in partnerships,…

  2. Building Migratory Bridges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Michael; Doss, Laurie K.

    2007-01-01

    The Building Migratory Bridges (BOMB) program--a collaboration between the Marvel wood School and Audubon Sharon in Connecticut and Conservation Research Education Action (CR EA), a U.S. not-for-profit in Panama--uses nontropical migratory bird research in the United States and Panama to demonstrate how negative environmental impacts in one…

  3. Bibliography on School Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomani, M. S.; Srivastava, R. D.

    This bibliography comprises 153 references with abstracts on school building publications published during the period of 1960-1966. The references have been grouped under seven headings--(1) air conditioning and ventilation, (2) bibliography and research reports, (3) construction systems, (4) design development, (5) furniture, (6) lighting, and…

  4. Building Camaraderie from Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Educational institutions have adopted athletics programs to promote character building. Sports help people feel comfortable in their skins and provide unique opportunities to develop qualities such as cooperation, perseverance, and the ability to cope with fear. But the arena can be a hothouse for more primal feelings that emerge in competition.…

  5. Building Model Motorcars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Ken

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project where students build a motorized car that can perform well in two distinctly different competitions: traveling 20 meters in the shortest time and pulling a 500-gram mass the farthest distance in 20 seconds. Enables students to apply physics principles to a real problem and to discover the importance of teamwork on large…

  6. Building with Sand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  7. LARGE BUILDING HVAC SIMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the monitoring and collection of data relating to indoor pressures and radon concentrations under several test conditions in a large school building in Bartow, Florida. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) used an integrated computational software, FSEC 3.0...

  8. Building Community in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sergiovanni, Thomas J.

    This book provides a view of community that educators can use to define and build community in their schools. Chapter 1 critiques the traditional view of schools as formal organizations and offers a theory of community as an alternative. Chapter 2 describes a pattern of relationships characteristic of communities, which can be applied to…

  9. Building Codes and Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, John L.

    The hazard of fire is of great concern to libraries due to combustible books and new plastics used in construction and interiors. Building codes and standards can offer architects and planners guidelines to follow but these standards should be closely monitored, updated, and researched for fire prevention. (DS)

  10. Build a City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Jean A.

    1985-01-01

    A week-long build-a-city project is described which lets students become familiar with the history of the five Platonic solids (tetrahedron, octahedron, hexahedron, isosahedron, dodecahedron) and then use these solids to create a city using posterboard and construction paper. (MNS)

  11. Building the Best Auditorium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Building a quality auditorium has never come at a cheap price. In today's economy, a $750,000 minimum price tag just for sound, lighting, stage rigging and seats can be exorbitant. However, schools that have built new auditoriums or upgraded existing ones in the past decade say the investment is worth every penny. This article discusses the…

  12. Financing medical office buildings.

    PubMed

    Blake, J W

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses financing medical office buildings. In particular, financing and ownership options from a not-for-profit health care system perspective are reviewed, including use of tax-exempt debt, taxable debt, limited partnerships, sale, and real estate investment trusts (REITs).

  13. To Build a Boat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonniwell, Tom; Coburn, Doug; McCarter, William S.

    1998-01-01

    A Virginia high school's Legacy program began six years ago when the Nature Conservancy, the Eastern Shore Historical Society, and Northampton County Schools joined forces to create an educational program to expose students to the area's ecological and historical richness. A boat-building project helped revitalize the hands-on learning project,…

  14. Sound Insulation in Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gösele, K.; Schröder, E.

    Sound insulation between the different rooms inside a building or to the outside is a very complex problem. First, the airborne sound insulation of ceilings, walls, doors and windows is important. Second, a sufficient structure-borne sound insulation, also called impact sound insulation, for the ceilings, has to be provided especially. Finally, the service equipment should be sufficiently quiet.

  15. Building the Mysterious Bankhide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurgs, Don W.

    1983-01-01

    Building bankhides (areas for trout to rest, hide from predators, and wait for their next meal) is one project of the Bettendorf (Iowa) Community School District's K-12 field science programs. Discusses sixth graders involvement and related activities in the bankhide project. (JN)

  16. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  17. Building Automation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    A number of different automation systems for use in monitoring and controlling building equipment are described in this brochure. The system functions include--(1) collection of information, (2) processing and display of data at a central panel, and (3) taking corrective action by sounding alarms, making adjustments, or automatically starting and…

  18. Building Relationships with Reporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwai, Sabrina

    2008-01-01

    Each story that is written about career and technical education (CTE) increases knowledge and support with local government, school officials and the community. The first step in improving publicity for one's program is to build a relationship with local reporters covering education. In this article, the author discusses how important it is to…

  19. Building Satellites is Easier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Phyllis Nimmo

    1996-01-01

    'Building Satellites' is a story about Jim Marsh's recovery from a severe head injury told by his wife Phyllis from the moment she learned of its happening, through the ups and downs of a lengthy rehabilitation, until his return to work and daily living. It continues on, however, and narrates his battle with the more insidious Grave's disease. Told in the first person, 'Building Satellites' vividly portrays Phyllis's thoughts and feelings throughout this experience with scrupulous honestly. This is a story worth reading for many reasons. First of all, Jim was an accomplished scientist, respected by his colleagues both in this country and abroad. Secondly, it narrates the many stages of his recovery from head injury with detailed readable accuracy; it informs us as well as inspires. Finally, 'Building Satellites" also tells us the story of Phyllis Marsh's remarkable creative response to this crisis. It narrates her personal experiences as she progresses through the strange and somewhat bizarre world of medicine and rehabilitation, guided by a few basic beliefs, which she learned as a child in Iowa, that provided her with the strength to endure. 'Building Satellites' seems to reaffirm our unconscious, but settled conviction, that when confornted overnight with adversity, we are somehow given the means for coping, supported by our basic beliefs, strengthened by family and friends, and eventually learning to accept any outcome.

  20. Building a Twig Phylogeny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    In this classroom activity, students build a phylogeny for woody plant species based on the morphology of their twigs. Using any available twigs, students can practice the process of cladistics to test evolutionary hypotheses for real organisms. They identify homologous characters, determine polarity through outgroup comparison, and construct a…

  1. Wayside Teaching: Building Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sara Davis

    2011-01-01

    Educators can implement strategies to build positive relationships with students that will help them become more autonomous and less anonymous in school. These strategies allow young adolescents to become more self aware, to take greater responsibility for their actions, to reflect on their own lives and actions, and to have choices regarding…

  2. Library Building and Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David J.; Gordon, Heather; Caddy, Julie; Kahlert, Maureen; Johnson, Carolyn; Holdstock, Fiona

    1997-01-01

    More frequently, community connections are being expressed in library design briefs and reflected in the completed buildings. This collection of brief articles discusses community involvement in library design and services and describes library construction projects in Australia and Malaysia. Also, discusses community art programs, integrating…

  3. Energy efficient building design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The fundamental concepts of the building design process, energy codes and standards, and energy budgets are introduced. These tools were combined into Energy Design Guidelines and design contract requirements. The Guidelines were repackaged for a national audience and a videotape for selling the concept to government executives. An effort to test transfer of the Guidelines to outside agencies is described.

  4. Building Successful Cleaning Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to build a successful cleaning process in order to most effectively maintain school facilities, explaining that the cleaning processes used plays a critical role in productivity. Focuses on: developing a standardized system; making sure that employees have the right tools for the work they perform; training employees; tracking and…

  5. Building Bridges to China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasta, Stephanie; Scott, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Describes a theme cycle called "Building Bridges to China" developed for third grade students that focuses on the similarities between the lives of children and families in China and the United States. Explains that the theme cycle addresses the National Geography Standards and three of the National Council for the Social Studies…

  6. Fire Protection for Buildings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Jane

    1972-01-01

    Reviews attack on fire safety in high rise buildings made by a group of experts representing the iron and steel industry at a recent conference. According to one expert, fire problems are people oriented, which calls for emphasis on fire prevention rather than reliance on fire suppression and for fire pretection to be built into a structure.…

  7. Seismic isolation systems with distinct multiple frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, Ralph W.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for isolating a building or other structure from smic vibratory motion which provides increased assurance that large horizontal motion of the structure will not occur than is provided by other isolation systems. Increased assurance that large horizontal motion will not occur is achieved by providing for change of the natural frequency of the support and structure system in response to displacement of the structure beyond a predetermined value. The natural frequency of the support and structure system may be achieved by providing for engaging and disengaging of the structure and some supporting members in response to motion of the supported structure.

  8. Asbestos exposure in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Gaensler, E.A. )

    1992-06-01

    Asbestos-related diseases are dose-related. Among these, asbestosis has occurred only with the heavy exposures of the past, is a disappearing disease, and is of no concern with the very small exposures from building occupancy. A possibly increased incidence of lung cancer has been included in risk analysis, but probably is also related to high exposure in that both epidemiologic and experimental data suggest a link between the process of alveolar inflammation and fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis. The major concern has been mesothelioma in that it has occurred with much lower household and neighborhood exposure. Additionally, anxiety concerning buildings with ACM has been heightened by finding of friable asbestos in about 20% of public buildings, discovery of environmental asbestos fibers and asbestos bodies in autopsies, and demonstration of a linear relationship between exposure and lung cancer risk in occupational groups, inviting extrapolation to a much lower dose. Legislative and regulatory mandates, promotional activities of abatement companies, adverse court decisions placing the onus of repairs on asbestos manufacturers, and a pandemic of mediagenic disease' all have contributed to panic among building owners, school boards, insurers, and others. In that there is neither clinical nor epidemiologic support for asbestos-related disease from building occupancy, risk estimates have been based on extrapolation from past experience with generally high-dose occupational exposure. However, only a few epidemiologic studies have contained quantitative estimates of exposure, and these have been measured in terms of all particles, with conversion to asbestos fibers uncertain and the fiber type and dimension largely unknown.

  9. Deactivation of Building 7602

    SciTech Connect

    Yook, H.R.; Barnett, J.R.; Collins, T.L.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored research and development programs in Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1984. This work focused on development of advanced technology for processing nuclear fuels. Building 7602 was used for engineering-scale tests using depleted and natural uranium to simulate the nuclear fuel. In April 1994 the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sent supplemental FY 1994 guidance to ORNL stating that in FY 1995 and beyond, Building 7602 is considered surplus to NE programs and missions and shall be shut down (deactivated) and maintained in a radiologically and industrially safe condition with minimal surveillance and maintenance (S&M). DOE-NE subsequently provided FY 1995 funding to support the deactivation activities. Deactivation of Building 7602 was initiated on October 1, 1994. The principal activity during the first quarter of FY 1995 was removal of process materials (chemicals and uranium) from the systems. The process systems were operated to achieve chemical solution concentrations needed for reuse or disposal of the solutions prior to removal of the materials from the systems. During this phase of deactivation the process materials processed and removed were: (1) Uranyl nitrate solution 30,178 L containing 4490 kg of uranium; (2) Nitric acid (neutralized) 9850 L containing less than 0.013 kg of uranium; (3) Organic solution 3346 L containing 265 kg of uranium; (4) Uranium oxide powder 95 kg; and (5) Miscellaneous chemicals. At the end of December 1994, the process systems and control systems were shut down and deactivated. Disposition of the process materials removed from the process systems in Building 7602 proved to be the most difficult part of the deactivation. An operational stand down and funding reductions at Y-12 prevented planned conversion of the uranyl nitrate solution to depleted uranium oxide powder. This led to disposal of the uranyl nitrate solution as waste.

  10. Compact optical isolator.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, F J

    1971-10-01

    This paper describes a compact Faraday rotation isolator using terbium aluminum garnet (TAG) as the Faraday rotation material and small high field permanent magnets made of copper-rare earth alloys. The nominal isolation is 26 dB with a 0.4-dB forward loss. The present isolator can be adjusted to provide effective isolation from 4880 A to 5145 A. Details of the design, fabrication, and performance of the isolator are presented.

  11. THE IMPACT OF BUILDING TOPOGRAPHY ON AEROSOL DISPERSION IN AN URBAN STREET CANYON

    EPA Science Inventory

    This extended abstract describes numerical simulations of the flow through a building array which includes an isolated tall tower. The work seeks to explore the impact of a single tall building on the circulation and channeling of aerosolized traffic emissions within a series of...

  12. VIEW NORTHEAST, LEFT BUILDING 40 WIRE WAREHOUSE (1915) RIGHT BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW NORTHEAST, LEFT BUILDING 40 WIRE WAREHOUSE (1915) RIGHT BUILDING 42 ROPE SHOP (1910) - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  13. 69. INTERIOR, BUILDING 272 (PLUTONIUM STORAGE BUILDING) LOOKING SOUTHWEST THROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR, BUILDING 272 (PLUTONIUM STORAGE BUILDING) LOOKING SOUTHWEST THROUGH DOOR-WAY INTO PLUTONIUM STORAGE AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  14. 71. INTERIOR, BUILDING 272 (PLUTONIUM STORAGE BUILDING) LOOKING NORTHEAST INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. INTERIOR, BUILDING 272 (PLUTONIUM STORAGE BUILDING) LOOKING NORTHEAST INTO PLUTONIUM STORAGE ROOM SHOWING CUBICLES FOR STORAGE. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  15. 20. BUILDING I, BAYS 3, 2 AND 1, AND BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. BUILDING I, BAYS 3, 2 AND 1, AND BUILDING K, VIEW SOUTHEAST, NORTHWEST ELEVATIONS - Public Service Railway Company, Newton Avenue Car Shops, Bounded by Tenth, Mount Ephraim, Border & Newton Avenue, Camden, Camden County, NJ

  16. 11. BEACH TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BEACH TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS Drawing No. 103-07 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

  17. Detail of interface between building 85 on right and building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of interface between building 85 on right and building 87 on left; camera facing northwest - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Boiler Shop, Waterfront Avenue, west side between A Street & Third Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  18. Detail of interface between building 85 on right and building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of interface between building 85 on right and building 87 on left; camera facing northwest - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Machine Shop, Waterfront Avenue, west side between A Street & Third Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  19. 51. BUILDING NO. 533, SOLVENT RECOVERY BUILDING, LOOKING WEST AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. BUILDING NO. 533, SOLVENT RECOVERY BUILDING, LOOKING WEST AT SOUTHEAST (REAR) ELEVATION. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  20. Interior view showing interface between building 271 and with building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view showing interface between building 271 and with building 87 in background; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Mechanics Shop, Waterfront Avenue, west side between A Street & Third Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  1. Contextual view of building showing relation to building 91 at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of building showing relation to building 91 at right; camera facing southwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Mechanics Shop, Waterfront Avenue, west side between A Street & Third Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  2. View of building 11070, with building 11050 in the background ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of building 11070, with building 11050 in the background (left side). Looking northeast. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Maintenance Shop, C Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  3. View showing base of Building 70021 with Building 70022 in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View showing base of Building 70021 with Building 70022 in background, facing southeast - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, Randsburg Wash Facility Target Test Towers, Tower Road, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  4. View of hoist southeast of Building 70022. facing northwest. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of hoist southeast of Building 70022. facing northwest. Building 70022 is in background - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, Randsburg Wash Facility Target Test Towers, Tower Road, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  5. View of building 11050. With view of building 11070 (See ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of building 11050. With view of building 11070 (See HABS No. CA 2774-B) in background. Looking southwest. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Machine Shop, C Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  6. Detail view of base of Building 70021, showing Building 70022 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of base of Building 70021, showing Building 70022 (background), facing southeast - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, Randsburg Wash Facility Target Test Towers, Tower Road, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  7. BUILDINGS #44 AND #45, "BEEHIVE" BARRACKS AT CENTER, BUILDING #44 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BUILDINGS #44 AND #45, "BEEHIVE" BARRACKS AT CENTER, BUILDING #44 AT RIGHT LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST FROM INTERSECTION OF KEARNEY & McCLELLAN - Fort Leavenworth, Metropolitan Avenue & Seventh Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  8. 37. Threequarter view of building 161, fallout shelter, showing building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Three-quarter view of building 161, fallout shelter, showing building 104, mess hall in background, looking southeast - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  9. 1. View of Building 802 from the parking lot, Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of Building 802 from the parking lot, Building 800 in the background, facing east. - Naval Air Station Fallon, 100-man Fallout Shelter, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  10. Contextual view showing building 50 east elevation, with building 46 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view showing building 50 east elevation, with building 46 on right; camera facing southwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Rubber Shop, California Avenue, west side across from Dry Dock 1 near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  11. Contextual view building 50 on right with building 52 on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view building 50 on right with building 52 on left; camera facing northwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Rubber Shop, California Avenue, west side across from Dry Dock 1 near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  12. New England Buildings Score in National Energy Star Building Competition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    More than 5,500 individual buildings across the United States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico competed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's fifth-annual ENERGY STAR Battle of the Buildings Competition: Team Challenge.

  13. Layout of barracks, Building No. 909 (right) and Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Layout of barracks, Building No. 909 (right) and Building No. 910 (left), looking 282 degrees west - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. Overview of buildings from empty lot north of Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of buildings from empty lot north of Building No. 901, looking 238 degrees west-southwest - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Rows of barrack, Building No. 909 (left) and Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rows of barrack, Building No. 909 (left) and Building No. 910 (right), looking 82 degrees east - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. Row of barracks, Building No. 902 (right) and Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Row of barracks, Building No. 902 (right) and Building No. 903 (left), looking 277 degrees west - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. Contextual view of building, with building #11 in right foreground. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of building, with building #11 in right foreground. Camera facing east - Naval Supply Center, Broadway Complex, Administration Storehouse, 911 West Broadway, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  18. Building 932, oblique view to northwest, 90 mm lens. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 932, oblique view to northwest, 90 mm lens. Building 933-935 at extreme left. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Plant 5, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  19. 18. Walkway between maintenance building and office building along south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Walkway between maintenance building and office building along south side of main plant looking east - Skinner Meat Packing Plant, Main Plant, 6006 South Twenty-seventh Street, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  20. Smokestack with incinerator building in background and unnumbered building lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Smokestack with incinerator building in background and unnumbered building lower right - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Incinerator Smokestack, 560 feet east-northeast of intersection of East Bushnell Avenue, & South Van Valzah Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. 1. BUILDING NO. 210, ORDNANCE FACILITY (TIME FUZE LOADING BUILDING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUILDING NO. 210, ORDNANCE FACILITY (TIME FUZE LOADING BUILDING), LOOKING EAST AT SOUTHWEST CORNER. - Picatinny Arsenal, 200 Area, Shell Component Loading, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  2. 2. BUILDING NO. 210, ORDNANCE FACILITY (TIME FUZE LOADING BUILDING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. BUILDING NO. 210, ORDNANCE FACILITY (TIME FUZE LOADING BUILDING), DETAIL VIEW SHOWING FRONT BAY. - Picatinny Arsenal, 200 Area, Shell Component Loading, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  3. 3. BUILDING NO. 210, ORDNANCE FACILITY (TIME FUZE LOADING BUILDING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BUILDING NO. 210, ORDNANCE FACILITY (TIME FUZE LOADING BUILDING), DETAIL VIEW SHOWING BACK SIDE. - Picatinny Arsenal, 200 Area, Shell Component Loading, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  4. 63. BUILDING NO. 1301, ORDNANCE FACILITY (MORTAR POWDER BUILDING), INTERIOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. BUILDING NO. 1301, ORDNANCE FACILITY (MORTAR POWDER BUILDING), INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST DOWN SCREENED WALKWAY ON NORTHWEST SIDE. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  5. 56. BUILDING NO. 333, TURBINE BUILDING (1905), VIEW LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. BUILDING NO. 333, TURBINE BUILDING (1905), VIEW LOOKING NORTH. NOTE GRANITE DATE STONE AND SEMICIRCULAR WINDOW LOCATED OVER PILASTER. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  6. 3. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDINGS 208 AND 214 FROM BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUILDINGS 208 AND 214 FROM BUILDING 204, LOOKING WEST-SOUTHWEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Bachelor Airmen Quarters, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  7. 2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT BUILDING 444 UNDER CONSTRUCTION. BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT BUILDING 444 UNDER CONSTRUCTION. BUILDING 444 WAS THE PRIMARY NON-PLUTONIUM MANUFACTURING FACILITY AT THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT. MANUFACTURING PROCESSES COMPLETED IN THIS BUILDING WERE USED TO FABRICATE WEAPONS COMPONENTS AND ASSEMBLIES FOR A VARIETY OF MATERIALS, INCLUDING DEPLETED URANIUM, BERYLLIUM, STAINLESS STEEL, ALUMINUM, AND VANADIUM. (4/25/52) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 2. Overview of Buildings 2015, 2133 and 2009, with Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Overview of Buildings 2015, 2133 and 2009, with Building 1001 (administration building) in background, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Texas State Highway 202, 4.8 miles east of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & U.S. State Highway 181, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  9. 27. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC MONITOR NO. 4 IN OPERATION AT 2002 ZULU, OCTOBER 26, 1999 CAPE COD, AS PAVE PAWS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  10. 11. BUILDING NO. 18 (ENGINEERING BUILDING), CENTER, IN RELATION TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BUILDING NO. 18 (ENGINEERING BUILDING), CENTER, IN RELATION TO BUILDING NO. 19 (BENDING SHOP AND OVEN) AT FAR LEFT, AND TO THE WET BASIN AT FAR RIGHT. VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHWEST. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  11. 26. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC IN OPERATION AT 1945 ZULU TIME, 26 OCTOBER, 1999. "SPACE TRACK BOARD" DATA SHOWING ITEMS #16609 MIR (RUSSIA) AND #25544 ISS (INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION) BEING TRACKED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. 21. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - LOOKING AT DISC STORAGE SYSTEMS A AND B (A OR B ARE REDUNDANT SYSTEMS), ONE MAINFRAME COMPUTER ON LINE, ONE ON STANDBY WITH STORAGE TAPE, ONE ON STANDBY WITHOUT TAPE INSTALLED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  13. 20. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING IN COMPUTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - IN COMPUTER ROOM LOOKING AT "CONSOLIDATED MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS CENTER" JOB AREA AND OPERATION WORK CENTER. TASKS INCLUDE RADAR MAINTENANCE, COMPUTER MAINTENANCE, CYBER COMPUTER MAINTENANCE AND RELATED ACTIVITIES. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  14. From a balcony of building 500, looking east towards building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    From a balcony of building 500, looking east towards building 504, straight ahead and building 505 to its left. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. From a balcony of building 500 looking northeast at building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    From a balcony of building 500 looking northeast at building 505 beyond to building 600. The water tower is at the upper left edge of the photograph. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. 19. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING AIR POLICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - AIR POLICE SITE SECURITY OFFICE WITH "SITE PERIMETER STATUS PANEL" AND REAL TIME VIDEO DISPLAY OUTPUT FROM VIDEO CAMERA SYSTEM AT SECURITY FENCE LOCATIONS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  17. 25. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC IN OPERATION AT 1930 ZULU TIME, 26 OCTOBER, 1999. MWOC SCREEN ALSO SHOWS RADAR "FACE A" AND "FACE B" ACTIVE STATUS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  18. 14. SOUTH PLANT MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AND WAREHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. SOUTH PLANT MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AND WAREHOUSE (BUILDING 729) FROM CHEMICAL STORAGE TANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  19. 3. View of Building 802 from the Guard Shack (Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Building 802 from the Guard Shack (Building 801), Buildings 800 and 804 beside, facing north. - Naval Air Station Fallon, 100-man Fallout Shelter, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  20. 45. BUILDING NO. 462, CHEMISTRY LAB (FORMERLY TRACER LOADING BUILDING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. BUILDING NO. 462, CHEMISTRY LAB (FORMERLY TRACER LOADING BUILDING), VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT WEST SIDE. BUILDING NO. 462-B, GENERAL PURPOSE MAGAZINE, AT LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ