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Sample records for lectin null alleles

  1. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  3. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set.

  4. Estimating relatedness and relationships using microsatellite loci with null alleles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A P; Creel, S; Kalinowski, S T

    2006-11-01

    Relatedness is often estimated from microsatellite genotypes that include null alleles. When null alleles are present, observed genotypes represent one of several possible true genotypes. If null alleles are detected, but analyses do not adjust for their presence (ie, observed genotypes are treated as true genotypes), then estimates of relatedness and relationship can be incorrect. The number of loci available in many wildlife studies is limited, and loci with null alleles are commonly a large proportion of data that cannot be discarded without substantial loss of power. To resolve this problem, we present a new approach for estimating relatedness and relationships from data sets that include null alleles. Once it is recognized that the probability of the observed genotypes is dependent on the probabilities of a limited number of possible true genotypes, the required adjustments are straightforward. The concept can be applied to any existing estimators of relatedness and relationships. We review established maximum likelihood estimators and apply the correction in that setting. In an application of the corrected method to data from striped hyenas, we demonstrate that correcting for the presence of null alleles affect results substantially. Finally, we use simulated data to confirm that this method works better than two common approaches, namely ignoring the presence of null alleles or discarding affected loci.

  5. Microsatellite null alleles and estimation of population differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Marie-Pierre; Estoup, Arnaud

    2007-03-01

    Microsatellite null alleles are commonly encountered in population genetics studies, yet little is known about their impact on the estimation of population differentiation. Computer simulations based on the coalescent were used to investigate the evolutionary dynamics of null alleles, their impact on F(ST) and genetic distances, and the efficiency of estimators of null allele frequency. Further, we explored how the existing method for correcting genotype data for null alleles performed in estimating F(ST) and genetic distances, and we compared this method with a new method proposed here (for F(ST) only). Null alleles were likely to be encountered in populations with a large effective size, with an unusually high mutation rate in the flanking regions, and that have diverged from the population from which the cloned allele state was drawn and the primers designed. When populations were significantly differentiated, F(ST) and genetic distances were overestimated in the presence of null alleles. Frequency of null alleles was estimated precisely with the algorithm presented in Dempster et al. (1977). The conventional method for correcting genotype data for null alleles did not provide an accurate estimate of F(ST) and genetic distances. However, the use of the genetic distance of Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards (1967) corrected by the conventional method gave better estimates than those obtained without correction. F(ST) estimation from corrected genotype frequencies performed well when restricted to visible allele sizes. Both the proposed method and the traditional correction method have been implemented in a program that is available free of charge at http://www.montpellier.inra.fr/URLB/. We used 2 published microsatellite data sets based on original and redesigned pairs of primers to empirically confirm our simulation results.

  6. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W.; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set. PMID:26500259

  7. Generation of a Conditional Null Allele of Jumonji

    PubMed Central

    Mysliwiec, Matthew R.; Chen, Junqin; Powers, Patricia A.; Bartley, Christopher R.; Schneider, Michael D.; Lee, Youngsook

    2007-01-01

    Summary: The jumonji (jmj) gene plays important roles in multiple organ development in mouse, including cardiovascular development. Since JMJ is expressed widely during mouse development, it is essential that conditional knockout approaches be employed to ablate JMJ in a tissue-specific manner to identify the cell lineage specific roles of JMJ. In this report, we describe the establishment of a jmj conditional null allele in mice by generating a loxP-flanked (floxed) jmj allele, which allows the in vivo ablation of jmj via Cre recombinase-mediated deletion. Gene targeting was used to introduce loxP sites flanking exon 3 of the jmj allele to mouse embryonic stem cells. Our results indicate that the jmj floxed allele converts to a null allele in a heart-specific manner when embryos homozygous for the floxed jmj allele and carrying the α-myosin heavy chain promoter-Cre transgene were analyzed by Southern and Northern blot analyses. Therefore, this mouse line harboring the conditional jmj null allele will provide a valuable tool for deciphering the tissue and cell lineage specific roles of JMJ. PMID:16900512

  8. Reliability assessment of null allele detection: inconsistencies between and within different methods.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, M J; Pilot, M; Kruczyk, M; Żmihorski, M; Umer, H M; Gliwicz, J

    2014-03-01

    Microsatellite loci are widely used in population genetic studies, but the presence of null alleles may lead to biased results. Here, we assessed five methods that indirectly detect null alleles and found large inconsistencies among them. Our analysis was based on 20 microsatellite loci genotyped in a natural population of Microtus oeconomus sampled during 8 years, together with 1200 simulated populations without null alleles, but experiencing bottlenecks of varying duration and intensity, and 120 simulated populations with known null alleles. In the natural population, 29% of positive results were consistent between the methods in pairwise comparisons, and in the simulated data set, this proportion was 14%. The positive results were also inconsistent between different years in the natural population. In the null-allele-free simulated data set, the number of false positives increased with increased bottleneck intensity and duration. We also found a low concordance in null allele detection between the original simulated populations and their 20% random subsets. In the populations simulated to include null alleles, between 22% and 42% of true null alleles remained undetected, which highlighted that detection errors are not restricted to false positives. None of the evaluated methods clearly outperformed the others when both false-positive and false-negative rates were considered. Accepting only the positive results consistent between at least two methods should considerably reduce the false-positive rate, but this approach may increase the false-negative rate. Our study demonstrates the need for novel null allele detection methods that could be reliably applied to natural populations.

  9. 'True' null allele detection in microsatellite loci: a comparison of methods, assessment of difficulties and survey of possible improvements.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, M J; Bornelöv, S; Kruczyk, M; Baltzer, N; Komorowski, J

    2015-05-01

    Null alleles are alleles that for various reasons fail to amplify in a PCR assay. The presence of null alleles in microsatellite data is known to bias the genetic parameter estimates. Thus, efficient detection of null alleles is crucial, but the methods available for indirect null allele detection return inconsistent results. Here, our aim was to compare different methods for null allele detection, to explain their respective performance and to provide improvements. We applied several approaches to identify the 'true' null alleles based on the predictions made by five different methods, used either individually or in combination. First, we introduced simulated 'true' null alleles into 240 population data sets and applied the methods to measure their success in detecting the simulated null alleles. The single best-performing method was ML-NullFreq_frequency. Furthermore, we applied different noise reduction approaches to improve the results. For instance, by combining the results of several methods, we obtained more reliable results than using a single one. Rule-based classification was applied to identify population properties linked to the false discovery rate. Rules obtained from the classifier described which population genetic estimates and loci characteristics were linked to the success of each method. We have shown that by simulating 'true' null alleles into a population data set, we may define a null allele frequency threshold, related to a desired true or false discovery rate. Moreover, using such simulated data sets, the expected null allele homozygote frequency may be estimated independently of the equilibrium state of the population.

  10. A novel JK null allele associated with typing discrepancies among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Katrina L; Posadas, Jeff B; Moulds, Joann M; Gaur, Lakshmi K

    2013-01-01

    The Jknun (Jk-3) phenotype, attributable to null or silenced alleles, has predominantly been found in persons of Polynesian descent. With the increased use of molecular genotyping, many new silencing mutations have been identified in persons of other ethnic backgrounds. To date, only two JK null alleles have been reported in African Americans, JK*01N.04 and JK*OlN.OS.A comparative study was undertaken to determine whether JK mutations were present in the regional African American population. Results of donor genotyping were compared with previously recorded results of serologic tests, and discrepant results were investigated. Although the two previously identified polymorphisms were not detected in the discrepant samples, a novel allele (191G>A) was identified and was assigned the ISBT number JK*02N.09. This study illustrates a limitation of using single-nucleotide polymorphisms for prediction of blood group antigens.

  11. JK null alleles identified from Japanese individuals with Jk(a−b−) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Onodera, T; Sasaki, K; Tsuneyama, H; Isa, K; Ogasawara, K; Satake, M; Tadokoro, K; Uchikawa, M

    2014-05-01

    The Kidd blood group system consists of three common phenotypes: Jk(a+b−), Jk(a−b+) and Jk(a+b+), and one rare phenotype, Jk(a−b−). Jka/Jkb polymorphism is associated with c.838G>A (p.Asp280Asn) in exon 9 of the JK (SLC14A1) gene, and the corresponding alleles are named JK*01 and JK*02. The rare phenotype Jk(a−b−) was first found in a Filipina of Spanish and Chinese ancestry, and to date, several JK null alleles responsible for the Jk(a−b−) phenotype have been reported. We report seven novel JK null alleles, 4 with a JK*01 background and 3 with a JK*02 background, identified from Jk(a−b−) Japanese.

  12. [A search for null alleles at the microsatellite locus of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum)].

    PubMed

    Kordicheva, S Iu; Rubtsova, G A; Shitova, M V; Shaĭkhaev, G O; Afanas'ev, K I; Zhivotovskiĭ, L A

    2010-08-01

    Population studies with the use of microsatellite markers face a problem of null alleles, i.e., the absence of a PCR product, caused by the mutations in the microsatellite flanking regions, which serve as the sites of primer hybridization. In this case, the microsatellite primer associated with such mutation is not amplified, leading to false homozygosity in heterozygous individuals. This, in turn, results in biased population genetic estimates, including the excess of homozygotes at microsatellite loci. Analysis of the population structure of a Pacific salmon species, chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum), revealed the presence of null alleles at the Oke3 microsatellite locus in the population samples, in which an excess of homozygotes was observed. The analysis was performed using different combinations of modified primers chosen to match the Oke3 locus. The use of these primers enabled identification of true heterozygotes among those individuals, which were previously diagnosed as homozygotes with the use of standard primers. Removal of null alleles eliminated the excess homozygotes in the chum salmon samples described. In addition to the exclusion of false homozygosity, the use of modified primers makes it possible to introduce polymorphic primer variants associated with certain microsatellite alleles into population studies.

  13. Incidence and origin of [open quotes]Null[close quotes] alleles in the (AC)n microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, D.F.,; Thompson, A.D.; Shen, Y.; Phillips, H.A.; Richards, R.I.; Mulley, J.C.; Sutherland, G.R. )

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-three (AC)n repeat markers from chromosome 16 were typed in the parents of the 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families. Where parents were informative, the entire families were then typed. There were seven markers in which null alleles were demonstrated, as recognized by the apparent noninheritance, by a sib, of a parental allele. Four of these markers showed a null allele in a single sibship, while in the other three at least 30% of the CEPH sibships were shown to have a null allele segregating. One null allele was sequenced and shown to be the result of an 8-bp deletion occurring within the priming sequence for PCR amplification of the (AC)n repeats. In gene mapping or in application to diagnosis, the presence of a segregating null allele will not corrupt the linkage data but could result in loss of information. In isolated instances a segregating null allele may be interpreted as nonpaternity. The presence of a null allele may generate misleading data when individuals are haplotyped to determine the presence of linkage disequilibrium with a disease gene. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Increased prevalence of mutant null alleles that cause hereditary fructose intolerance in the American population.

    PubMed

    Coffee, Erin M; Yerkes, Laura; Ewen, Elizabeth P; Zee, Tiffany; Tolan, Dean R

    2010-02-01

    Mutations in the aldolase B gene (ALDOB) impairing enzyme activity toward fructose-1-phosphate cleavage cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Diagnosis of the disease is possible by identifying known mutant ALDOB alleles in suspected patients; however, the frequencies of mutant alleles can differ by population. Here, 153 American HFI patients with 268 independent alleles were analyzed to identify the prevalence of seven known HFI-causing alleles (A149P, A174D, N334K, Delta4E4, R59Op, A337V, and L256P) in this population. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from these patients. In the American population, the missense mutations A149P and A174D are the two most common alleles, with frequencies of 44% and 9%, respectively. In addition, the nonsense mutations Delta4E4 and R59Op are the next most common alleles, with each having a frequency of 4%. Together, the frequencies of all seven alleles make up 65% of HFI-causing alleles in this population. Worldwide, these same alleles make up 82% of HFI-causing mutations. This difference indicates that screening for common HFI alleles is more difficult in the American population. Nevertheless, a genetic screen for diagnosing HFI in America can be improved by including all seven alleles studied here. Lastly, identification of HFI patients presenting with classic symptoms and who have homozygous null genotypes indicates that aldolase B is not required for proper development or metabolic maintenance.

  15. Increased prevalence of mutant null alleles that cause hereditary fructose intolerance in the American population

    PubMed Central

    Coffee, Erin M.; Yerkes, Laura; Ewen, Elizabeth P.; Zee, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the aldolase B gene (ALDOB) impairing enzyme activity toward fructose-1-phosphate cleavage cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Diagnosis of the disease is possible by identifying known mutant ALDOB alleles in suspected patients; however, the frequencies of mutant alleles can differ by population. Here, 153 American HFI patients with 268 independent alleles were analyzed to identify the prevalence of seven known HFI-causing alleles (A149P, A174D, N334K, Δ4E4, R59Op, A337V, and L256P) in this population. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from these patients. In the American population, the missense mutations A149P and A174D are the two most common alleles, with frequencies of 44% and 9%, respectively. In addition, the nonsense mutations Δ4E4 and R59Op are the next most common alleles, with each having a frequency of 4%. Together, the frequencies of all seven alleles make up 65% of HFI-causing alleles in this population. Worldwide, these same alleles make up 82% of HFI-causing mutations. This difference indicates that screening for common HFI alleles is more difficult in the American population. Nevertheless, a genetic screen for diagnosing HFI in America can be improved by including all seven alleles studied here. Lastly, identification of HFI patients presenting with classic symptoms and who have homozygous null genotypes indicates that aldolase B is not required for proper development or metabolic maintenance. PMID:20033295

  16. Molecular identification of rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles in Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Manfroi, Silvia; Scarcello, Antonio; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo

    2015-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies on Duffy blood group antigens have identified mutations underlying rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles. FY*Null has a high frequency in Blacks, especially from sub-Saharan Africa, while its frequency is not defined in Caucasians. FY*X allele, associated with Fy(a-b+w) phenotype, has a frequency of 2-3.5% in Caucasian people while it is absent in Blacks. During the project of extensive blood group genotyping in patients affected by hemoglobinopathies, we identified FY*X/FY*Null and FY*A/FY*Null genotypes in a Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia. We speculate on the frequency of FY*X and FY*Null alleles in Caucasian and Black people; further, we focused on the association of FY*X allele with weak Fyb antigen expression on red blood cells and its identification performing high sensitivity serological typing methods or genotyping.

  17. Marker assisted accelerated introgression of null allele of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Rani, Anita; Rawal, Reena; Mourya, Vaishali

    2015-01-01

    Development of kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI)-free soybean is crucial for soy-food industry as the heat inactivation employed to inactivate the anti-nutritional factor in regular soybean incurs extra cost and affects protein solubility. In the presented work, a null allele of KTI from PI542044 was introgressed into cultivar ‘JS97-52’ (recurrent parent) through marker assisted backcrossing. Foreground selection in BC1F2, BC2F2 and BC3F2 was carried out using the null allele-specific marker in tandem with SSR marker Satt228, tightly linked with a trypsin inhibitor Ti locus. Background selection in null allele-carrying plants through 106 polymorphic SSR markers across the genome led to the identification of 9 KTI-free lines exhibiting 98.6% average recurrent parent genome content (RPGC) after three backcrosses, which otherwise had required 5–6 backcrosses through conventional method. Introgressed lines (ILs) were free from KTI and yielded at par with recurrent parent. Reduction of 68.8–83.5% in trypsin inhibitor content (TIC) in ILs compared to the recurrent parent (‘JS97-52’) was attributed to the elimination of KTI. PMID:26719748

  18. Generation of mice with a conditional null Fraser syndrome 1 (Fras1) allele.

    PubMed

    Pitera, Jolanta E; Turmaine, Mark; Woolf, Adrian S; Scambler, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skin lesions and kidney and upper airway malformations. Fraser syndrome 1 (FRAS1) is an extracellular matrix protein, and FRAS1 homozygous mutations occur in some FS individuals. FRAS1 is expressed at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface in embryonic skin and kidney. blebbed mice have a null Fras1 mutation and phenocopy human FS. Like humans with FS, they exhibit a high fetal and neonatal mortality, precluding studies of FRAS1 functions in later life. We generated conditional Fras1 null allele mice. Cre-mediated generalized deletion of this allele generated embryonic skin blisters and renal agenesis characteristic of blebbed mice and human FS. Targeted deletion of Fras1 in kidney podocytes circumvented skin blistering, renal agenesis, and early death. FRAS1 expression was downregulated in maturing glomeruli which then became sclerotic. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that locally produced FRAS1 has roles in glomerular maturation and integrity. This conditional allele will facilitate study of possible role for FRAS1 in other tissues such as the skin.

  19. Null alleles of the aldolase B gene in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Tunçman, G; Cross, N C; Vidailhet, M; Bökesoy, I; Gitzelmann, R; Cox, T M

    1994-06-01

    We report three new mutations in the gene for aldolase B that are associated with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Two nonsense mutations create opal termination codons: R3op (C-->T, Arg3-->ter, exon 2) was found in homozygous form in four affected members of a large consanguineous Turkish pedigree and R59op (C-->T, Arg59-->ter, exon 3) was found on one allele in a woman of Austrian origin known to harbour one copy of the east European mutation, N334K (Asn334-->Lys). The third mutation occurred in a French HFI patient known to be heterozygous for the widespread mutation, A174D (Ala174-->Asp): a single mutation, G-->A, in the consensus acceptor site 3' of intron 6 was found on the remaining allele. These mutations are predicted to abrogate synthesis of functional protein and thus represent null alleles of aldolase B. The mutant alleles can be readily detected in the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) or (for R59op and 3' intron 6) by digestion of amplified genomic fragments with DdeI or A1wNI, respectively, to facilitate direct diagnosis of HFI by molecular analysis of aldolase B genes.

  20. Identification of null alleles and deletions from SNP genotypes for an intercross between domestic and wild chickens.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Lucy; Carlborg, Örjan; Marklund, Stefan; Johansson, Anna M

    2013-08-07

    We analyzed genotypes from ~10K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two families of an F2 intercross between Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn chickens. Possible null alleles were found by patterns of incompatible and missing genotypes. We estimated that 2.6% of SNPs had null alleles compared with 2.3% with genotyping errors and that 40% of SNPs in which a parent and offspring were genotyped as different homozygotes had null alleles. Putative deletions were identified by null alleles at adjacent markers. We found two candidate deletions that were supported by fluorescence intensity data from a 60K SNP chip. One of the candidate deletions was from the Red Junglefowl, and one was present in both the Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn. Both candidate deletions spanned protein-coding regions and were close to a previously detected quantitative trait locus affecting body weight in this population. This study demonstrates that the ~50K SNP genotyping arrays now available for several agricultural species can be used to identify null alleles and deletions in data from large families. We suggest that our approach could be a useful complement to linkage analysis in experimental crosses.

  1. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kasthurinaidu, Senthilkumar Pitchalu; Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra; Dave, Dhvani Kirtikumar; Adroja, Divya Anantray

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs.

  2. Inheritance of 15 microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: segregation and null allele identification for linkage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Guo, Ximing; Zhang, Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Microsatellites were screened in a backcross family of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Fifteen microsatellite loci were distinguishable and polymorphic with 6 types of allele-combinations. Null alleles were detected in 46.7% of loci, accounting for 11.7% of the total alleles. Four loci did not segregate in Mendelian Ratios. Three linkage groups were identified among 7 of the 15 segregating loci. Fluorescence-based automated capillary electrophoresis (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer) that used to detect the microsatellite loci, has been proved a fast, precise, and reliable method in microsatellite genotyping.

  3. Fibrillin levels in a severely affected Marfan syndrome patient with a null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, M.; Withers, A.P.; Al-Ghaban, Z. |

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by defects in the cardiovascular, skeletal and ocular systems. A patient was first examined in 1992 having survived an acute sortic dissection with subsequent composite repair and insertion of a prosthetic aortic valve. Clinical examination revealed arachnodactyly, narrow, high arched palate with dental crowding, an arm span exceeding her height by 10.5 cm, joint laxity and bilateral lens subluxation. Analysis of the family showed affected members in three generations and the fibrillin gene, FBN1, was shown to segregate with the disease when using polymorphic markers including an RsaI polymorphism in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the gene. Analysis of patient mRNA for this RsaI polymorphism by RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-PCR) amplification and restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR products showed that the copy of the gene segregating with the disease was not transcribed. No low level expression of this allele was observed despite RT-PCR amplification incorporating radioactively labelled dCTP, thus revealing a null allele phenotype. Western blotting analysis of fibrillin secreted by the patient`s dermal fibroblasts using fibrillin-specific antibodies showed only normal sized fibrillin protein. However, immunohistochemical studies of the patient`s tissue and fibroblasts showed markedly lowered levels in staining of microfibrillar structures compared with age-matched controls. This low level of expression of the protein affected in Marfan syndrome in a patient with such severe clinical manifestations is surprising since current understanding would suggest that this molecular phenotype should lead to a mild clinical disorder.

  4. Combined Effects of GSTM1 Null Allele and APOL1 Renal Risk Alleles in CKD Progression in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension Trial.

    PubMed

    Bodonyi-Kovacs, Gabor; Ma, Jennie Z; Chang, Jamison; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl Ann; Le, Thu H

    2016-10-01

    Apolipoprotein L-1 (APOL1) high-risk alleles and the glutathione-S-transferase-μ1 (GSTM1) null allele have been shown separately to associate with CKD progression in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial participants. Here, we determined combined effects of GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk alleles on clinical outcomes in 682 AASK participants who were classified into four groups by GSTM1 null or active genotype and APOL1 high- or low-risk genotype. We assessed survival differences among these groups by log-rank test and Cox regression adjusted for important clinical variables for time to GFR event (change in GFR of 50% or 25-ml/min per 1.73 m(2) decline), incident ESRD, death, or composite outcomes. The groups differed significantly in event-free survival for incident ESRD and composite outcomes (P≤0.001 by log-rank test). Compared with the reference GSTM1 active/APOL1 low-risk group, other groups had these hazard ratios for the composite outcome of incident ESRD and change in GFR: GSTM1 active/APOL1 high-risk hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.76 to 5.90 (P=0.15); GSTM1 null/APOL1 low-risk hazard ratio, 2.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 3.88 (P=0.03); and GSTM1 null/APOL1 high-risk hazard ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.51 to 5.96 (P=0.002). In conclusion, GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk alleles deleteriously affect CKD progression among blacks with hypertension, and subjects with both GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk genotypes had highest risk of adverse renal outcomes. Larger cohorts are needed to fully explore interactions of GSTM1 and APOL1 genotypes in other subgroups.

  5. Microsatellite size homoplasies and null alleles do not affect species diagnosis and population genetic analysis in a fungal species complex.

    PubMed

    Queloz, V; Duò, A; Sieber, T N; Grünig, C R

    2010-03-01

    The suitability of 13 microsatellite loci for species diagnosis and population genetics in 11 species of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) was assessed. Two data sets were compared to test possible biases in species typing and clone detection resulting from null alleles and size homoplasies. The first data set was based on fragment lengths derived from a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and the second data set was received from singleplex PCR at lower stringency and sequencing. Most null alleles observed in the multiplex PCR assay could be amplified during singleplex PCR under less stringent conditions. Size homoplasies resulting from mutations in flanking regions and differences in microsatellite structures were observed. For example, Phialocephala uotolensis possessed a (CT)(13) in addition to the (GT)(x) motif at locus mPF_0644. Despite the occurrence of null alleles and size homoplasies, species diagnosis and population genetic analysis studies were not affected. These markers will facilitate studies on population biology, ecology and biogeography of PAC species.

  6. Novel microsatellite markers for the oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and effects of null alleles on population genetics analyses.

    PubMed

    Song, W; Cao, L-J; Wang, Y-Z; Li, B-Y; Wei, S-J

    2016-11-07

    The oriental fruit moth (OFM) Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is an important economic pest of stone and pome fruits worldwide. We sequenced the OFM genome using next-generation sequencing and characterized the microsatellite distribution. In total, 56,674 microsatellites were identified, with 11,584 loci suitable for primer design. Twenty-seven polymorphic microsatellites, including 24 loci with trinucleotide repeat and three with pentanucleotide repeat, were validated in 95 individuals from four natural populations. The allele numbers ranged from 4 to 40, with an average value of 13.7 per locus. A high frequency of null alleles was observed in most loci developed for the OFM. Three marker panels, all of the loci, nine loci with the lowest null allele frequencies, and nine loci with the highest null allele frequencies, were established for population genetics analyses. The null allele influenced estimations of genetic diversity parameters but not the OFM's genetic structure. Both a STRUCTURE analysis and a discriminant analysis of principal components, using the three marker panels, divided the four natural populations into three groups. However, more individuals were incorrectly assigned by the STRUCTURE analysis when the marker panel with the highest null allele frequency was used compared with the other two panels. Our study provides empirical research on the effects of null alleles on population genetics analyses. The microsatellites developed will be valuable markers for genetic studies of the OFM.

  7. Forensic potential of the STR DXYS156 in Mexican populations: inference of X-linked allele null.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, M; Martínez-Cortes, G; Páez-Riberos, L A; Sandoval, L; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Ceballos-Quintal, J M; Pinto-Escalante, D; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2006-01-01

    The pentanucleotide STR (TAAAA)n DXYS156 offers advantages for genetic identity testing. In addition to establish the gender, DXYS156 expands the DNA profile and is able to indicate the possible geographic origin of the individual. We analyzed DXYS156 in 757 individuals of both sexes from Mexican populations. We studied the cosmopolitan Mestizo population and six Mexican ethnic groups: Tarahumaras, Purépechas, Nahuas, Mayas, Huicholes and Mezcala Indians. The six shorter (4-10) and the three larger alleles (11-13) were specific for the X and Y-chromosomes, respectively. A random distribution of alleles into genotypes was observed in males and females from each population. We estimated the power of exclusion for paternity testing according to the son's gender, and the power of discrimination in forensic casework. In addition, we detected a relatively high frequency of an X-linked allele null, principally in Mexican-Mestizos (3.6%), which must be considered when DXYS156 be applied for identification purposes.

  8. Analysis of a lin-42/period Null Allele Implicates All Three Isoforms in Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans Molting and Developmental Timing

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Theresa L. B.; McCulloch, Katherine A.; Barr, Angela; Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Rougvie, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans heterochronic gene pathway regulates the relative timing of events during postembryonic development. lin-42, the worm homolog of the circadian clock gene, period, is a critical element of this pathway. lin-42 function has been defined by a set of hypomorphic alleles that cause precocious phenotypes, in which later developmental events, such as the terminal differentiation of hypodermal cells, occur too early. A subset of alleles also reveals a significant role for lin-42 in molting; larval stages are lengthened and ecdysis often fails in these mutant animals. lin-42 is a complex locus, encoding overlapping and nonoverlapping isoforms. Although existing alleles that affect subsets of isoforms have illuminated important and distinct roles for this gene in developmental timing, molting, and the decision to enter the alternative dauer state, it is essential to have a null allele to understand all of the roles of lin-42 and its individual isoforms. To remedy this problem and discover the null phenotype, we engineered an allele that deletes the entire lin-42 protein-coding region. lin-42 null mutants are homozygously viable, but have more severe phenotypes than observed in previously characterized hypomorphic alleles. We also provide additional evidence for this conclusion by using the null allele as a base for reintroducing different isoforms, showing that each isoform can provide heterochronic and molting pathway activities. Transcript levels of the nonoverlapping isoforms appear to be under coordinate temporal regulation, despite being driven by independent promoters. The lin-42 null allele will continue to be an important tool for dissecting the functions of lin-42 in molting and developmental timing. PMID:27729432

  9. Analysis of a lin-42/period Null Allele Implicates All Three Isoforms in Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans Molting and Developmental Timing.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Theresa L B; McCulloch, Katherine A; Barr, Angela; Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M; Rougvie, Ann E

    2016-12-07

    The Caenorhabditis elegans heterochronic gene pathway regulates the relative timing of events during postembryonic development. lin-42, the worm homolog of the circadian clock gene, period, is a critical element of this pathway. lin-42 function has been defined by a set of hypomorphic alleles that cause precocious phenotypes, in which later developmental events, such as the terminal differentiation of hypodermal cells, occur too early. A subset of alleles also reveals a significant role for lin-42 in molting; larval stages are lengthened and ecdysis often fails in these mutant animals. lin-42 is a complex locus, encoding overlapping and nonoverlapping isoforms. Although existing alleles that affect subsets of isoforms have illuminated important and distinct roles for this gene in developmental timing, molting, and the decision to enter the alternative dauer state, it is essential to have a null allele to understand all of the roles of lin-42 and its individual isoforms. To remedy this problem and discover the null phenotype, we engineered an allele that deletes the entire lin-42 protein-coding region. lin-42 null mutants are homozygously viable, but have more severe phenotypes than observed in previously characterized hypomorphic alleles. We also provide additional evidence for this conclusion by using the null allele as a base for reintroducing different isoforms, showing that each isoform can provide heterochronic and molting pathway activities. Transcript levels of the nonoverlapping isoforms appear to be under coordinate temporal regulation, despite being driven by independent promoters. The lin-42 null allele will continue to be an important tool for dissecting the functions of lin-42 in molting and developmental timing.

  10. [Inheritance and phenotype expression of functional and null alleles of aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) in diploid wheats].

    PubMed

    Konovalov, A A; Shundrina, I K; Karpova, E V; Nefedov, A A; Goncharov, N P

    2014-11-01

    Functional F and null 0 alleles of the CAD1 (Aadh1) gene, which controls the biosynthesis of aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase, were studied in hybrids of the diploid wheat T. monococcum L. and Triticum sinskajae A.Filat. et Kurk. The gene CAD1 is located in chromosome 5A and is linked with the awnless gene awnS (La) with a recombination frequency of about 32%. Plants with genotypes FF, F0, and 00 were significantly different in the height and mechanical strength of the stalk (culm). The elastic limit of the culm tissues of plants FF was considerably higher than in 00 plants. F0 heterozygotes had intermediate values. The thickness of the wall of the sclerenchyma was thinner in plants with genotype 00. The chemical structure of lignin of plants with the functional CAD allele contained units of a phloroglucinol series missing in the mutant plants. The CAD genotypes had no effect on the relative content of cellulose and lignin in stalks ofdiploid wheat and insignificantly influenced the ratio of H :G : S units in the lignin structure, as well as some components of extractives.

  11. Homozygosity for a null allele of SMIM1 defines the Vel-negative blood group phenotype.

    PubMed

    Storry, Jill R; Jöud, Magnus; Christophersen, Mikael Kronborg; Thuresson, Britt; Åkerström, Bo; Sojka, Birgitta Nilsson; Nilsson, Björn; Olsson, Martin L

    2013-05-01

    The Vel antigen is present on red blood cells (RBCs) from all humans except rare Vel-negative individuals who can form antibodies to Vel in response to transfusion or pregnancy. These antibodies may cause severe hemolytic reactions in blood recipients. We combined SNP profiling and transcriptional network modeling to link the Vel-negative phenotype to SMIM1, located in a 97-kb haplotype block on chromosome 1p36. This gene encodes a previously undiscovered, evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein expressed on RBCs. Notably, 35 of 35 Vel-negative individuals were homozygous for a frameshift deletion of 17 bp in exon 3. Functional studies using antibodies raised against SMIM1 peptides confirmed a null phenotype in RBC membranes, and SMIM1 overexpression induced Vel expression. Genotype screening estimated that ~1 of 17 Swedish blood donors is a heterozygous deletion carrier and ~1 of 1,200 is a homozygous deletion knockout and enabled identification of Vel-negative donors. Our results establish SMIM1 as a new erythroid gene and Vel as a new blood group system.

  12. Efficiency of the inbreeding coefficient f and other estimators in detecting null alleles, as revealed by empirical data of locus oke3 across 65 populations of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymorphic DNA markers, e.g. mini- or microsatellite (SSR) loci, are often removed from data analyses if an excess of homozygosity, presumably an indication of null alleles, is observed. However, exclusion of such loci can reduce available information if multiple loci carry null alleles. Because nu...

  13. HLA-G(∗)01:05N null allele in Mayans (Guatemala) and Uros (Titikaka Lake, Peru): evolution and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio; Enriquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Areces, Cristina; Alonso-Rubio, Javier; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Fernandez-Honrado, Mercedes; Rey, Diego

    2013-04-01

    HLA-G molecules seem to have a protective effect for the semi-allogeneic fetus by mother immunosuppression. Also, pregnancy pathologies have been associated to HLA-G(∗)01:05N "null allele". In addition, other general regulatory immune functions have been associated to HLA-G in infections, tumors and autoimmunity. Thus, it is striking that HLA(∗)01:05N allele is maintained in a substantial frequency in certain human populations. In the present work, we have analysed HLA-G allele frequencies in Amerindian Mayans from Guatemala and in Uros from Titikaka Lake "totora" (reed) floating islands (Peru). No HLA-G(∗)01:05N has been found in both of these Amerindian populations. Further studies in Worldwide populations show that the highest HLA-G(∗)01:05 allele frequencies are found in Middle East; these findings have a bearing in future clinical/epidemiological studies in Amerindians. This would suggest that either this area was close to the "null" allele origin (as predicted by us) and/or some evolutive pressures are maintaining these high frequencies in Middle East. However, the fact that Cercopithecinae primate family (primates postulated as distant human ancestors) has also a MHC-G "null" allele in all individuals suggests that this allele may confer some advantage either at maternal/fetal interface or at other immune HLA-G function level (tumors, infections, autoimmunity). Human HLA-G(∗)01:05N may produce HLA-G isoforms, like Cercopithecinae monkeys may, which may suffice for function.

  14. A new AQP1 null allele identified in a Gypsy woman who developed an anti-CO3 during her first pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Saison, Carole; Peyrard, Thierry; Landre, Caroline; Ballif, Bryan A.; Schlosser, Kate A.; Dettori, Isabelle; Chicheportiche, Colette; Nemeth, Peter; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Arnaud, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives The Colton blood group antigens are carried by the AQP1 water channel. AQP1−/− individuals, also known as Colton-null since they express no Colton antigens, do not suffer any apparent clinical consequence but may develop a clinically significant alloantibody (anti-CO3) induced by transfusion or pregnancy. Identification and transfusion support of Colton-null patients are highly challenging, not only due to the extreme rarity of this phenotype, the lack of appropriate reagents in most laboratories, as well as the possibility of confusing its with the recently described CO:-1,-2,3,-4 phenotype where AQP1 is present. This study investigated a new Colton-null case and evaluated three commercially available anti-AQP1s to identify Colton-null red blood cell samples. Methods The Colton-null phenotype was investigated by standard serological techniques, AQP1 sequencing, immunoblot and flow cytometry analyses. Results We identified and characterized the Colton-null phenotype in a Gypsy woman who developed an anti-CO3 during her first pregnancy. After developing a simple and robust method to sequence AQP1, we showed that she was apparently homozygous for a new AQP1 null allele, AQP1 601delG, whose product is not expressed in her red blood cells. We also established the Colton specificity of three commercially available anti-AQP1s in immunoblot and/or flow cytometry analyses. Conclusion This Gypsy woman represents the sixth Colton-null case characterized at the serological, genetic and biochemical levels. The validation here of new reagents and methods should facilitate the identification of Colton-null individuals. PMID:22348807

  15. Homozygosity and Heterozygosity for Null Col5a2 Alleles Produce Embryonic Lethality and a Novel Classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Related Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Phillips, Charlotte L; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Roenneburg, Drew A; Kernien, John F; Adams, Sheila M; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Birk, David E; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2015-07-01

    Null alleles for the COL5A1 gene and missense mutations for COL5A1 or the COL5A2 gene underlie cases of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, characterized by fragile, hyperextensible skin and hypermobile joints. However, no classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome case has yet been associated with COL5A2 null alleles, and phenotypes that might result from such alleles are unknown. We describe mice with null alleles for the Col5a2. Col5a2(-/-) homozygosity is embryonic lethal at approximately 12 days post conception. Unlike previously described mice null for Col5a1, which die at 10.5 days post conception and virtually lack collagen fibrils, Col5a2(-/-) embryos have readily detectable collagen fibrils, thicker than in wild-type controls. Differences in Col5a2(-/-) and Col5a1(-/-) fibril formation and embryonic survival suggest that α1(V)3 homotrimers, a rare collagen V isoform that occurs in the absence of sufficient levels of α2(V) chains, serve functional roles that partially compensate for loss of the most common collagen V isoform. Col5a2(+/-) adults have skin with marked hyperextensibility and reduced tensile strength at high strain but not at low strain. Col5a2(+/-) adults also have aortas with increased compliance and reduced tensile strength. Results thus suggest that COL5A2(+/-) humans, although unlikely to present with frank classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, are likely to have fragile connective tissues with increased susceptibility to trauma and certain chronic pathologic conditions.

  16. Alpha 1-antitrypsin Null(isola di procida): an alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency allele caused by deletion of all alpha 1-antitrypsin coding exons.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, H; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) deficiency, a common hereditary disorder responsible for emphysema in Caucasians of northern European descent, is caused by single base substitutions, deletions, or additions in the seven exons (IA-IC and II-V), of the 12.2-kb alpha 1AT gene located on chromosome 14 at q31-32.3. Of the five known representatives of the "null" group of alpha 1AT-deficiency alleles (alpha 1AT genes incapable of producing alpha 1AT protein detectable in serum) evaluated at the gene level, all result from mutations causing the formation of stop codons in coding exons of the alpha 1AT gene. The present study identifies an alpha 1AT allele (referred to as "Null(isola di procida")) caused by complete deletion of the alpha 1AT coding exons. The Null(isola di procida) allele was identified in an individual with heterozygous inheritance of M(procida) (an allele associated with alpha 1AT deficiency) and a null allele. Although results of karyotypic analysis were normal, quantification of the copies of alpha 1AT genes in this individual revealed that the index case had only half the normal copies of alpha 1AT genes. Cloning and mapping of the Null(isola di procida) gene demonstrated a deletion of a 17-kb fragment that included exons II-V of the alpha 1AT structural gene. As a consequence of the deletion, the normal noncoding exons (IA-IC) were followed by exons II-V of the downstream alpha 1AT-like gene. Sequence analysis of the deletion demonstrated a 7-bp repeat sequence (GAGGACA) both 5' to the deletion and at the 3' end of the deletion, a 4-bp palindromic sequence (ACAG vs. CTGT) bracketing the deletion, and a novel inserted 4-bp sequence (CCTG) at the breakpoint, suggesting that the mechanism of the deletion may have been "slipped mispairing." Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1975477

  17. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the Benin population: heterozygosity for the p.G57E allele may confer a selective advantage.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Omer Placide; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Ducrocq, Rolande; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Elion, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    Human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays an important role in innate immunity. MBL deficiency is associated with mutations in the promoter region and in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene. Such deficiency has been correlated with elevated incidence of infections in infancy and in immunocompromised adults. We determined the distribution profile of the MBL2 gene variants in the general population of Benin (West Africa) and in a vulnerable subset of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) (SS homozygotes). Five hundred forty-two healthy individuals (274 newborns, 268 adults) and 128 patients with SCD (35 newborns, 93 children) were screened for the common variant alleles in the MBL2 secretor haplotype region (exon 1 and promoter). The p.G57E variant allele was the most frequent allele compared to p.G54D (27.5% vs. 1.6%, respectively). The p.R52C allele was not found in this population. There was no difference in allele or genotype frequencies between healthy newborns and newborns with SCD. Alleles associated with MBL deficiency were more frequent in adults than in newborns (69.8% vs. 57.3%, respectively; p = 0.002). This enrichment was exclusively due to an elevated proportion of heterozygotes for the p.G57E allele (47.0% vs. 35.3%, respectively; p = 0.004), supporting a potential selective advantage of this genotype. Our results, compared to those reported in other African countries, support the implication of the MBL2 gene in various major infections in Africa, such as meningitis and tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients.

  18. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the Benin population: heterozygosity for the p.G57E allele may confer a selective advantage. 2007.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Omer Placide; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Ducrocq, Rolande; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Elion, Jacques

    2009-12-01

    Human mannose- binding lectin (MBL) plays an important role in innate immunity. MBL deficiency is associated with mutations in the promoter region and in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene. Such deficiency has been correlated with elevated incidence of infections in infancy and in immunocompromised adults. We determined the distribution profile of the MBL2 gene variants in the general population of Benin (West Africa) and in a vulnerable subset of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) (SS homozygotes). Five hundred forty-two healthy individuals (274 newborns, 268 adults) and 128 patients with SCD (35 newborns, 93 children) were screened for the common variant alleles in the MBL2 secretor haplotype region (exon 1 and promoter). The p.G57E variant allele was the most frequent allele compared to p.G54D (27.5% vs. 1.6%, respectively). The p.R52C allele was not found in this population. There was no difference in allele or genotype frequencies between healthy newborns and newborns with SCD. Alleles associated with MBL deficiency were more frequent in adults than in newborns (69.8% vs. 57.3%, respectively; p=0.002). This enrichment was exclusively due to an elevated proportion of heterozygotes for the p.G57E allele (47.0% vs. 35.3%,respectively; p=0.004), supporting a potential selective advantage of this genotype. Our results, compared to those reported in other African countries, support the implication of the MBL2 gene in various major infections in Africa, such as meningitis and tuberculosis in HIV- positive patients.

  19. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle.

  20. Characterization of a New Pink-Fruited Tomato Mutant Results in the Identification of a Null Allele of the SlMYB12 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Tzfadia, Oren; Forment, Javier; Presa, Silvia; Rogachev, Ilana; Meir, Sagit; Orzaez, Diego; Aharoni, Aspah; Granell, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The identification and characterization of new tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants affected in fruit pigmentation and nutritional content can provide valuable insights into the underlying biology, as well as a source of new alleles for breeding programs. To date, all characterized pink-pigmented tomato fruit mutants appear to result from low SlMYB12 transcript levels in the fruit skin. Two new mutant lines displaying a pink fruit phenotype (pf1 and pf2) were characterized in this study. In the pf mutants, SlMYB12 transcripts accumulated to wild-type levels but exhibited the same truncation, which resulted in the absence of the essential MYB activation domain coding region. Allelism and complementation tests revealed that both pf mutants were allelic to the y locus and showed the same recessive null allele in homozygosis: Δy A set of molecular and metabolic effects, reminiscent of those observed in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myb11 myb12 myb111 triple mutant, were found in the tomato Δy mutants. To our knowledge, these have not been described previously, and our data support the idea of their being null mutants, in contrast to previously described transcriptional hypomorphic pink fruit lines. We detected a reduction in the expression of several flavonol glycosides and some associated glycosyl transferases. Transcriptome analysis further revealed that the effects of the pf mutations extended beyond the flavonoid pathway into the interface between primary and secondary metabolism. Finally, screening for Myb-binding sites in the candidate gene promoter sequences revealed that 141 of the 152 co-down-regulated genes may be direct targets of SlMYB12 regulation.

  1. Efficiency of the inbreeding coefficient f and other estimators in detecting null alleles, as revealed by empirical data of locus oke3 across 65 populations of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, L A; Kordicheva, S Yu; Shaikhaev, E G; Rubtsova, G A; Afanasiev, K I; Shitova, M V; Fuller, S A; Shaikhaev, G O; Gharrett, A J

    2015-01-01

    A survey of 65 populations of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta across the species range revealed homozygote excess (947 homozygotes in 2954 fish) at a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based simple sequence repeat (SSR) locus oke3 with multiple alleles, whereas re-designed PCR primers indicated that 328 of these homozygotes were actually heterozygotes. Statistically significant high positive values of inbreeding coefficients, f, in multiple populations appeared to be a reliable predictor of null alleles. Based on these data, three methods were checked for their ability to estimate null-allele frequencies.

  2. Premature chain termination is a unifying mechanism for COL1A1 null alleles in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Roberts, E.J.

    1996-10-01

    Nonsense and frameshift mutations, which predict premature termination of translation, often cause a dramatic reduction in the amount of transcript from the mutant allele (nonsense-mediated mRNA decay). In some genes, these mutations also influence RNA splicing and induce skipping of the exon that contains the nonsense codon. To begin to dissect how premature termination alters the metabolism of RNA from the COL1A1 gene, we studied nonsense and frameshift mutations distributed over exons 11-49 of the gene. These mutations were originally identified in 10 unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. We observed marked reduction in steady-state amounts of mRNA from the mutant allele in both total cellular and nuclear RNA extracts of cells from affected individuals, suggesting that nonsense-mediated decay of COL1A1 RNA is a nuclear phenomenon. Position of the mutation within the gene did not influence this observation. None of the mutations induced skipping of either the exon containing the mutation or, for the frameshifts, the downstream exons with the new termination sites. Our data suggest that nonsense and frameshift mutations throughout most of the COL1A1 gene result in a null allele, which is associated with the predictable mild clinical phenotype, OI type I. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Complementation of the pina (null) allele with the wild type Pina sequence restores a soft phenotype in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Martin, J M; Meyer, F D; Smidansky, E D; Wanjugi, H; Blechl, A E; Giroux, M J

    2006-11-01

    The tightly linked puroindoline genes, Pina and Pinb, control grain texture in wheat, with wild type forms of both giving soft, and a sequence alteration affecting protein expression or function in either giving rise to hard wheat. Previous experiments have shown that addition of wild type Pina in the presence of mutated Pinb gave intermediate grain texture but addition of wild type Pinb gave soft grain. This raises questions as to whether Pina may be less functional than Pinb. Our goal here was to develop and characterize wheat lines expressing the wild type Pina-D1a sequence in hard wheat with the null mutation (Pina-D1b) for Pina. Three transgenic lines plus Bobwhite were evaluated in two environments. Grain texture, grain protein, and kernel weight were determined for the transgenic lines and Bobwhite. The three transgenic lines had soft phenotype, and none of the transgenic lines differed from Bobwhite for grain protein or kernel weight. The soft phenotype was accompanied by increases in Pina transcript accumulation. Total Triton X-114 extractable PINA and PINB increased from 2.5 to 5.5 times those from a soft wheat reference sample, and friabilin, PINA and PINB bound to starch, increased from 3.8 to 7.8 times those of the soft wheat reference. Bobwhite showed no starch bound PINA, but transgenic lines had levels from 5.3 to 13.7 times those of the soft wheat reference sample. Starch bound PINB in transgenic lines also increased from 0.9 to 2.5 times that for the soft wheat reference sample. The transgenic expression of wild type Pina sequence in the Pina null genotype gave soft grain with the characteristics of soft wheat including increased starch bound friabilin. The results support the hypothesis that both wild type Pin genes need to be present for friabilin formation and soft grain.

  4. Null and hypomorph Prickle1 alleles in mice phenocopy human Robinow syndrome and disrupt signaling downstream of Wnt5a

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunqiao; Lin, Chen; Gao, Chun; May-Simera, Helen; Swaroop, Anand; Li, Tiansen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling plays a critical role in tissue morphogenesis. In mammals, disruption of three of the six “core PCP” components results in polarity-dependent defects with rotated cochlear hair cell stereocilia and open neural tube. We recently demonstrated a role of Prickle1, a core PCP molecule in Drosophila, in mammalian neuronal development. To examine Prickle1 function along a broader developmental window, we generated three mutant alleles in mice. We show that the complete loss of Prickle1 leads to systemic tissue outgrowth defects, aberrant cell organization and disruption of polarity machinery. Curiously, Prickle1 mutants recapitulate the characteristic features of human Robinow syndrome and phenocopy mouse mutants with Wnt5a or Ror2 gene defects, prompting us to explore an association of Prickle1 with the Wnt pathway. We show that Prickle1 is a proteasomal target of Wnt5a signaling and that Dvl2, a target of Wnt5a signaling, is misregulated in Prickle1 mutants. Our studies implicate Prickle1 as a key component of the Wnt-signaling pathway and suggest that Prickle1 mediates some of the WNT5A-associated genetic defects in Robinow syndrome. PMID:25190059

  5. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Head, Stewart I; Chan, Stephen; Houweling, Peter J; Quinlan, Kate G R; Murphy, Robyn; Wagner, Sören; Friedrich, Oliver; North, Kathryn N

    2015-01-01

    Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X) in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more "energy efficient" in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i) an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii) a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii) a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv) enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments during recent

  6. Penetrance of craniofacial anomalies in mouse models of Smith-Magenis syndrome is modified by genomic sequence surrounding Rai1: not all null alleles are alike.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiong; Bi, Weimin; Lupski, James R

    2007-03-01

    Craniofacial abnormality is one of the major clinical manifestations of Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). Previous analyses in a mixed genetic background of several SMS mouse models--including Df(11)17/+ and Df(11)17-1/+, which have 2-Mb and 590-kb deletions, respectively, and Rai1(-/+)--revealed that the penetrance of the craniofacial phenotype appears to be influenced by deletion size and genetic background. We generated an additional strain with a 1-Mb deletion intermediate in size between the two described above. Remarkably, the penetrance of its craniofacial anomalies in the mixed background was between those of Df(11)17 and Df(11)17-1. We further analyzed the deletion mutations and the Rai1(-/+) allele in a pure C57BL/6 background, to control for nonlinked modifier loci. The penetrance of the craniofacial anomalies was markedly increased for all the strains in comparison with the mixed background. Mice with Df(11)17 and Df(11)17-1 deletions had a similar penetrance, suggesting that penetrance may be less influenced by deletion size, whereas that of Rai1(-/+) mice was significantly lower than that of the deletion strains. We hypothesize that potential trans-regulatory sequence(s) or gene(s) that reside within the 590-kb genomic interval surrounding Rai1 are the major modifying genetic element(s) affecting the craniofacial penetrance. Moreover, we confirmed the influence of genetic background and different deletion sizes on the phenotype. The complicated control of the penetrance for one phenotype in SMS mouse models provides tools to elucidate molecular mechanisms for penetrance and clearly shows that a null allele caused by chromosomal deletion can have different phenotypic consequences than one caused by gene inactivation.

  7. Two null alleles for the insulin receptor and a concomitant defect of the epidermal growth factor receptor in a severe form of leprechaunism

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, N.; Langley, S.D.; Griffin, L.D.; Elsas, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    Leprechaunism is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the insulin receptor gene and characterized by growth restriction and severe insulin-resistance. Here we report the characterization of a female patient, GE, who died at 7 weeks of age with a severe form of this syndrome. {sup 126}I-Insulin binding to fibroblasts from patient GE, her mother and father was reduced to 5, 40, and 28 percent of controls, respectively. Analysis of other tyrosine kinase receptors indicated that the proband`s cells had a concomitant defect in EGF binding, which was reduced to 20-40% of matched controls. Binding of IGF-I and PDGF-AA was normal in the proband`s cells. Defective EGF binding was due to decreased affinity for EGF (K{sub D} =6.8 nM, normal range 0.5-1.5 nM) with a minor reduction in the number of EGF binding sites. Reduced EGF binding in the proband`s fibroblasts was accompanied by decreased ability of EGF to simulate DNA synthesis and by reduced in vitro growth. EGF binding was normal in fibroblasts cultured from both parents. Analysis of the insulin receptor gene by PCR amplification using primers flanking each of the 22 exons and direct DNA sequencing identified two different mutations in patient GE. The paternal allele had a single nucleotide insertion in exon 10 which changed the codon for Thr 657 (ACC) to Asp (GAC) in the insulin repector cDNA. The resulting frame shift produced a premature STOP codon in position 665. The maternal mutation was an insertion of a single nucleotide in exon 10 which converted the codon for Cys 682 (TGC) to a STOP codon (TAG). We conclude that patient GE was a compound heterozygote for two null alleles in the insulin receptor gene. The concomitant partial defect in the EGF receptor may be secondary to the complete absence of functional insulin receptors which in turn may further impair growth.

  8. Combination of null alleles with 7+9 allelic pair at Glu-B1 locus on the long arm of group 1 chromosome improves wheat dough functionality for tortillas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deletion of one or more high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) alleles reduces gluten strength in a way that may be beneficial for tortilla quality. Wheat lines in which one or more of the HMW-GS alleles were absent from Glu-A1, Glu-B1 or Glu-D1 locus (deletion lines) were compared with non...

  9. A novel null allele of mouse Dscam survives to adulthood on an inbred C3H background with reduced phenotypic variability

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Peter G.; Harris, Belinda S.; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    DSCAMs are cell adhesion molecules that play several important roles in neurodevelopment. Mouse alleles of Dscam identified to date do not survive on an inbred C57BL/6 background, complicating analysis of DSCAM-dependent developmental processes because of phenotypic variability related to the segregating backgrounds needed for postnatal survival. A novel spontaneous allele of Dscam, hereafter referred to as Dscam2J, has been identified. This allele contains a four base pair duplication in exon 19, leading to a frameshift and truncation of the open reading frame. Mice homozygous for the Dscam2J mutant allele survive into adulthood on the C3H/HeJ background on which the mutation was identified. Using the Dscam2J allele, retinal phenotypes that have variable severity on a segregating background were examined. A neurite lamination defect similar to that described in chick was discovered in mice. These results indicate that in the retina, additional DSCAM-dependent processes can be found by analysis of mutations on different genetic backgrounds. PMID:20715164

  10. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) / Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melissa B.; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M.; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  11. Rapid discrimination of MHC class I and killer cell lectin-like receptor allele variants by high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Alyssa; Kim, Sharon; Stadnisky, Michael D; Brown, Michael G

    2012-08-01

    Ly49G and H-2 class I D(k) molecules are critical to natural killer cell-mediated viral control. To examine their contributions in greater depth, we established NK gene complex (NKC)/Ly49 congenic strains and a novel genetic model defined by MHC class I D(k) disparity in congenic and transgenic mouse strains. Generation and maintenance of Ly49 and H-2 class I select strains require efficient and reproducible genotyping assays for highly polygenic and polymorphic sequences. Thus, we coupled gene- and allele-specific PCR with high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis to discriminate Ly49g and H-2 class I D and K alleles in select strains and in the F(2) and backcross hybrid offspring of different genetic crosses. We show that HRM typing for these critical immune response genes is fast, accurate, and dependable. We further demonstrate that H-2 class I D HRM typing is competent to detect and quantify transgene copy numbers in different mice with distinct genetic backgrounds. Our findings substantiate the utility and practicality of HRM genotyping for highly related genes and alleles, even those belonging to clustered multigene families. Based on these findings, we envision that HRM is capable to interrogate and quantify gene- and allele-specific variations due to differential regulation of gene expression.

  12. The HLA-G*0105N null allele induces cell surface expression of HLA-E molecule and promotes CD94/NKG2A-mediated recognition in JAR choriocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Sala, Frédéric G; Del Moral, Pierre-Marie; Pizzato, Nathalie; Legrand-Abravanel, Florence; Le Bouteiller, Philippe; Lenfant, Françoise

    2004-12-01

    HLA-G is a non-classical HLA class Ib molecule primarily expressed in trophoblast cells, and is thought to play a key role in the induction of materno-fetal tolerance during pregnancy. In addition, the HLA-G gene provides a suitable leader sequence peptide capable of binding to HLA-E. However, the existence of placentas homozygous for the HLA-G*0105N null allele suggests that HLA-G1 might not be essential for fetal survival. To investigate whether expression of the HLA-G*0105N allele supports HLA-E cell surface expression, we transfected the HLA-G*0105N gene into JAR trophoblast cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that HLA-G*0105N-transfected cells express surface HLA-E to a similar extent as the unmutated HLA-G gene, whereas HLA-G1 cell surface expression was undetectable. Using the NKL cell line in a standard (51)Cr release assay, the HLA-E molecules were found to inhibit natural killer lysis, through a mechanism partially dependent on CD94/NKG2A-mediated recognition.

  13. Characterization of null and hypomorphic alleles of the Drosophila l(2)dtl/cdt2 gene: Larval lethality and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Roketa S; Swanson, Christina I; Gavilano, Lily; Smith, Kristen N; Malek, Pamela Y; Snow-Smith, Mayronne; Duronio, Robert J; Key, S Catherine Silver

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila lethal(2)denticleless (l(2)dtl) gene was originally reported as essential for embryogenesis and formation of the rows of tiny hairs on the larval ventral cuticle known as denticle belts. It is now well-established that l(2)dtl (also called cdt2) encodes a subunit of a Cullin 4-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that targets a number of key cell cycle regulatory proteins, including p21, Cdt1, E2F1 and Set8, to prevent replication defects and maintain cell cycle control. To investigate the role of l(2)dtl/cdt2 during development, we characterized existing l(2)dtl/cdt2 mutants and generated new deletion alleles, using P-element excision mutagenesis. Surprisingly, homozygous l(2)dtl/cdt2 mutant embryos developed beyond embryogenesis, had intact denticle belts, and lacked an observable embryonic replication defect. These mutants died during larval stages, affirming that loss of l(2)dtl/cdt2 function is lethal. Our data show that L(2)dtl/Cdt2 is maternally deposited, remains nuclear throughout the cell cycle, and has a previously unreported, elevated expression in the developing gonads. We also find that E2f1 regulates l(2)dtl/cdt2 expression during embryogenesis, possibly via several highly conserved putative E2f1 binding sites near the l(2)dtl/cdt2 promoter. Finally, hypomorphic allele combinations of the l(2)dtl/cdt2 gene result in a novel phenotype: viable, low-fertility males. We conclude that "denticleless" is a misnomer, but that l(2)dtl/cdt2 is an essential gene for Drosophila development.

  14. Cyborg lectins: novel leguminous lectins with unique specificities.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Maruyama, I N; Osawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPA) is one of the beta-galactose-binding leguminous lectins. Leguminous lectins contain a long metal-binding loop, part of which determines their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Random mutations were introduced into a portion of the cDNA coding BPA that corresponds to the carbohydrate-binding loop of the lectin. An library of the mutant lectin expressed on the surface of lambda foo phages was screened by the panning method. Several phage clones with an affinity for mannose or N-acetylglucosamine were isolated. These results indicate the possibility of making artificial lectins (so-called "cyborg lectins") with distinct and desired carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  15. Null Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukács, B.; Perjés, Z.; Sebestyén, Á.

    1981-06-01

    Space-times admitting a null Killing vector are studied, using the Newman-Penrose spin coefficient formalism. The properties of the eigenrays (principal null curves of the Killing bivector) are shown to be related to the twist of the null Killing vector. Among the electrovacs, the ones containing a null Maxwell field turn out to belong to the twist-free class. An electrovac solution is obtained for which the null Killing vector is twisting and has geodesic and shear-free eigenrays. This solution is parameterless and appears to be the field of a zero-mass, spinning, and charged source.

  16. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-06

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  18. Nulling Breadboard for DARWIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatscher, Reinhold; Johann, Ulrich; Sodnik, Zoran

    2003-02-01

    This work is funded by ESA under ESTEC/Contract No. 14827/00/NL/CK. Astrium Germany has been awarded this first ESA breadboarding towards nulling interferometry. Interferometric nulling devices are essential ingredients in the TPF and DARWIN missions for suppressing the star light by a factor of 106 over a wide wavelength range in the mid infrared. The current DARWIN baseline concept comprises six telescopes. The coherent combination scheme in the nulling mode operation foresees three nulling assemblies in parallel. The breadboard serves to demonstrate the deep and stable null required for an operational instrument. The demonstrator operates in the near infrared to save costs but its principle is fully applicable to the mid infrared. The nulling device is based on an autobalancing Sagnac core offering just one critical beam combiner. Two different ways of achieving the required π phase shift are implemented: a) arbitrary phase shift by dispersive phase shifter plates b) phase shift of π using periscopes (image flip) The target simulator features two point sources of adjustable radiometry and angular separation, representing a strong star and a weak planet. In addition, the sources can be also used to simulate a double star for demonstrating the basic DARWIN imaging mode. The simulator can be operated in two styles, namely as wavefront dividing star/planet source and, alternatively, as an amplitude dividing source, providing highly symmetric wavefronts to both interferometer arms. Because of its representativity for the DARWIN situation, the latter mode is the preferred simulator for quantitative nulling experiments. The breadboard design has been finalized in January 2002 and verified by detailed simulations. The entire hardware has been manufactured by end of July. Currently, nulling and imaging measurements are in progress to validate the per-formance of the selected approach. The project is part of ESA´s technology preparatory program for DARWIN, paving the

  19. Lectin typing of Campylobacter isolates.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, N; Benjamin, J; Skirrow, M B

    1990-01-01

    Isolates of Campylobacter jejuni, C coli, C fetus and C laridis were tested for agglutination reactions with a panel of five lectins: Arachis hypogaea, Bauhinia purpurea, Solanum tuberosum, Triticum vulgaris and Wisteria floribunda. Twenty three patterns of agglutination (lectin types) were recorded among 376 isolates. Patterns were consistent and reproducible. Only 4.5% of isolates were untypable because of autoagglutination. Some lectin types were found exclusively or predominantly in a species, but others were shared between species. Forty two per cent of C jejuni and 35% of C coli isolates belonged to lectin type 4. There was no apparent correlation between lectin type and serotype; different lectin types were found among strains of single Penner and Lior serotypes. Lectin typing is a simple and economical procedure suitable for use in non-specialist laboratories, either as an adjunct to serogrouping or, after further development, as a sole typing scheme. PMID:2262570

  20. Analysis of the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes by PCR amplification and scanning by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis identifies only COL1A1 mutations in 15 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type I: identification of common sequences of null-allele mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Körkkö, J; Ala-Kokko, L; De Paepe, A; Nuytinck, L; Earley, J; Prockop, D J

    1998-01-01

    Although >90% of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) have been estimated to have mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes for type I procollagen, mutations have been difficult to detect in all patients with the mildest forms of the disease (i.e., type I). In this study, we first searched for mutations in type I procollagen by analyses of protein and mRNA in fibroblasts from 10 patients with mild OI; no evidence of a mutation was found in 2 of the patients by the protein analyses, and no evidence of a mutation was found in 5 of the patients by the RNA analyses. We then searched for mutations in the original 10 patients and in 5 additional patients with mild OI, by analysis of genomic DNA. To assay the genomic DNA, we established a consensus sequence for the first 12 kb of the COL1A1 gene and for 30 kb of new sequences of the 38-kb COL1A2 gene. The sequences were then used to develop primers for PCR for the 103 exons and exon boundaries of the two genes. The PCR products were first scanned for heteroduplexes by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis, and then products containing heteroduplexes were sequenced. The results detected disease-causing mutations in 13 of the 15 patients and detected two additional probable disease-causing mutations in the remaining 2 patients. Analysis of the data developed in this study and elsewhere revealed common sequences for mutations causing null alleles. PMID:9443882

  1. Translational control of discoidin lectin expression in drsA suppressor mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, S; Leone, S; Ostermeyer, E

    1991-01-01

    Genetic analysis in Dictyostelium discoideum has identified regulatory genes which control the developmental expression of the discoidin lectin multigene family. Among these, the drsA mutation is a dominant second-site suppressor of another mutation, disB, which has the discoidinless phenotype. We now demonstrate a novel mechanism by which the drsA allele exerts its suppressive effect on the disB mutation. Interestingly, drsA does not merely bypass the disB mutation and restore the wild-type pattern of lectin expression. Rather, drsA mutant cells have high levels of discoidin lectin synthesis during growth but do not express lectins during aggregation. In contrast, wild-type cells only express lectin protein during the aggregation period of development. Phenocopies of the drsA mutation show a pattern of discoidin expression similar to that seen in the bona fide mutant. These data suggest that there may be a mechanism of negative feedback, resulting from the high levels of discoidin lectin made during growth, which inhibits further discoidin lectin expression during development. Northern (RNA) analysis of developing drsA mutant cells shows that these cells contain high levels of discoidin mRNA, although no discoidin lectin protein is being translated from these messages. Therefore, expression of the discoidin gene family can be controlled at the level of translation as well as transcription. Images PMID:2038325

  2. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  3. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  4. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, L.; Aristidi, E.; Vakili, F.; Domiciano, A.

    We present an interferometric beam recombination technique which allows achromatic and direct true imaging of targets at very high angular resolution. This technique intrinsically overcomes the main problems of Labeyrie's hypertelescope design, and can be used in a nulling configuration. It is thus particularly well suited for high contrast imaging in the context of exo-planet search and characterization especially for future space-borne arrays. We present the concept on a formal basis, and discuss its instrumental implementation.

  5. Red hair is the null phenotype of MC1R.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Shekar, Sri N; Cook, Anthony L; Duffy, David L; Sturm, Richard A

    2008-08-01

    The Melanocortin-1 Receptor (MC1R) is a G-protein coupled receptor, which is responsible for production of the darker eumelanin pigment and the tanning response. The MC1R gene has many polymorphisms, some of which have been linked to variation in pigmentation phenotypes within human populations. In particular, the p.D84E, p.R151C, p.R160W and p.D294 H alleles have been strongly associated with red hair, fair skin and increased skin cancer risk. These red hair colour (RHC) variants are relatively well described and are thought to result in altered receptor function, while still retaining varying levels of signaling ability in vitro. The mouse Mc1r null phenotype is yellow fur colour, the p.R151C, p.R160W and p.D294 H alleles were able to partially rescue this phenotype, leading to the question of what the true null phenotype of MC1R would be in humans. Due to the rarity of MC1R null alleles in human populations, they have only been found in the heterozygous state until now. We report here the first case of a homozygous MC1R null individual, phenotypic analysis indicates that red hair and fair skin is found in the absence of MC1R function.

  6. Lectins and Tetrahymena - A review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-09-01

    The unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena is a complete organism, one of the most highly developed protozoans, which has specialized organelles performing each of the functions characteristic to the cells of higher ranked animals. It is also able to produce, store, and secrete hormones of higher ranked animals and also react to them. It produces lectins that can bind them and has functions, which are influenced by exogenous lectins. The review lists the observations on the relationship between lectins and Tetrahymena and try to construe them on the basis of the data, which are at our disposal. Considering the data, lectins can be used by Tetrahymena as materials for influencing conjugation, for stimulating hormone receptors, and by this, mimic the hormonal functions. Lectins can influence phagocytosis and movement of the cells as well as the cell division. As Tetrahymena can recognize both related and hostile cells by the help of lectins and surface sugars, it could be surmised a complex predator-prey system. This could determine the survival of the population as well as the nourishment conditions. When Tetrahymena is pathogenic, it can use lectins as virulence factors.

  7. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, F.; Aristidi, E.; Abe, L.; Lopez, B.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by reconfiguring images instead of pupils. Imaging is performed in a combined pupil-plane where the point-source intensity distribution (PSID by comparison to the more commonly quoted point-spread function, PSF) tends towards a pseudo Airy disc for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field limited to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance. We also discuss the application of IRAN to improve the performances of imaging and/or nulling interferometers like the full-fledged VLTI array or the DARWIN space-borne mission.

  8. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  9. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A self-calibrating nulling radiometer for non-contact temperature measurement of an object, such as a body of water, employs a black body source as a temperature reference, an optomechanical mechanism, e.g., a chopper, to switch back and forth between measuring the temperature of the black body source and that of a test source, and an infrared detection technique. The radiometer functions by measuring radiance of both the test and the reference black body sources; adjusting the temperature of the reference black body so that its radiance is equivalent to the test source; and, measuring the temperature of the reference black body at this point using a precision contact-type temperature sensor, to determine the radiative temperature of the test source. The radiation from both sources is detected by an infrared detector that converts the detected radiation to an electrical signal that is fed with a chopper reference signal to an error signal generator, such as a synchronous detector, that creates a precision rectified signal that is approximately proportional to the difference between the temperature of the reference black body and that of the test infrared source. This error signal is then used in a feedback loop to adjust the reference black body temperature until it equals that of the test source, at which point the error signal is nulled to zero. The chopper mechanism operates at one or more Hertz allowing minimization of l/f noise. It also provides pure chopping between the black body and the test source and allows continuous measurements.

  10. Mannose-binding lectin may affect pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Çalkavur, Şebnem; Erdemir, Gülin; Onay, Hüseyin; Altun Köroğlu, Özge; Yalaz, Mehmet; Zekioğlu, Osman; Aksu, Güzide; Özkınay, Ferda; Akercan, Fuat; Kültürsay, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system and acts as a complement activator through the lectin pathway. Genetic variations of MBL and low MBL levels cause several infection problems, which may also be related to pregnancy problems. We aimed to investigate the role of MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels in pregnancy problems and premature delivery. In this prospective study, MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels were studied in 45 mothers who delivered earlier than 35 gestational weeks. The frequency of MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B was much higher (homozygous 4.4% and heterozygous 33.3%) in the study group mothers than the previously reported frequency in the healthy Turkish population (homozygous 2-6%, heterozygous 12-20%). MBL variant allele B frequency was closely related to low MBL levels (<0.1 μg/ml), vaginitis and increased IL-6 levels. The median MBL levels were lower than the critical level of 0.1 μg/ ml in study mothers who had recurrent miscarriage, infertility, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm premature rupture of membranes with duration of longer than 72 hours, tocolysis, histological chorioamnionitis, urinary tract infection and vaginitis. MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B is related to low serum MBL levels, increased IL-6 levels, genitourinary infections and may cause pregnancy-related problems such as infertility, recurrent miscarriage and preterm delivery.

  11. sirt1-null mice develop an autoimmune-like condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, Jedon; Boily, Gino; Bazinet, Stephanie; Saliba, Sarah; He Xiaohong; Jardine, Karen; Kennedy, Christopher; Staines, William; Rousseaux, Colin; Mueller, Rudi; McBurney, Michael W.

    2008-10-01

    The sirt1 gene encodes a protein deacetylase with a broad spectrum of reported substrates. Mice carrying null alleles for sirt1 are viable on outbred genetic backgrounds so we have examined them in detail to identify the biological processes that are dependent on SIRT1. Sera from adult sirt1-null mice contain antibodies that react with nuclear antigens and immune complexes become deposited in the livers and kidneys of these animals. Some of the sirt1-null animals develop a disease resembling diabetes insipidus when they approach 2 years of age although the relationship to the autoimmunity remains unclear. We interpret these observations as consistent with a role for SIRT1 in sustaining normal immune function and in this way delaying the onset of autoimmune disease.

  12. Null testing convex optical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Szulc, A

    1997-09-01

    A new test for convex optical surfaces is presented. It makes use of an auxiliary ellipsoidal mirror that is of approximately the same diameter as the convex mirror tested. The test is a null test of excellent precision. The auxiliary ellipsoid used is also tested in a null fashion, permitting good precision to be obtained.

  13. On the randomness of pulsar nulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Rankin, Joanna M.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsar nulling is not always a random process; most pulsars, in fact, null non-randomly. The Wald-Wolfowitz statistical runs test is a simple diagnostic that pulsar astronomers can use to identify pulsars that have non-random nulls. It is not clear at this point how the dichotomy in pulsar nulling randomness is related to the underlying nulling phenomenon, but its nature suggests that there are at least two distinct reasons that pulsars null.

  14. Mannose-Binding Lectin Promoter Polymorphisms and Gene Variants in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients from Cantabria (Northern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lavín-Alconero, Lucía; Sánchez-Velasco, Pablo; Guerrero-Alonso, M.-Ángeles; Ausín, Fernando; Fariñas, M.-Carmen; Leyva-Cobián, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is a central molecule of the innate immune system. Mannose-binding lectin 2 promoter polymorphisms and structural variants have been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis. However, contradictory results among different populations have been reported, resulting in no convincing evidence of association between mannose-binding lectin 2 and susceptibility to tuberculosis. For this reason, we conducted a study in a well genetically conserved Spanish population in order to shed light on this controversial association. We analysed the six promoter and structural mannose-binding lectin 2 gene variants in 107 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 441 healthy controls. Only D variant and HYPD haplotype were significantly more frequents in controls which would indicate that this allele could confer protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, but this difference disappeared after statistical correction. Neither the rest of alleles nor the haplotypes were significantly associated with the disease. These results would indicate that mannose-binding lectin promoter polymorphisms and gene variants would not be associated with an increased risk to pulmonary tuberculosis. Despite the slight trend of the D allele and HYPD haplotype in conferring protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, susceptibility to this disease would probably be due to other genetic factors, at least in our population. PMID:23304495

  15. Null lifts and projective dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco

    2015-11-15

    We describe natural Hamiltonian systems using projective geometry. The null lift procedure endows the tangent bundle with a projective structure where the null Hamiltonian is identified with a projective conic and induces a Weyl geometry. Projective transformations generate a set of known and new dualities between Hamiltonian systems, as for example the phenomenon of coupling-constant metamorphosis. We conclude outlining how this construction can be extended to the quantum case for Eisenhart–Duval lifts.

  16. Annotation and genetic diversity of the chicken collagenous lectins.

    PubMed

    Hamzić, Edin; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2015-06-01

    Collectins and ficolins are multimeric proteins present in various tissues and are actively involved in innate immune responses. In chickens, six different collagenous lectins have been characterized so far: mannose-binding lectin (MBL), surfactant protein A (SP-A), collectin 10 (COLEC10), collectin 11 (COLEC11), collectin 12 (COLEC12), lung lectin (LL) and one ficolin (FCN). However, the structural and functional features of the chicken collectins and ficolin are still not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were: (i) to make an overview of the genetic structure and function of chicken collectins and the ficolin, (ii) to investigate the variation in the chicken collectins and the ficolin gene in different chicken populations, and (iii) to assess the presence of MBL gene variants in different chicken populations. We performed comparative genomic analysis using publically available data. The obtained results showed that collectins and ficolins have conserved protein sequences and gene structure across all vertebrate groups and this is especially notable for COLEC10, COLEC11 and COLEC12. For the purpose of studying the genetic variation, 179 animals from 14 populations were genotyped using 31 SNPs covering five genomic regions. The obtained results revealed low level of heterozygosity in the collagenous lectins except for the COLEC12 gene and the LL-SPA-MBL region compared to heterozygosity at neutral microsatellite markers. In addition, the MBL gene variants were assessed in different chicken populations based on the polymorphisms in the promoter region. We observed 10 previously identified MBL variants with A2/A8 and A4 as the most frequent alleles.

  17. Gravitational action with null boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Luis; Myers, Robert C.; Poisson, Eric; Sorkin, Rafael D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a complete discussion of the boundary term in the action functional of general relativity when the boundary includes null segments in addition to the more usual timelike and spacelike segments. We confirm that ambiguities appear in the contribution from a null segment, because it depends on an arbitrary choice of parametrization for the generators. We also show that similar ambiguities appear in the contribution from a codimension-two surface at which a null segment is joined to another (spacelike, timelike, or null) segment. The parametrization ambiguity can be tamed by insisting that the null generators be affinely parametrized; this forces each null contribution to the boundary action to vanish, but leaves intact the fredom to rescale the affine parameter by a constant factor on each generator. Once a choice of parametrization is made, the ambiguity in the joint contributions can be eliminated by formulating well-motivated rules that ensure the additivity of the gravitational action. Enforcing these rules, we calculate the time rate of change of the action when it is evaluated for a so-called "Wheeler-DeWitt patch" of a black hole in asymptotically anti de Sitter space. We recover a number of results cited in the literature, obtained with a less complete analysis.

  18. Molecular definition of an allelic series of mutations disrupting the mouse Lmx1a (dreher) gene.

    PubMed

    Chizhikov, Victor; Steshina, Ekaterina; Roberts, Richard; Ilkin, Yesim; Washburn, Linda; Millen, Kathleen J

    2006-10-01

    Mice homozygous for the dreher (dr) mutation are characterized by pigmentation and skeletal abnormalities and striking behavioral phenotypes, including ataxia, vestibular deficits, and hyperactivity. The ataxia is associated with a cerebellar malformation that is remarkably similar to human Dandy-Walker malformation. Previously, positional cloning identified mutations in LIM homeobox transcription factor 1 alpha gene (Lmx1a) in three dr alleles. Two of these alleles, however, are extinct and unavailable for further analysis. In this article we report a new spontaneous dr allele and describe the Lmx1a mutations in this and six additional dr alleles. Strikingly, deletion null, missense, and frameshift mutations in these alleles all cause similar cerebellar malformations, suggesting that all dr mutations analyzed to date are null alleles.

  19. Deficient and Null Variants of SERPINA1 Are Proteotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Erin E; O'Reilly, Linda P; King, Dale E; Silverman, Richard M; Miedel, Mark T; Luke, Cliff J; Perlmutter, David H; Silverman, Gary A; Pak, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) predisposes patients to both loss-of-function (emphysema) and gain-of-function (liver cirrhosis) phenotypes depending on the type of mutation. Although the Z mutation (ATZ) is the most prevalent cause of ATD, >120 mutant alleles have been identified. In general, these mutations are classified as deficient (<20% normal plasma levels) or null (<1% normal levels) alleles. The deficient alleles, like ATZ, misfold in the ER where they accumulate as toxic monomers, oligomers and aggregates. Thus, deficient alleles may predispose to both gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes. Null variants, if translated, typically yield truncated proteins that are efficiently degraded after being transiently retained in the ER. Clinically, null alleles are only associated with the loss-of-function phenotype. We recently developed a C. elegans model of ATD in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of proteotoxicity (gain-of-function phenotype) induced by the aggregation-prone deficient allele, ATZ. The goal of this study was to use this C. elegans model to determine whether different types of deficient and null alleles, which differentially affect polymerization and secretion rates, correlated to any extent with proteotoxicity. Animals expressing the deficient alleles, Mmalton, Siiyama and S (ATS), showed overall toxicity comparable to that observed in patients. Interestingly, Siiyama expressing animals had smaller intracellular inclusions than ATZ yet appeared to have a greater negative effect on animal fitness. Surprisingly, the null mutants, although efficiently degraded, showed a relatively mild gain-of-function proteotoxic phenotype. However, since null variant proteins are degraded differently and do not appear to accumulate, their mechanism of proteotoxicity is likely to be different to that of polymerizing, deficient mutants. Taken together, these studies showed that C. elegans is an inexpensive tool to assess the proteotoxicity of different AT

  20. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  1. NULL convention floating point multiplier.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anitha Juliette; Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation.

  2. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  3. Achronal averaged null energy condition

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Olum, Ken D.

    2007-09-15

    The averaged null energy condition (ANEC) requires that the integral over a complete null geodesic of the stress-energy tensor projected onto the geodesic tangent vector is never negative. This condition is sufficient to prove many important theorems in general relativity, but it is violated by quantum fields in curved spacetime. However there is a weaker condition, which is free of known violations, requiring only that there is no self-consistent spacetime in semiclassical gravity in which ANEC is violated on a complete, achronal null geodesic. We indicate why such a condition might be expected to hold and show that it is sufficient to rule out closed timelike curves and wormholes connecting different asymptotically flat regions.

  4. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  5. Influence of Lectins on Constricting Ring Formation by Arthrobotrys dactyloides.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L; Walter, D E

    1991-04-01

    Incubation of Arthrobotrys dactyloides conidia in the presence of Radopholus citrophilus in lectin solutions with their corresponding sugars did not alter the stimulation of trap formation in solutions containing lectins alone. The lack of inhibition of lectin-stimulated trap formation by sugars or by lectin denaturation and the lack of lectin specificity indicate that the carbohydrate-binding regions of the particular lectins studied are not the stimulatory moieties of these macromolecules.

  6. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  7. Structural comparisons of two allelic variants of human placental alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Millán, J L; Stigbrand, T; Jörnvall, H

    1985-01-01

    A simple immunosorbent purification scheme based on monoclonal antibodies has been devised for human placental alkaline phosphatase. The two most common allelic variants, S and F, have similar amino acid compositions with identical N-terminal amino acid sequences through the first 13 residues. Both variants have identical lectin binding properties towards concanavalin A, lentil-lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, phytohemagglutinin and soybean agglutinin, and identical carbohydrate contents as revealed by methylation analysis. CNBr fragments of the variants demonstrate identical high performance liquid chromatography patterns. The carbohydrate containing fragment is different from the 32P-labeled active site fragment and the N-terminal fragment.

  8. Lectin engineering, a molecular evolutionary approach to expanding the lectin utilities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-04-27

    In the post genomic era, glycomics--the systematic study of all glycan structures of a given cell or organism--has emerged as an indispensable technology in various fields of biology and medicine. Lectins are regarded as "decipherers of glycans", being useful reagents for their structural analysis, and have been widely used in glycomic studies. However, the inconsistent activity and availability associated with the plant-derived lectins that comprise most of the commercially available lectins, and the limit in the range of glycan structures covered, have necessitated the development of innovative tools via engineering of lectins on existing scaffolds. This review will summarize the current state of the art of lectin engineering and highlight recent technological advances in this field. The key issues associated with the strategy of lectin engineering including selection of template lectin, construction of a mutagenesis library, and high-throughput screening methods are discussed.

  9. Balloon exoplanet nulling interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-08-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize an exosolar planet and the surrounding debris disk. The existing instrument consists of a three-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with thre fast steering mirrors and three delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer would be coupled to the imaging interferometer and in principle, allows deep starlight suppression. Atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet show that balloonborne payloads are a possible path towards the direct detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and debris disks. Furthermore, rapid development of lower cost balloon payloads provide a path towards advancement of NASA technology readiness levels for future space-based exoplanet missions. Discussed are the BENI mission and instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such a balloon-borne mission.

  10. Nulling at the Keck Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. Mark; Serabyn, Gene; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Akeson, Rachel L.

    2006-01-01

    The nulling mode of the Keck Interferometer is being commissioned at the Mauna Kea summit. The nuller combines the two Keck telescope apertures in a split-pupil mode to both cancel the on-axis starlight and to coherently detect the residual signal. The nuller, working at 10 um, is tightly integrated with the other interferometer subsystems including the fringe and angle trackers, the delay lines and laser metrology, and the real-time control system. Since first 10 um light in August 2004, the system integration is proceeding with increasing functionality and performance, leading to demonstration of a 100:1 on-sky null in 2005. That level of performance has now been extended to observations with longer coherent integration times. An overview of the overall system is presented, with emphasis on the observing sequence, phasing system, and differences with respect to the V2 system, along with a presentation of some recent engineering data.

  11. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  12. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9 +/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  13. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  14. Detection of 549 new HLA alleles in potential stem cell donors from the United States, Poland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Cereb, N; Giani, A S; Ruppel, J; Maraszek, A; Pingel, J; Sauter, J; Schmidt, A H; Yang, S Y

    2016-01-01

    We characterized 549 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles found in newly registered stem cell donors as a result of high-throughput HLA typing. New alleles include 101 HLA-A, 132 HLA-B, 105 HLA-C, 2 HLA-DRB1, 89 HLA-DQB1 and 120 HLA-DPB1 alleles. Mainly, new alleles comprised single nucleotide variations when compared with homologous sequences. We identified nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in 70.7% of all new alleles, synonymous variations in 26.4% and nonsense substitutions in 2.9% (null alleles). Some new alleles (55, 10.0%) were found multiple times, HLA-DPB1 alleles being the most frequent among these. Furthermore, as several new alleles were identified in individuals from ethnic minority groups, the relevance of recruiting donors belonging to such groups and the importance of ethnicity data collection in donor centers and registries is highlighted.

  15. A journey through the lectin pathway of complement-MBL and beyond.

    PubMed

    Garred, Peter; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine; Bayarri-Olmos, Rafael; Rosbjerg, Anne; Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2016-11-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin-10, collectin-11, and the ficolins (ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3) are soluble pattern recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. These proteins act as mediators of host defense and participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. They bind to conserved pathogen-specific structures and altered self-antigens and form complexes with the pentraxins to modulate innate immune functions. All molecules exhibit distinct expression in different tissue compartments, but all are found to a varying degree in the circulation. A common feature of these molecules is their ability to interact with a set of serine proteases named MASPs (MASP-1, MASP-2, and MASP-3). MASP-1 and -2 trigger the activation of the lectin pathway and MASP-3 may be involved in the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. Furthermore, MASPs mediate processes related to coagulation, bradykinin release, and endothelial and platelet activation. Variant alleles affecting expression and structure of the proteins have been associated with a variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases, most commonly as disease modifiers. Notably, the severe 3MC (Malpuech, Michels, Mingarelli, and Carnevale) embryonic development syndrome originates from rare mutations affecting either collectin-11 or MASP-3, indicating a broader functionality of the complement system than previously anticipated. This review summarizes the characteristics of the molecules in the lectin pathway.

  16. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  17. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer. PMID:28123516

  18. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer.

  19. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  20. Spectral characters of lectin saccharide interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deyu; Jiang, Duxiao; Yuan, Chunwei

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we report attempts to directly detect the interaction behavior between erythrocyte and lectin concanavalin a (Con A) as well as phaseolus vulgaris (PHA) on the polystyrene film surface. In the procedure, an optical transducer based reflectance interferometry was set up and used to detect the film thickness change during the lectin adsorption and lectin- erythrocyte interaction. The specific interactions among Con A, PHA and erythrocyte were obtained. The solubility monosaccharide inhibition test confirmed that there is affinity between (alpha) - D-mannose and Con A.

  1. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  2. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  3. Identification of mycobacterial lectins from genomic data.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-four sequences containing lectin domains with homologs of known three-dimensional structure were identified through a search of mycobacterial genomes. They appear to belong to the β-prism II, the C-type, the Microcystis virdis (MV), and the β-trefoil lectin folds. The first three always occur in conjunction with the LysM, the PI-PLC, and the β-grasp domains, respectively while mycobacterial β-trefoil lectins are unaccompanied by any other domain. Thirty heparin binding hemagglutinins (HBHA), already annotated, have also been included in the study although they have no homologs of known three-dimensional structure. The biological role of HBHA has been well characterized. A comparison between the sequences of the lectin from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria provides insights into the carbohydrate binding region of the molecule, but the structure of the molecule is yet to be determined. A reasonable picture of the structural features of other mycobacterial proteins containing one or the other of the four lectin domains can be gleaned through the examination of homologs proteins, although the structure of none of them is available. Their biological role is also yet to be elucidated. The work presented here is among the first steps towards exploring the almost unexplored area of the structural biology of mycobacterial lectins.

  4. Lack of association between genetic variants in the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene and HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Paola; Seripa, Davide; Matera, Maria G; Rinaldi, Monica; Signori, Emanuela; Gravina, Carolina; Gallo, Antonietta P; Prencipe, Maria; Grandone, Elvira; Mariani, Luciano; Cordiali, Paola; Di Carlo, Aldo; Stentella, Patrizia; Pachì, Antonio; Fazio, Vito M

    2007-01-01

    Genetic variants in the immunomodulatory gene mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2), were associated with risk, severity, and frequency of viral infections. In a case-control setting, we investigated the association of MBL2 functional polymorphisms with Human Papillomas Virus (HPV) infection. No differences between cases (HPV(+)) and controls (HPV(-)) were found in the distribution of each single genotypes or allele. Haplotype analysis did not show any difference between HPV+ and HPV(-) groups.

  5. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  6. The Importance of Proving the Null

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallistel, C. R.

    2009-01-01

    Null hypotheses are simple, precise, and theoretically important. Conventional statistical analysis cannot support them; Bayesian analysis can. The challenge in a Bayesian analysis is to formulate a suitably vague alternative, because the vaguer the alternative is (the more it spreads out the unit mass of prior probability), the more the null is…

  7. On grating nulls in adaptive arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishide, A.; Compton, R. T., Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The effect of element patterns on grating nulls in adaptive arrays is considered. Two simple array models, a two-element and a three-element array with dipole element patterns, are used to study this question. The element patterns are assumed unequal (i.e., the beam maxima point in different directions). It is shown that element patterns greatly affect the occurrence of grating nulls in the array. Unequal element patterns cause extra grating nulls ('sign reversal grating nulls') to occur, in addition to conventional grating nulls. These sign reversal grating nulls can occur even with element spacing less than a half-wavelength. For a two-element array with dipole element patterns, it turns out that grating nulls cannot be avoided if the spacing is greater than a half-wavelength. However, with more than two elements, the situation is not so bleak. An example is given of a three-element array with dipole patterns and one-wavelength spacing in which all grating nulls are eliminated.

  8. On grating nulls in adaptive arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishide, A.; Compton, R. T., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report considers the effect of element patterns on grating nulls in adaptive arrays. Two simple array models, a two-element and a three-element array with dipole element patterns, are used to study this question. The element patterns are assumed unequal (i.e., the beam maxima point in different directions). It is shown that element patterns greatly affect the occurrence of grating nulls in the array. Unequal element patterns cause extra grating nulls (sign reversal grating nulls) to occur, in addition to conventional grating nulls. These sign reversal grating nulls can occur even with element spacing less than a half-wavelength. For a two-element array with dipole element patterns, it turns out that grating nulls cannot be avoided if the spacing is greater than a half wavelength. However, with more than two elements, the situation is not so bleak. An example is given of a three-element array with dipole patterns and one wavelength spacing in which all grating nulls are eliminated.

  9. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  10. Novel alleles at the JK blood group locus explain the absence of the erythrocyte urea transporter in European families.

    PubMed

    Irshaid, Nidal M; Eicher, Nicole I; Hustinx, Hein; Poole, Joyce; Olsson, Martin L

    2002-02-01

    The Kidd (JK) blood group system is of importance in transfusion medicine. The Jk(null) phenotype is associated with absence of the urea transporter in erythrocytes and moderately reduced ability to concentrate urine. We and others recently reported different molecular alterations in the silenced Jkb-like alleles of Polynesians and Finns, populations with higher Jk(null) frequencies. Here we report novel molecular bases of this phenotype in Caucasians. Blood samples from a Swiss and an English family were investigated by serological methods, urea haemolysis test and JK genotyping. Genomic DNA and JK mRNA were sequenced. Genotyping showed homozygosity for Jka-like alleles. The Swiss Jk(null) alleles deviated from wild-type Jka sequence by a nonsense mutation in exon 7 causing an immediate stop codon (Tyr194stop). The English Jk(null) alleles revealed a genomic 1.6 kilobase pair deletion including exons 4 and 5, the former of which includes the translation start codon. Multiple mRNA splicing variants were detected in reticulocytes but exons 3-5 were absent in all transcripts analysed. Screening for these alleles was negative in random donors. Two novel molecular alterations at the JK locus were defined and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for detection of the five known silent Jk alleles was developed to complement JK genotyping in clinical transfusion medicine.

  11. Automatic null ellipsometry with an interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Lionel R.

    2009-11-10

    A new approach to automatic null ellipsometry is described in which the analyzer of a traditional polarizer compensator sample analyzer (PCSA) null ellipsometer is replaced with a heterodyne Michelson interferometer. One arm of this interferometer is modified such that it produces a fixed, linearly polarized reference beam, irrespective of the input polarization state. This beam is recombined interferometrically with the measurement beam and spatially separated into its p and s polarizations. The relative phase of the resulting temporal fringes is a linear function of the polarizer azimuthal angle P, and thus this component can be driven to its null position without iteration. Once at null, the azimuthal angle of the reflected, linearly polarized light is trivially determined from the relative amplitude of the fringes. Measurements made with this instrument on a native oxide film on a silicon wafer were in excellent agreement with those made with a traditional PCSA null ellipsometer.

  12. A rainbow trout lectin with multimeric structure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Thiel, S; Petersen, T E; Jensenius, J C

    1997-04-01

    A novel lectin has been identified in rainbow trout serum and plasma. The lectin binds to Sepharose (an agarose polymer) in a calcium-dependent manner. Glucose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, mannose, N-acetyl-mannosamine, L-fucose, maltose and alpha-methyl-mannoside are good inhibitors of this binding, whereas glucosamine and D-fucose inhibits to a lesser degree and mannosamine and galactose do not inhibit the binding to Sepharose. When analysed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, the lectin appears as a characteristic ladder of bands with approximately 16 kDa between consecutive bands. Upon reduction, the lectin appears as a 16-kDa band. On size-exclusion chromatography of trout serum and plasma, the protein emerges over a broad range corresponding to sizes from about 2000 kDa to less than 200 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequence (AAENRNQXPPG) shows no significant homology with known proteins. Because of the characteristic appearance in non-reducing SDS-PAGE and the lectin activity, we propose to name the protein "ladderlectin."

  13. Isolation, characterization and molecular cloning of a leaf-specific lectin from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-11-01

    Lectins were isolated from roots and leaves of ramsons and compared to the previously described bulb lectins. Biochemical analyses indicated that the root lectins AUAIr and AUAIIr are identical to the bulb lectins AUAI and AUAII, whereas the leaf lectin AUAL has no counterpart in the bulbs. cDNA cloning confirmed that the leaf lectin differs from the bulb lectins. Northern blot analysis further indicated that the leaf lectin is tissue-specifically expressed. Sequence comparisons revealed that the ramsons leaf lectin differs considerably from the leaf lectins of garlic, leek, onion and shallot.

  14. Galectin-3–null mice display defective neutrophil clearance during acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rachael D; Souza, Patricia R.; Flak, Magdalena B.; Thedchanamoorthy, Prasheetha; Norling, Lucy V.; Cooper, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Galectin-3 has been associated with a plethora of proinflammatory functions because of its ability, among others, to promote neutrophil activation and because of the reduction in neutrophil recruitment in models of infection in Gal-3-null mice. Conversely, it has also been linked to resolution of inflammation through its actions as an opsonin and its ability to promote efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. Using a self-resolving model of peritonitis, we have addressed the modulation and role of Gal-3 in acute inflammation. We have shown that Gal-3 expression is increased in neutrophils that travel to the inflamed peritoneum and that cellular localization of this lectin is modulated during the course of the inflammatory response. Furthermore, neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed peritoneum is increased in Gal-3–null mice during the course of the response, and that correlates with reduced numbers of monocytes/macrophages in the cavities of those mice, as well as reduced apoptosis and efferocytosis of Gal-3–null neutrophils. These data indicate a role for endogenous Gal-3 in neutrophil clearance during acute inflammation. PMID:27733579

  15. IRAN: interferometric remapped array nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristidi, Eric; Vakili, Farrokh; Abe, Lyu; Belu, Adrian; Lopez, Bruno; Lanteri, Henri; Schutz, A.; Menut, Jean-Luc

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by observing in a combined pupil plane instead of an image plane. The point-source intensity distribution (PSID) of this interferometric "image" tends towards a psuedo Airy disc (similar to that of a giant monolithic telescope) for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field comparable to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions, circumstellar nebulosities or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance.

  16. Unfolding energetics and stability of banana lectin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Sinha, Sharmistha; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-08-01

    The unfolding pathway of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca was determined by isothermal denaturation induced by the chaotrope GdnCl. The unfolding was found to be a reversible process. The data obtained by isothermal denaturation provided information on conformational stability of banana lectin. The high values of DeltaG of unfolding at various temperatures indicated the strength of intersubunit interactions. It was found that banana lectin is a very stable and denatures at high chaotrope concentrations only. The basis of the stability may be attributed to strong hydrogen bonds of the order 2.5-3.1 A at the dimeric interface along with the presence of water bridges. This is perhaps very unique example in proteins where subunit association is not a consequence of the predominance of hydrophobic interactions.

  17. Ethnic variation of the HLA-G*0105N allele in two Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Lin, A; Li, M; Xu, D-P; Zhang, W-G; Yan, W-H

    2009-03-01

    Unlike high polymorphic classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, the genetic polymorphism of HLA-G is very limited. However, the prevalence of HLA-G alleles among different ethnic populations varied dramatically. The HLA-G null allele (HLA-G*0105N) is defined by a cytosine deletion (Delta C) at position 1597 in exon 3, which disrupts the reading frame and alters the expression of HLA-G proteins. The HLA-G*0105N allelic frequency was investigated in previous studies and possible roles were addressed. In the current study, a total of 310 Chinese Han and 260 Chinese She ethnic minority population had been genotyped for the G*0105N polymorphism. Marked difference was observed that the G*0105N allelic frequency in Chinese Han was 1.61%, while no copy of the null allele was observed in the Chinese She minority population (P(c) = 0.0073). Data also revealed that no homozygote of HLA-G*0105N allele exists in this Chinese Han population. Furthermore, significant difference was found for the frequencies of HLA-G*0105N both in Chinese Han and in Chinese She populations when compared with other ethnic populations. Taken together, our results indicated that ethnic variation of the HLA-G*0105N polymorphism among different ethnic populations is possibly the result of evolution. However, the advantages of the selection of this allele are necessary to be further investigated.

  18. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  19. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Ferguson, Ardene L.

    1978-01-01

    Three different assay procedures have been used to quantitate the levels of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lectin in various tissues of soybean plants. The assays used were a standard hemagglutination assay, a radioimmunoassay, and an isotope dilution assay. Most of the lectin in seeds was found in the cotyledons, but lectin was also detected in the embryo axis and the seed coat. Soybean lectin was present in all of the tissues of young seedlings, but decreased as the plants matured and was not detectable in plants older than 2 to 3 weeks. Soybean lectin isolated from seeds of several soybean varieties were identical when compared by several methods. PMID:16660384

  20. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  1. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  2. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  3. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A M; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K; Veelken, Hendrik; Jumaa, Hassan

    2015-05-21

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches.

  4. New null screen design for corneal topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Estrada-Molina, Amilcar; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2011-09-01

    In this work we report the design of a null screen for corneal topography. Here we assume that the corneal surface is an ellipsoid with a diameter of 12 mm and a curvature radius of 7.8 mm. To avoid the difficulties in the alignment of the test system due to the face contour (eyebrows, nose, or eyelids), we design a conical null-screen with spots (similar to ellipses) drawn on it in such a way that its image, which is formed by reflection on the test surface, becomes an exact radial array of circular spots if the surface is perfect. Additionally, we performed a numerical simulation introducing Gaussian random errors in the coordinates of the centroids of the spots on the image plane, and in the coordinates of the sources (spots on the null-screen) in order to obtain the conical null-screen that reduces the error in the evaluation of the topography.

  5. On the Penrose inequality along null hypersurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, Marc; Soria, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    The null Penrose inequality, i.e. the Penrose inequality in terms of the Bondi energy, is studied by introducing a functional on surfaces and studying its properties along a null hypersurface Ω extending to past null infinity. We prove a general Penrose-type inequality which involves the limit at infinity of the Hawking energy along a specific class of geodesic foliations called Geodesic Asymptotically Bondi (GAB), which are shown to always exist. Whenever this foliation approaches large spheres, this inequality becomes the null Penrose inequality and we recover the results of Ludvigsen-Vickers (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 3349-53) and Bergqvist (1997 Class. Quantum Grav. 14 2577-83). By exploiting further properties of the functional along general geodesic foliations, we introduce an approach to the null Penrose inequality called the Renormalized Area Method and find a set of two conditions which imply the validity of the null Penrose inequality. One of the conditions involves a limit at infinity and the other a restriction on the spacetime curvature along the flow. We investigate their range of applicability in two particular but interesting cases, namely the shear-free and vacuum case, where the null Penrose inequality is known to hold from the results by Sauter (2008 PhD Thesis Zürich ETH), and the case of null shells propagating in the Minkowski spacetime. Finally, a general inequality bounding the area of the quasi-local black hole in terms of an asymptotic quantity intrinsic of Ω is derived.

  6. Phase-only nulling for transmit antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Moayyed A.; Yu, Kai-Bor

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a technique for transmit antenna nulling for low-cost large sparse phased array radar system. Radar system described includes an array of elemental antennas, each with a transmit/receive (T/R) module. The T/R modules are operated at or near maximum output to achieve maximum CD-to-RF efficiency. A phase controller controls the phase shift, which are imparted by each module to its signal, to form a mainbeam and its associated sidelobes. A perturbation phase generator adds phase shifts computed, to form wide nulls in the sidelobe structure. The nulls are achieved at very minimal loss of gain, in the order of fraction of a dB. The speed of obtaining these nulls in real time allows a rapid steering of these nulls in a hostile environment. The thinned aperture allow designing a light weigh mobile system. In radar context, these nulls may be placed on a source of ground clutter, a set of jammers or a set of undesirable radio sources.

  7. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  8. Lectin-binding by sporozoites of Elmeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A L; McDougald, L R

    2002-02-01

    Sporozoites of Eimeria tenella were reacted in vitro with 19 different lectins characterized with a variety of carbohydrate-binding properties. Nine lectins caused sporozoite agglutination, which was inhibited by the specific carbohydrates mannose, sialic acid, melibiose, D-galactose, or D-galNAc. When intact live or fixed whole sporozoites were reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectins, another nine lectins bound to sporozoites, giving weak to strong fluorescence but not agglutination. Of these, all nine lectins bound to surface sites, but four also bound to the refractile body. Two of the agglutinating lectins also bound to intracellular organelles of air-dried sporozoites. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that biotinylated lectins bound a wide variety of parasite proteins. Lectins with similar carbohydrate specificities had some similarity in binding patterns of parasite proteins, as well as marked differences. In a few cases lectins with different carbohydrate specificities bound common protein bands. Only one lectin (Dolichos biflorus) showed no evidence of binding to whole sporozoites, organelles, or proteins.

  9. Lectins, Interconnecting Proteins with Biotechnological/Pharmacological and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Priscila Marcelino dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are proteins extensively used in biomedical applications with property to recognize carbohydrates through carbohydrate-binding sites, which identify glycans attached to cell surfaces, glycoconjugates, or free sugars, detecting abnormal cells and biomarkers related to diseases. These lectin abilities promoted interesting results in experimental treatments of immunological diseases, wounds, and cancer. Lectins obtained from virus, microorganisms, algae, animals, and plants were reported as modulators and tool markers in vivo and in vitro; these molecules also play a role in the induction of mitosis and immune responses, contributing for resolution of infections and inflammations. Lectins revealed healing effect through induction of reepithelialization and cicatrization of wounds. Some lectins have been efficient agents against virus, fungi, bacteria, and helminths at low concentrations. Lectin-mediated bioadhesion has been an interesting characteristic for development of drug delivery systems. Lectin histochemistry and lectin-based biosensors are useful to detect transformed tissues and biomarkers related to disease occurrence; antitumor lectins reported are promising for cancer therapy. Here, we address lectins from distinct sources with some biological effect and biotechnological potential in the diagnosis and therapeutic of diseases, highlighting many advances in this growing field. PMID:28367220

  10. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    PubMed

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interactions suggesting of their use in diverse areas of glycobiology.

  11. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  12. Two roads to the null energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Maulik

    2015-11-01

    The null energy condition has sweeping consequences in general relativity. I argue here that it has been misunderstood as a property exclusively of matter, when in fact it arises only in a theory of both matter and gravity. I then derive an equivalent geometric formulation of the null energy condition from worldsheet string theory, where it arises beautifully as simple Einstein’s equations in two dimensions. But further, I show that this condition also has a thermodynamic origin, following from a local version of the second law of thermodynamics, applied to gravitational entropy. Thus, far from being an incidental property of matter, the validity of the null energy condition hints at the deep dual origins of gravity.

  13. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  14. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  15. A hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 highlights the role of TSC1/TSC2 in signaling to AKT and models mild human TSC2 alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollizzi, Kristen; Malinowska-Kolodziej, Izabela; Doughty, Cheryl; Betz, Charles; Ma, Jian; Goto, June; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2009-07-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome in which hamartomas develop in multiple organ systems. Knockout and conditional alleles of Tsc1 and Tsc2 have been previously reported. Here, we describe the generation of a novel hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 (del3), in which exon 3, encoding 37 amino acids near the N terminus of tuberin, is deleted. Embryos homozygous for the del3 allele survive until E13.5, 2 days longer than Tsc2 null embryos. Embryos die from underdevelopment of the liver, deficient hematopoiesis, aberrant vascular development and hemorrhage. Mice that are heterozygous for the del3 allele have a markedly reduced kidney tumor burden in comparison with conventional Tsc2(+/-) mice. Murine embryo fibroblast (MEF) cultures that are homozygous for the del3 allele express mutant tuberin at low levels, and show enhanced activation of mTORC1, similar to Tsc2 null MEFs. Furthermore, the mutant cells show prominent reduction in the activation of AKT. Similar findings were made in the analysis of homozygous del3 embryo lysates. Tsc2-del3 demonstrates GTPase activating protein activity comparable to that of wild-type Tsc2 in a functional assay. These findings indicate that the del3 allele is a hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 with partial function due to reduced expression, and highlight the consistency of AKT downregulation when Tsc1/Tsc2 function is reduced. Tsc2-del3 mice also serve as a model for hypomorphic TSC2 missense mutations reported in TSC patients.

  16. Adaptive Nulling for Interferometric Detection of Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Peters, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    An adaptive-nulling method has been proposed to augment the nulling-optical- interferometry method of detection of Earth-like planets around distant stars. The method is intended to reduce the cost of building and aligning the highly precise optical components and assemblies needed for nulling. Typically, at the mid-infrared wavelengths used for detecting planets orbiting distant stars, a star is millions of times brighter than an Earth-sized planet. In order to directly detect the light from the planet, it is necessary to remove most of the light coming from the star. Nulling interferometry is one way to suppress the light from the star without appreciably suppressing the light from the planet. In nulling interferometry in its simplest form, one uses two nominally identical telescopes aimed in the same direction and separated laterally by a suitable distance. The light collected by the two telescopes is processed through optical trains and combined on a detector. The optical trains are designed such that the electric fields produced by an on-axis source (the star) are in anti-phase at the detector while the electric fields from the planet, which is slightly off-axis, combine in phase, so that the contrast ratio between the star and the planet is greatly decreased. If the electric fields from the star are exactly equal in amplitude and opposite in phase, then the star is effectively nulled out. Nulling is effective only if it is complete in the sense that it occurs simultaneously in both polarization states and at all wavelengths of interest. The need to ensure complete nulling translates to extremely tight demands upon the design and fabrication of the complex optical trains: The two telescopes must be highly symmetric, the reflectivities of the many mirrors in the telescopes and other optics must be carefully tailored, the optical coatings must be extremely uniform, sources of contamination must be minimized, optical surfaces must be nearly ideal, and alignments

  17. Nulling Measurements with the Keck Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2009-08-05

    The Keck Interferometer provides a mid-infrared nulling capability that is designed to detect faint mid-infrared emission from the immediate vicinity of bright stars. The Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN) has now been used to carry out initial shared-risk science observations, followed by three nulling key-science projects performed in the 2008 observing semesters. This paper describes the novel measurement technique employed by the KIN, and lists some of the initial observations obtained with it. These data sets are now in the process of being analyzed, and results should begin emerging in the near future.

  18. Nulling Measurements with the Keck Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2009-08-01

    The Keck Interferometer provides a mid-infrared nulling capability that is designed to detect faint mid-infrared emission from the immediate vicinity of bright stars. The Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN) has now been used to carry out initial shared-risk science observations, followed by three nulling key-science projects performed in the 2008 observing semesters. This paper describes the novel measurement technique employed by the KIN, and lists some of the initial observations obtained with it. These data sets are now in the process of being analyzed, and results should begin emerging in the near future.

  19. A vacuum spacetime with closed null geodesics

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Debojit Patgiri, Mahadev Ahmed, Faiz Uddin

    2013-02-15

    Here we present a vacuum spacetime with closed null geodesics (CNGs). These CNGs are obtained by analytically solving the geodesic equations. This spacetime is locally isometric to the plane wave spacetime and has very different global properties from metrics of the latter type. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Closed null geodesics are found in a vacuum spacetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These are obtained by analytically solving the geodesic equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nature of the spacetime is fully analysed.

  20. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  1. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Santos, I K; Pereira, M E

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various 125I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  2. A comparison of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin with its deglycosylated derivative.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, D C; Graham, C; Urbaniak, S J; Jeffree, C E; Allen, A K

    1984-06-15

    A deglycosylated derivative of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin was prepared with the use of trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Its properties were generally similar to those of the native lectin, but differences were evident in terms of relative agglutinating activity towards sheep, (untreated) human and trypsin-treated human erythrocytes. The two forms of tomato lectin were used in conjunction with a battery of specific antisera to investigate structural relatedness among solanaceous lectins. Immunological cross-reactivity between tomato, potato and Datura lectins depends on the integrity of the glycosylated region of those lectins; that between Datura lectin and other seed lectins, however, has a separate structural basis.

  3. Polarization nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-04-03

    We introduce a new concept of nulling interferometer without any achromatic device, using polarization properties of light. This type of interferometer should enable a high rejection ratio in a theoretically unlimited spectral band. We analyze several consequences of the proposed design, notably, the possibility of fast internal modulation.

  4. A Philosophical Critique of Null Hypothesis Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orey III, Michael A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    An attempt is made to clarify the philosophical foundations of the debate over research methodology appropriate for psychology in particular and the utility of null hypothesis testing in general. The article also relates the debate to education and suggests that the debate is far from settled. (IAH)

  5. Taurodontism, variations in tooth number, and misshapened crowns in Wnt10a null mice and human kindreds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Reid, Bryan M; Hu, Yuanyuan; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Herzog, Curtis R; Kim-Berman, Hera; Lee, Moses; Benke, Paul J; Kent Lloyd, K C; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2015-01-01

    WNT10A is a signaling molecule involved in tooth development, and WNT10A defects are associated with tooth agenesis. We characterized Wnt10a null mice generated by the knockout mouse project (KOMP) and six families with WNT10A mutations, including a novel p.Arg104Cys defect, in the absence of EDA,EDAR, or EDARADD variations. Wnt10a null mice exhibited supernumerary mandibular fourth molars, and smaller molars with abnormal cusp patterning and root taurodontism. Wnt10a−/− incisors showed distinctive apical–lingual wedge-shaped defects. These findings spurred us to closely examine the dental phenotypes of our WNT10A families. WNT10A heterozygotes exhibited molar root taurodontism and mild tooth agenesis (with incomplete penetrance) in their permanent dentitions. Individuals with two defective WNT10A alleles showed severe tooth agenesis and had fewer cusps on their molars. The misshapened molar crowns and roots were consistent with the Wnt10a null phenotype and were not previously associated with WNT10A defects. The missing teeth contrasted with the presence of supplemental teeth in the Wnt10a null mice and demonstrated mammalian species differences in the roles of Wnt signaling in early tooth development. We conclude that molar crown and root dysmorphologies are caused by WNT10A defects and that the severity of the tooth agenesis correlates with the number of defective WNT10A alleles. PMID:25629078

  6. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  7. Choreography of Ig allelic exclusion.

    PubMed

    Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2008-06-01

    Allelic exclusion guarantees that each B or T cell only produces a single antigen receptor, and in this way contributes to immune diversity. This process is actually initiated in the early embryo when the immune receptor loci become asynchronously replicating in a stochastic manner with one early and one late allele in each cell. This distinct differential replication timing feature then serves an instructive mark that directs a series of allele-specific epigenetic events in the immune system, including programmed histone modification, nuclear localization and DNA demethylation that ultimately bring about preferred rearrangement on a single allele, and this decision is temporally stabilized by feedback mechanisms that inhibit recombination on the second allele. In principle, these same molecular components are also used for controlling monoallelic expression at other genomic loci, such as those carrying interleukins and olfactory receptor genes that require the choice of one gene out of a large array. Thus, allelic exclusion appears to represent a general epigenetic phenomenon that is modeled on the same basis as X chromosome inactivation.

  8. Description of HLA-A*0127N, a novel nonexpressed allele identified by SBT.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Elena; Frison, Sara; Andreini, Emanuela; Karpasitou, Katerina; Serafini, Marta; Poli, Francesca

    2007-11-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a novel HLA-A null allele, officially named A*0127N. The A*0127N exon 2, 3, and 4 nucleotide sequence is identical to that of A*010101 except at position 553, where a G is substituted by a T, resulting in a coding change in exon 3 (GAG>TAG) from Glu to the stop codon AMB. The mutation described is responsible for the premature ending of the translation.

  9. Isothermal calorimetric analysis of lectin-sugar interaction.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Matsuo, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful tool for analyzing lectin-glycan interactions because it can measure the binding affinity and thermodynamic properties such as ∆H and ΔS in a single experiment without any chemical modification or immobilization. Here we describe a method for preparing glycan and lectin solution to minimize the buffer mismatch, setting parameters, and performing experiments.

  10. Glycan profiling of endometrial cancers using lectin microarray.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Sugiyama, Taro; Miyazawa, Masaki; Muramatsu, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kyoko; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Mikami, Mikio

    2012-10-01

    Cell surface glycans change during the process of malignant transformation. To characterize and distinguish endometrial cancer and endometrium, we performed glycan profiling using an emerging modern technology, lectin microarray analysis. The three cell lines, two from endometrial cancers [well-differentiated type (G1) and poorly differentiated type (G3)] and one from normal endometrium, were successfully categorized into three independent groups by 45 lectins. Furthermore, in cancer cells, a clear difference between G1 and G3 type was observed for the glycans recognized with six lectins, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), Sambucus sieboldiana agglutinin (SSA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Trichosanthes japonica agglutinin I (TJA-I), Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA), and Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPL). The lectin microarray analysis using G3 type tissues demonstrated that stage I and stage III or IV were distinguished depending on signal pattern of three lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), BPL, and ACA. In addition, the analysis of the glycans on the ovarian cancer cells showed that only anticancer drug-sensitive cell lines had almost no activities to specific three lectins. Glycan profiling by the lectin microarray may be used to assess the characteristics of tumors and potentially to predict the success of chemotherapy treatment.

  11. Characterization of mannose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity capable of activating the lectin pathway of the complement system. A MBL gene was isolated from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The deduced protein contains a canonical collagen-like domain, a carbohydrate recognition d...

  12. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  13. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  14. Seven novel HLA alleles reflect different mechanisms involved in the evolution of HLA diversity: description of the new alleles and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Adamek, Martina; Klages, Cornelia; Bauer, Manuela; Kudlek, Evelina; Drechsler, Alina; Leuser, Birte; Scherer, Sabine; Opelz, Gerhard; Tran, Thuong Hien

    2015-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci are among the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The diversity of these genes is thought to be generated by different mechanisms including point mutation, gene conversion and crossing-over. During routine HLA typing, we discovered seven novel HLA alleles which were probably generated by different evolutionary mechanisms. HLA-B*41:21, HLA-DQB1*02:10 and HLA-DQA1*01:12 likely emerged from the common alleles of their groups by point mutations, all of which caused non-synonymous amino acid substitutions. In contrast, a deletion of one nucleotide leading to a frame shift with subsequent generation of a stop codon is responsible for the appearance of a null allele, HLA-A*01:123N. Whereas HLA-B*35:231 and HLA-B*53:31 were probably products of intralocus gene conversion between HLA-B alleles, HLA-C*07:294 presumably evolved by interlocus gene conversion between an HLA-C and an HLA-B allele. Our analysis of these novel alleles illustrates the different mechanisms which may have contributed to the evolution of HLA polymorphism.

  15. A developmentally regulated lectin in Bufo arenarum embryos.

    PubMed

    Elola, M T; Fink-de-Cabutti, N E; Herkovits, H

    1987-01-01

    We report the levels of an endogenous beta-galactoside lectin activity from Bufo arenarum whole embryos extracts and specific inhibition by saccharides at different developmental stages. Specific activity measured against trypsinized rabbit red blood cells showed relatively high and fluctuating levels during early stages (up to about 76 h post-fertilization) which fell to significantly lower and more constant values at late stages (77-264 h post-fertilization). Lactose is the most potent inhibitor of this lectin activity, and saccharides having alpha-galactoside configurations are weaker inhibitors. At the last embryonic stage, the agglutinating activity showed a different sugar specificity which suggests either the modification of the preexistent lectin or the synthesis of another type of lectin. The possible physiological roles of these lectins in the blockage of polyspermy or in embryonic cell-cell interactions are discussed.

  16. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  17. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  18. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes.

  19. Ureaplasma urealyticum binds mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Barbara D; Ourth, Donald D; Crouse, Dennis T; Shanklin, D Radford

    2004-10-01

    Mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity in mammals. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an acute phase protein, acts as an opsonin for phagocytosis and also activates the mannan-binding lectin complement pathway. It may play a particularly significant role during infancy before adequate specific protection can be provided by the adaptive immune system. Ureaplasma urealyticum has been linked to several diseases including pneumonia and chronic lung disease (CLD) in premature infants. We therefore investigated the ability of U. urealyticum to bind MBL. A guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit-MBL antiserum was produced. An immunoblot (dot-blot) assay done on nitrocellulose membrane determined that the anti-MBL antibody had specificity against both rabbit and human MBL. Pure cultures of U. urealyticum, serotype 3, were used to make slide preparations. The slides containing the organisms were then incubated with nonimmune rabbit serum containing MBL. Ureaplasma was shown to bind rabbit MBL with an immunocytochemical assay using the guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit MBL antiserum. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-guinea pig IgG was used to localize the reaction. The anti-MBL antiserum was also used in an immunocytochemical assay to localize U. urealyticum in histological sections of lungs from mice specifically infected with this organism. The same method also indicated binding of MBL by ureaplasma in human lung tissue obtained at autopsy from culture positive infants. Our results demonstrate that ureaplasma has the capacity to bind MBL. The absence of MBL may play a role in the predisposition of diseases related to this organism.

  20. Genotype and allele frequencies of isoniazid-metabolizing enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in Latvian tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Igumnova, Viktorija; Capligina, Valentina; Krams, Alvils; Cirule, Andra; Elferts, Didzis; Pole, Ilva; Jansone, Inta; Bandere, Dace; Ranka, Renate

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing of tuberculosis drug-metabolizing enzyme genes was proposed as a strategy to identify patients at risk for suboptimal responses to medications. However, variations of the genotype frequencies among ethnic groups exist and new alleles are been identified. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms of genes encoding metabolic enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in tuberculosis patients in Latvia and to estimate the frequency of NAT2 slow acetylator and GSTM1 null genotypes. In total, 85 DNA samples were genotyped, all individuals were Caucasian. An ethnic heterogeneity reflecting the multiethnic population of the country was observed. 49 patients were Latvians, 30 were Russians and 6 of other ethnicity. In total, 7 NAT2 alleles were identified: *4, *5, *6, *7, *11, *12, * and *13. The most frequent was the slow acetylation allele NAT2*6 (frequency 0.388) followed by the slow acetylation allele NAT2*5 and the rapid acetylation allele NAT2*4 (frequencies 0.306 and 0.194, respectively). The predominance of slow (51.8%) and intermediate (43.5%) acetylators compared with rapid acetylators (4.7%) was observed. The GSTM1 null genotype was detected in 48.2% of tuberculosis patients. When subgroup analysis was performed according to ethnicity, the results showed that neither NAT2 allele frequencies nor GSTM1 null genotype frequency did not differ significantly in TB patients of Latvian or Russian ethnicity. Overall, genotyping results were similar with previous reports of a NAT2 gene variation and GSTM1 null genotype frequency in Caucasians. Our findings have a contribution for the pharmacogenetics-based tuberculosis therapy in Latvia in future.

  1. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko

    2006-01-01

    A description of adaptive nulling for Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPFI) is presented. The topics include: 1) Nulling in TPF-I; 2) Why Do Adaptive Nulling; 3) Parallel High-Order Compensator Design; 4) Phase and Amplitude Control; 5) Development Activates; 6) Requirements; 7) Simplified Experimental Setup; 8) Intensity Correction; and 9) Intensity Dispersion Stability. A short summary is also given on adaptive nulling for the TPFI.

  2. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age.

  3. Lectin binding to cystic stages of Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R M; Williams, J F

    1984-10-01

    Studies of membrane glycoconjugates of Taenia taeniaeformis were initiated by assays of the lectin binding characteristics of 35-day-old cysticerci. Parasites fixed in glutaraldehyde were incubated with one of the following FITC-labelled lectins: Concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), fucose binding protein (FBP) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and either their specific or a nonspecific sugar. Ultraviolet microscopy revealed that only Con A and LCA bound in large amounts to the surface of cysticerci. This binding was partly inhibited by the specific sugar, but the nonspecific sugar had little effect. The lectin not removed by either of the sugars may have been bound nonspecifically to the charged glycocalyx. Lectins were primarily bound on the anterior third of the parasite around the scolex invagination. Kinetic studies of lectin interactions were carried out with LCA and RCA by spectrophotofluorometric analysis of the amount bound specifically or nonspecifically over a range of lectin concentrations. Lens culinaris lectin binding was found to be specific and involve 2 receptors which showed large differences in their affinity for lectin and prevalence on the surface. Ricinus communis lectin did not bind specifically but nonspecific interactions were observed. Adherence of small numbers of host cells was shown to have no measurable effect on the lectin binding characteristics. The results suggest that the major surface carbohydrates exposed are D-mannose and/or D-glucose residues with the other sugar groups poorly represented. This relatively homogeneous surface may have implications for the antigenicity of the parasite in its host.

  4. Isolation and characterization of lectins and lectin-alliinase complexes from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-04-01

    A procedure developed to separate the homodimeric and heterodimeric mannose-binding lectins from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) and ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) also enabled the isolation of stable lectin-alliinase complexes. Characterization of the individual lectins indicated that, in spite of their different molecular structure, the homomeric and heteromeric lectins resemble each other reasonably well with respect to their agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity. However, a detailed analysis of the lectin-alliinase complexes from garlic and ramsons bulbs demonstrated that only the heterodimeric lectins are capable of binding to the glycan chains of the alliinase molecules (EC 4.4.1.4). Moreover, it appears that only a subpopulation of the alliinase molecules is involved in the formation of lectin-alliinase complexes and that the complexed alliinase contains more glycan chains than the free enzyme. Finally, some arguments are given that the lectin-alliinase complexes do not occur in vivo but are formed in vitro after homogenization of the tissue.

  5. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  6. Morphological Uniformity and the Null Subject Parameter in Adult SLA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, William D.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the application of the Null Subject Parameter. Data reveals that some second-language learners exhibit knowledge that English is morphologically nonuniform yet still accept English null subject sentences. Findings disprove the Morphological Uniformity Hypothesis, indicating that any reformulation of the Null Subject Parameter must…

  7. Null conformal Killing-Yano tensors and Birkhoff theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, Joan Josep; Sáez, Juan Antonio

    2016-04-01

    We study the space-times admitting a null conformal Killing-Yano tensor whose divergence defines a Killing vector. We analyze the similarities and differences with the recently studied non null case (Ferrando and Sáez in Gen Relativ Gravit 47:1911, 2015). The results by Barnes concerning the Birkhoff theorem for the case of null orbits are analyzed and generalized.

  8. Null Subjects, Filled CPs, and L2 Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebuck, Regina F.; Martinez-Arbelaiz, Maria A.; Perez-Silva, Jorge I.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the acquisition of a non-null-subject language (English) by speakers of two different null-subject languages (Spanish and Chinese) in light of recent research in theoretical syntax that shows that different syntactic mechanisms are at work in the expression of null subjects in the two languages.(Author/VWL)

  9. Blob dynamics in TORPEX poloidal null configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, B. W.; Dudson, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    3D blob dynamics are simulated in X-point magnetic configurations in the TORPEX device via a non-field-aligned coordinate system, using an isothermal model which evolves density, vorticity, parallel velocity and parallel current density. By modifying the parallel gradient operator to include perpendicular perturbations from poloidal field coils, numerical singularities associated with field aligned coordinates are avoided. A comparison with a previously developed analytical model (Avino 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 105001) is performed and an agreement is found with minimal modification. Experimental comparison determines that the null region can cause an acceleration of filaments due to increasing connection length, but this acceleration is small relative to other effects, which we quantify. Experimental measurements (Avino 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 105001) are reproduced, and the dominant acceleration mechanism is identified as that of a developing dipole in a moving background. Contributions from increasing connection length close to the null point are a small correction.

  10. Chromatic assimilation measured by temporal nulling.

    PubMed

    Shevell, Steven K; Cao, Dingcai

    2006-01-01

    Chromatic assimilation is the shift in color appearance toward nearby light. Assimilation was measured using nearby light with time-varying chromaticity. This light induced time-varying assimilation within the test area. Assimilation was quantified by the amplitude of temporally varying test-area light--in counter-phase to the induced assimilation--required to null the assimilation. Unlike previous studies of assimilation, observers here judged only the steadiness of the test area, not its color. The inducing light was varied in luminance, temporal frequency and chromaticity. The measured assimilation could not be explained by only optical factors affecting receptoral quantal absorption. This implies a neural process contributes to assimilation. The nulling measurements showed also that assimilation was not induced independently within the L/M- and S-cone pathways.

  11. Null model analysis of species nestedness patterns.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Werner; Gotelli, Nicholas J

    2007-07-01

    Nestedness is a common biogeographic pattern in which small communities form proper subsets of large communities. However, the detection of nestedness in binary presence-absence matrices will be affected by both the metric used to quantify nestedness and the reference null distribution. In this study, we assessed the statistical performance of eight nestedness metrics and six null model algorithms. The metrics and algorithms were tested against a benchmark set of 200 random matrices and 200 nested matrices that were created by passive sampling. Many algorithms that have been used in nestedness studies are vulnerable to type I errors (falsely rejecting a true null hypothesis). The best-performing algorithm maintains fixed row and fixed column totals, but it is conservative and may not always detect nestedness when it is present. Among the eight indices, the popular matrix temperature metric did not have good statistical properties. Instead, the Brualdi and Sanderson discrepancy index and Cutler's index of unexpected presences performed best. When used with the fixed-fixed algorithm, these indices provide a conservative test for nestedness. Although previous studies have revealed a high frequency of nestedness, a reanalysis of 288 empirical matrices suggests that the true frequency of nested matrices is between 10% and 40%.

  12. CYP1A1 (Ile462Val), CYP1B1 (Ala119Ser and Val432Leu), GSTM1 (null), and GSTT1 (null) polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk in a Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Berber, Ufuk; Yilmaz, Ismail; Yilmaz, Omer; Haholu, Aptullah; Kucukodaci, Zafer; Ates, Ferhat; Demirel, Dilaver

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate bladder cancer risk with reference to polymorphic variants of cytochrome p450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1B1, glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1, and GSTT1 genes in a case control study. Polymorphisms were examined in 114 bladder cancer patients and 114 age and sex-matched cancer-free subjects. Genotypes were determined using allele specific PCR for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genes, and by multiplex PCR and melting curve analysis for GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes. Our results revealed a statistically significant increased bladder cancer risk for GSTT1 null genotype carriers with an odds ratio of 3.06 (95% confidence interval=1.39-6.74, p=0.006). Differences of CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and GSTM1 genotype frequencies were not statistically significant between patients and controls. However, the specific combination of GSTM1 null, GSTT1 null, and CYP1B1 codon 119 risk allele carriers and specific combination of GSTM1 present, GSTT1 null, and CYP1B1 432 risk allele carriers exhibited increased cancer risk in the combined analysis. We did not observe any association between different genotype groups and prognostic tumor characteristics of bladder cancer. Our results indicate that inherited absence of GSTT1 gene may be associated with bladder cancer susceptibility, and specific combinations of GSTM1, GSTT1 and CYP1B1 gene polymorphisms may modify bladder cancer risk in the Turkish population, without any association being observed for CYP1A1 gene polymorphism and bladder cancer risk.

  13. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  14. Bridging lectin binding sites by multivalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Valentin; Pieters, Roland J

    2013-05-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions are involved in a multitude of biological recognition processes. Since individual protein-carbohydrate interactions are usually weak, multivalency is often required to achieve biologically relevant binding affinities and selectivities. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for binding enhancement by multivalency, the simultaneous attachment of a multivalent ligand to several binding sites of a multivalent receptor (i.e. chelation) has been proven to have a strong impact. This article summarizes recent examples of chelating lectin ligands of different size. Covered lectins include the Shiga-like toxin, where the shortest distance between binding sites is ca. 9 Å, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (shortest distance between binding sites 13-14 Å), LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (shortest distance 26 Å), cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin (shortest distance 31 Å), anti-HIV antibody 2G12 (shortest distance 31 Å), concanavalin A (ConA) (shortest distance 72 Å), RCA120 (shortest distance 100 Å), and Erythrina cristagalli (ECL) (shortest distance 100 Å). While chelating binding of the discussed ligands is likely, experimental proof, for example by X-ray crystallography, is limited to only a few cases.

  15. Extreme high prevalence of a defective mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotype in native South American West Andean populations.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.

  16. Extreme High Prevalence of a Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin (MBL2) Genotype in Native South American West Andean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O.; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations. PMID:25313559

  17. A GLRA1 null mutation in recessive hyperekplexia challenges the functional role of glycine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.; Saul, M.; Becker, C.M.

    1996-05-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the human glycine receptor (GlyR) {alpha}1 subunit gene (GLRA1) give rise to hereditary hyperekplexia. These mutations impair agonist affinities and change conductance states of expressed mutant channels, resulting in a partial loss of function. In a recessive case of hyperekplexia, we found a deletion of exons 1-6 of the GLRA1 gene. Born to consanguineous parents, the affected child is homozygous for this GLRA1{sup null} allele consistent with a complete loss of gene function. The child displayed exaggerated startle responses and pronounced head-retraction jerks reflecting a disinhibition of vestigial brain-stem reflexes. In contrast, proprio- and exteroceptive inhibition of muscle activity previously correlated to glycinergic mechanisms were not affected. This case demonstrates that, in contrast to the lethal effect of a null allele in the recessive mouse mutant oscillator (Glra1{sup spd-ot}), the loss of the GlyR {alpha}1 subunit is effectively compensated in man. 38 refs.

  18. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  19. Extensive amino acid sequence homologies between animal lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Paroutaud, P.; Levi, G.; Teichberg, V.I.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have established the amino acid sequence of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from the electric eel and the sequences of several peptides from a similar lectin isolated from human placenta. These sequences were compared with the published sequences of peptides derived from the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from human lung and with sequences deduced from cDNAs assigned to the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins from chicken embryo skin and human hepatomas. Significant homologies were observed. One of the highly conserved regions that contains a tryptophan residue and two glutamic acid resides is probably part of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding site, which, on the basis of spectroscopic studies of the electric eel lectin, is expected to contain such residues. The similarity of the hydropathy profiles and the predicted secondary structure of the lectins from chicken skin and electric eel, in spite of differences in their amino acid sequences, strongly suggests that these proteins have maintained structural homologies during evolution and together with the other ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins were derived form a common ancestor gene.

  20. Cloning and characterization of root-specific barley lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, D.R.; Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNa library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A{sup +}) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A{sup +}) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site.

  1. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function.

  2. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J M

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses.

  3. Cloning and Characterization of Root-Specific Barley Lectin 1

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, David R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1989-01-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNA library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A+) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A+) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16666982

  4. Somatic mosaicism and allele complexity induced by CRISPR/Cas9 RNA injections in mouse zygotes.

    PubMed

    Yen, Shuo-Ting; Zhang, Min; Deng, Jian Min; Usman, Shireen J; Smith, Chad N; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Swinton, Paul G; Martin, James F; Behringer, Richard R

    2014-09-01

    Tyrosinase is the rate-limiting enzyme for the production of melanin pigmentation. In the mouse and other animals, homozygous null mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (Tyr) result in the absence of pigmentation, i.e. albinism. Here we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate mono- and bi-allelic null mutations in the Tyr locus by zygote injection of two single-guide and Cas9 RNAs. Injection into C57BL/6N wild-type embryos resulted in one completely albino founder carrying two different Tyr mutations. In addition, three pigmentation mosaics and fully pigmented littermates were obtained that transmitted new mutant Tyr alleles to progeny in test crosses with albinos. Injection into Tyr heterozygous (B6CBAF1/J×FVB/NJ) zygotes resulted in the generation of numerous albinos and also mice with a graded range of albino mosaicism. Deep sequencing revealed that the majority of the albinos and the mosaics had more than two new mutant alleles. These visual phenotypes and molecular genotypes highlight the somatic mosaicism and allele complexity in founders that occurs for targeted genes during CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis by zygote injection in mice.

  5. Purification, some properties of a D-galactose-binding leaf lectin from Erythrina indica and further characterization of seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Konozy, Emadeldin H E; Mulay, Ranjana; Faca, Vitor; Ward, Richard John; Greene, Lewis Joel; Roque-Barriera, Maria Cristina; Sabharwal, Sushma; Bhide, Shobhana V

    2002-10-01

    Lectin from a leaf of Erythrina indica was isolated by affinity chromatography on Lactamyl-Seralose 4B. Lectin gave a single band in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In SDS-gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions Erythrina indica leaf lectin (EiLL) split into two bands with subunit molecular weights of 30 and 33 kDa, whereas 58 kDa was obtained for the intact lectin by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. EiLL agglutinated all human RBC types, with a slight preference for the O blood group. Lectin was found to be a glycoprotein with a neutral sugar content of 9.5%. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin was directed towards D-galactose and its derivatives with pronounced preference for lactose. EiLL had pH optima at pH 7.0; above and below this pH lectin lost sugar-binding capability rapidly. Lectin showed broad temperature optima from 25 to 50 degrees C; however, at 55 degrees C EiLL lost more than 90% of its activity and at 60 degrees C it was totally inactivated. The pI of EiLL was found to be 7.6. The amino acid analysis of EiLL indicated that the lectin was rich in acidic as well as hydrophobic amino acids and totally lacked cysteine and methionine. The N-terminal amino acids were Val-Glu-Thr-IIe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Glu-Phe-Glu-Ala-Gly-Asn-Asp-X-Leu-Thr-Gln-Glu-Gly-Ala-Ala-Leu-. Chemical modification studies of both EiLL and Erythrina indica seed lectin (EiSL) with phenylglyoxal, DEP and DTNB revealed an absence of arginine, histidine and cysteine, respectively, in or near the ligand-binding site of both lectins. Modification of tyrosine with NAI led to partial inactivation of EiLL and EiSL; however, total inactivation was observed upon NBS-modification of two tryptophan residues in EiSL. Despite the apparent importance of these tryptophan residues for lectin activity they did not seem to have a direct role in binding haptenic sugar as D-galactose did not protect lectin from inactivation by NBS.

  6. Magnetic Null Points in Kinetic Simulations of Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  7. Self-assembled carbohydrate-based vesicles for lectin targeting.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marinalva Cardoso; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; da Silveira, Nadya Pesce; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Giacomelli, Fernando Carlos; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues; Frizon, Tiago Elias Allievi; Dal-Bó, Alexandre Gonçalves

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the physicochemical interactions between vesicles formed by phosphatidylcholine (PC) and glycosylated polymeric amphiphile N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminyl-PEG900-docosanate (C22PEG900GlcNAc) conjugated with Bauhinia variegata lectin (BVL). Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins capable of binding glycosylated membrane components. Accordingly, the surface functionalization by such entities is considered a potential strategy for targeted drug delivery. We observed increased hydrodynamic radii (RH) of PC+C22PEG900GlcNAc vesicles in the presence of lectins, suggesting that this aggregation was due to the interaction between lectins and the vesicular glycosylated surfaces. Furthermore, changes in the zeta potential of the vesicles with increasing lectin concentrations implied that the vesicular glycosylated surfaces were recognized by the investigated lectin. The presence of carbohydrate residues on vesicle surfaces and the ability of the vesicles to establish specific interactions with BVL were further explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. The results indicated that the thickness of the hydrophilic layer was to some extent influenced by the presence of lectins. The presence of lectins required a higher degree of polydispersity as indicated by the width parameter of the log-normal distribution of size, which also suggested more irregular structures. Reflectance Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis.) analyses revealed that the studied lectin preferentially interacted with the choline and carbonyl groups of the lipid, thereby changing the choline orientation and intermolecular interactions. The protein also discretely reduced the intermolecular communication of the hydrophobic acyl chains, resulting in a disordered state.

  8. System and Method for Null-Lens Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter C. (Inventor); Thompson, Patrick L. (Inventor); Aronstein, David L. (Inventor); Bolcar, Matthew R. (Inventor); Smith, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of measuring aberrations in a null-lens including assembly and alignment aberrations. The null-lens may be used for measuring aberrations in an aspheric optic with the null-lens. Light propagates from the aspheric optic location through the null-lens, while sweeping a detector through the null-lens focal plane. Image data being is collected at locations about said focal plane. Light is simulated propagating to the collection locations for each collected image. Null-lens aberrations may extracted, e.g., applying image-based wavefront-sensing to collected images and simulation results. The null-lens aberrations improve accuracy in measuring aspheric optic aberrations.

  9. In vivo biosynthetic studies of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.M.; Etzler, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The in vivo biosynthesis of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin was studied by pulse-chase labeling experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine. These studies demonstrate that each of the two mature lectin subunit types are derived by the processing of separate glycosylated precursors. The appearance of the precursor to subunit I before the precursor to subunit II supports the possibility raised by previous studies that both subunit types of this lectin may originate from a single gene product.

  10. Differential allelic expression of a fibrillin gene (FBNI) in patients with Marfan syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.; Lynch, J.; Sykes, B.; Firth, H.; Child, A.

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective-tissue disorder affecting cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. The major Marfan locus has been identified as the FBN1 gene on chromosome 15; this codes for the extracellular-matrix protein fibrillin, a 350-kD constituent of the 8-10-nm elastin-associated microfibrils. The authors identified five MFS patients who were heterozygous for an RsaI restriction-site dimorphism in the 3{prime} UTR of the FBN1 gene. This expressed variation was used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two FBN1 alleles in fibroblast cultures from these five patients. Three of the patients were shown to produce <5% of the normal level of FBN1 transcripts from one of their alleles. This null-allele phenotype was not observed in 10 nonmarfanoid fibroblast cell lines. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  11. The number of alleles at a microsatellite defines the allele frequency spectrum and facilitates fast accurate estimation of theta.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical work focused on microsatellite variation has produced a number of important results, including the expected distribution of repeat sizes and the expected squared difference in repeat size between two randomly selected samples. However, closed-form expressions for the sampling distribution and frequency spectrum of microsatellite variation have not been identified. Here, we use coalescent simulations of the stepwise mutation model to develop gamma and exponential approximations of the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum, a distribution central to the description of microsatellite variation across the genome. For both approximations, the parameter of biological relevance is the number of alleles at a locus, which we express as a function of θ, the population-scaled mutation rate, based on simulated data. Discovered relationships between θ, the number of alleles, and the frequency spectrum support the development of three new estimators of microsatellite θ. The three estimators exhibit roughly similar mean squared errors (MSEs) and all are biased. However, across a broad range of sample sizes and θ values, the MSEs of these estimators are frequently lower than all other estimators tested. The new estimators are also reasonably robust to mutation that includes step sizes greater than one. Finally, our approximation to the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum provides a null distribution of microsatellite variation. In this context, a preliminary analysis of the effects of demographic change on the frequency spectrum is performed. We suggest that simulations of the microsatellite frequency spectrum under evolutionary scenarios of interest may guide investigators to the use of relevant and sometimes novel summary statistics.

  12. Allelic diversity of metallothionein in Orchesella cincta (L.): traces of natural selection by environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, M J T N; Ellers, J; Van Straalen, N M

    2007-05-01

    The advances made in statistical methods to detect selection from DNA sequence variation has resulted in an enormous increase in the number of studies reporting positive selection. However, a disadvantage of such statistical tests is that often no insight into the actual source of selection is obtained. Finer understanding of evolution can be obtained when those statistical tests are combined with field observations on allele frequencies. We assessed whether the metallothionein (mt) gene of Orchesella cincta (Collembola), which codes for a metal-binding protein, is subject to selection, by investigating alleles and allele frequencies among European metal-stressed and reference populations. Eight highly divergent alleles were resolved in Northwest Europe. At the nucleotide level, a total of 51 polymorphic sites (five of them implying amino-acid changes) were observed. Although statistical tests applied to the sequences alone showed no indication of selection, a G-test rejected the null hypothesis that alleles are homogeneously distributed over metal-stressed and reference populations. Analysis of molecular variance assigned a small, but significant amount of the total variance to differences between metal-stressed and non-stressed populations. In addition, it was shown that metal-stressed populations tend to be more genetically diversified at this locus than non-stressed ones. These results suggest that the mt gene and its surrounding DNA region are affected by environmental metal contamination. This study illustrates that, in addition to statistical tests, field observations on allele frequencies are needed to gain understanding of selection and adaptive evolution.

  13. Displacing Unpredictable Nulls in Antenna Radiation Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James; Schaefer, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A method of maintaining radio communication despite the emergence of unpredictable fades and nulls in the radiation pattern of an antenna has been proposed. The method was originally intended to be applied in the design and operation of a radio antenna aboard a robotic exploratory vehicle on a remote planet during communication with a spacecraft in orbit around the planet. The method could also be applied in similar terrestrial situations for example, radio communication between two ground vehicles or between a ground vehicle and an aircraft or spacecraft. The method is conceptually simple, is readily adaptable to diverse situations, and can be implemented without adding greatly to the weight, cost, power demand, or complexity of a system to which it may be applied. The unpredictable fades and nulls in an antenna radiation pattern arise because of electromagnetic interactions between the antenna and other objects within the near field of the antenna (basically, objects within a distance of a few wavelengths). These objects can include general vehicle components, masts, robotic arms, other antennas, the ground, and nearby terrain features. Figure 1 presents representative plots of signal strength versus time during a typical pass of a spacecraft or aircraft through the far field of such an antenna, showing typical nulls and fades caused by nearby objects. The traditional approach to ensuring reliability of communication in the presence of deep fades calls for increasing the effective transmitter power and/or reducing the receiver noise figure at the affected ground vehicle, possibly in combination with appropriate redesign of the equipment at the spacecraft or aircraft end of the communication link. These solutions can be expensive and/or risky and, depending on the application, can add significantly to weight, cost, and power demand. The proposed method entails none of these disadvantages.

  14. Sidelobe Sector Nulling with Minimized Phase Perturbations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Sciences Division FOR THE COMMANDER: ~t~4iq JOHN A. RITZ Acting Chief, Plans Office If your address has changed or if you wish to be removed from the...Perturbations for Arrays of 11, 21, and 41 Elements W~41 z~ 21 7N II -2. 4.0 -J.0 -2.0 -11.6 0.0 1.!0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 LOGI 0 (42141) Figure 3. Look...Trans. Antennas Propag. AP-20:432 -436. 4. Baird , C. A., and Rassweiler, G. G. (1976) Adaptive sidelobe nulling using digitally controlled phase

  15. Null Energy Condition in Dynamic Wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, D.; Visser, M.

    1998-07-01

    We extend previous proofs that violations of the null energy condition are a generic and universal feature of traversable wormholes to completely nonsymmetric time-dependent wormholes. We show that the analysis can be phrased purely in terms of local geometry at and near the wormhole throat, and we do not have to make any technical assumptions about asymptotic flatness or other global properties. A key aspect of the analysis is the demonstration that time-dependent wormholes have {ital two} throats, one for each direction through the wormhole, and that the two throats coalesce only for the case of a static wormhole. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Specific interaction of lectins with liposomes and monolayers bearing neoglycolipids.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Vincent; Costa, Maria de Lourdes; Boullanger, Paul; Baszkin, Adam; Rosilio, Véronique

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of three lectins (wheat germ, Ulex europaeus I, and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinins: WGA, UEA-I and LTA) with either N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or L-fucose neoglycolipids incorporated into phospholipid monolayers and liposome bilayers was studied at the air/water interface and in bulk solution. The results show that for both systems studied, synthesized neoglycolipids were capable of binding their specific lectin and that, in general, the binding of lectins increased with the increase in the molar fraction of the saccharide derivative incorporated in either the monolayers or bilayers. However, whereas for UEA-I, molecular recognition was enhanced by a strong hydrophobic interaction, for WGA and LTA successful recognition was predominantly related to the distance between neighboring sugar groups. The observed lengthy adsorption times of these lectins onto their specific ligands were attributed to interfacial conformational changes occurring in the proteins upon their adsorption at the interfaces.

  17. Molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from Clivia miniata.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-03-01

    Screening of a cDNA library constructed from total RNA isolated from young developing ovaries of Clivia miniata Regel with the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone resulted in the isolation of four different isolectin clones which clearly differ from each other in their nucleotide sequences and hence also in their deduced amino acid sequences. Apparently the lectin is translated from an mRNA of ca. 800 nucleotides encoding a precursor polypeptide of 163 amino acids. Northern blot analysis of total RNA isolated from different tissues of Clivia miniata has shown that the lectin is expressed in most plant tissues with very high lectin mRNA concentrations in the ovary and the seed endosperm.

  18. Effect of plant lectins on Ustilago maydis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Santiago, A P; Saavedra, E; Pérez Campos, E; Córdoba, F

    2000-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is an edible parasitic basidiomycete, which specifically infects corn (Zea mays) and teocintle (Z. diploperennis). To characterise the interaction between the basidiomycete and its host organism, we tested the effect of plant lectins with well-known sugar specificity on the growth and germination of U. maydis spores. Lectins specific for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, such as those from Dolichos biflorus and Phaseolus lunatus, and the wheatgerm agglutinin specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine inhibited spore germination, but were ineffective in modifying U. maydis cell growth. The galactose-specific lectin from the corn coleoptyle inhibited both germination and cell growth, while the lectin concanavalin A (mannose/glucose specific) activated spore germination and growth. Our results suggest that specific saccharide-containing receptors participate in regulating the growth and maturation of U. maydis spores.

  19. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  20. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit.

  1. Development and Distribution of Dolichos biflorus Lectin as Measured by Radioimmunoassay 1

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Craig F.; Etzler, Marilynn E.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay, capable of detecting the Dolichos biflorus lectin at concentrations as low as 400 ng/ml, was developed and used to follow the distribution of this lectin in the plant during its life cycle. The lectin was first detected in the seeds of the plant 27 days after flowering and rapidly attained the high level of lectin present in the mature seed. The lectin content of the plant is highest in the seeds and cotyledons and decreases as the storage materials of the cotyledons decrease. A low but measurable amount of material that reacts with antibodies to the seed lectin was detected in the leaves, stems, and pods of the plant. This material gives a precipitin band of only partial identity to the seed lectin when tested in immunodiffusion against antiserum to the seed lectin. No lectin was detected by the radioimmunoassay in the roots of the plant at any stage of development. ImagesFIG. 4 PMID:16660399

  2. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  3. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  4. Recent developments with the visible nulling coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Lyon, Richard G.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Howard, Joseph M.; Miller, Ian J.

    2016-08-01

    A wide array of general astrophysics studies including detecting and characterizing habitable exoplanets could be enabled by a future large segmented telescope with sensitivity in the UV, optical, and infrared bands. When paired with a starshade or coronagraph, such an observatory could enable direct imaging and detailed spectroscopic observations of nearby Earth-like habitable zone planets. Over the past several years, a laboratory-based Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) has evolved to reach requisite contrasts over a 1 nm bandwidth at narrow source angle separation using a segmented deformable mirror in one arm of a Mach-Zehnder layout. More recent efforts targeted broadband performance following the addition of two sets of half-wave Fresnel rhomb achromatic phase shifters (APS) with the goal of reaching 10-9 contrast, at a separation of 2λ/D, using a 40 nm (6%) bandwidth single mode fiber source. Here we present updates on the VNC broadband nulling effort, including approaches to addressing system contrast limitations.

  5. A lectin with some unique characteristics from the samta tomato.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B

    2006-04-01

    A lectin, with a molecular mass of 79 kDa, and with specificity toward rhamnose and O-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, was isolated from samta tomato fruits. The procedure entailed ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-cellulose. The lectin was stable up to 70 degrees C. The lectin activity was potentiated by NaOH solutions (25-100 mM), but was reduced by 50 and 100 mM HCl solutions. The activity of the lectin was reduced in the presence of CaCl(2), MgCl(2) and ZnCl(2), but was potentiated by 5 and 10 mM AlCl(3) solutions. The lectin stimulated the mitogenic response in mouse splenocytes and inhibited human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 6.2 microM.

  6. On the null origin of the ambitwistor string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, Eduardo; Tourkine, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present the null string origin of the ambitwistor string. Classically, the null string is the tensionless limit of string theory, and so too is the ambitwistor string. Both have as constraint algebra the Galilean Conformal Algebra in two dimensions. But something interesting happens in the quantum theory since there is an ambiguity in quantizing the null string. We show that, given a particular choice of quantization scheme and a particular gauge, the null string coincides with the ambitwistor string both classically and quantum mechanically. We also show that the same holds for the spinning versions of the null string and ambitwistor string. With these results we clarify the relationship between the ambitwistor string, the null string, the usual string and the Hohm-Siegel-Zwiebach theory.

  7. Off-Axis Nulling Transfer Function Measurement: A First Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedova, G. Dalla; Menut, J.-L.; Millour, F.; Petrov, R.; Cassaing, F.; Danchi, W. C.; Jacquinod, S.; Lhome, E.; Lopez, B.; Lozi, J.; Marcotto, A.; Parisot, J.; Reess, J.-M.

    2013-01-01

    We want to study a polychromatic inverse problem method with nulling interferometers to obtain information on the structures of the exozodiacal light. For this reason, during the first semester of 2013, thanks to the support of the consortium PERSEE, we launched a campaign of laboratory measurements with the nulling interferometric test bench PERSEE, operating with 9 spectral channels between J and K bands. Our objective is to characterise the transfer function, i.e. the map of the null as a function of wavelength for an off-axis source, the null being optimised on the central source or on the source photocenter. We were able to reach on-axis null depths better than 10(exp -4). This work is part of a broader project aiming at creating a simulator of a nulling interferometer in which typical noises of a real instrument are introduced. We present here our first results.

  8. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  9. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  10. Null test of aspheric surfaces in zone-plate interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junejei; Chang, Chihui

    1992-10-01

    Instead of using lenses or mirrors as a null compensator, the construction of the zone plate interferometer is used to accomplish the null test. By choosing the focal length of the zone plate according to the radius of curvature and conic constant of the test surface, the conventional zone plate interferometer is modified to be a null test of concave conicoids. To test convex conicoids, an imaging lens is added between the zone plate and the test surface. As long as the zone plate is perfectly imaged into the center of the curvature of the test surface, a null test of convex conicoids is the same as that of concave ones.

  11. Adaptive interferometric null testing for unknown freeform optics metrology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Choi, Heejoo; Zhao, Wenchuan; Graves, Logan R; Kim, Dae Wook

    2016-12-01

    We report an adaptive interferometric null testing method for overcoming the dynamic range limitations of conventional null testing approaches during unknown freeform optics metrology or optics manufacturing processes that require not-yet-completed surface measurements to guide the next fabrication process. In the presented adaptive method, a deformable mirror functions as an adaptable null component for an unknown optical surface. The optimal deformable mirror's shape is determined by the stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm and controlled by a deflectometry system. An adaptive interferometric null testing setup was constructed, and its metrology data successfully demonstrated superb adaptive capability in measuring an unknown surface.

  12. Utilization of lectin-histochemistry in forensic neuropathology: lectin staining provides useful information for postmortem diagnosis in forensic neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Katsuji; Tanegashima, Akio; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Ushiyama, Ikuko; Ikemoto, Keiko; Yamasaki, Shigeru; Nishimura, Akiyoshi; Rand, Steven; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2003-09-01

    We have investigated the deposition of glycoconjugates in human brain tissue with or without brain disorders. In this review we describe the application of lectin-histochemistry techniques to forensic neuropathology. Lectin staining is able to reveal several kinds of carbohydrate-related depositions in addition to the conventional degenerative changes including senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and corpora amylacea. The senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles were clearly stained by Con A, PSA and GSI lectins, the corpora amylacea which is relevant to repeated brain hypoxia and mitochondrial damage was also easily detected by these and many other kinds of lectins. Amorphous spaces were detected around blood vessels and independently from blood vessels by lectin staining in the white matter from patients with brain disorders or severe edema. The white matter lesions were not considered relevant for forensic pathology, until a large group of cerebral white matter lesions were detected in the elderly with increasing frequency by modern neuro-imaging methods. The spherical deposits were newly detected by lectin staining in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation chiefly from patients with schizophrenia or cognitive dysfunctions.

  13. Nulling Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 m), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied.

  14. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-02

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects.

  15. Ocular Phenotype of Fbn2-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Tu, Yidong; Mecham, Robert P.; Bassnett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Fibrillin-2 (Fbn2) is the dominant fibrillin isoform expressed during development of the mouse eye. To test its role in morphogenesis, we examined the ocular phenotype of Fbn2−/− mice. Methods. Ocular morphology was assessed by confocal microscopy using antibodies against microfibril components. Results. Fbn2−/− mice had a high incidence of anterior segment dysgenesis. The iris was the most commonly affected tissue. Complete iridal coloboma was present in 37% of eyes. Dyscoria, corectopia and pseudopolycoria were also common (43% combined incidence). In wild-type (WT) mice, fibrillin-2-rich microfibrils are prominent in the pupillary membrane (PM) during development. In Fbn2-null mice, the absence of Fbn2 was partially compensated for by increased expression of fibrillin-1, although the resulting PM microfibrils were disorganized, compared with WTs. In colobomatous adult Fbn2−/− eyes, the PM failed to regress normally, especially beneath the notched region of the iris. Segments of the ciliary body were hypoplastic, and zonular fibers, although relatively plentiful, were unevenly distributed around the lens equator. In regions where the zonular fibers were particularly disturbed, the synchronous differentiation of the underlying lens fiber cells was affected. Conclusions. Fbn2 has an indispensable role in ocular morphogenesis in mice. The high incidence of iris coloboma in Fbn2-null animals implies a previously unsuspected role in optic fissure closure. The observation that fiber cell differentiation was disturbed in Fbn2−/− mice raises the possibility that the attachment of zonular fibers to the lens surface may help specify the equatorial margin of the lens epithelium. PMID:24130178

  16. Technology Advancement of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Thompson, Patrick; Bolcar, Matt; Madison, Timothy; Woodruff, Robert; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The critical high contrast imaging technology for the Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) mission concept is the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC). EPIC would be capable of imaging jovian planets, dust/debris disks, and potentially super-Earths and contribute to answering how bright the debris disks are for candidate stars. The contrast requirement for EPIC is 10(exp 9) contrast at 125 milli-arseconds inner working angle. To advance the VNC technology NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin, previously developed a vacuum VNC testbed, and achieved narrowband and broadband suppression of the core of the Airy disk. Recently our group was awarded a NASA Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions to achieve two milestones: (i) 10(exp 8) contrast in narrowband light, and, (ii) 10(ecp 9) contrast in broader band light; one milestone per year, and both at 2 Lambda/D inner working angle. These will be achieved with our 2nd generation testbed known as the visible nulling testbed (VNT). It contains a MEMS based hex-packed segmented deformable mirror known as the multiple mirror array (MMA) and coherent fiber bundle, i.e. a spatial filter array (SFA). The MMA is in one interferometric arm and works to set the wavefront differences between the arms to zero. Each of the MMA segments is optically mapped to a single mode fiber of the SFA, and the SFA passively cleans the sub-aperture wavefront error leaving only piston, tip and tilt error to be controlled. The piston degree of freedom on each segment is used to correct the wavefront errors, while the tip/tilt is used to simultaneously correct the amplitude errors. Thus the VNT controls both amplitude and wavefront errors with a single MMA in closed-loop in a vacuum tank at approx.20 Hz. Herein we will discuss our ongoing progress with the VNT.

  17. Quasilocal energy exchange and the null cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Nezihe

    2016-10-01

    Energy is at best defined quasilocally in general relativity. Quasilocal energy definitions depend on the conditions one imposes on the boundary Hamiltonian, i.e., how a finite region of spacetime is "isolated." Here, we propose a method to define and investigate systems in terms of their matter plus gravitational energy content. We adopt a generic construction, that involves embedding of an arbitrary dimensional world sheet into an arbitrary dimensional spacetime, to a 2 +2 picture. In our case, the closed 2-dimensional spacelike surface S , that is orthogonal to the 2-dimensional timelike world sheet T at every point, encloses the system in question. The integrability conditions of T and S correspond to three null tetrad gauge conditions once we transform our notation to the one of the null cone observables. We interpret the Raychaudhuri equation of T as a work-energy relation for systems that are not in equilibrium with their surroundings. We achieve this by identifying the quasilocal charge densities corresponding to rotational and nonrotational degrees of freedom, in addition to a relative work density associated with tidal fields. We define the corresponding quasilocal charges that appear in our work-energy relation and which can potentially be exchanged with the surroundings. These charges and our tetrad conditions are invariant under type-III Lorentz transformations, i.e., the boosting of the observers in the directions orthogonal to S . We apply our construction to a radiating Vaidya spacetime, a C -metric and the interior of a Lanczos-van Stockum dust metric. The delicate issues related to the axially symmetric stationary spacetimes and possible extensions to the Kerr geometry are also discussed.

  18. Nephropathy in Pparg-null mice highlights PPARγ systemic activities in metabolism and in the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Toffoli, Barbara; Gilardi, Federica; Winkler, Carine; Soderberg, Magnus; Kowalczuk, Laura; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Bamberg, Krister; Bonny, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor involved in many aspects of metabolism, immune response, and development. Total-body deletion of the two Pparg alleles provoked generalized lipoatrophy along with severe type 2 diabetes. Herein, we explore the appearance and development of structural and functional alterations of the kidney, comparing Pparg null-mice to their littermate controls (carrying Pparg floxed alleles). We show that renal hypertrophy and functional alterations with increased glucosuria and albuminuria are already present in 3 weeks-old Pparg null-mice. Renal insufficiency with decreased creatinine clearance progress at 7 weeks of age, with the advance of the type 2 diabetes. At 52 weeks of age, these alterations are accompanied by signs of fibrosis and mesangial expansion. More intriguingly, aged Pparg null-mice concomitantly present an anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS), characterized by the late appearance of microthrombi and a mesangioproliferative pattern of glomerular injury, associated with significant plasmatic levels of anti-β2- glycoprotein1 antibodies and renal deposition of IgG, IgM, and C3. Thus, in line with the role of PPARγ in metabolic homeostasis, Pparg null-mice first represent a potent model for studying the initiation and the development of diabetic nephropathy. Second, and in relation with the important PPARγ activity in inflammation and in immune system, these mice also highlight a new role for PPARγ signaling in the promotion of APS, a syndrome whose pathogenesis is poorly known and whose current treatment is limited to prevention of thrombosis events. PMID:28182703

  19. MAGNETIC NULL POINTS IN KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3–9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  20. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity.

  1. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  2. Null infinity and extremal horizons in AdS-CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Andrew; Lucietti, James; Wiseman, Toby

    2015-02-01

    We consider AdS gravity duals to CFT on background spacetimes with a null infinity. Null infinity on the conformal boundary may extend to an extremal horizon in the bulk. For example it does so for Poincaré-AdS, although does not for planar Schwarzschild-AdS. If null infinity does extend into an extremal horizon in the bulk, we show that the bulk near-horizon geometry is determined by the geometry of the boundary null infinity. Hence the ‘infra-red’ geometry of the bulk is fixed by the large scale behaviour of the CFT spacetime. In addition the boundary stress tensor must have a particular decay at null infinity. As an application, we argue that for CFT on asymptotically flat backgrounds, any static bulk dual containing an extremal horizon extending from the boundary null infinity, must have the near-horizon geometry of Poincaré-AdS. We also discuss a class of boundary null infinity that cannot extend to a bulk extremal horizon, although we give evidence that they can extend to an analogous null surface in the bulk which possesses an associated scale-invariant ‘near-geometry’.

  3. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-07-10

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  4. Exact null controllability of degenerate evolution equations with scalar control

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Vladimir E; Shklyar, Benzion

    2012-12-31

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for the exact null controllability of a degenerate linear evolution equation with scalar control are obtained. These general results are used to examine the exact null controllability of the Dzektser equation in the theory of seepage. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  5. Logarithmic corrections to gravitational entropy and the null energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Maulik; Svesko, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Using a relation between the thermodynamics of local horizons and the null energy condition, we consider the effects of quantum corrections to the gravitational entropy. In particular, we find that the geometric form of the null energy condition is not affected by the inclusion of logarithmic corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  6. Visual and Plastic Arts in Teaching Literacy: Null Curricula?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakeland, Robin Gay

    2010-01-01

    Visual and plastic arts in contemporary literacy instruction equal null curricula. Studies show that painting and sculpture facilitate teaching reading and writing (literacy), yet such pedagogy has not been formally adopted into USA curriculum. An example of null curriculum can be found in late 19th - early 20th century education the USA…

  7. Structure predictions of two Bauhinia variegata lectins reveal patterns of C-terminal properties in single chain legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Conceição, Fabricio R; McBride, Alan J A; Pinto, Luciano da S

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and -II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins.

  8. Structure Predictions of Two Bauhinia variegata Lectins Reveal Patterns of C-Terminal Properties in Single Chain Legume Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Conceição, Fabricio R.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Pinto, Luciano da S.

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and –II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins. PMID:24260572

  9. Probing the cons and pros of lectin-induced immunomodulation: case studies for the mistletoe lectin and galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H J

    2001-07-01

    When imagining to monitor animal cells through a microscope with resolution at the molecular level, a salient attribute of their surfaces will be the abundance of glycan chains. They present galactosides at their termini widely extending like tentacles into the extracellular space. Their spatial accessibility and their potential for structural variability endow especially these glycan parts with capacity to act as docking points for molecular sensors (sugar receptors such as lectins). Binding and ligand clustering account for transmission of post-binding signals into the cell interior. The range of triggered activities has turned plant lectins into popular tools in cell biology and immunology. Potential for clinical application has been investigated rigorously only in recent years. As documented in vitro and in vivo for the galactoside-specific mistletoe lectin, its apparent immunomodulatory capacity reflected in upregulation of production of proinflammatory cytokines will not necessarily be clinically favorable but a double-edged sword. In fact, lectin application has been shown to stimulate tumor growth in cell lines, histocultures of human tumors and in two animal models using chemical carcinogenesis or tumor transplantation. When testing immunological effects of the endogenous lectin galectin-1, protection against disorders mediated by activated T cells came up for consideration. Elimination of these cells via CD7-dependent induction of apoptosis, and a shift to the Th2 response by the galectin, are factors to ameliorate disease states. This result encourages further efforts with other galectins. Functional redundancy, synergism, diversity or antagonism among galectins are being explored to understand the actual role of this class of endogenous lectins in inflammation. Regardless of the results of further preclinical testing for galectin-1, these two case studies break new ground in our understanding how glycans as ligands for lectins convey reactivity to

  10. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches.

  11. Lectin histochemistry of palatine glands in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Zaki; Kitaura, Hideki; Honma, Shiho; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the binding pattern of lectins, soybean agglutinin (SBA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and succinylated WGA (sucWGA) in the developing rat palatine glands. In adult rats, heterogeneous lectin binding patterns were revealed between the anterior and posterior portions of palatine glands, as DBA, VVA, and WGA were bound more intensely and broadly in the posterior portion. SBA, PNA, and sucWGA showed far less reactivity in the anterior than in the posterior portion. At embryonic day 18 (E18), weak labeling was observed with UEA-I and WGA at the basal membrane of terminal buds, UEA-I and PNA labeled the epithelial cord, and there was no apparent binding for SBA, DBA, VVA, and sucWGA. At E20, after acinar lumenization, all lectins were detected at the acinar cell basal membranes. After birth, all lectins detectably labeled at the mucous cell apical membranes and progressively, with maturation, extended from the apical to basal portions of the cytoplasm. Apparent serous cells were observed around postnatal day 10 (PN10) and bound UEA-I. Lectins reached peak reactivity at PN21 and the binding patterns became identical to those of adults around PN28.

  12. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata lectin: isolation, characterization, and comparison.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata var. variegata seeds are rich in proteins. Previously, one of the major storage proteins of the seeds was found to be a trypsin inhibitor that possessed various biological activities. By using another purification protocol, a glucoside- and galactoside-binding lectin that demonstrated some differences from the previously reported B. variegata lectin could be isolated from the seeds. It involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and Mono Q, and also size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was not retained on Affi-gel blue gel but interacted with Q-Sepharose. The lectin was a 64-kDa protein with two 32-kDa subunits. It had low thermostability (stable up to 50 °C) and moderate pH stability (stable in pH 3-10). It exhibited anti-proliferative activity on nasopharyngeal carcinoma HONE1 cells with an IC50 of 12.8 μM after treatment for 48 h. It also slightly inhibited the growth of hepatoma HepG2 cells. The lectin may have potential in aiding cancer treatments.

  13. Lectin Activity in Gut Extract of Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Mona; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Abolhasani, Mandan; Charedar, Soroor; Basseri, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of lectins is important in interaction between pathogens and mosquito vectors. This study was performed to identify agglutinin activities of protein molecules on the midgut of Culex pipiens. Methods: Culex pipiens was reared in insectray condition and the midguts of males and females (blood fed and unfed) were dissected separately in Tris-HCl buffer. The extracts of midguts were applied for hemagglutinin assay against red blood cells of rabbit, mouse, rat, dog, horse, sheep, guinea pig, cow, human (A, B, AB, O groups). Then, the RBCs with relatively high agglutinin activity were chosen for carbohydrate inhibition assay. D (+) glucose, D (+) galactose, D (+) mannose, D (−) fructose, D (−) arabinose, L (−) fucose, lactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid were used to specify carbohydrate binding lectin. Results: The highest agglutinin activities were found against sheep and rabbits RBCs. Sexual diversity of agglutinin activities was observed among midgut extraction of males and females. In addition, variation in agglutinin activity of blood fed and unfed female mosquitoes were detected. The lectin activity was inhibited highly with glucose, galactose, fucose and fructose but less inhibitor activities was observed by arabinose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, n-acetyl-d-glucosamine, lactose and mannose. Conclusion: The secretion of hemagglutinins (lectins or lectin-like molecules) in the digestive system depends on the type of food in the gut. This suggests that emptying of the gut in preparation for protein rich food probably starts the secretion of hemagglutinins. PMID:23785692

  14. The Visible Nulling Coronagraph--Architecture Definition and Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. Martin; Wallace, J. Kent; Liu, Duncan T.; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Serabyn, Eugene; Mennesson, Bertrand; Green, Joseph J.; Aguayo, Francisco; Fregoso, S. Felipe; Lane, Benjamin F.; Samuele, Rocco; Tuttle, Carl

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages of visible direct detection and spectroscopy of Earth-like extrasolar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a moderately sized single aperture space telescope. Our concept synthesizes a nulling interferometer by shearing the telescope pupil, with the resultant producing a deep null. We describe nulling configurations that also include methods to mitigate stellar leakage, such as spatial filtering by a coherent array of single mode fibers, and post-starlight suppression wavefront sensing and control. With diffraction limited telescope optics and similar quality components in the optical train (lambda/20), suppression of the starlight to 1e-10 is readily achievable. We describe key features of the architecture and analysis, present latest results of laboratory measurements demonstrating achievable null depth and component development, and discuss future key technical milestones.

  15. Conditional inactivation of the mouse Wwox tumor suppressor gene recapitulates the null phenotype†

    PubMed Central

    Abdeen, Suhaib K.; Mare, Sara Del; Hussain, Sadeeq; Remaileh, Muhannad Abu; Salah, Zaidoun; Hagan, John; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Pu, Xin-an; Russell, Stacey; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2013-01-01

    WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is highly conserved in both humans and murine. WWOX spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, and is commonly inactivated in multiple human cancers. Modeling WWOX inactivation in mice revealed a complex phenotype including postnatal lethality, defects in bone metabolism and steroidogenesis and tumor suppressor function resulting in osteosarcomas. For better understanding of WWOX roles in different tissues at distinct stages of development and in pathological conditions, Wwox conditional knockout mice were generated in which loxp sites flank exon 1 in the Wwox allele. We demonstrated that Cre-mediated recombination using EIIA-Cre, a Cre line expressed in germline, results in postnatal lethality by age of three weeks and decreased bone mineralization resembling total ablation of WWOX as in conventional null mice. This animal model will be useful to study distinct roles of WWOX in multiple tissues at different ages. PMID:23254685

  16. Conditional inactivation of the mouse Wwox tumor suppressor gene recapitulates the null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Abdeen, Suhaib K; Del Mare, Sara; Hussain, Sadeeq; Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Salah, Zaidoun; Hagan, John; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Pu, Xin-An; Russell, Stacey; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2013-07-01

    WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is highly conserved in both human and murine. WWOX spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, and is commonly inactivated in multiple human cancers. Modeling WWOX inactivation in mice revealed a complex phenotype including postnatal lethality, defects in bone metabolism and steroidogenesis and tumor suppressor function resulting in osteosarcomas. For better understanding of WWOX roles in different tissues at distinct stages of development and in pathological conditions, Wwox conditional knockout mice were generated in which loxp sites flank exon 1 in the Wwox allele. We demonstrated that Cre-mediated recombination using EIIA-Cre, a Cre line expressed in germline, results in postnatal lethality by age of 3 weeks and decreased bone mineralization resembling total ablation of WWOX as in conventional null mice. This animal model will be useful to study distinct roles of WWOX in multiple tissues at different ages.

  17. Partial deletion in the JK locus causing a Jk(null) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Nicole; Chiaroni, Jacques; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Bailly, Pascal

    2002-02-01

    A new alteration of the blood group JK*A allele was identified in a Jk(null) patient from Tunisia with an allo-anti-Jk3 in her serum. Southern blot and exon mapping analyses revealed an internal deletion within the Kidd (JK) locus encompassing exons 4 and 5. Sequence analysis of the Jk transcript showed that exons 4 and 5 were missing but were replaced by a 136-base-pair (bp) intron 3 sequence located 315 bp and 179 bp upstream from exon 4. This sequence is flanked by typical donor-acceptor cryptic splice sites used in the mutant but not in the normal JK gene. Because the translation initiation codon is located in exon 4, the Jk protein is not produced.

  18. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively.

  19. Recombinant lectins: an array of tailor-made glycan-interaction biosynthetic tools.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2013-03-01

    Lectins are a heterogeneous group of proteins found in plants, animals and microorganisms, which possess at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific mono- or oligosaccharides. The range of lectins and respective biological activities is unsurprising given the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and the multiple modes of interaction with proteins. Recombinant DNA technology has been traditionally used for cloning and characterizing newly discovered lectins. It has also been employed as a means of producing pure and sequence-defined lectins for different biotechnological applications. This review focuses on the production of recombinant lectins in heterologous organisms, and highlighting the Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris expression systems, which are the most employed. The choice of expression host depends on the lectin. Non-glycosylated recombinant lectins are produced in E. coli and post-translational modified recombinant lectins are produced in eukaryotic organisms, namely P. pastoris and non-microbial hosts such as mammalian cells. Emphasis is given to the applications of the recombinant lectins especially (a) in cancer diagnosis and/or therapeutics, (b) as anti-microbial, anti-viral, and anti-insect molecules or (c) in microarrays for glycome profiling. Most reported applications are from recombinant plant lectins. These applications benefit from the tailor-made design associated with recombinant production and will aid in unraveling the complex biological mechanisms of glycan-interactions, bringing recombinant lectins to the forefront of glycobiology. In conclusion, recombinant lectins are developing into valuable biosynthetic tools for biomedical research.

  20. Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    SIl Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the...16 Wheat Germ Lectin Electrophoresis to Quantitate Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes ................ 16 Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzyme...vs Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis ......................... 40 Clinical Correlation Using Wheat Germ Lectin 45 Placental Alkaline Phosphatase

  1. Null Models for Everyone: A Two-Step Approach to Teaching Null Model Analysis of Biological Community Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Declan J.; Knight, Evelyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Since being introduced by Connor and Simberloff in response to Diamond's assembly rules, null model analysis has been a controversial tool in community ecology. Despite being commonly used in the primary literature, null model analysis has not featured prominently in general textbooks. Complexity of approaches along with difficulty in interpreting…

  2. Studies on lectins. XLIX. The use of glycosyl derivatives of Dextran T-500 for affinity electrophoresis of lectins.

    PubMed

    Cerovský, V; Tichá, M; Horejsi, V; Kocourek, J

    1980-09-01

    p-Aminophenyl glycosides and glycosylamines were coupled to periodate oxidized Dextran T-500 either directly or through an epsilon-aminocaproic acid spacer. The new glycosylated derivatives of dextran specifically precipitate lectins having the appropriate carbohydrate specificity, and thus were used in the preparation of affinity gels for affinity electrophoresis of lectins. The apparent strength of interaction of several lectins with carbohydrate residues immobilized in this way was less than with carbohydrates immobilized in O-glycosyl polyacrylamide copolymers. The presence of epsilon-aminocaproic spacer had no effect on the strength of interaction. The advantages of this type of macromolecular derivative of the ligand for affinity electrophoresis and some differences between the glycosylated dextrans and O-glycosyl polyacrylamide copolymers are discussed. Dextrans containing bound p-aminophenyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside and p-aminophenyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside were used to study the binding properties of concanavalin A and the lectin from Lathyrus sativus seeds. For the investigation of interaction of lectins from Ricinus communis and Glycine soja seeds, dextran derivatives containing bound p-aminophenyl alpha- and beta-D-galactopyranosides and alpha- and beta-D-galactopyranosylamines were used.

  3. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-09

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport.

  4. Parkia pendula lectin as histochemistry marker for meningothelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Beltrão, E I C; Medeiros, P L; Rodrigues, O G; Figueredo-Silva, J; Valença, M M; Coelho, L C B B; Carvalho, L B

    2003-01-01

    Lectins have been intensively used in histochemical techniques for cell surface characterization. These proteins are involved in several biological processes and their use as histochemical markers have been evaluated since they can indicate differences in cell surfaces. Parkia pendula lectin (PpeL) was evaluated as histochemical marker for meningothelial meningioma biopsies. Tissue slices were incubated with PpeL conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (PpeL-HRP) and Concanavalin A-HRP (ConA-HPR) and the binding visualized with diaminobenzidine and hydrogen peroxide. The lectin-tissue binding was inhibited with D-glucose. PpeL showed to be a useful tool for the characterization of meningothelial tumour and clinico-pathological diagnosis.

  5. Wormholes minimally violating the null energy condition

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Lobo, Francisco S N; Martín-Moruno, Prado E-mail: fslobo@fc.ul.pt

    2014-11-01

    We consider novel wormhole solutions supported by a matter content that minimally violates the null energy condition. More specifically, we consider an equation of state in which the sum of the energy density and radial pressure is proportional to a constant with a value smaller than that of the inverse area characterising the system, i.e., the area of the wormhole mouth. This approach is motivated by a recently proposed cosmological event, denoted {sup t}he little sibling of the big rip{sup ,} where the Hubble rate and the scale factor blow up but the cosmic derivative of the Hubble rate does not [1]. By using the cut-and-paste approach, we match interior spherically symmetric wormhole solutions to an exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and analyse the stability of the thin-shell to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations around static solutions, by choosing suitable properties for the exotic material residing on the junction interface radius. Furthermore, we also consider an inhomogeneous generalization of the equation of state considered above and analyse the respective stability regions. In particular, we obtain a specific wormhole solution with an asymptotic behaviour corresponding to a global monopole.

  6. Parallel Reconstruction Using Null Operations (PRUNO)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Chunlei; Moseley, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    A novel iterative k-space data-driven technique, namely Parallel Reconstruction Using Null Operations (PRUNO), is presented for parallel imaging reconstruction. In PRUNO, both data calibration and image reconstruction are formulated into linear algebra problems based on a generalized system model. An optimal data calibration strategy is demonstrated by using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). And an iterative conjugate- gradient approach is proposed to efficiently solve missing k-space samples during reconstruction. With its generalized formulation and precise mathematical model, PRUNO reconstruction yields good accuracy, flexibility, stability. Both computer simulation and in vivo studies have shown that PRUNO produces much better reconstruction quality than autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA), especially under high accelerating rates. With the aid of PRUO reconstruction, ultra high accelerating parallel imaging can be performed with decent image quality. For example, we have done successful PRUNO reconstruction at a reduction factor of 6 (effective factor of 4.44) with 8 coils and only a few autocalibration signal (ACS) lines. PMID:21604290

  7. A Null Model for Pearson Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Andrea; Jurman, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gene coexpression networks inferred by correlation from high-throughput profiling such as microarray data represent simple but effective structures for discovering and interpreting linear gene relationships. In recent years, several approaches have been proposed to tackle the problem of deciding when the resulting correlation values are statistically significant. This is most crucial when the number of samples is small, yielding a non-negligible chance that even high correlation values are due to random effects. Here we introduce a novel hard thresholding solution based on the assumption that a coexpression network inferred by randomly generated data is expected to be empty. The threshold is theoretically derived by means of an analytic approach and, as a deterministic independent null model, it depends only on the dimensions of the starting data matrix, with assumptions on the skewness of the data distribution compatible with the structure of gene expression levels data. We show, on synthetic and array datasets, that the proposed threshold is effective in eliminating all false positive links, with an offsetting cost in terms of false negative detected edges. PMID:26030917

  8. A null model for Pearson coexpression networks.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Andrea; Jurman, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gene coexpression networks inferred by correlation from high-throughput profiling such as microarray data represent simple but effective structures for discovering and interpreting linear gene relationships. In recent years, several approaches have been proposed to tackle the problem of deciding when the resulting correlation values are statistically significant. This is most crucial when the number of samples is small, yielding a non-negligible chance that even high correlation values are due to random effects. Here we introduce a novel hard thresholding solution based on the assumption that a coexpression network inferred by randomly generated data is expected to be empty. The threshold is theoretically derived by means of an analytic approach and, as a deterministic independent null model, it depends only on the dimensions of the starting data matrix, with assumptions on the skewness of the data distribution compatible with the structure of gene expression levels data. We show, on synthetic and array datasets, that the proposed threshold is effective in eliminating all false positive links, with an offsetting cost in terms of false negative detected edges.

  9. Lectin histochemical studies on the vomeronasal organ of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ of sheep was examined using lectin histochemistry in order to compare the types and amounts of the glycoconjugates among various components of the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. In the vomeronasal sensory epithelium, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) stained particular cells, located at the same level as the vomeronasal receptor cells, while the distribution, shape and number of the stained cells did not correspond to those of the vomeronasal receptor cells. Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L) labeled the basal cells of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. While, Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL) and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120) labeled the basal cells of the sensory epithelium, and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I) stained the basal cells of the non-sensory epithelium, respectively. Seventeen lectins labeled the free border of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, while Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Jacalin and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) labeled neither free border of the sensory nor that of non-sensory epithelia. The expression pattern of glycoconjugate was similar, but not identical, in the free border between the sensory and non-sensory epithelia. These results indicate that there are dissimilar features in the type and amount of glycoconjugates between the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, and at the same time, among the various cell types either in the vomeronasal sensory or non-sensory epithelium.

  10. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Lectin binding to olfactory system in a shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, V; Ciani, F

    1993-01-01

    Lectin histochemical studies were performed on the olfactory system of Scyliorhinus canicula to identify specific glycoconjugates on the cell surface of primary olfactory neurons. The olfactory receptor cells, the olfactory nerve fibers and their terminals in the bulbs were labelled with SBA, BSA-I and BSA-I-B4. The lectin staining patterns indicate that the membranes of small-spotted catshark olfactory neurons had glycoproteins with alpha-galactose residues. This carbohydrate moiety could be related to modulation of the cell-cell interactions in the olfactory system.

  12. Ribosome-inactivating lectins with polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Barbieri, L; Bolognesi, A; Buonamici, L; Valbonesi, P; Polito, L; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Stirpe, F

    1997-05-26

    Lectins from Aegopodium podagraria (APA), Bryonia dioica (BDA), Galanthus nivalis (GNA), Iris hybrid (IRA) and Sambucus nigra (SNAI), and a new lectin-related protein from Sambucus nigra (SNLRP) were studied to ascertain whether they had the properties of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP). IRA and SNLRP inhibited protein synthesis by a cell-free system and, at much higher concentrations, by cells and had polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity, thus behaving like non-toxic type 2 (two chain) RIP. APA and SNAI had much less activity, and BDA and GNA did not inhibit protein synthesis.

  13. Retarded Fields of Null Particles and the Memory Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert

    2014-03-01

    We consider the scalar, electromagnetic and linearized gravitational fields produced by a particle moving on a null geodesic. We cut off the null source at a finite time t0 and then consider two limits: (i) the limit as the observation point goes to null infinity at fixed t0, and (ii) the limit t0 --> - ∞ at fixed observation point. Limit (i) gives rise to a velocity kick on distant test particles in the scalar and electromagnetic cases, and a memory effect (permanent change in relative separation of test particles) in the gravitational case, in agreement with past analyses. Limit (ii) does not exist in the scalar case or for the Lorenz gauge potential and metric perturbation in the electromagnetic and gravitational cases. However, we find well defined distributional limits for the electromagnetic field strength and Riemann tensors. In the gravitational case, there is no memory effect associated with this limit. This suggests that the memory effect should not be interpreted as arising simply from the passage of null stress energy to null infinity but rather as arising from a burst of radiation associated with the creation of the null stress-energy (as in case (i)) or, more generally, with radiation present that was not produced by the null stress-energy.

  14. Laboratory performance of the Keck interferometer nulling beam combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, B.; Crawford, S. L.; Serabyn, E.; Martin, S.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Hardy, G.

    2003-01-01

    Now that regular visibility squared measurements are routinely achieved, mid-infrared nulling is the next observing mode to be implemented on the Keck Interferometer. This mode's main objective is the characterization of exo-zodiacal dust disks around nearby main sequence stars in support of the TPF space mission. Keck Nuller also shares numerious characteristics with an interferometric TPF, and will then serve as a technical precursor for this mission. We report here the results obtained in the laboratory with the KI mid-IR nulling beam combiner, which is based on a dual polarization Modified Mach Zender combiner and dispersion and achromatic nulling through zinc-selenide dielectric plates.

  15. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: ULYSSES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  16. Molecular basis for the CAT-2 null phenotype in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Bethards, L.A.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have described several maize lines whose developmental patterns of catalase gene expression vary from the typical maize line, W64A. Among these variants are the lines A16 and A338, both found to be null for the CAT-2 protein. Identification of a third CAT-2 null line, designated A340, is described. RNA blots and S1 nuclease protection analysis, using (/sup 32/P)-labeled dCTP, indicate that all three CAT-2 null lines produce a similarly shortened Cat2 transcript. The molecular basis for this aberrant Cat2 transcript is discussed.

  17. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.; Smith, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  18. A novel codominant marker for selection of the null Wx-B1 allele in wheat breeding programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Waxy protein (granule-bound starch synthase I) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of amylose in endosperm tissue. The amylose content of wheat flour plays a significant role in determining Japanese udon noodle quality. Most wheat cultivars suitable for producing udon noodles have a low amylose level d...

  19. A novel measurement of allele discrimination for assessment of allele-specific silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2014-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing by RNA interference (ASP-RNAi) is an atypical RNAi that is capable of discriminating target alleles from non-target alleles, and may be therapeutically useful for specific inhibition of disease-causing alleles without affecting their corresponding normal alleles. However, it is difficult to design and select small interfering RNA (siRNAs) that confer ASP-RNAi. A major problem is that there are few appropriate measures in determining optimal allele-specific siRNAs. Here we show two novel formulas for calculating a new measure of allele-discrimination, named "ASP-score". The formulas and ASP-score allow for an unbiased determination of optimal siRNAs, and may contribute to characterizing such allele-specific siRNAs.

  20. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  1. Purification and characterization of a new type lactose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1991-02-01

    A new type lactose-binding lectin was purified from extracts of Ulex europaeus seeds by affinity chromatography on a column of galactose-Sepharose 4B, followed by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. This lectin, designated as Ulex europaeus lectin III (UEA-III), was found to be inhibited by lactose. The dimeric lectin is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 70,000 Da; it consists of two apparently identical subunits of a molecular mass of 34,000 Da. Compositional analysis showed that this lectin contains 30% carbohydrate and a large amount of aspartic acid, serine and valine, but no sulfur-containing amino acids. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I) and di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II), both of which we have already purified and characterized, and that of UEA-III were determined and compared.

  2. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  3. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  4. The visible nulling coronagraph -- progress towards mission and technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. Martin; Wallace, J. Kent; Serabyn, Eugene; Liu, Duncan T.; Lane, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a space mission for visible direct detection and spectroscopy of Earth like extrasolar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a moderately sized telescope in space.

  5. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure.

    PubMed

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-02-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Incorporating these processes fundamentally alters the structure of communities expected due to chance, with speciation leading to phylogenetic overdispersion compared to a classical statistical null model assuming equal probabilities of community membership. Applying this method to bird and primate communities in South America we show that patterns of phylogenetic overdispersion - often attributed to negative biotic interactions - are instead consistent with a species neutral model of allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Our findings provide a new null expectation for phylogenetic community patterns and highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the dynamic history of assembly when testing the mechanisms governing community structure.

  6. Momordica charantia seed lectin: toxicity, bacterial agglutination and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Nabi, Md Mahamodun; Nurujjaman, Md; Abu Reza, Md; Alam, A H M Khurshid; Uz Zaman, Rokon; Khalid-Bin-Ferdaus, Khandaker Md; Amin, Ruhul; Khan, Md Masudul Hasan; Hossain, Md Anowar; Uddin, Md Salim; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat

    2015-03-01

    In last three decades, several studies were carried out on the D-galactose-specific lectin of Momordica charantia seeds (MCL). In the present study, in vitro growth inhibition (8-23 %) at different concentrations (6-24 μg/ml) of MCL was observed against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. MCL also showed 28, 45, and 75 % growth inhibitions against EAC cells when administered 1.2, 2.0, and 2.8 mg/kg/day (i.p.), respectively for five consequent days in vivo in mice. After lectin treatment, the level of red blood cell and hemoglobin was increased significantly with the decrease of white blood cell and maintained the normal level when compared with EAC-bearing control and normal mice without EAC cells. Although MCL caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase of EAC cells, any irregular shape or apoptotic morphological alterations in the lectin-treated EAC cells was not observed by an optical and fluorescence microscope. Lectin showed toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii with an LC50 value of 49.7 μg/ml. Four out of seven pathogenic bacteria were agglutinated by MCL in the absence of inhibitory sugar D-lactose/D-galactose. In conclusion, MCL showed strong cytotoxic effect and therefore can be used as a potent anticancer chemotherapeutic agent.

  7. Lectin Binding to Radopholus citrophilus and R. similis Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Gottwald, T R

    1992-06-01

    Lectin-binding glycoproteins in seven populations of two burrowing nematode sibling species were probed with five different biotinylated lectins on Western blots, and differences were correlated with nematode ability to parasitize citrus and to overcome citrus rootstock resistance. Banding patterns of molecular weight standards were fit best by an exponential decay function, and a predictive equation was used to estimate molecular weights (r(2) = 0.999). A band (131 kDa) that labeled with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) occurred in extracts from cuticles and egg shells of populations of Radopholus citrophilus that parasitize citrus. Wheat germ agglutin labeled a band (58 kDa) in aqueous homogenates of populations that reproduce in roots of citrus rootstock normally resistant to burrowing nematodes. The two sibling species R. citrophilus and R. similis were distinguished by a high molecular weight Con A-labeled band (608 kDa) from cuticle and egg shells. Probing blots with the lectin Limulus polyphemus agglutinin indicated that each population contained a band (12-16 kDa) specifically inhibited by the addition of 25 mM neuraminic acid, suggesting that glycoproteins with sialic acid moieties are present in burrowing nematodes.

  8. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Lectins As Targets for Novel Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, A. V.; Krivozubov, M. S.; Karyagina, A. S.; Gintsburg, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most widespread and troublesome opportunistic pathogens that is capable of colonizing various human tissues and organs and is often resistant to many currently used antibiotics. This resistance is caused by different factors, including the acquisition of specific resistance genes, intrinsic capability to diminish antibiotic penetration into the bacterial cell, and the ability to form biofilms. This situation has prompted the development of novel compounds differing in their mechanism of action from traditional antibiotics that suppress the growth of microorganisms or directly kill bacteria. Instead, these new compounds should decrease the pathogens’ ability to colonize and damage human tissues by inhibiting the virulence factors and biofilm formation. The lectins LecA and LecB that bind galactose and fucose, as well as oligo- and polysaccharides containing these sugars, are among the most thoroughly-studied targets for such novel antibacterials. In this review, we summarize the results of experiments highlighting the importance of these proteins for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity and provide information on existing lectins inhibitors and their effectiveness in various experimental models. Particular attention is paid to the effects of lectins inhibition in animal models of infection and in clinical practice. We argue that lectins inhibition is a perspective approach to combating P. aeruginosa. However, despite the existence of highly effective in vitro inhibitors, further experiments are required in order to advance these inhibitors into pre-clinical studies. PMID:26085942

  9. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... MBL2 gene. Mannose-binding lectin plays an important role in the body's immune response by attaching to foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses, or yeast and turning on (activating) the complement system . The complement system is a group of immune system proteins that work together to ...

  10. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  11. Molecular structure of three mutations at the maize sugary1 locus and their allele-specific phenotypic effects.

    PubMed

    Dinges, J R; Colleoni, C; Myers, A M; James, M G

    2001-03-01

    Starch production in all plants examined is altered by mutations of isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzymes (DBE), although how these proteins affect glucan polymer assembly is not understood. Various allelic mutations in the maize (Zea mays) gene sugary1 (su1), which codes for an isoamylase-type DBE, condition distinct kernel phenotypes. This study characterized the recessive mutations su1-Ref, su1-R4582::Mu1, and su1-st, regarding their molecular basis, chemical phenotypes, and effects on starch metabolizing enzymes. The su1-Ref allele results in two specific amino acid substitutions without affecting the Su1 mRNA level. The su1-R4582::Mu1 mutation is a null allele that abolishes transcript accumulation. The su1-st mutation results from insertion of a novel transposon-like sequence, designated Toad, which causes alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Three su1-st mutant transcripts are produced, one that is nonfunctional and two that code for modified SU1 polypeptides. The su1-st mutation is dominant to the null allele su1-R4582::Mu1, but recessive to su1-Ref, suggestive of complex effects involving quaternary structure of the SU1 enzyme. All three su1- alleles severely reduce or eliminate isoamylase-type DBE activity, although su1-st kernels accumulate less phytoglycogen and Suc than su1-Ref or su1-R4582::Mu1 mutants. The chain length distribution of residual amylopectin is significantly altered by su1-Ref and su1-R4582::Mu1, whereas su1-st has modest effects. These results, together with su1 allele-specific effects on other starch- metabolizing enzymes detected in zymograms, suggest that total DBE catalytic activity is the not the sole determinant of Su1 function and that specific interactions between SU1 and other components of the starch biosynthetic system are required.

  12. Molecular Structure of Three Mutations at the Maize sugary1 Locus and Their Allele-Specific Phenotypic Effects1

    PubMed Central

    Dinges, Jason R.; Colleoni, Christophe; Myers, Alan M.; James, Martha G.

    2001-01-01

    Starch production in all plants examined is altered by mutations of isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzymes (DBE), although how these proteins affect glucan polymer assembly is not understood. Various allelic mutations in the maize (Zea mays) gene sugary1 (su1), which codes for an isoamylase-type DBE, condition distinct kernel phenotypes. This study characterized the recessive mutations su1-Ref, su1-R4582::Mu1, and su1-st, regarding their molecular basis, chemical phenotypes, and effects on starch metabolizing enzymes. The su1-Ref allele results in two specific amino acid substitutions without affecting the Su1 mRNA level. The su1-R4582::Mu1 mutation is a null allele that abolishes transcript accumulation. The su1-st mutation results from insertion of a novel transposon-like sequence, designated Toad, which causes alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Three su1-st mutant transcripts are produced, one that is nonfunctional and two that code for modified SU1 polypeptides. The su1-st mutation is dominant to the null allele su1-R4582::Mu1, but recessive to su1-Ref, suggestive of complex effects involving quaternary structure of the SU1 enzyme. All three su1- alleles severely reduce or eliminate isoamylase-type DBE activity, although su1-st kernels accumulate less phytoglycogen and Suc than su1-Ref or su1-R4582::Mu1 mutants. The chain length distribution of residual amylopectin is significantly altered by su1-Ref and su1-R4582::Mu1, whereas su1-st has modest effects. These results, together with su1 allele-specific effects on other starch- metabolizing enzymes detected in zymograms, suggest that total DBE catalytic activity is the not the sole determinant of Su1 function and that specific interactions between SU1 and other components of the starch biosynthetic system are required. PMID:11244120

  13. Null Controllability for the Dissipative Semilinear Heat Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, Anita; Tataru, Daniel

    2002-12-19

    We consider the exact null controllability problem for the semi- linear heat equation with dissipative nonlinearity in a bounded domain of R{sup n} . The main result of the article asserts that if the nonlinearity is even mildly superlinear, then global null controllability in an arbitrarily short time fails; instead we provide sharp estimates for the controllability time in terms of the size of the initial data.

  14. Another Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibodeau, Phillip E.; Sullender, Craig C.

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power circuit provides noncontact measurement of alternating or direct current of many ampheres in main conductor. Advantages of circuit over other nulling Hall-effect current-measuring circuits is stability and accuracy increased by putting both analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters in nulling feedback loop. Converters and rest of circuit designed for operation at sampling rate of 100 kHz, but rate changed to alter time or frequency response of circuit.

  15. Antimultipath communication by injecting tone into null in signal spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A transmitter for digital radio communication creates a null by balanced encoding of data modulated on an RF carrier, and inserts a calibration tone within the null. This is accomplished by having the calibration tone coincide in phase and frequency with the transmitted radio frequency output, for coherent demodulation of data at the receiver where the tone calibration signal is extracted and used for multipath fading compensation.

  16. Allelic selection of human IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, F; Delgado, C; Fresno, M; Alcina, A

    2000-12-01

    The allelic expression of mouse IL-2 cannot be definitely extrapolated to what might happen in humans. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of allelic expression of the IL-2 gene in non-genetically manipulated human T lymphocytes by following natural allelic polymorphisms. We found a phenotypically silent punctual change in the human IL-2 at position 114 after the first nucleotide of the initiation codon, which represents a dimorphic polymorphism at the first exon of the IL-2 gene. This allowed the study by single-cell PCR of the regulation of the human IL-2 allelic expression in heterozygous CD4(+) T cells, which was found to be tightly controlled monoallelically. These findings may be used as a suitable marker for monitoring the IL-2 allelic contribution to effector activities and in immune responses against different infections or in pathological situations.

  17. Divertor conditions near double null in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Dan; Labombard, Brian; Kuang, Adam; Terry, Jim; Mumgaard, Bob; Wolfe, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Many tokamak reactor designs utilize a double-null equilibrium for the boundary plasma because of the expected benefits of heat flux sharing between the two outer divertor leg as well as the attractiveness of the high-field side scrape-off layer plasma in double-null for RF actuators. However, there has been very little reported on boundary plasma conditions near double null, especially at the divertor plate. And, due to the narrow boundary plasma width, there is concern of the precision to which a double-null equilibrium must be controlled to maintain divertor heat flux sharing. To this end, a series of experiments were performed varying the magnetic balance around double null. The magnetic balance between the two nulls was scanned shot-to-shot in L-, I-, and H-mode plasmas. In addition, current and density scans were performed in L-mode plasmas. Results will be presented for relative balances of divertor particle and energy fluxes to the four divertors (inboard/outboard, upper/lower) as well as the sensitivity of changes in divertor conditions to the magnetic balance. Supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  18. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Shirine E.; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A.; Hill, Tracy L.; Welch, Ian D.; Beier, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα’s potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear. PMID:27457421

  19. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Shirine E; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A; Hill, Tracy L; Welch, Ian D; Beier, Frank

    2016-07-26

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα's potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear.

  20. Measurement Via Optical Near-Nulling and Subaperture Stitching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Greg; De Vries, Gary; Murphy, Paul; Brophy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    A subaperture stitching interferometer system provides near-nulling of a subaperture wavefront reflected from an object of interest over a portion of a surface of the object. A variable optical element located in the radiation path adjustably provides near-nulling to facilitate stitching of subaperture interferograms, creating an interferogram representative of the entire surface of interest. This enables testing of aspheric surfaces without null optics customized for each surface prescription. The surface shapes of objects such as lenses and other precision components are often measured with interferometry. However, interferometers have a limited capture range, and thus the test wavefront cannot be too different from the reference or the interference cannot be analyzed. Furthermore, the performance of the interferometer is usually best when the test and reference wavefronts are nearly identical (referred to as a null condition). Thus, it is necessary when performing such measurements to correct for known variations in shape to ensure that unintended variations are within the capture range of the interferometer and accurately measured. This invention is a system for nearnulling within a subaperture stitching interferometer, although in principle, the concept can be employed by wavefront measuring gauges other than interferometers. The system employs a light source for providing coherent radiation of a subaperture extent. An object of interest is placed to modify the radiation (e.g., to reflect or pass the radiation), and a variable optical element is located to interact with, and nearly null, the affected radiation. A detector or imaging device is situated to obtain interference patterns in the modified radiation. Multiple subaperture interferograms are taken and are stitched, or joined, to provide an interferogram representative of the entire surface of the object of interest. The primary aspect of the invention is the use of adjustable corrective optics in the

  1. A hypomorphic allele reveals an important role of Inturned in mouse skeletal development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rachel; Petersen, Juliette R.; Niswander, Lee A.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    Background Cilia are important for Hedgehog signaling in vertebrates and many genes that encode proteins involved in ciliogenesis have been studied for their roles in embryonic development. Null mutations in many of these genes cause early embryonic lethality, hence an understanding of their roles in postnatal development is limited. Results The Inturned (Intu) gene is required for ciliogenesis and here we report a recessive hypomorphic mutation, resulting in substitution of a conserved hydrophobic residue (I813N) near the C-terminus, that sheds light on later functions of Intu. Mice homozygous for this Double-thumb (IntuDtm) allele exhibit polydactyly, retarded growth, and reduced survival. There is a moderate loss of cilia in IntuDtm/Dtm mutants, and IntuI813N exhibits compromised ability to increase ciliogenesis in cultured Intu null mutant cells. IntuDtm mutants show rib defects and delay of endochondral ossification in long bones, digits, vertebrae and the sternum. These skeletal defects correlate with a decrease in Hh signaling. However, patterning of the neural tube and planar cell polarity appear to be normal. Conclusion This hypomorphic Intu allele highlights an important role of Intu in mouse skeletal development. PMID:25774014

  2. lagC-null and gbf-null cells define key steps in the morphogenesis of Dictyostelium mounds.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, S; Brown, J M; Firtel, R A; McNally, J G

    1998-08-01

    The transition to multicellularity is a key feature of the Dictyostelium life cycle, and two genes, gbf and lagC, are known to play pivotal roles in regulating this developmental switch. lagC-null and gbf-null cells fail to induce cell-type-specific genes ordinarily expressed during multicellular development. The null mutants also share a similar morphological phenotype: mutant cells repeatedly aggregate to form a loose mound, disperse, and reform a mound, rather than proceeding to form a tip. To characterize defects in morphogenesis in these mutants, we examined cell motion in the mutant mounds. In analogy with the failed transition in gene expression, we found that lagC-null and gbf-null mounds failed to make a morphogenetic transition from random to rotational motion normally observed in the parent strain. One reason for this was the inability of the mutant mounds to establish a single, dominant signaling-wave center. This defect of lagC-null or gbf-null cells could be overcome by the addition of adenosine, which alters cAMP signaling, but then even in the presence of apparently normal signaling waves, cell motility was still aberrant. This motility defect, as well as the signaling-wave defect, could be overcome in lagC-null cells by overexpression of GBF, suggesting that lagC is dispensable if GBF protein levels are high enough. This set of morphogenetic defects that we have observed helps define key steps in mound morphogenesis. These include the establishment of a dominant signaling-wave center and the capacity of cells to move directionally within the cell mass in response to guidance cues.

  3. Interactions of lectins with plasma membrane glycoproteins of the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Nachbar, M S; Oppenheim, J D; Aull, F

    1976-02-06

    Several aspects of the interaction of various lectins with the surface of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells are described. The order of agglutinating activity for various lectins is Ricinus communis greater than wheat germ greater than or equal to concanavalin A greater than or equal to soybean greater than Limulus polyphemus. No agglutination was noted for Ulex europaeus. Using 125I-labeled lectins it was determined that there are 1.6 and 7 times as many Ricinus communis lectin binding sites for concanavalin A and soybean lectins. Sodium deoxycholate-solubilized plasma membrane material was subjected to lectin affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The lectin receptors of the plasma membrane appeared to be heterogeneous and some qualitative differences could be discerned among the electrophoretically analyzed material, which bound to and was specifically eluted from the various lectin affinity columns. The characteristics of elution of bound material from individual lectin columns indicated secondary hydrophobic interactions between concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin and their respective lectin receptor molecules.

  4. Properties of Lectins in the Root and Seed of Lotononis bainesii1

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ian J.; Strijdom, Barend W.

    1984-01-01

    A lectin was purified from the root of Lotononis bainesii Baker by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-blood group substance A + H. The molecular weight of the lectin was estimated by gel filtration to be 118,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the lectin was a tetramer composed of two slightly different subunits with respective molecular weights of 32,000 and 35,000. The lectin had a hexose content of 12% (w/w) and contained the sugars fucose, glucosamine, mannose, and xylose. Root lectin hemagglutination was preferentially inhibited by disaccharides with terminal nonreducing galactose residues. Antigens capable of cross-reaction with root lectin antibody were not detected in the seed of L. bainesii. A lectin from the seed of L. bainesii was partially purified by adsorption to pronase-treated rabbit erythrocytes. The lectin preparation had a molecular weight of approximately 200,000. Galactose and galactono-1,4-lactone inhibited seed lectin hemagglutination but lactose was ineffective. There was no evidence that the root of L. bainesii contained material antigenically related to the seed lectin. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16663508

  5. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria) rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Nsimba-Lubaki, M; Peeters, B; Broekaert, W F

    1985-05-01

    A lectin has been isolated from rhizomes of ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria) using a combination of affinity chromatography on erythrocyte membrane proteins immobilized on cross-linked agarose and hydroxyapatite, and ion-exchange chromatography. The molecular structure of the lectin was determined by gelfiltration, sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. It has an unusually high Mr (about 480000) and is most probably an octamer composed of two distinct types of subunits with slightly different Mr (about 60000). Hapten inhibition assays indicated that the Aegopodium lectin is preferentially inhibited by N-acetylgalactosamine. Nevertheless, it does not agglutinate preferentially blood-group-A erythrocytes. The ground-elder lectin is a typical non-seed lectin, which occurs virtually exclusively in the underground rhizomes. In this organ it is an abundant protein as it represents up to 5% of the total protein content. The lectin content of the rhizome tissue varies strongly according to its particular location along the organ. In addition, the lectin content changes dramatically as a function of the seasons. The ground-elder lectin differs from all other plant lectins by its unusually high molecular weight. In addition, it is the first lectin to be isolated from a species of the family Apiaceae.

  6. Murine Hyperglycemic Vasculopathy and Cardiomyopathy: Whole-Genome Gene Expression Analysis Predicts Cellular Targets and Regulatory Networks Influenced by Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Chenhui; La Bonte, Laura R.; Pavlov, Vasile I.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, in the absence of type 1 or 2 diabetes, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated a central role for mannose binding lectin (MBL)-mediated cardiac dysfunction in acute hyperglycemic mice. In this study, we applied whole-genome microarray data analysis to investigate MBL’s role in systematic gene expression changes. The data predict possible intracellular events taking place in multiple cellular compartments such as enhanced insulin signaling pathway sensitivity, promoted mitochondrial respiratory function, improved cellular energy expenditure and protein quality control, improved cytoskeleton structure, and facilitated intracellular trafficking, all of which may contribute to the organismal health of MBL null mice against acute hyperglycemia. Our data show a tight association between gene expression profile and tissue function which might be a very useful tool in predicting cellular targets and regulatory networks connected with in vivo observations, providing clues for further mechanistic studies. PMID:22375142

  7. Genetically null mice reveal a central role for epidermal growth factor receptor in the differentiation of the hair follicle and normal hair development.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L. A.; Alexander, N.; Hogan, M. E.; Sundberg, J. P.; Dlugosz, A.; Threadgill, D. W.; Magnuson, T.; Yuspa, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Mice harboring a targeted disruption of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) allele exhibit a severely disorganized hair follicle phenotype, fuzzy coat, and systemic disease resulting in death before 3 weeks. This skin phenotype was reproduced in whole skin grafts and in grafts of EGFR null hair follicle buds onto nude mice, providing a model to evaluate the natural evolution of skin lacking the EGFR. Hair follicles in grafts of null skin did not progress from anagen to telogen and scanning electron micrografts revealed wavy, flattened hair fibers with cuticular abnormalities. Many of the EGFR null hair follicles in the grafted skin were consumed by an inflammatory reaction resulting in complete hair loss in 67% of the grafts by 10 weeks. Localization of follicular differentiation markers including keratin 6, transglutaminase, and the hair keratins mHa2 and hacl-1 revealed a pattern of premature differentiation within the null hair follicles. In intact EGFR null mice, proliferation in the interfollicular epidermis, but not hair follicles, was greatly decreased in the absence of EGFR. In contrast, grafting of EGFR null skin resulted in a hyperplastic response in the epidermis that did not resolve even after 10 weeks, although the wound-induced hyperplasia in EGFR wild-type grafts had resolved within 3 to 4 weeks. Thus, epithelial expression of the EGFR has complex functions in the skin. It is important in delaying follicular differentiation, may serve to protect the hair follicle from immunological reactions, and modifies both normal and wound-induced epidermal proliferation but seems dispensable for follicular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9176390

  8. Blocking of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum lectins by diverse mammalian milks.

    PubMed

    Zinger-Yosovich, K D; Iluz, D; Sudakevitz, D; Gilboa-Garber, N

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum morbid and mortal infections are initiated by bacterial adherence to host-cell receptors via their adhesins, including lectins (which also contribute to bacterial biofilm formation). Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a galactophilic lectin, PA-IL (LecA), and a fucophilic (Lewis-specific) lectin, PA-IIL (LecB), and C. violaceum produces a fucophilic (H-specific) lectin, CV-IIL. The antibiotic resistance of these bacteria prompted the search for glycosylated receptor-mimicking compounds that would function as glycodecoys for blocking lectin attachment to human cell receptors. Lectins PA-IL and PA-IIL have been shown to be useful for such glycodecoy probing, clearly differentiating between human and cow milks. This article describes their usage, together with CV-IIL and the plant lectin concanavalin A, for comparing the anti-lectin-dependent adhesion potential of diverse mammalian milks. The results show that the diverse milks differ in blocking (hemagglutination inhibition) and differential binding (Western blots) of these lectins. Human milk most strongly inhibited the 3 bacterial lectins (with PA-IIL superiority), followed by alpaca, giraffe, and monkey milks, whereas cow milk was a weak inhibitor. Lectin PA-IL was inhibited strongly by human, followed by alpaca, mare, giraffe, buffalo, and monkey milks, weakly by camel milk, and not at all by rabbit milk. Lectins PA-IIL and CV-IIL were also most sensitive to human milk, followed by alpaca, monkey, giraffe, rabbit, and camel milks but negligibly sensitive to buffalo and mare milks. Plant lectin concanavalinA, which was used as the reference, differed from them in that it was much less sensitive to human milk and was equally as sensitive to cow milk. These results have provided important information on the anti-lectin-dependent adhesion potential of the diverse milks examined. They showed that human followed by alpaca, giraffe, and Rhesus monkey milks efficiently

  9. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  10. Evaluation of null-point detection methods on simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Fu, Huishan; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    We model the measurements of artificial spacecraft that resemble the configuration of CLUSTER propagating in the particle-in-cell simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection. The simulation domain contains multiple isolated X-type null-points, but the majority are O-type null-points. Simulations show that current pinches surrounded by twisted fields, analogous to laboratory pinches, are formed along the sequences of O-type nulls. In the simulation, the magnetic reconnection is mainly driven by the kinking of the pinches, at spatial scales of several ion inertial lentghs. We compute the locations of magnetic null-points and detect their type. When the satellites are separated by the fractions of ion inertial length, as it is for CLUSTER, they are able to locate both the isolated null-points, and the pinches. We apply the method to the real CLUSTER data and speculate how common are pinches in the magnetosphere, and whether they play a dominant role in the dissipation of magnetic energy.

  11. Forms of null Lagrangians in field theories of continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, V. A.; Radaev, Yu. N.

    2012-02-01

    The divergence representation of a null Lagrangian that is regular in a star-shaped domain is used to obtain its general expression containing field gradients of order ≤ 1 in the case of spacetime of arbitrary dimension. It is shown that for a static three-component field in the three-dimensional space, a null Lagrangian can contain up to 15 independent elements in total. The general form of a null Lagrangian in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime is obtained (the number of physical field variables is assumed arbitrary). A complete theory of the null Lagrangian for the n-dimensional spacetime manifold (including the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime as a special case) is given. Null Lagrangians are then used as a basis for solving an important variational problem of an integrating factor. This problem involves searching for factors that depend on the spacetime variables, field variables, and their gradients and, for a given system of partial differential equations, ensure the equality between the scalar product of a vector multiplier by the system vector and some divergence expression for arbitrary field variables and, hence, allow one to formulate a divergence conservation law on solutions to the system.

  12. Mutator phenotype of MUTYH-null mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Seiki; Tominaga, Yohei; Ichinoe, Akimasa; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Honda-Ohnishi, Yoko; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2003-10-03

    To evaluate the antimutagenic role of a mammalian mutY homolog, namely the Mutyh gene, which encodes adenine DNA glycosylase excising adenine misincorporated opposite 8-oxoguanine in the template DNA, we generated MUTYH-null mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. In the MUTYH-null cells carrying no adenine DNA glycosylase activity, the spontaneous mutation rate increased 2-fold in comparison with wild type cells. The expression of wild type mMUTYH or mutant mMUTYH protein with amino acid substitutions at the proliferating cell nuclear antigen binding motif restored the increased spontaneous mutation rates of the MUTYH-null ES cells to the wild type level. The expression of a mutant mMUTYH protein with an amino acid substitution (G365D) that corresponds to a germ-line mutation (G382D) found in patients with multiple colorectal adenomas could not suppress the elevated spontaneous mutation rate of the MUTYH-null ES cells. Although the recombinant mMUTYH(G365D) purified from Escherichia coli cells had a substantial level of adenine DNA glycosylase activity as did wild type MUTYH, no adenine DNA glycosylase activity was detected in the MUTYH-null ES cells expressing the mMUTYH(G365D) mutant protein. The germ-line mutation (G382D) of the human MUTYH gene is therefore likely to be responsible for the occurrence of a mutator phenotype in these patients.

  13. Do Null Subjects (mis-)Trigger Pro-drop Grammars?

    PubMed

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-12-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [−pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing their grammars to a [−pro] setting. Mack et al. (J Memory Lang 67(1):211-223, 2012) showed that sentences with noise covering the subject are analyzed as having null subjects more often with a first person pronoun and with a present tense--properties correlated with more predictable referents--compared to a third person pronoun and past tense. However, those results might in principle have been due to reporting null subjects for verbs that often occur with null subjects. An experiment is reported here in which comparable results are found for sentences containing nonsense verbs. Participants preferred a null subject more often for first person present tense sentences than for third person past tense sentences. The results are as expected if participants are responding to predictability, the likelihood of reduction, rather than to lexical statistics. The results are argued to be important in removing a class of mis-triggering examples from the language acquisition problem.

  14. Visible Nulling Coronagraphy Testbed Development for Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Chen, Andrew; Petrone, Peter; Booth, Andrew; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Three of the recently completed NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept (ASMC) studies addressed the feasibility of using a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) as the prime instrument for exoplanet science. The VNC approach is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted aperture telescope systems and thus spans the space of potential ASMC exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance the this approach and the technologies associated with it. Herein we report on the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under high bandwidth closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible light nulling milestones of sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D and ultimately culminate in spectrally broadband (>20%) high contrast imaging. Each of the milestones, one per year, is traceable to one or more of the ASMC studies. The VNT uses a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, modified with a modified "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. Discussed will be the optical configuration laboratory results, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  15. Angiogenesis in Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Gaoyuan; Fehrenbach, Melane L.; Williams, James T.; Finklestein, Jeffrey M.; Zhu, Jing-Xu; DeLisser, Horace M.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 has been previously implicated in endothelial cell migration; additionally, anti-PECAM-1 antibodies have been shown to inhibit in vivo angiogenesis. Studies were therefore performed with PECAM-1-null mice to further define the involvement of PECAM-1 in blood vessel formation. Vascularization of subcutaneous Matrigel implants as well as tumor angiogenesis were both inhibited in PECAM-1-null mice. Reciprocal bone marrow transplants that involved both wild-type and PECAM-1-deficient mice revealed that the impaired angiogenic response resulted from a loss of endothelial, but not leukocyte, PECAM-1. In vitro wound migration and single-cell motility by PECAM-1-null endothelial cells were also compromised. In addition, filopodia formation, a feature of motile cells, was inhibited in PECAM-1-null endothelial cells as well as in human endothelial cells treated with either anti-PECAM-1 antibody or PECAM-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of PECAM-1 promoted filopodia formation and increased the protein expression levels of Cdc42, a Rho GTPase that is known to promote the formation of filopodia. In the developing retinal vasculature, numerous, long filamentous filopodia, emanating from endothelial cells at the tips of angiogenic sprouts, were observed in wild-type animals, but to a lesser extent in the PECAM-1-null mice. Together, these data further establish the involvement of endothelial PECAM-1 in angiogenesis and suggest that, in vivo, PECAM-1 may stimulate endothelial cell motility by promoting the formation of filopodia. PMID:19574426

  16. Histochemical characterization of the lectin-binding sites in the equine vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-young; Kang, Tae-young; Lee, Yong-duk; Shin, Tae-kyun

    2003-04-01

    The binding specificities of various lectins, such as the Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), and the Bandeiraea simplicifolia BS-1 (Isolectin B4), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), and Ulex europaeus (UEA-I) lectins, were studied in the vomeronasal organ of the horse. The microvilli of the vomeronasal sensory epithelium were positive for DBA, SBA, Isolectin B4, WGA, PNA, and UEA-I. The receptor cells showed intense reactivity for DBA and WGA. Lectins were not detected in the supporting cells or basal cells. The Jacobson's glands were positive for WGA and UEA-I, but lectins were absent from the nerve bundles. From these results, we postulate that several lectin-binding carbohydrates on the microvilli and neurosensory cells are associated with chemoreception in the horse. In addition, the differential lectin-binding patterns in the horse suggest that the carbohydrates present in this particular sense organ are species-specific.

  17. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  18. Leguminous lectins as tools for studying the role of sugar residues in leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, N M; Teixeira, E H; Assreuy, A M; Cavada, B S; Flores, C A; Ribeiro, R A

    1999-01-01

    The natural physiological ligands for selectins are oligosaccharides found in glycoprotein or glycolipid molecules in cell membranes. In order to study the role of sugar residues in the in vivo lectin anti-inflammatory effect, we tested three leguminous lectins with different carbohydrate binding affinities in the peritonitis and paw oedema models induced by carrageenin in rats. L. sericeus lectin was more anti-inflammatory than D. virgata lectin, the effects being reversed by their specific binding sugars (N-acetylglucosamine and alpha-methylmannoside, respectively). However, V. macrocarpa, a galactose-specific lectin, was not anti-inflammatory. The proposed anti-inflammatory activity of lectins could be due to a blockage of neutrophil-selectin carbohydrate ligands. Thus, according to the present data, we suggest an important role for N-acetylglucosamine residue as the major ligand for selectins on rat neutrophil membranes. PMID:10704148

  19. A galactose-specific lectin from the hemolymph of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata martensii.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Mori, K

    1989-01-01

    1. A lectin in the serum of Pinctada fucata martensii was purified by a combination of affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B coupled with bovine submaxillary gland mucine, anion exchange chromatography on Mono Q and gel filtration on Superose 6. 2. The purified lectin was indicated to be homogeneous by polyacrylamide electrophoresis and rechromatography on Mono Q. 3. The purified lectin was approximately 440,000 in molecular weight and was composed of identical subunits with a molecular weight of approximately 20,000. 4. D-galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine gave a 50% inhibition of agglutination of horse erythrocytes by the lectin at 0.3 and 1.2 mM, respectively. 5. The antibody obtained from rabbit immunized with the purified lectin was monospecific to the lectin judged from the hemagglutination blocking test, immunoelectrophoresis and immunoblotting.

  20. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  1. Could plant lectins become promising anti-tumour drugs for causing autophagic cell death?

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Luo, Y; Zhou, T-T; Zhang, W-Z

    2013-10-01

    Plant lectins, a group of highly diverse carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-immune origin, are ubiquitously distributed through a variety of plant species, and have recently drawn rising attention due to their remarkable ability to kill tumour cells using mechanisms implicated in autophagy. In this review, we provide a brief outline of structures of some representative plant lectins such as concanavalin A, Polygonatum cyrtonema lectin and mistletoe lectins. These can target autophagy by modulating BNIP-3, ROS-p38-p53, Ras-Raf and PI3KCI-Akt pathways, as well as Beclin-1, in many types of cancer cells. In addition, we further discuss how plant lectins are able to kill cancer cells by modulating autophagic death, for therapeutic purposes. Together, these findings provide a comprehensive perspective concerning plant lectins as promising new anti-tumour drugs, with respect to autophagic cell death in future cancer therapeutics.

  2. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jason H; Shaffer, Christian M; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M; Steiner, Heidi E; Mosley, Jonathan D; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Roden, Dan M

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations.

  3. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Christian M.; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M.; Steiner, Heidi E.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Roden, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations. PMID:28207879

  4. Large Scale Magnetic Separation of Solanum tuberosum Tuber Lectin from Potato Starch Waste Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Ivo; Horska, Katerina; Martinez, Lluis M.; Safarikova, Mirka

    2010-12-01

    A simple procedure for large scale isolation of Solanum tuberosum tuber lectin from potato starch industry waste water has been developed. The procedure employed magnetic chitosan microparticles as an affinity adsorbent. Magnetic separation was performed in a flow-through magnetic separation system. The adsorbed lectin was eluted with glycine/HCl buffer, pH 2.2. The specific activity of separated lectin increased approximately 27 times during the isolation process.

  5. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from a false brome grass (Brachypodium sylvaticum).

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, W J; Spaepen, C; Stinissen, H M; Carlier, A R

    1982-01-01

    A lectin has been isolated from embryos of a false brome grass species (Brachypodium sylvaticum) by affinity chromatography on immobilized N-acetylglucosamine. It is a dimeric protein of two identical subunits of mol.wt. 18 000. Although it resembles cereal lectins with respect to its biochemical and physicochemical properties, it differs structurally in several aspects from wheat-germ-agglutinin-like lectins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6816219

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of mannose-binding lectin ameliorates neurobehavioral dysfunction following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Daiana; Fumagalli, Stefano; Longhi, Luca; Orsini, Franca; Palmioli, Alessandro; Stravalaci, Matteo; Vegliante, Gloria; Zanier, Elisa R; Bernardi, Anna; Gobbi, Marco; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is present in the contusion area of traumatic brain-injured patients and in that of traumatic brain-injured mice, where mannose-binding lectin-C exceeds mannose-binding lectin-A. The reduced susceptibility to traumatic brain injury of mannose-binding lectin double knock-out mice (mannose-binding lectin(-/-)) when compared to wild type mice suggests that mannose-binding lectin may be a therapeutic target following traumatic brain injury. Here, we evaluated the effects of a multivalent glycomimetic mannose-binding lectin ligand, Polyman9, following traumatic brain injury in mice. In vitro surface plasmon resonance assay indicated that Polyman9 dose-dependently inhibits the binding to immobilized mannose residues of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C selectively over that of mannose-binding lectin-A. Male C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham/controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury and intravenous treatment with Polyman9/saline. Ex-vivo surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed that Polyman9 effectively reduces the binding of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C to immobilized mannose residues. In vivo studies up to four weeks post injury, showed that Polyman9 induces significant improvement in sensorimotor deficits (by neuroscore and beam walk), promotes neurogenesis (73% increase in doublecortin immunoreactivity), and astrogliosis (28% increase in glial fibrillary acid protein). Polyman9 administration in brain-injured mannose-binding lectin(-/-) mice had no effect on post-traumatic brain-injured functional deficits, suggestive of the specificity of its neuroprotective effects. The neurobehavioral efficacy of Polyman9 implicates mannose-binding lectin-C as a novel therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury.

  7. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  8. Parallel quantification of lectin-glycan interaction using ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Seko, Akira; Sakono, Masafumi; Hachisu, Masakazu; Koizumi, Akihiko; Fujikawa, Kohki; Ito, Yukishige

    2013-06-28

    Using ultrafiltration membrane, a simple method for screening protein-ligand interaction was developed. The procedure comprises three steps: mixing ligand with protein, ultrafiltration of the solution, and quantification of unbound ligands by HPLC. By conducting analysis with variable protein concentrations, affinity constants were easily obtained. Multiple ligands can be analyzed simultaneously as a mixture, when concentration of ligands was controlled. Feasibility of this method for lectin-glycan interaction analysis was examined using fluorescently labeled high-mannose-type glycans and recombinant intracellular lectins or endo-α-mannosidase mutants. Estimated Ka values of malectin and VIP36 were in good agreement indeed with those evaluated by conventional methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) or frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). Finally, several mutants of endo-α-mannosidase were produced and their affinities to monoglucosylated glycans were evaluated.

  9. Gliadins bind to reticulin in a lectin-like manner.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, D J; Leonard, J N; Hobday, C M; Griffiths, C E; Powles, A V; Haffenden, G P; Fry, L

    1987-01-01

    It has previously been reported that gliadins bind to reticulin in tissue sections. Three lines of evidence are reported in this study which indicate that the gliadins bind to reticulins because they are lectins which bind to sugars expressed on glycoproteins in reticulin and other sites. First, immunofluorescence studies on tissue sections showed that although gliadin binding is largely confined to areas rich in reticulin, it is, nonetheless, also seen in one or two other sites devoid of reticulin. Second, by using fluorescein-labelled lectins of known specificity, it has been shown that the areas to which gliadins bind in tissue sections (including those sites devoid of reticulin) are rich in particular sugars. Third, it has been shown that one of these sugars, alpha-D-mannose, partially inhibited gliadin binding to tissue sections.

  10. Purification and biological effects of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae) seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de; Aragao, Karoline Saboia; Gomes, Raphaela Cardoso; Freitas Pires, Alana de; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Oliveira Toyama, Daniela de; Nunes de Alencar, Nylane Maria; Criddle, David Neil; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio . E-mail: assreuy@uece.br; Cavada, Benildo Sousa . E-mail: bscavada@ufc.br

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the purification and characterization of a new N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific lectin from Araucaria angustifolia (AaL) seeds (Araucariaceae) and its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. AaL was purified using a combination of affinity chromatography on a chitin column and ion exchange chromatography on Sephacel-DEAE. The pure protein has 8.0 kDa (SDS-PAGE) and specifically agglutinates rabbit erythrocytes, effect that was independent of the presence of divalent cations and was inhibited after incubation with glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. AaL showed antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains, shown by scanning electron microscopy. AaL, intravenously injected into rats, showed anti-inflammatory effect, via carbohydrate site interaction, in the models of paw edema and peritonitis. This lectin can be used as a tool for studying bacterial infections and inflammatory processes.

  11. Human CLEC18 Gene Cluster Contains C-type Lectins with Differential Glycan-binding Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Lang; Pai, Feng-Shuo; Tsou, Yun-Ting; Mon, Hsien-Chen; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chou, Teh-Ying; Yang, Wen-Bin; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wong, Chi-Huey; Hsieh, Shie-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The human C-type lectin 18 (clec18) gene cluster, which contains three clec18a, clec18b, and clec18c loci, is located in human chromosome 16q22. Although the amino acid sequences of CLEC18A, CLEC18B, and CLEC18C are almost identical, several amino acid residues located in the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) and the sperm-coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) domain, also known as the cysteine-rich secretory proteins/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP) domain, are distinct from each other. Genotyping by real-time PCR and sequencing further shows the presence of multiple alleles in clec18a/b/c loci. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrates that CLEC18 (CLEC18A, -B, and -C) are expressed abundantly in human peripheral blood cells. Moreover, CLEC18 expression is further up-regulated when monocytes differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells. Immunofluorescence staining reveals that CLEC18 are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and endosome. Interestingly, CLEC18 are also detectable in human sera and culture supernatants from primary cells and 293T cells overexpressing CLEC18. Moreover, CLEC18 bind polysaccharide in Ca2+-independent manner, and amino acid residues Ser/Arg339 and Asp/Asn421 in CTLD domain contribute to their differential binding abilities to polysaccharides isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (GLPS-F3). The Ser339 (CLEC18A) → Arg339 (CLEC18A-1) mutation completely abolishes CLEC18A-1 binding to GLPS-F3, and a sugar competition assay shows that CLEC18 preferentially binds to fucoidan, β-glucans, and galactans. Because proteins with the SCP/TAPS/CAP domain are able to bind sterol and acidic glycolipid, and are involved in sterol transport and β-amyloid aggregation, it would be interesting to investigate whether CLEC18 modulates host immunity via binding to glycolipids, and are also involved in glycolipid transportation and protein aggregation in the future. PMID:26170455

  12. Null-steering techniques for application to large array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockham, G. A.; Cho, C.; Parr, J. C.; Wolfson, R. I.

    A multimode waveguide can be employed to design an antenna which produces a beam for each propagating mode. A dual-beam waveguide slot array is particularly attractive. The antenna is compact, highly efficient, and has lower sidelobe-level performance than can be achieved with conventional monopulse techniques. Adaptive phase steering for jammer nulling is considered, taking into account a large phased array using a series feed system. The considered configuration was selected for computer simulation. A description is presented of a multiple beam antenna with independent steerable nulls. The multiple beam low-sidelobe antenna configuration has the ability to provide a radiation pattern with multiple and independently-located nulls, with minimal effect on the sidelobes of the unperturbed pattern.

  13. A linear voltage-tunable distributed null device.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, H. F.; Mattauch, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A linear voltage-tunable null device was predicted, fabricated, and tested. This filter is conceptually a distributed parameter RC representation of the channel of a MOSFET in a network configuration with a second MOSFET that is treated as a variable resistor. Classical transmission-line theory is used to predict a linear tuning curve with applied bias for the device. This concept was used to design a null device having a null that is linearly tunable in the range of 100 kHz. Such devices were fabricated and tested. Typical MOS processing steps were used and the resulting structures are compatible with the planar technology. The compatibility leads towards extension of this work to different frequency ranges for other specific applications.

  14. Strehl ratio: a tool for optimizing optical nulls and singularities.

    PubMed

    Hénault, François

    2015-07-01

    In this paper a set of radial and azimuthal phase functions are reviewed that have a null Strehl ratio, which is equivalent to generating a central extinction in the image plane of an optical system. The study is conducted in the framework of Fraunhofer scalar diffraction, and is oriented toward practical cases where optical nulls or singularities are produced by deformable mirrors or phase plates. The identified solutions reveal unexpected links with the zeros of type-J Bessel functions of integer order. They include linear azimuthal phase ramps giving birth to an optical vortex, azimuthally modulated phase functions, and circular phase gratings (CPGs). It is found in particular that the CPG radiometric efficiency could be significantly improved by the null Strehl ratio condition. Simple design rules for rescaling and combining the different phase functions are also defined. Finally, the described analytical solutions could also serve as starting points for an automated searching software tool.

  15. Statefinder hierarchy: An extended null diagnostic for concordance cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Sahni, Varun

    2011-02-01

    We show how higher derivatives of the expansion factor can be developed into a null diagnostic for concordance cosmology (ΛCDM). It is well known that the Statefinder—the third derivative of the expansion factor written in dimensionless form, a(3)/aH3, equals unity for ΛCDM. We generalize this result and demonstrate that the hierarchy, a(n)/aHn, can be converted to a form that stays pegged at unity in concordance cosmology. This remarkable property of the Statefinder hierarchy enables it to be used as an extended null diagnostic for the cosmological constant. The Statefinder hierarchy combined with the growth rate of matter perturbations defines a composite null diagnostic which can distinguish evolving dark energy from ΛCDM.

  16. Characterizing the Properties of Coronal Magnetic Null Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Graham; DeRosa, Marc; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The topology of the coronal magnetic field plays a role in a wide range of phenomena, from Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) through heating of the corona. One fundamental topological feature is the null point, where the magnetic field vanishes. These points are natural sites of magnetic reconnection, and hence the release of energy stored in the magnetic field. We present preliminary results of a study using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to characterize the properties and evolution of null points in a Potential Field Source Surface model of the coronal field. The main properties considered are the lifetime of the null points, their distribution with height, and how they form and subsequently vanish.This work is supported by NASA/LWS Grant NNX14AD45G, and by NSF/SHINE grant 1357018.

  17. Increased angiogenic response in aortic explants of collagen XVIII/endostatin-null mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2004-08-01

    Endostatin, a proteolytic fragment of basement membrane-associated collagen XVIII, has been shown to be a potent angiogenesis inhibitor both in vivo and in vitro when given at high concentrations. The precise molecular mechanisms by which it functions and whether or not it plays a role in physiological regulation of angiogenesis are not clear. In mice with targeted null alleles of Col18a1, there appears to be no major abnormality in vascular patterns or capillary density in most organs. Furthermore, the growth of experimental tumors is not increased. However, a detailed analysis of induced angiogenesis in these mice has not been performed. Therefore, we compared the angiogenic responses induced by in vitro culture of aortic explants from collagen XVIII/endostatin-null mice (ko) to wild-type (wt) littermates. We found a twofold increase in microvessel outgrowth in explants from ko mice, relative to wt explants. This increased angiogenesis was reduced to the wt level by the addition of low levels (0.1 microg/ml) of recombinant mouse or human endostatin during the culture period. To address cellular/molecular mechanisms underlying this difference in angiogenic response between ko and wt mice, we isolated endothelial cells from both strains and compared their biological behavior. Proliferation assays showed no difference between the two types of endothelial cells. In contrast, adhesion assays showed a striking difference in their ability to adhere to fibronectin suggesting that collagen XVIII/endostatin may regulate interactions between endothelial cells and underlying basement membrane-associated components, including fibronectin, such that in the absence of collagen XVIII/endostatin, endothelial cells are more adhesive to fibronectin. In the aortic explant assay, characterized by dynamic processes of microvessel elongation and regression, this may result in stabilization of newly formed vessels, reduced regression, and a net increase in microvessel outgrowth in

  18. Impairment of Infectivity and Immunoprotective Effect of a LYT1 Null Mutant of Trypanosoma cruzi▿

    PubMed Central

    Zago, M. Paola; Barrio, Alejandra B.; Cardozo, Rubén M.; Duffy, Tomás; Schijman, Alejandro G.; Basombrío, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection of host cells is a complex process in which many proteins participate but only a few of these proteins have been identified experimentally. One parasite factor likely to be involved is the protein product of LYT1, a single-copy gene cloned, sequenced, and characterized by Manning-Cela et al. (Infect. Immun. 69:3916-3923, 2001). This gene was potentially associated with infectivity, since the deletion of both LYT1 alleles in the CL Brenner strain (the wild type [WT]) resulted in a null mutant T. cruzi clone (L16) that shows an attenuated phenotype in cell culture models. The aim of this work was to characterize the infective behavior of L16 in the insect vector and murine models. The infection of adult Swiss mice with 103 trypomastigotes of both clones revealed a significant reduction in infective behavior of L16, as shown by direct parasitemia, spleen index, and quantitation of tissue parasite burden, suggesting the loss of virulence in the null mutant clone. Although L16 blood counts were almost undetectable, blood-based PCRs indicated the presence of latent and persistent infection during all of the study period and epimastigotes were reisolated from hemocultures until 12 months postinfection. Nevertheless, virulence was not restored in L16 by serial passages in mice, and reisolated parasites lacking the LYT1 gene and bearing the antibiotic resistance genes revealed the stability of the genetic manipulation. Histopathological studies showed a strong diminution in the muscle inflammatory response triggered by L16 compared to that triggered by the WT group, consistent with a lower tissue parasite load. A strong protection against a virulent challenge in both L16- and WT-infected mice was observed; however, the immunizing infection by the genetically modified parasite was highly attenuated. PMID:17938222

  19. Lectins as membrane components of mitochondria from Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Bowles, D J; Schnarrenberger, C; Kauss, H

    1976-11-15

    1. Mitochondria were isolated from developing endosperm of Ricinus communis and were fractionated into outer membrane and inner membrane. The relative purity of the two membrane fractions was determined by marker enzymes. The fractions were also examined by negative-stain electron microscopy. 2. Membrane fractions were sequentially extracted in the following way. (a) Suspension in 0.5M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1; (b)suspension in 0.1M-EDTA (disodium salt)/0.05M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1; (c) sonication in 0.05M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1;(d)sonication in aq. Triton X-100 (0.1%). The membranes were pelleted by centrifugation at 100 000g for 15 min, between each step. Agglutination activity in the extracts was investigated by using trypsin-treated rabbit erythrocytes. 3. The addition of lactose to inner mitochondrial membrane resulted in the solubilization of part of the lectin activity, indicating that the protein was attached to the membrane via its carbohydrate-binding site. Pretreatment of the membranes with lactose before tha usual extraction procedure showed that lactose could extract lectins that normally required more harsh treatment of the membrane for solubilization. 4. Lectins extracted from inner membranes were purified by affinity chromatography on agarose gel. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of purified samples in sodium dodecyl sulphate indicated that at least part of the lectin present in inner mitochondrial membrane was identical with the R. communis agglutinin of mol.wt. 120 000.

  20. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  1. Factors affecting binding of galacto ligands to Actinomyces viscosus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, M J; Marini, A M; Gabriel, O

    1985-01-01

    The specificity requirements for the binding of Actinomyces viscosus T14V were examined by testing simple sugars, oligopeptides, and glycoproteins as inhibitors of the aggregation of glycoprotein-coated latex beads and washed A. viscosus cells. Lactose was the most inhibitory simple sugar; D-fucose and D-galactose were equally inhibitory, methyl-alpha-D-fucoside was slightly less inhibitory, and L-fucose and raffinose were not inhibitory. The concentration of galactose residues required for 50% inhibition of aggregation was 15 times higher in the form of lactose than in the form of asialoglycoprotein, suggesting an enhancement of lectin binding when galactose residues are clustered. However, when the inhibitory power of bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary asialooligopeptides of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was compared with that of equivalent concentrations of galactose in the form of lactose, the biantennary form was slightly less effective than lactose, the triantennary form was approximately as effective as lactose, and the tetraantennary form was slightly more effective than lactose. Steric interference may prevent this type of clustering from enhancing lectin binding. The O-linked asialooligopeptides of asialofetuin were 10 times more inhibitory than an equivalent concentration of galactose in the form of N-linked asialooligopeptides. Thus, galactose beta-1----3 linked to N-acetylgalactosamine exhibits greater specificity for the A. viscosus lectin than does galactose beta-1----4 linked to N-acetylglucosamine. These results, taken together with previously reported data, are consistent with a lectin of low affinity, binding enhanced by multivalency, and specificity for beta-linked galactose. PMID:2578122

  2. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  3. Ten novel HLA-DRB1 alleles and one novel DRB3 allele.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, A M; Steiner, N K; Moraes, M E; Moraes, J R; Ng, J; Hartzman, R J; Hurley, C K

    2005-10-01

    Ten novel HLA-DRB1 and one DRB3 alleles are described. Eight of the variants are single-nucleotide substitutions, four resulting in an amino acid change (DRB1*1145, *1148, *0828 and *1514) and four with silent substitutions (DRB1*040504, *130103, *160502 and DRB3*020204). Two alleles differ by two nucleotide changes altering one (DRB1*1447 and *1361) amino acid and one allele alters three nucleotides and two amino acids.

  4. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Population genetic analysis of Helicobacter pylori by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis: extensive allelic diversity and recombinational population structure.

    PubMed Central

    Go, M F; Kapur, V; Graham, D Y; Musser, J M

    1996-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships in 74 Helicobacter pylori isolates recovered from patients assigned to distinct clinical categories were estimated by examination of allelic variation in six genes encoding metabolic housekeeping enzymes by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Seventy-three distinct allele profiles, representing multilocus chromosomal genotypes, were identified. All six loci were highly polymorphic, with an average of 11.2 alleles per locus. The mean genetic diversity in the sample was 0.735, a value that exceeds the level of diversity recorded in virtually all bacterial species studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. A high frequency of occurrence of null alleles (lack of enzyme activity) was identified and warrants further investigation at the molecular level. Lack of linkage disequilibrium (nonrandom association (of alleles over loci) indicates that horizontal transfer and recombination of metabolic enzyme genes have contributed to the generation of chromosomal diversity in H. pylori. In this sample of isolates, there was no statistically significant association of multilocus enzyme electrophoretic types or cluster of related chromosomal types and disease category. PMID:8682800

  6. Microencapsulation of lectin anti-cancer agent and controlled release by alginate beads, biosafety approach.

    PubMed

    El-Aassar, M R; Hafez, Elsayed E; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered as one of the most aggressive cancer worldwide. In Egypt, the prevalence of HCC is increasing during last years. Recently, drug-loaded microparticles were used to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. This study is designed to evaluate the anticancer potentialities of lectins against HCC while hinting to its safety usage. The aim is also extended to encapsulate lectins in alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery purposes. The extracted lectins showed anti-proliferative effect against HCC with a percentage of 60.76% by using its nontoxic dose with an up-regulation of P53 gene expression. Concerning the handling of lectin alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery, the prepared lectin alginate beads were ∼100μm in diameter. The efficiency of the microcapsules was checked by scanning electron microscopy, the SEM showed the change on the alginate beads surface revealing the successful lectin encapsulation. The release of lectins from the microbeads depended on a variety of factors as the microbeads forming carriers and the amount-encapsulated lectins. The Pisum sativum extracted lectins may be considered as a promising agent in controlling HCC and this solid dosage form could be suitable for oral administration complemented with/or without the standard HCC drugs.

  7. A lectin-mediated resistance of higher fungi against predators and parasites.

    PubMed

    Bleuler-Martínez, S; Butschi, A; Garbani, M; Wälti, M A; Wohlschlager, T; Potthoff, E; Sabotiĉ, J; Pohleven, J; Lüthy, P; Hengartner, M O; Aebi, M; Künzler, M

    2011-07-01

    Fruiting body lectins are ubiquitous in higher fungi and characterized by being synthesized in the cytoplasm and up-regulated during sexual development. The function of these lectins is unclear. A lack of phenotype in sexual development upon inactivation of the respective genes argues against a function in this process. We tested a series of characterized fruiting body lectins from different fungi for toxicity towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the mosquito Aedes aegypti and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. Most of the fungal lectins were found to be toxic towards at least one of the three target organisms. By altering either the fungal lectin or the glycans of the target organisms, or by including soluble carbohydrate ligands as competitors, we demonstrate that the observed toxicity is dependent on the interaction between the fungal lectins and specific glycans in the target organisms. The toxicity was found to be dose-dependent such that low levels of lectin were no longer toxic but still led to food avoidance by C. elegans. Finally, we show, in an ecologically more relevant scenario, that challenging the vegetative mycelium of Coprinopsis cinerea with the fungal-feeding nematode Aphelenchus avenae induces the expression of the nematotoxic fruiting body lectins CGL1 and CGL2. Based on these findings, we propose that filamentous fungi possess an inducible resistance against predators and parasites mediated by lectins that are specific for glycans of these antagonists.

  8. Parkia pendula seed lectin: potential use to treat cutaneous wounds in healthy and immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Coriolano, Marília Cavalcanti; de Melo, Cristiane Moutinho Lagos; Silva, Flávio de Oliveira; Schirato, Giuliana Viegas; Porto, Camila Souza; dos Santos, Paulo Jorge Parreira; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo; Carneiro-Leão, Ana Maria dos Anjos; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso

    2014-03-01

    Parkia pendula seed lectin was used to treat cutaneous wounds of normal and immunocompromised mice, inducing cicatrization. Methotrexate (0.8 mg/kg/week) was used as immunosuppressive drug. Wounds were produced in the dorsal region (1 cm(2)) of female albino Swiss mice (Mus musculus), health and immunocompromised. Wounds were daily topically treated with 100 μL of the following solutions: (1) control (NaCl 0.15 M), (2) control Im (0.15 M NaCl), (3) P. pendula seed lectin (100 μg/mL), and (4) P. pendula seed lectin Im (100 μg/mL). Clinical evaluation was performed during 12 days. Biopsies for histopathology analysis and microbiological examinations were carried out in the second, seventh, and 12th days. The presence of edema and hyperemia was observed in all groups during inflammatory period. The first crust was detected from the second day, only in the groups treated with P. pendula seed lectin. Microbiological analysis of wounds from day 0 to day 2 did not show bacterium at P. pendula seed lectin group; however, Staphylococcus sp. was detected every day in the other groups. The lectin markedly induced a total wound closing at P. pendula seed lectin and P. pendula seed lectin Im groups on 11th day of evolution. The present study suggests that P. pendula seed lectin is a biomaterial potential to show pharmacological effect in the repair process of cutaneous wounds.

  9. Toxicity and binding profile of lectins from the Genus canavalia on brine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins.

  10. Cloning and characterization of the lectin cDNA clones from onion, shallot and leek.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Engelborghs, I; Aelbers, H; Balzarini, J; Pusztai, A; van Leuven, F; Goldstein, I J; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the lectins from onion (Allium cepa), shallot (A. ascalonicum) and leek (A. porrum) has shown that these lectins differ from previously isolated Alliaceae lectins not only in their molecular structure but also in their ability to inhibit retrovirus infection of target cells. cDNA libraries constructed from poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from young shoots of onion, shallot and leek were screened for lectin cDNA clones using colony hybridization. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from these three species revealed a high degree of sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and at the amino acid level. Apparently the onion, shallot and leek lectins are translated from mRNAs of ca. 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins (ca. 19 kDa) which are converted into the mature lectin polypeptides (12.5-13 kDa) after post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  11. The three-dimensional structure of codakine and related marine C-type lectins.

    PubMed

    Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Markiv, Anatoly; Smith-Ravin, Juliette

    2007-10-01

    Codakine is a new Ca(2+)-dependent mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) isolated from the gill tissue of the tropical clam, Codakia orbicularis. Bioinformatic analyses with the BLAST program have revealed similarities with marine lectins involved in immunity whose three-dimensional (3D) structures were unknown up until recently. In this article, we present bioinformatic analyses of marine lectins that are homologous to codakine, in particular lectins from the sea worm Laxus oneistus, named mermaid. These lectins are involved in the symbiotic association with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria which are closely related to the C. orbicularis gill symbiont. Using homology modelling, folding that is characteristic of C-type lectins was observed in all the marine Ca(2+)-dependent lectins studied, with conservation of random coiled structures of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and Ca(2+)-binding sites. Like codakine, the marine lectins analysed contain a signal peptide commonly found in secreted and transmembrane proteins. The majority of the predictive 3D models established from the lectins exhibit a common feature, namely the involvement in invertebrate and vertebrate immunity (dendritic cell receptor, macrophage receptor, etc.). These bioinformatic analyses and the literature data support the hypothesis that codakine, like the L. oneistus mermaids, is probably involved in the cellular mediation of symbiosis and defence against pathogenic microorganisms.

  12. Interpreting null findings from trials of alcohol brief interventions.

    PubMed

    Heather, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of alcohol brief intervention (ABI) has been established by a succession of meta-analyses but, because the effects of ABI are small, null findings from randomized controlled trials are often reported and can sometimes lead to skepticism regarding the benefits of ABI in routine practice. This article first explains why null findings are likely to occur under null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) due to the phenomenon known as "the dance of the p-values." A number of misconceptions about null findings are then described, using as an example the way in which the results of the primary care arm of a recent cluster-randomized trial of ABI in England (the SIPS project) have been misunderstood. These misinterpretations include the fallacy of "proving the null hypothesis" that lack of a significant difference between the means of sample groups can be taken as evidence of no difference between their population means, and the possible effects of this and related misunderstandings of the SIPS findings are examined. The mistaken inference that reductions in alcohol consumption seen in control groups from baseline to follow-up are evidence of real effects of control group procedures is then discussed and other possible reasons for such reductions, including regression to the mean, research participation effects, historical trends, and assessment reactivity, are described. From the standpoint of scientific progress, the chief problem about null findings under the conventional NHST approach is that it is not possible to distinguish "evidence of absence" from "absence of evidence." By contrast, under a Bayesian approach, such a distinction is possible and it is explained how this approach could classify ABIs in particular settings or among particular populations as either truly ineffective or as of unknown effectiveness, thus accelerating progress in the field of ABI research.

  13. Magnetoacoustic Waves in Stratified Atmospheres with a Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic fields strongly modify the propagation of MHD waves from the photosphere to the low corona, as can be shown exactly for the most simple case of a uniform magnetic field and isothermally stratrified atmosphere. For slightly more realistic scenarios, where both the atmospheric parameters and the magnetic field vary spatially, the linear MHD equations typically cannot be solved analytically. We use the Lagrangian Remap code--a nonlinear, shock-capturing MHD code--to study the propagation of initially acoustic wavepackets through a model 2D atmosphere that includes a gravitationally stratified chromosphere, transition region, and low corona. The magnetic field is formed by three photospheric concentrations and includes a single magnetic null point, resulting in an inhomogeneous system with a magnetic dome topology. A portion of an introduced wavepacket will refract toward the null due to the varying Alfven speed. Waves incident on the equipartition contour surrounding the null, where the sound and Alfven speeds coincide, partially transmit, reflect, and mode convert between branches of the local dispersion relation. Outward propagating slow modes generated during conversion become strongly concentrated along the set of field lines passing near the null. Acoustic energy is beamed back downwards towards each photospheric foot point, and upwards along one separatrix that exits the top of the numerical domain. Changes in the dominant restoring force for the wavepacket, between the Lorentz and pressure gradient forces, lead to a buildup of current density along topologically important features of the system (the null point and its four separatrices) and can drive reconnection at the null point itself. Ohmic dissipation of the currents locally heats the plasma. We find that the amount of current accumulation depends on where the centroid of a wavepacket initial crosses the photosphere, but does not simply coincide with regions of open versus closed magnetic field or

  14. Retention of crab larvae in a coastal null zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilburg, Charles E.; Dittel, Ana I.; Epifanio, Charles E.

    2007-05-01

    Alongshelf transport in the southern Middle Atlantic Bight is forced by buoyancy-driven currents originating in three large estuaries along the bight. These currents are strongest in the coastal ocean near the southern terminus of each estuary, while the analogous region on the northern side is characterized by weak subtidal flow. We used a combination of field observations and numerical modeling to test the hypothesis that these regions of weak subtidal flow are coastal null zones that serve as retention areas for larvae. The field study consisted of a four-day, shipboard investigation of the distribution of blue crab larvae ( Callinectes sapidus) near the mouth of Delaware Bay (˜39°N, 75°W) in late summer, 2004. Hydrographic surveys of the study site were conducted with a hull-mounted, surface-measuring system. Results showed a sharp boundary between the null zone and the buoyancy-driven current to the south. Blue crab larvae were collected in surface plankton tows along a 30-km transect that encompassed these two areas. Stations with higher densities of larvae were clustered in the null zone during both ebb and flood tides. A numerical model was used to examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed distribution. Model results agreed with the field survey and showed that simulated larvae are aggregated in the null zone. The simulations also demonstrated that larvae spawned within the null zone have a much greater probability of settling in juvenile nursery habitat within the bay. The close agreement between field and model results provides consistent support for the hypothesis that coastal null zones associated with the buoyancy-driven circulation of large estuaries may allow retention of larvae in the vicinity of the natal spawning population.

  15. Development of gastrointestinal surface. VIII. Lectin identification of carbohydrate differences

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, K.Y.; Bresson, J.L.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-05-01

    Binding of microvillus membranes (MVM) from newborn and adult rats by concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus (UEA I), Dolichos bifluorus (DBA), and Triticum vulgaris (WGA) was examined to determine the availability of carbohydrate-containing sites for these lectins on the intestinal surface during development. Consistent patterns of differences in the reaction of MVM with these lectins were found. Con A and UEA had much higher reactivities to MVM of adult than newborn rats. /sup 125/I-labeled-UEA gel overlay experiments revealed the abundance of UEA-binding sites in MVM of adult rat in contrast to the two binding sites in MVM of a newborn rat. DBA bound only to MVM of the adults, and very few binding sites were found in immature MVM. In contrast to these lectins, WGA binding was much higher in MVM of the newborns and decreased with maturation. Additional experiments on the age dependence of UEA and DBA reactivities revealed that the most striking changes occur in animals from 2 to 2 wk of age. In MVM from 2-wk-old rats, there were only 13.9% and < 0.2% of the adult binding capacities for UEA and DBA, respectively. By the time the animals were 4 wk old, the binding capacity for UEA had attained close to the level of the adults, whereas for DBA it reached 71.3% of the adult value. These results provide definite evidence of changes in the intestinal surface during perinatal development.

  16. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  17. Fluorescent lectins for local in vivo visualization of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    KleinJan, Gijs Hendrik; Buckle, Tessa; van Willigen, Danny Michel; van Oosterom, Matthias Nathanaël; Spa, Silvia Johara; Kloosterboer, Harmen Egbert; van Leeuwen, Fijs Willem Bernhard

    2014-07-08

    Damage to peripheral nerves caused during a surgical intervention often results in function loss. Fluorescence imaging has the potential to improve intraoperative identification and preservation of these structures. However, only very few nerve targeting agents are available. This study describes the in vivo nerve staining capabilities of locally administered fluorescent lectin-analogues. To this end WGA, PNA, PHA-L and LEL were functionalized with Cy5 (λex max 640 nm; λem max 680 nm). Transfer of these imaging agents along the sciatic nerve was evaluated in Thy1-YFP mice (n = 12) after intramuscular injection. Migration from the injection site was assessed in vivo using a laboratory fluorescence scanner and ex vivo via fluorescence confocal microscopy. All four lectins showed retrograde movement and staining of the epineurium with a signal-to-muscle ratio of around two. On average, the longest transfer distance was obtained with WGA-Cy5 (0.95 cm). Since WGA also gave minimal uptake in the lymphatic system, this lectin type revealed the highest potential as a migration imaging agent to visualize nerves.

  18. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  19. Lectins influence chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in limb bud mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Monsefi, Malihezaman; Ghasemi, Mansoureh

    2011-02-01

    The role of cell surface glycoproteins in cell behavior can be characterized by their interactions with plant lectins. This study was designed to identify the effects of lectins on chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in limb bud mesenchymal cells in vitro. Limb bud mesenchymal cells from mouse embryos were cultured in high-density micromass culture. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), concanavalin A (ConA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA) were added separately to the culture media. Cells were cultured for 5 or 9 days, and cell viability was assayed by neutral red on day 5. The micromasses were stained with alcian blue, alizarin red S and Von Kossa stains, and alkaline phosphatase assays were also done. Dolichos biflorus agglutinin induced an increase in chondrogenesis, calcium precipitation and proteoglycan production. ConA and PNA did not affect chondrocyte differentiation but induced chondrocytes to produce more proteoglycan. Wheat germ agglutinin reduced chondrification and ossification but induced mesenchymal cells to store lipid droplets. Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 was toxic and significantly reduced cell survival. In conclusion, DBA was the most effective inducer of ossification and chondrification. Wheat germ agglutinin induced adipogenesis instead. These assays showed that lectins play important roles in limb bud development.

  20. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  1. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  2. Ganoderma lucidum: a source for novel bioactive lectin.

    PubMed

    U Girjal, Vinay; Neelagund, Shivayogeeswar; Krishnappa, Madappa

    2011-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is known for its high medicinal value, clinically used in treatment for various diseases. We have selected this mushroom for isolation of novel bioactive lectin. The isolation procedure comprised of ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE- cellulose and affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel. Purified lectin was monomer with a molecular mass of 15 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE, Gel filtration, MALDI-ToF. It showed hemagglutinating activity against both human and animal erythrocytes. The hemagglutination activity was not inhibited by simple sugars but inhibited by glycoproteins. The activity was maximal at pH range 4.0-9.0 and at temperature up to 60° C. The hemagglutination activity was stable even in the presence of 10mM EDTA and other divalent metal cations such as CaCl2, MgCl2, ZnCl2, and MnCl2. Lectin was shown antifungal activity against following pathogens Fusarium oxysporium, Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus Niger, Colletotrichum musae, Botrytis cinerea, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton interdigitale, Epidermophyton floccosum and Microsporum canis.

  3. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide.

  4. Ten Novel HLA-DRB1 Alleles and One Novel DRB3 Allele

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    BRIEF COMMUNICATION Ten novel HLA-DRB1 alleles and one novel DRB3 allele A. M. Lazaro1, N. K. Steiner1, M. E. Moraes2, J. R. Moraes2, J. Ng1, R. J...accepted for publication 31 May 2005 doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0039.2005.00459.x Abstract Ten novel HLA-DRB1 and one DRB3 alleles are described. Eight of the...substitutions (DRB1*040504, *130103, *160502 and DRB3 *020204). Two alleles differ by two nucleotide changes altering one (DRB1*1447 and *1361) amino acid and

  5. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko; Lay, Oliver P.; Peters, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    Deep, stable starlight nulls are needed for the direct detection of Earth-like planets and require careful control of the intensity and phases of the beams that are being combined. We are testing a novel compensator based on a deformable mirror to correct the intensity and phase at each wavelength and polarization across the nulling bandwidth. We have successfully demonstrated intensity and phase control using a deformable mirror across a 100nm wide band in the near-IR, and are in the process of conducting experiments in the mid-IR wavelengths. This paper covers the current results and in the mid-IR.

  6. Effect of residual phase gradients in optical null interference.

    PubMed

    Naik, Dinesh N; Pradeep Chakravarthy, T; Viswanathan, Nirmal K

    2016-01-01

    A scheme to study the effect of residual phase gradients in an optical interference between two out-of-phase Gaussian beams is proposed. In a Sagnac interferometer configured to provide a null output, a variable linear phase swept across the null point unfolds an optical field rotation due to an apparently negligible residual phase gradient present orthogonal to the linear phase sweep. As the optical beam that rotates around its propagation axis carries orbital angular momentum, the experimental results presented in this Letter could provide an insight into the momentum change associated with the energy redistribution in the fundamental phenomenon of optical interference.

  7. The mannose-specific lectins from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) are encoded by three sets of genes.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Lectin cDNA clones encoding the two mannose-binding lectins from ramsons (allium ursinum L.) bulbs, AUAI and AUAII (AUA, Allium ursinum agglutinin), were isolated and characterized. Sequence comparison of the different cDNA clones isolated revealed three types of lectin clones called LECAUAG0, LECAUAG1 and LECAUAG2, which besides the obvious differences in their sequences also differ from each other in the number of potential glycosylation sites within the C-terminal peptide of the lectin precursor. In vivo biosynthesis studies of the ramson lectins have shown that glycosylated lectin precursors occur in the organelle fraction of radioactively labeled ramson bulbs. Despite the similarities between the A. ursinum and the A. sativum (garlic) lectins at the protein level, molecular cloning of the two ramson lectins has shown that the lectin genes in A. ursinum are organized differently. Whereas in A. sativum the lectin polypeptides of the heterodimeric ASAI are encoded by one large precursor, those of the heterodimeric AUAI lectin are derived from two different precursors. These results are confirmed by Northern blot hybridization of A. ursinum RNA which, after hybridization with a labeled lectin cDNA, reveals only one band of 800 nucleotides in contrast to A. sativum RNA which yields two bands of 1400 and 800 nucleotides. Furthermore it is shown that the two mannose-binding lectins are differentially expressed.

  8. Characterization of behavioral and neuromuscular junction phenotypes in a novel allelic series of SMA mouse models.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Melissa; Gomez, Daniel; Feng, Zhihua; McEwen, Corissa; Beltran, Jose; Cirillo, Kim; El-Khodor, Bassem; Lin, Ming-Yi; Li, Yun; Knowlton, Wendy M; McKemy, David D; Bogdanik, Laurent; Butts-Dehm, Katherine; Martens, Kimberly; Davis, Crystal; Doty, Rosalinda; Wardwell, Keegan; Ghavami, Afshin; Kobayashi, Dione; Ko, Chien-Ping; Ramboz, Sylvie; Lutz, Cathleen

    2012-10-15

    A number of mouse models for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) have been genetically engineered to recapitulate the severity of human SMA by using a targeted null mutation at the mouse Smn1 locus coupled with the transgenic addition of varying copy numbers of human SMN2 genes. Although this approach has been useful in modeling severe SMA and very mild SMA, a mouse model of the intermediate form of the disease would provide an additional research tool amenable for drug discovery. In addition, many of the previously engineered SMA strains are multi-allelic by design, containing a combination of transgenes and targeted mutations in the homozygous state, making further genetic manipulation difficult. A new genetic engineering approach was developed whereby variable numbers of SMN2 sequences were incorporated directly into the murine Smn1 locus. Using combinations of these alleles, we generated an allelic series of SMA mouse strains harboring no, one, two, three, four, five, six or eight copies of SMN2. We report here the characterization of SMA mutants in this series that displayed a range in disease severity from embryonic lethal to viable with mild neuromuscular deficits.

  9. Molecular genetics of Drosophila alpha-actinin: mutant alleles disrupt Z disc integrity and muscle insertions

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated a Drosophila melanogaster alpha-actinin gene and partially characterized several mutant alleles. The Drosophila protein sequence is very similar (68% identity) to those of chicken alpha- actinin isoforms, but less closely related (30% identity) to Dictyostelium alpha-actinin. The gene is within subdivision 2C of the X chromosome, coincident with 15 lethal (1)2Cb mutations. At least four alleles, l(1)2Cb1, l(1)2Cb2, l(1)2Cb4, and l(1)2Cb5 are interrupted by rearrangement breakpoints and must be null. In all four cases, hemizygous mutants complete embryogenesis and do not die until the second day of larval growth, signifying that either the role of alpha- actinin in nonmuscle cells is redundant or that a distinct and only distantly related gene encodes the non-muscle isoform. Allelic but less severely affected fliA mutants are apparently due to point mutations, and develop into adults having thoracic muscle abnormalities. EM of mutant muscles reveals that Z discs and myofibrillar attachments are disrupted, whereas epithelial "tendon" cells are less affected. We discuss these phenotypes in the light of presumed in vivo alpha-actinin functions. PMID:2112549

  10. Interaction of linear manno-oligosaccharides with three mannose-specific bulb lectins. Comparison with mannose/glucose-binding lectins.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J

    1992-05-22

    Three new mannose-binding lectins, isolated from daffodil (NPA), amaryllis (HHA), and snowdrop (GNA) bulbs, are capable of precipitating with a linear mannopentaose (Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-2Man). NPA and HHA reacted strongly with the mannopentaose whereas GNA gave a precipitate only at concentrations greater than 500 microM. A phosphate group at C-6 of the nonreducing terminal mannosyl group prevented precipitation in all three cases. The reduced (NaBH4) mannopentaose, Man4Man-ol, did not precipitate with GNA or NPA, but was active with HHA. This activity was lost when Man4Man-ol was converted (NaIO4 then NaBH4; mild acid hydrolysis of the reduced product) into trisaccharide derivatives. With alpha-D-Manp-OMe the three lectins gave UV difference spectra having large positive peaks at 292-293 and 283-284 nm, and a small positive peak at 275 nm, characteristic of tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues. The association constants for the interaction with alpha-D-Manp-OMe were very low (NPA, 86; HHA, 66; and GNA, 41 M-1), but the lectins bound methyl (1----3)-alpha-mannobioside with increased affinity (K for NPA 540, for HHA 2400, and for GNA 200 M-1). The bulb lectins lack binding sites for hydrophobic ligands, as judged by their failure to interact with the fluorescent probes 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (TNS).

  11. Analysis of the GSTM1-null polymorphism in patients with pterygium from Goiânia, Goiás Brazil.

    PubMed

    de P R Júnior, A; Dos Reis, G M; E Silva, K S F; Rodrigues, D A; Gomes, M C S; Martins, J V M; da Costa, I R; Freitas, G A; Moura, K K V O

    2015-06-11

    The first reports about pterygium date back to Hippocrates, and this disease still threatens vision health around the world. Pterygium is a formation of fibrous tissue consisting of highly vascularized epithelial and subepithelial tissue that grows excessively and with an abnormal shape on the cornea. Many physical and biological factors are associated with the pathogenesis of pterygium, including heat, dust, and other particles in the atmosphere, and immunological mechanisms, mechanisms involving extracellular matrix reorganization, growth factors, cytokines, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to further investigate the association between polymorphisms in GSTM1 and the formation of pterygium. We collected peripheral blood samples from 90 patients diagnosed with pterygium and from 23 subjects with-out the disease in order to perform molecular analysis of the GSTM1 gene. Subjects with one or two copies of the GSTM1 allele had a normal genotype while those without any copies of the allele had a null geno-type. The chi-square test or the Fisher exact test was performed in order to investigate possible associations between the molecular analysis and the risk of pterygium. A significant difference between the frequency of the GSTM1-null genotype in patient and control groups was identified. However, sub-group analysis found that the GSTM1-null genotype was statistically significant in men, but not in women, and in Caucasians, but not in Brown or Black groups. Furthermore, the GSTM1-null geno-type was not related to any of the risk factors analyzed: cases in family, occupational exposure, smoking, hypertension, and diabetes.

  12. Near-planar Solution Structures of Mannose-binding Lectin Oligomers Provide Insight on Activation of Lectin Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ami; Phillips, Anna; Gor, Jayesh; Wallis, Russell; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is a fundamental component of innate immunity that orchestrates complex immunological and inflammatory processes. Complement comprises over 30 proteins that eliminate invading microorganisms while maintaining host cell integrity. Protein-carbohydrate interactions play critical roles in both the activation and regulation of complement. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) activates the lectin pathway of complement via the recognition of sugar arrays on pathogenic surfaces. To determine the solution structure of MBL, synchrotron x-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the MBL dimer, trimer, and tetramer are positioned close to each other in near-planar fan-like structures. These data were subjected to constrained modeling fits. A bent structure for the MBL monomer was identified starting from two crystal structures for its carbohydrate-recognition domain and its triple helical region. The MBL monomer structure was used to identify 10–12 near-planar solution structures for each of the MBL dimers, trimers, and tetramers starting from 900 to 6,859 randomized structures for each. These near-planar fan-like solution structures joined at an N-terminal hub clarified how the carbohydrate-recognition domain of MBL binds to pathogenic surfaces. They also provided insight on how MBL presents a structural template for the binding and auto-activation of the MBL-associated serine proteases to initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. PMID:22167201

  13. Allele-specific DNA methylation: beyond imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-10-15

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) and allele-specific gene expression (ASE) have long been studied in genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. But these types of allelic asymmetries, along with allele-specific transcription factor binding (ASTF), have turned out to be far more pervasive-affecting many non-imprinted autosomal genes in normal human tissues. ASM, ASE and ASTF have now been mapped genome-wide by microarray-based methods and NextGen sequencing. Multiple studies agree that all three types of allelic asymmetries, as well as the related phenomena of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci, are mostly accounted for by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms. The precise mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet understood, but there are some testable hypotheses and already a few direct clues. Future challenges include achieving higher resolution maps to locate the epicenters of cis-regulated ASM, using this information to test mechanistic models, and applying genome-wide maps of ASE/ASM/ASTF to pinpoint functional regulatory polymorphisms influencing disease susceptibility.

  14. Is mannan-binding lectin (MBL) detectable on monocytes and monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells?

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Shirley L; Downing, Ian; Turner, Marc; Kilpatrick, David C

    2008-12-01

    MBL (mannan-binding lectin; also called mannose-binding lectin) is a circulating C-type lectin with a collagen-like region synthesized mainly by the liver. MBL may influence susceptibility to infection in recipients of stem cell transplants, and it has even been suggested that the MBL status of a donor can influence the recipient's susceptibility to post-transplant infections. We have previously reported that MBL can be detected on human monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells, based on detection using biotinylated anti-MBL, suggesting that those cells could synthesize MBL. If true, permanent MBL replacement therapy could be achieved by stem cell infusions. However, two other groups independently failed to find mbl-2-derived mRNA in monocytes. Therefore, to confirm or refute our previous observations, we used an alternative experimental strategy. Instead of using biotinylated antibody and labelled streptavidin, detection of surface MBL was attempted using MBL-specific primary antibodies (131-1, 131-10 and 131-11) followed by fluorescein-labelled anti-IgG, and controlled by the use of non-specific IgG as primary antibody. Monocytes were counterstained with anti-CD14-PE before FACS analysis. Adherent monocytes were also cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium or converted into immature dendritic cells by culture with IL-4 (interleukin-4) and GM-CSF (granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor). During FACS analysis, the dendritic cells were gated after counter-staining with anti-CD1a-PE. MBL was readily detected on the surface of fresh monocytes using all three specific anti-MBL monoclonal antibodies, but specific anti-MBL binding was greatly diminished after monocytes had been cultured for 2 days in serum-free medium. Moreover, we could not detect any MBL present on the surface of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. We therefore conclude that MBL is indeed present on the surface of fresh human monocytes. However, in view of the mRNA findings of others and our

  15. The appearance, motion, and disappearance of three-dimensional magnetic null points

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Parnell, Clare E.; Haynes, Andrew L.

    2015-10-15

    While theoretical models and simulations of magnetic reconnection often assume symmetry such that the magnetic null point when present is co-located with a flow stagnation point, the introduction of asymmetry typically leads to non-ideal flows across the null point. To understand this behavior, we present exact expressions for the motion of three-dimensional linear null points. The most general expression shows that linear null points move in the direction along which the magnetic field and its time derivative are antiparallel. Null point motion in resistive magnetohydrodynamics results from advection by the bulk plasma flow and resistive diffusion of the magnetic field, which allows non-ideal flows across topological boundaries. Null point motion is described intrinsically by parameters evaluated locally; however, global dynamics help set the local conditions at the null point. During a bifurcation of a degenerate null point into a null-null pair or the reverse, the instantaneous velocity of separation or convergence of the null-null pair will typically be infinite along the null space of the Jacobian matrix of the magnetic field, but with finite components in the directions orthogonal to the null space. Not all bifurcating null-null pairs are connected by a separator. Furthermore, except under special circumstances, there will not exist a straight line separator connecting a bifurcating null-null pair. The motion of separators cannot be described using solely local parameters because the identification of a particular field line as a separator may change as a result of non-ideal behavior elsewhere along the field line.

  16. Evidence for export of a muscle lectin from cytosol to extracellular matrix and for a novel secretory mechanism

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A soluble lactose-binding lectin with subunit Mr of 14,500 is believed to function by interacting with extracellular glycoconjugates, because it has been detected extracellularly by immunohistochemistry. This localization has been questioned, however, since the lectin lacks a secretion signal sequence, which challenges the contention that it is secreted. We have demonstrated externalization of this lectin from C2 mouse muscle cells by both immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein and immunohistochemical localization. We further show that externalization of the lectin is a developmentally regulated process that accompanies myoblast differentiation and that the lectin codistributes with laminin in myotube extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical localization during intermediate stages of externalization suggests that the lectin becomes concentrated in evaginations of plasma membrane, which pinch off to form labile lectin- rich extracellular vesicles. This suggests a possible mechanism for lectin export from the cytosol to the extracellular matrix. PMID:2335567

  17. Targeted delivery of antigen to hamster nasal lymphoid tissue with M-cell-directed lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, P J; Boden, J A; Monath, T P

    1997-01-01

    The nasal cavity of a rodent is lined by an epithelium organized into distinct regional domains responsible for specific physiological functions. Aggregates of nasal lymphoid tissue (NALT) located at the base of the nasal cavity are believed to be sites of induction of mucosal immune responses to airborne antigens. The epithelium overlying NALT contains M cells which are specialized for the transcytosis of immunogens, as demonstrated in other mucosal tissues. We hypothesized that NALT M cells are characterized by distinct glycoconjugate receptors which influence antigen uptake and immune responses to transcytosed antigens. To identify glycoconjugates that may distinguish NALT M cells from other cells of the respiratory epithelium (RE), we performed lectin histochemistry on sections of the hamster nasal cavity with a panel of lectins. Many classes of glycoconjugates were found on epithelial cells in this region. While most lectins bound to sites on both the RE and M cells, probes capable of recognizing alpha-linked galactose were found to label the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) almost exclusively. By morphological criteria, the FAE contains >90% M cells. To determine if apical glycoconjugates on M cells were accessible from the nasal cavity, an M-cell-selective lectin and a control lectin in parallel were administered intranasally to hamsters. The M-cell-selective lectin was found to specifically target the FAE, while the control lectin did not. Lectin bound to M cells in vivo was efficiently endocytosed, consistent with the role of M cells in antigen transport. Intranasal immunization with lectin-test antigen conjugates without adjuvant stimulated induction of specific serum immunoglobulin G, whereas antigen alone or admixed with lectin did not. The selective recognition of NALT M cells by a lectin in vivo provides a model for microbial adhesin-host cell receptor interactions on M cells and the targeted delivery of immunogens to NALT following intranasal

  18. Self-Nulling Beam Combiner Using No External Phase Inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.

    2010-01-01

    A self-nulling beam combiner is proposed that completely eliminates the phase inversion subsystem from the nulling interferometer, and instead uses the intrinsic phase shifts in the beam splitters. Simplifying the flight instrument in this way will be a valuable enhancement of mission reliability. The tighter tolerances on R = T (R being reflection and T being transmission coefficients) required by the self-nulling configuration actually impose no new constraints on the architecture, as two adaptive nullers must be situated between beam splitters to correct small errors in the coatings. The new feature is exploiting the natural phase shifts in beam combiners to achieve the 180 phase inversion necessary for nulling. The advantage over prior art is that an entire subsystem, the field-flipping optics, can be eliminated. For ultimate simplicity in the flight instrument, one might fabricate coatings to very high tolerances and dispense with the adaptive nullers altogether, with all their moving parts, along with the field flipper subsystem. A single adaptive nuller upstream of the beam combiner may be required to correct beam train errors (systematic noise), but in some circumstances phase chopping reduces these errors substantially, and there may be ways to further reduce the chop residuals. Though such coatings are beyond the current state of the art, the mechanical simplicity and robustness of a flight system without field flipper or adaptive nullers would perhaps justify considerable effort on coating fabrication.

  19. DARWIN nulling interferometer breadboard I: System engineering and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatscher, Reinhold; Sodnik, Zoran; Ergenzinger, Klaus; Johann, Ulrich; Vink, Rob

    2003-10-01

    The presented work has been funded by ESA under ESTEC/Contract No. 14827/00/NL/CK and Astrium Germany has been awarded with this first ESA breadboarding towards nulling interferometry. Astrium designed and manufactured a nulling breadboard operating in the near infrared. The selected concept is fully transferable to the mid infrared. The interferometer is based on a highly symmetric Sagnac core. A dispersive phase shifter or a periscope system maintains the required phase shift of π. Two different source simulators have been built to test the interferometer's performance. They provide two point sources simulating a typical star and a planet signal. Angular separation of the point sources and intensity can be adapted to both operation modes, nulling and imaging. The OPD is actively stabilized to a gray fringe at a shorter wavelength without wobbling the system's OPD. The best results obtained with a diode laser source were a star suppression of 408,000 and a suppression of 32,000 using a broad-band ASE source. A stable deep null with a star suppression of 50,000 to 70,000 could be achieved over half an hour.

  20. Null matrices and the analysis of species co-occurrences.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, James G; Moulton, Michael P; Selfridge, Ralph G

    1998-08-01

    Patterns in species occurrences on islands have been analyzed by several authors. At issue is the number of non-occurring pairs of species (also known as checkerboards). Previous authors have suggested that if the number of checkerboards differs from what is expected by chance, then island communities might have been structured by competition. Investigators have pursued this problem by first generating random (or null) matrices and then testing a metric derived from the collection of null matrices against the metric calculated from the actual species co-occurrence matrix. The random matrices were constrained by requiring the number of species on each island, and the number of islands on which each species occurred to be equal to their observed values. We show that results from previous studies are generally flawed. We present a fast, efficient algorithm to generate null matrices for any set of fixed row and column sums, and propose a modification of a previously proposed metric as a test statistic. We evaluated the efficacy of our construction method for null creation and our metric using incidence matrices from the avifauna of Vanuatu (formerly New Hebrides).

  1. Proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in connexin43-null osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, F.; Lecanda, F.; Screen, J.; Civitelli, R.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoblasts are highly coupled by gap junctions formed primarily by connexin43 (Cx43). We have shown that interference with Cx43 expression or function disrupts transcriptional regulation of osteoblast genes, and that deletion of Cx43 in the mouse causes skeletal malformations, delayed mineralization, and osteoblast dysfunction. Here, we studied the mechanisms by which genetic deficiency of Cx43 alters osteoblast development. While cell proliferation rates were similar in osteoblastic cells derived from calvaria of Cx43-null and wild type mice, camptothecin-induced apoptosis was 3-fold higher in mutant compared to wild type osteoblasts. When grown in mineralizing medium, Cx43-null cells were able to produce mineralized matrix but it took one week longer to reach the same mineralization levels as in normal cells. Likewise, expression of alkaline phosphatase activity per cell--a marker of osteoblast differentiation--was maximal only 2 weeks later in Cx43-null relative to wild-type cells. These observations suggest that Cx43 is important for a normal and timely development of the osteoblastic phenotype. Delayed differentiation and increase programmed cell death may explain the skeletal phenotype of Cx43-null mice.

  2. Traversable wormholes: Minimum violation of the null energy condition revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2007-08-15

    It was argued in literature that traversable wormholes can exist with an arbitrarily small violation of null energy conditions. I show that if the amount of exotic material near the wormhole throat tends to zero, either this leads to a horn instead of a wormhole or the throat approaches the horizon in such a way that infinitely large stresses develop on the throat.

  3. Null Lens Assembly for X-Ray Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a null lens assembly that allows laser interferometry of 60 deg. slumped glass mirror segments used in x-ray mirrors. The assembly consists of four lenses in precise alignment to each other, with incorporated piezoelectric nanometer stepping actuators to position the lenses in six degrees of freedom for positioning relative to each other.

  4. Null Objects in Second Language Acquisition: Grammatical vs. Performance Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyzik, Eve C.

    2008-01-01

    Null direct objects provide a favourable testing ground for grammatical and performance models of argument omission. This article examines both types of models in order to determine which gives a more plausible account of the second language data. The data were collected from second language (L2) learners of Spanish by means of four oral…

  5. Effectiveness of Null Signal Sky Localization in Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq Hazboun, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    A null stream is constructed from the timing residuals of three pulsars by noting that the same source polarization amplitudes appear in the data stream from each pulsar. Linear combinations of a set of individual pulsar data streams can be shown to be a two-parameter family (the two sky position angles of the source) that can be minimized to determine the location of the source on the sky. Taking the product of a number of null streams allows for an even stronger localization of the gravitational wave's source; a large advantage in a PTA where there are more independent signals than other gravitational wave detectors. While a null stream contains the same information as any other data stream with the same number of pulsars, the statistics of a product of noisy signals is inherently different than for a sum of those same signals.A comparison of how null signal searches compare to other techniques for sky localization of PTA sources will be discussed, as well as an assessment of the types of searches for which the method may be useful.

  6. Do Null Subjects (Mis-)Trigger Pro-Drop Grammars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [[superscript -]pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing…

  7. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not.

  8. Testing the null hypothesis: the forgotten legacy of Karl Popper?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Testing of the null hypothesis is a fundamental aspect of the scientific method and has its basis in the falsification theory of Karl Popper. Null hypothesis testing makes use of deductive reasoning to ensure that the truth of conclusions is irrefutable. In contrast, attempting to demonstrate the new facts on the basis of testing the experimental or research hypothesis makes use of inductive reasoning and is prone to the problem of the Uniformity of Nature assumption described by David Hume in the eighteenth century. Despite this issue and the well documented solution provided by Popper's falsification theory, the majority of publications are still written such that they suggest the research hypothesis is being tested. This is contrary to accepted scientific convention and possibly highlights a poor understanding of the application of conventional significance-based data analysis approaches. Our work should remain driven by conjecture and attempted falsification such that it is always the null hypothesis that is tested. The write up of our studies should make it clear that we are indeed testing the null hypothesis and conforming to the established and accepted philosophical conventions of the scientific method.

  9. Overt and Null Subject Pronouns in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Momani, Islam M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims at examining the role that morphology plays in allowing and/or motivating sentences in Jordanian Arabic (hereafter JA) to be formed with or without subject pronouns. It also aims at giving a comprehensive and descriptive presentation of the distribution of overt and null subject pronouns in JA, and tries to determine to what extent…

  10. AlleleSeq: analysis of allele-specific expression and binding in a network framework.

    PubMed

    Rozowsky, Joel; Abyzov, Alexej; Wang, Jing; Alves, Pedro; Raha, Debasish; Harmanci, Arif; Leng, Jing; Bjornson, Robert; Kong, Yong; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Rubin, Mark; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2011-08-02

    To study allele-specific expression (ASE) and binding (ASB), that is, differences between the maternally and paternally derived alleles, we have developed a computational pipeline (AlleleSeq). Our pipeline initially constructs a diploid personal genome sequence (and corresponding personalized gene annotation) using genomic sequence variants (SNPs, indels, and structural variants), and then identifies allele-specific events with significant differences in the number of mapped reads between maternal and paternal alleles. There are many technical challenges in the construction and alignment of reads to a personal diploid genome sequence that we address, for example, bias of reads mapping to the reference allele. We have applied AlleleSeq to variation data for NA12878 from the 1000 Genomes Project as well as matched, deeply sequenced RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq data sets generated for this purpose. In addition to observing fairly widespread allele-specific behavior within individual functional genomic data sets (including results consistent with X-chromosome inactivation), we can study the interaction between ASE and ASB. Furthermore, we investigate the coordination between ASE and ASB from multiple transcription factors events using a regulatory network framework. Correlation analyses and network motifs show mostly coordinated ASB and ASE.

  11. Retarded fields of null particles and the memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    We consider the retarded solution to the scalar, electromagnetic, and linearized gravitational field equations in Minkowski spacetime, with source given by a particle moving on a null geodesic. In the scalar case and in the Lorenz gauge in the electromagnetic and gravitational cases, the retarded integral over the infinite past of the source does not converge as a distribution, so we cut off the null source suitably at a finite time t0 and then consider two different limits: (i) the limit as the observation point goes to null infinity at fixed t0, from which the "1/r" part of the fields can be extracted and (ii) the limit t0→-∞ at fixed "observation point." The limit (i) gives rise to a "velocity kick" on distant test particles in the scalar and electromagnetic cases, and it gives rise to a "memory effect" (i.e., a permanent change in relative separation of two test particles) in the linearized gravitational case, in agreement with previous analyses. As already noted, the second limit does not exist in the scalar case or for the Lorenz gauge vector potential and Lorenz gauge metric perturbation in the electromagnetic and linearized gravitational cases. However, in the electromagnetic case, we obtain a well-defined distributional limit for the electromagnetic field strength, and in the linearized gravitational case, we obtain a well-defined distributional limit for the linearized Riemann tensor. In the gravitational case, this limit agrees with the Aichelberg-Sexl solution. There is no memory effect associated with this limiting solution. This strongly suggests that the memory effect—including nonlinear memory effect of Christodoulou—should not be interpreted as arising simply from the passage of (effective) null stress energy to null infinity but rather as arising from a "burst of radiation" associated with the creation of the null stress energy [as in case (i) above] or, more generally, with radiation present in the spacetime that was not "produced" by the

  12. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  13. Thermodynamical interpretation of the geometrical variables associated with null surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; Padmanabhan, T.

    2015-11-01

    The emergent gravity paradigm interprets gravitational field equations as describing the thermodynamic limit of the underlying statistical mechanics of microscopic degrees of freedom of the spacetime. The connection is established by attributing a heat density T s to the null surfaces where T is the appropriate Davies-Unruh temperature and s is the entropy density. The field equations can be obtained from a thermodynamic variational principle which extremizes the total heat density of all null surfaces. The explicit form of s determines the nature of the theory. We explore the consequences of this paradigm for an arbitrary null surface and highlight the thermodynamic significance of various geometrical quantities. In particular, we show that (a) a conserved current, associated with the time development vector in a natural fashion, has direct thermodynamic interpretation in all Lanczos-Lovelock models of gravity; (b) one can generalize the notion of gravitational momentum, introduced in T. Padmanabhan, [arXiv:1506.03814] to all Lanczos-Lovelock models of gravity such that the conservation of the total momentum leads to the relevant field equations; (c) the thermodynamic variational principle which leads to the field equations of gravity can also be expressed in terms of the gravitational momentum in all Lanczos-Lovelock models; and (d) three different projections of gravitational momentum related to an arbitrary null surface in the spacetime lead to three different equations, all of which have thermodynamic interpretation. The first one reduces to a Navier-Stokes equation for the transverse drift velocity. The second can be written as a thermodynamic identity T d S =d E +P d V . The third describes the time evolution of the null surface in terms of suitably defined surface and bulk degrees of freedom. The implications are discussed.

  14. Transformation of QTL genotypic effects to allelic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Yoshitaka

    2005-01-01

    The genotypic and allelic effect models are equivalent in terms of QTL detection in a simple additive model, but the QTL allelic model has the advantage of providing direct information for marker-assisted selection. However, the allelic matrix is four times as large as the genotypic IBD matrix, causing computational problems, especially in genome scans examining multiple positions. Transformation from genotypic to allelic effects, after estimating the genotypic effects with a smaller IBD matrix, can solve this problem. Although the validity of transformation from genotypic to allelic effects has been disputed, this work proves that transformation can successfully yield unique allelic effects when genotypic and allelic IBD matrixes exist. PMID:16093016

  15. Hmga1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts display downregulation of spindle assembly checkpoint gene expression associated to nuclear and karyotypic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Conte, Andrea; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Tornincasa, Mara; Gerlini, Raffaele; Valente, Davide; Izzo, Antonella; Fusco, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The High Mobility Group A1 proteins (HMGA1) are nonhistone chromatinic proteins with a critical role in development and cancer. We have recently reported that HMGA1 proteins are able to increase the expression of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) genes, thus impairing SAC function and causing chromosomal instability in cancer cells. Moreover, we found a significant correlation between HMGA1 and SAC genes expression in human colon carcinomas. Here, we report that mouse embryonic fibroblasts null for the Hmga1 gene show downregulation of Bub1, Bub1b, Mad2l1 and Ttk SAC genes, and present several features of chromosomal instability, such as nuclear abnormalities, binucleation, micronuclei and karyotypic alterations. Interestingky, also MEFs carrying only one impaired Hmga1 allele present karyotypic alterations. These results indicate that HMGA1 proteins regulate SAC genes expression and, thereby, genomic stability also in embryonic cells. PMID:26889953

  16. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search

    PubMed Central

    Bauters, Lander; Naalden, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2017-01-01

    Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species. PMID:28054982

  17. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Lander; Naalden, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2017-01-04

    Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species.

  18. Mechanism of entomotoxicity of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) in Spodoptera littoralis larvae.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-09-01

    Plant lectins have received a lot of attention because of their insecticidal properties. When orally administered in artificial diet or in transgenic plants, lectins provoke a wide range of detrimental effects, including alteration of the digestive enzyme machinery, fecundity drop, reduced feeding, changes in oviposition behavior, growth and development inhibition and mortality. Although many studies reported the entomotoxicity of lectins, only a few of them investigated the mode of action by which lectins exert toxicity. In the present paper we have studied for the first time the insecticidal potential of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) bulbs against the larvae of the cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). Bioassays on neonate larvae showed that this mannose-specific lectin affected larval growth, causing a development retardation and larval weight decrease. Using primary cell cultures from S. littoralis midguts and confocal microscopy we have elucidated FITC-HHA binding and internalization mechanisms. We found that HHA did not exert a toxic effect on S. littoralis midgut cells, but HHA interaction with the brush border of midgut cells interfered with normal nutrient absorption in the S. littoralis midgut, thereby affecting normal larval growth in vivo. This study thus confirms the potential of mannose-specific lectins as pest control agents and sheds light on the mechanism underlying lectin entomotoxicity.

  19. Preparation and biological properties of a melibiose binding lectin from Bauhinia variegata seeds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2008-11-26

    A dimeric 64-kDa melibiose-binding lectin was isolated from the seeds of Bauhinia variegata. The isolation procedure comprised affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Mono Q, and gel filtration on Superdex 75. The lectin was adsorbed on the first two chromatographic media. Its hemagglutinating activity was stable after 30-min exposure to temperatures up to 70 degrees C. Since lectins may demonstrate biological activities such as antiproliferative, immunomodulatory, antifungal, antiviral, and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities, the isolated lectin was tested for these activities. It was found that the lectin inhibited proliferation in hepatoma HepG2 cells and breast cancer MCF7 cells with an IC(50) of 1.4 microM and 0.18 microM, respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity was inhibited with an IC(50) of 1.02 microM. The lectin and concanavalin A (Con A) evoked maximal mitogenic response from mouse splenocytes at similar concentrations, but the maximal response to B. variegata lectin was only 1/5 of that induced by Con A in magnitude. B. variegata lectin was devoid of antifungal activity.

  20. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray structure analysis of the banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca.

    PubMed

    Singh, D D; Saikrishnan, K; Kumar, Prashant; Dauter, Z; Sekar, K; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2004-11-01

    The banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca, MW 29.4 kDa, has been isolated, purified and crystallized. The trigonal crystals contain one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement to a resolution of 3 A. The structure of the subunit is similar to that of jacalin-like lectins.

  2. Architecture of Deinococcus geothermalis biofilms on glass and steel: a lectin study.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Minna; Neu, Thomas R; Raulio, Mari; Kolari, Marko; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2008-07-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is resistant to chemical and physical stressors and forms tenuous biofilms in paper industry. The architecture of its biofilms growing on glass and on stainless acid proof steel was studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescent lectins and nanobeads as in situ probes. Hydrophobic nanobeads adhered to the biofilms but did not penetrate to biofilm interior. In contrast, the biofilms were readily permeable towards many different lectins. A skeletal network of glycoconjugates, reactive with Dolichos biflorus and Maclura pomifera lectins, was prominent in the space inside the biofilm colony core but absent on the exterior. Cells in the core space of the biofilm were interconnected by a network of adhesion structures, reactive with Amaranthus caudatus lectin but with none of the 65 other tested lectins. The glycoconjugates connecting the individual cells to steel reacted with Phaseolus vulgaris lectin whereas those connecting to glass mainly reacted with A. caudatus lectin. Envelopes of all cells in the D. geothermalis biofilm reacted with several other lectins, with many different specificities. We conclude that numerous different glycoconjugates are involved in the adhesion and biofilm formation of D. geothermalis, possibly contributing its unique survival capacity when exposed to dehydration, biocidal chemicals and other extreme conditions.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Messenger RNAs for Seed Lectin and Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitor in Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Vodkin, Lila O.

    1981-01-01

    The mRNAs for seed lectin and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor of soybean have been highly enriched by immunoadsorption of the polysomes synthesizing these proteins. Polysomes isolated from developing seed of variety Williams were incubated with monospecific rabbit antibodies produced against lectin subunits or trypsin inhibitor protein. The polysomal mixture was passed over a column containing goat anti-rabbit antibodies bound to Sepharose. Bound polysomes were eluted and the mRNA was selected by passage over oligo(dT)-cellulose. Lectin complementary DNA hybridized to an 1150-nucleotide message and trypsin inhibitor complementary DNA hybridized to a 770-nucleotide message in blotting experiments using total poly(A) RNA. Translation of soybean lectin mRNA using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate yielded a major polypeptide of 32,300 whereas the molecular weight for purified lectin subunits was 30,000. Trypsin inhibitor mRNA directed the synthesis of a 23,800-dalton polypeptide as compared to 21,500 daltons for trypsin inhibitor marker protein. Lectin specific polysomes could not be obtained from a soybean variety which lacks detectable lectin protein whereas trypsin inhibitor-specific polysomes were bound by immunoselection. These results confirmed the specificity of the immunoadsorption procedure and strongly indicated that the lectinless variety was deficient or substantially reduced in functional lectin mRNA. Images PMID:16661996

  4. Both the nature of KIR3DL1 alleles and the KIR3DL1/S1 allele combination affect the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire in the French population.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Katia; Willem, Catherine; Legrand, Nolwenn; Djaoud, Zakia; David, Gaëlle; Rettman, Pauline; Bressollette-Bodin, Céline; Senitzer, David; Esbelin, Julie; Cesbron-Gautier, Anne; Schneider, Thierry; Retière, Christelle

    2013-04-01

    NK-cell functions are regulated by many activating and inhibitory receptors including KIR3DL1. Extensive allelic polymorphism and variability in expression can directly alter NK-cell phenotype and functions. Here we investigated the KIR3DL1(+) NK-cell repertoire, taking into account the allelic KIR3DL1/S1 polymorphism, KIR3DL1 phenotype, and function. All 109 studied individuals possessed at least one KIR3DL1 allele, with weak KIR3DL1*054, or null alleles being frequently present. In KIR3DL1(high/null) individuals, we observed a bimodal distribution of KIR3DL1(+) NK cells identified by a different KIR3DL1 expression level and cell frequency regardless of a similar amount of both KIR3DL1 transcripts, HLA background, or KIR2D expression. However, this bimodal distribution can be explained by a functional selection following a hierarchy of KIR3DL1 receptors. The higher expression of KIR3DL1 observed on cord blood NK cells suggests the expression of the functional KIR3DL1*004 receptors. Thus, the low amplification of KIR3DL1(high) , KIR3DL1*004 NK-cell subsets during development may be due to extensive signaling via these two receptors. Albeit in a nonexclusive manner, individual immunological experience may contribute to shaping the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire. Together, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms regulating the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire.

  5. Mannose-binding lectin 2 (Mbl2) gene polymorphisms are related to protein plasma levels, but not to heart disease and infection by Chlamydia

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, M.A.F.; Gomes, S.T.M.; Almeida, N.C.C.; Souza, M.I.M.; Costa, S.R.C.F.; Hermes, R.B.; Lima, S.S.; Zaninotto, M.M.; Fossa, M.A.A.; Maneschy, M.A.; Martins-Feitosa, R.N.; Azevedo, V.N.; Machado, L.F.A.; Ishak, M.O.G.; Ishak, R.; Vallinoto, A.C.R.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the single nucleotide polymorphisms in exon 1 of the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene was evaluated in a sample of 159 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (71 patients undergoing valve replacement surgery and 300 control subjects) to investigate a possible association between polymorphisms and heart disease with Chlamydia infection. The identification of the alleles B and D was performed using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and of the allele C was accomplished through PCR assays followed by digestion with the restriction enzyme. The comparative analysis of allelic and genotypic frequencies between the three groups did not reveal any significant difference, even when related to previous Chlamydia infection. Variations in the MBL plasma levels were influenced by the presence of polymorphisms, being significantly higher in the group of cardiac patients, but without representing a risk for the disease. The results showed that despite MBL2 gene polymorphisms being associated with the protein plasma levels, the polymorphisms were not enough to predict the development of heart disease, regardless of infection with both species of Chlamydia. PMID:27982280

  6. Novel roles for erythroid Ankyrin-1 revealed through an ENU-induced null mouse mutant

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Gerhard; Sutton, Rosemary; Marshall, Vikki; Lundie, Rachel J.; Caddy, Jacinta; Romeo, Tony; Fernandez, Kate; McCormack, Matthew P.; Cooke, Brian M.; Foote, Simon J.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Curtis, David J.; Hilton, Douglas J.; Kile, Benjamin T.

    2009-01-01

    Insights into the role of ankyrin-1 (ANK-1) in the formation and stabilization of the red cell cytoskeleton have come from studies on the nb/nb mice, which carry hypomorphic alleles of Ank-1. Here, we revise several paradigms established in the nb/nb mice through analysis of an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)–induced Ank-1–null mouse. Mice homozygous for the Ank-1 mutation are profoundly anemic in utero and most die perinatally, indicating that Ank-1 plays a nonredundant role in erythroid development. The surviving pups exhibit features of severe hereditary spherocytosis (HS), with marked hemolysis, jaundice, compensatory extramedullary erythropoiesis, and tissue iron overload. Red cell membrane analysis reveals a complete loss of ANK-1 protein and a marked reduction in β-spectrin. As a consequence, the red cells exhibit total disruption of cytoskeletal architecture and severely altered hemorheologic properties. Heterozygous mutant mice, which have wild-type levels of ANK-1 and spectrin in their RBC membranes and normal red cell survival and ultrastructure, exhibit profound resistance to malaria, which is not due to impaired parasite entry into RBC. These findings provide novel insights into the role of Ank-1, and define an ideal model for the study of HS and malarial resistance. PMID:19179303

  7. Small unilamellar vesicles as reagents: a chemically defined, quantitative assay for lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Rando, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    Samll unilamellar vesicles containing synthetic glycolipids can be prepared. These vesicles are aggregated by the appropriate lectin (Orr et al., 1979; Rando and Bangerter, 1979; Slama and Rando, 1980). It is shown here that extent of aggregation of these vesicles as measured by light scattering at 360 nm, is, under certain conditions, linear with amount of lectin added. This forms the basis of a rapid and simple quantitative assay for lectins using the modified vesicles as a defined chemical substrate. The assay is sensitive to lectin concentrations in the low ..mu..g range. The assay is applied here to studies on concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin and the ..cap alpha..-fucosyl binding lectin from Ulex europaeus (Type I).

  8. Assessment of weak sugar-binding ability using lectin tetramer and membrane-based glycans.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To consider biological significance of glycosylation of proteins, it is necessary to evaluate the importance of sugar-recognition processes mediated by lectins. Though the interaction between sugars and proteins, especially animal lectins, is quite weak with K d approximately 10(-4) M, cellular and molecular recognitions mediated via sugar-protein interaction increase their avidity by 1-3 orders of magnitude by the self-association of both receptors and their ligands on cell surfaces. To assess the weak interaction between lectins and their sugar ligands, we established lectin tetramer binding to cell surface glycans using flow cytometry. This strategy is highly sensitive, and useful to determine whether or not a putative lectin domain may have sugar-binding ability.

  9. Deterrent activity of plant lectins on cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) oviposition.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Amin; Van Damme, Els J M; Peumans, Willy J; Smagghe, Guy

    2006-09-01

    A set of 14 plant lectins was screened in a binary choice bioassay for inhibitory activity on cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) oviposition. Coating of chickpea seeds (Cicer arietinum L.) with a 0.05% (w/v) solution of plant lectins caused a significant reduction in egg laying. Control experiments with heat inactivated lectin and BSA indicated that the observed deterrent effects are specific and require carbohydrate-binding activity. However, no clear correlation could be established between deterrent activity and sugar-binding specificity/molecular structure of the lectins. Increasing the insect density reduced the inhibitory effect of the lectins confirming that female insects are capable of adjusting their oviposition rates as a function of host availability.

  10. Sexual selection by female immunity against paternal antigens can fix loss of function alleles.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Darius; Springer, Stevan A; Ma, Fang; Cohen, Miriam; Secrest, Patrick; Taylor, Rachel E; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2011-10-25

    Humans lack the common mammalian cell surface molecule N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) due to a CMAH gene inactivation, which occurred approximately three million years ago. Modern humans produce antibodies specific for Neu5Gc. We hypothesized that anti-Neu5Gc antibodies could enter the female reproductive tract and target Neu5Gc-positive sperm or fetal tissues, reducing reproductive compatibility. Indeed, female mice with a human-like Cmah(-/-) mutation and immunized to express anti-Neu5Gc antibodies show lower fertility with Neu5Gc-positive males, due to prezygotic incompatibilities. Human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies are also capable of targeting paternally derived antigens and mediate cytotoxicity against Neu5Gc-bearing chimpanzee sperm in vitro. Models of populations polymorphic for such antigens show that reproductive incompatibility by female immunity can drive loss-of-function alleles to fixation from moderate initial frequencies. Initially, the loss of a cell-surface antigen can occur due to drift in isolated populations or when natural selection favors the loss of a receptor exploited by pathogens, subsequently the same loss-of-function allele can come under sexual selection because it avoids being targeted by the female immune system. Thus, we provide evidence of a link between sexual selection and immune function: Antigenicity in females can select against foreign paternal antigens on sperm and rapidly fix loss-of-function alleles. Similar circumstances existed when the CMAH null allele was polymorphic in ancestral hominins, just before the divergence of Homo from australopithecines.

  11. High-resolution crystal structures of Colocasia esculenta tarin lectin.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patricia R; Meagher, Jennifer L; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J; Paschoalin, Vânia M F; Silva, Joab T; Stuckey, Jeanne A

    2017-01-01

    Tarin, the Colocasia esculenta lectin from the superfamily of α-d-mannose-specific plant bulb lectins, is a tetramer of 47 kDa composed of two heterodimers. Each heterodimer possesses homologous monomers of ~11.9 (A chain) and ~12.7 (B chain) kDa. The structures of apo and carbohydrate-bound tarin were solved to 1.7 Å and 1.91 Å, respectively. Each tarin monomer forms a canonical β-prism II fold, common to all members of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) family, which is partially stabilized by a disulfide bond and a conserved hydrophobic core. The heterodimer is formed through domain swapping involving the C-terminal β-strand and the β-sheet on face I of the prism. The tetramer is assembled through the dimerization of the B chains from heterodimers involving face II of each prism. The 1.91 Å crystal structure of tarin bound to Manα(1,3)Manα(1,6)Man reveals an expanded carbohydrate-binding sequence (QxDxNxVxYx4/6WX) on face III of the β-prism. Both monomers possess a similar fold, except for the length of the loop, which begins after the conserved tyrosine and creates the binding pocket for the α(1,6)-terminal mannose. This loop differs in size and amino-acid composition from 10 other β-prism II domain proteins, and may confer carbohydrate-binding specificity among members of the GNA-related lectin family.

  12. Defective intestinal amino acid absorption in Ace2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Singer, Dustin; Camargo, Simone M R; Ramadan, Tamara; Schäfer, Matthias; Mariotta, Luca; Herzog, Brigitte; Huggel, Katja; Wolfer, David; Werner, Sabine; Penninger, Josef M; Verrey, François

    2012-09-15

    Mutations in the main intestinal and kidney luminal neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (Slc6a19) lead to Hartnup disorder, a condition that is characterized by neutral aminoaciduria and in some cases pellagra-like symptoms. These latter symptoms caused by low-niacin are thought to result from defective intestinal absorption of its precursor L-tryptophan. Since Ace2 is necessary for intestinal B(0)AT1 expression, we tested the impact of intestinal B(0)AT1 absence in ace2 null mice. Their weight gain following weaning was decreased, and Na(+)-dependent uptake of B(0)AT1 substrates measured in everted intestinal rings was defective. Additionally, high-affinity Na(+)-dependent transport of L-proline, presumably via SIT1 (Slc6a20), was absent, whereas glucose uptake via SGLT1 (Slc5a1) was not affected. Measurements of small intestine luminal amino acid content following gavage showed that more L-tryptophan than other B(0)AT1 substrates reach the ileum in wild-type mice, which is in line with its known lower apparent affinity. In ace2 null mice, the absorption defect was confirmed by a severalfold increase of L-tryptophan and of other neutral amino acids reaching the ileum lumen. Furthermore, plasma and muscle levels of glycine and L-tryptophan were significantly decreased in ace2 null mice, with other neutral amino acids displaying a similar trend. A low-protein/low-niacin diet challenge led to differential changes in plasma amino acid levels in both wild-type and ace2 null mice, but only in ace2 null mice to a stop in weight gain. Despite the combination of low-niacin with a low-protein diet, plasma niacin concentrations remained normal in ace2 null mice and no pellagra symptoms, such as photosensitive skin rash or ataxia, were observed. In summary, mice lacking Ace2-dependent intestinal amino acid transport display no total niacin deficiency nor clear pellagra symptoms, even under a low-protein and low-niacin diet, despite gross amino acid homeostasis alterations.

  13. Dietary garlic (Allium sativum) lectins, ASA I and ASA II, are highly stable and immunogenic.

    PubMed

    Clement, Fatima; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2010-10-01

    The immunomodulatory proteins present in garlic have recently been shown to be identical to the garlic lectins ASA I and ASA II [Clement F, Pramod SN, Venkatesh YP. Int. Immunopharmacol. 2010; 10: 316-324]. In this study, the stability of garlic lectins as a function of pH, temperature and denaturants has been examined in relation to biological activity (hemagglutination and hagocytosis). Stability of garlic lectins in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was assessed by their hemagglutination activity, immunoreactivity, and intactness by SDS-PAGE. Garlic lectins were moderately stable in SGF for up to 30 min; while they retained hemagglutination activities, immunoreactivity with the respective rabbit antiserum decreased immediately (0.5 min) to 10-30%. ASA I retained ~80% hemagglutination activity in the pH range 2-12; however, ASA II retained only 40% in the pH ranges 2-4 and 10-12. Garlic lectins exposed to 60 °C (30 min) and pepsin (1 and 2 min) retained hemagglutination and phagocytic activities. Urea (4M) and Gdn.HCl (2M) did not affect hemagglutination. The immunogenicity of garlic lectins upon oral feeding in BALB/c mice was examined. A lectin-specific serum IgG response was seen in mice comparable to the oral immunogen, phytohemagglutinin. The recovered lectin in feces of mice administered with garlic lectins showed antigenicity identical to that of the administered proteins. The stabilities of the garlic lectins, their ability to withstand the gastrointestinal passage, and their recognition by the immune system upon oral feeding reinforce the reported presence of natural antibodies to garlic proteins in normal human sera.

  14. Adaptive evolution of a novel Drosophila lectin induced by parasitic wasp attack.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Erin S; Schlenke, Todd A

    2012-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has long been used as a model for the molecular genetics of innate immunity. Such work has uncovered several immune receptors that recognize bacterial and fungal pathogens by binding unique components of their cell walls and membranes. Drosophila also act as hosts to metazoan pathogens such as parasitic wasps, which can infect a majority of individuals in natural populations, but many aspects of their immune responses against these more closely related pathogens are poorly understood. Here, we present data describing the transcriptional induction and molecular evolution of a candidate Drosophila anti-wasp immunity gene, lectin-24A. Lectin-24A has a secretion signal sequence and its lectin domain suggests a function in sugar group binding. Transcript levels of lectin-24A were induced significantly stronger and faster following wasp attack than following wounding or bacterial infection, demonstrating lectin-24A is not a general stress response or defense response gene but is instead part of a specific response against wasps. The major site of lectin-24A transcript production is the fat body, the main humoral immune tissue of flies. Interestingly, lectin-24A is a new gene of the D. melanogaster/Drosophila simulans clade, displaying very little homology to any other Drosophila lectins. Population genetic analyses of lectin-24A DNA sequence data from African and North American populations of D. melanogaster and D. simulans revealed gene length polymorphisms segregating at high frequencies as well as strong evidence of repeated and recent selective sweeps. Thus, lectin-24A is a rapidly evolving new gene that has seemingly developed functional importance for fly resistance against infection by parasitic wasps.

  15. Intragenic allele pyramiding combines different specificities of wheat Pm3 resistance alleles.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Susanne; Hurni, Severine; Streckeisen, Philipp; Mayr, Gabriele; Albrecht, Mario; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2010-11-01

    Some plant resistance genes occur as allelic series, with each member conferring specific resistance against a subset of pathogen races. In wheat, there are 17 alleles of the Pm3 gene. They encode nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC) and leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) domain proteins, which mediate resistance to distinct race spectra of powdery mildew. It is not known if specificities from different alleles can be combined to create resistance genes with broader specificity. Here, we used an approach based on avirulence analysis of pathogen populations to characterize the molecular basis of Pm3 recognition spectra. A large survey of mildew races for avirulence on the Pm3 alleles revealed that Pm3a has a resistance spectrum that completely contains that of Pm3f, but also extends towards additional races. The same is true for the Pm3b and Pm3c gene pair. The molecular analysis of these allelic pairs revealed a role of the NB-ARC protein domain in the efficiency of effector-dependent resistance. Analysis of the wild-type and chimeric Pm3 alleles identified single residues in the C-terminal LRR motifs as the main determinant of allele specificity. Variable residues of the N-terminal LRRs are necessary, but not sufficient, to confer resistance specificity. Based on these data, we constructed a chimeric Pm3 gene by intragenic allele pyramiding of Pm3d and Pm3e that showed the combined resistance specificity and, thus, a broader recognition spectrum compared with the parental alleles. Our findings support a model of stepwise evolution of Pm3 recognition specificities.

  16. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-23

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer-receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating--a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against "obligate cheaters" quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity.

  17. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer–receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating—a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against “obligate cheaters” quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  18. Lectin sensitized anisotropic silver nanoparticles for detection of some bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Vardan K; Bazukyan, Inga L

    2013-03-05

    A method of bacteria detection by sensitized anisotropic silver nanoparticles is presented. Anisotropic silver nanoparticles with two bands of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are prepared and sensitized with potato lectin. These nanoparticles are able to detect three bacterial species: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. The interaction of these bacteria with such nanoparticles induces drastic changes in optical spectra of nanoparticles that are correlated with bacteria titer. The maximal sensitivity is observed for S. aureus (up to 1.5×10(4) mL(-1)).

  19. Probing lectin and sperm with carbohydrate-modified quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Anandakathir; Fang, Jim-Min; Chou, Pi-Tai; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Chu, Rea-Min; Lee, Shyh-Jye

    2005-10-01

    We report the encapsulation of quantum dots with biologically important beta-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in different ratios, together with studies of their specific/sensitive multivalent interactions with lectins and sperm by fluorimetry, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering microscopy, confocal imaging techniques, and flow cytometry. These GlcNAc-encapsulated quantum dots (QDGLNs) specifically bind to wheat germ agglutinin, and cause fluorescence quenching and aggregation. Further studies of QDGLNs and the mannose-encapsulated QDs (QDMANs) with sperm revealed site-specific interactions, in which QDGLNs bind to the head of the sperm, while QDMANs spread over the whole sperm body.

  20. Analysis of EST and lectin expressions in hemocytes of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) (Bivalvia: Mollusca) infected with Perkinsus olseni.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Young-Mee; Park, Kyung-Il; Kim Cho, Somi; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Moonjae

    2006-01-01

    The hemocytes of invertebrates play key roles in both cellular and humoral immune reactions by phagocytosis or delivering immune factors such as lectin and anti-microbial peptides. Bacterial infection causes changes in components such as lectins, anti-bacterial peptides, and lysosomal enzymes of plasma or hemolymph in molluscs. Previously, we found that infection with the protozoan parasite, Perkinsus, increases lectin synthesis in hemocytes. In order to investigate the patterns of genes expressed in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) infected with the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni, we constructed a cDNA library and sequenced 1850 clones (expressed sequence tags). A total of 79 ESTs, were related to 29 functional immune genes such as C-type lectin, lysozyme, and cystatin B, in Manila clams. Lectins were the largest group of immune-function ESTs found in our Manila clams library. Among 7 lectin clones, two full length cDNAs of lectins were cloned. MCL-3, which is a simple C-type lectin composed of 151 amino acids, has a relatively short signal sequence of 17aa and single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of approximately 130 residues. It is highly homologous to eel C-type lectin. The sequence of mc-sialic acid-binding lectin consists of 168 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 19.2 and shows high homology to sialic acid-binding lectin from the snail, Cepaea hortensis. The expression of 7 different lectins in hemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR using gene-specific primers. Hemocytes from Perkinsus-infected clam expressed different sets of lectins than with Vibrio infection. These results demonstrate that several lectins are involved in Manila clam innate immunity and different challenges induce expression of different lectins.

  1. Extraction and purification of a lectin from red kidney bean and preliminary immune function studies of the lectin and four Chinese herbal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yufang; Hou, Yubao; Yanyan, Liu; Qin, Guang; Li, Jichang

    2010-01-01

    Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time) were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4-6, back extraction at pH 9-11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4-6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris) Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS) with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity.

  2. Allele and haplotype distribution for 16 Y-STRs (AmpFlSTR Y-filer kit) in the state of Chihuahua at North Center of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Alarcón, A B; Moguel-Torres, M; León-Jiménez, A K; Cuéllar-Nevárez, G E; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2007-05-01

    The AmpFlSTR Y-filer kit, including 16 Y-STRs was analyzed in 326 males from Chihuahua, at North Central, Mexico. Allele frequencies and gene diversity for each locus were estimated. Four allele duplications, namely DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391 and DYS439; and one allele null at DYS448 were observed in the sample. The haplotype diversity was 99.97+/-0.3%. The AMOVA results, including a previous report from West of Mexico (Jalisco), showed that most of the genetic variability between these Mexican populations is attributable to intrapopulational differences (99.87%). This result supports a low-genetic differentiation between males from North and West regions of Mexico.

  3. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Morling, Niels

    2009-09-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework.

  4. A new Adamts9 conditional mouse allele identifies its non-redundant role in interdigital web regression

    PubMed Central

    Dubail, Johanne; Aramaki-Hattori, Noriko; Bader, Hannah L.; Nelson, Courtney M.; Katebi, Negin; Matuska, Brittany; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Apte, Suneel S.

    2014-01-01

    ADAMTS9 is the most conserved member of a large family of secreted metalloproteases having diverse functions. Adamts9 null mice die before gastrulation, precluding investigations of its roles later in embryogenesis, in adult mice or disease models. We therefore generated a floxed Adamts9 allele to bypass embryonic lethality. In this mutant, unidirectional loxP sites flank exons 5 through 8, which encode the catalytic domain, including the protease active site. Mice homozygous for the floxed allele were viable, lacked an overt phenotype, and were fertile. Conversely, mice homozygous for a germ-line deletion produced from the floxed allele by Cre-lox recombination did not survive past gastrulation. Hemizygosity of the deleted Adamts9 in combination with mutant Adamts20 led to cleft palate and severe white spotting as previously described. Previously, Adamts9 haploinsufficiency combined with either Adamts20 or Adamts5 nullizygosity suggested a cooperative role in interdigital web regression, but the outcome of deletion of Adamts9 alone remained unknown. Here, Adamts9 was conditionally deleted in limb mesoderm using Prx1-Cre mice. Unlike other ADAMTS single knockouts, limb-specific Adamts9 deletion resulted in soft-tissue syndactyly (STS) with 100% penetrance and concurrent deletion of Adamts5 increased the severity of STS. Thus, Adamts9 has both non-redundant and cooperative roles in ensuring interdigital web regression. This new allele will be useful for investigating other biological functions of ADAMTS9. PMID:24753090

  5. Two novel lectins from Parkia biglandulosa and Parkia roxburghii: isolation, physicochemical characterization, mitogenicity and anti-proliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navjot; Singh, Jatinder; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Agrewala, Javed N; Kaur, Manpreet

    2005-08-01

    Two mannose/glucose specific seed lectins were isolated from Parkia biglandulosa and Parkia roxburghii and were characterized w.r.t various physicochemical properties. Unlike other Parkia lectins a comparison of native and subunit molecular mass showed that both Parkia lectins were heterotetramers. Parkia biglandulosa lectin was found to be T-cell mitogen as revealed by IL-2 bioassay. These lectins showed anti-proliferative effect on two murine macrophage cancer cell lines i.e. P 388DI (50%) and J774 (70%). In addition Parkia roxburghii also inhibited proliferation of HB98 (65.47%), a B-cell hybridoma cell line.

  6. Chromatism compensation in wide-band nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-02-01

    We introduce the concept of chromatism compensation in nulling interferometry that enables a high rejection ratio in a wide spectral band. Therefore the achromaticity condition considered in most nulling interferometers can be relaxed. We show that this chromatism compensation cannot be applied to a two-beam nulling interferometer, and we make an analysis of the particular case of a three-telescope configuration.

  7. Repeated Names, Overt Pronouns, and Null Pronouns in Spanish

    PubMed Central

    Lezama, Carlos Gelormini; Almor, Amit

    2010-01-01

    In two self-paced, sentence-by-sentence reading experiments we examined the difference in the processing of Spanish discourses with repeated names, overt pronouns, and null pronouns in emphatic and non-emphatic contexts. In Experiment 1, repeated names and overt pronouns caused a processing delay when they referred to salient antecedents in non-emphatic contexts. In Experiment 2, both processing delays were eliminated when an emphatic cleft-structure was used. The processing delay caused by overt pronouns referring to salient antecedents in non-emphatic contexts in Spanish contrasts with previous findings in Chinese, where null and overt pronouns elicited similar reading times. We explain both our Spanish findings and the Chinese findings in a unified framework based on the notion of balance between processing cost and discourse function in line with the Informational Load Hypothesis. PMID:21552376

  8. Exact Null Controllability of a Nonlinear Thermoelastic Contact Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sivergina, Irina F. Polis, Michael P.

    2005-01-15

    We study the controllability properties of a nonlinear parabolic system that models the temperature evolution of a one-dimensional thermoelastic rod that may come into contact with a rigid obstacle. Basically the system dynamics is described by a one-dimensional nonlocal heat equation with a nonlinear and nonlocal boundary condition of Newmann type.We focus on the control problem and treat the case when the control is distributed over the whole space domain. In this case the system is proved to be exactly null controllable provided the parameters of the system are smooth.The proof is based on changing the control variable and using Aubin's Compactness Lemma to obtain an invariant set for the linearized controllability map. Then, by proving that the found solution is sufficiently smooth, we get the null controllability for the original system.

  9. Three-dimensional kinematic reconnection of plasmoids with nulls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yun-Tung; Finn, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The global nonlinear dynamics of magnetic field lines in plasmoids with a pair of nulls, where B = 0, is studied. The aim of this analysis is to describe the separatrix surfaces on which singularities can occur in ideal magnetohydrodynamics because of topological changes in the field. These separatrix surfaces should locate the boundary layers associated with 3D reconnection in the presence of resistivity or inertia. It is found that the field lines exhibit chaotic scattering with several properties in common with plasmoid models without nulls (in which one component of the magnetic field never changes sign). In particular, the singular surfaces can be fractal, implying complex current density structures down to the dissipation scale. These generic features are expected to exist in typical coronal magnetic geometries exhibiting three-dimensional reconnection and the formation of current sheets.

  10. Advances in corneal topography measurements with conical null-screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Cossio-Guerrero, Cesar; Huerta-Carranza, Oliver; Moreno-Oliva, Víctor I.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we report the design of a null-screen for corneal topography. To avoid the difficulties in the alignment of the test system due to the face contour (eyebrows, nose, or eyelids), we design a conical null-screen with a novel radial points distribution drawn on it in such a way that its image, which is formed by reflection on the test surface, becomes an exact array of circular spots if the surface is perfect. Additionally, an algorithm to compute the sagittal and meridional radii of curvature for the corneal surface is presented. The sagittal radius is obtained from the surface normal, and the meridional radius is calculated from a function fitted to the derivative of the sagittal curvature by using the surfacenormals raw data. Experimental results for the testing a calibration spherical surface are shown. Also, we perform some corneal topography measurements.

  11. Axon and muscle spindle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse.

    PubMed

    Elashry, Mohamed I; Otto, Anthony; Matsakas, Antonios; El-Morsy, Salah E; Jones, Lisa; Anderson, Bethan; Patel, Ketan

    2011-02-01

    Germline deletion of the myostatin gene results in hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the tension-generating (extrafusal) fibres in skeletal muscle. As this gene is expressed predominantly in myogenic tissues it offers an excellent model with which to investigate the quantitative relationship between muscle and axonal development. Here we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in nerve fibres in major nerves of both the fore- and hindlimbs. We show that axons within these nerves undergo hypertrophy. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the age-related neural atrophic process is delayed in the absence of myostatin. Finally, we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in the number of muscle spindles (also called stretch receptors or proprioceptors). However, our work demonstrates that the mechanisms regulating intrafusal fibre hyperplasia and hypertrophy differ from those that control the aetiology of extrafusal fibres.

  12. Avoid a Void: The Eradication of Null Dereferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Bertrand; Kogtenkov, Alexander; Stapf, Emmanuel

    All object-oriented programs, but also those in C or Pascal as soon as they use pointers, are subject to the risk of run-time crash due to "null pointer dereferencing". Until recently this was the case even in statically typed languages. Tony Hoare has called this problem his "billion-dollar mistake". In the type system of ISO-standard Eiffel, the risk no longer exists: void safety (the absence of null pointer dereferencing) has become a property guaranteed by the type system and enforced by the compiler. The mechanism is fully implemented and major libraries and applications have been made void-safe. This presentation describes the principles of Eiffel's void safety, their implementation and the lessons gained.

  13. Defocusing of null rays in infinite derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Aindriú; Koshelev, Alexey S.; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2017-01-01

    Einstein's General theory of relativity permits spacetime singularities, where null geodesic congruences focus in the presence of matter, which satisfies an appropriate energy condition. In this paper, we provide a minimal defocusing condition for null congruences without assuming any ansatz-dependent background solution. The two important criteria are: (1) an additional scalar degree of freedom, besides the massless graviton must be introduced into the spacetime; and (2) an infinite derivative theory of gravity is required in order to avoid tachyons or ghosts in the graviton propagator. In this regard, our analysis strengthens earlier arguments for constructing non-singular bouncing cosmologies within an infinite derivative theory of gravity, without assuming any ansatz to solve the full equations of motion.

  14. A phenotypic null hypothesis for the genetics of personality.

    PubMed

    Turkheimer, Eric; Pettersson, Erik; Horn, Erin E

    2014-01-01

    We review the genetically informed literature on the genetics of personality. Over the past century, quantitative genetic studies, using identical and fraternal twins, have demonstrated that differences in human personality are substantially heritable. We focus on more contemporary questions to which that basic observation has led. We examine whether differences in the heritability of personality are replicable across different traits, samples, and studies; how the heritability of personality relates to its reliability; and how behavior genetics can be employed in studies of validity, and we discuss the stability of personality in genetic and environmental variance. The appropriate null hypothesis in behavior genetics is not that genetic or environmental influence on personality is zero. Instead, we offer a phenotypic null hypothesis, which states that genetic variance is not an independent mechanism of individual differences in personality but rather a reflection of processes that are best conceptualized at the phenotypic level.

  15. Rescue of motor coordination by Purkinje cell-targeted restoration of Kv3.3 channels in Kcnc3-null mice requires Kcnc1.

    PubMed

    Hurlock, Edward C; Bose, Mitali; Pierce, Ganon; Joho, Rolf H

    2009-12-16

    The role of cerebellar Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 channels in motor coordination was examined with an emphasis on the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Kv3 channel subunits encoded by Kcnc genes are distinguished by rapid activation and deactivation kinetics that support high-frequency, narrow action potential firing. Previously we reported that increased lateral deviation while ambulating and slips while traversing a narrow beam of ataxic Kcnc3-null mice were corrected by restoration of Kv3.3 channels specifically to Purkinje cells, whereas Kcnc3-mutant mice additionally lacking one Kcnc1 allele were partially rescued. Here, we report mice lacking all Kcnc1 and Kcnc3 alleles exhibit no such rescue. For Purkinje cell output to reach the rest of the brain it must be conveyed by neurons of the DCN or vestibular nuclei. As Kcnc1, but not Kcnc3, alleles are lost, mutant mice exhibit increasing gait ataxia accompanied by spike broadening and deceleration in DCN neurons, suggesting the facet of coordination rescued by Purkinje-cell-restricted Kv3.3 restoration in mice lacking just Kcnc3 is hypermetria, while gait ataxia emerges when additionally Kcnc1 alleles are lost. Thus, fast repolarization in Purkinje cells appears important for normal movement velocity, whereas DCN neurons are a prime candidate locus where fast repolarization is necessary for normal gait patterning.

  16. Analysis of nucleotide diversity among alleles of the major bacterial blight resistance gene Xa27 in cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) and its wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Bimolata, Waikhom; Kumar, Anirudh; Sundaram, Raman Meenakshi; Laha, Gouri Shankar; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Reddy, Gajjala Ashok; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2013-08-01

    Xa27 is one of the important R-genes, effective against bacterial blight disease of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Using natural population of Oryza, we analyzed the sequence variation in the functionally important domains of Xa27 across the Oryza species. DNA sequences of Xa27 alleles from 27 rice accessions revealed higher nucleotide diversity among the reported R-genes of rice. Sequence polymorphism analysis revealed synonymous and non-synonymous mutations in addition to a number of InDels in non-coding regions of the gene. High sequence variation was observed in the promoter region including the 5'UTR with 'π' value 0.00916 and 'θ w ' = 0.01785. Comparative analysis of the identified Xa27 alleles with that of IRBB27 and IR24 indicated the operation of both positive selection (Ka/Ks > 1) and neutral selection (Ka/Ks ≈ 0). The genetic distances of alleles of the gene from Oryza nivara were nearer to IRBB27 as compared to IR24. We also found the presence of conserved and null UPT (upregulated by transcriptional activator) box in the isolated alleles. Considerable amino acid polymorphism was localized in the trans-membrane domain for which the functional significance is yet to be elucidated. However, the absence of functional UPT box in all the alleles except IRBB27 suggests the maintenance of single resistant allele throughout the natural population.

  17. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  18. Null result for the weight change of a spinning gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.; Wilmarth, P.A. )

    1990-04-30

    A null result was obtained for the weight change of a right-spinning gyroscope, contradicting the results recently reported by Hayasaka and Takeuchi. No weight change could be observed under a variety of spin directions for rotational frequencies between 0 and 2.2{times}10{sup 4} rpm. Our limit of {minus}0.025{plus minus}0.07 mg is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the effect reported by Hayasaka and Takeuchi.

  19. (abstract) Ulysses Observations of Magnetic Nulls in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, D.; Murphy, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.

    1993-01-01

    High time resolution magnetic field measurements (1 vector/s) at radial distances out to 5.3 AU and heliographic latitudes from 0(deg) to > 35(deg) S reveal the presence of solitary pulses lasting tens of seconds in which the field magnitude approaches or reaches zero. The properties of these nulls, their spatial distribution and relation to solar wind structures and to similar-apppearing interplanetary and magnetospheric impulses will be discussed.

  20. 4-dimensional spacetimes from 2-dimensional conformal null data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Rituparno; Ellis, George F. R.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we investigate whether the holographic principle proposed in string theory has a classical counterpart in general relativity theory. We show that there is a partial correspondence: at least in the case of vacuum Petrov type D spacetimes that admit a non-trivial Killing tensor, which encompass all the astrophysical black hole spacetimes, there exists a one-to-one correspondence between gravity in bulk and a 2-dimensional classical conformal scalar field on a null boundary.

  1. Uniqueness of Kerr space-time near null infinity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Bai Shan

    2008-12-15

    We reexpress the Kerr metric in standard Bondi-Sachs coordinates near null infinity I{sup +}. Using the uniqueness result of the characteristic initial value problem, we prove the Kerr metric is the only asymptotically flat, stationary, axially symmetric, type-D solution of the vacuum Einstein equation. The Taylor series of Kerr space-time is expressed in terms of Bondi-Sachs coordinates, and the Newman-Penrose constants have been calculated.

  2. Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Vazquez, Juan M.; Berru, Robert I.

    1993-01-01

    Circuit measures electrical current via combination of Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling techniques. Known current generated by feedback circuit adjusted until it causes cancellation or near cancellation of magnetic field produced in toroidal ferrite core by current measured. Remaining magnetic field measured by Hall-effect sensor. Circuit puts out analog signal and digital signal proportional to current measured. Accuracy of measurement does not depend on linearity of sensing components.

  3. A two-nucleotide deletion renders the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene nonfunctional in Danish Landrace and Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Bergman, I M; Edman, K; van As, P; Huisman, A; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2014-03-01

    The mannose-binding lectins (MBLs) are central components of innate immunity, facilitating phagocytosis and inducing the lectin activation pathway of the complement system. Previously, it has been found that certain single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MBL1 and MBL2 (pMBL1, pMBL2) affect mRNA expression, serum concentration, and susceptibility to disease, but the combinatory effect of pMBL1 and pMBL2 genotypes needs further elucidation. In the present study, pMBL1 and pMBL2 alleles, combined pMBL haplotypes, and MBL-A concentration in serum were analyzed in purebred Landrace (N = 30) and Duroc (N = 10) pigs. Furthermore, the combined pMBL haplotypes of 89 Piètrain × (Large White × Landrace) crossbred pigs were studied, and the genotypes of 67 crossbreds challenged with Escherichia coli were compared to their individual disease records. In the purebred animals, three non-synonymous SNPs and a two-nucleotide deletion were detected in the coding sequence of pMBL2. The two-nucleotide deletion was present at a frequency of 0.88 in the Landrace pigs and 0.90 in the Duroc pigs, respectively. In the crossbreds, the T allele of the SNP G949T in pMBL1-previously shown to have profound effect on MBL-A concentration even in the heterozygote condition-was detected in 47 % of the animals. Finally, an association was found between low-producing MBL genotypes and low body weight on the day of weaning in the same animals.

  4. High-Throughput Genotyping with TaqMan Allelic Discrimination and Allele-Specific Genotyping Assays.

    PubMed

    Heissl, Angelika; Arbeithuber, Barbara; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Real-time PCR-based genotyping methods, such as TaqMan allelic discrimination assays and allele-specific genotyping, are particularly useful when screening a handful of single nucleotide polymorphisms in hundreds of samples; either derived from different individuals, tissues, or pre-amplified DNA. Although real-time PCR-based methods such as TaqMan are well-established, alternative methods, like allele-specific genotyping, are powerful alternatives, especially for genotyping short tandem repeat (STR) length polymorphisms. Here, we describe all relevant aspects when developing an assay for a new SNP or STR using either TaqMan or allele-specific genotyping, respectively, such as primer and probe design, optimization of reaction conditions, the experimental procedure for typing hundreds of samples, and finally the data evaluation. Our goal is to provide a guideline for developing genotyping assays using these two approaches that render reliable and reproducible genotype calls involving minimal optimization.

  5. Non-null annular subaperture stitching interferometry for aspheric test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Dong; Shi, Tu; Yang, Yongying; Chong, Shiyao; Miao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Shen, Yibing; Bai, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A non-null annular subaperture stitching interferometry (NASSI), combining the subaperture stitching idea and non-null test method, is proposed for steep aspheric testing. Compared with standard annular subaperture stitching interferometry (ASSI), a partial null lens (PNL) is employed as an alternative to the transmission sphere, to generate different aspherical wavefronts as the references. The coverage subaperture number would thus be reduced greatly for the better performance of aspherical wavefronts in matching the local slope of aspheric surfaces. Instead of various mathematical stitching algorithms, a simultaneous reverse optimizing reconstruction (SROR) method based on system modeling and ray tracing is proposed for full aperture figure error reconstruction. All the subaperture measurements are simulated simultaneously with a multi-configuration model in a ray-tracing program, including the interferometric system modeling and subaperture misalignments modeling. With the multi-configuration model, full aperture figure error would be extracted in form of Zernike polynomials from subapertures wavefront data by the SROR method. This method concurrently accomplishes subaperture retrace error and misalignment correction, requiring neither complex mathematical algorithms nor subaperture overlaps. A numerical simulation exhibits the comparison of the performance of the NASSI and standard ASSI, which demonstrates the high accuracy of the NASSI in testing steep aspheric. Experimental results of NASSI are shown to be in good agreement with that of Zygo® VerifireTM Asphere interferometer.

  6. Hoxa10 null animals exhibit reduced platelet biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Iwona M.; DeLuca, Teresa A.; Eklund, Elizabeth A.; Miller, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor HOXA10 is an important regulator of myelopoiesis. Engineered over-expression of Hoxa10 in mice results in a myeloproliferative disorder that progresses to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) over time, and in humans over-expression is associated with poor outcomes in AML. Here, we report that loss of Hoxa10 expression in mice results in reduced platelet count and platelet production, but does not affect clotting efficiency. About 40% fewer platelets were found in Hoxa10 null animals in comparison to wild type littermates. We found a nearly 50% reduction in the percentage of reticulated platelets in Hoxa10 null mice, suggesting deficient platelet production. Furthermore, Hoxa10 null animals recovered less efficiently from induced thrombocytopenia, supporting our hypothesis of defective platelet production. This also correlated with reduced colony formation potential of stem and progenitor cells seeded in megakaryocyte-enhancing conditions in vitro. Together, our results indicate that HOXA10 is important for megakaryopoiesis and platelet biogenesis. PMID:26847476

  7. Neuropathy in Human and Mice with PMP22 null

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario Andre; Katona, Istvan; Zhang, Xuebao; Roper, Helen P.; Carr, Louise; Macdonald, Fiona; Brueton, Louise; Blake, Julian; Suter, Ueli; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Haploinsufficiency of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). However, the biological functions of PMP22 in humans are largely unexplored due to the absence of patients with PMP22 null mutations. Design, Setting and Participants We have evaluated a 7-year-old boy with PMP22 null. Findings were compared with those from nerves of Pmp22 null mice. Results Motor and sensory deficits in the proband were non-length dependent. Weakness was found in cranial muscles, but not in the limbs. Large fiber sensory modalities were profoundly abnormal, which started prior to the maturation of myelin. This is in line with the temporal pattern of PMP22 expression predominantly in cranial motor neurons and DRG during embryonic development, becoming undetectable in adulthood. Moreover, there were conspicuous maturation defects of myelinating Schwann cells that were more significant in motor nerve fibers than in sensory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that PMP22 is important for the normal function of neurons that express PMP22 during early development, such as cranial motor neurons and spinal sensory neurons. Moreover, PMP22 deficiency differentially affects myelination between motor and sensory nerves, which may have contributed to the unique clinical phenotype in the patient with absence of PMP22. PMID:21670407

  8. Averaged null energy condition in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Li Lifang; Zhu Jianyang

    2009-02-15

    Wormholes and time machines are objects of great interest in general relativity. However, to support them it needs exotic matters which are impossible at the classical level. Semiclassical gravity introduces the quantum effects into the stress-energy tensor and constructs many self-consistent wormholes. But they are not traversable due to the averaged null energy condition. Loop quantum gravity (LQG) significantly modifies the Einstein equation in the deep quantum region. If we write the modified Einstein equation in the form of the standard one but with an effective stress-energy tensor, it is convenient to analyze the geometry in LQG through the energy condition. Loop quantum cosmology (LQC), an application of LQG, has an effective stress-energy tensor which violates some kinds of local energy conditions. So it is natural that the inflation emerges in LQC. In this paper, we investigate the averaged null energy condition in LQC in the framework of the effective Hamiltonian, and we find that the effective stress-energy tensor in LQC violates the averaged null energy condition in the massless scalar field coupled model.

  9. Null-space function estimation for the interior problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-04-01

    In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), projection data can be truncated when the camera's field of view is smaller than the object to be imaged. Using truncated projections to reconstruct a region of interest (ROI) is a reality we must face if small detectors are used. The truncated data result in an underdetermined system of imaging equations, which may lead to non-unique solutions. Data sampling and photon attenuation may also affect the solution uniqueness and stability. The uniqueness of the solutions in the ROI can be investigated by studying the null-space functions in the ROI. This paper uses an iterative algorithm to estimate the null-space image, to determine the sampling conditions under which a stable ROI reconstruction is possible with truncated data and to investigate whether attenuation can influence the ROI reconstruction bias. This iterative algorithm is validated by the singular value decomposition method. We show that if the ROI is sufficiently sampled, the null-space image is close to zero inside the ROI, and any almost-zero offset is insignificant in SPECT, because the noise is a much more dominating degradation factor.

  10. The degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors during germination of white kidney beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; Tamminga, S; Leenaars, P P; Schering, J; Ter Maat, D W

    1994-04-01

    White kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), cv Processor, contain a relatively high content of phaseolin (storage protein), lectins and a special group of glycoproteins as well as a considerable amount of protein-type trypsin inhibitors. Protein digestion of raw 'Processor' beans in monogastrics, for example pigs, is disturbed by poorly digested, phaseolin lectins, which can bind to carbohydrates in brush border membranes of the small intestinal epithelium, and trypsin inhibitors. The effect of the germination of white kidney beans on lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors was studied in order to achieve a degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors and an increase of in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein of bean flour. Therefore, whole bean extracts were examined throughout a germination period of up to seven days for their lectin and phaseolin pattern, lectin content, binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes and trypsin inhibitor content. In addition the in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis by pepsin and pancreatin of the protein from flours of (un)germinated white kidney beans was studied. SDS-PAGE demonstrated a degradation of E-lectins and a disappearance of L-lectins and phaseolin during germination. Results indicated a decrease of the lectin content by 85%, a loss of binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes by 91%, and a decrease of trypsin inhibitors by 76%, in bean flour after germination for seven days. A maximum in in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of protein from bean flour was already established after germination for half a day.

  11. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: new B39 and B15 alleles.

    PubMed

    Garber, T L; Butler, L M; Trachtenberg, E A; Erlich, H A; Rickards, O; De Stefano, G; Watkins, D I

    1995-01-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles.

  12. Isolation and characterization of two Korean mistletoe lectins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Bong; Song, Seong Kyu; Yoon, Taek Joon; Yoo, Yung Choon; Lee, Kwan Hee; Her, Erk; Kim, Jong Bae

    2007-11-30

    Two isolectins (KML-IIU and the KML-IIL) were individually isolated from the previously reported Korean mistletoe lectin, KML-C, by using an immunoaffinity column. Molecular weights of the KML-IIU and the KML-IIL were 64 kDa and 60 kDa respectively. Both of the lectins were composed of heterogeneous A and B subunits linked with a disulfide bond, and showed the same carbohydrate-binding specificities for Gal and GalNAc. However, they are different not only in biophysical properties (glycosylation and amino acid compositions) but also bioactivities (cell killing and cytokine induction). The KML-IIL showed 17-145 times stronger in cytotoxicities to various human and mouse cancer cell lines than the KML-IIU. The KML-IIL also induced TNF-alpha secretion from mouse peritoneal macrophages 4.5 times better than the KML-IIU. The results demonstrated isolectins in Korean mistletoe were varied in bioactivities and the KML-IIL may be developed as an anti-cancer agent.

  13. Anti-Neuroblastoma Properties of a Recombinant Sunflower Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Marcela; Genoula, Melanie; Silveyra, María Ximena; De Oliveira Carvalho, André; Regente, Mariana; Del Río, Marianela; Ribeiro Soares, Júlia; Moreira Gomes, Valdirene; De La Canal, Laura

    2017-01-01

    According to their sugar recognition specificity, plant lectins are proposed as bioactive proteins with potential in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Helja is a mannose-specific jacalin-like lectin from sunflower which was shown to inhibit the growth of certain fungi. Here, we report its recombinant expression in a prokaryotic system and its activity in neurobalstoma cells. Helja coding sequence was fused to the pET-32 EK/LIC, the enterokinase/Ligation-independent cloning vector and a 35 kDa protein was obtained in Escherichia coli representing Helja coupled to thioredoxin (Trx). The identity of this protein was verified using anti-Helja antibodies. This chimera, named Trx-rHelja, was enriched in the soluble bacterial extracts and was purified using Ni+2-Sepharose and d-mannose-agarose chromatography. Trx-rHelja and the enterokinase-released recombinant Helja (rHelja) both displayed toxicity on human SH-SY5Y neuroblastomas. rHelja decreased the viability of these tumor cells by 75% according to the tetrazolium reduction assay, and microscopic analyses revealed that the cell morphology was disturbed. Thus, the stellate cells of the monolayer became spheroids and were isolated. Our results indicate that rHelja is a promising tool for the development of diagnostic or therapeutic methods for neuroblastoma cells, the most common solid tumors in childhood. PMID:28075401

  14. Altered binding of Ulex europaeus I lectin to psoriatic epidermis.

    PubMed

    Kariniemi, A L; Holthöfer, H; Miettinen, A; Virtanen, I

    1983-11-01

    We have used Ulex europaeus I (UEA I) lectin, specific for alpha-L-fucose-containing glycoconjugates, in fluorescence microscopy to stain cryostat sections of human skin from normal persons and patients with psoriasis and lichen simplex. In normal skin the upper layers of the stratum spinosum and the stratum granulosum were strongly reactive with UEA I, whereas the lower layers of the epidermis did not react. The staining intensity of the upper epidermis was similar to that of the endothelium of dermal blood vessels. Biopsies of the lesional skin of lichen simplex showed an intense UEA I-specific staining throughout the whole epidermis, similar in intensity to that seen in the upper epidermis of normal skin. In psoriatic lesions positive UEA I-specific fluorescence was seen throughout the whole epidermis, but the fluorescence was more faint and often granular. In uninvolved skin of psoriatic patients the whole epidermis showed a diffuse UEA I-specific fluorescence, differing in this respect from normal skin. In normal skin UEA I binds to epidermal cells which are at a certain state of differentiation. The results with psoriatic epidermis confirm that both uninvolved and lesional epidermis have a defect in epidermal maturation, as shown by the altered binding of UEA I lectin.

  15. Lectin functionalized quantum dots for recognition of mammary tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Beate S.; de Farias, Patricia M. A.; de Menezes, Frederico D.; de C. Ferreira, Ricardo; Júnior, Severino A.; Figueiredo, Regina C. B. Q.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2006-02-01

    In this study we use CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots functionalized with concanavalin-A (Con-A) lectin, specific to glucose/mannose residues, to investigate cell alterations regarding carbohydrate profile in human mammary tissues diagnosed as fibroadenoma (benign tumor). These particles were functionalized with glutaraldehyde and Con-A and incubated with tissue sections of normal and to Fibroadenoma, a benign type of mammary tumor. The tissue sections were deparafinized, hydrated in graded alcohol and treated with a solution of Evans Blue in order to avoid autofluorescence. The fluorescence intensity of QD-Con-A stained tissues showed different patterns, which reflect the carbohydrate expression of glucose/mannose in fibroadenoma when compared to the detection of the normal carbohydrate expression. The pattern of unspecific labeling of the tissues with glutaraldehyde functionalized CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots is compared to the targeting driven by the Con-A lectin. The preliminary findings reported here support the use of CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots as specific probes of cellular alterations and their use in diagnostics.

  16. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  17. Characterization of Caenorhabditis Elegans Lectin-Binding Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Link, C. D.; Silverman, M. A.; Breen, M.; Watt, K. E.; Dames, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    We have identified 45 mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans that show ectopic surface binding of the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA). These mutations are all recessive and define six genes: srf-2, srf-3, srf-4, srf-5, srf-8 and srf-9. Mutations in these genes fall into two phenotypic classes: srf-2, -3, -5 mutants are grossly wild-type, except for their lectin-binding phenotype; srf-4, -8, -9 mutants have a suite of defects, including uncoordinated movement, abnormal egg laying, and defective copulatory bursae morphogenesis. Characterization of these pleiotropic mutants at the cellular level reveals defects in the migration of the gonadal distal tip cell and in axon morphology. Unexpectedly, the pleiotropic mutations also interact with mutations in the lin-12 gene, which encodes a putative cell surface receptor involved in the control of cell fate. We propose that the underlying defect in the pleiotropic mutations may be in the general processing or secretion of extracellular proteins. PMID:1516818

  18. Use of lectin-functionalized particles for oral immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Diesner, Susanne C; Wang, Xue-Yan; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Untersmayr, Eva; Gabor, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy, in recent times, has found its application in a variety of immunologically mediated diseases. Oral immunotherapy may not only increase patient compliance but may, in particular, also induce both systemic as well as mucosal immune responses, due to mucosal application of active agents. To improve the bioavailability and to trigger strong immunological responses, recent research projects focused on the encapsulation of drugs and antigens into polymer particles. These particles protect the loaded antigen from the harsh conditions in the GI tract. Furthermore, modification of the surface of particles by the use of lectins, such as Aleuria aurantia lectin, wheatgerm agglutinin or Ulex europaeus-I, enhances the binding to epithelial cells, in particular to membranous cells, of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Membranous cell-specific targeting leads to an improved transepithelial transport of the particle carriers. Thus, enhanced uptake and presentation of the encapsulated antigen by antigen-presenting cells favor strong systemic, but also local, mucosal immune responses. PMID:22834202

  19. [Discovery of a novel A2 allel in ABO blood group system and investigation of its distribution in Han population of Chinese Fujian province].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai; Chi, Quan; Ren, Ben-Chun

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of A2 subgroup in Han Population of Chinese Fujian province and its molecular mechanisms. One individual with serologic ABO blood grouping discrepancy was identified with commercially available monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and lectin: anti-A, anti-B, anti-AB, anti-A1, and anti-H reagents according to the routine laboratory methods. DNA sequences of exon 6, 7 and intron 6 of ABO gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction using genomic DNA and direct DNA sequencing or sequencing after gene cloning. Red cells of 3 176 A or AB unrelated individuals were tested with anti-A1. The results showed that this individual was identified as A2 subgroup by serological technology, sequencing analysis indicated the A2 subgroup with novel A variant allele, the novel A allele being different from the allele A101 by 467C > T and 607G > A missense mutation in exon 7, no A2 subgroup was identified from the 3 176 individuals by using standard serological technology. It is concluded that a novel A allele responsible for A2 subgroup composing of 467C > T and 607G > A has been firstly confirmed, and the A2 subgroup is very rare in Chinese Fujian Han population.

  20. Preliminary Study of the GSTM1 Null Polymorphism and History of Tobacco Smoking among Oral Cancer Patients in Northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Natphopsuk, Sitakan; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Phuthong, Sophida; Ishida, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Risks with GSTM1 genotypes and potential roles of smoking in the susceptibility to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) were studied in Northeastern Thailand. Study subjects were 79 histologically-confirmed OSCC cases (31 men, 48 women) and 79 age- and sex-matched healthy controls ranging in age from 25 to 84 years. GSTM1 genotyping was achieved by two independent PCR assays. The GSTM1 null allele and the homozygous genotype did not increase risk of OSCC vs the wild type allele and the remaining genotypes. When the focus was on the smoking habit, male subjects who smoked ≥10 or ≥35 years were at significantly increased risk for OSCC with adjusted ORs of 4.88 [95%CI, 1.41-16.87, p=0.012] or 4.94 [95%CI, 1.62-15.12, p=0.005], respectively. A higher risk for OSCC was found for smoking amount; those who smoked >5 or >10 pack-years were at a higher risk with adjusted OR of 4.46 [95%CI; 1.45-13.74, p=0.009] or 3.89 [95%CI; 1.34-11.28, p=0.012], respectively. There are certain smoking patterns that give greater risks and thus both smoking duration and pack-years should be taken into consideration in tobacco related cancer prevention.

  1. Initial invasion of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles in the absence of tight linkage between pollen and pistil S alleles.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoki; Wakoh, Haluka

    2014-08-01

    In homomorphic self-incompatibility (SI) systems of plants, the loci controlling the pollen and pistil types are tightly linked, and this prevents the generation of compatible combinations of alleles expressing pollen and pistil types, which would result in self-fertilization. We modeled the initial invasion of the first pollen and pistil alleles in gametophytic SI to determine whether these alleles can stably coexist in a population without tight linkage. We assume pollen and pistil loci each carry an incompatibility allele S and an allele without an incompatibility function N. We assume that pollen with an S allele are incompatible with pistils carrying S alleles, whereas other crosses are compatible. Ovules in pistils carrying an S allele suffer viability costs because recognition consumes resources. We found that the cost of carrying a pistil S allele allows pollen and pistil S alleles to coexist in a stable equilibrium if linkage is partial. This occurs because parents that carry pistil S alleles but are homozygous for pollen N alleles cannot avoid self-fertilization; however, they suffer viability costs. Hence, pollen N alleles are selected again. When pollen and pistil S alleles can coexist in a polymorphic equilibrium, selection will favor tighter linkage.

  2. Proteins with an Euonymus lectin-like domain are ubiquitous in Embryophyta

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cloning of the Euonymus lectin led to the discovery of a novel domain that also occurs in some stress-induced plant proteins. The distribution and the diversity of proteins with an Euonymus lectin (EUL) domain were investigated using detailed analysis of sequences in publicly accessible genome and transcriptome databases. Results Comprehensive in silico analyses indicate that the recently identified Euonymus europaeus lectin domain represents a conserved structural unit of a novel family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins, which will further be referred to as the Euonymus lectin (EUL) family. The EUL domain is widespread among plants. Analysis of retrieved sequences revealed that some sequences consist of a single EUL domain linked to an unrelated N-terminal domain whereas others comprise two in tandem arrayed EUL domains. A new classification system for these lectins is proposed based on the overall domain architecture. Evolutionary relationships among the sequences with EUL domains are discussed. Conclusion The identification of the EUL family provides the first evidence for the occurrence in terrestrial plants of a highly conserved plant specific domain. The widespread distribution of the EUL domain strikingly contrasts the more limited or even narrow distribution of most other lectin domains found in plants. The apparent omnipresence of the EUL domain is indicative for a universal role of this lectin domain in plants. Although there is unambiguous evidence that several EUL domains possess carbohydrate-binding activity further research is required to corroborate the carbohydrate-binding properties of different members of the EUL family. PMID:19930663

  3. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Green Split Peas (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-11-01

    Lectins have captured the attention of a large number of researchers on account of their various exploitable activities, including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, as well as HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities. A mannose/glucose-specific lectin was isolated from green split peas (a variety of Pisum sativum) and characterized. The purification step involved anion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column, cation-exchange chromatography on an SP-Sepharose column, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Superdex 200. The purified lectin had a native molecular mass of around 50 kDa as determined by size exclusion chromatography. It appeared as a heterotetramer, composed of two distinct polypeptide bands with a molecular mass of 6 and 19 kDa, respectively, in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The N-terminal sequence of green split pea lectin shows some degree of homology compared to lectins from other legume species. Its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by glucose, mannose, and sucrose, and attenuated at pH values higher than 12 or lower than 3. Hemagglutinating activity was preserved at temperatures lower than 80 °C. The lectin did not show antifungal activity toward fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Green split pea lectin showed a mitogenic effect toward murine splenocytes and could inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  4. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. Methods The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. Results The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Conclusions Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections. PMID:27537843

  5. Chemical modification studies on a lectin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast).

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, M; Basu, J; Ghosh, A; Chakrabarti, P

    1987-01-01

    The effect of chemical modification on a galactose-specific lectin isolated from a fatty acid auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated in order to identify the type of amino acids involved in its agglutinating activity. Modification of 50 free amino groups with succinic anhydride or citraconic anhydride led to an almost complete loss of activity. This could not be protected by the inhibitory sugar methyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside. Treatment with N-bromosuccinimide and N-acetylimidazole, for the modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues, did not affect lectin activity. Modification of carboxy groups with glycine ethyl ester greatly affected lectin activity, although sugars afford partial protection. Modification of four thiol groups with N-ethylmaleimide was accompanied by a loss of 85% of the agglutinating activity, and two thiol groups were found to be present at the sugar-binding site of the lectin. Modification of 18 arginine residues with cyclohexane-1,2-dione and 26 histidine residues with ethoxyformic anhydride led to a loss of lectin activity. However, in these cases, modification was not protected by the abovementioned inhibitory sugar, suggesting the absence of these groups at the sugar-binding site. In all the cases, immunodiffusion studies with modified lectin showed no gross structural changes which could disrupt antigenic sites of the lectin. Images Fig. 5. PMID:3128265

  6. Effective inhibition of melanosome transfer to keratinocytes by lectins and niacinamide is reversible.

    PubMed

    Greatens, Amanda; Hakozaki, Tomohiro; Koshoffer, Amy; Epstein, Howard; Schwemberger, Sandy; Babcock, George; Bissett, Donald; Takiwaki, Hirotsugu; Arase, Seiji; Wickett, R Randall; Boissy, Raymond E

    2005-07-01

    Skin pigmentation results in part from the transfer of melanized melanosomes synthesized by melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes. Plasma membrane lectins and their glycoconjugates expressed by these epidermal cells are critical molecules involved in this transfer process. In addition, the derivative of vitamin B(3), niacinamide, can inhibit melanosome transfer and induce skin lightening. We investigated the effects of these molecules on the viability of melanocytes and keratinocytes and on the reversibility of melanosome-transfer inhibition induced by these agents using an in vitro melanocyte-keratinocyte coculture model system. While lectins and neoglycoproteins could induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner to melanocytes or keratinocytes in monoculture, similar dosages of the lectins, as opposed to neoglycoproteins, did not induce apoptosis to either cell type when treated in coculture. The dosages of lectins and niacinamide not affecting cell viability produced an inhibitory effect on melanosome transfer, when used either alone or together in cocultures of melanocytes-keratinocytes. Cocultures treated with lectins or niacinamide resumed normal melanosome transfer in 3 days after removal of the inhibitor, while cocultures treated with a combination of lectins and niacinamide demonstrated a lag in this recovery. Subsequently, we assessed the effect of niacinamide on facial hyperpigmented spots using a vehicle-controlled, split-faced design human clinical trial. Topical application of niacinamide resulted in a dose-dependent and reversible reduction in hyperpigmented lesions. These results suggest that lectins and niacinamide at concentrations that do not affect cell viability are reversible inhibitors of melanosome transfer.

  7. A novel L-fucose-binding lectin from Fenneropenaeus indicus induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biji; Ghosh, Krishna; Yadav, Nitin; Kanade, Santosh R

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are omnipresent in almost all life forms, being the proteins which specifically bind to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface; they have been explored for their anti-tumour activities. In this study, we purified a fucose specific-lectin (IFL) from Fenneropenaeus indicus haemolymph using fucose-affinity column and characterized for its haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, dependency on cations and cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The lectin showed non-specificity against human erythrocytes. It was a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin which remained stable over wide pH and temperature ranges. The lectin showed effective dose dependent cytotoxicity against different human cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as evidenced by DNA ladder assay and PARP cleavage in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, an increased p21 level corresponding to cyclin D downregulation in response to IFL treatment was observed which might work as probable factors to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. Therefore, we report a novel lectin from the prawn haemolymph with high specificity for L-fucose and antiproliferative towards human cancer cells. However, further establishment of the modus operandi of this lectin is required to enable its biotechnological applications.

  8. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  9. Isolation and analysis of mannose/trehalose/maltose specific lectin from jack bean with antibruchid activity.

    PubMed

    Shanmugavel, Sakthivelkumar; Velayutham, Veeramani; Kamalanathan, Tamilarasan; Periasamy, Mullainadhan; Munusamy, Arumugam; Sundaram, Janarthanan

    2016-10-01

    A lectin with insecticidal property against the stored product pest, Callosobruchus maculatus was successfully isolated from the seeds of Canavalia virosa using standard affinity chromatography. The isolated molecule typically behaved like a lectin in its characteristics. It agglutinated indicator red blood cells (RBC) in its native as well as enzyme treated conditions. The enzyme treated RBC types exhibited a very high hemagglutination (HA) titre values and this property of isolated molecule behaved like arcelin, the lectin-like molecules reported from several species of Phaseolus. As a characteristic feature of a lectin, the isolated molecule effectively inhibited the agglutination of indicator RBC types with simple and complex carbohydrates including glycoproteins. This nature of the isolated molecule also relate with characteristic feature of arcelin isoforms in inhibiting HA activity with complex glycoproteins as reported in many studies. Most interestingly, the present study disclosed trehalose as a potent inhibitor of C. virosa lectin. Therefore, feeding insect pests on the lectin like arcelin could serve as antibiosis factor/anti-insect activity. The molecular characteristics of this isolated molecule and its mass studies too revealed its homology with arcelin, arcelin-1, 2 and 6 isoforms of P. vulgaris and lectin from Canavalia cathartica, C. lineata and C. brasiliensis.

  10. Quantitation of two endogenous lactose-inhibitable lectins in embryonic and adult chicken tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, E.C.; Barondes, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two lactose-binding lectins from chicken tissues, chicken-lactose-lectin-I (CLL-I) and chicken-lactose-lectin-II (CLL-II) were quantified with a radioimmunoassay in extracts of a number of developing and adult chicken tissues. Both lectins could be measured in the same extract without separation, because they showed no significant immunological cross- reactivity. Many embryonic and adult tissues, including brain, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, and spleen, contained one or both lectins, although their concentrations differed markedly. For example, embryonic muscle, the richest source of CLL-I contained only traces of CLL-II whereas embryonic kidney, a very rich source of CLL-II contained substantial CLL-I. In both muscle and kidney, lectin levels in adulthood were much lower than in the embryonic state. In contrast, CLL-I in liver and CLL-II in intestine were 10-fold to 30-fold more concentrated in the adult than in the 15-d embryo. CLL-I and CLL-II from several tissues were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity in the various tissues was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and peptide mapping. The results suggest that these lectins might have different functions in the many developing and adult tissues in which they are found.

  11. Null model analysis of species associations using abundance data.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Werner; Gotelli, Nicholas J

    2010-11-01

    The influence of negative species interactions has dominated much of the literature on community assembly rules. Patterns of negative covariation among species are typically documented through null model analyses of binary presence/absence matrices in which rows designate species, columns designate sites, and the matrix entries indicate the presence (1) or absence (0) of a particular species in a particular site. However, the outcome of species interactions ultimately depends on population-level processes. Therefore, patterns of species segregation and aggregation might be more clearly expressed in abundance matrices, in which the matrix entries indicate the abundance or density of a species in a particular site. We conducted a series of benchmark tests to evaluate the performance of 14 candidate null model algorithms and six covariation metrics that can be used with abundance matrices. We first created a series of random test matrices by sampling a metacommunity from a lognormal species abundance distribution. We also created a series of structured matrices by altering the random matrices to incorporate patterns of pairwise species segregation and aggregation. We next screened each algorithm-index combination with the random and structured matrices to determine which tests had low Type I error rates and good power for detecting segregated and aggregated species distributions. In our benchmark tests, the best-performing null model does not constrain species richness, but assigns individuals to matrix cells proportional to the observed row and column marginal distributions until, for each row and column, total abundances are reached. Using this null model algorithm with a set of four covariance metrics, we tested for patterns of species segregation and aggregation in a collection of 149 empirical abundance matrices and 36 interaction matrices collated from published papers and posted data sets. More than 80% of the matrices were significantly segregated, which

  12. Characterization and molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from the Orchidaceae species Listera ovata, Epipactis helleborine and Cymbidium hybrid.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-04-15

    Mannose-binding lectins were purified from the leaves of three Orchidaceae species, namely Listera ovata (twayblade), Epipactis helleborine (broad-leaved helleborine) and Cymbidium hybrid, using affinity chromatography on Mannose - Sepharose-4B. Apparently, the Orchidaceae lectins are dimeric proteins composed of lectin subunits of 12-13 kDa. All of the isolated lectins exhibit exclusive specificity towards mannose. A cDNA library constructed from poly(A) rich RNA isolated from leaves of L. ovata was screened for cDNA clones encoding the lectin using colony hybridization. Since N-terminal sequence analysis of the twayblade lectin revealed some sequence similarity to the previously cloned mannose-binding lectin Hippeastrum hybrid (amaryllis) ovaries, the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone was used as a probe to screen the L. ovata library. Subsequently, the cDNA clone encoding the L. ovata lectin was used to screen the cDNA libraries from the taxonomically related orchid species Cymbidium hybrid and E. helleborine. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from different Orchidaceae species revealed approximately 50% sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The Orchidaceae lectins are apparently translated from mRNAs consisting of approximately 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins which are converted into the mature lectins following post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  13. Three-dimensional kinematic reconnection in the presence of field nulls and closed field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yun-Tung; Finn, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of three-dimensional reconnection of magnetic fields with nulls and of fields with closed lines gives attention to the geometry of the former, with a view to their gamma-line and Sigma-surface structures. The geometric structures of configurations with a pair of type A and B nulls permit reconnection across the null-null lines; these are the field lines which join the two nulls. Also noted is the case of magnetostatic reconnection, in which the magnetic field is time-independent and the electrostatic potential is constant along field lines.

  14. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  15. Physicochemical properties and oxidative inactivation of soluble lectin from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) brain.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sabika; Banu, Naheed

    2008-03-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins present in a wide variety of plants and animals, which serve various important physiological functions. A soluble beta-galactoside binding lectin has been isolated and purified to homogeneity from buffalo brain using ammonium sulphate precipitation (40-70%) and gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G50-80 column. The molecular weight of buffalo brain lectin (BBL) as determined by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions was 14.2 kDa, however, with gel filtration it was 28.5 kDa, revealing the dimeric form of protein. The neutral sugar content of the soluble lectin was estimated to be 3.3%. The BBL showed highest affinity for lactose and other sugar moieties in glycosidic form, suggesting it to be a beta-galactoside binding lectin. The association constant for lactose binding as evidenced by Scatchard analysis was 6.6 x 10(3) M(-1) showing two carbohydrate binding sites per lectin molecule. A total inhibition of lectin activity was observed by denaturants like guanidine HCl, thiourea and urea at 6 M concentration. The treatment of BBL with oxidizing agent destroyed its agglutination activity, abolished its fluorescence, and shifted its UV absorption maxima from 282 to 250 nm. The effect of H2O2 was greatly prevented by lactose indicating that BBL is more stable in the presence of its specific ligand. The purified lectin was investigated for its brain cell aggregation properties by testing its ability to agglutinate cells isolated from buffalo and goat brains. Rate of aggregation of buffalo brain cells by purified protein was more than the goat brain cells. The data from above study suggests that the isolated lectin may belong to the galectin-1 family but is glycosylated unlike those purified till date.

  16. Seasonal lectin binding variations of thumb pad in the frog (Pelophylax ridibundus).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2014-01-01

    The thumb pad is one of the most common secondary sexual characteristics in frogs. Although it is known that amphibian skin has affinity for several lectins, there is no report regarding lectin-binding affinity of the thumb pad or its structural components. This study investigated localization and seasonal variation of specific carbohydrate moieties of glycoconjugates in both the epidermal and dermal components of the frog thumb pad at the light microscopic level using lectin histochemistry. The study consisted of four seasonal groups of the frog species, Pelophylax ridibundus (Synonym of Rana ridibunda): active, prehibernating, hibernating and posthibernating. Four horseradish peroxidase conjugated lectins were employed. It was found that dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and ulex europaeus (UEAI) gave positive reactions in both epidermal layers and breeding glands. These three lectins bound specific secretory cells in the breeding glands, and the distribution of the cells and epithelial lectin reactions exhibited seasonal changes. In addition, UEA-I and peanut agglutinin (PNA) showed an affinity in granular glands and the granular zone of mixed glands. Generally, epidermal lectin binding showed dense affinity during the posthibernation period. DBA, UEA-I, and WGA-specific cells in the mucous gland decreased gradually until the posthibernation period. These findings suggest that differences of lectin binding in the thumb pad may be related to functional activities and, thus, seasonal adaptations. Moreover, the presence of specific lectin-binding cells in the breeding glands indicated that they consisted of heterogeneous secretory cell composition or that the cells were at different secretory stages.

  17. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of carbohydrate binding to the basic lectin from winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus).

    PubMed

    Khan, M I; Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1986-03-05

    A basic lectin (pI approximately 10.0) was purified to homogeneity from the seeds of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) by affinity chromatography on Sepharose 6-aminocaproyl-D-galactosamine. The lectin agglutinated trypsinized rabbit erythrocytes and had a relative molecular mass of 58,000 consisting of two subunits of Mr 29,000. The lectin binds to N-dansylgalactosamine, leading to a 15-fold increase in dansyl fluorescence with a concomitant 25-nm blue shift in the emission maximum. The lectin has two binding sites/dimer for this sugar and an association constant of 4.17 X 10(5) M-1 at 25 degrees C. The strong binding to N-dansylgalactosamine is due to a relatively positive entropic contribution as revealed by the thermodynamic parameters: delta H = -33.62 kJ mol-1 and delta S0 = -5.24 J mol-1 K-1. Binding of this sugar to the lectin shows that it can accommodate a large hydrophobic substituent on the C-2 carbon of D-galactose. Studies with other sugars indicate that a hydrophobic substituent in alpha-conformation at the anomeric position increases the affinity of binding. The C-4 and C-6 hydroxyl groups are critical for sugar binding to this lectin. Lectin difference absorption spectra in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine indicate perturbation of tryptophan residues on sugar binding. The results of stopped flow kinetics with N-dansylgalactosamine and the lectin are consistent with a simple one-step mechanism for which k+1 = 1.33 X 10(4) M-1 s-1 and k-1 = 3.2 X 10(-2) s-1 at 25 degrees C. This k-1 is slower than any reported for a lectin-monosaccharide complex so far. The activation parameters indicate an enthalpically controlled association process.

  18. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), as well as the Gal beta 1-3GalNAc-specific lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Agaricus bisporus (ABA) inhibited killing of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 by sialidase-treated PMNs. These five lectins detected a 130-kDa surface-labeled glycoprotein on nitrocellulose transfers of PMN extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This glycoprotein was revealed only after treatment of the transfers with sialidase, a condition analogous to the sialidase dependence of the lectin-mediated biological responses of the PMNs to the actinomyces. The mannose-reactive lectin concanavalin A did not inhibit killing of the actinomyces and failed to detect the 130-kDa glycoprotein but did block PMN-dependent killing of Escherichia coli B, a bacterium that possesses mannose-sensitive fimbriae. Therefore, the PMN glycoprotein receptor for A. naeslundii is clearly distinct from those recognized by E. coli. Two major putative glycolipid receptors were also identified by actinomyces and RCAI overlays on sialidase-treated thin-layer chromatograms of PMN gangliosides. Thus, both a 130-kDa glycoprotein and certain gangliosides are implicated in the attachment of the actinomyces to PMNs. PMID:7790078

  19. Receptor mobility and the binding of cells to lectin-coated fibers

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The ability of cells to bind to nylon fibers coated with lectin molecules interspaced with varying numbers of albumin molecules has been analyzed. The cells used were lymphoma cells, normal lymphocytes, myeloid leukemia cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, and the fibers were coated with different densities of concanavalin A or the lectins from soybean or wheat germ. Cells fixed with glutaraldehyde did not bind to lectin-coated fibers. The number of cells bound to fibers could be increased by increasing the density of lectin molecules on the fiber, the density of specific receptors on the cell, or the mobility of the receptors. It is suggested that binding of cells to fibers involves alignment and binding of specific cell surface receptors with lectin molecules immobilized on the fibers, and that this alignment requires short-range rapid lateral mobility (RLM) of the receptors. The titration of cell binding to fibers coated with different densities of lectin and albumin has been used to measure the relative RLM of unoccupied cell surface receptors for the lectin. The results indicate a relationship of RLM to lectin-induced cell-to-cell binding. The RLM or receptors for concanavalin A (Con A) was generally found to be higher than that of receptors for the lectins from wheat germ or soybean. Receptor RLM could be decreased by use of metabolic inhibitors or by lowering the temperature. Receptors for Con A had a lower RLM on normal fibroblasts than on SV40-transformed fibroblasts, and trypsinization of normal fibroblasts increased Con A receptor RLM. Normal lymphocytes, lymphoma cells, and lines of myeloid leukemia cells that can be induced to differentiate had a high receptor RLM, whereas lines of myeloid leukemia cells that could not be induced to differentiate had a low receptor RLM. These results suggest that the RLM of Con A receptors is related to the transformation of fibroblasts and the ability of myeloid leukemia cells to undergo differentiation PMID

  20. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  1. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; ...

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  2. Recognition of a CD4+ mouse medullary thymocyte subpopulation by Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Lascurain, R; Chávez, R; Gorocica, P; Pérez, A; Montaño, L F; Zenteno, E

    1994-01-01

    We have used the Gal beta(1-->3)GalNAc-specific Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to isolate a thymus cell subpopulation which is different from that sorted with Arachis hypogaea lectin. The cells recognized by A. leucocarpus lectin were predominantly CD4+, whereas a minor proportion of CD8+ cells (approximately 11%) were also identified. The A. leucocarpus-positive cells were located in the thymus medulla and the cortico-medullary junction. The cortex was negative for A. leucocarpus cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7835965

  3. Genomic sequence and organization of two members of a human lectin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Gitt, M.A.; Barondes, S.H. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA encoding a human dimeric soluble lactose-binding lectin. The gene has four exons, and its upstream region contains sequences that suggest control by glucocorticoids, heat (environmental) shock, metals, and other factors. They have also isolated and sequenced three exons of the gene encoding another human putative lectin, the existence of which was first indicated by isolation of its cDNA. Comparisons suggest a general pattern of genomic organization of members of this lectin gene family.

  4. Functional variation of MC1R alleles from red-haired individuals.

    PubMed

    Healy, E; Jordan, S A; Budd, P S; Suffolk, R; Rees, J L; Jackson, I J

    2001-10-01

    Red hair in humans is associated with variant alleles of the alphaMSH receptor gene, MC1R. Loss of MC1R function in other mammals results in red or yellow hair pigmentation. We show that a mouse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) which contains Mc1r will efficiently rescue loss of Mc1r in transgenic mice, and that overexpression of the receptor suppresses the effect of the endogenous antagonist, agouti protein. We engineered the BAC to replace the mouse coding region with the human MC1R sequence and used this in the transgenic assay. The human receptor also efficiently rescued Mc1r deficiency, and in addition, appeared to be completely resistant to the effects of agouti, suggesting agouti protein may not play a role in human pigmentary variation. Three human variant alleles account for 60% of all cases of red hair. We engineered each of these in turn into the BAC and find that they have reduced, but not completely absent, function in transgenic mice. Comparison of the phenotypes of alphaMSH-deficient mice and humans in conjunction with this data suggests that red hair may not be the null phenotype of MC1R.

  5. Lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 3 rs4652 A/C gene variation and the risk for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Atabaki, Mahdi; Hashemi, Mohammad; Daneshvar, Hamid; Alijani, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex genetic disease. The lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 3 (LGALS3) gene, encodes a member of the galectin family of carbohydrate binding proteins, and is one of the best examples of a non-human leukocyte antigen gene associated with a risk for RA in various populations. In the current study, the association between LGALS3 rs4652 gene polymorphism and RA was examined. This case-control study was performed on the 120 patients with RA and 120 healthy subjects. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood, and gene polymorphism was tested using a tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that LGALS3 rs4652 AC genotype increased the risk of RA (OR=11.622, 95% CI=4.473–28.656; P=0.001) when compared with the AA genotype. However, the CC genotype and the C allele were not associated with RA. These findings indicated an association between LGALS3 rs4652 variation and the risk of RA in a sample of Iranian individuals. Further studies with larger sample sizes and populations of different ethnicities are required to validate our findings. PMID:28357081

  6. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  7. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  8. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  9. Broadband Achromatic Phase Shifter for a Nulling Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Nulling interferometry is a technique for imaging exoplanets in which light from the parent star is suppressed using destructive interference. Light from the star is divided into two beams and a phase shift of radians is introduced into one of the beams. When the beams are recombined, they destructively interfere to produce a deep null. For monochromatic light, this is implemented by introducing an optical path difference (OPD) between the two beams equal to lambda/2, where lambda is the wavelength of the light. For broadband light, however, a different phase shift will be introduced at each wavelength and the two beams will not effectively null when recombined. Various techniques have been devised to introduce an achromatic phase shift a phase shift that is uniform across a particular bandwidth. One popular technique is to use a series of dispersive elements to introduce a wavelength-dependent optical path in one or both of the arms of the interferometer. By intelligently choosing the number, material and thickness of a series of glass plates, a nearly uniform, arbitrary phase shift can be introduced between two arms of an interferometer. There are several constraints that make choosing the number, type, and thickness of materials a difficult problem, such as the size of the bandwidth to be nulled. Several solutions have been found for bandwidths on the order of 20 to 30 percent (Delta(lambda)/lambda(sub c)) in the mid-infrared region. However, uniform phase shifts over a larger bandwidth in the visible regime between 480 to 960 nm (67 percent) remain difficult to obtain at the tolerances necessary for exoplanet detection. A configuration of 10 dispersive glass plates was developed to be used as an achromatic phase shifter in nulling interferometry. Five glass plates were placed in each arm of the interferometer and an additional vacuum distance was also included in the second arm of the interferometer. This configuration creates a phase shift of pi radians with

  10. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    PubMed

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology.

  11. Cell- and region-specific expression of sugar chains in the mouse epididymal epithelium using lectin histochemistry combined with immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Shota; Fukui, Tatsuya; Sawaguchi, Akira; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2012-02-01

    To understand the cytochemical properties of epididymal epithelial cells, the characteristics of glycoconjugates in the mouse epididymis were examined using the technique of lectin histochemistry combined with immunohistochemistry. Characteristic staining patterns depending on the type of lectins were observed in the epididymal epithelium. Principal cells expressed N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), and Fucose in the proximal region of the epididymis and Mannose, Glucose, and Galactose in the distal region of the epididymis. Basal cells expressed Mannose, Glucose, Galactose, and GlcNAc in the proximal region and Galactose in the distal region. On the other hand, clear cells expressed various sugar residues and differences among regions were not observed. Interestingly, principal cells, clear cells, and basal cells specifically reacted with Ulex Europaeus-Agglutinin I (UEA-I lectin), Maackia Amurensis-Lectin I (MAL-I lectin), and Griffonia simplicifolia Lectin I-B4 (GS-I B lectin), respectively. These findings indicate that the selectivity in lectin reactivity for distinct cell types and segment-dependent staining in the epididymis may be related to cellular and regional differences in function. Furthermore, because some lectins stain particular cells or cellular compartments selectively, these lectins could be useful markers for histopathological evaluation of diseases or diagnosis of male infertility.

  12. A novel L-type lectin was required for the multiplication of WSSV in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunjia; Wang, Yuqing; Zhao, Lingling; Qin, Zhendong; Yuan, Junfa; Qin, Qiwei; Lin, Li; Lan, Jiangfeng

    2016-08-01

    L-type lectins are involved in glycoproteins secretory pathways and are associated with many immune responses. There is growing evidence that L-type lectins are also involved in viral replication. In this study, a novel L-type lectin (named as PcL-lectin) was identified from red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii). Gene sequencing and phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the PcL-lectin was a kind of endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment-53 (ERGIC-53). The expression level of PcL-lectin was significantly down regulated in crayfish after challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Recombinant PcL-lectin protein facilitated the replication of WSSV in crayfish. In addition, WSSV replication was decreased when endogenous PcL-lectin was knocked down by RNA interference in crayfish. Furthermore, PcL-lectin may interact with VP24, an envelope protein of WSSV. Our results suggest that PcL-lectin may be required for the multiplication of WSSV, and will pave a new way for the developing of strategies against WSSV infection.

  13. Polytropic spheres containing regions of trapped null geodesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotný, Jan; Hladík, Jan; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that in the framework of standard general relativity, polytropic spheres with properly fixed polytropic index n and relativistic parameter σ , giving a ratio of the central pressure pc to the central energy density ρc , can contain a region of trapped null geodesics. Such trapping polytropes can exist for n >2.138 , and they are generally much more extended and massive than the observed neutron stars. We show that in the n - σ parameter space, the region of allowed trapping increases with the polytropic index for intervals of physical interest, 2.138 null geodesics increases with both increasing n and σ >0.677 from the allowed region. In order to relate the trapping phenomenon to astrophysically relevant situations, we restrict the validity of the polytropic configurations to their extension rextr corresponding to the gravitational mass M ˜2 M⊙ of the most massive observed neutron stars. Then, for the central density ρc˜1 015 g cm-3 , the trapped regions are outside rextr for all values of 2.138 null geodesics is located close to the polytrope center and could have a relevant influence on the cooling of such polytropes or binding of gravitational waves in their interior.

  14. Vacuum Nuller Testbed Performance, Characterization and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. G.; Clampin, M.; Petrone, P.; Mallik, U.; Madison, T.; Bolcar, M.; Noecker, C.; Kendrick, S.; Helmbrecht, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) can detect and characterize exoplanets with filled, segmented and sparse aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the choice of future internal coronagraph exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) to advance this approach, and assess and advance technologies needed to realize a VNC as a flight instrument. The VNT is an ultra-stable testbed operating at 15 Hz in vacuum. It consists of a MachZehnder nulling interferometer; modified with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hexpacked MEMS based deformable mirror (DM), coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. The 2-output channels are imaged with a vacuum photon counting camera and conventional camera. Error-sensing and feedback to DM and delay line with control algorithms are implemented in a real-time architecture. The inherent advantage of the VNC is that it is its own interferometer and directly controls its errors by exploiting images from bright and dark channels simultaneously. Conservation of energy requires the sum total of the photon counts be conserved independent of the VNC state. Thus sensing and control bandwidth is limited by the target stars throughput, with the net effect that the higher bandwidth offloads stressing stability tolerances within the telescope. We report our recent progress with the VNT towards achieving an incremental sequence of contrast milestones of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) respectively at inner working angles approaching 2A/D. Discussed will be the optics, lab results, technologies, and null control. Shown will be evidence that the milestones have been achieved.

  15. EADS Astrium Nulling Interferometer Breadboard for DARWIN and GENIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergenzinger, Klaus; Flatscher, Reinhold; Johann, Ulrich; Vink, Rob; Sodnik, Zoran

    2004-06-01

    Within the context of the ESA TRP programme for DARWIN, a Nulling Interferometer Breadboard for the Near-Infrared was developed and tested. Its basic principle is recombining two light beams relying on a highly symmetric optical design (autobalanced Sagnac Core). Two different star simulators have been implemented, based on a) amplitude division and b) on wavefront division. The required achromatic Pi phase shift was implemented using a) dispersive phase shifter, and b) periscopes (geometrical pupil and field rotation). Due to the extremely symmetric optical design, very good star suppression up to 400000 has been achieved. OPD control better than 1 nm RMS has been demonstrated over hours.

  16. Speckle nulling wavefront control for Palomar and Keck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottom, Michael; Femenia, Bruno; Huby, Elsa; Mawet, Dimitri; Dekany, Richard; Milburn, Jennifer; Serabyn, Eugene

    2016-07-01

    We present a speckle nulling code currently being used for high contrast imaging at the Palomar and Keck telescopes. The code can operate in open and closed loop and is self-calibrating, requiring no system model and minimal hand-coded parameters. Written in a modular fashion, it is straightforward to port to different instruments. It has been used with systems operating in the optical through thermal infrared, and can deliver nearly an order of magnitude improvement in raw contrast. We will be releasing this code to the public in the near future.

  17. Null Values and Quantum State Discrìmination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberberg, Oded; Romito, Alessandro; Starling, David J.; Howland, Gregory A.; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.; Gefen, Yuval

    2013-04-01

    We present a measurement protocol for discriminating between two different quantum states of a qubit with high fidelity. The protocol, called null value, is comprised of a projective measurement performed on the system with a small probability (also known as partial collapse), followed by a tuned postselection. We report on an optical experimental implementation of the scheme. We show that our protocol leads to an amplified signal-to-noise ratio (as compared with a straightforward strong measurement) when discerning between the two quantum states.

  18. Biodiversity of mannose-specific lectins within Narcissus species.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Susanna; Codina, Carlos; Bastida, Jaume; Viladomat, Francesc; Davidson, Elaine; Stewart, Derek

    2002-04-24

    Mannose-specific lectins (MSLs) were isolated from the bulbs of 27 species of wild Spanish Narcissi and compared to the commercially available MSL from daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus, NPA). Molecular weight analysis showed the monomers of all the MSLs were at, or around, 12.5 kD. Haemagglutination assays showed that the MSLs exhibited activities at up to four times greater than that displayed by NPA and other MSLs derived from other species such as Galanthus nivalus (snowdrop) and Allium ursinum (ramson). Elution profiles from ion exchange chromatography exhibited similarities for species within the same taxonomic section suggesting that this method could aid in species classification. Further analysis by isoelectric focusing showed many isolectins are present in vivo and that even within a single peak from ion exchange chromatography there are numerous isolectins present. The basis of the isolectin heterogeneity is suggested to reside in the tetraploidy (sometime triploidy) nature of Narcissus genes.

  19. Data on IL-17 production induced by plant lectins

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Fernandes, Fabrício Freitas; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    We reported in article da Silva et al. (2016) [2] that ArtinM induces the IL-17 production through interaction with CD4+ T cells and stimulation of IL-23 and IL-1. Besides ArtinM, other plant lectins (PLs) induce IL-17 production by murine spleen cells. The IL-17 production induced by PLs was evaluated regarding the involvement of IL-23, IL-6, Th1-, and Th2-cytokines. Furthermore, the effect exerted TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 on the PLs׳ performance in the induction of IL-17 was examined. The current data were compared to the known ArtinM ability to induce Th17 immunity. PMID:27222857

  20. Atomic- Resolution Crystal Structure of the Antiviral Lectin Scytovirin

    SciTech Connect

    Moulaei,T.; Botos, I.; Ziolkowska, N.; Bokesch, H.; Krumpe, L.; McKee, T.; O'Keefe, B.; Dauter, Z.; Wlodawer, A.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of the natural and recombinant antiviral lectin scytovirin (SVN) were solved by single-wavelength anomalous scattering and refined with data extending to 1.3 Angstroms and 1.0 Angstroms resolution, respectively. A molecule of SVN consists of a single chain 95 amino acids long, with an almost perfect sequence repeat that creates two very similar domains (RMS deviation 0.25 Angstroms for 40 pairs of Ca atoms). The crystal structure differs significantly from a previously published NMR structure of the same protein, with the RMS deviations calculated separately for the N- and C-terminal domains of 5.3 Angstroms and 3.7 Angstroms, respectively, and a very different relationship between the two domains. In addition, the disulfide bonding pattern of the crystal structures differs from that described in the previously published mass spectrometry and NMR studies.

  1. Low allelic heterogeneity in a sample of Mexican patients with classical galactosaemia.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Aragón, J; Alcántara-Ortigoza, M A; Vela-Amieva, M; Monroy, S; Martínez-Cruz, V; Todd-Quiñones, C; González-del Angel, A

    2008-12-01

    Classical galactosaemia is an autosomal recessive disease of galactose metabolism caused by a deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT). Galactosaemia is not included in the neonatal screening programme in Mexico and it is necessary to implement methodologies for prompt diagnosis of these patients to establish treatment. To date, more than 190 mutations in the GALT gene have been reported, most in caucasian populations, but there have been no reports of mutations in Latin-American populations. We report here the mutational spectrum in 19 Mexican galactosaemic patients. The most frequent mutations were p.Q188R, p.N314D and IVS2-2A>G, which together represented 71% of detected mutations. The mutation IVS2-2A>G, which has been detected only in Hispanics, was thought to generate a null allele; we identified one patient with a homozygous IVS2-2A>G mutation who showed a mild deficiency of enzyme value in erythrocytes. One patient homozygous for Duarte 2 (p.N314D, IVS5+62G>A) is probably due to a partial uniparental disomy of chromosome 9. In addition, a novel mutation c.336T>C (p.S112R) was detected in one patient with severe enzymatic deficiency. Despite the small number of patients studied, our results suggest that classical galactosaemia shows low allelic heterogeneity in Mexican patients, in contrast what is observed in other Mendelian disorders such as cystinosis or autosomal dominant hypercholesterolaemia. This low allelic heterogeneity might be explained by a "population of origin" effect in the central region of Mexico, as has been described for phenylketonuria.

  2. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications.

  3. [Dynamic of lectin activity during germination of bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)].

    PubMed

    Koval'chuk, N V

    2006-01-01

    PHA quantity and activity dynamics during early germination of bean seed were investigated. Electrophoretic characteristics, subunits composition and carbohydrate-binding specificity of lectin extracted from white kidney bean cv. Bilozerna were studied. It was shown that investigated lectin consisted of 2 subunits E and L with molecular weight 34 and 36 kDa, respectively, analogously to purified PHA ("Serva", Germany), and specifically bound N-acetyl-D-galactosamin and galactose. During germination both quantity and activity of PHA were dramatically decreasing in embryonic axes and in cotyledons, possibly, as a result of the lectin release from seeds to the environment. It is very likely that one of the defence mechanisms of germinating seeds is related with the releasing of lectins that are able to bind components of the bacterial cell wall and to inhibit their growth.

  4. Novel hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica lectin.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro; Yahata, Kazuhide; Gopal Dhoubhadel, Bhim; Fujii, Yoshito; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2015-09-10

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica, a common protozoan parasite, has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in mouse models of amoebiasis. The lectin consists of heavy (Hgl), light (Lgl), and intermediate (Igl) subunits. Hgl has lectin activity and Lgl does not, but little is known about the activity of Igl. In this study, we assessed various regions of Igl for hemagglutinating activity using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. We identified a weak hemagglutinating activity of the protein. Furthermore, we found novel hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the lectin, which resided in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein. Antibodies against Igl inhibited the hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. This is the first report showing hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of an amoebic molecule, Igl.

  5. Mechanisms of the insecticidal action of TEL (Talisia esculenta lectin) against Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues; de Castro, Márcia Mota; Freire, Maria das Graças Machado

    2004-06-01

    Plant lectins have insecticidal activity that is probably mediated through their ability to bind carbohydrates. To examine the influence of sugars on the insecticidal activity of a lectin from Talisia esculenta seeds (TEL), the lectin was mixed with mannose, glucose, or mannose plus glucose. Mannose abolished the insecticidal activity. Affinity chromatography showed that TEL bound to midgut proteins of the insect Callosobruchus maculatus. Immunoblotting showed that TEL recognized some proteins, probably glycoproteins, present in the midgut membrane of this insect. The principal proteases responsible for digestive proteolysis in fourth instar larvae of C. maculatus were purified by chromatography on activated thiol-Sepharose. These purified proteases were unable to digest TEL after a 15-h incubation. These results suggest that the insecticidal activity of TEL involves a specific carbohydrate-lectin interaction with glycoconjugates on the surface of digestive tract epithelial cells, as well as binding to assimilatory glycoproteins present in midgut extracts and resistance to enzymatic digestion by cysteine proteinases.

  6. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature.

  7. Lectin-Magnetic Beads for Plasma Membrane Isolation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Chuang, Carol; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane proteins mainly function to transmit external signals into the cell. Many plasma membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g., HER2 and EGFR) are known to mediate oncogenic progression, making them prime targets for cancer therapy. Recently, it has become important to identify plasma membrane proteins that are differentially expressed in normal versus cancer cells, in drug-sensitive versus drug-resistant cells, or among tumor cells that metastasize to different organ sites because these differentially expressed membrane proteins may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. In addition, there is an increased interest in identifying cell-surface proteins that could serve as markers for stem cells, progenitor cells, or cells of different lineages. Traditionally, membrane isolation requires multiple centrifugation steps to isolate different organelles based on their density. With the advent of affinity matrix technology, it is possible to separate organelles based on their molecular differences. A defining characteristic of the plasma membrane is that plasma membrane proteins are more extensively glycosylated than are intracellular membrane proteins. As a result, affinity chromatography employing lectin, a carbohydrate-binding protein, is commonly used to isolate plasma membrane proteins. We have extended this concept for plasma membrane isolation by using concanavalin A (ConA), a lectin with mannose specificity. Here we describe a protocol that uses immobilized ConA bound to magnetic beads to isolate plasma membranes from homogenized cell lysates. The captured plasma membrane proteins are then solubilized from the ConA-magnetic beads by detergents in the presence of a competing sugar, methyl α-mannopyranoside.

  8. Dominance relationships among mutant alleles of regulatory gene araC in the Escherichia coli B/R L-arabinose operon.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, D E

    1986-11-01

    The araBAD operon of Escherichia coli B/r is positively and negatively regulated by the araC+ regulatory protein. Mutations in gene araC can result in a variety of different regulatory phenotypes: araC null mutants (those carrying a null allele exhibiting no repressor or activator activity) are unable to achieve operon induction; araC-constitutive (araCc) mutants are partially constitutive, inducible by D-fucose, and resistant to catabolite repression; araCh mutants are hypersensitive to catabolite repression; and araCi mutants are resistant to catabolite repression. Various mutant alleles of gene araC were cloned into a derivative of plasmid pBR322 by in vivo recombination. Various heterozygous araC allelic combinations were constructed by transformation. Analysis of isomerase (araA) specific activity levels under various growth conditions indicated the following dominance relationships with regard to sensitivity to catabolite repression: araCh greater than araC+ greater than (araCc and araCi) greater than araC. It was concluded that the araCh protein may form a repressor complex that is refractory to removal by cyclic AMP receptor protein-cyclic AMP complex. This was interpreted in terms of the known nucleoprotein interactions between ara regulatory proteins and ara regulatory DNA.

  9. Single cell monitoring of growth arrest and morphological changes induced by transfer of wild-type p53 alleles to glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Van Meir, E G; Roemer, K; Diserens, A C; Kikuchi, T; Rempel, S A; Haas, M; Huang, H J; Friedmann, T; de Tribolet, N; Cavenee, W K

    1995-01-01

    Mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the earliest identified genetic lesions during malignant progression of human astrocytomas. To assess the functional significance of these mutations, wild-type (WT) p53 genes were introduced into glioblastoma cell lines having mutant, WT, or null endogenous p53 alleles. Populations of cells with mutant or null endogenous p53 alleles and exogenous WT p53 were spontaneously selected in culture for cells expressing only mutant p53 or no p53, which then displayed a growth and tumorigenic phenotype identical to the parental cells. To determine the phenotypic consequences of WT p53 expression before the occurrence of mutations, we developed a single cell assay to monitor WT p53-dependent transcription activity. Transfer and expression of exogenous WT p53 genes to cells with endogenous mutant or deleted, but not WT, p53 alleles caused growth arrest and morphological changes, including increased cell size and acquisition of multiple nuclei. This supports the hypothesis that genetic lesions of the p53 gene play an important role in the genesis of astrocytomas. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the episomal single cell reporter strategy developed here has potential clinical applications in the rapid screening of patients for germ-line mutations of the p53 gene or any other gene with known targets for transcriptional transactivation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7862624

  10. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  11. Biased gene conversion skews allele frequencies in human populations, increasing the disease burden of recessive alleles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-10-02

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ≈ 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications.

  12. Evidence for an increase in positive surface charge and an increase in susceptibility to trypsin of Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina) on its interaction with galactose, a hapten sugar of the lectin.

    PubMed

    Komano, H; Kurama, T; Nagasawa, Y; Natori, S

    1992-05-15

    When Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina), an insect humoral lectin, was eluted from a column of DEAE-cellulose in the presence of galactose (a hapten sugar of this lectin), it emerged at a lower salt concentration than when galactose was absent. In the presence of galactose the lectin was, in addition, more susceptible to trypsin digestion. The lectin was found to have an affinity for basic proteins such as histone H3 and sarcotoxin IA, but this property was lost in the presence of galactose. These results suggested that the lectin changes its conformation on interaction with galactose. This change is suggested to result in the exposure of some hidden lysine and/or arginine residues.

  13. Evidence for an increase in positive surface charge and an increase in susceptibility to trypsin of Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina) on its interaction with galactose, a hapten sugar of the lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Komano, H; Kurama, T; Nagasawa, Y; Natori, S

    1992-01-01

    When Sarcophaga lectin (from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina), an insect humoral lectin, was eluted from a column of DEAE-cellulose in the presence of galactose (a hapten sugar of this lectin), it emerged at a lower salt concentration than when galactose was absent. In the presence of galactose the lectin was, in addition, more susceptible to trypsin digestion. The lectin was found to have an affinity for basic proteins such as histone H3 and sarcotoxin IA, but this property was lost in the presence of galactose. These results suggested that the lectin changes its conformation on interaction with galactose. This change is suggested to result in the exposure of some hidden lysine and/or arginine residues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:1599400

  14. Glycoconjugates in the mandibular salivary gland of adult dogs revealed by lectin histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pedini, V; Ceccarelli, P; Gargiulo, A M

    1994-11-01

    The glycosidic residues in the mandibular glands of five adult dogs were studied by using seven different lectin-horseradish peroxidase conjugates. In some cases a treatment with sialidase preceded the lectin staining. The mucous acinar cells contained oligosaccharides with alpha- and beta-N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylglucosamine and fucose residues, whereas the demilunar cells contained glycoconjugates rich in sialic acid linked to the penultimate disaccharide galactosyl-(beta 1-->3) N-acetylgalactosamine.

  15. Lectin staining patterns in human gastric mucosae with and without exposure to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Junior, Mario R.; Cavalcanti, Carmelita L.B.; Pontes-Filho, Nicodemos T.; Carvalho Jr, Luiz B.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate qualitative changes in the glycoconjugate expression in human gastric tissue of positive and negative patients for Helicobacter pylori, through lectins: Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) and Concanavalin A (Con A). The lectins recognized differently the glycoconjugates in the superficial mucous layer at the gastric tissues. The results suggest a significant change in the carbohydrate moieties present on the surface of the gastric cells during infection. PMID:24031208

  16. Lectin Binding to the Root and Root Hair Tips of the Tropical Legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, R. W.; Rolfe, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Ten fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins were tested on the roots of the tropical legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb. Four of these (concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Ricinis communis agglutinin I [RCA-I], wheat germ agglutinin) were found to bind to the exterior of root cap cells, the root cap slime, and the channels between epidermal cells in the root elongation zone. One of these lectins, RCA-I, bound to the root hair tips in the mature and emerging hair zones and also to sites at which root hairs were only just emerging. There was no RCA-I binding to immature trichoblasts. Preincubation of these lectins with their hapten sugars eliminated all types of root cell binding. By using a microinoculation technique, preincubation of the root surface with RCA-I lectin was found to inhibit infection and nodulation by Rhizobium spp. Preincubation of the root surface with the RCA-I hapten β-d-galactose or a mixture of RCA-I lectin and its hapten failed to inhibit nodulation. Application of RCA-I lectin to the root surface caused no apparent detrimental effects to the root hair cells and did not prevent the growth of root hairs. The lectin did not prevent Rhizobium sp. motility or viability even after 24 h of incubation. It was concluded that the RCA-I lectin-specific sugar β-d-galactose may be involved in the recognition or early infection stages, or both, in the Rhizobium sp. infection of M. atropurpureum. Images PMID:16346989

  17. Interactions with lectins and agglutination profiles of clinical, food, and environmental isolates of Listeria.

    PubMed Central

    Facinelli, B; Giovanetti, E; Casolari, C; Varaldo, P E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary trials with 14 collection strains of Listeria, five lectins (Canavalia ensiformis, concanavalin A; Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I; Helix pomatia agglutinin; Ricinus communis agglutinin; and Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin) were selected to set up a microtiter agglutination assay. The lectin agglutination profiles of 174 clinical, food, and environmental strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Listeria seeligeri were investigated. Data on the standard determination of the antigenic structure were available for clinical strains; nonclinical isolates were assigned to serogroup 1 or 4 with commercial antisera. The listeria-lectin interaction was related to serological type rather than species; in particular, the strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3a, 3b, and 7 were never agglutinated by G. simplicifolia lectin I. The five-lectin set proved to be capable of detecting differences between serologically identical isolates of L. monocytogenes. Of the 150 isolates of this species, 144 were distributed over 15 different lectin agglutination profiles and 6 autoagglutinated, the overall typeability being 96%. However, the profiles encountered among L. monocytogenes isolates were not randomly distributed. With strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 3b, the clinical isolates fell into only two of the eight patterns recorded overall; with strains of serogroup 4 and serovar 4b, food and environmental isolates were distributed over eight of the nine patterns found in total, while clinical isolates were distributed over five patterns. In a comparative study of 15 epidemiologically relevant isolates of L. monocytogenes from five distinct outbreaks, strains with identical phage types and/or DNA fingerprints displayed identical lectin profiles. The heterogeneity of agglutination profiles may form the basis of a new approach to L. monocytogenes typing

  18. Isolation and antiproliferative activity of Lotus corniculatus lectin towards human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Shaista; Majeed, Rabiya; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Ganai, Bashir Ahmad; Wani, Ishfak; Rakhshanda, Syed; Qurishi, Yasrib; Sharma, P R; Hamid, Abid; Masood, Akbar; Hamid, Rabia

    2013-12-15

    The objective of the study was to investigate the anti cancer activity of a lectin isolated from Lotus corniculatus seeds. A tetrameric 70kDa galactose specific lectin was purified using two step simple purification protocol which involved affinity chromatography on AF-BlueHC650M and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The lectin was adsorbed on AF-BlueHC650M and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 yielded a major peak absorbance that gave two bands of 15kDa and 20kDa in SDS PAGE. Hemagglutination activity was completely preserved, when the temperature was in the range of 20-60°C. However, drastic reduction in activity occurred at temperatures above 60°C. Full hemagglutination activity was retained at ambient pH 4-12. Thereafter no activity was observed above pH 13. Hemaglutination of the lectin was inhibited by d-galactose. The lectin showed a strong antiproliferative activity towards human leukemic (THP-1) cancer cells followed by lung cancer (HOP62) cells and HCT116 with an IC50 of 39μg/ml and 50μg/ml and 60μg/ml respectively. Flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub G0G1 phase confirming that Lotus corniculatus lectin induced apoptosis. Morphological observations showed that Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) treated THP-1 cells displayed apparent apoptosis characteristics such as nuclear fragmentation, appearance of membrane enclosed apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) effectively inhibits the cell migration in a dose dependent manner as indicated by the wound healing assay.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of lectin receptor-like kinases in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yongil; Labbé, Jessy; Muchero, Wellington; Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara S.; Kennedy, Megan; Johnson, Jenifer; Sreedasyam, Avinash; Schmutz, Jeremy; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Chen, Jin -Gui

    2016-09-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) belong to a large protein family with over 600 members in Arabidopsis and over 1000 in rice. Among RLKs, the lectin receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) possess a characteristic extracellular carbohydrate-binding lectin domain and play important roles in plant development and innate immunity. In addition, there are 75 and 173 LecRLKs in Arabidopsis and rice, respectively. However, little is known about LecRLKs in perennial woody plants.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of lectin receptor-like kinases in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Yongil; Labbé, Jessy; Muchero, Wellington; ...

    2016-09-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) belong to a large protein family with over 600 members in Arabidopsis and over 1000 in rice. Among RLKs, the lectin receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) possess a characteristic extracellular carbohydrate-binding lectin domain and play important roles in plant development and innate immunity. In addition, there are 75 and 173 LecRLKs in Arabidopsis and rice, respectively. However, little is known about LecRLKs in perennial woody plants.