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Sample records for lectin null alleles

  1. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  3. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set.

  4. Reliability assessment of null allele detection: inconsistencies between and within different methods.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, M J; Pilot, M; Kruczyk, M; Żmihorski, M; Umer, H M; Gliwicz, J

    2014-03-01

    Microsatellite loci are widely used in population genetic studies, but the presence of null alleles may lead to biased results. Here, we assessed five methods that indirectly detect null alleles and found large inconsistencies among them. Our analysis was based on 20 microsatellite loci genotyped in a natural population of Microtus oeconomus sampled during 8 years, together with 1200 simulated populations without null alleles, but experiencing bottlenecks of varying duration and intensity, and 120 simulated populations with known null alleles. In the natural population, 29% of positive results were consistent between the methods in pairwise comparisons, and in the simulated data set, this proportion was 14%. The positive results were also inconsistent between different years in the natural population. In the null-allele-free simulated data set, the number of false positives increased with increased bottleneck intensity and duration. We also found a low concordance in null allele detection between the original simulated populations and their 20% random subsets. In the populations simulated to include null alleles, between 22% and 42% of true null alleles remained undetected, which highlighted that detection errors are not restricted to false positives. None of the evaluated methods clearly outperformed the others when both false-positive and false-negative rates were considered. Accepting only the positive results consistent between at least two methods should considerably reduce the false-positive rate, but this approach may increase the false-negative rate. Our study demonstrates the need for novel null allele detection methods that could be reliably applied to natural populations.

  5. 'True' null allele detection in microsatellite loci: a comparison of methods, assessment of difficulties and survey of possible improvements.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, M J; Bornelöv, S; Kruczyk, M; Baltzer, N; Komorowski, J

    2015-05-01

    Null alleles are alleles that for various reasons fail to amplify in a PCR assay. The presence of null alleles in microsatellite data is known to bias the genetic parameter estimates. Thus, efficient detection of null alleles is crucial, but the methods available for indirect null allele detection return inconsistent results. Here, our aim was to compare different methods for null allele detection, to explain their respective performance and to provide improvements. We applied several approaches to identify the 'true' null alleles based on the predictions made by five different methods, used either individually or in combination. First, we introduced simulated 'true' null alleles into 240 population data sets and applied the methods to measure their success in detecting the simulated null alleles. The single best-performing method was ML-NullFreq_frequency. Furthermore, we applied different noise reduction approaches to improve the results. For instance, by combining the results of several methods, we obtained more reliable results than using a single one. Rule-based classification was applied to identify population properties linked to the false discovery rate. Rules obtained from the classifier described which population genetic estimates and loci characteristics were linked to the success of each method. We have shown that by simulating 'true' null alleles into a population data set, we may define a null allele frequency threshold, related to a desired true or false discovery rate. Moreover, using such simulated data sets, the expected null allele homozygote frequency may be estimated independently of the equilibrium state of the population.

  6. Frequencies of Null Alleles at Enzyme Loci in Natural Populations of Ponderosa and Red Pine

    PubMed Central

    Allendorf, Fred W.; Knudsen, Kathy L.; Blake, George M.

    1982-01-01

    Pinus ponderosa and P. resinosa population samples have mean frequencies of enzymatically inactive alleles of 0.0031 and 0.0028 at 29 and 27 enzyme loci, respectively. Such alleles are rare and are apparently maintained by selection-mutation balance. Ponderosa pine have much higher amounts of allozymic and polygenic phenotypic variation than red pine, yet both species have similar frequencies of null alleles. Thus, null alleles apparently do not contribute to polygenic variation, as has been suggested. The concordance between allozymic and polygenic variation adds support to the view that allozyme studies may be valuable in predicting the relative amount of polygenic variation in populations. PMID:17246067

  7. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  8. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. JK null alleles identified from Japanese individuals with Jk(a−b−) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Onodera, T; Sasaki, K; Tsuneyama, H; Isa, K; Ogasawara, K; Satake, M; Tadokoro, K; Uchikawa, M

    2014-05-01

    The Kidd blood group system consists of three common phenotypes: Jk(a+b−), Jk(a−b+) and Jk(a+b+), and one rare phenotype, Jk(a−b−). Jka/Jkb polymorphism is associated with c.838G>A (p.Asp280Asn) in exon 9 of the JK (SLC14A1) gene, and the corresponding alleles are named JK*01 and JK*02. The rare phenotype Jk(a−b−) was first found in a Filipina of Spanish and Chinese ancestry, and to date, several JK null alleles responsible for the Jk(a−b−) phenotype have been reported. We report seven novel JK null alleles, 4 with a JK*01 background and 3 with a JK*02 background, identified from Jk(a−b−) Japanese. PMID:24877238

  10. A novel JK null allele associated with typing discrepancies among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Katrina L; Posadas, Jeff B; Moulds, Joann M; Gaur, Lakshmi K

    2013-01-01

    The Jknun (Jk-3) phenotype, attributable to null or silenced alleles, has predominantly been found in persons of Polynesian descent. With the increased use of molecular genotyping, many new silencing mutations have been identified in persons of other ethnic backgrounds. To date, only two JK null alleles have been reported in African Americans, JK*01N.04 and JK*OlN.OS.A comparative study was undertaken to determine whether JK mutations were present in the regional African American population. Results of donor genotyping were compared with previously recorded results of serologic tests, and discrepant results were investigated. Although the two previously identified polymorphisms were not detected in the discrepant samples, a novel allele (191G>A) was identified and was assigned the ISBT number JK*02N.09. This study illustrates a limitation of using single-nucleotide polymorphisms for prediction of blood group antigens. PMID:24689685

  11. Incidence and origin of [open quotes]Null[close quotes] alleles in the (AC)n microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, D.F.,; Thompson, A.D.; Shen, Y.; Phillips, H.A.; Richards, R.I.; Mulley, J.C.; Sutherland, G.R. )

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-three (AC)n repeat markers from chromosome 16 were typed in the parents of the 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families. Where parents were informative, the entire families were then typed. There were seven markers in which null alleles were demonstrated, as recognized by the apparent noninheritance, by a sib, of a parental allele. Four of these markers showed a null allele in a single sibship, while in the other three at least 30% of the CEPH sibships were shown to have a null allele segregating. One null allele was sequenced and shown to be the result of an 8-bp deletion occurring within the priming sequence for PCR amplification of the (AC)n repeats. In gene mapping or in application to diagnosis, the presence of a segregating null allele will not corrupt the linkage data but could result in loss of information. In isolated instances a segregating null allele may be interpreted as nonpaternity. The presence of a null allele may generate misleading data when individuals are haplotyped to determine the presence of linkage disequilibrium with a disease gene. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Increased prevalence of mutant null alleles that cause hereditary fructose intolerance in the American population

    PubMed Central

    Coffee, Erin M.; Yerkes, Laura; Ewen, Elizabeth P.; Zee, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the aldolase B gene (ALDOB) impairing enzyme activity toward fructose-1-phosphate cleavage cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Diagnosis of the disease is possible by identifying known mutant ALDOB alleles in suspected patients; however, the frequencies of mutant alleles can differ by population. Here, 153 American HFI patients with 268 independent alleles were analyzed to identify the prevalence of seven known HFI-causing alleles (A149P, A174D, N334K, Δ4E4, R59Op, A337V, and L256P) in this population. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from these patients. In the American population, the missense mutations A149P and A174D are the two most common alleles, with frequencies of 44% and 9%, respectively. In addition, the nonsense mutations Δ4E4 and R59Op are the next most common alleles, with each having a frequency of 4%. Together, the frequencies of all seven alleles make up 65% of HFI-causing alleles in this population. Worldwide, these same alleles make up 82% of HFI-causing mutations. This difference indicates that screening for common HFI alleles is more difficult in the American population. Nevertheless, a genetic screen for diagnosing HFI in America can be improved by including all seven alleles studied here. Lastly, identification of HFI patients presenting with classic symptoms and who have homozygous null genotypes indicates that aldolase B is not required for proper development or metabolic maintenance. PMID:20033295

  13. Molecular identification of rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles in Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Manfroi, Silvia; Scarcello, Antonio; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo

    2015-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies on Duffy blood group antigens have identified mutations underlying rare FY*Null and FY*X alleles. FY*Null has a high frequency in Blacks, especially from sub-Saharan Africa, while its frequency is not defined in Caucasians. FY*X allele, associated with Fy(a-b+w) phenotype, has a frequency of 2-3.5% in Caucasian people while it is absent in Blacks. During the project of extensive blood group genotyping in patients affected by hemoglobinopathies, we identified FY*X/FY*Null and FY*A/FY*Null genotypes in a Caucasian thalassemic family from Sardinia. We speculate on the frequency of FY*X and FY*Null alleles in Caucasian and Black people; further, we focused on the association of FY*X allele with weak Fyb antigen expression on red blood cells and its identification performing high sensitivity serological typing methods or genotyping.

  14. Marker assisted accelerated introgression of null allele of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Rani, Anita; Rawal, Reena; Mourya, Vaishali

    2015-01-01

    Development of kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI)-free soybean is crucial for soy-food industry as the heat inactivation employed to inactivate the anti-nutritional factor in regular soybean incurs extra cost and affects protein solubility. In the presented work, a null allele of KTI from PI542044 was introgressed into cultivar ‘JS97-52’ (recurrent parent) through marker assisted backcrossing. Foreground selection in BC1F2, BC2F2 and BC3F2 was carried out using the null allele-specific marker in tandem with SSR marker Satt228, tightly linked with a trypsin inhibitor Ti locus. Background selection in null allele-carrying plants through 106 polymorphic SSR markers across the genome led to the identification of 9 KTI-free lines exhibiting 98.6% average recurrent parent genome content (RPGC) after three backcrosses, which otherwise had required 5–6 backcrosses through conventional method. Introgressed lines (ILs) were free from KTI and yielded at par with recurrent parent. Reduction of 68.8–83.5% in trypsin inhibitor content (TIC) in ILs compared to the recurrent parent (‘JS97-52’) was attributed to the elimination of KTI. PMID:26719748

  15. Identification of null alleles and deletions from SNP genotypes for an intercross between domestic and wild chickens.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Lucy; Carlborg, Örjan; Marklund, Stefan; Johansson, Anna M

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed genotypes from ~10K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two families of an F2 intercross between Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn chickens. Possible null alleles were found by patterns of incompatible and missing genotypes. We estimated that 2.6% of SNPs had null alleles compared with 2.3% with genotyping errors and that 40% of SNPs in which a parent and offspring were genotyped as different homozygotes had null alleles. Putative deletions were identified by null alleles at adjacent markers. We found two candidate deletions that were supported by fluorescence intensity data from a 60K SNP chip. One of the candidate deletions was from the Red Junglefowl, and one was present in both the Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn. Both candidate deletions spanned protein-coding regions and were close to a previously detected quantitative trait locus affecting body weight in this population. This study demonstrates that the ~50K SNP genotyping arrays now available for several agricultural species can be used to identify null alleles and deletions in data from large families. We suggest that our approach could be a useful complement to linkage analysis in experimental crosses. PMID:23708300

  16. Identification of null alleles and deletions from SNP genotypes for an intercross between domestic and wild chickens.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Lucy; Carlborg, Örjan; Marklund, Stefan; Johansson, Anna M

    2013-08-07

    We analyzed genotypes from ~10K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two families of an F2 intercross between Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn chickens. Possible null alleles were found by patterns of incompatible and missing genotypes. We estimated that 2.6% of SNPs had null alleles compared with 2.3% with genotyping errors and that 40% of SNPs in which a parent and offspring were genotyped as different homozygotes had null alleles. Putative deletions were identified by null alleles at adjacent markers. We found two candidate deletions that were supported by fluorescence intensity data from a 60K SNP chip. One of the candidate deletions was from the Red Junglefowl, and one was present in both the Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn. Both candidate deletions spanned protein-coding regions and were close to a previously detected quantitative trait locus affecting body weight in this population. This study demonstrates that the ~50K SNP genotyping arrays now available for several agricultural species can be used to identify null alleles and deletions in data from large families. We suggest that our approach could be a useful complement to linkage analysis in experimental crosses.

  17. A robust statistical method to detect null alleles in microsatellite and SNP datasets in both panmictic and inbred populations.

    PubMed

    Girard, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Null alleles are common technical artifacts in genetic-based analysis. Powerful methods enabling their detection in either panmictic or inbred populations have been proposed. However, none of these methods appears unbiased in both types of mating systems, necessitating a priori knowledge of the inbreeding level of the population under study. To counter this problem, I propose to use the software FDist2 to detect the atypical fixation indices that characterize markers with null alleles. The rational behind this approach and the parameter settings are explained. The power of the method for various sample sizes, degrees of inbreeding and null allele frequencies is evaluated using simulated microsatellite and SNP datasets and then compared to two other null allele detection methods. The results clearly show the robustness of the method proposed here as well as its greater accuracy in both panmictic and inbred populations for both types of marker. By allowing a proper detection of null alleles for a wide range of mating systems and markers, this new method is particularly appealing for numerous genetic studies using co-dominant loci. PMID:21381434

  18. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kasthurinaidu, Senthilkumar Pitchalu; Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra; Dave, Dhvani Kirtikumar; Adroja, Divya Anantray

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs.

  19. GST M1-T1 null Allele Frequency Patterns in Geographically Assorted Human Populations: A Phylogenetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs. PMID:25867025

  20. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kasthurinaidu, Senthilkumar Pitchalu; Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra; Dave, Dhvani Kirtikumar; Adroja, Divya Anantray

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs. PMID:25867025

  1. Frequency of null allele of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) locus in subjects to recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Nazila; Mosaferi, Elnaz; Farzadi, Laya; Majidi, Jafar; Monfaredan, Amir; Yousefi, Bahman; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class I molecule highly expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells. Due to a single base pair deletion, its function can be compensated by other isoforms. Investigating the frequency of null allele in Recurrent Miscarriage (RM) subjects could be useful in understanding the relationship between frequency of this allele and RM in a given population. Objective: This study aimed to determine the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele and its potential association with down-regulation of HLA-G in subjects with RM. Materials and Methods: Western blotting was used to assess the level of HLA-G protein expression. For investigating the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele in RM subjects, PCR-RFLP method was used. Exon 3 of HLA-G gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PpuM-1 enzyme was employed to digest the PCR products and fragments were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Results: Digestion using restriction enzyme showed the presence of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele in 10% of the test population. Western blotting results confirmed the decrease in expression of HLA-G in the placental tissue of subjects with RM compared to subjects who could give normal birth. Conclusion: The frequency of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele was high to some extent in subjects with RM. The mutation rate in subjects suggested that there is a significant association between RM and frequency of mutations in this allele. PMID:27525330

  2. Inheritance of 15 microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: segregation and null allele identification for linkage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Guo, Ximing; Zhang, Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Microsatellites were screened in a backcross family of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Fifteen microsatellite loci were distinguishable and polymorphic with 6 types of allele-combinations. Null alleles were detected in 46.7% of loci, accounting for 11.7% of the total alleles. Four loci did not segregate in Mendelian Ratios. Three linkage groups were identified among 7 of the 15 segregating loci. Fluorescence-based automated capillary electrophoresis (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer) that used to detect the microsatellite loci, has been proved a fast, precise, and reliable method in microsatellite genotyping.

  3. Linkage disequilibrium between a 5q13 microsatellite null allele and SMA indicates complex but stable deletions/duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Surhk, L.C.; Aubry, H.L.; MacKenzie, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    SMA is a recessively inherited degeneration of alpha motor neurons presenting in three distinct types with diverse onsets ranging from infancy (type I) to childhood (types II and III). All forms have been mapped to chromosome 5q13.1. We have developed PCR primers for two distinct microsatellite repeats (MSR), CATT-40G1 and CATT-192F7. These subloci are constituents of a previously reported 5q13.1 complex CA dinucleotide MSR, CATT-1, with four or more copies per chromosome. Type 1 SMA families (n=35) were examined because stricter clinical criteria permitted greater diagnostic accuracy and, possibly, greater mutational homogeneity. One allele per chromosome is amplified with the 40G1 and 192F7 subloci-specific primers out of a total of 3 and 7 possible alleles, respectively. Significant linkage disequilibrium was observed between the disease phenotype and the 40G1 null allele ({chi}{sup 2}=38.23) and 192F7 allele with 19 CA repeats ({chi}{sup 2}=6.62) in contrast to two markers D5S435 ({chi}{sup 2}=.42) and D5S351 ({chi}{sup 2}=.16), which have been shown to flank the SMA locus at less than 1% recombination. The null alleles present in both subloci appeared to be due to stable deletions rather than isolated DNA sequence polymorphisms. In contrast to recent reports, no evidence of de novo rearrangements were observed. Furthermore, duplications of these subloci have been observed in three normal chromosomes. Our data are consistent with unequal cross-overs generating deletions/duplications which not only account for the complexity being observed in the genomic walk within the critical SMA region, but could also be causally related SMA mutations. Results of similar linkage disequilibrium analyses employing 3 additional 5q13.1 microsatellites will also be presented.

  4. Discrimination of HLA null and low expression alleles by cytokine-induced secretion of recombinant soluble HLA.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Jan; Figueiredo, Constança; Hirv, Kaimo; Mytilineos, Joannis; Blasczyk, Rainer; Horn, Peter A; Eiz-Vesper, Britta

    2009-04-01

    The disruption of disulfide bridges can decrease or abolish the cell surface expression of HLA class I molecules. Such disulfide bridges are formed by cysteine residues between amino acid (aa) positions 101/164 (alpha(2) domain) and 203/259 (alpha(3) domain). Sequence alterations in codons 101, 164, 203 and 259 have been observed in eleven HLA-A molecules. All of these variants except of A*3014L and A*3211Q have been reported to result in null expression alleles. In the case of HLA-A*3014L, a transversion at nucleotide position 563 replaces cysteine by serine at position 164 of the mature polypeptide. HLA-A*3014L is not detectable by standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. To verify low or non-expression of this allele, we cloned soluble HLA-A*3014L and the reference allele HLA-A*3001 into a eukaryotic expression vector and transfected K562, C1R and HEK293 cells. Expression of soluble HLA-A*3014L and HLA-A*3001 was measured in the supernatants of transfected and untransfected cells incubated with or without IFN-gamma and/or TNF-alpha using a W6/32 and anti-beta(2)-microglobulin-based sandwich ELISA. Expression of mRNA transcripts of both alleles was determined by real-time RT-PCR. HLA-A*3014L was not detected in the supernatant of unstimulated transfectants. Stimulation with IFN-gamma and/or TNF-alpha led to an increase of HLA-A*3014L secretion to a detectable level and increased HLA-A*3001 expression up to 8-fold, but did not show any difference in the increase of mRNA levels between HLA-A*3014L and A*3001. Because of this lack of any difference in the mRNA transcription, the protein expression defect is most likely caused by the missing disulfide bond formation in the alpha2 domain. Thus, exposing the cells to cytokine stress allows to distinguish between low- and non-expressed alleles and to classify alleles with a questionable expression pattern (Q alleles). Classifying HLA alleles in expressed and non-expressed variants is essential for matching assessments

  5. Forensic potential of the STR DXYS156 in Mexican populations: inference of X-linked allele null.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, M; Martínez-Cortes, G; Páez-Riberos, L A; Sandoval, L; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Ceballos-Quintal, J M; Pinto-Escalante, D; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2006-01-01

    The pentanucleotide STR (TAAAA)n DXYS156 offers advantages for genetic identity testing. In addition to establish the gender, DXYS156 expands the DNA profile and is able to indicate the possible geographic origin of the individual. We analyzed DXYS156 in 757 individuals of both sexes from Mexican populations. We studied the cosmopolitan Mestizo population and six Mexican ethnic groups: Tarahumaras, Purépechas, Nahuas, Mayas, Huicholes and Mezcala Indians. The six shorter (4-10) and the three larger alleles (11-13) were specific for the X and Y-chromosomes, respectively. A random distribution of alleles into genotypes was observed in males and females from each population. We estimated the power of exclusion for paternity testing according to the son's gender, and the power of discrimination in forensic casework. In addition, we detected a relatively high frequency of an X-linked allele null, principally in Mexican-Mestizos (3.6%), which must be considered when DXYS156 be applied for identification purposes.

  6. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I: Molecular heterogeneity for COL1A1 null alleles of type I collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Pitts, S.H.; Arikat, H.; Roberts, E.J.; Scott, D.A.; Slayton, R.L.; Byers, P.H.

    1994-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of inherited brittle-bone disease. Dermal fibroblasts from most affected individuals produce about half the usual amount of type I procollagen, as a result of a COL1A1 {open_quotes}null{close_quotes} allele. Using PCR amplification of genomic DNA from affected individuals, followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and SSCP, we identified seven different COL1A1 gene mutations in eight unrelated families with OI type I. Three families have single nucleotide substitutions that alter 5{prime} donor splice sites; two of these unrelated families have the same mutation. One family has a point mutation, in an exon, that creates a premature termination codon, and four have small deletions or insertions, within exons, that create translational frameshifts and new termination codons downstream of the mutation sites. Each mutation leads to both marked reduction in steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant allele and a quantitative decrease in type I procollagen production. Our data demonstrate that different molecular mechanisms that have the same effect on type I collagen production result in the same clinical phenotype. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. [Inheritance and phenotype expression of functional and null alleles of aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) in diploid wheats].

    PubMed

    Konovalov, A A; Shundrina, I K; Karpova, E V; Nefedov, A A; Goncharov, N P

    2014-11-01

    Functional F and null 0 alleles of the CAD1 (Aadh1) gene, which controls the biosynthesis of aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase, were studied in hybrids of the diploid wheat T. monococcum L. and Triticum sinskajae A.Filat. et Kurk. The gene CAD1 is located in chromosome 5A and is linked with the awnless gene awnS (La) with a recombination frequency of about 32%. Plants with genotypes FF, F0, and 00 were significantly different in the height and mechanical strength of the stalk (culm). The elastic limit of the culm tissues of plants FF was considerably higher than in 00 plants. F0 heterozygotes had intermediate values. The thickness of the wall of the sclerenchyma was thinner in plants with genotype 00. The chemical structure of lignin of plants with the functional CAD allele contained units of a phloroglucinol series missing in the mutant plants. The CAD genotypes had no effect on the relative content of cellulose and lignin in stalks ofdiploid wheat and insignificantly influenced the ratio of H :G : S units in the lignin structure, as well as some components of extractives. PMID:25739284

  8. Efficiency of the inbreeding coefficient f and other estimators in detecting null alleles, as revealed by empirical data of locus oke3 across 65 populations of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymorphic DNA markers, e.g. mini- or microsatellite (SSR) loci, are often removed from data analyses if an excess of homozygosity, presumably an indication of null alleles, is observed. However, exclusion of such loci can reduce available information if multiple loci carry null alleles. Because nu...

  9. Homozygosity and Heterozygosity for Null Col5a2 Alleles Produce Embryonic Lethality and a Novel Classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Related Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Phillips, Charlotte L; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Roenneburg, Drew A; Kernien, John F; Adams, Sheila M; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Birk, David E; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2015-07-01

    Null alleles for the COL5A1 gene and missense mutations for COL5A1 or the COL5A2 gene underlie cases of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, characterized by fragile, hyperextensible skin and hypermobile joints. However, no classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome case has yet been associated with COL5A2 null alleles, and phenotypes that might result from such alleles are unknown. We describe mice with null alleles for the Col5a2. Col5a2(-/-) homozygosity is embryonic lethal at approximately 12 days post conception. Unlike previously described mice null for Col5a1, which die at 10.5 days post conception and virtually lack collagen fibrils, Col5a2(-/-) embryos have readily detectable collagen fibrils, thicker than in wild-type controls. Differences in Col5a2(-/-) and Col5a1(-/-) fibril formation and embryonic survival suggest that α1(V)3 homotrimers, a rare collagen V isoform that occurs in the absence of sufficient levels of α2(V) chains, serve functional roles that partially compensate for loss of the most common collagen V isoform. Col5a2(+/-) adults have skin with marked hyperextensibility and reduced tensile strength at high strain but not at low strain. Col5a2(+/-) adults also have aortas with increased compliance and reduced tensile strength. Results thus suggest that COL5A2(+/-) humans, although unlikely to present with frank classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, are likely to have fragile connective tissues with increased susceptibility to trauma and certain chronic pathologic conditions.

  10. Homozygosity and Heterozygosity for Null Col5a2 Alleles Produce Embryonic Lethality and a Novel Classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Related Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Phillips, Charlotte L; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Roenneburg, Drew A; Kernien, John F; Adams, Sheila M; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Birk, David E; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2015-07-01

    Null alleles for the COL5A1 gene and missense mutations for COL5A1 or the COL5A2 gene underlie cases of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, characterized by fragile, hyperextensible skin and hypermobile joints. However, no classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome case has yet been associated with COL5A2 null alleles, and phenotypes that might result from such alleles are unknown. We describe mice with null alleles for the Col5a2. Col5a2(-/-) homozygosity is embryonic lethal at approximately 12 days post conception. Unlike previously described mice null for Col5a1, which die at 10.5 days post conception and virtually lack collagen fibrils, Col5a2(-/-) embryos have readily detectable collagen fibrils, thicker than in wild-type controls. Differences in Col5a2(-/-) and Col5a1(-/-) fibril formation and embryonic survival suggest that α1(V)3 homotrimers, a rare collagen V isoform that occurs in the absence of sufficient levels of α2(V) chains, serve functional roles that partially compensate for loss of the most common collagen V isoform. Col5a2(+/-) adults have skin with marked hyperextensibility and reduced tensile strength at high strain but not at low strain. Col5a2(+/-) adults also have aortas with increased compliance and reduced tensile strength. Results thus suggest that COL5A2(+/-) humans, although unlikely to present with frank classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, are likely to have fragile connective tissues with increased susceptibility to trauma and certain chronic pathologic conditions. PMID:25987251

  11. Identification of a null allele in genetic tests for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency in Pakistani Bos indicus × Bos taurus cattle.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, Fozia; Malik, Naveed A; Qureshi, Javed A; Raadsma, Herman W; Tammen, Imke

    2012-12-01

    Two clinically healthy mature Pakistani Bos indicus × Bos taurus cattle were genotyped as homozygous affected for the lethal immunodeficiency disorder bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) using previously described PCR-RFLP based DNA tests which was confirmed by sequencing. Sequencing of Bos taurus and B. indicus × B. taurus genomic DNA surrounding the disease causing mutation (c.383A > G) in the ITGB2 gene identified numerous variations in exonic and intronic regions within and between species, including substantial variation in primer annealing sites for three PCR-RFLP tests for one of the B. indicus allelic variants. These variations in the primer annealing sites resulted in a null allele in the DNA tests causing the misdiagnosis of some heterozygous B. taurus × B. indicus cattle to be classified as homozygous affected. New primers were designed and a modified test was developed which simultaneously identified the disease mutation and the Pakistani B. indicus allelic variant associated with the null allele in the previous test. PMID:22374219

  12. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle. PMID:27048647

  13. Characterization of a New Pink-Fruited Tomato Mutant Results in the Identification of a Null Allele of the SlMYB12 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Tzfadia, Oren; Forment, Javier; Presa, Silvia; Rogachev, Ilana; Meir, Sagit; Orzaez, Diego; Aharoni, Aspah; Granell, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The identification and characterization of new tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants affected in fruit pigmentation and nutritional content can provide valuable insights into the underlying biology, as well as a source of new alleles for breeding programs. To date, all characterized pink-pigmented tomato fruit mutants appear to result from low SlMYB12 transcript levels in the fruit skin. Two new mutant lines displaying a pink fruit phenotype (pf1 and pf2) were characterized in this study. In the pf mutants, SlMYB12 transcripts accumulated to wild-type levels but exhibited the same truncation, which resulted in the absence of the essential MYB activation domain coding region. Allelism and complementation tests revealed that both pf mutants were allelic to the y locus and showed the same recessive null allele in homozygosis: Δy A set of molecular and metabolic effects, reminiscent of those observed in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myb11 myb12 myb111 triple mutant, were found in the tomato Δy mutants. To our knowledge, these have not been described previously, and our data support the idea of their being null mutants, in contrast to previously described transcriptional hypomorphic pink fruit lines. We detected a reduction in the expression of several flavonol glycosides and some associated glycosyl transferases. Transcriptome analysis further revealed that the effects of the pf mutations extended beyond the flavonoid pathway into the interface between primary and secondary metabolism. Finally, screening for Myb-binding sites in the candidate gene promoter sequences revealed that 141 of the 152 co-down-regulated genes may be direct targets of SlMYB12 regulation. PMID:27208285

  14. Characterization of a New Pink-Fruited Tomato Mutant Results in the Identification of a Null Allele of the SlMYB12 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Tzfadia, Oren; Forment, Javier; Presa, Silvia; Rogachev, Ilana; Meir, Sagit; Orzaez, Diego; Aharoni, Aspah; Granell, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The identification and characterization of new tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants affected in fruit pigmentation and nutritional content can provide valuable insights into the underlying biology, as well as a source of new alleles for breeding programs. To date, all characterized pink-pigmented tomato fruit mutants appear to result from low SlMYB12 transcript levels in the fruit skin. Two new mutant lines displaying a pink fruit phenotype (pf1 and pf2) were characterized in this study. In the pf mutants, SlMYB12 transcripts accumulated to wild-type levels but exhibited the same truncation, which resulted in the absence of the essential MYB activation domain coding region. Allelism and complementation tests revealed that both pf mutants were allelic to the y locus and showed the same recessive null allele in homozygosis: Δy A set of molecular and metabolic effects, reminiscent of those observed in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myb11 myb12 myb111 triple mutant, were found in the tomato Δy mutants. To our knowledge, these have not been described previously, and our data support the idea of their being null mutants, in contrast to previously described transcriptional hypomorphic pink fruit lines. We detected a reduction in the expression of several flavonol glycosides and some associated glycosyl transferases. Transcriptome analysis further revealed that the effects of the pf mutations extended beyond the flavonoid pathway into the interface between primary and secondary metabolism. Finally, screening for Myb-binding sites in the candidate gene promoter sequences revealed that 141 of the 152 co-down-regulated genes may be direct targets of SlMYB12 regulation.

  15. Detection and characterization by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of a goat beta-casein associated with a CSN2 null allele.

    PubMed

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Galliano, Francesco; Muccilli, Vera; Saletti, Rosaria; Marletta, Donata; Bordonaro, Salvatore; Foti, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    The identification and characterization of a truncated goat beta-casein, associated with a null beta-casein allele (CSN2(O')), is reported. The truncated beta-casein predicted at the DNA level (NCBI Acc. No. CAB39313) but never observed at the protein level, here named beta-casein O, was detected as a minor component in a goat milk sample from an autochthonous breed from southern Italy, 'Rossa Mediterranea', by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC/ESI-MS). The ESI mass spectrum of the intact beta-casein O determined an M(r) value of 18 780 Da (calculated 18 781.5). Characterization of the amino acid sequence, performed by coupling trypsin digestion with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), RP-HPLC/ESI-MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), demonstrated that the amino acid sequence corresponds to the 1-166 sequence of mature beta-casein variant A (Acc. No. P33048), thus confirming that the protein is coded by the null allele CSN2(O'), characterized by a transition (C --> T) at the 373rd nucleotide of the 7th exon of the gene, which generates a premature stop codon in position 182.

  16. Mechanisms for dominance: Adh heterodimer formation in heterozygotes between ENU or x-ray induced null alleles and normal alleles in drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.C.; Lee, W.R.; Chang, S.H.; Silverman, H. )

    1992-01-01

    To study mechanisms for dominance of phenotype, eight ENU- and four x-ray-induced mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus were analyzed for partial dominance in their interaction with normal alleles. All ENU and one of the x-ray mutations were single base substitutions; the other three x-ray mutations were 9-21 base deletions. All but one of the 12 mutant alleles were selected for this study because they produced detectable mutant polypeptides, but seven of the 11 producing a peptide could not form dimers with the normal peptide and the enzyme activity of heterozygotes was about half that of normal homozygotes. Four mutations formed dimers with a decreased catalytic efficiency and two of these were near the limit of detectability; these two also inhibited the formation of normal homodimers. The mutant alleles therefore show multiple mechanisms leading to partial enzyme expression in heterozygotes and a wide range of dominance ranging from almost complete recessive to nearly dominant. All amino acid changes in mutant peptides that form dimers are located between amino acids 182 and 194, so this region is not critical for dimerization. It may, however, be an important surface domain for catalyzation. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Identification of novel functional null allele of SLC26A4 associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct and its possible implication.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Jinsei; Kim, Ah Reum; Cho, Young Mi; Kim, Min Young; Lee, Sang Yeon; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene, which encodes pendrin, cause congenital hearing loss as a manifestation of Pendred syndrome (PS) with an iodide organification defect or nonsyndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (NSEVA, DFNB4). There have been reports of differences between PS and NSEVA, including their auditory phenotypes and molecular genetic bases. For appropriate genetic diagnosis and counseling, it is important to functionally characterize SLC26A4 variants. In this study, we identified and evaluated a novel null mutation of SLC26A4 and report our method of assessing the pathogenic potential of mutations in SLC26A4, one of the most frequent causative genes of deafness in humans. A 3-year-old female with progressive sensorineural hearing loss and her parents were recruited. They underwent clinical, audiological, radiological and genetic evaluations, which revealed that the female patient had an enlarged vestibular aqueduct and an incomplete partition type II anomaly in the cochlea bilaterally. Sanger sequencing of the SLC26A4 gene was also performed. For a confirmatory genetic diagnosis, we first characterized the anion/base exchange ability of mutant pendrin products in HEK 293 cells and, if necessary, evaluated whether the mutant pendrin traffics to the plasma membrane in COS-7 cells. We also expressed a null function mutant, p.H723R, and a previously documented polymorphism, p.P542R, as controls. The pure tone average was 66 dB HL in the right ear and 75 dB HL in the left ear. Sequencing of SLC26A4 revealed a known pathogenic mutation (p.H723R) and a novel missense variant (p.V510D) as a compound heterozygote. When we expressed the p.V510D mutant pendrin in mammalian cells, the rate constants for Cl-/HCO3- exchange were 10.96±4.79% compared with those of wild-type pendrin. This figure was comparable to that of p.H723R, indicating p.V510D to be another pathogenic mutation with a null function. The p.V510D pendrin product was shown to be entrapped in the

  18. Neurobiological effects of a null mutation depend on genetic context: comparison between two hotfoot alleles of the delta-2 ionotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Lalouette, A; Lohof, A; Sotelo, C; Guénet, J; Mariani, J

    2001-01-01

    Hotfoot is a mutant mouse with an ataxic phenotype which has been shown to be due to a mutation in the Grid2 gene. In this paper, we compare molecular, morphological, electrophysiological and behavioral features of two Grid2 alleles: Grid2(ho-4J) and Grid2(ho-Nancy). We first show that these two mutations are deletions in the open reading frame of the gene and that no GRID2 protein is detectable in extracts of mutant cerebella, suggesting that the two alleles are null-like mutations. Morphological and electrophysiological analyses reveal no obvious differences between the two strains: both strains showed the naked Purkinje dendritic spines and mismatch between the length of the presynaptic active zone and postsynaptic differentiation characteristic of the hotfoot mutation; and the same low level (20%) of multiple climbing fiber innervation of Purkinje cells was found in both strains. Only differences in motor behavior were found between the two strains. The Grid2(ho-4J) mouse shows more severe ataxia that the Grid2(ho-Nancy) mouse and, although both strains show a clear capacity to improve their performance of a motor task with training, the Grid2(ho-4J) performance remains very poor whereas Grid2(ho-Nancy) mice approach control levels. The only difference between the two strains is their genetic background. Our results show that the genetic background must be taken into account when analyzing sensorimotor performances of mutant mice.

  19. Population genetics for 23 Y-STR loci in Tibetan in China and confirmation of DYS448 null allele.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yi; Gao, Jingshang; Fan, Guangyao; Liao, Linchuan; Hou, Yiping

    2015-05-01

    Tibetan is one of 56 ethnic groups in China, where a level of genetic sub-structure might be expected. Although a global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci and Y-STR databases with PPY23 kit were created with collaborative effort, there was a lack of data for Tibetan population. In this study we evaluated 248 unrelated male individuals of Chinese Tibetan living in the Tibet Autonomous Region to explore the underlying genetic structure of Tibetan populations. These samples were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) by using PPY23 kit. A total of 224 different haplotypes were found. Haplotype diversity was 0.9990. Both Rst pairwise analyses and multidimensional scaling plot showed the genetic structure of Tibetan population was significantly different from some of Chinese ethnic groups and neighboring populations. There were few interesting null features at DYS448 observed by PPY23 that deserved some comment. It revealed that PPY23 marker set provided substantially stronger discriminatory power in Tibetan population. PMID:25524635

  20. Combination of null alleles with 7+9 allelic pair at Glu-B1 locus on the long arm of group 1 chromosome improves wheat dough functionality for tortillas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deletion of one or more high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) alleles reduces gluten strength in a way that may be beneficial for tortilla quality. Wheat lines in which one or more of the HMW-GS alleles were absent from Glu-A1, Glu-B1 or Glu-D1 locus (deletion lines) were compared with non...

  1. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1)/Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melissa B; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  2. Characterization of null and hypomorphic alleles of the Drosophila l(2)dtl/cdt2 gene: Larval lethality and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Roketa S; Swanson, Christina I; Gavilano, Lily; Smith, Kristen N; Malek, Pamela Y; Snow-Smith, Mayronne; Duronio, Robert J; Key, S Catherine Silver

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila lethal(2)denticleless (l(2)dtl) gene was originally reported as essential for embryogenesis and formation of the rows of tiny hairs on the larval ventral cuticle known as denticle belts. It is now well-established that l(2)dtl (also called cdt2) encodes a subunit of a Cullin 4-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that targets a number of key cell cycle regulatory proteins, including p21, Cdt1, E2F1 and Set8, to prevent replication defects and maintain cell cycle control. To investigate the role of l(2)dtl/cdt2 during development, we characterized existing l(2)dtl/cdt2 mutants and generated new deletion alleles, using P-element excision mutagenesis. Surprisingly, homozygous l(2)dtl/cdt2 mutant embryos developed beyond embryogenesis, had intact denticle belts, and lacked an observable embryonic replication defect. These mutants died during larval stages, affirming that loss of l(2)dtl/cdt2 function is lethal. Our data show that L(2)dtl/Cdt2 is maternally deposited, remains nuclear throughout the cell cycle, and has a previously unreported, elevated expression in the developing gonads. We also find that E2f1 regulates l(2)dtl/cdt2 expression during embryogenesis, possibly via several highly conserved putative E2f1 binding sites near the l(2)dtl/cdt2 promoter. Finally, hypomorphic allele combinations of the l(2)dtl/cdt2 gene result in a novel phenotype: viable, low-fertility males. We conclude that "denticleless" is a misnomer, but that l(2)dtl/cdt2 is an essential gene for Drosophila development.

  3. Maize beta-glucosidase-aggregating factor is a polyspecific jacalin-related chimeric lectin, and its lectin domain is responsible for beta-glucosidase aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kittur, Farooqahmed S; Lalgondar, Mallikarjun; Yu, Hyun Young; Bevan, David R; Esen, Asim

    2007-03-01

    In certain maize genotypes, called "null," beta-glucosidase does not enter gels and therefore cannot be detected on zymograms after electrophoresis. Such genotypes were originally thought to be homozygous for a null allele at the glu1 gene and thus devoid of enzyme. We have shown that a beta-glucosidase-aggregating factor (BGAF) is responsible for the "null" phenotype. BGAF is a chimeric protein consisting of two distinct domains: the disease response or "dirigent" domain and the jacalin-related lectin (JRL) domain. First, it was not known whether the lectin domain in BGAF is functional. Second, it was not known which of the two BGAF domains is involved in beta-glucosidase binding and aggregation. To this end, we purified BGAF to homogeneity from a maize null inbred line called H95. The purified protein gave a single band on SDS-PAGE, and the native protein was a homodimer of 32-kDa monomers. Native and recombinant BGAF (produced in Escherichia coli) agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, and various carbohydrates and glycoproteins inhibited their hemagglutination activity. Sugars did not have any effect on the binding of BGAF to the beta-glucosidase isozyme 1 (Glu1), and the BGAF-Glu1 complex could still bind lactosyl-agarose, indicating that the sugar-binding site of BGAF is distinct from the beta-glucosidase-binding site. Neither the dirigent nor the JRL domains alone (produced separately in E. coli) produced aggregates of Glu1 based on results from pull-down assays. However, gel shift and competitive binding assays indicated that the JRL domain binds beta-glucosidase without causing it to aggregate. These results with those from deletion mutagenesis and replacement of the JRL domain of a BGAF homolog from sorghum, which does not bind Glu1, with that from maize allowed us to conclude that the JRL domain of BGAF is responsible for its lectin and beta-glucosidase binding and aggregating activities. PMID:17210577

  4. Null alleles of the COL5A1 gene of type V collagen are a cause of the classical forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (types I and II).

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, U; Atkinson, M; Hoffman, G G; Greenspan, D S; Byers, P H

    2000-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) types I and II, which comprise the classical variety, are well characterized from the clinical perspective, but it has been difficult to identify the molecular basis of the disorder in the majority of affected individuals. Several explanations for this failure to detect mutations have been proposed, including genetic heterogeneity, failure of allele expression, and technical difficulties. Genetic heterogeneity has been confirmed as an explanation for such failure, since causative mutations have been identified in the COL5A1, COL5A2, and tenascin X genes and since they have been inferred in the COL1A2 gene. Nonetheless, in the majority of families with autosomal dominant inheritance of EDS, there appears to be linkage to loci that contain the COL5A1 or COL5A2 genes. To determine whether allele-product instability could explain failure to identify some mutations, we analyzed polymorphic variants in the COL5A1 gene in 16 individuals, and we examined mRNA for the expression of both alleles and for alterations in splicing. We found a splice-site mutation in a single individual, and we determined that, in six individuals, the mRNA from one COL5A1 allele either was not expressed or was very unstable. We identified small insertions or deletions in five of these cell strains, but we could not identify the mutation in the sixth individual. Thus, although as many as one-half of the mutations that give rise to EDS types I and II are likely to lie in the COL5A1 gene, a significant portion of them result in very low levels of mRNA from the mutant allele, as a consequence of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. PMID:10796876

  5. Lectins from edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Singh, Senjam Sunil; Wang, Hexiang; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Dan, Xiuli; Yin, Cui Ming; Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-12-31

    Mushrooms are famous for their nutritional and medicinal values and also for the diversity of bioactive compounds they contain including lectins. The present review is an attempt to summarize and discuss data available on molecular weights, structures, biological properties, N-terminal sequences and possible applications of lectins from edible mushrooms. It further aims to update and discuss/examine the recent advancements in the study of these lectins regarding their structures, functions, and exploitable properties. A detailed tabling of all the available data for N-terminal sequences of these lectins is also presented here.

  6. Lectins: production and practical applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lectins are proteins found in a diversity of organisms. They possess the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes with known carbohydrate specificity since they have at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. This articles aims to review the production and practical applications of lectins. Lectins are isolated from their natural sources by chromatographic procedures or produced by recombinant DNA technology. The yields of animal lectins are usually low compared with the yields of plant lectins such as legume lectins. Lectins manifest a diversity of activities including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory, and anti-insect activities, which may find practical applications. A small number of lectins demonstrate antibacterial and anti-nematode activities. PMID:20890754

  7. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25569520

  8. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Participation of a galactose-specific C-type lectin in Drosophila immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tanji, Takahiro; Ohashi-Kobayashi, Ayako; Natori, Shunji

    2006-01-01

    A galactose-specific C-type lectin has been purified from a pupal extract of Drosophila melanogaster. This lectin gene, named DL1 (Drosophila lectin 1), is part of a gene cluster with the other two galactose-specific C-type lectin genes, named DL2 (Drosophila lectin 2) and DL3 (Drosophila lectin 3). These three genes are expressed differentially in fruit fly, but show similar haemagglutinating activities. The present study characterized the biochemical and biological properties of the DL1 protein. The recombinant DL1 protein bound to Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi, but not to other Gram-negative or any other kinds of microbial strains that have been investigated. In addition, DL1 agglutinated E. coli and markedly intensified the association of a Drosophila haemocytes-derived cell line with E. coli. For in vivo genetic analysis of the lectin genes, we also established a null-mutant Drosophila. The induction of inducible antibacterial peptide genes was not impaired in the DL1 mutant, suggesting that the galactose-specific C-type lectin does not participate in the induction of antibacterial peptides, but possibly participates in the immune response via the haemocyte-mediated mechanism. PMID:16475980

  10. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  11. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A self-calibrating nulling radiometer for non-contact temperature measurement of an object, such as a body of water, employs a black body source as a temperature reference, an optomechanical mechanism, e.g., a chopper, to switch back and forth between measuring the temperature of the black body source and that of a test source, and an infrared detection technique. The radiometer functions by measuring radiance of both the test and the reference black body sources; adjusting the temperature of the reference black body so that its radiance is equivalent to the test source; and, measuring the temperature of the reference black body at this point using a precision contact-type temperature sensor, to determine the radiative temperature of the test source. The radiation from both sources is detected by an infrared detector that converts the detected radiation to an electrical signal that is fed with a chopper reference signal to an error signal generator, such as a synchronous detector, that creates a precision rectified signal that is approximately proportional to the difference between the temperature of the reference black body and that of the test infrared source. This error signal is then used in a feedback loop to adjust the reference black body temperature until it equals that of the test source, at which point the error signal is nulled to zero. The chopper mechanism operates at one or more Hertz allowing minimization of l/f noise. It also provides pure chopping between the black body and the test source and allows continuous measurements.

  12. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  13. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270074

  14. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  15. Glycan and lectin biosensors.

    PubMed

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Tkáč, Ján

    2016-06-30

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  16. Designing with null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Null flux were suggested by Danby and Powell in the late 1960`s as a useful means for realizing induced lift with little drag. As an array of alternating magnets is translated past a set of null flux coils, the currents induced in these coils act to vertically center the magnets on those coils. At present, one Japanese MAGLEV system company and two American-based companies are employing either null flux or flux eliminating coils in their design for high speed magnetically levitated transportation. The principle question addressed in paper is: what is the proper choice of coil length to magnet length in a null flux system? A generic analysis in the time and frequency domain is laid out with the intent of showing the optimal design specification in terms of coil parameters.

  17. Lectins in the investigation of receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtin, V. M.; Yamskov, Igor A.

    1991-08-01

    Problems of the purification and characterisation are considered for approximately 270 receptors (including cell surface and organelle enzymes), which are glycoconjugates (mainly glycoproteins) from animals, plants and microorganisms, using various lectins (mainly lectin sorbents). An analysis has been carried out of the stages of lectin affinity chromatography of receptors (choice of detergent, use of organic solvents, elution with carbohydrates, etc.). Examples are given of procedures for the purification of receptors, including the use of paired columns and combination chromatography on lectins. The possibility of separating sub-populations of receptors using lectins has been demonstrated. Examples are given of the use of lectins in the analysis of the oligosaccharide structure of receptors. Cases are recorded of the interaction of receptors with endogenous lectins and of receptor lectins with endogenous glycoconjugates. It has been shown that lectins, in combination with glycosidases and antibodies, may be useful in the investigation of receptors. The bibliography contains 406 references.

  18. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  19. A review of fish lectins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Fai Cheung, Randy Chi; Wing Ng, Charlene Cheuk; Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Lectins have been reported from various tissues of a diversity of fish species including Japanese eel, conger eel, electric eel, bighead carp, gibel carp, grass carp, Arabian Gulf catfish, channel catfish, blue catfish, catfish, pike perch, perch, powan, zebrafish, toxic moray, cobia fish, steelhead trout, Japanese trout, Atlantic salmon, chinook salmon, olive rainbow smelt, rainbow smelt, white-spotted charr, tilapia, blue gourami, ayu, Potca fish, Spanish mackerel, gilt head bream, tench, roach, rudd, common skate, and sea lamprey. The tissues from which the lectins were isolated comprise gills, eggs, electric organ, stomach, intestine, and liver. Lectins have also been isolated from skin, mucus serum, and plasma. The lectins differ in molecular weight, number of subunits, glycosylation, sugar binding specificity and amino acid sequence. Their activities include antimicrobial, antitumor, immunoregulatory and a role in development. PMID:25929869

  20. Use of lectins in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review.

  1. Characterisation of Jack fruit lectin.

    PubMed

    Arslan, M I; Chulavatnatol, M

    2000-04-01

    Jack fruit (Artocarpus Heterophyllus) seed extract contains a lectin termed Jack fruit lectin (JFL) which possesses diversed biological properties. A detailed analysis of its properties has been lacking. The present investigation was initiated to study the detail properties of JFL. After extraction and purification on affigel galactosamine-agarose column, JFL was subjected to ND-PAGE. Several different charged species from ND-PAGE upon SDS-PAGE gave rise to two dissimilar trimeric subunit at 12.5 and 15.0 KDa and retain biological activity. It was possible to elute the subunit bands separately from polyacrylamide gel to investigate their biological activity. Each subunit was found to be retained the lectin activity. Agglutinating activity of smaller subunit was found to be more, may be due to the greater amount of the subunit. This also suggests that each unit of trimeric JFL have similar lectin activity.

  2. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  3. Pattern nulling by reflector shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, D. A.

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of adaptive array concepts to continuous aperture antennas was studied and appropriate aperture field distributions for pattern nulling were found from them. The adaptive array weights were found to be useful as discrete points in a continuous distribution. This distribution could then be used in an aperture integration scheme to produce a nulled pattern. Also studied was the use of geometrical optics to calculate the aperture field distribution of an arbitrarily shaped reflector. Under some restrictions, geometrical optics can provide a useful approximation. Constructing the aperture field of a reflector defined by a discrete grid of points using a numerical ray tracing scheme was also investigated. Certain numerical problems were identified. Finally, an attempt was made to implement the nulled pattern by a well known beam shaping method based on geometrical optics principles. This technique was found to be inadequate. More promising techniques for implementing the aperture distributions were suggested but not pursued in this work.

  4. Deficient and Null Variants of SERPINA1 Are Proteotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Erin E; O'Reilly, Linda P; King, Dale E; Silverman, Richard M; Miedel, Mark T; Luke, Cliff J; Perlmutter, David H; Silverman, Gary A; Pak, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) predisposes patients to both loss-of-function (emphysema) and gain-of-function (liver cirrhosis) phenotypes depending on the type of mutation. Although the Z mutation (ATZ) is the most prevalent cause of ATD, >120 mutant alleles have been identified. In general, these mutations are classified as deficient (<20% normal plasma levels) or null (<1% normal levels) alleles. The deficient alleles, like ATZ, misfold in the ER where they accumulate as toxic monomers, oligomers and aggregates. Thus, deficient alleles may predispose to both gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes. Null variants, if translated, typically yield truncated proteins that are efficiently degraded after being transiently retained in the ER. Clinically, null alleles are only associated with the loss-of-function phenotype. We recently developed a C. elegans model of ATD in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of proteotoxicity (gain-of-function phenotype) induced by the aggregation-prone deficient allele, ATZ. The goal of this study was to use this C. elegans model to determine whether different types of deficient and null alleles, which differentially affect polymerization and secretion rates, correlated to any extent with proteotoxicity. Animals expressing the deficient alleles, Mmalton, Siiyama and S (ATS), showed overall toxicity comparable to that observed in patients. Interestingly, Siiyama expressing animals had smaller intracellular inclusions than ATZ yet appeared to have a greater negative effect on animal fitness. Surprisingly, the null mutants, although efficiently degraded, showed a relatively mild gain-of-function proteotoxic phenotype. However, since null variant proteins are degraded differently and do not appear to accumulate, their mechanism of proteotoxicity is likely to be different to that of polymerizing, deficient mutants. Taken together, these studies showed that C. elegans is an inexpensive tool to assess the proteotoxicity of different AT

  5. Fracture characterisation using geoelectric null-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Pierik; Negro, François; Szalai, Sándor; Milnes, Ellen

    2013-06-01

    The term "geoelectric null-array" is used for direct current electrode configurations yielding a potential difference of zero above a homogeneous half-space. This paper presents a comparative study of the behaviour of three null-arrays, midpoint null-array (MAN), Wenner-γ null-array and Schlumberger null-array in response to a fracture, both in profiling and in azimuthal mode. The main objective is to determine which array(s) best localise fractures or best identify their orientation. Forward modelling of the three null-arrays revealed that the Wenner-γ and Schlumberger null-arrays localise vertical fractures the most accurately, whilst the midpoint null-array combined with the Schlumberger null-array allows accurate orientation of a fracture. Numerical analysis then served as a basis to interpret the field results. Field test measurements were carried out above a quarry in Les Breuleux (Switzerland) with the three null-arrays and classical arrays. The results were cross-validated with quarry-wall geological mapping. In real field circumstances, the Wenner-γ null-array proved to be the most efficient and accurate in localising fractures. The orientations of the fractures according to the numerical results were most efficiently determined with the midpoint null-array, whilst the Schlumberger null-array adds accuracy to the results. This study shows that geoelectrical null-arrays are more suitable than classical arrays for the characterisation of fracture geometry.

  6. Antinutritional properties of plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José Tadeu A

    2004-09-15

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding (glyco)proteins which are ubiquitous in nature. In plants, they are distributed in various families and hence ingested daily in appreciable amounts by both humans and animals. One of the most nutritionally important features of plant lectins is their ability to survive digestion by the gastrointestinal tract of consumers. This allows the lectins to bind to membrane glycosyl groups of the cells lining the digestive tract. As a result of this interaction a series of harmful local and systemic reactions are triggered placing this class of molecules as antinutritive and/or toxic substances. Locally, they can affect the turnover and loss of gut epithelial cells, damage the luminal membranes of the epithelium, interfere with nutrient digestion and absorption, stimulate shifts in the bacterial flora and modulate the immune state of the digestive tract. Systemically, they can disrupt lipid, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, promote enlargement and/or atrophy of key internal organs and tissues and alter the hormonal and immunological status. At high intakes, lectins can seriously threaten the growth and health of consuming animals. They are also detrimental to numerous insect pests of crop plants although less is presently known about their insecticidal mechanisms of action. This current review surveys the recent knowledge on the antinutritional/toxic effects of plant lectins on higher animals and insects. PMID:15302522

  7. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins. PMID:20726799

  8. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins.

  9. Nulling at the Keck Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. Mark; Serabyn, Gene; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Akeson, Rachel L.

    2006-01-01

    The nulling mode of the Keck Interferometer is being commissioned at the Mauna Kea summit. The nuller combines the two Keck telescope apertures in a split-pupil mode to both cancel the on-axis starlight and to coherently detect the residual signal. The nuller, working at 10 um, is tightly integrated with the other interferometer subsystems including the fringe and angle trackers, the delay lines and laser metrology, and the real-time control system. Since first 10 um light in August 2004, the system integration is proceeding with increasing functionality and performance, leading to demonstration of a 100:1 on-sky null in 2005. That level of performance has now been extended to observations with longer coherent integration times. An overview of the overall system is presented, with emphasis on the observing sequence, phasing system, and differences with respect to the V2 system, along with a presentation of some recent engineering data.

  10. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  11. Annotation and genetic diversity of the chicken collagenous lectins.

    PubMed

    Hamzić, Edin; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2015-06-01

    Collectins and ficolins are multimeric proteins present in various tissues and are actively involved in innate immune responses. In chickens, six different collagenous lectins have been characterized so far: mannose-binding lectin (MBL), surfactant protein A (SP-A), collectin 10 (COLEC10), collectin 11 (COLEC11), collectin 12 (COLEC12), lung lectin (LL) and one ficolin (FCN). However, the structural and functional features of the chicken collectins and ficolin are still not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were: (i) to make an overview of the genetic structure and function of chicken collectins and the ficolin, (ii) to investigate the variation in the chicken collectins and the ficolin gene in different chicken populations, and (iii) to assess the presence of MBL gene variants in different chicken populations. We performed comparative genomic analysis using publically available data. The obtained results showed that collectins and ficolins have conserved protein sequences and gene structure across all vertebrate groups and this is especially notable for COLEC10, COLEC11 and COLEC12. For the purpose of studying the genetic variation, 179 animals from 14 populations were genotyped using 31 SNPs covering five genomic regions. The obtained results revealed low level of heterozygosity in the collagenous lectins except for the COLEC12 gene and the LL-SPA-MBL region compared to heterozygosity at neutral microsatellite markers. In addition, the MBL gene variants were assessed in different chicken populations based on the polymorphisms in the promoter region. We observed 10 previously identified MBL variants with A2/A8 and A4 as the most frequent alleles.

  12. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  13. Lectindb: a plant lectin database.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Nagasuma R; Kumar, Nirmal; Jeyakani, Justin; Singh, Desh Deepak; Gowda, Sharan B; Prathima, M N

    2006-10-01

    Lectins, a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins, are now widely recognized to play a range of crucial roles in many cell-cell recognition events triggering several important cellular processes. They encompass different members that are diverse in their sequences, structures, binding site architectures, quaternary structures, carbohydrate affinities, and specificities as well as their larger biological roles and potential applications. It is not surprising, therefore, that the vast amount of experimental data on lectins available in the literature is so diverse, that it becomes difficult and time consuming, if not impossible to comprehend the advances in various areas and obtain the maximum benefit. To achieve an effective use of all the data toward understanding the function and their possible applications, an organization of these seemingly independent data into a common framework is essential. An integrated knowledge base ( Lectindb, http://nscdb.bic.physics.iisc.ernet.in ) together with appropriate analytical tools has therefore been developed initially for plant lectins by collating and integrating diverse data. The database has been implemented using MySQL on a Linux platform and web-enabled using PERL-CGI and Java tools. Data for each lectin pertain to taxonomic, biochemical, domain architecture, molecular sequence, and structural details as well as carbohydrate and hence blood group specificities. Extensive links have also been provided for relevant bioinformatics resources and analytical tools. Availability of diverse data integrated into a common framework is expected to be of high value not only for basic studies in lectin biology but also for basic studies in pursuing several applications in biotechnology, immunology, and clinical practice, using these molecules.

  14. Lectins as markers for blood grouping.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fauzia; Khan, Rizwan H; Sherwani, Asma; Mohmood, Sameena; Azfer, Md A

    2002-12-01

    Lectins are unique proteins of varying biological importance. They are characterized by specific binding to carbohydrate residues, whether monosaccharides, disaccharides or polysaccharides. The sugar heads on the surface of the erythrocyte specify the different blood groups. Lectins, as an antigenic determinant of blood group, have come to be an important tool in the identification of different blood groups. A handful of lectins may be considered excellent reagents for anti-A, anti-B, anti-N etc, but the anti-A and anti-M are not yet regarded as commercially suitable antisera. Lectin from Vicia cracca has been proved to be a good anti-A, lectin from Dolichus biflorus can be used as anti-A1, and lectin from Griffonia simplicifolia as anti-B. Lectin from Vicia graminea is said to be a good typing reagent as Anti-N. On the other hand, the lectins involved in polyagglutination are absolutely essential as the reagent of choice and these cannot as yet be replaced by antibodies of any kind. Erythrocytes with exposed cryptantigens are significantly more sensitive to agglutination by certain lectins than by polyclonal antibodies. Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Polybrene, and Glycine max lectins are frequently used for the identification of different cryptantigens. The application of lectins as an anti-B reagent has proven to be as useful as human polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies. Besides their specificity, lectins are excellent reagents because of their lower cost and indigenous production. The importance of various lectins used as markers for blood grouping is discussed.

  15. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9 +/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  16. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  17. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  18. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  19. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  20. Detection of 549 new HLA alleles in potential stem cell donors from the United States, Poland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Cereb, N; Giani, A S; Ruppel, J; Maraszek, A; Pingel, J; Sauter, J; Schmidt, A H; Yang, S Y

    2016-01-01

    We characterized 549 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles found in newly registered stem cell donors as a result of high-throughput HLA typing. New alleles include 101 HLA-A, 132 HLA-B, 105 HLA-C, 2 HLA-DRB1, 89 HLA-DQB1 and 120 HLA-DPB1 alleles. Mainly, new alleles comprised single nucleotide variations when compared with homologous sequences. We identified nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in 70.7% of all new alleles, synonymous variations in 26.4% and nonsense substitutions in 2.9% (null alleles). Some new alleles (55, 10.0%) were found multiple times, HLA-DPB1 alleles being the most frequent among these. Furthermore, as several new alleles were identified in individuals from ethnic minority groups, the relevance of recruiting donors belonging to such groups and the importance of ethnicity data collection in donor centers and registries is highlighted.

  1. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  2. Allelic interactions at the nivea locus of Antirrhinum.

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, J; Carpenter, R; Coen, E S

    1991-01-01

    Most null alleles at the nivea (niv) locus are recessive to Niv+ and, when homozygous, give white flowers rather than the red of the wild type. In contrast, the niv-571 allele is semidominant; although it gives white flowers when homozygous, very pale flowers result when this allele is heterozygous with NIV+. We showed that in heterozygotes, niv-571 acts in trans to inhibit expression of its Niv+ homology 25-fold to 50-fold. The inhibition is reversible after meiosis and partially reversible somatically. The niv-571 allele carries a transposable element Tam3 insertion and three truncated copies of the niv gene, one copy being in inverse orientation. Analysis of two further niv alleles, niv-572 and niv-527, showed that excision of Tam3 from niv-571 does not affect the ability of the allele to repress Niv+ and that one truncated niv copy alone is insufficient to confer semidominance. The detailed structures of various semidominant niv alleles suggest that their effects in trans are not readily explained by production of antisense RNA but are more easily reconciled with a direct recognition/interaction between homologous genes, reminiscent of cosuppression and transvection phenomena described in other systems. PMID:1840900

  3. DAVINCI: Dilute Aperture VIsible Nulling Coronagraphic Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. M.; Vasisht, G.; Lane, B. F.; Woodruff, R.; Vasudevan, G.; Samuele, R.; Lloyd, C. A.; Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.; Guyon, O.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of DAVINCI (Dilute Aperture VIsible Nulling Coronagraphic Imager). The presentation also includes information about dilute aperture coronagraph, and lyot efficiency.

  4. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  5. Lectin engineering, a molecular evolutionary approach to expanding the lectin utilities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In the post genomic era, glycomics--the systematic study of all glycan structures of a given cell or organism--has emerged as an indispensable technology in various fields of biology and medicine. Lectins are regarded as "decipherers of glycans", being useful reagents for their structural analysis, and have been widely used in glycomic studies. However, the inconsistent activity and availability associated with the plant-derived lectins that comprise most of the commercially available lectins, and the limit in the range of glycan structures covered, have necessitated the development of innovative tools via engineering of lectins on existing scaffolds. This review will summarize the current state of the art of lectin engineering and highlight recent technological advances in this field. The key issues associated with the strategy of lectin engineering including selection of template lectin, construction of a mutagenesis library, and high-throughput screening methods are discussed.

  6. The Importance of Proving the Null

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallistel, C. R.

    2009-01-01

    Null hypotheses are simple, precise, and theoretically important. Conventional statistical analysis cannot support them; Bayesian analysis can. The challenge in a Bayesian analysis is to formulate a suitably vague alternative, because the vaguer the alternative is (the more it spreads out the unit mass of prior probability), the more the null is…

  7. Electron trapping around a magnetic null

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.-S.; Zong, Q.-G.; Deng, X.-H.; Tu, C.-Y.; Xiao, C.-J.; Wang, X.-G.; Ma, Z.-W.; Pu, Z.-Y.; Lucek, E.; Pedersen, A.; Fazakerley, A.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Dunlop, M. W.; Tian, H.; Yao, S.; Tan, B.; Fu, S.-Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.; Escoubet, C. P.

    2008-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important process in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas. The magnetic null pair structure is theoretically suggested to be a crucial feature of the three-dimensional magnetic reconnection. The physics around the null pair, however, has not been explored in combination with the magnetic field configuration deduced from in situ observations. Here, we report the identification of the configuration around a null pair and simultaneous electron dynamics near one null of the pair, observed by four Cluster spacecraft in the geo-magnetotail. Further, we propose a new scenario of electron dynamics in the null region, suggesting that electrons are temporarily trapped in the central reconnection region including electron diffusion region resulting in an electron density peak, accelerated possibly by parallel electric field and electron pressure gradient, and reflected from the magnetic cusp mirrors leading to the bi-directional energetic electron beams, which excite the observed high frequency electrostatic waves.

  8. Association Study of Mannose-Binding Lectin Levels and Genetic Variants in Lectin Pathway Proteins with Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Dean, Melinda M.; Baird, Paul N.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Daniell, Mark; Guymer, Robyn H.; Eisen, Damon P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the complement system is thought to be activated by chronic oxidative damage with genetic variants identified in the alternative pathway as susceptibility factors. However, the involvement of the lectin pathway of complement, a key mediator of oxidative damage, is controversial. This study investigated whether mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels and genetic variants in lectin pathway proteins, are associated with the predisposition to and severity of AMD. Methods MBL levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBL2 and the ficolin-2 (FCN2) gene were determined in 109 patients with AMD and 109 age- and sex-matched controls. Results MBL expression levels were equally distributed in both cases (early and late AMD) and controls (p>0.05). However, there was a trend towards higher median MBL levels in cases with late AMD compared to cases with early AMD (1.0 vs. 0.4 μg/ml, p = 0.09) and MBL deficiency (<0.5 μg/ml) was encountered less frequently in the late AMD group (35% vs 56%, p = 0.03). FCN2 and MBL2 allele frequencies were similarly distributed in early and late AMD cases compared with controls (p>0.05 for all analyses) as were MBL2 genotypes. Similarly, there was no significant difference in allele frequencies in any SNPs in either the MBL2 or FCN2 gene in cases with early vs. late AMD. Conclusions SNPs of lectin pathway proteins investigated in this study were not associated with AMD or AMD severity. However, MBL levels deserve further study in a larger cohort of early vs. late AMD patients to elucidate any real effect on AMD severity. PMID:26207622

  9. Characterization of an unstable allele of the Arabidopsis HY4 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Bruggemann, E P; Doan, B; Handwerger, K; Storz, G

    1998-01-01

    The Arabidopsis HY4 gene encodes the nonessential blue light photoreceptor CRY1. Loss-of-function hy4 mutants have an elongated hypocotyl phenotype after germination under blue light. We previously analyzed 20 independent hy4 alleles produced by fast neutron mutagenesis. These alleles were grouped into two classes based on their genetic behavior and corresponding deletion size: (1) null hy4 alleles that were semidominant over wild type and contained small or moderate-sized deletions at HY4 and (2) null hy4 alleles that were recessive lethal and contained large HY4 deletions. Here we describe one additional fast neutron hy4 mutant, B144, that did not fall into either of these two classes. Mutant B144 was isolated as a heterozygote with an intermediate hy4 phenotype. One allele from this mutant, hy4-B144(Delta), contains a large deletion at HY4 and is recessive lethal. The other allele from this mutant, HY4-B144*, appears to be intact and functional but is unstable and spontaneously converts to a nonfunctional hy4 allele. In addition, HY4-B144* is lethal in homozygotes and suppresses local recombination. We discuss genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that may account for the unusual behavior of the HY4-B144* allele. PMID:9649544

  10. Allelic variation of the β-, γ- and δ-kafirin genes in diverse Sorghum genotypes.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, H K C; Mace, E S; Williams, S B; Sakrewski, K; Mudge, A M; Prentis, P J; Jordan, D R; Godwin, I D

    2010-11-01

    The β-, γ- and δ-kafirin genes were sequenced from 35 Sorghum genotypes to investigate the allelic diversity of seed storage proteins. A range of grain sorghums, including inbred parents from internationally diverse breeding programs and landraces, and three wild Sorghum relatives were selected to encompass an extensive array of improved and unimproved germplasm in the Eusorghum. A single locus exists for each of the expressed kafirin-encoding genes, unlike the multigenic α-kafirins. Significant diversity was found for each locus, with the cysteine-rich β-kafirin having four alleles, including the first natural null mutant reported for this prolamin subfamily. This allele contains a frame shift insertion at +206 resulting in a premature stop codon. SDS-PAGE revealed that lines with this allele do not produce β-kafirin. An analysis of flour viscosity reveals that these β-kafirin null lines have a difference in grain quality, with significantly lower viscosity observed over the entire Rapid ViscoAnalyser time course. There was less diversity at the protein level within the cysteine-rich γ-kafirin, with only two alleles in the cultivated sorghums. There were only two alleles for the δ-kafirin locus among the S. bicolor germplasm, with one allele encoding ten extra amino acids, of which five were methionine residues, with an additional methionine resulting from a nucleotide substitution. This longer allele encodes a protein with 19.1% methionine. The Asian species, S. propinquum, had distinct alleles for all three kafirin genes. We found no evidence for selection on the three kafirin genes during sorghum domestication even though the δ-kafirin locus displayed comparatively low genetic variation. This study has identified genetic diversity in all single copy seed storage protein genes, including a null mutant for β-kafirin in Sorghum.

  11. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F.; Charbonneau, Noe L.; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J.; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  12. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  13. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  14. Null structure groups in eleven dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Mac Conamhna, Oisin A. P.

    2006-02-15

    We classify all the structure groups which arise as subgroups of the isotropy group (Spin(7)xR{sup 8})xR, of a single null Killing spinor in 11 dimensions. We construct the spaces of spinors fixed by these groups. We determine the conditions under which structure subgroups of the maximal null structure group (Spin(7)xR{sup 8})xR may also be embedded in SU(5), and hence the conditions under which a supersymmetric spacetime admits only null, or both timelike and null, Killing spinors. We discuss how this purely algebraic material will facilitate the direct analysis of the Killing spinor equation of 11 dimensional supergravity, and the classification of supersymmetric spacetimes therein.

  15. Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalus Arnee) allotypes: identification of a multiple allelic system.

    PubMed

    Iannelli, D

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes two allotypes of water buffalo controlled by two codominant allelic genes. The third allele is a null allele and behaves as a recessive one. The two detectable serum antigens are termed A1 and A2 and the third one (as yet undetectable) A0. The A1 antigen was recovered in the third peak and A2 antigen in the first peak following gel filtration through Sephadex G-200. The A1 antigen is common to water buffalo and cattle; the frequency of the corresponding gene (A1) was the same in both species.

  16. Frequency and characterization of known and novel RHD variant alleles in 37 782 Dutch D-negative pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Tamara C; Veldhuisen, Barbera; Bijman, Renate; Thurik, Florentine F; Bossers, Bernadette; Cheroutre, Goedele; Jonkers, Remco; Ligthart, Peter; de Haas, Masja; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; van der Schoot, C Ellen

    2016-05-01

    To guide anti-D prophylaxis, Dutch D- pregnant women are offered a quantitative fetal-RHD-genotyping assay to determine the RHD status of their fetus. This allowed us to determine the frequency of different maternal RHD variants in 37 782 serologically D- pregnant women. A variant allele is present in at least 0·96% of Dutch D- pregnant women The D- serology could be confirmed after further serological testing in only 54% of these women, which emphasizes the potential relevance of genotyping of blood donors. 43 different RHD variant alleles were detected, including 15 novel alleles (11 null-, 2 partial D- and 2 DEL-alleles). Of those novel null alleles, one allele contained a single missense mutation (RHD*443C>G) and one allele had a single amino acid deletion (RHD*424_426del). The D- phenotype was confirmed by transduction of human D- erythroblasts, consolidating that, for the first time, a single amino acid change or deletion causes the D- phenotype. Transduction also confirmed the phenotypes for the two new variant DEL-alleles (RHD*721A>C and RHD*884T>C) and the novel partial RHD*492C>A allele. Notably, in three additional cases the DEL phenotype was observed but sequencing of the coding sequence, flanking introns and promoter region revealed an apparently wild-type RHD allele without mutations. PMID:27018217

  17. Analysis of compound heterozygotes reveals that the mouse floxed Pax6 (tm1Ued) allele produces abnormal eye phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dorà, Natalie J; Crookshanks, Aaron J F; Leung, Karen K Y; Simpson, T Ian; Mason, John O; Price, David J; West, John D

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of abnormal phenotypes produced by different types of mutations has been crucial for our understanding of gene function. Some floxed alleles that retain a neomycin-resistance selection cassette (neo cassette) are not equivalent to wild-type alleles and provide useful experimental resources. Pax6 is an important developmental gene and the aim of this study was to determine whether the floxed Pax6 (tm1Ued) (Pax6 (fl) ) allele, which has a retained neo cassette, produced any abnormal eye phenotypes that would imply that it differs from the wild-type allele. Homozygous Pax6 (fl/fl) and heterozygous Pax6 (fl/+) mice had no overt qualitative eye abnormalities but morphometric analysis showed that Pax6 (fl/fl) corneas tended be thicker and smaller in diameter. To aid identification of weak effects, we produced compound heterozygotes with the Pax6 (Sey-Neu) (Pax6 (-)) null allele. Pax6 (fl/-) compound heterozygotes had more severe eye abnormalities than Pax6 (+/-) heterozygotes, implying that Pax6 (fl) differs from the wild-type Pax6 (+) allele. Immunohistochemistry showed that the Pax6 (fl/-) corneal epithelium was positive for keratin 19 and negative for keratin 12, indicating that it was abnormally differentiated. This Pax6 (fl) allele provides a useful addition to the existing Pax6 allelic series and this study demonstrates the utility of using compound heterozygotes with null alleles to unmask cryptic effects of floxed alleles.

  18. Analysis of compound heterozygotes reveals that the mouse floxed Pax6 (tm1Ued) allele produces abnormal eye phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dorà, Natalie J; Crookshanks, Aaron J F; Leung, Karen K Y; Simpson, T Ian; Mason, John O; Price, David J; West, John D

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of abnormal phenotypes produced by different types of mutations has been crucial for our understanding of gene function. Some floxed alleles that retain a neomycin-resistance selection cassette (neo cassette) are not equivalent to wild-type alleles and provide useful experimental resources. Pax6 is an important developmental gene and the aim of this study was to determine whether the floxed Pax6 (tm1Ued) (Pax6 (fl) ) allele, which has a retained neo cassette, produced any abnormal eye phenotypes that would imply that it differs from the wild-type allele. Homozygous Pax6 (fl/fl) and heterozygous Pax6 (fl/+) mice had no overt qualitative eye abnormalities but morphometric analysis showed that Pax6 (fl/fl) corneas tended be thicker and smaller in diameter. To aid identification of weak effects, we produced compound heterozygotes with the Pax6 (Sey-Neu) (Pax6 (-)) null allele. Pax6 (fl/-) compound heterozygotes had more severe eye abnormalities than Pax6 (+/-) heterozygotes, implying that Pax6 (fl) differs from the wild-type Pax6 (+) allele. Immunohistochemistry showed that the Pax6 (fl/-) corneal epithelium was positive for keratin 19 and negative for keratin 12, indicating that it was abnormally differentiated. This Pax6 (fl) allele provides a useful addition to the existing Pax6 allelic series and this study demonstrates the utility of using compound heterozygotes with null alleles to unmask cryptic effects of floxed alleles. PMID:27240603

  19. On the Penrose inequality along null hypersurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, Marc; Soria, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    The null Penrose inequality, i.e. the Penrose inequality in terms of the Bondi energy, is studied by introducing a functional on surfaces and studying its properties along a null hypersurface Ω extending to past null infinity. We prove a general Penrose-type inequality which involves the limit at infinity of the Hawking energy along a specific class of geodesic foliations called Geodesic Asymptotically Bondi (GAB), which are shown to always exist. Whenever this foliation approaches large spheres, this inequality becomes the null Penrose inequality and we recover the results of Ludvigsen-Vickers (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 3349-53) and Bergqvist (1997 Class. Quantum Grav. 14 2577-83). By exploiting further properties of the functional along general geodesic foliations, we introduce an approach to the null Penrose inequality called the Renormalized Area Method and find a set of two conditions which imply the validity of the null Penrose inequality. One of the conditions involves a limit at infinity and the other a restriction on the spacetime curvature along the flow. We investigate their range of applicability in two particular but interesting cases, namely the shear-free and vacuum case, where the null Penrose inequality is known to hold from the results by Sauter (2008 PhD Thesis Zürich ETH), and the case of null shells propagating in the Minkowski spacetime. Finally, a general inequality bounding the area of the quasi-local black hole in terms of an asymptotic quantity intrinsic of Ω is derived.

  20. Phase-only nulling for transmit antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Moayyed A.; Yu, Kai-Bor

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a technique for transmit antenna nulling for low-cost large sparse phased array radar system. Radar system described includes an array of elemental antennas, each with a transmit/receive (T/R) module. The T/R modules are operated at or near maximum output to achieve maximum CD-to-RF efficiency. A phase controller controls the phase shift, which are imparted by each module to its signal, to form a mainbeam and its associated sidelobes. A perturbation phase generator adds phase shifts computed, to form wide nulls in the sidelobe structure. The nulls are achieved at very minimal loss of gain, in the order of fraction of a dB. The speed of obtaining these nulls in real time allows a rapid steering of these nulls in a hostile environment. The thinned aperture allow designing a light weigh mobile system. In radar context, these nulls may be placed on a source of ground clutter, a set of jammers or a set of undesirable radio sources.

  1. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  2. CancerLectinDB: a database of lectins relevant to cancer.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Deepa; Jeyakani, Justin; Chauhan, Alok; Kumar, Nirmal; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-04-01

    The role of lectins in mediating cancer metastasis, apoptosis as well as various other signaling events has been well established in the past few years. Data on various aspects of the role of lectins in cancer is being accumulated at a rapid pace. The data on lectins available in the literature is so diverse, that it becomes difficult and time-consuming, if not impossible to comprehend the advances in various areas and obtain the maximum benefit. Not only do the lectins vary significantly in their individual functional roles, but they are also diverse in their sequences, structures, binding site architectures, quaternary structures, carbohydrate affinities and specificities as well as their potential applications. An organization of these seemingly independent data into a common framework is essential in order to achieve effective use of all the data towards understanding the roles of different lectins in different aspects of cancer and any resulting applications. An integrated knowledge base (CancerLectinDB) together with appropriate analytical tools has therefore been developed for lectins relevant for any aspect of cancer, by collating and integrating diverse data. This database is unique in terms of providing sequence, structural, and functional annotations for lectins from all known sources in cancer and is expected to be a useful addition to the number of glycan related resources now available to the community. The database has been implemented using MySQL on a Linux platform and web-enabled using Perl-CGI and Java tools. Data for individual lectins pertain to taxonomic, biochemical, domain architecture, molecular sequence and structural details as well as carbohydrate specificities. Extensive links have also been provided for relevant bioinformatics resources and analytical tools. Availability of diverse data integrated into a common framework is expected to be of high value for various studies on lectin cancer biology. CancerLectinDB can be accessed through

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic flows sustaining stationary magnetic nulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Vyacheslav S.; Hornig, Gunnar

    2000-09-01

    Exact solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations are derived which describe a stationary incompressible flow near a generic null point of a three-dimensional magnetic field. The properties of the solutions depend on the topological skeleton of the corresponding magnetic field. This skeleton is formed by one-dimensional and two-dimensional invariant manifolds (so-called spine line and fan plane) of the magnetic field. It is shown that configurations of generic null points may always be sustained by stationary field-aligned flows of the stagnation type, where the null points of the magnetic and velocity fields have the same location. However, if the absolute value |j∥| of the current density component parallel to the spine line exceeds a critical value jc, the solution is not unique—there is a second nontrivial solution describing spiral flows with the stagnation point at the magnetic null. The characteristic feature of these new flows is that they cross magnetic field lines but they do not cross the corresponding spine and fan of the magnetic null. Therefore these are nonideal but nonreconnecting flows. The critical value |j∥|=jc coincides exactly with a threshold separating the topological distinct improper radial and spiral nulls. It is shown that this is not an accidental coincidence: the spiral field-crossing flows of the considered type are possible only due to the topological equivalence of the field lines forming the fan plane of the spiral magnetic null. The explicit expression for the pressure distribution of the solution is given and its iso-surfaces are found to be always ellipsoidal for the field-aligned flows, while for the field-crossing flows there are also cases with a hyperboloidal structure.

  4. Genetically-Defined Deficiency of Mannose-Binding Lectin Is Associated with Protection after Experimental Stroke in Mice and Outcome in Human Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Alvaro; Planas, Anna M.; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Jensenius, Jens C.; Torres, Ferran; Lozano, Francisco; Chamorro, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Background The complement system is a major effector of innate immunity that has been involved in stroke brain damage. Complement activation occurs through the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. The latter is initiated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Here we investigated whether the lectin pathway contributes to stroke outcome in mice and humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in MBL-null mice induced smaller infarctions, better functional outcome, and diminished C3 deposition and neutrophil infiltration than in wild-type mice. Accordingly, reconstitution of MBL-null mice with recombinant human MBL (rhMBL) enhanced brain damage. In order to investigate the clinical relevance of these experimental observations, a study of MBL2 and MASP-2 gene polymorphism rendering the lectin pathway dysfunctional was performed in 135 stroke patients. In logistic regression adjusted for age, gender and initial stroke severity, unfavourable outcome at 3 months was associated with MBL-sufficient genotype (OR 10.85, p = 0.008) and circulating MBL levels (OR 1.29, p = 0.04). Individuals carrying MBL-low genotypes (17.8%) had lower C3, C4, and CRP levels, and the proinflammatory cytokine profile was attenuated versus MBL-sufficient genotypes. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, genetically defined MBL-deficiency is associated with a better outcome after acute stroke in mice and humans. PMID:20140243

  5. Three-dimensional null point reconnection regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, E. R.; Pontin, D. I.

    2009-12-15

    Recent advances in theory and computational experiments have shown the need to refine the previous categorization of magnetic reconnection at three-dimensional null points--points at which the magnetic field vanishes. We propose here a division into three different types, depending on the nature of the flow near the spine and fan of the null. The spine is an isolated field line which approaches the null (or recedes from it), while the fan is a surface of field lines which recede from it (or approach it). So-called torsional spine reconnection occurs when field lines in the vicinity of the fan rotate, with current becoming concentrated along the spine so that nearby field lines undergo rotational slippage. In torsional fan reconnection field lines near the spine rotate and create a current that is concentrated in the fan with a rotational flux mismatch and rotational slippage. In both of these regimes, the spine and fan are perpendicular and there is no flux transfer across spine or fan. The third regime, called spine-fan reconnection, is the most common in practice and combines elements of the previous spine and fan models. In this case, in response to a generic shearing motion, the null point collapses to form a current sheet that is focused at the null itself, in a sheet that locally spans both the spine and fan. In this regime the spine and fan are no longer perpendicular and there is flux transfer across both of them.

  6. Allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, S.E.; Fearon, E.R.; Tersmette, K.W.F.; Enterline, J.P.; Vogelstein, B.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Leppert, M.; Nakamura, Yusuke; White, R. )

    1989-06-02

    Clinical and pathological associations with molecular genetic alterations were studied in colorectal carcinomas from 83 patients. Fractional allelic loss, a measure of allelic deletions throughout the genome, and allelic deletions of specific chromosomal arms (the short arm of 17 and long arm of 18) each provided independent prognostic information by multivariate analysis when considered individually with Dukes' classification. Distant metastasis was significantly associated with high fractional allelic loss and with deletions of 17p and 18q. Mutations of ras proto-oncogenes and deletions of 5q had no prognostic importance. Statistically significant associations were also found between allelic losses and a family history of cancer, left-sided tumor location, and absence of extracellular tumor mucin. Allelic deletion analysis thus identified subsets of colorectal carcinoma with increased predilection for distant metastasis and cancer-related death. Further studies may define a subset of genetic alterations that can be used clinically to help assess prognosis.

  7. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  8. Sugared biomaterial binding lectins: achievements and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bojarová, P; Křen, V

    2016-07-19

    Lectins, a distinct group of glycan-binding proteins, play a prominent role in the immune system ranging from pathogen recognition and tuning of inflammation to cell adhesion or cellular signalling. The possibilities of their detailed study expanded along with the rapid development of biomaterials in the last decade. The immense knowledge of all aspects of glycan-lectin interactions both in vitro and in vivo may be efficiently used in bioimaging, targeted drug delivery, diagnostic and analytic biological methods. Practically applicable examples comprise photoluminescence and optical biosensors, ingenious three-dimensional carbohydrate microarrays for high-throughput screening, matrices for magnetic resonance imaging, targeted hyperthermal treatment of cancer tissues, selective inhibitors of bacterial toxins and pathogen-recognising lectin receptors, and many others. This review aims to present an up-to-date systematic overview of glycan-decorated biomaterials promising for interactions with lectins, especially those applicable in biology, biotechnology or medicine. The lectins of interest include galectin-1, -3 and -7 participating in tumour progression, bacterial lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IL), E. coli (Fim-H) and Clostridium botulinum (HA33) or DC-SIGN, receptors of macrophages and dendritic cells. The spectrum of lectin-binding biomaterials covered herein ranges from glycosylated organic structures, calixarene and fullerene cores over glycopeptides and glycoproteins, functionalised carbohydrate scaffolds of cyclodextrin or chitin to self-assembling glycopolymer clusters, gels, micelles and liposomes. Glyconanoparticles, glycan arrays, and other biomaterials with a solid core are described in detail, including inorganic matrices like hydroxyapatite or stainless steel for bioimplants. PMID:27075026

  9. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  10. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  11. Polarization nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-04-01

    We introduce a new concept of nulling interferometer without any achromatic device, using polarization properties of light. This type of interferometer should enable a high rejection ratio in a theoretically unlimited spectral band. We analyze several consequences of the proposed design, notably, the possibility of fast internal modulation.

  12. Polarization nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-04-01

    We introduce a new concept of nulling interferometer without any achromatic device, using polarization properties of light. This type of interferometer should enable a high rejection ratio in a theoretically unlimited spectral band. We analyze several consequences of the proposed design, notably, the possibility of fast internal modulation. PMID:19516397

  13. Determination of sugar specificity of jackfruit lectin by a simple sugar-lectin binding assay using microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Wetprasit, N; Chulavatnatol, M

    1997-06-01

    Sugar-lectin binding assay was developed as a simple method which employed direct coating of microtiter plate with galactose-binding lectins. Biotin-galactose conjugate was used to bind to the immobilized lectins. The bound conjugate was then detected using streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase. Using the assay in conjunction with various competing carbohydrates, jackfruit lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus was found to be specific for alpha-anomer of galactoside with an aromatic residue.

  14. Alternative 3' splice acceptor sites modulate enzymic activity in derivative alleles of the maize bronze1-mutable 13 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Okagaki, R J; Sullivan, T D; Schiefelbein, J W; Nelson, O E

    1992-01-01

    The defective Suppressor-mutator (dSpm)-induced allele bronze1-mutable 13 (bz1-m13) and many of its derivative alleles are leaky mutants with measurable levels of flavonol O3-glucosyltransferase activity. This activity results from splicing at acceptor site-1, one of two cryptic 3' splice sites within the dSpm insertion in bz1-m13. In this study, splicing in bz1-m13 change-in-state (CS) alleles CS-3 and CS-64 was shown to be altered from bz1-m13; previous work found altered splicing in CS-9. CS-64 is a null allele and lacks the acceptor site-1-spliced transcript because this site is deleted. CS-3 and CS-9 had increased levels of the acceptor site-1 transcript relative to bz1-m13 and increased enzymic activities. A deletion in CS-9 altered splicing by eliminating acceptor site-2. Both acceptor sites were intact in CS-3, but a deletion removed most of a 275-bp GC-rich sequence in dSpm. This suggests that GC-rich sequences affect splicing and is consistent with models postulating a role for AU content in the splicing of plant introns. Splicing does not necessarily occur, however, at the junction of AU-rich intron sequences and GC-rich exon sequences. PMID:1477558

  15. Purification and characterization of Dolichos lablab lectin.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Meah, Y; Moore, J G; Goldstein, I J

    1999-02-01

    The mannose/glucose-binding Dolichos lablab lectin (designated DLL) has been purified from seeds of Dolichos lablab (hyacinth bean) to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography on an ovalbumin-Sepharose 4B column. The purified lectin gave a single symmetric protein peak with an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa on gel filtration chromatography, and five bands ranging from 10 kDa to 22 kDa upon SDS-PAGE. N-Terminal sequence analysis of these bands revealed subunit heterogeneity due to posttranslational proteolytic truncation at different sites mostly at the carboxyl terminus. The carbohydrate binding properties of the purified lectin were investigated by three different approaches: hemagglutination inhibition assay, quantitative precipitation inhibition assay, and ELISA. On the basis of these studies, it is concluded that the Dolichos lablab lectin has neither an extended carbohydrate combining site, nor a hydrophobic binding site adjacent to it. The carbohydrate combining site of DLL appears to most effectively accommodate a nonreducing terminal alpha-d-mannosyl unit, and to be complementary to the C-3, C-4, and C-6 equatorial hydroxyl groups of alpha-d-mannopyranosyl and alpha-d-glucopyranosyl residues. DLL strongly precipitates murine IgM but not IgG, and the recent finding that this lectin interacts specifically with NIH 3T3 fibroblasts transfected with the Flt3 tyrosine kinase receptor and preserves human cord blood stem cells and progenitors in a quiescent state for prolonged periods in culture, make this lectin a valuable tool in biomedical research. PMID:9949194

  16. Diversity of lectins in Macrobrachium rosenbergii and their expression patterns under spiroplasma MR-1008 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huanxi; Du, Jie; Hui, Kai-Min; Liu, Peng; Chen, Jing; Xiu, Yunji; Yao, Wei; Wu, Ting; Meng, Qingguo; Gu, Wei; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2013-08-01

    Lectins play important roles in crustacean innate immunity through recognition of foreign pathogens. In this study, 20 lectins including C-type lectins [dual-carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) type and single-CRD type], L-type lectin, and lectin with low-density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) domain were identified from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The tissue distribution and expression patterns of these lectins under spiroplasma strain MR-1008 challenge were investigated. Most of the lectins were found to be mainly distributed in the hepatopancreas. Lectin5, Lectin14, Lectin17, and Lectin18 exhibited the highest expression level in the hemocytes, nerve, intestine, and heart, respectively. MrLec1 to MrLec6 (dual-CRD lectins) in the hepatopancreas were up-regulated by spiroplasma challenge. Single-CRD lectins reached the highest level at 72 h after spiroplasma challenge. Lectin9 and Lectin15 both belong to L-type lectins. At post-spiroplasma challenge, Lectin9 expression was up-regulated, whereas Lectin15 expression was down-regulated. Lectin11 with LDLa domain showed the highest level after 12 h Lectin18 and Lectin20, namely, CD209, were also up-regulated by spiroplasma challenge. Lectin14, a C-type lectin, quickly reached the highest level after 2 h Lectin16 showed the highest level after 72 h Lectin5 reached the highest level in cultured hemocytes after 6 h Lectin17 in the intestine and Lectin14 in the nerve were slightly up-regulated after 6 and 2 h, respectively. Our research results indicate that lectins may play important roles in early or late immune responses against spiroplasma challenge.

  17. A hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 highlights the role of TSC1/TSC2 in signaling to AKT and models mild human TSC2 alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollizzi, Kristen; Malinowska-Kolodziej, Izabela; Doughty, Cheryl; Betz, Charles; Ma, Jian; Goto, June; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2009-07-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome in which hamartomas develop in multiple organ systems. Knockout and conditional alleles of Tsc1 and Tsc2 have been previously reported. Here, we describe the generation of a novel hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 (del3), in which exon 3, encoding 37 amino acids near the N terminus of tuberin, is deleted. Embryos homozygous for the del3 allele survive until E13.5, 2 days longer than Tsc2 null embryos. Embryos die from underdevelopment of the liver, deficient hematopoiesis, aberrant vascular development and hemorrhage. Mice that are heterozygous for the del3 allele have a markedly reduced kidney tumor burden in comparison with conventional Tsc2(+/-) mice. Murine embryo fibroblast (MEF) cultures that are homozygous for the del3 allele express mutant tuberin at low levels, and show enhanced activation of mTORC1, similar to Tsc2 null MEFs. Furthermore, the mutant cells show prominent reduction in the activation of AKT. Similar findings were made in the analysis of homozygous del3 embryo lysates. Tsc2-del3 demonstrates GTPase activating protein activity comparable to that of wild-type Tsc2 in a functional assay. These findings indicate that the del3 allele is a hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 with partial function due to reduced expression, and highlight the consistency of AKT downregulation when Tsc1/Tsc2 function is reduced. Tsc2-del3 mice also serve as a model for hypomorphic TSC2 missense mutations reported in TSC patients.

  18. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K.; Veelken, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25784678

  19. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Ferguson, Ardene L.

    1978-01-01

    Three different assay procedures have been used to quantitate the levels of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lectin in various tissues of soybean plants. The assays used were a standard hemagglutination assay, a radioimmunoassay, and an isotope dilution assay. Most of the lectin in seeds was found in the cotyledons, but lectin was also detected in the embryo axis and the seed coat. Soybean lectin was present in all of the tissues of young seedlings, but decreased as the plants matured and was not detectable in plants older than 2 to 3 weeks. Soybean lectin isolated from seeds of several soybean varieties were identical when compared by several methods. PMID:16660384

  20. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  1. Current progress on TPFI nulling architectures at Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gappinger, Robert O.; Wallace, J. Kent; Bartos, Randall D.; Macdonald, Daniel R.; Brown, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Infrared interferometric nulling is a promising technology for exoplanet detection. Nulling research for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer has been exploring a variety of interferometer architectures at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  2. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  3. Comprehensive list of lectins: origins, natures, and carbohydrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Tateno, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Haruko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the first lectin ricin was discovered. Since then, a wide variety of lectins (lect means "select" in Latin) have been isolated from plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, as well as viruses, and their structures and properties have been characterized. At present, as many as 48 protein scaffolds have been identified as functional lectins from the viewpoint of three-dimensional structures as described in this chapter. In this chapter, representative 53 lectins are selected, and their major properties that include hemagglutinating activity, mitogen activity, blood group specificity, molecular weight, metal requirement, and sugar specificities are summarized as a comprehensive table. The list will provide a practically useful, comprehensive list for not only experienced lectin users but also many other non-expert researchers, who are not familiar to lectins and, therefore, have no access to advanced lectin biotechnologies described in other chapters. PMID:25117264

  4. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  5. Adaptive null steering by reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofer, J. W.; Martin, G. P.; Ralph, S. E.

    The feasibility of peforming adaptive null steering by reflector antennas is investigated, and the results are reported. The implementation consists of an array of feed elements located in the focal region. The outputs of all the feeds are weighted in phase and amplitude and summed coherently. After deduction by a receiver, the signal passes to a digital algorithm computer where a decision is made as to how the weights should be adjusted, and interactive perturbational process continues until the system has arrived at an optimal weight combination. The configuration allows for multiple jammers and/or desired signals. Nulls on the order of 35 dB can be achieved with the basic limitation being amplitude and phase balance of the RF weights versus frequency. The system offers simpler, lighter weight more economically than full-phased arrays, much broader bandwidth than sidelobe cancellers, well-understood analysis procedures, and allows cancellation high up on the main beam.

  6. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko

    2006-01-01

    A description of adaptive nulling for Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPFI) is presented. The topics include: 1) Nulling in TPF-I; 2) Why Do Adaptive Nulling; 3) Parallel High-Order Compensator Design; 4) Phase and Amplitude Control; 5) Development Activates; 6) Requirements; 7) Simplified Experimental Setup; 8) Intensity Correction; and 9) Intensity Dispersion Stability. A short summary is also given on adaptive nulling for the TPFI.

  7. Starlight Nulling Technology at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The current interests in extra-solar planet detection and space-based and ground-based interferometry for astronomical observations has led to the development of a number of nulling instrument designs at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and elsewhere. This paper summarizes briefly JPL's efforts in nulling interferometry to date and consists of illustrations of some key nulling activities. Basic layouts of nulling testbeds are described and key applications discussed.

  8. Gap solitons with null-scattering.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Nireekshan; Dutta Gupta, S

    2014-04-15

    In this Letter, we study the excitation of gap solitons under the conditions of coherent perfect absorption. Our system consists of a symmetric periodic structure with alternating Kerr nonlinear and linear layers illuminated from both ends. We show near-total transfer of incident light energy into the gap solitons resulting in null scattering. We also report on the nonlinear super-scattering states. Both the exact and the approximate results, which show good agreement based on nonlinear characteristic matrix methods, are presented.

  9. Gradient moment nulling in fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Hinks, R S; Constable, R T

    1994-12-01

    The fast spin echo sequence combines data from many echo signals in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train to form a single image. Much of the signal in the second and later echoes results from the coherent addition of stimulated echo signal components back to the spin echo signal. Because stimulated echoes experience no dephasing effects during the time that they are stored as Mz magnetization, they experience a different gradient first moment than does the spin echo. This leads to flow-related phase differences between different echo components and results in flow voids and ghosting, even when the first moment is nulled for the spin echo signal. A method of gradient moment nulling that correctly compensates both spin echo and stimulated echo components has been developed. The simplest solution involves nulling the first gradient moment at least at the RF pulses and preferably at both the RF pulses and the echoes. Phantom and volunteer studies demonstrate good suppression of flow-related artifacts.

  10. Allelic association between marker loci.

    PubMed

    Lonjou, C; Collins, A; Morton, N E

    1999-02-16

    Allelic association has proven useful to refine the location of major genes prior to positional cloning, but it is of uncertain value for genome scans in complex inheritance. We have extended kinship theory to give information content for linkage and allelic association. Application to pairs of closely linked markers as a surrogate for marker x oligogene pairs indicates that association is largely determined by regional founders, with little effect of subsequent demography. Sub-Saharan Africa has the least allelic association, consistent with settlement of other regions by small numbers of founders. Recent speculation about substantial advantages of isolates over large populations, of constant size over expansion, and of F1 hybrids over incrosses is not supported by theory or data. On the contrary, fewer affected cases, less opportunity for replication, and more stochastic variation tend to make isolates less informative for allelic association, as they are for linkage.

  11. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Demonstrate Extreme Directional Differentiation among Human Populations, Compared to Other Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T.; Morgan, Alex A.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B.; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Butte, Atul J.

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  13. Lectin genes in the Frankia alni genome.

    PubMed

    Pujic, Petar; Fournier, Pascale; Alloisio, Nicole; Hay, Anne-Emmanuelle; Maréchal, Joelle; Anchisi, Stéphanie; Normand, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Frankia alni strain ACN14a's genome was scanned for the presence of determinants involved in interactions with its host plant, Alnus spp. One such determinant type is lectin, proteins that bind specifically to sugar motifs. The genome of F. alni was found to contain 7 such lectin-coding genes, five of which were of the ricinB-type. The proteins coded by these genes contain either only the lectin domain, or also a heat shock protein or a serine-threonine kinase domain upstream. These lectins were found to have several homologs in Streptomyces spp., and a few in other bacterial genomes among which none in Frankia EAN1pec and CcI3 and two in strain EUN1f. One of these F. alni genes, FRAAL0616, was cloned in E. coli, fused with a reporter gene yielding a fusion protein that was found to bind to both root hairs and to bacterial hyphae. This protein was also found to modify the dynamics of nodule formation in A. glutinosa, resulting in a higher number of nodules per root. Its role could thus be to permit binding of microbial cells to root hairs and help symbiosis to occur under conditions of low Frankia cell counts such as in pioneer situations. PMID:22159868

  14. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  15. Jacalin: an IgA-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Roque-Barreira, M C; Campos-Neto, A

    1985-03-01

    We previously reported that seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit) contain a lectin, which we call jacalin, that is both a potent T cell mitogen and an apparently T cell-independent activator of human B cells for the secretion of immunoglobulins. During the above experiments we noted a massive precipitation in cell cultures stimulated with greater than or equal to 100 micrograms of lectin. In this paper, we show that the precipitate is formed after the interaction of jacalin and the serum protein added to the culture medium. More importantly, we demonstrate that IgA is probably the major serum constituent precipitated by the lectin and that no IgG or IgM can be detected in the precipitates. In secretions such as colostrum, IgA is the only protein precipitated by jacalin. On the basis of this specificity we describe a simple and reliable affinity chromatography procedure for the purification of both human serum and colostrum IgA. Jacalin is a D-Gal binding lectin and should be a useful tool for studying of serum and secretory IgA.

  16. A mushroom lectin from ascomycete Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eui Cha; Kim, Ki Don; Bae, Chan Hyung; Kim, Ju Cheol; Kim, Dae Kyong; Kim, Ha Hyung

    2007-05-01

    A mushroom lectin has been purified from ascomycete Cordyceps militaris, which is one of the most popular mushrooms in eastern Asia used as a nutraceutical and in traditional Chinese medicine. This lectin, designated CML, exhibited hemagglutination activity in mouse and rat erythrocytes, but not in human ABO erythrocytes. SDS-PAGE of CML revealed a single band with a molecular mass of 31.0 kDa under both nonreducing and reducing conditions that was stained by silver nitrate, and a 31.4 kDa peak in a Superdex-200 HR gel-filtration column. The hemagglutination activity was inhibited by sialoglycoproteins, but not in by mono- or disaccharides, asialoglycoproteins, or de-O-acetylated glycoprotein. The activity was maximal at pH 6.0-9.1 and at temperatures below 50 degrees C. Circular dichroism spectrum analysis revealed that CML comprises 27% alpha-helix, 12% beta-sheets, 29% beta-turns, and 32% random coils. Its binding specificity and secondary structure are similar to those of a fungal lectin from Arthrobotrys oligospora. However, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of CML differs greatly from those of other lectins. CML exhibits mitogenic activity against mouse splenocytes. PMID:17306462

  17. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  18. Seven novel HLA alleles reflect different mechanisms involved in the evolution of HLA diversity: description of the new alleles and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Adamek, Martina; Klages, Cornelia; Bauer, Manuela; Kudlek, Evelina; Drechsler, Alina; Leuser, Birte; Scherer, Sabine; Opelz, Gerhard; Tran, Thuong Hien

    2015-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci are among the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The diversity of these genes is thought to be generated by different mechanisms including point mutation, gene conversion and crossing-over. During routine HLA typing, we discovered seven novel HLA alleles which were probably generated by different evolutionary mechanisms. HLA-B*41:21, HLA-DQB1*02:10 and HLA-DQA1*01:12 likely emerged from the common alleles of their groups by point mutations, all of which caused non-synonymous amino acid substitutions. In contrast, a deletion of one nucleotide leading to a frame shift with subsequent generation of a stop codon is responsible for the appearance of a null allele, HLA-A*01:123N. Whereas HLA-B*35:231 and HLA-B*53:31 were probably products of intralocus gene conversion between HLA-B alleles, HLA-C*07:294 presumably evolved by interlocus gene conversion between an HLA-C and an HLA-B allele. Our analysis of these novel alleles illustrates the different mechanisms which may have contributed to the evolution of HLA polymorphism.

  19. Differentiation of Bacillus anthracis and other Bacillus species by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, H B; Ezzell, J W; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1984-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis was agglutinated by several lectins, including those from Griffonia simplicifolia, Glycine max, Abrus precatorius, and Ricinus communis. Some strains of Bacillus cereus var. mycoides (B. mycoides) were strongly reactive with the lectin from Helix pomatia and weakly reactive with the G. max lectin. The differential interactions between Bacillus species and lectins afforded a means of distinguishing B. anthracis from other bacilli. B. cereus strains exhibited heterogeneity with respect to agglutination patterns by lectins but could readily be differentiated from B. anthracis and the related B. mycoides. Spores of B. anthracis and B. mycoides retained lectin receptors, although the heating of spores or vegetative cells at 100 degrees C resulted in a decrease in their ability to be specifically agglutinated. Fluorescein-conjugated lectin of G. max stained vegetative cells of B. anthracis uniformly, suggesting that the distribution of lectin receptors was continuous over the entire cellular surface. B. anthracis cells grown under conditions to promote the production of capsular poly(D-glutamyl peptide) were also readily agglutinated by the lectins, suggesting that the lectin reactive sites penetrate the polypeptide layer. Trypsin, subtilisin, lysozyme, and mutanolysin did not modify the reactivity of B. anthracis with the G. max agglutinin, although the same enzymes markedly diminished the interaction between the lectin and B. mycoides. Because the lectins which interact with B. anthracis are specific for alpha-D-galactose or 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-galactose residues, it is likely that the bacteria possess cell surface polymers which contain these sugars. Lectins may prove useful in the laboratory identification of B. anthracis and possibly other pathogenic Bacillus species, such as B. cereus. Images PMID:6418761

  20. A GLRA1 null mutation in recessive hyperekplexia challenges the functional role of glycine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.; Saul, M.; Becker, C.M.

    1996-05-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the human glycine receptor (GlyR) {alpha}1 subunit gene (GLRA1) give rise to hereditary hyperekplexia. These mutations impair agonist affinities and change conductance states of expressed mutant channels, resulting in a partial loss of function. In a recessive case of hyperekplexia, we found a deletion of exons 1-6 of the GLRA1 gene. Born to consanguineous parents, the affected child is homozygous for this GLRA1{sup null} allele consistent with a complete loss of gene function. The child displayed exaggerated startle responses and pronounced head-retraction jerks reflecting a disinhibition of vestigial brain-stem reflexes. In contrast, proprio- and exteroceptive inhibition of muscle activity previously correlated to glycinergic mechanisms were not affected. This case demonstrates that, in contrast to the lethal effect of a null allele in the recessive mouse mutant oscillator (Glra1{sup spd-ot}), the loss of the GlyR {alpha}1 subunit is effectively compensated in man. 38 refs.

  1. System and Method for Null-Lens Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter C. (Inventor); Thompson, Patrick L. (Inventor); Aronstein, David L. (Inventor); Bolcar, Matthew R. (Inventor); Smith, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of measuring aberrations in a null-lens including assembly and alignment aberrations. The null-lens may be used for measuring aberrations in an aspheric optic with the null-lens. Light propagates from the aspheric optic location through the null-lens, while sweeping a detector through the null-lens focal plane. Image data being is collected at locations about said focal plane. Light is simulated propagating to the collection locations for each collected image. Null-lens aberrations may extracted, e.g., applying image-based wavefront-sensing to collected images and simulation results. The null-lens aberrations improve accuracy in measuring aspheric optic aberrations.

  2. The first mecp2-null zebrafish model shows altered motor behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pietri, Thomas; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Guyon, Nicolas; Romano, Sebastián A.; Washbourne, Philip; Moens, Cecilia B.; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G.; Sumbre, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and one of the most common causes of mental retardation in affected girls. Other symptoms include a rapid regression of motor and cognitive skills after an apparently early normal development. Sporadic mutations in the transcription factor MECP2 has been shown to be present in more than 90% of the patients and several models of MeCP2-deficient mice have been created to understand the role of this gene. These models have pointed toward alterations in the maintenance of the central nervous system rather than its development, in line with the late onset of the disease in humans. However, the exact functions of MeCP2 remain difficult to delineate and the animal models have yielded contradictory results. Here, we present the first mecp2-null allele mutation zebrafish model. Surprisingly and in contrast to MeCP2-null mouse models, mecp2-null zebrafish are viable and fertile. They present nonetheless clear behavioral alterations during their early development, including spontaneous and sensory-evoked motor anomalies, as well as defective thigmotaxis. PMID:23874272

  3. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  4. Displacing Unpredictable Nulls in Antenna Radiation Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James; Schaefer, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A method of maintaining radio communication despite the emergence of unpredictable fades and nulls in the radiation pattern of an antenna has been proposed. The method was originally intended to be applied in the design and operation of a radio antenna aboard a robotic exploratory vehicle on a remote planet during communication with a spacecraft in orbit around the planet. The method could also be applied in similar terrestrial situations for example, radio communication between two ground vehicles or between a ground vehicle and an aircraft or spacecraft. The method is conceptually simple, is readily adaptable to diverse situations, and can be implemented without adding greatly to the weight, cost, power demand, or complexity of a system to which it may be applied. The unpredictable fades and nulls in an antenna radiation pattern arise because of electromagnetic interactions between the antenna and other objects within the near field of the antenna (basically, objects within a distance of a few wavelengths). These objects can include general vehicle components, masts, robotic arms, other antennas, the ground, and nearby terrain features. Figure 1 presents representative plots of signal strength versus time during a typical pass of a spacecraft or aircraft through the far field of such an antenna, showing typical nulls and fades caused by nearby objects. The traditional approach to ensuring reliability of communication in the presence of deep fades calls for increasing the effective transmitter power and/or reducing the receiver noise figure at the affected ground vehicle, possibly in combination with appropriate redesign of the equipment at the spacecraft or aircraft end of the communication link. These solutions can be expensive and/or risky and, depending on the application, can add significantly to weight, cost, and power demand. The proposed method entails none of these disadvantages.

  5. Clausius entropy for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccetti, Valentina; Visser, Matt

    2014-02-01

    Jacobson’s thermodynamic derivation of the Einstein equations was originally applied only to local Rindler horizons. But at least some parts of that construction can usefully be extended to give meaningful results for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces. As presaged in Jacobson’s original article, this more general construction sharply brings into focus the questions: is entropy objectively ‘real’? Or is entropy in some sense subjective and observer-dependent? These innocent questions open a Pandora’s box of often inconclusive debate. A consensus opinion, though certainly not universally held, seems to be that Clausius entropy (thermodynamic entropy, defined via a Clausius relation {\\rm{d}}S = \\unicode{x111} Q/T) should be objectively real, but that the ontological status of statistical entropy (Shannon or von Neumann entropy) is much more ambiguous, and much more likely to be observer-dependent. This question is particularly pressing when it comes to understanding Bekenstein entropy (black hole entropy). To perhaps further add to the confusion, we shall argue that even the Clausius entropy can often be observer-dependent. In the current article we shall conclusively demonstrate that one can meaningfully assign a notion of Clausius entropy to arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces—effectively defining a ‘virtual Clausius entropy’ for arbitrary ‘virtual (local) causal horizons’. As an application, we see that we can implement a version of the generalized second law (GSL) for this virtual Clausius entropy. This version of GSL can be related to certain (nonstandard) integral variants of the null energy condition. Because the concepts involved are rather subtle, we take some effort in being careful and explicit in developing our framework. In future work we will apply this construction to generalize Jacobson’s derivation of the Einstein equations.

  6. Null Energy Condition in Dynamic Wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, D.; Visser, M.

    1998-07-01

    We extend previous proofs that violations of the null energy condition are a generic and universal feature of traversable wormholes to completely nonsymmetric time-dependent wormholes. We show that the analysis can be phrased purely in terms of local geometry at and near the wormhole throat, and we do not have to make any technical assumptions about asymptotic flatness or other global properties. A key aspect of the analysis is the demonstration that time-dependent wormholes have {ital two} throats, one for each direction through the wormhole, and that the two throats coalesce only for the case of a static wormhole. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Polyhedra in spacetime from null vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiman, Yasha

    2014-01-01

    We consider convex spacelike polyhedra oriented in the Minkowski space. These are the classical analogues of spinfoam intertwiners. We point out a parametrization of these shapes using null face normals, with no constraints or redundancies. Our construction is dimension-independent. In 3+1d, it provides the spacetime picture behind a well-known property of the loop quantum gravity intertwiner space in spinor form, namely that the closure constraint is always satisfied after some SL(2, C) rotation. As a simple application of our variables, we incorporate them in a 4-simplex action that reproduces the large-spin behavior of the Barrett-Crane vertex amplitude.

  8. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  9. Complement-mediated neutralization of dengue virus requires mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Hauhart, Richard E; Marovich, Mary A; Garred, Peter; Atkinson, John P; Diamond, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble pathogen recognition protein of the innate immune system that binds specific mannose-containing glycans on the surfaces of microbial agents and initiates complement activation via the lectin pathway. Prior studies showed that MBL-dependent activation of the complement cascade neutralized insect cell-derived West Nile virus (WNV) in cell culture and restricted pathogenesis in mice. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of MBL in infection by dengue virus (DENV), a related flavivirus. Using a panel of naïve sera from mouse strains deficient in different complement components, we showed that inhibition of infection by insect cell- and mammalian cell-derived DENV was primarily dependent on the lectin pathway. Human MBL also bound to DENV and neutralized infection of all four DENV serotypes through complement activation-dependent and -independent pathways. Experiments with human serum from naïve individuals with inherent variation in the levels of MBL in blood showed a direct correlation between the concentration of MBL and neutralization of DENV; samples with high levels of MBL in blood neutralized DENV more efficiently than those with lower levels. Our studies suggest that allelic variation of MBL in humans may impact complement-dependent control of DENV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus that causes a spectrum of clinical disease in humans ranging from subclinical infection to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Four serotypes of DENV exist, and severe illness is usually associated with secondary infection by a different serotype. Here, we show that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule that initiates the lectin pathway of complement activation, neutralized infection of all four DENV serotypes through complement activation-dependent and -independent pathways. Moreover, we observed a direct correlation with the concentration of MBL in

  10. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  11. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  12. ON VASCULAR STENOSIS, RESTENOSIS AND MANNOSE BINDING LECTIN

    PubMed Central

    KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; SKARE, Thelma L; RIBAS, Carmen Australia Paredes Marcondes; RAMOS, Gabriela Piovezani; PETISCO, Roberta Dombroski

    2016-01-01

    Mannose binding lectin is a lectin instrumental in the innate immunity. It recognizes carbohydrate patterns found on the surface of a large number of pathogenic micro-organisms, activating the complement system. However, this protein seems to increase the tissue damage after ischemia. In this paper is reviewed some aspects of harmful role of the mannose binding lectin in ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27120743

  13. Mannose-binding lectin in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Sarah; Dzwonek, Agnieszka; Klein, Nigel J

    2010-01-01

    Infection with HIV represents a significant global health problem, with high infection rates and high mortality worldwide. Treatment with antiretroviral therapy is inaccessible to many patients and efficacy is limited by development of resistance and side effects. The interactions of HIV with the human immune system, both innate and humoral, are complex and complicated by the profound ability of the virus to disable the host immune response. Mannose-binding lectin, a component of the innate immune system, has been demonstrated to play a role in host-virus interactions. This protein may have a key role in determining host susceptibility to infection, pathogenesis and progression of disease, and may contribute to the extensive variability of host response to infection. Further understanding and manipulation of the mannose-binding lectin response may represent a target for immunomodulation in HIV infection, which may, in conjunction with highly active antiretroviral therapy, allow development of a novel therapeutic approach to HIV infection. PMID:21218140

  14. A Nulling Coronagraph for TPF-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, Bruce Martin; Wallace, James Kent; Orton, Glenn S.; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Lane, Benjamin F.; Seager, Sara; Tolls, Volker; Lyon, Richard G.; Samuele, Rocco; Tenerelli, Domenick J.; Woodruff, Robert; Ge, Jian

    2006-01-01

    The nulling coronagraph is one of 5 instrument concepts selected by NASA for study for potential use in the TPF-C mission. This concept for extreme starlight suppression has two major components, a nulling interferometer to suppress the starlight to 10(sup -10) per airy spot within 2 (lamda)/D of the star, and a calibration interferometer to measure the residual scattered starlight. The ability to work at 2 (lamda)/D dramatically improves the science throughput of a space based coronagraph like TPF-C. The calibration interferometer is an equally important part of the starlight suppression system. It measures the measures the wavefront of the scattered starlight with very high SNR, to 0.05nm in less than 5 minutes on a 5mag star. In addition, the post coronagraph wavefront sensor will be used to measure the residual scattered light after the coronagraph and subtract it in post processing to 12x10(sup -11) to enable detection of an Earthlike planet with a SNR of 510.

  15. Passive reverberation nulling for target enhancement.

    PubMed

    Song, H C; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Sabra, K G; Akal, T; Stevenson, M

    2007-12-01

    Echo-to-reverberation enhancement previously has been demonstrated using time reversal focusing when knowledge of the channel response between a target and the source array elements is available. In the absence of this knowledge, direct focusing is not possible. However, active reverberation nulling still is feasible given observations of reverberation from conventional source array transmissions. For a given range of interest, the response between the source array elements and the dominant sources of boundary reverberation is provided by the corresponding reverberation from this range. Thus, an active transmission can be projected from the source array which minimizes the energy interacting with the boundaries at a given range while still ensonifying the waveguide between the boundaries. As an alternative, here a passive reverberation nulling concept is proposed. In a similar fashion, the observed reverberation defines the response between the source array elements and the dominant sources of boundary reverberation at each range and this is used to drive a range-dependent sequence of projection operators. When these projection operators subsequently are applied to the received data vectors, reverberation can be diminished. The improvement in target detectability is demonstrated using experimental data with an echo repeater simulating the presence of a target.

  16. Concept, strategy and realization of lectin-based glycan profiling.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Lectins are a diverse group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Each lectin has its own specificity profile. It is believed that lectins exist in all living organisms that produce glycans. From a practical viewpoint, lectins have been used extensively in biochemical fields including proteomics due to their usefulness as detection and enrichment tools for specific glycans. Nevertheless, they have often been underestimated as probes, especially compared with antibodies, because of their low affinity and broad specificity. However, together with the concept of glycomics, such properties of lectins are now considered to be suitable for the task of 'profiling' in order to cover a wider range of ligands. Recently there has been rapid movement in the field of proteomics aimed at the investigation of glycan-related biomarkers. This is partly because of limitations of the present approach of simply following changes in protein-level expression, without paying sufficient attention to the fact and effects of glycosylation. The trend is reflected in the frequent use of lectins in the contexts of glycoprotein enrichment and glycan profiling. However, there are many aspects to be considered in using lectins, which differ considerably from antibodies. In this article, the author, as a developer of two unique methodologies, frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) and the lectin microarray, describes critical points concerning the use of lectins, together with the concept, strategy and means to achieve advances in these emerging glycan profiling technologies. PMID:18390573

  17. Are vicilins another major class of legume lectins?

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana C; Monteiro, Sara V; Carrapiço, Belmira M; Ferreira, Ricardo B

    2014-01-01

    Legume lectins comprise a structurally related, Ca/Mn-dependent, widespread, abundant and well characterized lectin family when compared to the large number of lectins from other sources described in the literature. Strangely enough, no specific function has been assigned to them aside from a possible role in storage and/or defense. Using a recent and fine-tuned methodology capable of specific lectin identification, β-conglutin, Vicia faba vicilin and β-lathyrin, the vicilin storage globulins from Lupinus albus, V. faba and Lathyrus sativus, respectively, were shown to be capable of affinity binding to thoroughly washed erythrocyte membranes and of specific elution with appropriate sugars. Based on this evidence and on sparse data published in the literature, a second family of legume lectins is proposed: the 7S family of storage proteins from leguminous seeds, or family II of legume lectins. These lectins are also structurally related, widespread and well characterized. In addition, they self-aggregate in a Ca/Mg, electrostatic dependent manner and are even more abundant than the family I of legume lectins. Using the same evidence, reserve and defense roles may be attributed to family II of legume lectins.

  18. Antifungal properties of lectin and new chitinases from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Gozia, O; Ciopraga, J; Bentia, T; Lungu, M; Zamfirescu, I; Tudor, R; Roseanu, A; Nitu, F

    1993-08-01

    We have purified from potato tubers, the lectin STA devoid of chitinase activity and two chitinases devoid of lectin activity. Both enzymes are 16 kDa glycoproteins, and probably belong to a new family of plant chitinases. The respective antifungal properties of lectin and chitinases were studied by following their effects against early developmental stages of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal potato pathogen. Here we demonstrate that: (1) lectin does not inhibit mycelial growth but irreversibly inhibits conidia germination and alters the germ tubes; and (2) chitinases block mycelial growth as well as conidia germination and lyse germ tubes.

  19. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  20. Tomato lectin histochemistry for microglial visualization.

    PubMed

    Villacampa, Nàdia; Almolda, Beatriz; González, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    The use of different lectins for the study of microglial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) is a valuable tool that has been extensively used in the last years for the selective staining of this glial cell population, not only in normal physiological conditions, but also in a wide range of pathological situations where the normal homeostasis of the parenchyma is disturbed. In this chapter we accurately describe the methodology for the selective labelling of microglial cells by using the tomato lectin (TL), a protein lectin obtained from Lycopersicum esculentum with specific affinity for poly-N-acetyl lactosamine sugar residues which are found on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm of microglia. Here we describe how to perform this technique on vibratome, frozen, and paraffin sections for optical microscopy, as well as for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Using this methodology it is possible to visualize amoeboid microglia in the developing brain, ramified microglia in the adult, and activated/reactive microglia in the experimentally damaged brain. In addition, as TL also recognized sugar residues in endothelial cells, this technique is very useful for the study of the relationship established between microglia and the CNS vasculature. PMID:23813385

  1. Phenotypic analysis of separation-of-function alleles of MEI-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR.

    PubMed Central

    Laurençon, Anne; Purdy, Amanda; Sekelsky, Jeff; Hawley, R Scott; Su, Tin Tin

    2003-01-01

    ATM/ATR kinases act as signal transducers in eukaryotic DNA damage and replication checkpoints. Mutations in ATM/ATR homologs have pleiotropic effects that range from sterility to increased killing by genotoxins in humans, mice, and Drosophila. Here we report the generation of a null allele of mei-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR homolog, and the use of it to document a semidominant effect on a larval mitotic checkpoint and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) sensitivity. We also tested the role of mei-41 in a recently characterized checkpoint that delays metaphase/anaphase transition after DNA damage in cellular embryos. We then compare five existing mei-41 alleles to the null with respect to known phenotypes (female sterility, cell cycle checkpoints, and MMS resistance). We find that not all phenotypes are affected equally by each allele, i.e., the functions of MEI-41 in ensuring fertility, cell cycle regulation, and resistance to genotoxins are genetically separable. We propose that MEI-41 acts not in a single rigid signal transduction pathway, but in multiple molecular contexts to carry out its many functions. Sequence analysis identified mutations, which, for most alleles, fall in the poorly characterized region outside the kinase domain; this allowed us to tentatively identify additional functional domains of MEI-41 that could be subjected to future structure-function studies of this key molecule. PMID:12807779

  2. Off-Axis Nulling Transfer Function Measurement: A First Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedova, G. Dalla; Menut, J.-L.; Millour, F.; Petrov, R.; Cassaing, F.; Danchi, W. C.; Jacquinod, S.; Lhome, E.; Lopez, B.; Lozi, J.; Marcotto, A.; Parisot, J.; Reess, J.-M.

    2013-01-01

    We want to study a polychromatic inverse problem method with nulling interferometers to obtain information on the structures of the exozodiacal light. For this reason, during the first semester of 2013, thanks to the support of the consortium PERSEE, we launched a campaign of laboratory measurements with the nulling interferometric test bench PERSEE, operating with 9 spectral channels between J and K bands. Our objective is to characterise the transfer function, i.e. the map of the null as a function of wavelength for an off-axis source, the null being optimised on the central source or on the source photocenter. We were able to reach on-axis null depths better than 10(exp -4). This work is part of a broader project aiming at creating a simulator of a nulling interferometer in which typical noises of a real instrument are introduced. We present here our first results.

  3. The number of alleles at a microsatellite defines the allele frequency spectrum and facilitates fast accurate estimation of theta.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical work focused on microsatellite variation has produced a number of important results, including the expected distribution of repeat sizes and the expected squared difference in repeat size between two randomly selected samples. However, closed-form expressions for the sampling distribution and frequency spectrum of microsatellite variation have not been identified. Here, we use coalescent simulations of the stepwise mutation model to develop gamma and exponential approximations of the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum, a distribution central to the description of microsatellite variation across the genome. For both approximations, the parameter of biological relevance is the number of alleles at a locus, which we express as a function of θ, the population-scaled mutation rate, based on simulated data. Discovered relationships between θ, the number of alleles, and the frequency spectrum support the development of three new estimators of microsatellite θ. The three estimators exhibit roughly similar mean squared errors (MSEs) and all are biased. However, across a broad range of sample sizes and θ values, the MSEs of these estimators are frequently lower than all other estimators tested. The new estimators are also reasonably robust to mutation that includes step sizes greater than one. Finally, our approximation to the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum provides a null distribution of microsatellite variation. In this context, a preliminary analysis of the effects of demographic change on the frequency spectrum is performed. We suggest that simulations of the microsatellite frequency spectrum under evolutionary scenarios of interest may guide investigators to the use of relevant and sometimes novel summary statistics.

  4. Biosynthesis of the Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) Lectin in Ripening Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1988-03-01

    The biosynthesis and processing of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin were studied in vivo in ripening snowdrop ovaries. Using labeling and pulse chase labeling experiments it could be demonstrated that the snowdrop lectin is synthesized as a precursor of relative molecular weight (M(r)) 15,000 which is posttranslationally converted into the authentic lectin polypeptide of M(r) 13,000 with a half-life of about 6 hours. Gel filtration of an extract of [(3)H]leucine labeled ovaries on Sepharose 4B showed that a significant portion of the newly synthesized lectin is associated with the particulate fraction. When the organellar fraction was fractionated on isopycnic sucrose gradients this lectin banded in the same density region as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker enzyme NADH cytochrome c reductase. Both radioactivity in lectin and in enzyme activity shifted towards a higher density in the presence of 2 millimolar Mg-acetate indicating that the labeled lectin was associated with the rough ER. Labeled lectin could be chased from the ER with a half-life of 4 hours and then accumulated in the soluble fraction. Whereas the ER-associated lectin contains exclusively polypeptides of M(r) 15,000 the soluble fraction contains both precursor molecules and mature lectin polypeptides. The snowdrop lectin in the ER is fully capable of binding immobilized mannose. It is associated into tetramers with an appropriate molecular weight of 60,000. These results indicate that newly synthesized snowdrop lectin is transiently associated with the ER before transport and processing.

  5. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-01

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects.

  6. Nulling Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 m), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied.

  7. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-01

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects. PMID:19421271

  8. String spectra near some null cosmological singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, Kallingalthodi; Narayan, K.

    2009-06-15

    We construct cosmological spacetimes with null Kasner-like singularities as purely gravitational solutions with no other background fields turned on. These can be recast as anisotropic plane-wave spacetimes by coordinate transformations. We analyze string quantization to find the spectrum of string modes in these backgrounds. The classical string modes can be solved for exactly in these time-dependent backgrounds, which enables a detailed study of the near-singularity string spectrum, (time-dependent) oscillator masses, and wave functions. We find that for low-lying string modes (finite oscillation number), the classical near-singularity string mode functions are nondivergent for various families of singularities. Furthermore, for any infinitesimal regularization of the vicinity of the singularity, we find a tower of string modes of ultrahigh oscillation number which propagate essentially freely in the background. The resulting picture suggests that string interactions are non-negligible near the singularity.

  9. Technology Advancement of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Thompson, Patrick; Bolcar, Matt; Madison, Timothy; Woodruff, Robert; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The critical high contrast imaging technology for the Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) mission concept is the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC). EPIC would be capable of imaging jovian planets, dust/debris disks, and potentially super-Earths and contribute to answering how bright the debris disks are for candidate stars. The contrast requirement for EPIC is 10(exp 9) contrast at 125 milli-arseconds inner working angle. To advance the VNC technology NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin, previously developed a vacuum VNC testbed, and achieved narrowband and broadband suppression of the core of the Airy disk. Recently our group was awarded a NASA Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions to achieve two milestones: (i) 10(exp 8) contrast in narrowband light, and, (ii) 10(ecp 9) contrast in broader band light; one milestone per year, and both at 2 Lambda/D inner working angle. These will be achieved with our 2nd generation testbed known as the visible nulling testbed (VNT). It contains a MEMS based hex-packed segmented deformable mirror known as the multiple mirror array (MMA) and coherent fiber bundle, i.e. a spatial filter array (SFA). The MMA is in one interferometric arm and works to set the wavefront differences between the arms to zero. Each of the MMA segments is optically mapped to a single mode fiber of the SFA, and the SFA passively cleans the sub-aperture wavefront error leaving only piston, tip and tilt error to be controlled. The piston degree of freedom on each segment is used to correct the wavefront errors, while the tip/tilt is used to simultaneously correct the amplitude errors. Thus the VNT controls both amplitude and wavefront errors with a single MMA in closed-loop in a vacuum tank at approx.20 Hz. Herein we will discuss our ongoing progress with the VNT.

  10. Effects of lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificities on hepatoma, choriocarcinoma, melanoma and osteosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B; Ooi, V E; Liu, W K

    2000-03-01

    The effects of lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificities on human hepatoma (H3B), human choriocarcinoma (JAr), mouse melanoma (B16) and rat osteosarcoma (ROS) cell lines were investigated. Cell viability was estimated by uptake of crystal violet. Wheat germ lectin was the lectin with the most deleterious effect on the viability of H3B, JAr and ROS cell lines. The cytotoxicity of lectins with similar sugar-binding specificity to wheat germ lectin, including Maackia amurensis lectin and Solanum tuberosum lectin, was weaker than that of wheat germ lectin. N-acetylgalactosamine-and galactose-binding Tricholoma mongolicum lectin ranked third, after wheat germ lectin and Maackia amurensis lectin, with regard to its effect on H3B, and ranked, together with Maackia amurensis lectin, as the lectins with the second most pronounced effects on ROS. However, the cytotoxic effects of Tricholoma mongolicum lectin on JAr were much weaker than those of Maackia amurensis lectin, Solanum tuberosum lectin and Anguilla anguilla lectin. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin, Lens culinaris lectin and Anguilla anguilla lectin possessed milder cytotoxicity than the remaining lectins. which were approximately equipotent. The mannose-binding Narcissus pseudonarcissus and Lens culinaris lectins were only weakly cytotoxic, the exception being a stronger effect on H3B. The N-acetylgalactosamine-binding Glycine max lectin and methylgalactose-binding Artocarpus integrifolia lectin similarly exhibited low cytotoxicity. It can thus be concluded that in general the ranking was wheat germ lectin > Maackia amurensis lectin approximately Trichloma mongolicum lectins > other aforementioned lectins in cytotoxicity. A particular lectin may manifest more conspicuous toxicity on certain cell lines and less on others.

  11. Assessment of lectin inactivation by heat and digestion.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Grant, G

    1998-01-01

    Proteins/glycoproteins from plants, particularly lectins, are more resistant to heat denaturation than animal proteins (1, 2). With legume seeds, whose lectin content is appreciable, this presents potentially serious problems in nutritional practice. Therefore, before they can be used safely, legume-based food/ feeds usually require thorough and expensive heat processing to inactivate antinutritive components. Indeed, dry or moist heating of seeds at 70°C for several h has little or no effect on their lectin activity (Fig. 1) and treatment at much higher temperatures is needed to inactivate the biological and antinutritional effects of legume lectins (1, 2). The safety aspect is even more serious with some monocot lectins, such as wheatgerm agglutinin or a number of oilseed lectins, such as peanut agglutinin and many others because they are extremely heat stable and normal cooking or other conventional heat treatments may fail to inactivate them (3) Thus, the best way to avoid potential harmful effects of these heat-resistant lectins is to limit their dietary intake to a minimum. Fig. 1. Loss of lectin activity during aqueous heat treatment of soybean at various temperatures. PMID:21374488

  12. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  13. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  14. Plant Lectins: Wheat Defense Strategy Against Hessian Fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants produce a variety of defense proteins, including lectins in response to attack by phytophagous insects. Ultrastructural studies reveal that binding to insect gut structures and resistance to proteolytic degradation by insect digestive enzymes are the two main prerequisites for the lectins to...

  15. Combined biochemical and cytological analysis of membrane trafficking using lectins.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gareth W; Kail, Mark; Hollinshead, Michael; Vaux, David J

    2013-10-01

    We have tested the application of high-mannose-binding lectins as analytical reagents to identify N-glycans in the early secretory pathway of HeLa cells during subcellular fractionation and cytochemistry. Post-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) pre-Golgi intermediates were separated from the ER on Nycodenz-sucrose gradients, and the glycan composition of each gradient fraction was profiled using lectin blotting. The fractions containing the post-ER pre-Golgi intermediates are found to contain a subset of N-linked α-mannose glycans that bind the lectins Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) but not lectins binding Golgi-modified glycans. Cytochemical analysis demonstrates that high-mannose-containing glycoproteins are predominantly localized to the ER and the early secretory pathway. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that GNA colocalizes with the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and the COPI coat protein β-COP. In situ competition with concanavalin A (ConA), another high-mannose specific lectin, and subsequent GNA lectin histochemistry refined the localization of N-glyans containing nonreducing mannosyl groups, accentuating the GNA vesicular staining. Using GNA and treatments that perturb ER-Golgi transport, we demonstrate that lectins can be used to detect changes in membrane trafficking pathways histochemically. Overall, we find that conjugated plant lectins are effective tools for combinatory biochemical and cytological analysis of membrane trafficking of glycoproteins.

  16. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  17. Interaction of native and asialo rat sublingual glycoproteins with lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Herp, A; Song, S C; Wu, J H; Chang, K S

    1995-01-01

    The binding properties of the rat sublingual glycoprotein (RSL) and its asialo product with lectins were characterized by quantitative precipitin(QPA) and precipitin inhibition(QPIA) assays. Among twenty lectins tested for QPA, native RSL reacted well only with Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin), but weakly or not at all with the other lectins. However, its asialo product (asialo-RSL) reacted strongly with many Gal and GalNAc specific lectins-it bound best to three of the GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and/or Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc (II) active lectins [jacalin, Wistaria floribunda and Ricinus communis agglutinins] and completely precipitated each of these three lectins. Asialo-RSL also reacted well with Abrus precatorius, Glycine max, Bauhinia purpurea alba, and Maclura pomifera agglutinins, and abrin-a, but not with Arachis hypogeae and Dolichos biflorus agglutinins. The interaction between asialo-RSL and lectins were inhibited by either Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc, p-NO2-phenyl alpha-GalNAc or both. The mapping of the precipitation and inhibition profiles leads to the conclusion that the asialo rat sublingual glycoprotein provides important ligands for II (Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->) and Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr) active lectins.

  18. Biotoxicity assays for fruiting body lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Garbani, Mattia; Lüthy, Peter; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a specific class of fungal lectins, commonly referred to as fruiting body lectins, play a role as effector molecules in the defense of fungi against predators and parasites. Hallmarks of these fungal lectins are their specific expression in reproductive structures, fruiting bodies, and/or sclerotia and their synthesis on free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Fruiting body lectins are released upon damage of the fungal cell and bind to specific carbohydrate structures of predators and parasites, which leads to deterrence, inhibition of growth, and development or even killing of these organisms. Here, we describe assays to assess the toxicity of such lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins toward three different model organisms: the insect Aedes aegypti, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. All three assays are based on heterologous expression of the examined proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and feeding of these recombinant bacteria to omnivorous and bacterivorous organisms. PMID:20816208

  19. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  20. Mitogenic effect of Parkia speciosa seed lectin on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Suvachittanont, W; Jaranchavanapet, P

    2000-12-01

    Mitogenic activity of a lectin, purified from Parkia speciosa seeds, on the isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from normal blood donors and patients with esophageal carcinoma was examined using [3H]thymidine incorporation. The lectin increases the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA of human lymphocytes. The activity of the lectin increased as its concentration was increased and then declined once the concentration passed an optimum point. The stimulant effect was also expressed using a proliferation index (PI): the ratio of [3H]thymidine incorporated into lymphocytes in the presence and absence of the lectin. The mitogenic activity of the lectin is comparable to those of the known T-cell mitogens, such as concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen. Only slightly less responsiveness was observed in the case of lymphocytes from esophageal cancer compared to lymphocytes from normal donors. PMID:11199124

  1. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  2. Nutritional evaluation of lectin-free soybeans for poultry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, M W; Parsons, C M; Hymowitz, T

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the nutritional value of raw lectin-free soybeans in comparison with raw Kunitz trypsin inhibitor-free soybeans, raw conventional soybeans, and commercial heat processed soybean meal (SBM). Analyzed lectin values (milligrams per kilogram) were 7.2, 7.1, and < 0.00015 for the Kunitz-free, conventional, and lectin-free soybeans, respectively. Three experiments were conducted using New Hampshire x Columbian male chicks fed 23% CP dextrose-soybean diets from 8 to 17 d of age. Growth performance of chicks fed lectin-free soybeans was greater (P < 0.05) than that of chicks fed raw conventional soybeans in all three experiments. However, performance of chicks fed lectin-free soybeans was lower than that of chicks fed Kunitz-free soybeans or SBM. The SBM yielded weight gains and feed efficiencies that were much higher than those observed from any of the raw soybeans. True amino acid digestibility and TMEn of the lectin-free and conventional soybeans were determined using the precision-fed cecectomized rooster assay. Seven roosters were crop-intubated with 30 g of soybeans and excreta were collected for 48 h. Digestibility coefficients of most amino acids for lectin-free soybeans were 5 to 8 percentage units higher than those for conventional soybeans, but the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). Likewise, the TMEn for lectin-free soybeans was 11% higher than that for raw conventional soybeans (3.577 vs 3.227 kcal/g DM) but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that the nutritional value of raw lectin-free soybeans is greater than raw conventional soybeans but is less than raw Kunitz-free soybeans and SBM, suggesting that trypsin inhibitor is a greater antinutritional factor than lectins. PMID:10023754

  3. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age. PMID:27237111

  4. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  5. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes. PMID:23176516

  6. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-07-10

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  7. Visual and Plastic Arts in Teaching Literacy: Null Curricula?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakeland, Robin Gay

    2010-01-01

    Visual and plastic arts in contemporary literacy instruction equal null curricula. Studies show that painting and sculpture facilitate teaching reading and writing (literacy), yet such pedagogy has not been formally adopted into USA curriculum. An example of null curriculum can be found in late 19th - early 20th century education the USA…

  8. Exact null controllability of degenerate evolution equations with scalar control

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Vladimir E; Shklyar, Benzion

    2012-12-31

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for the exact null controllability of a degenerate linear evolution equation with scalar control are obtained. These general results are used to examine the exact null controllability of the Dzektser equation in the theory of seepage. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  9. Logarithmic corrections to gravitational entropy and the null energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Maulik; Svesko, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Using a relation between the thermodynamics of local horizons and the null energy condition, we consider the effects of quantum corrections to the gravitational entropy. In particular, we find that the geometric form of the null energy condition is not affected by the inclusion of logarithmic corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  10. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  11. Null hypersurfaces in generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Matias; Palmas, Oscar; Solis, Didier A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the geometry of null hypersurfaces M in generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes. First we characterize such null hypersurfaces as graphs of generalized eikonal functions over the fiber and use this characterization to show that such hypersurfaces are parallel if and only if their fibers are also parallel. We further use this technique to construct several examples of null hypersurfaces in both de Sitter and anti de Sitter spaces. Then we characterize all the totally umbilical null hypersurfaces M in a Lorentzian space form (viewed as a quadric in a semi-Euclidean ambient space) as intersections of the space form with a hyperplane. Finally we study the totally umbilical spacelike hypersurfaces of null hypersurfaces in space forms and characterize them as planar sections of M.

  12. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  13. Bodyweight assessment of enamelin null mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert H-L; Lertlam, Rangsiyakorn; Simmer, James P; Wang, Chia-Ning; Hu, Jan C C

    2013-01-01

    The Enam null mice appear to be smaller than wild-type mice, which prompted the hypothesis that enamel defects negatively influence nutritional intake and bodyweight gain (BWG). We compared the BWG of Enam(-/-) and wild-type mice from birth (D0) to Day 42 (D42). Wild-type (WT) and Enam(-/-) (N) mice were given either hard chow (HC) or soft chow (SC). Four experimental groups were studied: WTHC, WTSC, NHC, and NSC. The mother's bodyweight (DBW) and the average litter bodyweight (ALBW) were obtained from D0 to D21. After D21, the pups were separated from the mother and provided the same type of food. Litter bodyweights were measured until D42. ALBW was compared at 7-day intervals using one-way ANOVA, while the influence of DBW on ALBW was analyzed by mixed-model analyses. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on hard chow (NHC) was significantly lower than the two WT groups at D21 and the differences persisted into young adulthood. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on soft chow (NSC) trended lower, but was not significantly different than that of the WT groups. We conclude that genotype, which affects enamel integrity, and food hardness influence bodyweight gain in postnatal and young adult mice. PMID:23509695

  14. Wormholes minimally violating the null energy condition

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Lobo, Francisco S N; Martín-Moruno, Prado E-mail: fslobo@fc.ul.pt

    2014-11-01

    We consider novel wormhole solutions supported by a matter content that minimally violates the null energy condition. More specifically, we consider an equation of state in which the sum of the energy density and radial pressure is proportional to a constant with a value smaller than that of the inverse area characterising the system, i.e., the area of the wormhole mouth. This approach is motivated by a recently proposed cosmological event, denoted {sup t}he little sibling of the big rip{sup ,} where the Hubble rate and the scale factor blow up but the cosmic derivative of the Hubble rate does not [1]. By using the cut-and-paste approach, we match interior spherically symmetric wormhole solutions to an exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and analyse the stability of the thin-shell to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations around static solutions, by choosing suitable properties for the exotic material residing on the junction interface radius. Furthermore, we also consider an inhomogeneous generalization of the equation of state considered above and analyse the respective stability regions. In particular, we obtain a specific wormhole solution with an asymptotic behaviour corresponding to a global monopole.

  15. Null fluid collapse in brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2014-03-01

    The brane world description of our Universe entails a large extra dimension and a fundamental scale of gravity that may be lower than the Planck scale by several orders of magnitude. An interesting consequence of this scenario occurs in the nature of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to the brane gravitational field equations, which often have properties quite distinct from the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. In this paper, the spherically symmetric collapse on the brane world of four types of null fluid, governed by the barotropic, polytropic, strange quark "bag" model and Hagedorn equations of state, is investigated. In each case, we solve the approximate gravitational field equations, obtained in the high-density limit, determine the equation which governs the formation of apparent horizons and investigate the conditions for the formation of naked singularities. Though, naively, one would expect the increased effective energy density on the brane to favor the formation of black holes over naked singularities, we find that, for the types of fluid considered, this is not the case. However, the black hole solutions differ substantially from their general-relativistic counterparts and brane world corrections often play a role analogous to charge in general relativity. As an astrophysical application of this work, the possibility that energy emission from a Hagedorn fluid collapsing to form a naked singularity may be a source of GRBs in the brane world is also considered.

  16. Null cosmological singularities and free strings: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, K.

    2011-01-01

    In arXiv:0909:4731 , we argued that the free string lightcone Schrodinger wavefunctional in the vicinity of null Kasner-like cosmological singularities has nonsingular time-dependence if the Kasner exponents satisfy certain relations. These backgrounds are anisotropic plane waves with singularities. We first show here that only certain singularities admit a Rosen-Kasner frame with exponents satisfying relations leading to a wavefunctional with nonsingular time-dependence. Then we build on the (Rosen) description further and study various physical observables for a time-dependent harmonic oscillator toy model and then the free string, reconciling this with the corresponding description in the conventional plane wave variables. We find that observables containing no time derivatives are identical in these variables while those with time derivatives are different. Various free string observables are still divergent, perhaps consistent with string oscillator states becoming light in the vicinity of the singularity.

  17. New insights on the structural/functional properties of recombinant human mannan-binding lectin and its variants.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Rema; Salvi, Veena P; Jensenius, Jens Chr; Rawal, Nenoo

    2009-04-27

    Inefficient activation of complement lectin pathway in individuals with variant mannan-binding lectin (MBL) genotypes has been attributed to poor formation of higher order oligomers by MBL. But recent studies have shown the presence of large oligomers of MBL (approximately 450 kDa) in serum of individuals with variant MBL alleles. The recombinant forms of MBL (rMBL) variants except MBL/B that assemble into higher order oligomers have not yet been reported. In the present study, structural/functional properties of recombinant forms of wild type MBL (rMBL/A) and its three structural variants, rMBL/B, C, and D generated in insect cells were examined. Western blot analysis indicated covalently linked monomers to hexamers while gel filtration chromatography exhibited non-covalently linked higher order oligomers in addition to prevalent low oligomeric forms. Mannan binding determined by ELISA showed rMBL/A but not the structural variants bind to mannan. Apparent avidity of monoclonal antibody used was found to be about 18- to 52-fold weaker for rMBL structural variants than rMBL/A. Complement activation varied with maximum impairment apparent in rMBL/C followed by rMBL/B, but rMBL/D was functional to the same extent as rMBL/A. Comparison of rMBL/A to MBL purified from plasma (pMBL/A) indicated 8- and 24-fold weaker binding to mannan by BIAcore analysis and ELISA and about 5-fold lesser efficiency in activating complement. The findings provide new insights on the structural/functional properties of rMBL variants and imply that lectin pathway activation may be impaired in individuals, homozygous for the mutant alleles, MBL/C and to a lesser extent MBL/B but not MBL/D. PMID:19428558

  18. Noncovalent PEGylation via Lectin-Glycopolymer Interactions.

    PubMed

    Antonik, Paweł M; Eissa, Ahmed M; Round, Adam R; Cameron, Neil R; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    PEGylation, the covalent modification of proteins with polyethylene glycol, is an abundantly used technique to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic proteins. The drawback with this methodology is that the covalently attached PEG can impede the biological activity (e.g., reduced receptor-binding capacity). Protein therapeutics with "disposable" PEG modifiers have potential advantages over the current technology. Here, we show that a protein-polymer "Medusa complex" is formed by the combination of a hexavalent lectin with a glycopolymer. Using NMR spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), size exclusion chromatography, and native gel electrophoresis it was demonstrated that the fucose-binding lectin RSL and a fucose-capped polyethylene glycol (Fuc-PEG) form a multimeric assembly. All of the experimental methods provided evidence of noncovalent PEGylation with a concomitant increase in molecular mass and hydrodynamic radius. The affinity of the protein-polymer complex was determined by ITC and competition experiments to be in the micromolar range, suggesting that such systems have potential biomedical applications. PMID:27403588

  19. Cloning and characterization of root-specific barley lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, D.R.; Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNa library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A{sup +}) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A{sup +}) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site.

  20. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  1. Potential immunomodulatory effects of plant lectins in Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Reis, Eliana A G; Athanazio, Daniel A; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; de Paulo Teixeira Pinto, Vicente; Carmo, Theomira M A; Reis, Alice; Trocolli, Graziela; Croda, Julio; Harn, Donald; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Reis, Mitermayer G

    2008-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding glycoproteins that can stimulate, in a non-antigen-specific fashion, lymphocytes, leading to proliferation and cytokine production. Some lectins are utilized as in vitro mitogenic lymphocyte stimulators and their use as immunomodulators against infectious diseases has been evaluated experimentally. In the experimental murine model, the immune response to schistosomiasis is Th1-like during the initial stage of infection, with a shift towards a Th2-like response after oviposition. We report the response of schistosomiasis patients' (n=37) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to stimulation by lectins, including newly isolated lectins from Brazilian flora, and by Schistosomamansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA). Cytokine production upon lectin stimulation ex vivo was assessed in PBMC supernatants, collected at 24 and 72 h, by sandwich ELISA to IL-5, IL-10, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In PBMC from infected patients all but one of the lectins induced a Th2-like cytokine response, characterized by elevated IL-5 production that was higher than that induced by SEA stimulation alone. Our results show that the Th2 environment present during schistosomiasis is not affected and that it may be further stimulated by the presence of lectins. PMID:18579103

  2. The insecticidal activity of recombinant garlic lectins towards aphids.

    PubMed

    Fitches, Elaine; Wiles, Duncan; Douglas, Angela E; Hinchliffe, Gareth; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-10-01

    The heterodimeric and homodimeric garlic lectins ASAI and ASAII were produced as recombinant proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The proteins were purified as functional dimeric lectins, but underwent post-translational proteolysis. Recombinant ASAII was a single homogenous polypeptide which had undergone C-terminal processing similar to that occurring in planta. The recombinant ASAI was glycosylated and subject to variable and heterogenous proteolysis. Both lectins showed insecticidal effects when fed to pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) in artificial diet, ASAII being more toxic than ASAI at the same concentration. Acute toxicity (mortality at < or =48 h exposure; similar timescale to starvation) was only apparent at the highest lectin concentrations tested (2.0 mg ml(-)1), but dose-dependent chronic toxicity (mortality at >3d exposure) was observed over the concentration range 0.125-2.0 mg ml(-1). The recombinant lectins caused mortality in both symbiotic and antibiotic-treated aphids, showing that toxicity is not dependent on the presence of the bacterial symbiont (Buchnera aphidicola), or on interaction with symbiont proteins, such as the previously identified lectin "receptor" symbionin. A pull-down assay coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting identified two abundant membrane-associated aphid gut proteins, alanyl aminopeptidase N and sucrase, as "receptors" for lectin binding. PMID:18707000

  3. Isolation and characterization of a lectin from Japanese mottled beans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Ahmad, Ameer Maqsood; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-07-01

    A 64-kDa dimeric lectin was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Japanese mottled beans. The purification protocol involved ion exchange chromatography with Q-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose and size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was adsorbed on both Q-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose columns. Finally, the lectin gave a sharp absorbance peak which corresponded to 64 kDa based on results of size exclusion chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulphate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis displayed a single band at around 32 kDa, indicating that the protein was dimeric. The hemagglutination inhibition assay indicated that the lectin showed specificity toward galactose. The lectin preserved hemagglutinating activity below 70 °C and at a pH range 3 - 12. The lectin was able to inhibit proliferation of MCF-7 cells and Hep G2 cells and possessed antifungal activity toward Mycosphaeralla arachidicola with an IC50 value of 3.9 µM. The activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was reduced by 61.9 % in the presence of the lectin at 6.25 µM concentration. PMID:24654854

  4. New sensitive detection method for lectin hemagglutination using microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adamová, Lenka; Malinovská, Lenka; Wimmerová, Michaela

    2014-10-01

    The blood group system AB0 is determined by the composition of terminal oligosaccharides on red blood cells. Thanks to this structural feature, these groups can be recognized by saccharide-recognizing compounds. Lectins are proteins that are able to reversibly bind saccharide structures. They generally occur as multimers and are known as hemagglutination agents. Hemagglutination is a process in which blood cells are cross-linked via multivalent molecules. Apart from lectins, hemagglutination can also be caused by antibodies or viruses. A hemagglutination assay is commonly used for the detection of multivalent molecules that recognize blood cells, in order to search for their sugar specificity. It is traditionally performed on a microtiter plate, where the lectin solution is serially diluted and the lowest concentration of lectin causing agglutination is detected. This experimental set-up is utilized further for testing lectin specificity via a hemagglutination inhibition assay. We have developed a new way of detecting hemagglutination using microscopy, which was tested on purified lectins as well as cell lysates. Hemagglutination was performed on a microscope slide directly and detected using a microscope. Comparison with the standard hemagglutination assay using microtiter plates revealed that microscopic approach is faster and more robust and allows fast determination of lectin activities immediately in bacterial cytosols.

  5. Intrinsic fluorescence studies on saccharide binding to Artocarpus integrifolia lectin.

    PubMed

    Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1986-10-01

    The combining region of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin has been studied by using the ligand-induced changes in the fluorescence of the lectin. The saccharide binding properties of the lectin show that C-1, C-2, C-4, and C-6 hydroxyl groups of D-galactose are important loci for sugar binding. The alpha-anomer of galactose binds more strongly than its beta-counterpart. Inversion in the configuration at C-4 as in glucose results in a loss of binding to the lectin. The C-6 hydroxyl group is also presumably involved in binding as D-fucose does not bind to the lectin. The lectin binds to the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (Gal beta(1----3)GalNAc) more strongly than the other disaccharides studied, viz. Gal beta (1----4) Gal and Gal beta (1----3) GlcNAc, which are topographically similar to T-antigen. This observation suggests that the combining region of Artocarpus lectin is complementary to that of T-antigen. Solvent accessibility of the protein fluorophores have been probed by the quenching of protein fluorescence by Iodide ion in the absence and presence of sugar. In the presence of sugar a slight inaccessibility of the fluorophores to the solvent has been observed.

  6. Multiple lectin detection by cell membrane affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana; Catarino, Sofia; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida

    2012-05-01

    Assuming that lectins evolved to recognise relatively complex and branched oligosaccharides or parts of them, rather than simple sugars, a procedure based on lectin affinity binding to isolated erythrocyte (or any other cell type) membranes is proposed. This methodology was validated using six pure commercial lectins, as well as lectins from total protein extracts of Arbutus unedo leaves. All commercial lectins, as well as five polypeptides from A. unedo leaves bound to the glycosylated membrane receptors and were eluted by the corresponding sugars. When compared to the standard affinity chromatography procedure involving an individual sugar bound to a solid matrix, the new method provides a single-step, effective detection method for lectins and allows the rapid screening of their profile present in any unknown protein solution, indicates their biological carbohydrate affinities as well as their sugar specificities (if any), enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples, does not require any pre-purification steps, permits detection of additional lectins and provides data which are more relevant from the physiological point of view. PMID:22381939

  7. Defective flagellar assembly and length regulation in LF3 null mutants in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Lai-Wa; Dentler, William L.; Lefebvre, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Four long-flagella (LF) genes are important for flagellar length control in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we characterize two new null lf3 mutants whose phenotypes are different from previously identified lf3 mutants. These null mutants have unequal-length flagella that assemble more slowly than wild-type flagella, though their flagella can also reach abnormally long lengths. Prominent bulges are found at the distal ends of short, long, and regenerating flagella of these mutants. Analysis of the flagella by electron and immunofluorescence microscopy and by Western blots revealed that the bulges contain intraflagellar transport complexes, a defect reported previously (for review see Cole, D.G., 2003. Traffic. 4:435–442) in a subset of mutants defective in intraflagellar transport. We have cloned the wild-type LF3 gene and characterized a hypomorphic mutant allele of LF3. LF3p is a novel protein located predominantly in the cell body. It cosediments with the product of the LF1 gene in sucrose density gradients, indicating that these proteins may form a functional complex to regulate flagellar length and assembly. PMID:14610061

  8. Effects of lectin ingestion on animal growth and internal organs.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A

    1998-01-01

    Lectins are essential and omnipresent plant constituents. As many foods are of plant origin, the daily ingestion of lectins by both humans and animals is appreciable. For example, in an ad hoc survey, 53 edible plants were shown to contain lectins and approx 30% of fresh and processed food regularly consumed by humans had significant hemagglutinating activity (1). The situation is potentially even more acute in animal nutrition because animal diet is less diverse than that of humans, and in most instances foodstuffs are not thoroughly heat-treated. This is particularly significant in the light of our finding a correlation between lectin activity and antinutritional effects (2). As in evolution, the mammalian gut has been regularly exposed to lectins, they must have played an important part in the development of the digestive system. Although based on experience, most overtly toxic plants have been eliminated from the diet, many plants with appreciable lectin content are still consumed because it has not been easy to relate growth retardation and antinutritional, mild allergic or other subclinical symptoms to the food consumed or a particular component of it. As some lectins are at least partially heat stable and most survive the passage through the gut in functionally and immunologically intact form, their interaction with the gut surface epithelium (3) can damage the gut at high dietary intakes and this may lead to digestive disorders/diseases in some instances. However, it is not generally appreciated that not all lectins are antinutrients and indeed some may have beneficial effects and be of potential value in nutritional practice. Accordingly, it is of considerable importance to establish whether a lectin has deleterious or potentially beneficial effects for mammals. Unfortunately at present there are no adequate in vitro methods to do this reliably and it is usually necessary to carry out in vivo animal feeding studies, despite their relatively cumbersome

  9. Gaucher disease with prenatal onset and perinatal death due to compound heterozygosity for the missense R131C and null Rec Nci I GBA mutations.

    PubMed

    Goebl, April; Ferrier, Raechel A; Ferreira, Patrick; Pinto-Rojas, Alfredo; Matshes, Evan; Choy, Francis Y M

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA, E.C.3.2.1.45). Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1, nonneuronopathic; type 2, acute neuronopathic; and type 3, subacute neuronopathic (OMIM 230800, 230900, 231000). Over the past decade, recognition of a distinct, perinatal lethal form of Gaucher disease (PLGD) has led researchers and clinicians to evaluate Gaucher disease in the differential diagnosis of congenital ichthyosis and nonimmune hydrops fetalis. To date, more than 30 cases of PLGD have been genotyped and reported. It has been observed that homozygosity for recombinant GBA alleles, which are fundamentally null alleles, leads to early lethality, usually in utero or during the 1st few days of life, whereas genotypes involving a recombinant allele and a missense mutation may be less detrimental. Here, we report a case of Gaucher disease with prenatal onset and death within hours of birth, likely due to compound heterozygosity for the GBA Rec Nci I null allele and a R131C missense mutation. In view of the patient's severe clinical course, and based on reviews of other PLGD cases, we postulate that a missense mutation that abruptly disrupts the structure/function of GBA, in combination with a null allele, may result in early lethality in patients with PLGD. We also speculate that R131C is an extremely severe mutation that has occurred more than once in different populations and, in either the homozygous form or heterozygous with another severe mutation, will result in a poor prognosis.

  10. In vivo biosynthetic studies of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.M.; Etzler, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The in vivo biosynthesis of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin was studied by pulse-chase labeling experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine. These studies demonstrate that each of the two mature lectin subunit types are derived by the processing of separate glycosylated precursors. The appearance of the precursor to subunit I before the precursor to subunit II supports the possibility raised by previous studies that both subunit types of this lectin may originate from a single gene product.

  11. Molecular basis for the CAT-2 null phenotype in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Bethards, L.A.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have described several maize lines whose developmental patterns of catalase gene expression vary from the typical maize line, W64A. Among these variants are the lines A16 and A338, both found to be null for the CAT-2 protein. Identification of a third CAT-2 null line, designated A340, is described. RNA blots and S1 nuclease protection analysis, using (/sup 32/P)-labeled dCTP, indicate that all three CAT-2 null lines produce a similarly shortened Cat2 transcript. The molecular basis for this aberrant Cat2 transcript is discussed.

  12. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.; Smith, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  13. The gene for stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin) encodes both a lectin and a chitinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, D R; Raikhel, N V

    1992-06-01

    Chitin-binding proteins are present in a wide range of plant species, including both monocots and dicots, even though these plants contain no chitin. To investigate the relationship between in vitro antifungal and insecticidal activities of chitin-binding proteins and their unknown endogenous functions, the stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin, UDA) cDNA was cloned using a synthetic gene as the probe. The nettle lectin cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding 374 amino acids. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed a 21-amino acid putative signal sequence and the 86 amino acids encoding the two chitin-binding domains of nettle lectin. These domains were fused to a 19-amino acid "spacer" domain and a 244-amino acid carboxyl extension with partial identity to a chitinase catalytic domain. The authenticity of the cDNA clone was confirmed by deduced amino acid sequence identity with sequence data obtained from tryptic digests, RNA gel blot, and polymerase chain reaction analyses. RNA gel blot analysis also showed the nettle lectin message was present primarily in rhizomes and inflorescence (with immature seeds) but not in leaves or stems. Chitinase enzymatic activity was found when the chitinase-like domain alone or the chitinase-like domain with the chitin-binding domains were expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first example of a chitin-binding protein with both a duplication of the 43-amino acid chitin-binding domain and a fusion of the chitin-binding domains to a structurally unrelated domain, the chitinase domain. PMID:1375935

  14. Fine specificities of two lectins from Cymbosema roseum seeds: a lectin specific for high-mannose oligosaccharides and a lectin specific for blood group H type II trisaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Cavada, Benildo S; Nagano, Celso S; Rocha, Bruno Am; Benevides, Raquel G; Nascimento, Kyria S; de Sousa, Luiz Ag; Oscarson, Stefan; Brewer, C Fred

    2011-07-01

    The legume species of Cymbosema roseum of Diocleinae subtribe produce at least two different seed lectins. The present study demonstrates that C. roseum lectin I (CRL I) binds with high affinity to the "core" trimannoside of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cymbosema roseum lectin II (CRL II), on the other hand, binds with high affinity to the blood group H trisaccharide (Fucα1,2Galα1-4GlcNAc-). Thermodynamic and hemagglutination inhibition studies reveal the fine binding specificities of the two lectins. Data obtained with a complete set of monodeoxy analogs of the core trimannoside indicate that CRL I recognizes the 3-, 4- and 6-hydroxyl groups of the α(1,6) Man residue, the 3- and 4-hydroxyl group of the α(1,3) Man residue and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the trimannoside. CRL I possesses enhanced affinities for the Man5 oligomannose glycan and a biantennary complex glycan as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans. On the other hand, CRL II distinguishes the blood group H type II epitope from the Lewis(x), Lewis(y), Lewis(a) and Lewis(b) epitopes. CRL II also distinguishes between blood group H type II and type I trisaccharides. CRL I and CRL II, respectively, possess differences in fine specificities when compared with other reported mannose and fucose recognizing lectins. This is the first report of a mannose-specific lectin (CRL I) and a blood group H type II-specific lectin (CRL II) from seeds of a member of the Diocleinae subtribe.

  15. RHD allele distribution in Africans of Mali

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Franz F; Moulds, Joann M; Tounkara, Anatole; Kouriba, Bourema; Flegel, Willy A

    2003-01-01

    Background Aberrant and non-functional RHD alleles are much more frequent in Africans than in Europeans. The DAU cluster of RHD alleles exemplifies that the alleles frequent in Africans have evaded recognition until recently. A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in any African population was lacking. Results We surveyed the molecular structure and frequency of RHD alleles in Mali (West Africa) by evaluating 116 haplotypes. Only 69% could be attributed to standard RHD (55%) or the RHD deletion (14%). The aberrant RHD allele DAU-0 was predicted for 19%, RHDΨ for 7% and Ccdes for 4% of all haplotypes. DAU-3 and the new RHD allele RHD(L207F), dubbed DMA, were found in one haplotype each. A PCR-RFLP for the detection of the hybrid Rhesus box diagnostic for the RHD deletion in Europeans was false positive in 9 individuals, including all carriers of RHDΨ . Including two silent mutations and the RHD deletion, a total of 9 alleles could be differentiated. Conclusion Besides standard RHD and the RHD deletion, DAU-0, RHDΨ and Ccdes are major alleles in Mali. Our survey proved that the most frequent alleles of West Africans have been recognized allowing to devise reliable genotyping and phenotyping strategies. PMID:14505497

  16. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure

    PubMed Central

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Incorporating these processes fundamentally alters the structure of communities expected due to chance, with speciation leading to phylogenetic overdispersion compared to a classical statistical null model assuming equal probabilities of community membership. Applying this method to bird and primate communities in South America we show that patterns of phylogenetic overdispersion – often attributed to negative biotic interactions – are instead consistent with a species neutral model of allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Our findings provide a new null expectation for phylogenetic community patterns and highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the dynamic history of assembly when testing the mechanisms governing community structure. PMID:25560516

  17. A null-steering viewpoint of interferometric SAR

    SciTech Connect

    BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-05-02

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) extends the two-dimensional imaging capability of traditional synthetic aperture radar to three-dimensions by using an aperture in the elevation plane to estimate the 3-D structure of the target. The operation of this additional aperture can be viewed from a null-steering point of view, rather than the traditional phase determination point of view. Knowing that IFSAR can be viewed from the null-steering perspective allows one to take advantage of the mathematical foundation developed for null-steering arrays. In addition, in some problems of interest in IFSAR the null-steering perspective provides better intuition and suggests alternative solutions. One example is the problem of estimating building height where layover is present.

  18. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure.

    PubMed

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-02-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Incorporating these processes fundamentally alters the structure of communities expected due to chance, with speciation leading to phylogenetic overdispersion compared to a classical statistical null model assuming equal probabilities of community membership. Applying this method to bird and primate communities in South America we show that patterns of phylogenetic overdispersion - often attributed to negative biotic interactions - are instead consistent with a species neutral model of allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Our findings provide a new null expectation for phylogenetic community patterns and highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the dynamic history of assembly when testing the mechanisms governing community structure.

  19. Structure and Function of Mammalian Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kevin; Evers, David; Rice, Kevin G.

    Over the past three decades the field of glycobiology has expanded beyond a basic understanding of the structure and biosynthesis of glycoprotein, proteoglycans, and glycolipids toward a more detailed picture of how these molecules afford communication through binding to mammalian lectins. Although the number of different mammalian lectin domains appears to be finite and even much smaller than early estimates predicated based on the diversity of glycan structures, nature appears capable of using these in numerous combinations to fine tune specificity. The following provides an overview of the major classes of mammalian lectins and discusses their glycan binding specificity. The review provides a snapshot of the field of glycobiology that continues to grow providing an increasing number of examples of biological processes that rely upon glycan-lectin binding.

  20. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit. PMID:17590430

  1. Isolation and characterization of a lectin from Annona muricata seeds.

    PubMed

    Damico, D C S; Freire, M G M; Gomes, V M; Toyama, M H; Marangoni, S; Novello, J C; Macedo, M L R

    2003-11-01

    A lectin with a high affinity for glucose/mannose was isolated from Annona muricata seeds (Annonaceae) by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE SP-5 PW column, and molecular exclusion on a Protein Pak Glass 300 SW column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) yielded two protein bands of approximately 14 kDa and 22 kDa. However, only one band was seen in native PAGE. The Mr of the lectin estimated by fast-performance liquid chromatography-gel filtration on Superdex 75 was 22 kDa. The lectin was a glycoprotein with 8% carbohydrate (neutral sugar) and required divalent metal cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+) for full activity. Amino acid analysis revealed a large content of Glx, Gly, Phe, and Lys. The lectin agglutinated dog, chicken, horse, goose, and human erythrocytes and inhibited the growth of the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Colletotrichum musae.

  2. Sweet complementarity: the functional pairing of glycans with lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H-J; Manning, J C; Kopitz, J; André, S; Kaltner, H

    2016-05-01

    Carbohydrates establish the third alphabet of life. As part of cellular glycoconjugates, the glycans generate a multitude of signals in a minimum of space. The presence of distinct glycotopes and the glycome diversity are mapped by sugar receptors (antibodies and lectins). Endogenous (tissue) lectins can read the sugar-encoded information and translate it into functional aspects of cell sociology. Illustrated by instructive examples, each glycan has its own ligand properties. Lectins with different folds can converge to target the same epitope, while intrafamily diversification enables functional cooperation and antagonism. The emerging evidence for the concept of a network calls for a detailed fingerprinting. Due to the high degree of plasticity and dynamics of the display of genes for lectins the validity of extrapolations between different organisms of the phylogenetic tree yet is inevitably limited. PMID:26956894

  3. Insights into animal and plant lectins with antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Dias, Renata de Oliveira; Machado, Leandro Dos Santos; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2015-01-05

    Lectins are multivalent proteins with the ability to recognize and bind diverse carbohydrate structures. The glyco -binding and diverse molecular structures observed in these protein classes make them a large and heterogeneous group with a wide range of biological activities in microorganisms, animals and plants. Lectins from plants and animals are commonly used in direct defense against pathogens and in immune regulation. This review focuses on sources of animal and plant lectins, describing their functional classification and tridimensional structures, relating these properties with biotechnological purposes, including antimicrobial activities. In summary, this work focuses on structural-functional elucidation of diverse lectin groups, shedding some light on host-pathogen interactions; it also examines their emergence as biotechnological tools through gene manipulation and development of new drugs.

  4. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  5. Protozoa lectins and their role in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins of non-immune origin that agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc., and bind reversibly to carbohydrates present on the apposing cells. They have at least two carbohydrate binding sites and their binding can be inhibited by one or more carbohydrates. Owing to carbohydrate binding specificity of lectins, they mediate cell-cell interactions and play role in protozoan adhesion and host cell cytotoxicity, thus are central to the pathogenic property of the parasite. Several parasitic protozoa possess lectins which mediate parasite adherence to host cells based on their carbohydrate specificities. These interactions could be exploited for development of novel therapeutics, targeting the adherence and thus helpful in eradicating wide spread of protozoan diseases. The current review highlights the present state knowledge with regard to protozoal lectins with an emphasis on their haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, characteristics and also their role in pathogenesis notably as adhesion molecules, thereby aiding the pathogen in disease establishment.

  6. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata.

    PubMed

    Work, Thierry M; Farah, Yael

    2014-03-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis. PMID:24518620

  7. Potential of KM+ lectin in immunization against Leishmania amazonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Clarissa R; Cavassani, Karen A; Gomes, Regis B; Teixeira, Maria Jania; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Cavada, Benildo S; da Silva, João Santana; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2006-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated Canavalia brasiliensis (ConBr), Pisum arvense (PAA) and Artocarpus integrifolia (KM+) lectins as immunostimulatory molecules in vaccination against Leishmania amazonensis infection. Although they induced IFN-gamma production, the combination of the lectins with SLA antigen did not lead to lesion reduction. However, parasite load was largely reduced in mice immunized with KM+ lectin and SLA. KM+ induced a smaller inflammatory reaction in the air pouch model and was able to inhibit differentiation of dendritic cells (BMDC), but to induce maturation by enhancing the expression of MHC II, CD80 and CD86. These observations indicate the modulatory role of plant lectins in leishmaniasis vaccination may be related to their action on the initial innate response.

  8. Lectin-binding properties of different Leishmania species.

    PubMed

    Andrade, A F; Saraiva, E M

    1999-07-01

    Carbohydrate cell-surface residues on stationary promastigotes of 19 isolates of Leishmania were studied with a panel of 27 highly purified lectins, which were specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, and sialic acid. The specificity of the cell-surface carbohydrates was analyzed by agglutination and radioiodinated lectin-binding assays. L. (L.) amazonensis and L. (L.) donovani were agglutinated by 12 and 10 of the 27 lectins used, respectively. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (Jacalin) was incapable of agglutinating the tested species of the donovani complex, and this result was confirmed by radioiodinated Jacalin-binding assays. Jacalin had an average of 3.8 x 10(6) receptors/L. (L) amazonensis promastigote and bound with an association constant of 5 x 10(6) M(-1).

  9. Bacterial Isolation by Lectin-Modified Microengines

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Susana; Orozco, Jahir; Kagan, Daniel; Guix, Maria; Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Claussen, Jonathan C.; Merkoçi, Arben; Wang, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    New template-based self-propelled gold/nickel/polyaniline/platinum (Au/Ni/PANI/Pt) microtubular engines, functionalized with the Concanavalin A (ConA) lectin bioreceptor, are shown to be extremely useful for the rapid, real-time isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria from fuel-enhanced environmental, food and clinical samples. These multifunctional microtube engines combine the selective capture of E. coli with the uptake of polymeric drug-carrier particles to provide an attractive motion-based theranostics strategy. Triggered release of the captured bacteria is demonstrated by movement through a low-pH glycine-based dissociation solution. The smaller size of the new polymer-metal microengines offers convenient, direct and label-free optical visualization of the captured bacteria and discrimination against non-target cells. PMID:22136558

  10. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  11. A multiplex lectin-channel monitoring method for human serum glycoproteins by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Kim, Yong-Sam; Ko, Jeong Heon; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-02-01

    A mass profiling method and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based quantitative approach were used to analyze multiple lectin-captured fractions of human serum using different lectins such as aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), phytohemagglutinin-L(4) (L-PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) to quantitatively monitor protein glycosylation diversity. Each fraction, prepared by multiple lectin-fractionation and tryptic digestion, was analyzed by 1-D LC-MS/MS. Semi-quantitative profiling showed that the list of glycoproteins identified from each lectin-captured fraction is significantly different according to the used lectin. Thus, it was confirmed that the multiplex lectin-channel monitoring (LCM) using multiple lectins is useful for investigating protein glycosylation diversity in a proteome sample. Based on the semi-quantitative mass profiling, target proteins showing lectin-specificity among each lectin-captured fraction were selected and analyzed by the MRM-based method in triplicate using each lectin-captured fraction (average CV 7.9%). The MRM-based analysis for each lectin-captured fraction was similar to those obtained by the profiling experiments. The abundance of each target protein measured varied dramatically, based on the lectin-specificity. The multiplex LCM approach using MRM-based analyses is useful for quantitatively monitoring target protein glycoforms selectively fractionated by multiple lectins. Thus through multiplex LCM rather than single, we could inquire minutely into protein glycosylation states. PMID:22158852

  12. The effect of lectins on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst in vitro attachment to host cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Barry; Stover, Larry; Gillem, Ashley; Winters, Katherine; Leet, John H; Chauret, Christian

    2006-02-01

    The influence of lectins on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst agglutination and on attachment to both fixed Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and fixed HCT-8 (human colorectal epithelial) cells was examined. Oocyst cell wall characteristics were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Lectin-free oocysts were shown to adhere equally to both MDCK cells and HCT-8 cells. In MDCK cells, the addition of 1-25 microg/ml Codium fragile lectin, 10 microg/ml Maclura pomifera lectin, 10 microg/ml Helix pomatia lectin, and 10-200 microg/ml Artocarpus integrifolia lectin significantly increased attachment to at least 1 of the cell cultures as compared to oocysts incubated without any lectin. The lectin-enhanced attachment was reversed by co-incubation of lectin treated-oocysts with 250 mM of each specific sugar (for a given lectin). In agglutination assays, concentrations as low as 0.5 microg/ml of C. fragile, M. pomifera, and A. integrifolia lectin agglutinated oocysts within 60 min. Finally, in TEM samples, colloidal gold conjugated-lectins from A. integrifolia, C. fragile, H. pomatia, and M. pomifera attached to oocysts, and this could be competitively inhibited by a lectin-specific sugar. This suggests that C. parvum oocysts are highly reactive to N-acetyl galactosamine-binding lectins and that the presence of N-acetyl-galactosamine containing molecules on oocysts can potentially help in oocyst attachment to host cells.

  13. Antimultipath communication by injecting tone into null in signal spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A transmitter for digital radio communication creates a null by balanced encoding of data modulated on an RF carrier, and inserts a calibration tone within the null. This is accomplished by having the calibration tone coincide in phase and frequency with the transmitted radio frequency output, for coherent demodulation of data at the receiver where the tone calibration signal is extracted and used for multipath fading compensation.

  14. Another Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibodeau, Phillip E.; Sullender, Craig C.

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power circuit provides noncontact measurement of alternating or direct current of many ampheres in main conductor. Advantages of circuit over other nulling Hall-effect current-measuring circuits is stability and accuracy increased by putting both analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters in nulling feedback loop. Converters and rest of circuit designed for operation at sampling rate of 100 kHz, but rate changed to alter time or frequency response of circuit.

  15. Experimental Progress and Results of a Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuele, Rocco; Wallace, J. Kent; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Shao, Mike; Levine, B. Martin; Fregoso, Santos

    2007-01-01

    The crux of visible exoplanet detection is overcoming significant star-planet contrast ratios on the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -10)-at very small angular separations. We are developing an interferometric nulling coronagraph designed to achieve a 10(exp -6) contrast ratio at a working science bandpass of 20% visible light. Achieving large, broadband suppression requires a pseudo-achromatic phase flip, while maintaining a strict error budget. Recent results from our nulling interferometer testbed yield contrast ratios at the 1.05x10(exp -6) level, with a 15% visible bandpass. This result is at 65% of our final bandpass requirement, although limitations of our current configuration make major hardware changes essential to broadening the bandpass. We make the argument that broadening the bandpass should not necessarily adversely affect the null depth until beyond the 20% visible light level. Using the same setup we are able to reach monochromatic null depths of 1.11x10(exp -7) (?= 638 nm)averaged over three seconds. This paper will describe our experimental approach for achieving deep broadband nulls, as well as error considerations and limitations, and the most recent results for our nulling coronagraph testbed.

  16. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Shirine E; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A; Hill, Tracy L; Welch, Ian D; Beier, Frank

    2016-07-26

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα's potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear.

  17. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Shirine E.; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A.; Hill, Tracy L.; Welch, Ian D.; Beier, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα’s potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear. PMID:27457421

  18. Assessment of Sauromatum guttatum lectin toxicity against Bactrocera cucurbitae.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Thakur, Kshema; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Kaur, Satwinder; Kaur, Amritpal; Singh, Jatinder

    2015-11-01

    Lectins are proteins that bind specifically to foreign glycans. Due to this binding property, these molecules have potential application as bioinsecticidal tools replacing conventional chemical insecticides. The present study involved purification of phytolectin from the tubers of Sauromatum guttatum by affinity chromatography on asialofetuin-linked silica matrix. The purity of the sample was checked by SDS-PAGE at pH 8.3. Purified lectin was incorporated in the artificial diet of a Dipteran model, Bactrocera cucurbitae at different concentrations (10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 µgml(-1)). The lectin significantly affected various developmental parameters that were studied. Percentage pupation and percentage emergence was reduced to 44 % and 7.9%, respectively, at 80 µgml(-1) concentration as compared to control (100%). LC50 of Sauromatum guttatum lectin was calculated to be 19.42 µgml(-1). Treatment of insect larvae with LC50 of Sauromatum guttatum lectin suppressed the activity of hydrolytic enzymes (esterases and acid phosphatases) and oxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase). Thus, with low LC50 and high mortality (approximately 92% at 80 µgml(-1)) of the insect larvae, Sauromatum guttatum lectin offers a possibility to engineer crop plants for improved and safer agriculture. PMID:26688959

  19. Antifungal activity of lectins against yeast of vaginal secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruno Severo; Siqueira, Ana Beatriz Sotero; de Cássia Carvalho Maia, Rita; Giampaoli, Viviana; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; de Lima, Adriana Nunes; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-imune origin. This group of proteins is distributed widely in nature and they have been found in viruses, microorganisms, plants and animals. Lectins of plants have been isolated and characterized according to their chemical, physical-chemical, structural and biological properties. Among their biological activities, we can stress its fungicidal action. It has been previously described the effect of the lectins Dviol, DRL, ConBr and LSL obtained from the seeds of leguminous plants on the growth of yeasts isolated from vaginal secretions. In the present work the experiments were carried out in microtiter plates and the results interpreted by both methods: visual observations and a microplate reader at 530nm. The lectin concentrations varied from 0.5 to 256μg/mL, and the inoculum was established between 65-70% of trammitance. All yeast samples isolated from vaginal secretion were evaluated taxonomically, where were observed macroscopic and microscopic characteristics to each species. The LSL lectin did not demonstrate any antifungal activity to any isolate studied. The other lectins DRL, ConBr and DvioL, showed antifungal potential against yeast isolated from vaginal secretion. These findings offering offer a promising field of investigation to develop new therapeutic strategies against vaginal yeast infections, collaborating to improve women's health. PMID:24031889

  20. Chemical modification studies of Artocarpus lakoocha lectin artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Ahmed, H; Chatterjee, B P

    1991-05-01

    The effect of chemical modification on an anti T-like lectin, artocarpin isolated from Artocarpus lakoocha seeds was investigated in order to identify the type of amino acids involved in its agglutinating activity. Modification of carboxyl groups, arginine and lysine residues, did not affect the lectin activity. However, modification of tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine residues led to a complete loss of its activity, indicating the involvement of these amino acids in the saccharide-binding ability. A protection was observed in the presence of inhibitory sugar. A marked decrease in the fluorescence emission was found when the tryptophan residues of lectin were modified. The circular dichroism spectra showed the presence of an identical pattern of conformation in the native and modified lectin, indicating that the loss in activity was due to modification only. The effect of pronase on artocarpin showed loss of activity whereas papain and trypsin had no effect. The specific activity of artocarpin remained unaltered on treatment with glycosidases but remarkable increase in the activity (of the same) was observed with xylanase treatment. Immunodiffusion studies with chemically modified lectin showed no gross structural changes, indicating that the group specific modifying agents did not alter the antigenic sites of the modified lectin.

  1. Identification of lectin binding proteins in human tears.

    PubMed

    Kuizenga, A; van Haeringen, N J; Kijlstra, A

    1991-12-01

    The identity of glycoproteins in stimulated normal human tears was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of tears onto minigels, blotting, and subsequent incubation with different biotinylated lectins (concanavalin A [Con A], peanut agglutinin [PNA], glycine max agglutinin [SBA], Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin [WGA, native form], Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin [Jacalin], and Pisum sativum agglutinin). Control proteins included purified secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) from human colostrum, human milk lactoferrin, and chicken-egg lysozyme. All samples were prepared in a denaturing (SDS) buffer under nonreducing and reducing conditions. The sIgA in tears and IgA (alpha) heavy chain fragments (reduced sample) were identified with most of the lectins tested. A particular high molecular weight (greater than 200 kD) protein fraction in tears that just entered the separation gel on SDS-PAGE was detected with WGA and Jacalin. This fraction stain poorly with silver. Tear lactoferrin was identified with all lectins used, although binding was low with SBA. Purified milk lactoferrin showed a poor reaction with Jacalin, but a protein in tears of similar mobility bound this lectin (nonreduced samples). Under both nonreducing and reducing conditions, tear-specific prealbumin in tears did not bind any of the lectins tested. Tear lysozyme only reacted with lectin after reduction. The techniques described may provide additional valuable information in addition to commonly used methods for tear protein analysis and further knowledge concerning the role of glycoproteins on the ocular surface.

  2. Measurement Via Optical Near-Nulling and Subaperture Stitching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Greg; De Vries, Gary; Murphy, Paul; Brophy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    A subaperture stitching interferometer system provides near-nulling of a subaperture wavefront reflected from an object of interest over a portion of a surface of the object. A variable optical element located in the radiation path adjustably provides near-nulling to facilitate stitching of subaperture interferograms, creating an interferogram representative of the entire surface of interest. This enables testing of aspheric surfaces without null optics customized for each surface prescription. The surface shapes of objects such as lenses and other precision components are often measured with interferometry. However, interferometers have a limited capture range, and thus the test wavefront cannot be too different from the reference or the interference cannot be analyzed. Furthermore, the performance of the interferometer is usually best when the test and reference wavefronts are nearly identical (referred to as a null condition). Thus, it is necessary when performing such measurements to correct for known variations in shape to ensure that unintended variations are within the capture range of the interferometer and accurately measured. This invention is a system for nearnulling within a subaperture stitching interferometer, although in principle, the concept can be employed by wavefront measuring gauges other than interferometers. The system employs a light source for providing coherent radiation of a subaperture extent. An object of interest is placed to modify the radiation (e.g., to reflect or pass the radiation), and a variable optical element is located to interact with, and nearly null, the affected radiation. A detector or imaging device is situated to obtain interference patterns in the modified radiation. Multiple subaperture interferograms are taken and are stitched, or joined, to provide an interferogram representative of the entire surface of the object of interest. The primary aspect of the invention is the use of adjustable corrective optics in the

  3. Purification and cDNA cloning of a lectin and a lectin-like protein from Apios americana Medikus tubers.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Irie, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Rikiya; Yonekura, Masami

    2014-01-01

    An Apios americana lectin (AAL) and a lectin-like protein (AALP) were purified from tubers by chromatography on Butyl-Cellulofine, ovomucoid-Cellulofine, and DEAE-Cellulofine columns. AAL showed strong hemagglutinating activity toward chicken and goose erythrocytes, but AALP showed no such activity toward any of the erythrocytes tested. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was not inhibited by mono- or disaccharides, but was inhibited by glycoproteins, such as asialofetuin and ovomucoid, suggesting that AAL is an oligosaccharide-specific lectin. The cDNAs of AAL and AALP consist of 1,093 and 1,104 nucleotides and encode proteins of 302 and 274 amino acid residues, respectively. Both amino acid sequences showed high similarity to known legume lectins, and those of their amino acids involved in carbohydrate and metal binding were conserved. PMID:25036952

  4. lagC-null and gbf-null cells define key steps in the morphogenesis of Dictyostelium mounds.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, S; Brown, J M; Firtel, R A; McNally, J G

    1998-08-01

    The transition to multicellularity is a key feature of the Dictyostelium life cycle, and two genes, gbf and lagC, are known to play pivotal roles in regulating this developmental switch. lagC-null and gbf-null cells fail to induce cell-type-specific genes ordinarily expressed during multicellular development. The null mutants also share a similar morphological phenotype: mutant cells repeatedly aggregate to form a loose mound, disperse, and reform a mound, rather than proceeding to form a tip. To characterize defects in morphogenesis in these mutants, we examined cell motion in the mutant mounds. In analogy with the failed transition in gene expression, we found that lagC-null and gbf-null mounds failed to make a morphogenetic transition from random to rotational motion normally observed in the parent strain. One reason for this was the inability of the mutant mounds to establish a single, dominant signaling-wave center. This defect of lagC-null or gbf-null cells could be overcome by the addition of adenosine, which alters cAMP signaling, but then even in the presence of apparently normal signaling waves, cell motility was still aberrant. This motility defect, as well as the signaling-wave defect, could be overcome in lagC-null cells by overexpression of GBF, suggesting that lagC is dispensable if GBF protein levels are high enough. This set of morphogenetic defects that we have observed helps define key steps in mound morphogenesis. These include the establishment of a dominant signaling-wave center and the capacity of cells to move directionally within the cell mass in response to guidance cues.

  5. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  6. Generation of a conditional knockout allele for the NFAT5 gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The osmosensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5), also known as tonicity enhancer element binding protein (TonEBP) plays a crucial role in protection of renal medullary cells against hyperosmotic stress, urinary concentration, the adaptive immune response, and other physiological systems. Since it is also important for development, conventional homozygous-null mutations result in perinatal death, which hinders the analysis of NFAT5 function in specific tissues in vivo. Here we describe the generation of mice with a conditional-null allele, in which loxP sites are inserted around exon 4. Mice harboring the floxed allele (NFAT5(flx) ) were mated to a strain expressing a tamoxifen-inducible derivative of the Cre-recombinase (Cre (+)) under the control of the ubiqitinC promoter. The resultant homozygous conditional knockout mice (Cre (+) NFAT5 (flx/flx) ) are viable, fertile, and show normal expression of NFAT5 and NFAT5 target genes, indicating that the conditional alleles retain their wild-type function. Induction of Cre-mediated recombination by administration of tamoxifen in 8-week-old mice resulted in a decrease in NFAT5 expression of about 70-90% in all tested tissues (renal cortex, renal outer medulla, renal inner medulla, heart, lung, spleen, skeletal muscle). Accordingly, the expression of the NFAT5 target genes aldose reductase and heat shock protein 70 in the renal medulla was also significantly decreased. Mice harboring this conditional knockout allele should be useful in future studies for gaining a better understanding of tissue and cell-type specific functions of NFAT5 in adult animals under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25601839

  7. A novel measurement of allele discrimination for assessment of allele-specific silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2014-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing by RNA interference (ASP-RNAi) is an atypical RNAi that is capable of discriminating target alleles from non-target alleles, and may be therapeutically useful for specific inhibition of disease-causing alleles without affecting their corresponding normal alleles. However, it is difficult to design and select small interfering RNA (siRNAs) that confer ASP-RNAi. A major problem is that there are few appropriate measures in determining optimal allele-specific siRNAs. Here we show two novel formulas for calculating a new measure of allele-discrimination, named "ASP-score". The formulas and ASP-score allow for an unbiased determination of optimal siRNAs, and may contribute to characterizing such allele-specific siRNAs.

  8. Hotfoot mouse mutations affect the delta 2 glutamate receptor gene and are allelic to lurcher.

    PubMed

    Lalouette, A; Guénet, J L; Vriz, S

    1998-05-15

    Hotfoot (ho) is a recessive mouse mutation characterized by cerebellar ataxia associated with relatively mild abnormalities of the cerebellum. It has been previously mapped to Chromosome 6, and at least eight independent alleles have been reported. Here we show that the hotfoot phenotype is associated with mutations in the glutamate receptor ionotropic delta2 gene (Grid2). We have identified a 510-bp deletion in the Grid2 coding sequence in the ho4J allele, resulting in a deletion of 170 amino acids of the extracellular domain of the receptor. Analysis of a second allele, hoTgN37INRA, revealed a 4-kb deletion in the Grid2 transcript. The GRID2 protein in these hotfoot mutants probably has a reduced (or null) activity since the phenotype of hotfoot bears similarities with the previously described phenotype of Grid2 knockout mice. The exceptionally high number of independent alleles at the ho locus is an invaluable tool for investigating the function of the glutamate receptor ionotropic delta2 protein, which so far remains largely unknown.

  9. Efficient genotype elimination via adaptive allele consolidation.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, Nicoletta; Lettieri, Giuseppe; Martini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We propose the technique of Adaptive Allele Consolidation, that greatly improves the performance of the Lange-Goradia algorithm for genotype elimination in pedigrees, while still producing equivalent output. Genotype elimination consists in removing from a pedigree those genotypes that are impossible according to the Mendelian law of inheritance. This is used to find errors in genetic data and is useful as a preprocessing step in other analyses (such as linkage analysis or haplotype imputation). The problem of genotype elimination is intrinsically combinatorial, and Allele Consolidation is an existing technique where several alleles are replaced by a single “lumped” allele in order to reduce the number of combinations of genotypes that have to be considered, possibly at the expense of precision. In existing Allele Consolidation techniques, alleles are lumped once and for all before performing genotype elimination. The idea of Adaptive Allele Consolidation is to dynamically change the set of alleles that are lumped together during the execution of the Lange-Goradia algorithm, so that both high performance and precision are achieved. We have implemented the technique in a tool called Celer and evaluated it on a large set of scenarios, with good results.

  10. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity. PMID:25451301

  11. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  12. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function. PMID:25534591

  13. Interferometric nulling of four channels with integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Errmann, Ronny; Minardi, Stefano; Labadie, Lucas; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2015-08-20

    Nulling interferometry has been identified as a competitive technique for the detection of extrasolar planets. In its basic form, the technique consists of combining out-of-phase a single pair of telescopes to effectively null the light of a bright star and reveal the dim glow of the companion. However, in order to mitigate the effect of the stellar leaks through the interferometer, a broad angular central null is required. The hierarchical combination of several pairs of telescopes can accomplish this task. We have manufactured and tested with monochromatic light an integrated optics component, which combines a linear array of four telescopes in the nulling mode envisaged by Angel and Woolf [Astroph. J.475, 373-379 (1997).10.1086/apj.1997.475.issue-1ASJOAB0004-637X]. By simulating in the laboratory the motion of a star in the sky, we could measure the expected angular transmission of the four-telescope nuller. Moreover, the tests have demonstrated a broad nulling scaling as the fourth power of the baseline delay.

  14. Ballooning modes localized near the null point of a divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.

    2014-04-15

    The stability of ballooning modes localized to the null point in both the standard and snowflake divertors is considered. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics is used. A series expansion of the flux function is performed in the vicinity of the null point with the lowest, non-vanishing term retained for each divertor configuration. The energy principle is used with a trial function to determine a sufficient instability threshold. It is shown that this threshold depends on the orientation of the flux surfaces with respect to the major radius with a critical angle appearing due to the convergence of the field lines away from the null point. When the angle the major radius forms with respect to the flux surfaces exceeds this critical angle, the system is stabilized. Further, the scaling of the instability threshold with the aspect ratio and the ratio of the scrape-off-layer width to the major radius is shown. It is concluded that ballooning modes are not a likely candidate for driving convection in the vicinity of the null for parameters relevant to existing machines. However, the results place a lower bound on the width of the heat flux in the private flux region. To explain convective mixing in the vicinity of the null point, new consideration should be given to an axisymmetric mixing mode [W. A. Farmer and D. D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 20, 092117 (2013)] as a possible candidate to explain current experimental results.

  15. Do Null Subjects (mis-)Trigger Pro-drop Grammars?

    PubMed

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-12-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [−pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing their grammars to a [−pro] setting. Mack et al. (J Memory Lang 67(1):211-223, 2012) showed that sentences with noise covering the subject are analyzed as having null subjects more often with a first person pronoun and with a present tense--properties correlated with more predictable referents--compared to a third person pronoun and past tense. However, those results might in principle have been due to reporting null subjects for verbs that often occur with null subjects. An experiment is reported here in which comparable results are found for sentences containing nonsense verbs. Participants preferred a null subject more often for first person present tense sentences than for third person past tense sentences. The results are as expected if participants are responding to predictability, the likelihood of reduction, rather than to lexical statistics. The results are argued to be important in removing a class of mis-triggering examples from the language acquisition problem.

  16. Visible Nulling Coronagraphy Testbed Development for Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Chen, Andrew; Petrone, Peter; Booth, Andrew; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Three of the recently completed NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept (ASMC) studies addressed the feasibility of using a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) as the prime instrument for exoplanet science. The VNC approach is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted aperture telescope systems and thus spans the space of potential ASMC exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance the this approach and the technologies associated with it. Herein we report on the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under high bandwidth closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible light nulling milestones of sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D and ultimately culminate in spectrally broadband (>20%) high contrast imaging. Each of the milestones, one per year, is traceable to one or more of the ASMC studies. The VNT uses a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, modified with a modified "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. Discussed will be the optical configuration laboratory results, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  17. Interferometric nulling of four channels with integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Errmann, Ronny; Minardi, Stefano; Labadie, Lucas; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2015-08-20

    Nulling interferometry has been identified as a competitive technique for the detection of extrasolar planets. In its basic form, the technique consists of combining out-of-phase a single pair of telescopes to effectively null the light of a bright star and reveal the dim glow of the companion. However, in order to mitigate the effect of the stellar leaks through the interferometer, a broad angular central null is required. The hierarchical combination of several pairs of telescopes can accomplish this task. We have manufactured and tested with monochromatic light an integrated optics component, which combines a linear array of four telescopes in the nulling mode envisaged by Angel and Woolf [Astroph. J.475, 373-379 (1997).10.1086/apj.1997.475.issue-1ASJOAB0004-637X]. By simulating in the laboratory the motion of a star in the sky, we could measure the expected angular transmission of the four-telescope nuller. Moreover, the tests have demonstrated a broad nulling scaling as the fourth power of the baseline delay. PMID:26368784

  18. Achromatic phase shifts utilizing dielectric plates for nulling interferometery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, R. M.; Burge, J. M.

    1998-12-01

    Schemes for detecting planets around other stars using interferometery have been developed which rely on a half wave phase delay to shift the central constructive fringe of an interferometer to a deep, destructive null fringe. To achieve the sensitivity and spectroscopy desired for exo-planets observations, such a null must be achromatic over a broad spectral region. One method for creating such a half wave phase delay achromatically involves the use of pairs of dielectric, plane parallel plates, analogous to the use of two types of glass in an achromatic lens. An analysis of the technique is presented with solutions using single plates to achieve null fringes to a cancellation of 10 exp -4 in the visible, near infrared, and mid infrared for null. Solutions using two matched materials show that nulls to a depth of 10 exp -6 are achievable in 2 um bands in the 7-17 um regime, or to a depth of 10 exp -5 over the entire 7-17 um band. Experimental results using a single plate of BK7 in the visible spectrum verify the technique.

  19. Do Null Subjects (mis-)Trigger Pro-drop Grammars?

    PubMed

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-12-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [−pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing their grammars to a [−pro] setting. Mack et al. (J Memory Lang 67(1):211-223, 2012) showed that sentences with noise covering the subject are analyzed as having null subjects more often with a first person pronoun and with a present tense--properties correlated with more predictable referents--compared to a third person pronoun and past tense. However, those results might in principle have been due to reporting null subjects for verbs that often occur with null subjects. An experiment is reported here in which comparable results are found for sentences containing nonsense verbs. Participants preferred a null subject more often for first person present tense sentences than for third person past tense sentences. The results are as expected if participants are responding to predictability, the likelihood of reduction, rather than to lexical statistics. The results are argued to be important in removing a class of mis-triggering examples from the language acquisition problem. PMID:25086703

  20. Partial characterization of the lectin of runner beans (Phaseolus coccieneus) var. Alubia.

    PubMed

    Armienta-Aldana, Eduardo; Moreno-Legorreta, Manuel; Armienta-Aldana, Ernesto; Laguna-Granados, Sandra Viviana

    2009-03-01

    We extracted and partial characterized lectin from runner beans (Phaseolus coccineus L.). This lectin shows a great affinity to fetuin-agarose column like others lectins and the electrophoretic gels point one band of approximately 45 kDa. In addition to the previous assays, we detected the presence of lectins by agglutination assays. We know that lectins are non-enzymatic proteins or glycoproteins that bind carbohydrates. The biological function of plant lectins is not fully understood, but they are hypothesized to be involved in a number of intrinsic processes. Many of those processes include hemagglutination. We believe that the P. coocineus lectin will be an important tool for know the properties of many lectins, included their capacity to detected and quantify tumor markers.

  1. Tissue binding pattern of plant lectins in benign and malignant lesions of thyroid.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, T; Augustine, J; Mathew, L; Aleykutty, M A; Nair, M B; Remani, P; Nair, M K

    1992-01-01

    N-acetyl D-galactosamine specific lectins were isolated from the seeds of Jack Fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and Winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) and D-galactose specific lectin was isolated from peanut (Arachis hypogaea). These lectins were conjugated to Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP) and were used to study the lectin binding properties of benign and malignant lesions of the thyroid. For comparison of the results 10 normal fresh autopsy specimens were included in the study. The Peanut lectin (PNL) and Jack fruit lectin (JFL) conjugates showed positive binding with the cells in different lesions, while Winged Bean Lectin (WBL), despite its having a common inhibitory sugar, showed no binding even after neuraminidase treatment. These lectins revealed difference in the composition of glycoconjugates of benign and malignant thyroid cells. The HRP conjugated JFL and PNL may be of use in distinguishing carcinomatous tissues from benign tissues which makes them potential tools in the differential diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

  2. Genetically null mice reveal a central role for epidermal growth factor receptor in the differentiation of the hair follicle and normal hair development.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L. A.; Alexander, N.; Hogan, M. E.; Sundberg, J. P.; Dlugosz, A.; Threadgill, D. W.; Magnuson, T.; Yuspa, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Mice harboring a targeted disruption of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) allele exhibit a severely disorganized hair follicle phenotype, fuzzy coat, and systemic disease resulting in death before 3 weeks. This skin phenotype was reproduced in whole skin grafts and in grafts of EGFR null hair follicle buds onto nude mice, providing a model to evaluate the natural evolution of skin lacking the EGFR. Hair follicles in grafts of null skin did not progress from anagen to telogen and scanning electron micrografts revealed wavy, flattened hair fibers with cuticular abnormalities. Many of the EGFR null hair follicles in the grafted skin were consumed by an inflammatory reaction resulting in complete hair loss in 67% of the grafts by 10 weeks. Localization of follicular differentiation markers including keratin 6, transglutaminase, and the hair keratins mHa2 and hacl-1 revealed a pattern of premature differentiation within the null hair follicles. In intact EGFR null mice, proliferation in the interfollicular epidermis, but not hair follicles, was greatly decreased in the absence of EGFR. In contrast, grafting of EGFR null skin resulted in a hyperplastic response in the epidermis that did not resolve even after 10 weeks, although the wound-induced hyperplasia in EGFR wild-type grafts had resolved within 3 to 4 weeks. Thus, epithelial expression of the EGFR has complex functions in the skin. It is important in delaying follicular differentiation, may serve to protect the hair follicle from immunological reactions, and modifies both normal and wound-induced epidermal proliferation but seems dispensable for follicular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9176390

  3. Lectin binding in the anterior segment of the bovine eye.

    PubMed

    Tuori, A; Virtanen, I; Uusitalo, H

    1994-10-01

    Eleven different fluorescent lectin-conjugates were used to reveal the location of carbohydrate residues in frozen sections of the anterior segment of bovine eyes. The lectins were specific for the following five major carbohydrate groups: (1) glucose/mannose group (Concanavalin A (Con A)); (2) N-acetylglucosamine group (wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)); (3) galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine group (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA), Psophocarpus tetragonolobus agglutinin (PTA), Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I-B4 (GSA-I-B4), Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (JAC), peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA-I)); (4) L-fucose group (Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I)); (5) sialic acid group (wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)). All the studied lectins except UEA-I reacted widely with different structures and the results suggest that there are distinct patterns of expression of carbohydrate residues in the anterior segment of the bovine eye. UEA-I bound only to epithelial structures. Some of the lectins reacted very intensely with apical cell surfaces of conjunctival and corneal epithelia suggesting a different glycosylation at the glycocalyx of the epithelia. Also, the binding patterns of conjunctival and corneal epithelia differed with some of the lectins: PNA and RCA-I did not bind at all, and GSA-I-B4 bound only very weakly to the epithelium of the cornea, whereas they bound to the epithelium of the conjunctiva. In addition, HPA, HAA, PNA and WGA did not bind to the corneal basement membrane, but bound to the conjunctiva and vascular basement membranes. This suggests that corneal basement membrane is somehow different from other basement membranes. Lectins with the same carbohydrate specificity (DBA, HPA, HAA and PTA) reacted with the sections almost identically, but some differences were noticed: DBA did not bind to the basement membrane of the conjunctiva and the sclera and did bind to

  4. Mannan-Binding Lectin in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cedzyński, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide so research continues into underlying mechanisms. Since innate immunity and its potent component mannan-binding lectin have been proven to play an important role in the inflammatory response during infection and ischaemia-reperfusion injury, attention has been paid to its role in the development of cardiovascular complications as well. This review provides a general outline of the structure and genetic polymorphism of MBL and its role in inflammation/tissue injury with emphasis on associations with cardiovascular disease. MBL appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and, in consequence, coronary artery disease and also inflammation and tissue injury after myocardial infarction and heart transplantation. The relationship between MBL and disease is rather complex and depends on different genetic and environmental factors. That could be why the data obtained from animal and clinical studies are sometimes contradictory proving not for the first time that innate immunity is a “double-edge sword,” sometimes beneficial and, at other times disastrous for the host. PMID:24877121

  5. Lectin-like activity from Persea americana.

    PubMed

    Meade, N A; Staat, R H; Langley, S D; Doyle, R J

    1980-01-15

    An extract from the seeds of Persea americana possessed an erythro-agglutinating activity. The agglutinin was devoid of specificity for carbohydrates, but interacted readily with basic proteins or basic polyamino acids. The interaction between the agglutinin and egg-white lysozyme was not inhibited by chaotropic salts, but was sensitive to relatively low concentrations of urea. An affinity chromatographic procedure was developed in an effort to purify the agglutinin. Products from the chromatographic procedure were found not to contain higher specific agglutinating activities than the crude extract. Amino acid acid analyses of the extract showed the presence of relatively high proportions of glutamic and aspartic acids. In addition, the extract contained phosphorus and a visible chromophore. The agglutinin was resistant to detergents and denaturants, and proteases, nucleases, and other enzymes. The results suggest that, as opposed to other plant agglutinins, the active component from Persea is not a protein. Similarly, in contrast to many lectins, the agglutinin from Persea was not mitogenic for mouse lymphocytes. The agglutinin partially inhibited the mitogenesis of lymphocytes when the cells were treated with concanavalin A, or with bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

  6. Phase closure nulling: results from the 2009 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvert, Gilles; Malbet, Fabien; Chelli, Alain; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Monnier, John D.; Schaefer, Gail H.

    2010-07-01

    We present here a new observational technique, Phase Closure Nulling (PCN), which has the potential to obtain very high contrast detection and spectroscopy of faint companions to bright stars. PCN consists in measuring closure phases of fully resolved objects with a baseline triplet where one of the baselines crosses a null of the object visibility function. For scenes dominated by the presence of a stellar disk, the correlated flux of the star around nulls is essentially canceled out, and in these regions the signature of fainter, unresolved, scene object(s) dominates the imaginary part of the visibility in particular the closure phase. We present here the basics of the PCN method, the initial proof-of-concept observation, the envisioned science cases and report about the first observing campaign made on VLTI/AMBER and CHARA/MIRC using this technique.

  7. Statefinder hierarchy: An extended null diagnostic for concordance cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Sahni, Varun

    2011-02-15

    We show how higher derivatives of the expansion factor can be developed into a null diagnostic for concordance cosmology ({Lambda}CDM). It is well known that the Statefinder - the third derivative of the expansion factor written in dimensionless form, a{sup (3)}/aH{sup 3}, equals unity for {Lambda}CDM. We generalize this result and demonstrate that the hierarchy, a{sup (n)}/aH{sup n}, can be converted to a form that stays pegged at unity in concordance cosmology. This remarkable property of the Statefinder hierarchy enables it to be used as an extended null diagnostic for the cosmological constant. The Statefinder hierarchy combined with the growth rate of matter perturbations defines a composite null diagnostic which can distinguish evolving dark energy from {Lambda}CDM.

  8. Null-steering techniques for application to large array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockham, G. A.; Cho, C.; Parr, J. C.; Wolfson, R. I.

    A multimode waveguide can be employed to design an antenna which produces a beam for each propagating mode. A dual-beam waveguide slot array is particularly attractive. The antenna is compact, highly efficient, and has lower sidelobe-level performance than can be achieved with conventional monopulse techniques. Adaptive phase steering for jammer nulling is considered, taking into account a large phased array using a series feed system. The considered configuration was selected for computer simulation. A description is presented of a multiple beam antenna with independent steerable nulls. The multiple beam low-sidelobe antenna configuration has the ability to provide a radiation pattern with multiple and independently-located nulls, with minimal effect on the sidelobes of the unperturbed pattern.

  9. Null but not void: considerations for hypothesis testing.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Pamela A; Proschan, Michael A

    2013-01-30

    Standard statistical theory teaches us that once the null and alternative hypotheses have been defined for a parameter, the choice of the statistical test is clear. Standard theory does not teach us how to choose the null or alternative hypothesis appropriate to the scientific question of interest. Neither does it tell us that in some cases, depending on which alternatives are realistic, we may want to define our null hypothesis differently. Problems in statistical practice are frequently not as pristinely summarized as the classic theory in our textbooks. In this article, we present examples in statistical hypothesis testing in which seemingly simple choices are in fact rich with nuance that, when given full consideration, make the choice of the right hypothesis test much less straightforward. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22807023

  10. A linear voltage-tunable distributed null device.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, H. F.; Mattauch, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A linear voltage-tunable null device was predicted, fabricated, and tested. This filter is conceptually a distributed parameter RC representation of the channel of a MOSFET in a network configuration with a second MOSFET that is treated as a variable resistor. Classical transmission-line theory is used to predict a linear tuning curve with applied bias for the device. This concept was used to design a null device having a null that is linearly tunable in the range of 100 kHz. Such devices were fabricated and tested. Typical MOS processing steps were used and the resulting structures are compatible with the planar technology. The compatibility leads towards extension of this work to different frequency ranges for other specific applications.

  11. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Streiner, David L

    2003-12-01

    Introductory statistics classes teach us that we can never prove the null hypothesis; all we can do is reject or fail to reject it. However, there are times when it is necessary to try to prove the nonexistence of a difference between groups. This most often happens within the context of comparing a new treatment against an established one and showing that the new intervention is not inferior to the standard. This article first outlines the logic of "noninferiority" testing by differentiating between the null hypothesis (that which we are trying to nullify) and the "nill" hypothesis (there is no difference), reversing the role of the null and alternate hypotheses, and defining an interval within which groups are said to be equivalent. We then work through an example and show how to calculate sample sizes for noninferiority studies. PMID:14733457

  12. Analysis of a Hand1 hypomorphic allele reveals a critical threshold for embryonic viability.

    PubMed

    Firulli, Beth A; McConville, David P; Byers, James S; Vincentz, Joshua W; Barnes, Ralston M; Firulli, Anthony B

    2010-10-01

    Loss-of-function analysis of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Hand1 indicates critical roles in development. In an effort to generate a Hand1 cDNA knock-in reporter mouse, we generated two hypomorphic alleles, which extend embryonic survival to between embryonic day (E) 10.5 and E12.5. Heart morphogenesis appears largely normal; however, hypomorphic mice display thin left ventricular myocardium and reduction in pharyngeal mesoderm. Caudal defects, large allantois, and thickened yolk sac are observed and consistent with systemic Hand1 gene deletion. Hand1 mRNA is expressed at 30% of wild-type littermates and known Hand1-dependent genes show intermediate expression compared with wild-type and Hand1 null mice. Interestingly, putative bHLH partners, Hand2 and Twist1, show altered expression in both Hand1 null and hypomorphic backgrounds and intercrossing the Hand1 hypomorphic mice onto the Hand2 systemic null background exacerbates the cardiac and lateral mesoderm phenotypes. Together, these data define a critical threshold of Hand1 expression that is necessary for embryonic survival.

  13. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches. PMID:25943580

  14. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches.

  15. Identification of Lectins from Metastatic Cancer Cells through Magnetic Glyconanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kavunja, Herbert W.; Voss, Patricia G.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells can have characteristic carbohydrate binding properties. Previously, it was shown that a highly metastatic melanoma cell line B16F10 bound to galacto-side-functionalized nanoparticles much stronger than the corresponding less metastatic B16F1 cells. To better understand the carbohydrate binding properties of cancer cells, herein, we report the isolation and characterization of endogenous galactose binding proteins from B16F10 cells using magnetic glyconanoparticles. The galactose-coated magnetic glyconanoparticles could bind with lectins present in the cells and be isolated through magnet-mediated separation. Through Western blot and mass spectrometry, the arginine/serine rich splicing factor Sfrs1 was identified as a galactose-selective endogenous lectin, overexpressed in B16F10 cells, compared with B16F1 cells. In addition, galactin-3 was found in higher amounts in B16F10 cells. Finally, the glyconanoparticles exhibited a superior efficiency in lectin isolation, from both protein mixtures and live cells, than the corresponding more traditional microparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. Thus, the magnetic glyconanoparticles present a useful tool for discovery of endogenous lectins, as well as binding partners of lectins, without prior knowledge of protein identities. PMID:27110035

  16. The specificity of frutalin lectin using biomembrane models.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Thatyane M; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Cominetti, Márcia R; Selistre de-Araújo, Heloísa S; Zaniquelli, Maria E D; Beltramini, Leila M

    2010-08-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric alpha-d-galactose (d-Gal)-binding lectin that activates natural killer cells in vitro and promotes leukocyte migration in vivo. Because lectins are potent lymphocyte stimulators, understanding the interactions that occur between them and cell surfaces can help to the action mechanisms involved in this process. In this paper, we present a detailed investigation of the interactions of frutalin with phospho- and glycolipids using Langmuir monolayers as biomembrane models. The results confirm the specificity of frutalin for d-Gal attached to a biomembrane. Adsorption of frutalin was more efficient for the galactose polar head lipids, in contrast to the one for sulfated galactose, in which a lag time is observed, indicating a rearrangement of the monolayer to incorporate the protein. Regarding ganglioside GM1 monolayers, lower quantities of the protein were adsorbed, probably due to the farther apart position of d-galactose from the interface. Binary mixtures containing galactocerebroside revealed small domains formed at high lipid packing in the presence of frutalin, suggesting that lectin induces the clusterization and the forming of domains in vitro, which may be a form of receptor internalization. This is the first experimental evidence of such lectin effect, and it may be useful to understand the mechanism of action of lectins at the molecular level.

  17. Magnetoacoustic Waves in Stratified Atmospheres with a Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic fields strongly modify the propagation of MHD waves from the photosphere to the low corona, as can be shown exactly for the most simple case of a uniform magnetic field and isothermally stratrified atmosphere. For slightly more realistic scenarios, where both the atmospheric parameters and the magnetic field vary spatially, the linear MHD equations typically cannot be solved analytically. We use the Lagrangian Remap code--a nonlinear, shock-capturing MHD code--to study the propagation of initially acoustic wavepackets through a model 2D atmosphere that includes a gravitationally stratified chromosphere, transition region, and low corona. The magnetic field is formed by three photospheric concentrations and includes a single magnetic null point, resulting in an inhomogeneous system with a magnetic dome topology. A portion of an introduced wavepacket will refract toward the null due to the varying Alfven speed. Waves incident on the equipartition contour surrounding the null, where the sound and Alfven speeds coincide, partially transmit, reflect, and mode convert between branches of the local dispersion relation. Outward propagating slow modes generated during conversion become strongly concentrated along the set of field lines passing near the null. Acoustic energy is beamed back downwards towards each photospheric foot point, and upwards along one separatrix that exits the top of the numerical domain. Changes in the dominant restoring force for the wavepacket, between the Lorentz and pressure gradient forces, lead to a buildup of current density along topologically important features of the system (the null point and its four separatrices) and can drive reconnection at the null point itself. Ohmic dissipation of the currents locally heats the plasma. We find that the amount of current accumulation depends on where the centroid of a wavepacket initial crosses the photosphere, but does not simply coincide with regions of open versus closed magnetic field or

  18. Interpreting null findings from trials of alcohol brief interventions.

    PubMed

    Heather, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of alcohol brief intervention (ABI) has been established by a succession of meta-analyses but, because the effects of ABI are small, null findings from randomized controlled trials are often reported and can sometimes lead to skepticism regarding the benefits of ABI in routine practice. This article first explains why null findings are likely to occur under null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) due to the phenomenon known as "the dance of the p-values." A number of misconceptions about null findings are then described, using as an example the way in which the results of the primary care arm of a recent cluster-randomized trial of ABI in England (the SIPS project) have been misunderstood. These misinterpretations include the fallacy of "proving the null hypothesis" that lack of a significant difference between the means of sample groups can be taken as evidence of no difference between their population means, and the possible effects of this and related misunderstandings of the SIPS findings are examined. The mistaken inference that reductions in alcohol consumption seen in control groups from baseline to follow-up are evidence of real effects of control group procedures is then discussed and other possible reasons for such reductions, including regression to the mean, research participation effects, historical trends, and assessment reactivity, are described. From the standpoint of scientific progress, the chief problem about null findings under the conventional NHST approach is that it is not possible to distinguish "evidence of absence" from "absence of evidence." By contrast, under a Bayesian approach, such a distinction is possible and it is explained how this approach could classify ABIs in particular settings or among particular populations as either truly ineffective or as of unknown effectiveness, thus accelerating progress in the field of ABI research.

  19. Retention of crab larvae in a coastal null zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilburg, Charles E.; Dittel, Ana I.; Epifanio, Charles E.

    2007-05-01

    Alongshelf transport in the southern Middle Atlantic Bight is forced by buoyancy-driven currents originating in three large estuaries along the bight. These currents are strongest in the coastal ocean near the southern terminus of each estuary, while the analogous region on the northern side is characterized by weak subtidal flow. We used a combination of field observations and numerical modeling to test the hypothesis that these regions of weak subtidal flow are coastal null zones that serve as retention areas for larvae. The field study consisted of a four-day, shipboard investigation of the distribution of blue crab larvae ( Callinectes sapidus) near the mouth of Delaware Bay (˜39°N, 75°W) in late summer, 2004. Hydrographic surveys of the study site were conducted with a hull-mounted, surface-measuring system. Results showed a sharp boundary between the null zone and the buoyancy-driven current to the south. Blue crab larvae were collected in surface plankton tows along a 30-km transect that encompassed these two areas. Stations with higher densities of larvae were clustered in the null zone during both ebb and flood tides. A numerical model was used to examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed distribution. Model results agreed with the field survey and showed that simulated larvae are aggregated in the null zone. The simulations also demonstrated that larvae spawned within the null zone have a much greater probability of settling in juvenile nursery habitat within the bay. The close agreement between field and model results provides consistent support for the hypothesis that coastal null zones associated with the buoyancy-driven circulation of large estuaries may allow retention of larvae in the vicinity of the natal spawning population.

  20. Cloning and characterization of a monocot mannose-binding lectin from Crocus vernus (family Iridaceae).

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Astoul, C H; Barre, A; Rougé, P; Peumans, W J

    2000-08-01

    The molecular structure and carbohydrate-binding activity of the lectin from bulbs of spring crocus (Crocus vernus) has been determined unambiguously using a combination of protein analysis and cDNA cloning. Molecular cloning revealed that the lectin called C. vernus agglutinin (CVA) is encoded by a precursor consisting of two tandemly arrayed lectin domains with a reasonable sequence similarity to the monocot mannose-binding lectins. Post-translational cleavage of the precursor yields two equally sized polypeptides. Mature CVA consists of two pairs of polypeptides and hence is a heterotetrameric protein. Surface plasmon resonance studies of the interaction of the crocus lectin with high mannose-type glycans showed that the lectin interacts specifically with exposed alpha-1,3-dimannosyl motifs. Molecular modelling studies confirmed further the close relationships in overall fold and three-dimensional structure of the mannose-binding sites of the crocus lectin and other monocot mannose-binding lectins. However, docking experiments indicate that only one of the six putative mannose-binding sites of the CVA protomer is active. These results can explain the weak carbohydrate-binding activity and low specific agglutination activity of the lectin. As the cloning and characterization of the spring crocus lectin demonstrate that the monocot mannose-binding lectins occur also within the family Iridaceae a refined model of the molecular evolution of this lectin family is proposed.

  1. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively. PMID:24200894

  2. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko; Lay, Oliver P.; Peters, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    Deep, stable starlight nulls are needed for the direct detection of Earth-like planets and require careful control of the intensity and phases of the beams that are being combined. We are testing a novel compensator based on a deformable mirror to correct the intensity and phase at each wavelength and polarization across the nulling bandwidth. We have successfully demonstrated intensity and phase control using a deformable mirror across a 100nm wide band in the near-IR, and are in the process of conducting experiments in the mid-IR wavelengths. This paper covers the current results and in the mid-IR.

  3. BSA-boronic acid conjugate as lectin mimetics.

    PubMed

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Pinnamaneni, Poornima; Nie, Huan; Li, Yu; Sun, Xue-Long

    2014-01-10

    We report bovine serum albumin (BSA)-boronic acid (BA) conjugates as lectin mimetics and their glyco-capturing capacity. The BSA-BA conjugates were synthesized by amidation of carboxylic acid groups in BSA with aminophenyl boronic acid in the presence of EDC, and were characterized by Alizarin Red S (ARS) assay and SDS-PAGE gel. The BSA-BA conjugates were immobilized onto maleimide-functionalized silica beads and their sugar capturing capacity and specificity were confirmed by ARS displacement assay. Further, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis of the glyco-capturing activity of the BSA-BA conjugates was conducted by immobilizing BSA-BA onto SPR gold chip. Overall, we demonstrated a BSA-BA-based lectin mimetics for glyco-capturing applications. These lectin mimetics are expected to provide an important tool for glycomics and biosensor research and applications.

  4. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-09

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport.

  5. Production and purification of active snowdrop lectin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, M; Powell, K S; Gatehouse, J A; Raemaekers, R; Newell, C A; Hamilton, W D

    1998-02-15

    Recombinant snowdrop lectin was produced in Escherichia coli from a cDNA clone encoding mature Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. After induction with isopropylthio-beta-D-galactoside, inclusion bodies from E. coli were solubilised and the G. nivalis agglutinin purified by metal-affinity chromatography using a carboxy-terminal hexahistidine tag. The protein was refolded on the metal-affinity column prior to elution. After purification, the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes to a dilution similar to that determined for 'native' lectin purified from snowdrop, and showed similar specific binding to mannose. The toxicity of the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin towards rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) was shown to be similar to that of 'native' G. nivalis agglutinin when incorporated into an artificial diet. The recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin is thus functionally similar to 'native' snowdrop lectin.

  6. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport. PMID:25584830

  7. Evaluating the Thickness of Multivalent Glycopolymer Brushes for Lectin Binding.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Jaroslav; Park, Hyunji; Rosencrantz, Ruben R; Böker, Alexander; Elling, Lothar; Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is applied for investigating binding of lectins to multivalent glycopolymer brushes grafted from interdigital gold microelectrodes. By variation of the measuring frequency, EIS allows simultaneous analysis of binding at different subnanometer distances from the sensor surfaces. In this way, the binding dynamics along the brushes are quantified, giving an idea about the motion of the lectin through the brush layer. Two different brush lengths are investigated, revealing distinct dynamics of lectin binding due to changing topology of the brushes. Moreover, very low K D values in the nanomolar range are obtained. This unique platform may be used as sophisticated biosensor for detailed investigation of high-affinity protein binding to poly-mer layers. PMID:26096302

  8. Cell surface lectin-binding glycoconjugates on marine planktonic protists.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Emily C; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Martin-Cereceda, Mercedes; Novarino, Gianfranco; Wootton, Emma C

    2006-12-01

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions appear to play an important role in the phagocytosis of microbial prey by free-living protozoa. The present study utilizes FITC-labelled plant lectins to investigate the presence and localization of cell surface glycoconjugates on live and fixed planktonic protists (Dunaliella primolecta, Oxyrrhis marina, Goniomonas amphinema, Paraphysomonas vestita and Euplotes vannus). With live flagellate preparations, lectins primarily bound to external cell surfaces, with minimal internal staining observed. In contrast, cell fixation permeabilized cell membranes, allowing lectins to bind to internal structures, such as nuclear membranes and food vacuoles, interfering with the characterization of cell surface glycoconjugates. The method developed to label cell surface sugar moieties of live planktonic protists successfully overcomes the problems associated with fixation, and thus provides a useful protocol for future studies on protistan cell surface carbohydrate characterization.

  9. Lectin histochemical studies on the vomeronasal organ of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ of sheep was examined using lectin histochemistry in order to compare the types and amounts of the glycoconjugates among various components of the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. In the vomeronasal sensory epithelium, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) stained particular cells, located at the same level as the vomeronasal receptor cells, while the distribution, shape and number of the stained cells did not correspond to those of the vomeronasal receptor cells. Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L) labeled the basal cells of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. While, Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL) and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120) labeled the basal cells of the sensory epithelium, and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I) stained the basal cells of the non-sensory epithelium, respectively. Seventeen lectins labeled the free border of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, while Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Jacalin and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) labeled neither free border of the sensory nor that of non-sensory epithelia. The expression pattern of glycoconjugate was similar, but not identical, in the free border between the sensory and non-sensory epithelia. These results indicate that there are dissimilar features in the type and amount of glycoconjugates between the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, and at the same time, among the various cell types either in the vomeronasal sensory or non-sensory epithelium. PMID:23595118

  10. Effect of lectins from Diocleinae subtribe against oral Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Theodora Thays Arruda; Anderson Matias da Rocha, Bruno; Alves Carneiro, Victor; Vassiliepe Sousa Arruda, Francisco; Fernandes do Nascimento, Antônia Sâmia; Cardoso Sá, Nairley; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Holanda Teixeira, Edson

    2011-01-01

    Surface colonization is an essential step in biofilm development. The ability of oral pathogens to adhere to tooth surfaces is directly linked with the presence of specific molecules at the bacterial surface that can interact with enamel acquired pellicle ligands. In light of this, the aim of this study was to verify inhibitory and antibiofilm action of lectins from the Diocleinaesubtribe against Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus oralis. The inhibitory action against planctonic cells was assessed using lectins from Canavaliaensi formis (ConA), Canavalia brasiliensis (ConBr), Canavalia maritima (ConM), Canavalia gladiata (CGL) and Canavalia boliviana (ConBol). ConBol, ConBr and ConM showed inhibitory activity on S. mutans growth. All lectins, except ConA, stimulated significantly the growth of S. oralis. To evaluate the effect on biofilm formation, clarified saliva was added to 96-well, flat-bottomed polystyrene plates, followed by the addition of solutions containing 100 or 200 µg/mL of the selected lectins. ConBol, ConM and ConA inhibited the S. mutans biofilms. No effects were found on S. oralis biofilms. Structure/function analysis were carried out using bioinformatics tools. The aperture and deepness of the CRD (Carbohydrate Recognition Domain) permit us to distinguish the two groups of Canavalia lectins in accordance to their actions against S. mutans and S. oralis. The results found provide a basis for encouraging the use of plant lectins as biotechnological tools in ecological control and prevention of caries disease. PMID:21525793

  11. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26638121

  12. Erythrina lectins detect the H/HI blood groups.

    PubMed

    Sudakevitz, D; Gilboa-Garber, N; Levene, C; Sela, R; Bhattacharyya, L

    1991-08-01

    The lectin purified from Erythrina corallodendron seeds which binds N-acetyllactosamine greater than N-acetyl-D-galactosamine greater than alpha and beta galactosides greater than D-galactose was examined for its ABO(H) blood group specificity. It has been shown that this lectin causes the strongest hemagglutination of O(H) and weakest of Oh(Bombay) red blood cells, and interacts with the H antigen in association with the I antigen. The reactions of Erythrina corallodendron and Erythrina indica lectins (which are similar in sugar specificity) with erythrocytes of different ABO(H) and Ii blood groups (the I bloods were all from adults and the i from either cord or adult bloods) revealed the following order of activity: O(H)I greater than A2 I greater than O(H)i adult greater than A2BI greater than BI greater than O(H)i cord greater than A1I greater than A1i adult greater than Bi cord greater than A1BI greater than Ai cord greater than ABi cord greater than OhI. The Erythrina indica lectin showed a lower differentiation between the agglutination of O(H) and Oh erythrocytes. Both Erythrina lectins exhibited H/HI blood group preference but were not inhibited by the saliva from ABO(H) "secretors". Thus they may be classified with the Cytisus sessilifolius, Lotus tetragonolobus and Laburnum alpinum lectins which are inhibited by lactose but not by H blood group substances in secretions.

  13. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  15. Electrochemical potential of Microgramma vaccinifolia rhizome lectin.

    PubMed

    Santana, Giselly Maria de Sá; Albuquerque, Lidiane Pereira de; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Souza, Sandra Rodrigues de; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2012-06-01

    This work reports the isolation of Microgramma vaccinifolia rhizome lectin (MvRL) and the determination of electrochemical potentials of MvRL in the presence of Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺ and human type O erythrocytes. MvRL showed the highest specific hemagglutinating activity with human type O erythrocytes and showed a single polypeptide band of 17 kDa on SDS-PAGE. MvRL hemagglutinating activity was neutralized after dialysis with EDTA, and addition of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ restored the activity. Electrochemical potentials of MvRL in the presence of 100 mM Ca²⁺ (882 mV) and 60 mM Mg²⁺ (1051 mV) were higher (p<0.05) than in the presence of only 0.15 M NaCl (247 mV), indicating that the electrochemical system was sensitive to structural and physico-chemical changes promoted by these ions. MvRL potential did not change in the presence of type O erythrocytes. The electrochemical system was able to detect changes in electrochemical potentials of MvRL promoted by Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺, even in a complex environment (human serum supplemented with 40 and 60mM of these ions). The study reveals that the stimulatory effect of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ on hemagglutinating activity may be linked to conformational change and/or alterations in surface charge distribution of MvRL. PMID:22197266

  16. Neutrophil haptotaxis induced by the lectin KM+.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, L; Martins, A R; Espreáfico, E M; Roque-Barreira, M C

    1998-05-01

    KM+ is a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces neutrophil migration in vitro and in vivo. This attractant activity was shown to be caused by haptotaxis rather than chemotaxis. The inhibition by D-mannose of the neutrophil attraction exerted by KM+, both in vitro and in vivo, supports the idea that haptotaxis is triggered in vivo by the sugar binding sites interacting with glycoconjugates located on the neutrophil surface and in the extracellular matrix. In the present study an in vivo haptotaxis assay was performed by intradermally (i.d.) injecting 125I-KM+ (200 ng), which led to a selective staining of loose connective tissue and vascular endothelium. The radiolabelled area exhibited a maximum increase (five-fold) in neutrophil infiltration 3 h after injection, relative to i.d. 200 ng 125I-BSA. We characterized the ex vivo binding of KM+ to tissue elements by immunohistochemistry, using paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded, untreated rat skin. Bound KM+ was detected with an affinity-purified rabbit IgG anti-KM+ and visualized with an alkaline phosphatase based system. KM+ binding to connective tissue and vascular endothelium was inhibited by preincubating KM+ with 0.4 mM D-mannose and was potentiated by heparan sulfate (100 microg ml(-1)). An in vitro assay carried out in a Boyden microchamber showed that heparan sulfate potentiated the attractant effect of 10 microg KM+ by 34%. The present data suggest that KM+ induces neutrophil migration in vivo by haptotaxis and that the haptotactic gradient could be provided by the interaction of the KM+ carbohydrate recognition site(s) with mannose-containing glycoconjugate(s) in vascular endothelium and connective tissue. Heparan sulfate would act as an accessory molecule, enhancing the KM+ tissue binding and potentiating the induced neutrophil haptotaxis.

  17. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  18. Lectin binding and surface glycoprotein pattern of human macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H; Radzun, H J; Schumacher, U; Parwaresch, M R

    1986-01-01

    In the present study unstimulated and stimulated human blood monocytes, untreated and phorbol ester treated U-937 cells, as well as human peritoneal and alveolar macrophages were studied with respect to their surface membrane properties. Binding of different lectins and electrophoretic patterns of tritium labeled surface glycoproteins were compared. The analysis of surface glycoproteins could be interpreted as evidence for a common origin of the analysed cell populations. Furthermore, banding patterns of glycoproteins might be useful to define certain activation states within monocyte/macrophage differentiation. In contrast, lectin binding pattern did not clearly discriminate macrophage subpopulations. PMID:3102412

  19. Structural and functional similarities of breadfruit seed lectin and jacalin.

    PubMed

    Pineau, N; Pousset, J L; Preud'Homme, J L; Aucouturier, P

    1990-03-01

    Aquous extracts from seeds of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) were compared by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two bands of the same size (12 and 15 kD) as the jacalin subunits were the major components in breadfruit seed extract. They strongly reacted with anti-jacalin antibodies by western blotting. The breadfruit lectin displayed the same IgAl and IgD precipitation specificity as jacalin in gel double diffusion experiments. It also stimulated in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These results suggest that lectins from both species of Artocarpus are very similar.

  20. The Dual Status of the Null Object in Chinese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Yanfeng

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the status of the null object in Mandarin Chinese. It proposes that if an object is topicalized, the empty category in the object position should be analyzed as a variable. If it is not topicalized, it is a "pro." It is argued that a pro resembles an overt pronoun in obeying Condition B, but differs from the latter in being…

  1. Circumpulsar Asteroids: Inferences from Nulling Statistics and High Energy Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Cordes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    We have proposed that some classes of radio pulsar variability are associated with the entry of neutral asteroidal material into the pulsar magnetosphere. The region surrounding neutron stars is polluted with supernova fall-back material, which collapses and condenses into an asteroid-bearing disk that is stable for millions of years. Over time, collisional and radiative processes cause the asteroids to migrate inward until they are heated to the point of ionization. For older and cooler pulsars, asteroids ionize within the large magnetospheres and inject a sufficient amount of charged particles to alter the electrodynamics of the gap regions and modulate emission processes. This extrinsic model unifies many observed phenomena of variability that occur on time scales that are disparate with the much shorter time scales associated with pulsars and their magnetospheres. One such type of variability is nulling, in which certain pulsars exhibit episodes of quiescence that for some objects may be as short as a few pulse periods, but, for others, is longer than days. Here, in the context of this model, we examine the nulling phenomenon. We analyze the relationship between in-falling material and the statistics of nulling. In addition, as motivation for further high energy observations, we consider the relationship between the nulling and other magnetospheric processes.

  2. White-Light Nulling Interferometers for Detecting Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Shao, Michael; Levine, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    A report proposes the development of a white-light nulling interferometer to be used in conjunction with a singleaperture astronomical telescope that would be operated in outer space. When such a telescope is aimed at a given star, the interferometer would suppress the light of that star while passing enough light from planets (if any) orbiting the star, to enable imaging or spectroscopic examination of the planets. In a nulling interferometer, according to the proposal, scattered light would be suppressed by spatial filtering in an array of single-mode optical fibers rather than by requiring optical surfaces to be accurate within 1/4,000 wavelength as in a coronagraph or an apodized telescope. As a result, angstrom-level precision would be needed in only the small nulling combiner, and not in large, meter-sized optics. The nulling interferometer could work as an independent instrument in space or in conjunction with a coronagraphic system to detect planets outside our solar system.

  3. Progress in broadband infrared nulling technology for TPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Brown, Ken; Bartos, Randall; Gappinger, Robert; Loya, Frank; Macdonald, Dan; Moser, Steve; Negron, John

    2005-01-01

    TPF-I has set for itself a host of challenging technical milestones along its path to demonstrating the feasibility of infrared nulling for planet detection Progress in each of these areas of technical development will be reviewed as well as progress in meeting the overarching technical milestones.

  4. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not.

  5. Traversable wormholes: Minimum violation of the null energy condition revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2007-08-15

    It was argued in literature that traversable wormholes can exist with an arbitrarily small violation of null energy conditions. I show that if the amount of exotic material near the wormhole throat tends to zero, either this leads to a horn instead of a wormhole or the throat approaches the horizon in such a way that infinitely large stresses develop on the throat.

  6. Null Objects in Second Language Acquisition: Grammatical vs. Performance Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyzik, Eve C.

    2008-01-01

    Null direct objects provide a favourable testing ground for grammatical and performance models of argument omission. This article examines both types of models in order to determine which gives a more plausible account of the second language data. The data were collected from second language (L2) learners of Spanish by means of four oral…

  7. Null Lens Assembly for X-Ray Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a null lens assembly that allows laser interferometry of 60 deg. slumped glass mirror segments used in x-ray mirrors. The assembly consists of four lenses in precise alignment to each other, with incorporated piezoelectric nanometer stepping actuators to position the lenses in six degrees of freedom for positioning relative to each other.

  8. Waves and null congruences in a draining bathtub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, David; Dolan, Sam R.

    2016-04-01

    We study wave propagation in a draining bathtub: a black hole analogue in fluid mechanics whose perturbations are governed by a Klein-Gordon equation on an effective Lorentzian geometry. Like the Kerr spacetime, the draining bathtub geometry possesses an (effective) horizon, an ergosphere and null circular orbits. We propose here that a ‘pulse’ disturbance may be used to map out the light-cone of the effective geometry. First, we apply the eikonal approximation to elucidate the link between wavefronts, null geodesic congruences and the Raychaudhuri equation. Next, we solve the wave equation numerically in the time domain using the method of lines. Starting with Gaussian initial data, we demonstrate that a pulse will propagate along a null congruence and thus trace out the light-cone of the effective geometry. Our new results reveal features, such as wavefront intersections, frame-dragging, winding and interference effects, that are closely associated with the presence of null circular orbits and the ergosphere.

  9. DARWIN nulling interferometer breadboard I: System engineering and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatscher, Reinhold; Sodnik, Zoran; Ergenzinger, Klaus; Johann, Ulrich; Vink, Rob

    2003-10-01

    The presented work has been funded by ESA under ESTEC/Contract No. 14827/00/NL/CK and Astrium Germany has been awarded with this first ESA breadboarding towards nulling interferometry. Astrium designed and manufactured a nulling breadboard operating in the near infrared. The selected concept is fully transferable to the mid infrared. The interferometer is based on a highly symmetric Sagnac core. A dispersive phase shifter or a periscope system maintains the required phase shift of π. Two different source simulators have been built to test the interferometer's performance. They provide two point sources simulating a typical star and a planet signal. Angular separation of the point sources and intensity can be adapted to both operation modes, nulling and imaging. The OPD is actively stabilized to a gray fringe at a shorter wavelength without wobbling the system's OPD. The best results obtained with a diode laser source were a star suppression of 408,000 and a suppression of 32,000 using a broad-band ASE source. A stable deep null with a star suppression of 50,000 to 70,000 could be achieved over half an hour.

  10. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not. PMID:24737768

  11. Testing the null hypothesis: the forgotten legacy of Karl Popper?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Testing of the null hypothesis is a fundamental aspect of the scientific method and has its basis in the falsification theory of Karl Popper. Null hypothesis testing makes use of deductive reasoning to ensure that the truth of conclusions is irrefutable. In contrast, attempting to demonstrate the new facts on the basis of testing the experimental or research hypothesis makes use of inductive reasoning and is prone to the problem of the Uniformity of Nature assumption described by David Hume in the eighteenth century. Despite this issue and the well documented solution provided by Popper's falsification theory, the majority of publications are still written such that they suggest the research hypothesis is being tested. This is contrary to accepted scientific convention and possibly highlights a poor understanding of the application of conventional significance-based data analysis approaches. Our work should remain driven by conjecture and attempted falsification such that it is always the null hypothesis that is tested. The write up of our studies should make it clear that we are indeed testing the null hypothesis and conforming to the established and accepted philosophical conventions of the scientific method.

  12. Proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in connexin43-null osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, F.; Lecanda, F.; Screen, J.; Civitelli, R.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoblasts are highly coupled by gap junctions formed primarily by connexin43 (Cx43). We have shown that interference with Cx43 expression or function disrupts transcriptional regulation of osteoblast genes, and that deletion of Cx43 in the mouse causes skeletal malformations, delayed mineralization, and osteoblast dysfunction. Here, we studied the mechanisms by which genetic deficiency of Cx43 alters osteoblast development. While cell proliferation rates were similar in osteoblastic cells derived from calvaria of Cx43-null and wild type mice, camptothecin-induced apoptosis was 3-fold higher in mutant compared to wild type osteoblasts. When grown in mineralizing medium, Cx43-null cells were able to produce mineralized matrix but it took one week longer to reach the same mineralization levels as in normal cells. Likewise, expression of alkaline phosphatase activity per cell--a marker of osteoblast differentiation--was maximal only 2 weeks later in Cx43-null relative to wild-type cells. These observations suggest that Cx43 is important for a normal and timely development of the osteoblastic phenotype. Delayed differentiation and increase programmed cell death may explain the skeletal phenotype of Cx43-null mice.

  13. Do Null Subjects (Mis-)Trigger Pro-Drop Grammars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [[superscript -]pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing…

  14. Lectin extracts of champedak seeds demonstrate selective stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Gendeh, G S; Jaafar, M I

    1992-06-01

    The effect of extracts of champedak (Artocarpus integer) seed lectin on the proliferation of normal human lymphocyte was investigated. The IgA1 binding lectin was demonstrated to stimulate the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Action of the lectin on enriched T and B cell populations demonstrated T lymphocyte specificity. The lectin was not mitogenic to B lymphocytes. Optimal stimulation of proliferative response was achieved when cells were subjected to 5 days exposure to the crude lectin at 20 micrograms/ml.

  15. A dynamical system's approach to Schwarzschild null geodesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belbruno, Edward; Pretorius, Frans

    2011-10-01

    The null geodesics of a Schwarzschild black hole are studied from a dynamical system's perspective. Written in terms of Kerr-Schild coordinates, the null geodesic equation takes on the simple form of a particle moving under the influence of a Newtonian central force with an inverse-cubic potential. We apply a McGehee transformation to these equations, which clearly elucidates the full phase space of solutions. All the null geodesics belong to one of the four families of invariant manifolds and their limiting cases, further characterized by the angular momentum L of the orbit: for |L| > |Lc|, (1) the set that flow outward from the white hole, turn around, and then fall into the black hole, (2) the set that fall inward from past null infinity, turn around outside the black hole to continue to future null infinity, and for |L| < |Lc|, (3) the set that flow outward from the white hole and continue to future null infinity and (4) the set that flow inward from past null infinity and into the black hole. The critical angular momentum Lc corresponds to the unstable circular orbit at r = 3M, and the homoclinic orbits associated with it. There are two additional critical points of the flow at the singularity at r = 0. Though the solutions of geodesic motion and Hamiltonian flow we describe here are well known, what we believe is that a novel aspect of this work is the mapping between the two equivalent descriptions, and the different insights each approach can give to the problem. For example, the McGehee picture points to a particularly interesting limiting case of the class (1) that move from the white to black hole: in the L → ∞ limit, as described in Schwarzschild coordinates, these geodesics begin at r = 0, flow along t = constant lines, turn around at r = 2M, and then continue to r = 0. During this motion they circle in azimuth exactly once, and complete the journey in zero affine time.

  16. Analysis of the GSTM1-null polymorphism in patients with pterygium from Goiânia, Goiás Brazil.

    PubMed

    de P R Júnior, A; Dos Reis, G M; E Silva, K S F; Rodrigues, D A; Gomes, M C S; Martins, J V M; da Costa, I R; Freitas, G A; Moura, K K V O

    2015-06-11

    The first reports about pterygium date back to Hippocrates, and this disease still threatens vision health around the world. Pterygium is a formation of fibrous tissue consisting of highly vascularized epithelial and subepithelial tissue that grows excessively and with an abnormal shape on the cornea. Many physical and biological factors are associated with the pathogenesis of pterygium, including heat, dust, and other particles in the atmosphere, and immunological mechanisms, mechanisms involving extracellular matrix reorganization, growth factors, cytokines, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to further investigate the association between polymorphisms in GSTM1 and the formation of pterygium. We collected peripheral blood samples from 90 patients diagnosed with pterygium and from 23 subjects with-out the disease in order to perform molecular analysis of the GSTM1 gene. Subjects with one or two copies of the GSTM1 allele had a normal genotype while those without any copies of the allele had a null geno-type. The chi-square test or the Fisher exact test was performed in order to investigate possible associations between the molecular analysis and the risk of pterygium. A significant difference between the frequency of the GSTM1-null genotype in patient and control groups was identified. However, sub-group analysis found that the GSTM1-null genotype was statistically significant in men, but not in women, and in Caucasians, but not in Brown or Black groups. Furthermore, the GSTM1-null geno-type was not related to any of the risk factors analyzed: cases in family, occupational exposure, smoking, hypertension, and diabetes.

  17. Analysis of the GSTM1-null polymorphism in patients with pterygium from Goiânia, Goiás Brazil.

    PubMed

    de P R Júnior, A; Dos Reis, G M; E Silva, K S F; Rodrigues, D A; Gomes, M C S; Martins, J V M; da Costa, I R; Freitas, G A; Moura, K K V O

    2015-01-01

    The first reports about pterygium date back to Hippocrates, and this disease still threatens vision health around the world. Pterygium is a formation of fibrous tissue consisting of highly vascularized epithelial and subepithelial tissue that grows excessively and with an abnormal shape on the cornea. Many physical and biological factors are associated with the pathogenesis of pterygium, including heat, dust, and other particles in the atmosphere, and immunological mechanisms, mechanisms involving extracellular matrix reorganization, growth factors, cytokines, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to further investigate the association between polymorphisms in GSTM1 and the formation of pterygium. We collected peripheral blood samples from 90 patients diagnosed with pterygium and from 23 subjects with-out the disease in order to perform molecular analysis of the GSTM1 gene. Subjects with one or two copies of the GSTM1 allele had a normal genotype while those without any copies of the allele had a null geno-type. The chi-square test or the Fisher exact test was performed in order to investigate possible associations between the molecular analysis and the risk of pterygium. A significant difference between the frequency of the GSTM1-null genotype in patient and control groups was identified. However, sub-group analysis found that the GSTM1-null genotype was statistically significant in men, but not in women, and in Caucasians, but not in Brown or Black groups. Furthermore, the GSTM1-null geno-type was not related to any of the risk factors analyzed: cases in family, occupational exposure, smoking, hypertension, and diabetes. PMID:26125818

  18. The appearance, motion, and disappearance of three-dimensional magnetic null points

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Parnell, Clare E.; Haynes, Andrew L.

    2015-10-15

    While theoretical models and simulations of magnetic reconnection often assume symmetry such that the magnetic null point when present is co-located with a flow stagnation point, the introduction of asymmetry typically leads to non-ideal flows across the null point. To understand this behavior, we present exact expressions for the motion of three-dimensional linear null points. The most general expression shows that linear null points move in the direction along which the magnetic field and its time derivative are antiparallel. Null point motion in resistive magnetohydrodynamics results from advection by the bulk plasma flow and resistive diffusion of the magnetic field, which allows non-ideal flows across topological boundaries. Null point motion is described intrinsically by parameters evaluated locally; however, global dynamics help set the local conditions at the null point. During a bifurcation of a degenerate null point into a null-null pair or the reverse, the instantaneous velocity of separation or convergence of the null-null pair will typically be infinite along the null space of the Jacobian matrix of the magnetic field, but with finite components in the directions orthogonal to the null space. Not all bifurcating null-null pairs are connected by a separator. Furthermore, except under special circumstances, there will not exist a straight line separator connecting a bifurcating null-null pair. The motion of separators cannot be described using solely local parameters because the identification of a particular field line as a separator may change as a result of non-ideal behavior elsewhere along the field line.

  19. DNA-PKcs mutations in dogs and horses: allele frequency and association with neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qi; Bramble, Lori; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Bell, Thomas; Meek, Katheryn

    2002-01-23

    Previously, spontaneous genetic immunodeficiencies in mice, Arabian foals, and recently in Jack Russell terriers have been ascribed to defects in DNA-PKcs (catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase) expression. In severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) foals, a 5 bp deletion at codon 9480 results in a frameshift and a 967 amino acid deletion from the C terminus (including the entire PI3 kinase domain) and an unstable mutant protein. In SCID mice, a single base pair mutation results in a premature stop codon and deletion of 83 amino acids; as in SCID foals, the mutant protein is unstable. Here, we define the mutation within the canine DNA-PKcs gene that results in SCID. In this case, a point mutation results in a stop codon at nucleotide 10,828 and premature termination at a position 517 amino acids before the normal C terminus resulting in a functionally null allele. Thus, this is the third documentation of a spontaneous germline mutation in the C terminus of DNA-PKcs. Emerging data implicate DNA repair factors as potential tumor suppressors. Here, we have ascertained the carrier frequency of the defective DNA-PKcs genes in Arabian horses and in Jack Russell terriers. Our data indicate (in good agreement with a previous report) that the carrier frequency of the equine SCID allele is approximately 8%; in contrast, the carrier frequency of the canine SCID allele is less than 1.1%. We also assessed the frequency of the equine SCID allele in a series of 295 tumors from Arabian horses. We find a statistically significant correlation between the development of a virally induced tumor (sarcoid) and heterozygosity for the equine SCID allele. These data provide further support for an emerging consensus: that DNA-PK may normally act as a tumor suppressor through its caretaker role in maintaining chromosomal stability. PMID:11867233

  20. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin(s): use and applications in chromosome studies of lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Soares, M B; Armada, J L; Soares, V M; Seuánez, H N

    1982-01-01

    A simple procedure for extracting a lectin from the seeds of the jackfruit, Artocarpus integrifolia, is described. The extracts had an average protein concentration of 13.3 mg/ml, and were strongly erythroagglutinating with a 10(6) titre. Erythroagglutination was shown to be non-specific for A1-B-0 erythrocytes. Lymphoblastic transformation and mitogenic stimulation occurred in lymphocyte cultures both in man and Rhesus monkey, and chromosome preparations were obtained. Such preparations were of good quality and were adequate for chromosome analysis with chromosome banding techniques. In man, the response to the mitogenic stimulation did not vary significantly between individuals. In Rhesus monkey, where Phaseolus vulgaris phytohaemagglutinin produced a weaker mitogenic stimulation than in man, jacalin proved to be very effective.

  1. Lectin-binding sites in epithelial cells of the mouse prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Kentaro; Yoshida, Ayaka; Muragishi, Ryoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The prostate is an exocrine gland in the male reproductive tract that secretes seminal fluids. To gain insight into the cytochemical properties of prostatic epithelial cells, the characteristics of glycoconjugates in mouse prostate sections were examined by lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Characteristic staining patterns were observed, depending on the type of lectins present in the epithelia. Luminal cells reacted specifically with mannose-binding lectins (Galanthus nivalis lectin, Hippeastrum hybrid lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin) and Maclura pomifera lectin in all lobes of the prostate. Luminal cells also expressed galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), and fucose residues in the lateral and ventral lobes. Basal cells expressed GlcNAc and fucose, and reacted with Datura stramonium lectin and Aleuria aurantia lectin in all lobes. These results indicate that in the mouse prostate, the selectivity of lectin-binding sites for distinct cell types and lobe-dependent staining may relate to cellular and regional differences in function. Furthermore, some lectins selectively bound to prostatic epithelial cells, indicating their potential use as markers for the histopathological evaluation of prostatic diseases, cancer diagnosis, or male infertility. PMID:26004072

  2. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  3. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  4. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  5. Binding of mannose-functionalized dendrimers with pea (Pisum sativum) lectin.

    PubMed

    Schlick, Kristian H; Udelhoven, Rachel A; Strohmeyer, Gregory C; Cloninger, Mary J

    2005-01-01

    Lectins are invaluable tools for chemical biology because they recognize carbohydrate arrays. Multivalent carbohydrate binding by lectins is important for processes such as bacterial and viral adhesion and cancer metastasis. A better understanding of mammalian lectin binding to carbohydrate arrays is critical for controlling these and other cellular recognition processes. Plant lectins are excellent model systems for the study of multivalent protein-carbohydrate interactions because of their robustness and ready availability. Here, we describe binding studies of mannose-functionalized poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to a mitogenic lectin from Pisum sativum (pea lectin). Hemagglutination and precipitation assays were performed, and results were compared to those obtained from concanavalin A (Con A), a lectin that has been studied in more detail. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments are also described.

  6. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  7. Population genetic analysis of Helicobacter pylori by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis: extensive allelic diversity and recombinational population structure.

    PubMed Central

    Go, M F; Kapur, V; Graham, D Y; Musser, J M

    1996-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships in 74 Helicobacter pylori isolates recovered from patients assigned to distinct clinical categories were estimated by examination of allelic variation in six genes encoding metabolic housekeeping enzymes by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Seventy-three distinct allele profiles, representing multilocus chromosomal genotypes, were identified. All six loci were highly polymorphic, with an average of 11.2 alleles per locus. The mean genetic diversity in the sample was 0.735, a value that exceeds the level of diversity recorded in virtually all bacterial species studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. A high frequency of occurrence of null alleles (lack of enzyme activity) was identified and warrants further investigation at the molecular level. Lack of linkage disequilibrium (nonrandom association (of alleles over loci) indicates that horizontal transfer and recombination of metabolic enzyme genes have contributed to the generation of chromosomal diversity in H. pylori. In this sample of isolates, there was no statistically significant association of multilocus enzyme electrophoretic types or cluster of related chromosomal types and disease category. PMID:8682800

  8. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  9. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on mistletoe (Viscum album) lectin-mediated toxicity and immunomodulatory activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Jung, Pil-Mun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on the reduction of the toxicity of mistletoe lectin using both in vitro and in vivo models. To extract the lectin from mistletoe, an (NH4)2SO4 precipitation method was employed and the precipitant purified using a Sepharose 4B column to obtain the pure lectin fraction. Purified lectin was then gamma-irradiated at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 kGy, or heated at 100 °C for 30 min. Toxic effects of non-irradiated, irradiated, and heat-treated lectins were tested using hemagglutination assays, cytotoxicity assays, hepatotoxicity, and a mouse survival test and immunological response was tested using cytokine production activity. Hemagglutination of lectin was remarkably decreased (P < 0.05) by irradiation at doses exceeding 10 kGy and with heat treatment. However, lectin irradiated with 5 kGy maintained its hemagglutination activity. The cytotoxicity of lectin was decreased by irradiation at doses over 5 kGy and with heat treatment. In experiments using mouse model, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) levels were decreased in the group treated with the 5 kGy irradiated and heat-treated lectins as compared to the intact lectin, and it was also shown that 5 kGy irradiated and heat-treated lectins did not cause damage in liver tissue or mortality. In the result of immunological response, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL-6) levels were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the 5 kGy gamma-irradiated lectin treated group. These results indicate that 5 kGy irradiated lectin still maintained the immunological response with reduction of toxicity. Therefore, gamma-irradiation may be an effective method for reducing the toxicity of lectin maintaining the immune response. PMID:23847758

  12. Intraclass and interclass correlations of allele sizes within and between loci in DNA typing data

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Srinivasan, M.R.; Andrade, M. de )

    1993-02-01

    Nonparametric measures of correlations of DNA fragment lengths within and between variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci are proposed to test the hypothesis of random association of allele sizes at VNTR loci. Transformations of these nonparametric correlation measures are suggested to detect deviations of their null expectations caused by population subdivision and errors of measurement of VNTR fragment lengths. Analytic and permutation-based computer simulation studies are performed to show that under the hypothesis of independence of allele sizes the transformed correlation measures are normally distributed, irrespective of the VNTR fragment size distribution in the population even when the number of individuals samples is as low as 100. Power calculations are performed to establish that the current population data on six VNTR loci in the US Hispanic sample are in accordance with the hypothesis of random association of allele sizes within and between loci. Implications of these results in the context of forensic use of DNA typing are also discussed. 29 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Architectures of Multivalent Glycomimetics for Probing Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, Martina

    Well-defined multivalent glycoconjugates are valued tools in glycoscience and they are particularly valuable for the investigation of carbohydrate-lectin interactions. In addition to the relatively globularly shaped glycodendrimers many other designs have been realized. This chapter gives an overview on the common different architectures and their chemical synthesis by focussing on the achievements made since 2001.

  14. Membrane adsorbers comprising grafted glycopolymers for targeted lectin binding

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Husson, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    This work details the design and testing of affinity membrane adsorbers for lectin purifications that incorporate glucose-containing glycopolymers. It is the selective interaction between the sugar residues of the glycopolymer and the complementary carbohydrate-binding domain of the lectin that provides the basis for the isolation and purification of lectins from complex biological media. The design approach used in these studies was to graft glycopolymer ‘tentacles’ from macroporous regenerated cellulose membranes by atom transfer radical polymerization. As shown in earlier studies, this design approach can be used to prepare high-productivity membrane adsorbers. The model lectin, concanavalin A (conA), was used to evaluate membrane performance in bind-and-elute purification, using a low molecular weight sugar for elution. The membrane capacity for binding conA was measured at equilibrium and under dynamic conditions using flow rates of 0.1 and 1.0 mL/min. The first Damkohler number was estimated to relate the adsorption rate to the convective mass transport rate through the membrane bed. It was used to assess whether adsorption kinetics or mass transport contributed the primary limitation to conA binding. Analyses indicate that this system is not limited by the accessibility of the binding sites, but by the inherent rate of adsorption of conA onto the glycopolymer. PMID:25866416

  15. Momordica charantia seed lectin: toxicity, bacterial agglutination and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Nabi, Md Mahamodun; Nurujjaman, Md; Abu Reza, Md; Alam, A H M Khurshid; Uz Zaman, Rokon; Khalid-Bin-Ferdaus, Khandaker Md; Amin, Ruhul; Khan, Md Masudul Hasan; Hossain, Md Anowar; Uddin, Md Salim; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat

    2015-03-01

    In last three decades, several studies were carried out on the D-galactose-specific lectin of Momordica charantia seeds (MCL). In the present study, in vitro growth inhibition (8-23 %) at different concentrations (6-24 μg/ml) of MCL was observed against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. MCL also showed 28, 45, and 75 % growth inhibitions against EAC cells when administered 1.2, 2.0, and 2.8 mg/kg/day (i.p.), respectively for five consequent days in vivo in mice. After lectin treatment, the level of red blood cell and hemoglobin was increased significantly with the decrease of white blood cell and maintained the normal level when compared with EAC-bearing control and normal mice without EAC cells. Although MCL caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase of EAC cells, any irregular shape or apoptotic morphological alterations in the lectin-treated EAC cells was not observed by an optical and fluorescence microscope. Lectin showed toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii with an LC50 value of 49.7 μg/ml. Four out of seven pathogenic bacteria were agglutinated by MCL in the absence of inhibitory sugar D-lactose/D-galactose. In conclusion, MCL showed strong cytotoxic effect and therefore can be used as a potent anticancer chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:25542240

  16. Cancer Biomarker Discovery: Lectin-Based Strategies Targeting Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David; Mao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker discovery can identify molecular markers in various cancers that can be used for detection, screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease progression. Lectin-affinity is a technique that can be used for the enrichment of glycoproteins from a complex sample, facilitating the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers associated with a disease state. PMID:22710864

  17. Interaction of the tobacco lectin with histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Schouppe, Dieter; Ghesquière, Bart; Menschaert, Gerben; De Vos, Winnok H; Bourque, Stéphane; Trooskens, Geert; Proost, Paul; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Els J M

    2011-03-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) agglutinin or Nictaba is a member of a novel class of plant lectins residing in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of tobacco cells. Since tobacco lectin expression is only observed after the plant has been subjected to stress situations such as jasmonate treatment or insect attack, Nictaba is believed to act as a signaling protein involved in the stress physiology of the plant. In this paper, a nuclear proteomics approach was followed to identify the binding partners for Nictaba in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of tobacco cv Xanthi cells. Using lectin affinity chromatography and pull-down assays, it was shown that Nictaba interacts primarily with histone proteins. Binding of Nictaba with histone H2B was confirmed in vitro using affinity chromatography of purified calf thymus histone proteins on a Nictaba column. Elution of Nictaba-interacting histone proteins was achieved with 1 m N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). Moreover, mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the Nictaba-interacting histone proteins are modified by O-GlcNAc. Since the lectin-histone interaction was shown to be carbohydrate dependent, it is proposed that Nictaba might fulfill a signaling role in response to stress by interacting with O-GlcNAcylated proteins in the plant cell nucleus. PMID:21224338

  18. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... proteins derived from plants and lower animals that cause cell agglutination in the presence of...

  19. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... proteins derived from plants and lower animals that cause cell agglutination in the presence of...

  20. Purification, characterization, and biological activities of broccolini lectin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Zhang, Ting; Guo, Xiaolei; Ma, Chungwah; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-01-01

    Plant lectins have displayed a variety of biological activities. In this study, for the first time, a 27 kDa arabinose- and mannose-specific lectin from Broccolini (Brassica oleracea Italica × Alboglabra), named as BL (Broccolini lectin), was purified by an activity-driven protocol. Mass spectrometry analysis and database search indicated that no matches with any plant lectin were found, but BL contained some peptide fragments (QQQGQQGQQLQQVISR, QQGQQQGQQGQQLQQVISR and VCNIPQVSVCPF QK). BL exhibited hemagglutinating activity against chicken erythrocytes at 4 µg/mL. BL retained full hemagglutinating activity at pH 7-8 and temperature 30-40°C, and had an optimal activity in Ca(2+) solution. Bioactivity assay revealed that BL exhibited dose-dependent inhibition activity on 5 bacterial species with IC50 values of 143.95-486.33 μg/mL, and on 3 cancer cells with IC50 values of 178.82-350.93 μg/mL. Notably, 5-fold reduction in IC50 values was observed on normal L-O2 vs cancerous HepG-2 cells (924.35 vs. 178.82 μg/mL). This suggests that BL should be promising in food and medicine. PMID:25737003

  1. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proteins derived from plants and lower animals that cause cell agglutination in the presence of certain... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  2. Lectin cytochemistry in the exfoliative cytology of uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Remani, P; Pillai, K R; Haseenabeevi, V M; Ankathil, R; Bhattathiri, V N; Nair, M K; Vijayakumar, T

    1994-01-01

    A lectin was isolated from the seeds of jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and purified using a column of immobilized N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. This jack fruit lectin (JFL) was then conjugated to horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) type VI and used to study the cell surface carbohydrate profile of the cytological smears of the uterine cervix using diaminobenzidine as substrate. Cervical smears from 15 healthy individuals and 65 patients with dysplasia, carcinoma in situ and carcinoma of uterine cervix were used for the study. Normal cells showed weak binding in the membrane as well as cytoplasm, whereas carcinomatous cells showed strong binding towards JFL. Carcinoma in situ cells showed a binding pattern similar to that of carcinoma. Dysplastic cells showed difference in binding in mild, moderate and severe dysplasia. The intensity of binding increased with the severity of the dysplasia. The nature and intensity of binding of jack fruit lectin with cancer tissues suggest that this lectin may be of use as a diagnostic aid in exfoliative cytology.

  3. Lectin histochemistry of microvascular endothelium in chick and quail musculature.

    PubMed

    Nanka, O; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J; Pfüller, U; Valásek, P; Halata, Z; Schumacher, U; Grim, M

    2001-11-01

    The lectin binding pattern of muscular microvessels in chick, quail and chick/quail chimeras was analysed. Paraffin wax sections of muscles from embryonic and adult animals were used. The biotin-labelled lectins were detected by avidin-alkaline phosphatase complex. The following lectins bound to muscular microvessels including arterioles, capillaries and venules of both species: SNA-I (Sambucus nigra agglutinin), MAA (Maackia amurensis agglutinin), AIA (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin), VAA-I, VAA-II and VAA-III (Viscum album agglutinin I-III), WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), LEA (Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin). Endomysium and basement membranes of muscle fibres were also stained to a variable extent and intensity. Only SNA-I stained almost exclusively the endothelium of blood vessels. WFA (Wisteria floribunda agglutinin) bound to the quail endothelium only. MPA (Maclura pomifera agglutinin) marked vessels in adult muscles of chick and quail, but embryonic vessels were stained in quail only. Our results show that lectin histochemistry is a useful tool for visualisation of microvasculature in avian species. In particular, WFA and MPA can be used to determine the origin of endothelia in chick/quail chimeras.

  4. Antibiotic activity of lectins from marine algae against marine vibrios.

    PubMed

    Liao, W-R; Lin, J-Y; Shieh, W-Y; Jeng, W-L; Huang, R

    2003-07-01

    Saline and aqueous ethanol extracts of marine algae and the lectins from two red algal species were assayed for their antibiotic activity against marine vibrios. Experimental studies were also carried out on the influence of environmental factors on such activity, using batch cultures. The results indicated that many of the saline extracts of the algal species were active and that the activity was selective against those vibrios assayed. The algal extracts were active against Vibrio pelagius and the fish pathogen V. vulnificus, but inactive against V. neresis. Algal lectins from Eucheuma serra (ESA) and Galaxaura marginata (GMA) strongly inhibited V. vulnificus but were inactive against the other two vibrios. The antibacterial activity of algal extracts was inhibited by pretreatment with various sugars and glycoprotein. Extracts of the two red algae, E. serra and Pterocladia capillacea, in saline and aqueous ethanol, inhibited markedly the growth rate of V. vulnificus at very low concentrations. Culture results indicated that metabolites active against V. vulnificus were invariably produced in P. capillacea over a wide range of temperature, light intensity, and nutritional conditions. Enhanced antibacterial activity occurred when P. capillacea was grown under higher irradiance, severe nutrient stress and moderate temperature (20 degrees C), reflecting the specific antibiotic characteristics of this alga. The strong antibiotic activity of lectins towards fish pathogenic bacteria reveals one of the important roles played by algal lectins, as well as the potential high economic value of those marine algae assayed for aquaculture and for biomedical purposes. PMID:12884128

  5. Mushroom lectin protects arsenic induced apoptosis in hepatocytes of rodents.

    PubMed

    Rana, Tanmoy; Bera, Asit Kumar; Das, Subhashree; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Pan, Diganta; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasish; De, Sumanta; Das, Subrata Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Acute and chronic arsenic exposure result in toxicity both in human and animal beings and cause many hepatic and renal manifestations. The present study stated that mushroom lectin prevents arsenic-induced apoptosis. Apoptosis was measured by morphological alterations, cell proliferation index (CPI), phagocytic activity (nitro blue tetrazolium index; NBT), nitric oxide (NO) production, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activity. Arsenic exposure at 5 μM in the form of sodium arsenite resulted in significant elevation of deformed cells, NO production, TUNEL stained nuclei of hepatocytes, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activity. But the CPI and NBT index were significantly declined in arsenic-treated hepatocytes. The beneficial effect of mushroom lectin at 10 μg/mL, 20 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL) showed increased CPI and phagocytic activity. Mushroom lectin at those concentrations reduced deformed cells, NO production, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activity of hepatocytes. But significant better protection was observed in 50 μg/mL mushroom lectin-treated hepatocytes. This finding may be of therapeutic benefit in people suffering from chronic arsenic exposure.

  6. A method distinguishing expressed vs. null mutations of the Col1A1 gene in osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Redford-Badwal, D.A.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders of bone characterized by increased susceptibility to fracture. Most of the causative mutations were identified in patients with the lethal form of the disease. Attention is now shifting to the milder forms of OI where glycine substitutions and null producing mutations have been found. Single amino acid substitutions can be identified by RT/PCR of total cellular RNA, but this approach does not work well for null mutations since the defective transcript does not accumulate in the cytoplasm. We have altered our RNA extraction method to separate RNA from the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of cultured fibroblasts. Standard methods of mutation identification (RT/PCR followed by SSCP) is applied to each RNA fraction. DNA from an abnormal band on the SSCP gel is eluted and amplified by PCR for cloning and sequencing. Using this approach we have identified an Asp to Asn change in exon 50 (type II OI) and a Gly to Arg in exon 11 (type I OI) of the COL1A1 gene. These changes were found in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. These putative mutations are currently being confirmed by protein studies. In contrast, three patients with mild OI associated with reduced {proportional_to}(I)mRNA, had distinguishing SSCP bands present in the nuclear but not the cytoplasmic compartment. In one case a frame shift mutation was observed, while the other two revealed polymorphisms. The compartmentalization of the mutant allele has directed us to look elsewhere in the transcript for the causative mutation. This approach to mutation identification is capable of distinguishing these fundamentally different types of mutations and allows for preferential cloning and sequencing of the abnormal allele.

  7. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the anti-tuberculosis drug ethionamide in a flavin-containing monooxygenase null mouse.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Amy L; Leykam, Virginia L; Larkin, Andrew; Krueger, Sharon K; Phillips, Ian R; Shephard, Elizabeth A; Williams, David E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mTB), the causative agent for tuberculosis (TB), has led to increased use of second-line drugs, including ethionamide (ETA). ETA is a prodrug bioactivated by mycobacterial and mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). FMO2 is the major isoform in the lungs of most mammals, including primates. In humans a polymorphism exists in the expression of FMO2. FMO2.2 (truncated, inactive) protein is produced by the common allele, while the ancestral allele, encoding active FMO2.1, has been documented only in individuals of African and Hispanic origin, at an incidence of up to 50% and 7%, respectively. We hypothesized that FMO2 variability in TB-infected individuals would yield differences in concentrations and ratios of ETA prodrug and metabolites. In this study we assessed the impact of the FMO2 genetic polymorphism on the pharmacokinetics of ETA after administration of a single oral dose of ETA (125 mg/kg) to wild type and triple Fmo1/2/4-null mice, measuring levels of prodrug vs. metabolites in plasma collected from 0 to 3.5 h post-gavage. All mice metabolized ETA to ETA S-oxide (ETASO) and 2-ethyl-4-amidopyridine (ETAA). Wild type mice had higher plasma concentrations of metabolites than of parent compound (p = 0.001). In contrast, Fmo1/2/4-null mice had higher plasma concentrations of parent compound than of metabolites (p = 0.0001). Thus, the human FMO2 genotype could impact the therapeutic efficacy and/or toxicity of ETA. PMID:23580869

  8. Frequency of glutathione-S-transferase null-M1 and null-T1 genotypes among the Turabah population in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Mansour, A A; Saleh, O M; Askar, T; Salim, A M; Mergani, A

    2015-12-14

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) are key phase II detoxifying enzymes that play critical roles in protection against products of oxidative stress and against electrophiles. Glutathione S-transferase mu (GST-M1) and theta (GST-T1) are isoforms of glutathione transferase enzymes that participate in the metabolism of a wide range of chemicals. Deletion variants that are associated with a lack of enzyme function exist at both these loci. The frequencies of homozygous GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletion carriers are very high in most of the populations studied to date. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequencies of GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes among the Turabah population in Saudi Arabia in comparison with the data published for some other Arabic populations. The subjects consisted of 164 unrelated healthy individuals from the Turabah population. GST genotyping was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based methods. The GSTM1 deletion homozygosity was 56.1% and GSTT1 deletion homozygosity was 20.7%, while the GSTM1 and GSTT1 double-deletion homozygosity was 11.0%. Comparison with published data from Bahraini, Lebanese, and Tunisian populations demonstrated no significant difference for GSTM1 between these populations. The GSTT1 null-allele frequency was significantly lower than those for the Lebanese and Tunisian populations (P = 0.001) but similar to that for the Bahraini population (P = 0.099). Characterization of GST genetic polymorphisms in the Saudi population may aid in genetic studies on the association of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms with disease risks and the pharmacogenetics of chemotherapy.

  9. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, T. V.; Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1977-01-01

    Highly purified soybean lectin (SBL) was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-SBL) or tritium (3H-SBL) and repurified by affinity chromatography. FITC-SBL was found to bind to living cells of 15 of the 22 Rhizobium japonicum strains tested. The lectin did not bind to cells of the other seven R. japonicum strains, or to cells of any of the nine Rhizobium strains tested which do not nodulate soybean. The binding of the lectin to the SBL-positive strains of R. japonicum was shown to be specific and reversible by hapten inhibition with d-galactose or N-acetyl-d-galactosamine. The lectin-binding properties of the SBL-positive R. japonicum strains were found to change substantially with culture age. The percentage of cells in a population exhibiting fluorescence after exposure to FITC-SBL varied between 0 and 70%. The average number of SBL molecules bound per cell varied between 0 and 2 × 106. While most strains had their highest percentage of SBL-positive cells and maximum number of SBL-binding sites per cell in the early and midlog phases of growth, one strain had a distinctly different pattern. The SBL-negative strains did not bind lectin at any stage of growth. Quantitative binding studies with 3H-SBL indicated that the affinity constant for binding of SBL to its receptor sites on R. japonicum is approximately 4 × 107m−1. Many of the binding curves were biphasic. An inhibitor of SBL binding was found to be present in R. japonicum culture filtrates. PMID:16660121

  10. Urtica dioica agglutinin. A superantigenic lectin from stinging nettle rhizome.

    PubMed

    Galelli, A; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1993-08-15

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is an unusual plant lectin that differs from all other known plant lectins with respect to its molecular structure and its extremely low specific agglutination activity. We recently reported that this small lectin (8.5 kDa) is a T cell mitogen distinguishable from classical T cell lectin mitogens by its ability to discriminate a particular population of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as its capacity to induce an original pattern of T cell activation and cytokine production. The mechanism by which UDA activates T cells was investigated and compared with the conventional T cell mitogen Con A and the known superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Our data show that T cell proliferation induced by UDA is strictly dependent on AC expressing MHC class II molecules but is not MHC restricted. This proliferation can be partially inhibited by anti-I-A or anti-I-E mAb and completely blocked by a mAb recognizing monomorphic determinants on the Ia molecule. UDA indeed binds to specific carbohydrate structures present on class II molecules. UDA-induced T cell stimulation is dependent on TCR recognition of the unprocessed intact molecule in association with various Ia molecules. T cell response to UDA is clonally expressed and correlates with particular TCR V beta gene families usage. This stimulation leads to a sixfold enrichment of V beta 8.3+ T cells within 3 days. Therefore, UDA appears to use the same molecular mechanism as structurally unrelated bacterial or retroviral superantigens and we propose that this lectin is a superantigen. UDA, which is not a pathogenicity factor, could provide a useful probe for the analysis of T cell activation by superantigens. PMID:8345184

  11. Molecular basis of congenital lp(a) deficiency: a frequent apo(a) 'null' mutation in caucasians.

    PubMed

    Ogorelkova, M; Gruber, A; Utermann, G

    1999-10-01

    High plasma concentrations of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], a covalent low-density lipoprotein-apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] complex, are associated with coronary heart disease and stroke. Heritability of Lp(a) levels is high and the major locus determining Lp(a) concentrations is the apo(a) gene. We here demonstrate that a G-->A substitution at the +1 donor splice site of the apo(a) kringle (K) IV type 8 intron occurs with a high frequency ( approximately 6%) in Caucasians but not in Africans and is associated with congenital deficiency of Lp(a) in plasma. This mutation alone accounts for a quarter of all 'null' apo(a) alleles in Caucasians. RT-PCR analysis based on apo(a) illegitimate transcription in lympho- blastoid cells demonstrated that the donor splice site mutation results in an alternative splicing of the K IV type 8 intron and encodes a truncated form of apo(a). Expression of the alternatively spliced cDNA analogue in HepG2 cells showed that the truncated apo(a) form is secreted but is unable to form the covalent Lp(a) complex. Immunoprecipitated plasma apo(a) from homozygotes for the mutation was almost completely fragmented. Taken together, our data indicate that a failure in complex formation followed by fast degradation in plasma of the truncated free apo(a) is one mechanism which underlies the null Lp(a) type associated with the donor splice site mutation.

  12. Closing the gap: discrimination of the expression profile of HLA questionable alleles by a cytokine-induced secretion approach using HLA-A*32:11Q.

    PubMed

    Föll, D; Hinrichs, J; Tischer, S; Battermann, A; Schambach, A; Figueiredo, C; Immenschuh, S; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2012-05-01

    Matching of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles between donors and recipients plays a major role in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Null or questionably expressed HLA allelic variants are a major issue in HLA matching, because the aberrant expression of such alleles can have a major impact on the outcome of HSCT and/or its complications such as graft-versus-host disease. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of a recently developed cytokine-induced secretion assay to differentiate the expression levels of HLA-A*32:11Q (questionable) into a null (N) or low (L) expression variant. An amino acid mutation at position 164 of HLA-A*32:11Q disrupts the disulfide bridge in the α2 domain. HLA-A*32:11Q is not detectable by standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. To this end, we cloned soluble HLA-A*32:11Q and a reference allele (HLA-A*32:01) into expression vectors and transfected/transduced HEK293 and K562 cells. Allele-expressing K562 cells were simultaneously transfected/transduced with a β2-microglobulin (B2M)-encoding vector to ensure the intact HLA structure with B2M. After treatment with proinflammatory cytokines, secreted soluble HLA molecules were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the supernatant and intracellular accumulation of the recombinant proteins by flow cytometry. HLA-A*32:11Q was nearly undetectable in untreated transfectants. Cytokine treatment increased the secretion of HLA-A*32:11Q to detectable levels and resulted in intracellular accumulation of the allele. There was no difference in mRNA transcription between the A*32 alleles. On the basis of these results, we recommend reclassification of HLA-A*32:11Q as a low expression (L) variant.

  13. Fut2-null mice display an altered glycosylation profile and impaired BabA-mediated Helicobacter pylori adhesion to gastric mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana; Gomes, Joana; Ismail, Mohd Nazri; Haslam, Stuart M; Mendes, Nuno; Osório, Hugo; David, Leonor; Le Pendu, Jacques; Haas, Rainer; Dell, Anne; Borén, Thomas; Reis, Celso A

    2009-01-01

    Glycoconjugates expressed on gastric mucosa play a crucial role in host–pathogen interactions. The FUT2 enzyme catalyzes the addition of terminal α(1,2)fucose residues, producing the H type 1 structure expressed on the surface of epithelial cells and in mucosal secretions of secretor individuals. Inactivating mutations in the human FUT2 gene are associated with reduced susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection. H. pylori infects over half the world's population and causes diverse gastric lesions, from gastritis to gastric cancer. H. pylori adhesion constitutes a crucial step in the establishment of a successful infection. The BabA adhesin binds the Leb and H type 1 structures expressed on gastric mucins, while SabA binds to sialylated carbohydrates mediating the adherence to inflamed gastric mucosa. In this study, we have used an animal model of nonsecretors, Fut2-null mice, to characterize the glycosylation profile and evaluate the effect of the observed glycan expression modifications in the process of H. pylori adhesion. We have demonstrated expression of terminal difucosylated glycan structures in C57Bl/6 mice gastric mucosa and that Fut2-null mice showed marked alteration in gastric mucosa glycosylation, characterized by diminished expression of α(1,2)fucosylated structures as indicated by lectin and antibody staining and further confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis. This altered glycosylation profile was further confirmed by the absence of Fucα(1,2)-dependent binding of calicivirus virus-like particles. Finally, using a panel of H. pylori strains, with different adhesin expression profiles, we have demonstated an impairment of BabA-dependent adhesion of H. pylori to Fut2-null mice gastric mucosa, whereas SabA-mediated binding was not affected. PMID:19706747

  14. Averaged-null-energy condition for electromagnetism in Minkowski spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Folacci, A. )

    1992-09-15

    We show, on four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime, that {l angle}{psi}{vert bar}{ital T}{sub {mu}{nu}}{vert bar}{psi}{r angle}, the renormalized expectation value in a general quantum state {vert bar}{psi}{r angle} of the stress-energy tensor for electromagnetism, satisfies the averaged-null-energy condition, i.e., that {integral}{ital d}{lambda}{l angle}{psi}{vert bar}{ital T}{sub {mu}{nu}}{vert bar}{psi}{r angle}{ital t}{sup {mu}}{ital t{nu}}{ge}0 where this integral is along complete null geodesics with an affine parameter {lambda} and tangent vector {ital t}{sup {mu}}.

  15. Three-dimensional kinematic reconnection of plasmoids with nulls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yun-Tung; Finn, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The global nonlinear dynamics of magnetic field lines in plasmoids with a pair of nulls, where B = 0, is studied. The aim of this analysis is to describe the separatrix surfaces on which singularities can occur in ideal magnetohydrodynamics because of topological changes in the field. These separatrix surfaces should locate the boundary layers associated with 3D reconnection in the presence of resistivity or inertia. It is found that the field lines exhibit chaotic scattering with several properties in common with plasmoid models without nulls (in which one component of the magnetic field never changes sign). In particular, the singular surfaces can be fractal, implying complex current density structures down to the dissipation scale. These generic features are expected to exist in typical coronal magnetic geometries exhibiting three-dimensional reconnection and the formation of current sheets.

  16. A phenotypic null hypothesis for the genetics of personality.

    PubMed

    Turkheimer, Eric; Pettersson, Erik; Horn, Erin E

    2014-01-01

    We review the genetically informed literature on the genetics of personality. Over the past century, quantitative genetic studies, using identical and fraternal twins, have demonstrated that differences in human personality are substantially heritable. We focus on more contemporary questions to which that basic observation has led. We examine whether differences in the heritability of personality are replicable across different traits, samples, and studies; how the heritability of personality relates to its reliability; and how behavior genetics can be employed in studies of validity, and we discuss the stability of personality in genetic and environmental variance. The appropriate null hypothesis in behavior genetics is not that genetic or environmental influence on personality is zero. Instead, we offer a phenotypic null hypothesis, which states that genetic variance is not an independent mechanism of individual differences in personality but rather a reflection of processes that are best conceptualized at the phenotypic level. PMID:24050184

  17. Time travel in transformation optics: Metamaterials with closed null geodesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, S. Reece

    2015-06-01

    We apply the methods of transformation optics to theoretical descriptions of spacetimes that support closed null geodesic curves. The metric used is based on frame dragging spacetimes, such as the van Stockum dust or the Kerr black hole. Through transformation optics, this metric is analogous to a material that in theory should allow for communication between past and future. Presented herein is a derivation and description of the spacetime and the resulting permeability, permittivity, and magnetoelectric couplings that a material would need in order for light in the material to follow closed null geodesics. We also address the paradoxical implications of such a material and demonstrate why such a material would not actually result in a violation of causality. A full derivation of the Plebanski equations is also included.

  18. Exact Null Controllability of a Nonlinear Thermoelastic Contact Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sivergina, Irina F. Polis, Michael P.

    2005-01-15

    We study the controllability properties of a nonlinear parabolic system that models the temperature evolution of a one-dimensional thermoelastic rod that may come into contact with a rigid obstacle. Basically the system dynamics is described by a one-dimensional nonlocal heat equation with a nonlinear and nonlocal boundary condition of Newmann type.We focus on the control problem and treat the case when the control is distributed over the whole space domain. In this case the system is proved to be exactly null controllable provided the parameters of the system are smooth.The proof is based on changing the control variable and using Aubin's Compactness Lemma to obtain an invariant set for the linearized controllability map. Then, by proving that the found solution is sufficiently smooth, we get the null controllability for the original system.

  19. Null fluids: A new viewpoint of Galilean fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Dutta, Suvankar; Jain, Akash

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we study a Galilean fluid with a conserved U (1 ) current up to anomalies. We construct a relativistic system, which we call a null fluid and show that it is in one-to-one correspondence with a Galilean fluid living in one lower dimension. The correspondence is based on light cone reduction, which is known to reduce the Poincaré symmetry of a theory to Galilean in one lower dimension. We show that the proposed null fluid and the corresponding Galilean fluid have exactly same symmetries, thermodynamics, constitutive relations, and equilibrium partition to all orders in the derivative expansion. We also devise a mechanism to introduce U (1 ) anomaly in even dimensional Galilean theories using light cone reduction, and study its effect on the constitutive relations of a Galilean fluid.

  20. Modifications of the Schwarzschild null geodesics in effective field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, N.

    2009-12-15

    In this paper the dynamics of Schwarzschild null geodesics in the context of low-energy effective field theories incorporating some interactions violating the equivalence principle is examined. Nonperturbed geodesics are expressed in terms of a convenient set of constants called orbital elements. The modifications introduced by the effective interactions are treated as small perturbations, then the method of variation of parameters is employed to find the evolution of the orbital elements for the true worldlines. We next focus our discussion on the geometry of nondispersive photon orbits and highlight the importance of different orbital elements in long-term change of the orbit. This calculation shows that nondispersive forces acting on null geodesics drive a secular growth of the positional elements. As an application of our results we examine the evolution of mean orbital elements in the semiclassical theory of quantum gravitational optics and show that the averaged correction terms are within the range of the uncertainty principle.

  1. Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Vazquez, Juan M.; Berru, Robert I.

    1993-01-01

    Circuit measures electrical current via combination of Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling techniques. Known current generated by feedback circuit adjusted until it causes cancellation or near cancellation of magnetic field produced in toroidal ferrite core by current measured. Remaining magnetic field measured by Hall-effect sensor. Circuit puts out analog signal and digital signal proportional to current measured. Accuracy of measurement does not depend on linearity of sensing components.

  2. Null result for the weight change of a spinning gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.; Wilmarth, P.A. )

    1990-04-30

    A null result was obtained for the weight change of a right-spinning gyroscope, contradicting the results recently reported by Hayasaka and Takeuchi. No weight change could be observed under a variety of spin directions for rotational frequencies between 0 and 2.2{times}10{sup 4} rpm. Our limit of {minus}0.025{plus minus}0.07 mg is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the effect reported by Hayasaka and Takeuchi.

  3. (abstract) Ulysses Observations of Magnetic Nulls in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, D.; Murphy, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.

    1993-01-01

    High time resolution magnetic field measurements (1 vector/s) at radial distances out to 5.3 AU and heliographic latitudes from 0(deg) to > 35(deg) S reveal the presence of solitary pulses lasting tens of seconds in which the field magnitude approaches or reaches zero. The properties of these nulls, their spatial distribution and relation to solar wind structures and to similar-apppearing interplanetary and magnetospheric impulses will be discussed.

  4. Properties of Lectins in the Root and Seed of Lotononis bainesii1

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ian J.; Strijdom, Barend W.

    1984-01-01

    A lectin was purified from the root of Lotononis bainesii Baker by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-blood group substance A + H. The molecular weight of the lectin was estimated by gel filtration to be 118,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the lectin was a tetramer composed of two slightly different subunits with respective molecular weights of 32,000 and 35,000. The lectin had a hexose content of 12% (w/w) and contained the sugars fucose, glucosamine, mannose, and xylose. Root lectin hemagglutination was preferentially inhibited by disaccharides with terminal nonreducing galactose residues. Antigens capable of cross-reaction with root lectin antibody were not detected in the seed of L. bainesii. A lectin from the seed of L. bainesii was partially purified by adsorption to pronase-treated rabbit erythrocytes. The lectin preparation had a molecular weight of approximately 200,000. Galactose and galactono-1,4-lactone inhibited seed lectin hemagglutination but lactose was ineffective. There was no evidence that the root of L. bainesii contained material antigenically related to the seed lectin. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16663508

  5. Comprehensive profiling of accessible surface glycans of mammalian sperm using a lectin microarray

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that cell surface glycans or glycocalyx play important roles in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of the sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic research (sperm glycobiology) and clinical studies, such as diagnostics of infertility. As a group of natural glycan binders, lectin is an ideal tool for cell surface glycan profiling. However, because of the lack of effective technology, only a few lectins have been tested for lectin-sperm binding profiles. To address this challenge, we have developed a procedure for high-throughput probing of mammalian sperm with 91 lectins on lectin microarrays. Normal sperm from human, boar, bull, goat and rabbit were collected and analyzed on the lectin microarrays. Positive bindings of a set of ~50 lectins were observed for all the sperm of 5 species, which indicated a wide range of glycans are on the surface of mammalian sperm. Species specific lectin bindings were also observed. Clustering analysis revealed that the distances of the five species according to the lectin binding profiles are consistent with that of the genome sequence based phylogenetic tree except for rabbit. The procedure that we established in this study could be generally applicable for sperm from other species or defect sperm from the same species. We believe the lectin binding profiles of the mammalian sperm that we established in this study are valuable for both basic research and clinical studies. PMID:24629138

  6. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  7. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin.

    PubMed

    Rauschenberg, Melanie; Fritz, Eva-Corrina; Schulz, Christian; Kaufmann, Tobias; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors ("synthetic lectins") constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  8. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  9. Non-null annular subaperture stitching interferometry for aspheric test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Dong; Shi, Tu; Yang, Yongying; Chong, Shiyao; Miao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Shen, Yibing; Bai, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A non-null annular subaperture stitching interferometry (NASSI), combining the subaperture stitching idea and non-null test method, is proposed for steep aspheric testing. Compared with standard annular subaperture stitching interferometry (ASSI), a partial null lens (PNL) is employed as an alternative to the transmission sphere, to generate different aspherical wavefronts as the references. The coverage subaperture number would thus be reduced greatly for the better performance of aspherical wavefronts in matching the local slope of aspheric surfaces. Instead of various mathematical stitching algorithms, a simultaneous reverse optimizing reconstruction (SROR) method based on system modeling and ray tracing is proposed for full aperture figure error reconstruction. All the subaperture measurements are simulated simultaneously with a multi-configuration model in a ray-tracing program, including the interferometric system modeling and subaperture misalignments modeling. With the multi-configuration model, full aperture figure error would be extracted in form of Zernike polynomials from subapertures wavefront data by the SROR method. This method concurrently accomplishes subaperture retrace error and misalignment correction, requiring neither complex mathematical algorithms nor subaperture overlaps. A numerical simulation exhibits the comparison of the performance of the NASSI and standard ASSI, which demonstrates the high accuracy of the NASSI in testing steep aspheric. Experimental results of NASSI are shown to be in good agreement with that of Zygo® VerifireTM Asphere interferometer.

  10. Null-space function estimation for the interior problem.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Gengsheng L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-04-01

    In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), projection data can be truncated when the camera's field of view is smaller than the object to be imaged. Using truncated projections to reconstruct a region of interest (ROI) is a reality we must face if small detectors are used. The truncated data result in an underdetermined system of imaging equations, which may lead to non-unique solutions. Data sampling and photon attenuation may also affect the solution uniqueness and stability. The uniqueness of the solutions in the ROI can be investigated by studying the null-space functions in the ROI. This paper uses an iterative algorithm to estimate the null-space image, to determine the sampling conditions under which a stable ROI reconstruction is possible with truncated data and to investigate whether attenuation can influence the ROI reconstruction bias. This iterative algorithm is validated by the singular value decomposition method. We show that if the ROI is sufficiently sampled, the null-space image is close to zero inside the ROI, and any almost-zero offset is insignificant in SPECT, because the noise is a much more dominating degradation factor.

  11. Neuropathy in Human and Mice with PMP22 null

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario Andre; Katona, Istvan; Zhang, Xuebao; Roper, Helen P.; Carr, Louise; Macdonald, Fiona; Brueton, Louise; Blake, Julian; Suter, Ueli; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Haploinsufficiency of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). However, the biological functions of PMP22 in humans are largely unexplored due to the absence of patients with PMP22 null mutations. Design, Setting and Participants We have evaluated a 7-year-old boy with PMP22 null. Findings were compared with those from nerves of Pmp22 null mice. Results Motor and sensory deficits in the proband were non-length dependent. Weakness was found in cranial muscles, but not in the limbs. Large fiber sensory modalities were profoundly abnormal, which started prior to the maturation of myelin. This is in line with the temporal pattern of PMP22 expression predominantly in cranial motor neurons and DRG during embryonic development, becoming undetectable in adulthood. Moreover, there were conspicuous maturation defects of myelinating Schwann cells that were more significant in motor nerve fibers than in sensory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that PMP22 is important for the normal function of neurons that express PMP22 during early development, such as cranial motor neurons and spinal sensory neurons. Moreover, PMP22 deficiency differentially affects myelination between motor and sensory nerves, which may have contributed to the unique clinical phenotype in the patient with absence of PMP22. PMID:21670407

  12. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Reconnection Through A Moving Magnetic Null.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav; Linton, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    We model the dynamics of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection in a system where magnetic fields are observed to evolve from an unstable force-free equilibrium to a minimum energy state by way of global rearrangement of the magnetic topology. The process conserves total magnetic helicity and reconnection through a magnetic null is the dominant magnetic energy loss mechanism. During the period of most intense reconnection, the 3D localized reconnection region is observed to follow the magnetic null moving at a substantial fraction of the Alfven speed (up to 0.2 vAlf). Here, we will explore the qualitative effects of a moving 3D reconnection region on the rate of change of magnetic topology and the associated non-ideal electric fields. The quantitative impact of background plasma beta and ion inertia (the Hall effect) on the measured correlation between the motion of the magnetic null and the reconnection region will also be demonstrated. This research is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Self-attraction and natural curvature in null DNA.

    PubMed

    Manning, G S

    1989-08-01

    Forces of self-attraction inherent in DNA are unmasked when its ionic charge is neutralized. On the global level, self-attraction operates between segments to condense null (charge-neutralized) DNA into a segment-rich particle. Locally, self-attraction tends to contract an individual segment along its axis. If certain conditions are satisfied, the compressed segment buckles outward from the original line of the axis. Its most stable shape is then curved, or, as an extreme case, even completely folded. Buckling conditions are derived and shown to be met by DNA, thus explaining the high degree of ordered curvature and folding in the observed morphologies of condensed null DNA. The central concept employed is the buckling persistence length. It is evaluated for null DNA (40-50 bp) and agrees with experimental data (less than 60 bp). It helps in understanding the observed cooperative unit in the condensation/decondensation equilibrium (about 60 bp) and the observed size of digestion fragments unstable in the condensed phase (about 80 bp). The root-mean-square thermal compression/extension fluctuation in DNA is estimated at about 0.1 A/bp. PMID:2684222

  14. Evaluating thermoregulation in reptiles: an appropriate null model.

    PubMed

    Christian, Keith A; Tracy, Christopher R; Tracy, C Richard

    2006-09-01

    Established indexes of thermoregulation in ectotherms compare body temperatures of real animals with a null distribution of operative temperatures from a physical or mathematical model with the same size, shape, and color as the actual animal but without mass. These indexes, however, do not account for thermal inertia or the effects of inertia when animals move through thermally heterogeneous environments. Some recent models have incorporated body mass, to account for thermal inertia and the physiological control of warming and cooling rates seen in most reptiles, and other models have incorporated movement through the environment, but none includes all pertinent variables explaining body temperature. We present a new technique for calculating the distribution of body temperatures available to ectotherms that have thermal inertia, random movements, and different rates of warming and cooling. The approach uses a biophysical model of heat exchange in ectotherms and a model of random interaction with thermal environments over the course of a day to create a null distribution of body temperatures that can be used with conventional thermoregulation indexes. This new technique provides an unbiased method for evaluating thermoregulation in large ectotherms that store heat while moving through complex environments, but it can also generate null models for ectotherms of all sizes.

  15. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kunning G.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is ±0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation.

  16. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunning G; Walker, Mitchell L R

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is +/-0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation.

  17. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  18. Chromatism compensation in wide-band nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-02-01

    We introduce the concept of chromatism compensation in nulling interferometry that enables a high rejection ratio in a wide spectral band. Therefore the achromaticity condition considered in most nulling interferometers can be relaxed. We show that this chromatism compensation cannot be applied to a two-beam nulling interferometer, and we make an analysis of the particular case of a three-telescope configuration.

  19. Purification of the glycoprotein lectin from the broad bean (Vicia faba) and a comparison of its properties with lectins of similar specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, A K; Desai, N N; Neuberger, A

    1976-01-01

    1. The lectin from the broad bean (Vicia faba) was purified by affinity chromatography by using 3-O-methylglucosamine covalently attached through the amino group to CH-Sepharose (an omega-hexanoic acid derivative of agarose). Its composition and the nature of its subunits were compared with concanavalin A and the lectins from pea and lentil. 2. Unlike the other three lectins, broad-bean lectin is a glycoprotein; a glycopeptide containing glucosamine and mannose was isolated from a proteolytic digest. 3. The mol.wt. is about 47500; the glycoprotein consists of two apprently identical subunits, held together by non-covalent forces. Fragments of the subunits, similar to those found in concanavalin A and soya-bean agglutinin, were found in active preparations. 4. Broad-bean lectin was compared with concanavalin A and the lectins from pea and lentil in an investigation of the inhibition of their action by a number of monosaccharides, methyl ethers of monosaccharides, disaccharides and glycopeptides. The most striking differences concern 3-O-substituted monosaccharides, which are strong inhibitors of the action of broad-bean, pea and lentil lectins but not of the action of concanavalin A. There is, however, no strong inhibition of the action of these lectins by 3-Olinked disaccharides. PMID:938471

  20. Both the nature of KIR3DL1 alleles and the KIR3DL1/S1 allele combination affect the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire in the French population.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Katia; Willem, Catherine; Legrand, Nolwenn; Djaoud, Zakia; David, Gaëlle; Rettman, Pauline; Bressollette-Bodin, Céline; Senitzer, David; Esbelin, Julie; Cesbron-Gautier, Anne; Schneider, Thierry; Retière, Christelle

    2013-04-01

    NK-cell functions are regulated by many activating and inhibitory receptors including KIR3DL1. Extensive allelic polymorphism and variability in expression can directly alter NK-cell phenotype and functions. Here we investigated the KIR3DL1(+) NK-cell repertoire, taking into account the allelic KIR3DL1/S1 polymorphism, KIR3DL1 phenotype, and function. All 109 studied individuals possessed at least one KIR3DL1 allele, with weak KIR3DL1*054, or null alleles being frequently present. In KIR3DL1(high/null) individuals, we observed a bimodal distribution of KIR3DL1(+) NK cells identified by a different KIR3DL1 expression level and cell frequency regardless of a similar amount of both KIR3DL1 transcripts, HLA background, or KIR2D expression. However, this bimodal distribution can be explained by a functional selection following a hierarchy of KIR3DL1 receptors. The higher expression of KIR3DL1 observed on cord blood NK cells suggests the expression of the functional KIR3DL1*004 receptors. Thus, the low amplification of KIR3DL1(high) , KIR3DL1*004 NK-cell subsets during development may be due to extensive signaling via these two receptors. Albeit in a nonexclusive manner, individual immunological experience may contribute to shaping the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire. Together, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms regulating the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire.

  1. Sexual selection by female immunity against paternal antigens can fix loss of function alleles.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Darius; Springer, Stevan A; Ma, Fang; Cohen, Miriam; Secrest, Patrick; Taylor, Rachel E; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2011-10-25

    Humans lack the common mammalian cell surface molecule N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) due to a CMAH gene inactivation, which occurred approximately three million years ago. Modern humans produce antibodies specific for Neu5Gc. We hypothesized that anti-Neu5Gc antibodies could enter the female reproductive tract and target Neu5Gc-positive sperm or fetal tissues, reducing reproductive compatibility. Indeed, female mice with a human-like Cmah(-/-) mutation and immunized to express anti-Neu5Gc antibodies show lower fertility with Neu5Gc-positive males, due to prezygotic incompatibilities. Human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies are also capable of targeting paternally derived antigens and mediate cytotoxicity against Neu5Gc-bearing chimpanzee sperm in vitro. Models of populations polymorphic for such antigens show that reproductive incompatibility by female immunity can drive loss-of-function alleles to fixation from moderate initial frequencies. Initially, the loss of a cell-surface antigen can occur due to drift in isolated populations or when natural selection favors the loss of a receptor exploited by pathogens, subsequently the same loss-of-function allele can come under sexual selection because it avoids being targeted by the female immune system. Thus, we provide evidence of a link between sexual selection and immune function: Antigenicity in females can select against foreign paternal antigens on sperm and rapidly fix loss-of-function alleles. Similar circumstances existed when the CMAH null allele was polymorphic in ancestral hominins, just before the divergence of Homo from australopithecines. PMID:21987817

  2. Sexual selection by female immunity against paternal antigens can fix loss of function alleles

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderi, Darius; Springer, Stevan A.; Ma, Fang; Cohen, Miriam; Secrest, Patrick; Taylor, Rachel E.; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Humans lack the common mammalian cell surface molecule N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) due to a CMAH gene inactivation, which occurred approximately three million years ago. Modern humans produce antibodies specific for Neu5Gc. We hypothesized that anti-Neu5Gc antibodies could enter the female reproductive tract and target Neu5Gc-positive sperm or fetal tissues, reducing reproductive compatibility. Indeed, female mice with a human-like Cmah(−/−) mutation and immunized to express anti-Neu5Gc antibodies show lower fertility with Neu5Gc-positive males, due to prezygotic incompatibilities. Human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies are also capable of targeting paternally derived antigens and mediate cytotoxicity against Neu5Gc-bearing chimpanzee sperm in vitro. Models of populations polymorphic for such antigens show that reproductive incompatibility by female immunity can drive loss-of-function alleles to fixation from moderate initial frequencies. Initially, the loss of a cell-surface antigen can occur due to drift in isolated populations or when natural selection favors the loss of a receptor exploited by pathogens, subsequently the same loss-of-function allele can come under sexual selection because it avoids being targeted by the female immune system. Thus, we provide evidence of a link between sexual selection and immune function: Antigenicity in females can select against foreign paternal antigens on sperm and rapidly fix loss-of-function alleles. Similar circumstances existed when the CMAH null allele was polymorphic in ancestral hominins, just before the divergence of Homo from australopithecines. PMID:21987817

  3. Sexual selection by female immunity against paternal antigens can fix loss of function alleles.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Darius; Springer, Stevan A; Ma, Fang; Cohen, Miriam; Secrest, Patrick; Taylor, Rachel E; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2011-10-25

    Humans lack the common mammalian cell surface molecule N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) due to a CMAH gene inactivation, which occurred approximately three million years ago. Modern humans produce antibodies specific for Neu5Gc. We hypothesized that anti-Neu5Gc antibodies could enter the female reproductive tract and target Neu5Gc-positive sperm or fetal tissues, reducing reproductive compatibility. Indeed, female mice with a human-like Cmah(-/-) mutation and immunized to express anti-Neu5Gc antibodies show lower fertility with Neu5Gc-positive males, due to prezygotic incompatibilities. Human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies are also capable of targeting paternally derived antigens and mediate cytotoxicity against Neu5Gc-bearing chimpanzee sperm in vitro. Models of populations polymorphic for such antigens show that reproductive incompatibility by female immunity can drive loss-of-function alleles to fixation from moderate initial frequencies. Initially, the loss of a cell-surface antigen can occur due to drift in isolated populations or when natural selection favors the loss of a receptor exploited by pathogens, subsequently the same loss-of-function allele can come under sexual selection because it avoids being targeted by the female immune system. Thus, we provide evidence of a link between sexual selection and immune function: Antigenicity in females can select against foreign paternal antigens on sperm and rapidly fix loss-of-function alleles. Similar circumstances existed when the CMAH null allele was polymorphic in ancestral hominins, just before the divergence of Homo from australopithecines.

  4. Leguminous lectins as tools for studying the role of sugar residues in leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, N M; Teixeira, E H; Assreuy, A M; Cavada, B S; Flores, C A; Ribeiro, R A

    1999-01-01

    The natural physiological ligands for selectins are oligosaccharides found in glycoprotein or glycolipid molecules in cell membranes. In order to study the role of sugar residues in the in vivo lectin anti-inflammatory effect, we tested three leguminous lectins with different carbohydrate binding affinities in the peritonitis and paw oedema models induced by carrageenin in rats. L. sericeus lectin was more anti-inflammatory than D. virgata lectin, the effects being reversed by their specific binding sugars (N-acetylglucosamine and alpha-methylmannoside, respectively). However, V. macrocarpa, a galactose-specific lectin, was not anti-inflammatory. The proposed anti-inflammatory activity of lectins could be due to a blockage of neutrophil-selectin carbohydrate ligands. Thus, according to the present data, we suggest an important role for N-acetylglucosamine residue as the major ligand for selectins on rat neutrophil membranes. PMID:10704148

  5. Transcriptomic response of cowpea bruchids to N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Hua; Chi, Yong Hun; Guo, Feng-Guang; Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Balfe, Susan; Fang, Ji-Chao; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2015-02-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) are N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectins. Previous studies demonstrated that they have anti-insect activity, a property potentially useful in pest control. To gain some insight into the insect response to dietary lectins, we performed transcriptomic analysis using the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus) midgut microarray platform we built. Compared to the nonnutritional cellulose treatment, dietary lectins induced more profound changes in gene expression. Ingestion of relatively high doses of lectins for 24 h resulted in alteration of gene expression involved in sugar and lipid metabolism, transport, development, defense, and stress tolerance. Metabolic genes were largely downregulated. Moreover, we observed disorganized microvilli resulting from ingestion of WGA. This morphological change is consistent with the lectin-induced changes in genes related to midgut epithelial cell repair. In addition, suboptimal nutrient conditions may serve as a stress signal to trigger senescence processes, leading to growth arrest and developmental delay.

  6. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  7. Effect of Artocarpus integer lectin on functional activity of guinea-pig complement.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Gendeh, G S; Cheong, C N; Jaafar, M I

    1994-03-01

    The effect of Artocarpus integer lectin (lectin C) on the functional activity of guinea-pig complement was investigated. Purified and crude extract of lectin C from six cultivars of Artocarpus integer seeds were found to consume complement and thus decreased the complement-induced haemolytic activity of sensitized sheep erythrocytes. The change in the complement-mediated haemolytic activity was significantly decreased when incubation of the lectins was performed in the presence of melibiose. The reversal effect of the carbohydrate, which is a potent inhibitor of the lectin's binding to O-linked oligosaccharides of glycoprotein, demonstrate involvement of the lectins interaction with O-glycans of glycoproteins in the consumption of guinea-pig complement.

  8. Lectins in fish skin: do they play a role in host-monogenean interactions?

    PubMed

    Buchmann, K

    2001-09-01

    Mucus samples from rainbow trout skin with or without infections by Gyrodactylus derjavini were tested for the presence of lectins reacting with mannose, galactose and lactose. The samples inhibited the binding of biotinylated lectins (from Canavalia ensiformis, Artocarpus integrifolia and Erythrina corallodendron, respectively) to microtitre plates with covalently bound carbohydrates (mannopyranoside, galactopyranoside and lactose, respectively). However, the inhibition of C. ensiformis and A. integrifolia lectins was slightly greater when mucus from infected (but recovering) fish was used, suggesting an increase of mannose and galactose binding lectins in fish skin exposed to parasites. As mannose, galactose and lactose are present on the glycocalyx of Gyrodactylus derjavini, it is suggested that lectins could play a dual role in interactions between fish hosts and their monogenean parasites. Thus, recognition between parasite and host and also host responses towards parasite infections could both, at least partly, involve carbohydrate-lectin binding.

  9. Tissue binding patterns of lectins in premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, K K; Remani, P; Beevi, V M; Ankathil, R; Vijayakumar, T; Rajendran, R; Augustine, J; Vasudevan, D M

    1987-01-01

    Lectins from the seeds of Jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) were isolated using an immobilized N-acetyl D-galactosamine column and conjugated to type VI horse radish peroxidase. The purified conjugate was used for the study of tissue specificities using diaminobenzidine as the substrate on dewaxed tissue sections of normal, oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, verucous carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. In spite of having a common inhibitory sugar, winged bean lectin did not bind to any lectins whereas Jackfruit lectin showed varying degrees of binding towards the above tissues. The difference in the nature and intensity of binding of the Jackfruit lectin suggest the utilizing this lectin in the differential diagnosis of the premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity.

  10. Fluorimetric studies on saccharide binding to the basic lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, S M; Gurjar, M M; Khan, M I

    1998-09-01

    The binding of Artocarpus hirsuta lectin to galactose and its derivatives was examined by fluorescence spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence intensity of the lectin was enhanced by 55% upon binding to methyl alpha-galactose without any change in the emission maximum (333 nm). 4-Methyl umbellifery alpha-galactopyranoside showed 100% quenching of its fluorescence intensity upon binding to the lectin without any shift in the emission maximum (373 nm). The association constant for the binding of the above sugars to the lectin decreases with increasing temperature. Methyl group in the alpha anomeric position of galactose enhanced the binding while that in the beta position reduced the binding to the lectin. Solute quenching studies of the lectin using acrylamide, potassium iodide and cesium chloride indicated that the tryptophan residues were fully accessible to the neutral quencher, while only partly accessible to the ionic quenchers.

  11. Isolation and characterization of three Ca2+-dependent beta-galactoside-specific lectins from snake venoms.

    PubMed Central

    Gartner, T K; Ogilvie, M L

    1984-01-01

    Three lactose-inhibited lectins from the venoms of the snakes Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix (southern copperhead), Ancistrodon piscivorous leukostoma (western cottonmouth moccasin) and Crotalus atrox (western diamondback rattlesnake) have been isolated and newly characterized. The three lectins are similar to thrombolectin, a lectin isolated from the venom of Bothrops atrox (fer-de-lance) (Gartner, Stocker & Williams, 1980), with regard to sugar specificity, Mr, Ca2+ requirements and sensitivity to reducing agents. Each lectin is a dimer (Mr 28 000) consisting of monomers (Mr 14 000) indistinguishable on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Haemagglutination activity is dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and is inhibited by reducing agents. The lectins are not identical and can be distinguished on the basis of relative affinities for inhibiting sugars, isoelectric points and immunoprecipitation assays using anti-(cottonmouth lectin) serum. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6391472

  12. Three-dimensional kinematic reconnection in the presence of field nulls and closed field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yun-Tung; Finn, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of three-dimensional reconnection of magnetic fields with nulls and of fields with closed lines gives attention to the geometry of the former, with a view to their gamma-line and Sigma-surface structures. The geometric structures of configurations with a pair of type A and B nulls permit reconnection across the null-null lines; these are the field lines which join the two nulls. Also noted is the case of magnetostatic reconnection, in which the magnetic field is time-independent and the electrostatic potential is constant along field lines.

  13. Intragenic allele pyramiding combines different specificities of wheat Pm3 resistance alleles.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Susanne; Hurni, Severine; Streckeisen, Philipp; Mayr, Gabriele; Albrecht, Mario; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2010-11-01

    Some plant resistance genes occur as allelic series, with each member conferring specific resistance against a subset of pathogen races. In wheat, there are 17 alleles of the Pm3 gene. They encode nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC) and leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) domain proteins, which mediate resistance to distinct race spectra of powdery mildew. It is not known if specificities from different alleles can be combined to create resistance genes with broader specificity. Here, we used an approach based on avirulence analysis of pathogen populations to characterize the molecular basis of Pm3 recognition spectra. A large survey of mildew races for avirulence on the Pm3 alleles revealed that Pm3a has a resistance spectrum that completely contains that of Pm3f, but also extends towards additional races. The same is true for the Pm3b and Pm3c gene pair. The molecular analysis of these allelic pairs revealed a role of the NB-ARC protein domain in the efficiency of effector-dependent resistance. Analysis of the wild-type and chimeric Pm3 alleles identified single residues in the C-terminal LRR motifs as the main determinant of allele specificity. Variable residues of the N-terminal LRRs are necessary, but not sufficient, to confer resistance specificity. Based on these data, we constructed a chimeric Pm3 gene by intragenic allele pyramiding of Pm3d and Pm3e that showed the combined resistance specificity and, thus, a broader recognition spectrum compared with the parental alleles. Our findings support a model of stepwise evolution of Pm3 recognition specificities.

  14. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer–receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating—a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against “obligate cheaters” quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  15. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-23

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer-receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating--a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against "obligate cheaters" quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity.

  16. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-23

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer-receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating--a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against "obligate cheaters" quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  17. Unique posttranslational modifications of chitin-binding lectins of Entamoeba invadens cyst walls.

    PubMed

    Van Dellen, Katrina L; Chatterjee, Anirban; Ratner, Daniel M; Magnelli, Paula E; Cipollo, John F; Steffen, Martin; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2006-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amebic dysentery and liver abscesses, is spread via chitin-walled cysts. The most abundant protein in the cyst wall of Entamoeba invadens, a model for amebic encystation, is a lectin called EiJacob1. EiJacob1 has five tandemly arrayed, six-Cys chitin-binding domains separated by low-complexity Ser- and Thr-rich spacers. E. histolytica also has numerous predicted Jessie lectins and chitinases, which contain a single, N-terminal eight-Cys chitin-binding domain. We hypothesized that E. invadens cyst walls are composed entirely of proteins with six-Cys or eight-Cys chitin-binding domains and that some of these proteins contain sugars. E. invadens genomic sequences predicted seven Jacob lectins, five Jessie lectins, and three chitinases. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that mRNAs encoding Jacobs, Jessies, and chitinases are increased during E. invadens encystation, while mass spectrometry showed that the cyst wall is composed of an approximately 30:70 mix of Jacob lectins (cross-linking proteins) and Jessie and chitinase lectins (possible enzymes). Three Jacob lectins were cleaved prior to Lys at conserved sites (e.g., TPSVDK) in the Ser- and Thr-rich spacers between chitin-binding domains. A model peptide was cleaved at the same site by papain and E. invadens Cys proteases, suggesting that the latter cleave Jacob lectins in vivo. Some Jacob lectins had O-phosphodiester-linked carbohydrates, which were one to seven hexoses long and had deoxysugars at reducing ends. We concluded that the major protein components of the E. invadens cyst wall all contain chitin-binding domains (chitinases, Jessie lectins, and Jacob lectins) and that the Jacob lectins are differentially modified by site-specific Cys proteases and O-phosphodiester-linked glycans.

  18. Large Scale Magnetic Separation of Solanum tuberosum Tuber Lectin from Potato Starch Waste Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Ivo; Horska, Katerina; Martinez, Lluis M.; Safarikova, Mirka

    2010-12-01

    A simple procedure for large scale isolation of Solanum tuberosum tuber lectin from potato starch industry waste water has been developed. The procedure employed magnetic chitosan microparticles as an affinity adsorbent. Magnetic separation was performed in a flow-through magnetic separation system. The adsorbed lectin was eluted with glycine/HCl buffer, pH 2.2. The specific activity of separated lectin increased approximately 27 times during the isolation process.

  19. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  20. Purification and biological effects of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae) seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de; Aragao, Karoline Saboia; Gomes, Raphaela Cardoso; Freitas Pires, Alana de; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Oliveira Toyama, Daniela de; Nunes de Alencar, Nylane Maria; Criddle, David Neil; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio . E-mail: assreuy@uece.br; Cavada, Benildo Sousa . E-mail: bscavada@ufc.br

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the purification and characterization of a new N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific lectin from Araucaria angustifolia (AaL) seeds (Araucariaceae) and its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. AaL was purified using a combination of affinity chromatography on a chitin column and ion exchange chromatography on Sephacel-DEAE. The pure protein has 8.0 kDa (SDS-PAGE) and specifically agglutinates rabbit erythrocytes, effect that was independent of the presence of divalent cations and was inhibited after incubation with glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. AaL showed antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains, shown by scanning electron microscopy. AaL, intravenously injected into rats, showed anti-inflammatory effect, via carbohydrate site interaction, in the models of paw edema and peritonitis. This lectin can be used as a tool for studying bacterial infections and inflammatory processes.

  1. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent.

  2. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. PMID:23737242

  3. Bishydrazide glycoconjugates for lectin recognition and capture of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Adak, Avijit Kumar; Leonov, Alexei P; Ding, Ning; Thundimadathil, Jyothi; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S; Wei, Alexander

    2010-11-17

    Bishydrazides are versatile linkers for attaching glycans to substrates for lectin binding and pathogen detection schemes. The α,ω-bishydrazides of carboxymethylated hexa(ethylene glycol) (4) can be conjugated at one end to unprotected oligosaccharides, then attached onto carrier proteins, tethered onto activated carboxyl-terminated surfaces, or functionalized with a photoactive cross-linking agent for lithographic patterning. Glycoconjugates of bishydrazide 4 can also be converted into dithiocarbamates (DTCs) by treatment with CS(2) under mild conditions, for attachment onto gold substrates. The immobilized glycans serve as recognition elements for cell-surface lectins and enable the detection and capture of bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by their adsorption onto micropatterned substrates. A detection limit of 10³ cfu/mL is demonstrated, using a recently introduced method based on optical pattern recognition. PMID:20925370

  4. Bishydrazide Glycoconjugates for Lectin Recognition and Capture of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Adak, Avijit Kumar; Leonov, Alexei P.; Ding, Ning; Thundimadathil, Jyothi; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S.; Wei, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Bishydrazides are versatile linkers for attaching glycans to substrates for lectin binding and pathogen detection schemes. The α,ω-bishydrazides of carboxymethylated hexaethylene glycol (4) can be conjugated at one end to unprotected oligosaccharides, then attached onto carrier proteins, tethered onto activated carboxyl-terminated surfaces, or functionalized with a photoactive crosslinking agent for lithographic patterning. Glycoconjugates of bishydrazide 4 can also be converted into dithiocarbamates (DTCs) by treatment with CS2 under mild conditions, for attachment onto gold substrates. The immobilized glycans serve as recognition elements for cell-surface lectins and enable the detection and capture of bacterial pathogens such as Psuedomonas aeruginosa by their adsorption onto micropatterned substrates. A detection limit of 103 cfu/mL is demonstrated, using a recently introduced method based on optical pattern recognition. PMID:20925370

  5. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  6. Prevention of intestinal amebiasis by vaccination with the Entamoeba histolytica Gal/GalNac lectin.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Eric; Barroso, Lisa; Lockhart, Lauren; Wright, Rhonda; Cramer, Carole; Lyerly, David; Petri, William A

    2004-01-26

    Prevention of intestinal infection by Entamoeba histolytica would block both invasive disease and parasite transmission. The amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin mediates parasite adherence to the colonic surface and fecal anti-lectin IgA is associated with protection from intestinal reinfection in children. We tested if vaccination with the E. histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin could prevent cecal infection in a C3H mouse model of amebic colitis. Two trials using native lectin purified from the parasite and two trials using a 64 kDa recombinant fragment ("LecA") were performed with a combined intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization regimen using cholera toxin and Freund's adjuvants, respectively. Two weeks after immunization mice were challenged intracecally with trophozoites, and 4-12 weeks after challenge mice were sacrificed for histopathologic evaluation of infection. Vaccination prevented intestinal infection with efficacies of 84 and 100% in the two native lectin trials and 91 and 34% in the two LecA trials. Mice with detectable pre-challenge fecal anti-lectin IgA responses were significantly more resistant to infection than mice without fecal anti-lectin IgA responses. These results show for the first time that immunization with the Gal/GalNAc lectin can prevent intestinal amebiasis in mice and suggest a protective role for fecal anti-lectin IgA in vivo.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the lectin cDNA clones from onion, shallot and leek.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Engelborghs, I; Aelbers, H; Balzarini, J; Pusztai, A; van Leuven, F; Goldstein, I J; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the lectins from onion (Allium cepa), shallot (A. ascalonicum) and leek (A. porrum) has shown that these lectins differ from previously isolated Alliaceae lectins not only in their molecular structure but also in their ability to inhibit retrovirus infection of target cells. cDNA libraries constructed from poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from young shoots of onion, shallot and leek were screened for lectin cDNA clones using colony hybridization. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from these three species revealed a high degree of sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and at the amino acid level. Apparently the onion, shallot and leek lectins are translated from mRNAs of ca. 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins (ca. 19 kDa) which are converted into the mature lectin polypeptides (12.5-13 kDa) after post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  8. Toxicity and binding profile of lectins from the Genus canavalia on brine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins. PMID:24380079

  9. Bitter-sweet symphony: glycan-lectin interactions in virus biology.

    PubMed

    Van Breedam, Wander; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Favoreel, Herman W; de Groot, Raoul J; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-01

    Glycans are carbohydrate modifications typically found on proteins or lipids, and can act as ligands for glycan-binding proteins called lectins. Glycans and lectins play crucial roles in the function of cells and organs, and in the immune system of animals and humans. Viral pathogens use glycans and lectins that are encoded by their own or the host genome for their replication and spread. Recent advances in glycobiological research indicate that glycans and lectins mediate key interactions at the virus-host interface, controlling viral spread and/or activation of the immune system. This review reflects on glycan-lectin interactions in the context of viral infection and antiviral immunity. A short introduction illustrates the nature of glycans and lectins, and conveys the basic principles of their interactions. Subsequently, examples are discussed highlighting specific glycan-lectin interactions and how they affect the progress of viral infections, either benefiting the host or the virus. Moreover, glycan and lectin variability and their potential biological consequences are discussed. Finally, the review outlines how recent advances in the glycan-lectin field might be transformed into promising new approaches to antiviral therapy.

  10. A simple fibril and lectin model for cyst walls of Entamoeba and perhaps Giardia.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, John; Robbins, Phillips

    2011-01-01

    Cyst walls of Entamoeba and Giardia protect them from environmental insults, stomach acids, and intestinal proteases. Each cyst wall contains a sugar homopolymer: chitin in Entamoeba and a unique N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) homopolymer in Giardia. Entamoeba cyst wall proteins include Jacob lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) that crosslink chitin, chitinases that degrade chitin, and Jessie lectins that make walls impermeable. Giardia cyst wall proteins are also lectins that bind fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer. Although many of the details remain to be determined for the cyst wall of Giardia, current data suggest a relatively simple fibril and lectin model for the Entamoeba cyst wall.

  11. Toxicity and Binding Profile of Lectins from the Genus Canavalia on Brine Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins. PMID:24380079

  12. Functional recombinants designed from a fetuin/asialofetuin-specific marine algal lectin, rhodobindin.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong Won; Jung, Min Gui; Shim, Eun Young; Shim, Jun Bo; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2015-04-01

    Plant lectins have attracted much attention for biomedical applications including targeted drug delivery system and therapy against tumors and microbial infections. The main problem of using lectins as a biomedical tool is a batch-to-batch variation in isoforms content. The production of lectins using recombination tools has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with more precise properties, but there are only a handful of functional recombinant lectins presently available. A fetuin/asialo-fetuin specific lectin, Rhodobindin, has unique tandem repeats structure which makes it useful in exploiting for recombinant lectin. We developed three functional recombinant lectins using E. coli expression system: one from full cDNA sequence and two from fragmentary sequences of Rhodobindin. Hemagglutinating activity and solubility of the recombinant lectins were highest at OD 0.7 cell concentration at 20 °C. The optimized process developed in this study was suitable for the quality-controlled production of high amounts of soluble recombinant lectins. PMID:25871294

  13. Characterization of a new lectin involved in the protoplast regeneration of Bryopsis hypnoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce; Lü, Fang; Zhou, Baicheng; Peng, Guang

    2009-09-01

    A group of coenocytic marine algae differs from higher plants, whose totipotency depends on an intact cell (or protoplast). Instead, this alga is able to aggregate its extruded protoplasm in sea water and generate new mature individuals. It is thought that lectins play a key role in the aggregation process. We purified a lectin associated with the aggregation of cell organelles in Bryopsis hypnoides. The lectin was ca. 27 kDa with a pI between pH 5 and pH 6. The absence of carbohydrate suggested that the lectin was not a glycoprotein. The hemagglutinating activity (HA) of the lectin was not dependent on the presence of divalent cations and was inhibited by N-Acetylgalactosamine, N-Acetylglucosamine, and the glycoprotein bovine submaxillary mucin. The lectin preferentially agglutinated Gram-negative bacterium. The HA of this lectin was stable between pH 4 to pH 10. Cell organelles outside the cytoplasm were agglutinated by the addition of lectin solution (0.5 mg ml-1). Our results suggest that the regeneration of B. hypnoides is mediated by this lectin. We also demonstrated that the formation of cell organelle aggregates was inhibited by nigericin in natural seawater (pH 8.0). Given that nigericin dissipates proton gradients across the membrane, we hypothesize that the aggregation of cell organelles was proton-gradient dependent.

  14. Functional Recombinants Designed from a Fetuin/Asialofetuin-Specific Marine Algal Lectin, Rhodobindin

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jong Won; Jung, Min Gui; Shim, Eun Young; Shim, Jun Bo; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Plant lectins have attracted much attention for biomedical applications including targeted drug delivery system and therapy against tumors and microbial infections. The main problem of using lectins as a biomedical tool is a batch-to-batch variation in isoforms content. The production of lectins using recombination tools has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with more precise properties, but there are only a handful of functional recombinant lectins presently available. A fetuin/asialo-fetuin specific lectin, Rhodobindin, has unique tandem repeats structure which makes it useful in exploiting for recombinant lectin. We developed three functional recombinant lectins using E. coli expression system: one from full cDNA sequence and two from fragmentary sequences of Rhodobindin. Hemagglutinating activity and solubility of the recombinant lectins were highest at OD 0.7 cell concentration at 20 °C. The optimized process developed in this study was suitable for the quality-controlled production of high amounts of soluble recombinant lectins. PMID:25871294

  15. Evaluation of the specificity of lectin binding to sections of plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Guinel, F C; McCully, M E

    1985-01-01

    Hand sections of young corn root tips have been used in a study of problems encountered in the binding of fluorescently-labelled lectins to plant tissues. It was found, surprisingly, that with lectins specific for a sugar known to be present (Lotus and Ulex lectins for L-fucose), with a lectin specific for a sugar thought not to be present (wheat-germ agglutinin for N-acetylglucosamine), with non-lectin glycoprotein and protein (gamma-globulin and bovine serum albumin) and with basophilic dyes (alcian blue and toluidine blue), a coincidental binding pattern similar to the pattern of autofluorescence in the same tissue was obtained. Corn root tissues include cell walls composed of complex polysaccharides esterified with ferulic acid residues, as well as mucilages which are highly hydrated and expanded. In such material, neither standard inhibition controls with haptens nor the use of a wide range of lectin concentrations are adequate to distinguish clearly specific and non-specific binding of fluorescently-labelled lectin. Therefore, lectins are not the simple test probes they have been supposed. Before interpreting results obtained in using fluorescently-labelled lectins on any tissue sections, all available information (biochemical as well as histochemical) about the tissue must be considered.

  16. F-type lectin involved in defense against bacterial infection in the pearl oyster (Pinctada martensii).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-02-01

    In invertebrates and vertebrates, carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) play an important role in innate immunity against microbial invasion. In the present study, we report the cloning of an F-type lectin (designated as PmF-lectin) from pearl oyster (Pinctada martensii) using a combination of expression sequence tag (EST) analysis and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The full-length cDNA of PmF-lectin contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 579 bp coding for192 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide possesses six conserved residues of the F-lectin family critical for the formation of disulfide bonds (Cys⁴³-Cys¹⁴³, Cys⁷⁵-Cys⁷⁶ and Cys¹⁰²-Cys¹¹⁹). Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses in adult tissues showed that the PmF-lectin mRNA was abundantly expressed in haemocytes and gill, moderately expressed in the mantle, and rarely expressed in other tissues tested. After challenge with Vibrio alginolyticus, expression of PmF-lectin mRNA in haemocytes was dramatically up-regulated, reaching the highest level (13-fold higher than that of the control group) at 3 h post challenge, and then dropped gradually. These results suggest that PmF-lectin is a member of the F-lectin family and is involved in the innate immune response in pearl oyster.

  17. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  18. Role of the lectin complement pathway in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    In the last 15 years two major advances in the role of complement in the kidney transplant have come about. The first is that ischaemia reperfusion injury and its profound effect on transplant outcome is dependent on the terminal product of complement activation, C5b-9. The second key observation relates to the function of the small biologically active fragments C3a and C5a released by complement activation in increasing antigen presentation and priming the T cell response that results in transplant rejection. In both cases local synthesis of C3 principally by the renal tubule cells plays an essential role that overshadows the role of the circulating pool of C3 generated largely by hepatocyte synthesis. More recent efforts have investigated the molecules expressed by renal tissue that can trigger complement activation. These have revealed a prominent effect of collectin-11 (CL-11), a soluble C-type lectin that is expressed in renal tissue and aligns with its major ligand L-fucose at sites of complement activation following ischaemic stress. Biochemical studies have shown that interaction between CL-11 and L-fucose results in complement activation by the lectin complement pathway, precisely targeting the innate immune response to the ischaemic tubule surface. Therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammatory and immune stimulation in ischaemic kidney have so far targeted C3 or its activation products and several are in clinical trials. The finding that lectin-fucose interaction is an important trigger of lectin pathway complement activation within the donor organ opens up further therapeutic targets where intervention could protect the donor kidney against complement. PMID:27286717

  19. Broadband Achromatic Phase Shifter for a Nulling Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Nulling interferometry is a technique for imaging exoplanets in which light from the parent star is suppressed using destructive interference. Light from the star is divided into two beams and a phase shift of radians is introduced into one of the beams. When the beams are recombined, they destructively interfere to produce a deep null. For monochromatic light, this is implemented by introducing an optical path difference (OPD) between the two beams equal to lambda/2, where lambda is the wavelength of the light. For broadband light, however, a different phase shift will be introduced at each wavelength and the two beams will not effectively null when recombined. Various techniques have been devised to introduce an achromatic phase shift a phase shift that is uniform across a particular bandwidth. One popular technique is to use a series of dispersive elements to introduce a wavelength-dependent optical path in one or both of the arms of the interferometer. By intelligently choosing the number, material and thickness of a series of glass plates, a nearly uniform, arbitrary phase shift can be introduced between two arms of an interferometer. There are several constraints that make choosing the number, type, and thickness of materials a difficult problem, such as the size of the bandwidth to be nulled. Several solutions have been found for bandwidths on the order of 20 to 30 percent (Delta(lambda)/lambda(sub c)) in the mid-infrared region. However, uniform phase shifts over a larger bandwidth in the visible regime between 480 to 960 nm (67 percent) remain difficult to obtain at the tolerances necessary for exoplanet detection. A configuration of 10 dispersive glass plates was developed to be used as an achromatic phase shifter in nulling interferometry. Five glass plates were placed in each arm of the interferometer and an additional vacuum distance was also included in the second arm of the interferometer. This configuration creates a phase shift of pi radians with

  20. Allelic association and extended haplotype analysis of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) candidate region in the French Candadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, L.R.; Prescott, G.; Rochette, C. |

    1994-09-01

    SMA is a common lower motor neuron disease characterized by progressive proximal limb and trunk muscle weakness. Despite the wide range in phenotypic severity, all three clinical types of childhood SMAs map to chromosome 5q11.2-5q13.3. The proximal (D5S557) flanking markers span about 1 Mb. We have previously demonstrated significant linkage disequilibrium between D5S125, D5S435, D5S351, JK53CA1/2 and SMA in the French Canadian population. We now present data for three new DNA markers mapping between D5S435 and D5S557 kindly provided to us by Drs. B. Wirth (A31), A. Burghes (Ag1) and A. MacKenzie (CATT-40G1). We identified 10 different A31 Alleles whose frequencies were similar for both normal and SMA chromosomes. Ag1 is a complex multi-allelic marker and specific primers amplified 1 (Class I), 2 or rarely 3 (Class II) alleles per chromosome. We observed significant association between Ag1 and SMA. For example, the 100 bp Ag1 fragment was typed on 20 of 73 SMA chromosomes and 0 of 74 normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). We also observed significant association between Ag1 Class genotypes and phenotypic severity. Class I chromosomes predominated in Type I SMA (p=.001) while Type II SMA individuals were generally heterozygous Class I/Class II (p=.001). Finally, we provide evidence for allelic association between Type I SMA and CATT-40G1, a tri-allelic sublocus of CATT-1. All of our Type I SMA chromosomes (n=20) carried a null allele compared to 40% of normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). Extended haplotype analyses indicated that > 19% of French Canadian SMA chromosomes appear to be ancestrally related to two unique haplotypes indicating their utility for linkage disequilibrium mapping.

  1. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  2. Vacuum Nuller Testbed Performance, Characterization and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. G.; Clampin, M.; Petrone, P.; Mallik, U.; Madison, T.; Bolcar, M.; Noecker, C.; Kendrick, S.; Helmbrecht, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) can detect and characterize exoplanets with filled, segmented and sparse aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the choice of future internal coronagraph exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) to advance this approach, and assess and advance technologies needed to realize a VNC as a flight instrument. The VNT is an ultra-stable testbed operating at 15 Hz in vacuum. It consists of a MachZehnder nulling interferometer; modified with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hexpacked MEMS based deformable mirror (DM), coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. The 2-output channels are imaged with a vacuum photon counting camera and conventional camera. Error-sensing and feedback to DM and delay line with control algorithms are implemented in a real-time architecture. The inherent advantage of the VNC is that it is its own interferometer and directly controls its errors by exploiting images from bright and dark channels simultaneously. Conservation of energy requires the sum total of the photon counts be conserved independent of the VNC state. Thus sensing and control bandwidth is limited by the target stars throughput, with the net effect that the higher bandwidth offloads stressing stability tolerances within the telescope. We report our recent progress with the VNT towards achieving an incremental sequence of contrast milestones of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) respectively at inner working angles approaching 2A/D. Discussed will be the optics, lab results, technologies, and null control. Shown will be evidence that the milestones have been achieved.

  3. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, T. V.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of rhizosphere/rhizoplane culture conditions on the ability of various rhizobia to bind soybean seed lectin (SBL) was examined. Eleven strains of the soybean symbiont, Rhizobium japonicum, and six strains of various heterologous Rhizobium species were cultured in root exudate of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and in association with roots of soybean seedlings which were growing either hydroponically or in montmorillonite clay soil amendment (Turface). All 11 of the R. japonicum strains developed biochemically specific receptors for the lectin when cultured under these conditions, whereas six of the 11 did not develop such receptors when cultured in synthetic salts medium. Two cowpea strains also developed receptors for SBL. The other four heterologous strains of rhizobia gave no evidence of biochemically specific SBL binding in either synthetic salts media or rhizosphere/rhizoplane cultures. These results demonstrate that the environment provided by plant roots is an important factor in the development of specific lectin receptors on the cell surface of R. japonicum. PMID:16660472

  4. Development of gastrointestinal surface. VIII. Lectin identification of carbohydrate differences

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, K.Y.; Bresson, J.L.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-05-01

    Binding of microvillus membranes (MVM) from newborn and adult rats by concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus (UEA I), Dolichos bifluorus (DBA), and Triticum vulgaris (WGA) was examined to determine the availability of carbohydrate-containing sites for these lectins on the intestinal surface during development. Consistent patterns of differences in the reaction of MVM with these lectins were found. Con A and UEA had much higher reactivities to MVM of adult than newborn rats. /sup 125/I-labeled-UEA gel overlay experiments revealed the abundance of UEA-binding sites in MVM of adult rat in contrast to the two binding sites in MVM of a newborn rat. DBA bound only to MVM of the adults, and very few binding sites were found in immature MVM. In contrast to these lectins, WGA binding was much higher in MVM of the newborns and decreased with maturation. Additional experiments on the age dependence of UEA and DBA reactivities revealed that the most striking changes occur in animals from 2 to 2 wk of age. In MVM from 2-wk-old rats, there were only 13.9% and < 0.2% of the adult binding capacities for UEA and DBA, respectively. By the time the animals were 4 wk old, the binding capacity for UEA had attained close to the level of the adults, whereas for DBA it reached 71.3% of the adult value. These results provide definite evidence of changes in the intestinal surface during perinatal development.

  5. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  6. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling. PMID:1030938

  7. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  8. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide. PMID:26022515

  9. Ganoderma lucidum: a source for novel bioactive lectin.

    PubMed

    U Girjal, Vinay; Neelagund, Shivayogeeswar; Krishnappa, Madappa

    2011-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is known for its high medicinal value, clinically used in treatment for various diseases. We have selected this mushroom for isolation of novel bioactive lectin. The isolation procedure comprised of ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE- cellulose and affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel. Purified lectin was monomer with a molecular mass of 15 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE, Gel filtration, MALDI-ToF. It showed hemagglutinating activity against both human and animal erythrocytes. The hemagglutination activity was not inhibited by simple sugars but inhibited by glycoproteins. The activity was maximal at pH range 4.0-9.0 and at temperature up to 60° C. The hemagglutination activity was stable even in the presence of 10mM EDTA and other divalent metal cations such as CaCl2, MgCl2, ZnCl2, and MnCl2. Lectin was shown antifungal activity against following pathogens Fusarium oxysporium, Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus Niger, Colletotrichum musae, Botrytis cinerea, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton interdigitale, Epidermophyton floccosum and Microsporum canis. PMID:21728991

  10. Plasmon waveguide resonance for sensing glycan-lectin interactions.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isabel; Kurylo, Ievgen; Coffinier, Yannick; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Harté, Etienne; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-05-11

    Carbohydrate-modified interfaces have been shown to be valuable tools for the study of protein-glycan recognition events. Label-free approache such as plasmonic based techniques are particularly attractive. This paper describes a new analytical platform for the sensitive and selective screening of carbohydrate-lectin interactions using plasmon waveguide resonance. Planar optical waveguides (POW), consisting of glass prisms coated with silver (50 nm) and silica (460 nm) layers were derivatized with mannose or lactose moieties. The specific association of the resulting interface with selected lectins was assessed by following the changes in its plasmonic response. The immobilization strategy investigated in this work is based on the formation of a covalent bond between propargyl-functionalized glycans and surface-linked azide groups via a Cu(I) "click" chemistry. Optimization of the surface architecture through the introduction of an oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer between the plasmonic surface and the glycan ligands provided an interface which allowed screening of glycan-lectin interactions in a highly selective manner. The limit of detection (LOD) of this method for this particular application was found to be in the subnanomolar range (0.5 nM), showing it to constitute a promising analytical platform for future development and use in a pharmaceutical or biomedical setting.

  11. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  12. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  13. Mosaic lectin labelling in the quail collecting ducts.

    PubMed

    Menghi, G; Gabrielli, M G; Accili, D

    1995-04-01

    Morphological and histoenzymological differences have been observed between intercalated and principal cells of the quail Coturnix coturnix japonica collecting ducts. The present study was designed to shed light on the lectin affinity of the collecting duct cells within cortex and medulla by the use of HRP-labelled lectins combined with glycosidase degradation. Binding of PNA and RCA-I lectins consequent to enzymatic release of sialic acid revealed abundant sialylated carbohydrate moieties within the principal cell cytoplasm. This characteristic binding pattern differed considerably from the staining observed in the intercalated cells. Interesting information also emerged about the presence of sialoglycoconjugates having the terminal disaccharide sialic acid-beta-N-acetylgalactosamine originating from the increased SBA binding and the unmodified DBA labelling after removal of sialic acid. Sequential degradation by sialidase/beta-galactosidase followed by incubation with DBA offered the possibility to suspect that the receptor sugar for the penultimate beta-galactose may be N-acetylgalactosamine. Conversely, we were not able to define the accept sugar for penultimate beta-GalNAc owing to the lack of availability of beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme. When although further studies are clearly needed to elucidate the physiological role of the cellular sialoglycoconjugates detected, the present results already provide valuable insight into the carbohydrate composition of intercalated and principal cells in the quail collecting ducts.

  14. Artocarpus hirsuta lectin. Differential modes of chemical and thermal denaturation.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Sushama M; Gurjar, Madhura M; Khan, M Islam

    2002-03-01

    Unfolding, inactivation and dissociation of the lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta seeds were studied by chemical (guanidine hydrochloride, GdnHCl) and thermal denaturation. Conformational transitions were monitored by intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism. The gradual red shift in the emission maxima of the native protein from 335 to 356 nm, change in the ellipticity at 218 nm and simultaneous decrease in the sugar binding activity were observed with increasing concentration of GdnHCl in the pH range between 4.0 and 9.0. The unfolding and inactivation by GdnHCl were partially reversible. Gel filtration of the lectin in presence of 1-6 m GdnHCl showed that the protein dissociates reversibly into partially unfolded dimer and then irreversibly into unfolded inactive monomer. Thermal denaturation was irreversible. The lectin loses activity rapidly above 45 degrees C. The exposure of hydrophobic patches, distorted secondary structure and formation of insoluble aggregates of the thermally inactivated protein probably leads to the irreversible denaturation.

  15. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide.

  16. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; Mot, René

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. Bacteriocins mediate highly selective antagonism among closely related bacteria but such antimicrobial proteins have not yet been reported in Burkholderia. We identified a lectin-like protein of the LlpA family in a Burkholderia cenocepacia human isolate that strain-specifically and selectively kills planktonic and biofilm cells of other Burkholderia cepacia complex members. PMID:23737242

  17. A new concept of achromatic phase shifter for nulling interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, Daniel; Pelat, D.; Ygouf, Marie; Reess, Jean-Michel; Chemla, Fanny; Riaud, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Direct detection and characterization of a planet around a star by nulling interferometry, must be efficient in a large wavelength domain in order to detect simultaneously the infrared bio-tracers CO II, O 3 and H IIO. This condition requires that an achromatic phase shift of π be implemented, with an accuracy sufficient for achieving a deep nulling at all considered wavelengths. Several solutions have been presented. We present here a new concept for designing such an achromatic phase shifter. It is based on two cellular mirrors (alternatively, transparent plates can be used) where cells have thickness which are respectively odd and even multiples of a quarter of the central wavelength. Each cell introduces then a phase shift of (2k + 1)π or of 2kπ, on the fraction of the wave it reflects. Each mirror is introduced in the collimated beam issued from one or the other telescopes. Because of the odd/even distribution, a destructive interference is obviously produced on axis for the central wavelength when recombining the two beams. The trick to obtain a quasi-achromatisation is to distribute the thickness of the cells, so that the nulling is also efficient for a wavelength not too far from the central wavelength. We show that if the thicknesses are distributed according to the Pascal triangle, a fair quasi-achromatism is reached. This effect is the more efficient that the number of cells is large. For instance, with 256 × 256 cells, where phase shift range is between -6π and +6π one shows that the nulling reaches 10 -6 on the wavelength range [0.7λ 0, 1.3λ 0] which corresponds roughly to the DARWIN specification. In a second step, we study the optimum way to distribute the cells in the plane of the pupil. The most important criterion is the isolation of the planet image from the residual image of the star. Several efficient configurations are presented. Finally we consider some practical aspects on a device belonging to the real world and on the bench we are

  18. Geometrodynamics in a spherically symmetric, static crossflow of null dust

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Zsolt; Kovacs, Zoltan; Gergely, Laszlo A.

    2006-10-15

    The spherically symmetric, static space-time generated by a crossflow of noninteracting radiation streams, treated in the geometrical optics limit (null dust), is equivalent to an anisotropic fluid forming a radiation atmosphere of a star. This reference fluid provides a preferred/internal time, which is employed as a canonical coordinate. Among the advantages we encounter a new Hamiltonian constraint, which becomes linear in the momentum conjugate to the internal time (therefore yielding a functional Schroedinger equation after quantization), and a strongly commuting algebra of the new constraints.

  19. Structure of mannose-specific snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) lectin is representative of a new plant lectin family.

    PubMed

    Hester, G; Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Wright, C S

    1995-06-01

    Tetrameric Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (50,000 M(r)) belongs to a super-family of alpha-D-mannose-specific plant bulb lectins known to be potent inhibitors of retroviruses. The 2.3 A crystal structure of this lectin complexed with methyl alpha-D-mannose reveals a novel three-fold symmetric beta-sheet polypeptide fold. Three antiparallel four-stranded beta-sheets, each with a conserved mannose-binding site, are arranged as a 12-stranded beta-barrel. The tetramer displays 222 symmetry. Pairs of monomers form stable dimers through C-terminal strand exchange. The so formed hybrid beta-sheets are the sites for high affinity mannose binding in the dimer interface. Occupancy observed at corresponding sites in other beta-sheets suggests a potential for twelve sites per tetramer.

  20. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn's disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn's disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn's disease phenotype in 69 Crohn's disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin-mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn's disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn's disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants.

  1. Initial invasion of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles in the absence of tight linkage between pollen and pistil S alleles.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoki; Wakoh, Haluka

    2014-08-01

    In homomorphic self-incompatibility (SI) systems of plants, the loci controlling the pollen and pistil types are tightly linked, and this prevents the generation of compatible combinations of alleles expressing pollen and pistil types, which would result in self-fertilization. We modeled the initial invasion of the first pollen and pistil alleles in gametophytic SI to determine whether these alleles can stably coexist in a population without tight linkage. We assume pollen and pistil loci each carry an incompatibility allele S and an allele without an incompatibility function N. We assume that pollen with an S allele are incompatible with pistils carrying S alleles, whereas other crosses are compatible. Ovules in pistils carrying an S allele suffer viability costs because recognition consumes resources. We found that the cost of carrying a pistil S allele allows pollen and pistil S alleles to coexist in a stable equilibrium if linkage is partial. This occurs because parents that carry pistil S alleles but are homozygous for pollen N alleles cannot avoid self-fertilization; however, they suffer viability costs. Hence, pollen N alleles are selected again. When pollen and pistil S alleles can coexist in a polymorphic equilibrium, selection will favor tighter linkage.

  2. Functional characterization of mannose-binding lectin in zebrafish: implication for a lectin-dependent complement system in early embryos.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Bu, Lingzhen; Sun, Weiwei; Hu, Lili; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The lectin pathway involves recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by mannose-binding lectin (MBL), and the subsequent activation of associated enzymes, termed MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). In this study, we demonstrate that the transcript of MBL gene is present in the early embryo of zebrafish, and MBL protein is also present in the embryo. In addition, we show that recombinant zebrafish MBL was able to bind the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, and rMBL was able to promote the phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus by macrophages, indicating that like mammalian MBL, zebrafish MBL performs a dual function in both pattern recognition and opsonization. Importantly, we show that microinjection of anti-MBL antibody into the early developing embryos resulted in a significantly increased mortality in the embryos challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila (pathogenic to zebrafish); and injection of rMBL into the embryos (resulting in increase in MBL in the embryo) markedly promoted their resistance to A. hydrophila; and this promoted bacterial resistance was significantly reduced by the co-injection of anti-MBL antibody with rMBL but not by the injection of anti-actin antibody with rMBL. These suggest that the lectin pathway may be already functional in the early embryos in zebrafish before their immune system is fully matured, protecting the developing embryos from microbial infection. This work provides a new angle to understand the immune role of the lectin pathway in early development of animals.

  3. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R

    2013-08-23

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes.

  4. Regulation of adherence and virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica lectin cytoplasmic domain, which contains a beta2 integrin motif.

    PubMed

    Vines, R R; Ramakrishnan, G; Rogers, J B; Lockhart, L A; Mann, B J; Petri, W A

    1998-08-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the beta2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediated cell adherence. Mutation of the integrin-like sequence abrogates the dominant negative effect. Amebae expressing the dominant negative mutant are less virulent in an animal model of amebiasis. These results suggest that inside-out signaling via the lectin cytoplasmic domain may control the extracellular adhesive activity of the amebic lectin and provide in vivo demonstration of the lectin's role in virulence.

  5. Evidence for export of a muscle lectin from cytosol to extracellular matrix and for a novel secretory mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.N.; Barondes, S.H. )

    1990-05-01

    A soluble lactose-binding lectin with subunit Mr of 14,500 is believed to function by interacting with extracellular glycoconjugates, because it has been detected extracellularly by immunohistochemistry. This localization has been questioned, however, since the lectin lacks a secretion signal sequence, which challenges the contention that it is secreted. We have demonstrated externalization of this lectin from C2 mouse muscle cells by both immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein and immunohistochemical localization. We further show that externalization of the lectin is a developmentally regulated process that accompanies myoblast differentiation and that the lectin codistributes with laminin in myotube extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical localization during intermediate stages of externalization suggests that the lectin becomes concentrated in evaginations of plasma membrane, which pinch off to form labile lectin-rich extracellular vesicles. This suggests a possible mechanism for lectin export from the cytosol to the extracellular matrix.

  6. Jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) and the Agaricus mushroom lectin fit also to the so-called peanut receptor.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, B P; Ahmed, H; Uhlenbruck, G; Janssen, E; Kolar, C; Seiler, F R

    1985-12-01

    The lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) reacts with the peanut-specific lectin receptor represented by the T-disaccharide, which is also part of the Thomsen (= T)-Friedenreich antigen, namely O-beta-D-galactosyl-(1----3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. The difference between the jackfruit lectin and peanut lectin has been shown to be mainly due to the further linkage of the T-disaccharide: Whereas the peanut lectin reacts with both anomeric forms, jackfruit lectin and the closely - with respect to its specificity - related Agaricus bisporus mushroom lectin react predominantly with the alpha-linked T-disaccharide, so that they cannot detect the lipid-linked T-disaccharide, as the peanut lectin does.

  7. The in vivo synthesis and accumulation of lectin in developing seeds of black gram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper).

    PubMed

    Suseelan, K N; Mitra, R; Bhatia, C R; Gopalakrishna, T

    2004-01-01

    Black gram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper) seed contains two D-galactose-specific lectin species, BGL-I and BGL-II, identified on the basis of elution from ion exchange column and immunochemical cross-reactivity. BGL-I consisted of two monomeric lectins, BGL-I-1 and BGL-1-2, of relative molecular weights 94 and 89 kDa, respectively. BGL-II is another monomeric lectin with a molecular weight of 83 kDa. The in vivo synthesis studies using pulse-chase experiment showed that BGL-II lectin was synthesized as early as 14 days after flowering (DAF). The 94-kDa BGL-I-1 lectin was synthesized around 17 DAF. There was no cotranslational or posttranslational modification of the lectin proteins. The amount of lectin in developing seeds was determined by radial immunodiffusion assay technique. The maximum amount of lectin per seed was found at 28 DAF.

  8. Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph: Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC will provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 3-year mission lifetime ( 5 year goal) and will revisit planets at least three times at intervals of 9 months. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables high order starlight suppression in broadband light. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Lockheed-Martin have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed,

  9. Particle Acceleration at Reconnecting 3D Null Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, A.; Browning, P.; Gordovskyy, M.; Dalla, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hard X-ray observations from the RHESSI spacecraft indicate that a significant fraction of solar flare energy release is in non-thermal energetic particles. A plausible acceleration mechanism for these are the strong electric fields associated with reconnection, a process that can be particularly efficient when particles become unmagnetised near to null points. This mechanism has been well studied in 2D, at X-points within reconnecting current sheets; however, 3D reconnection models show significant qualitative differences and it is not known whether these new models are efficient for particle acceleration. We place test particles in analytic model fields (eg. Craig and Fabling 1996) and numerical solutions to the the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations near reconnecting 3D nulls. We compare the behaviour of these test particles with previous results for test particle acceleration in ideal MHD models (Dalla and Browning 2005). We find that the fan model is very efficient due to an increasing "guide field" that stabilises particles against ejection from the current sheet. However, the spine model, which was the most promising in the ideal case, gives weak acceleration as the reconnection electric field is localised to a narrow cylinder about the spine axis.

  10. Geometry of extended null supersymmetry in M theory

    SciTech Connect

    Conamhna, Oisin A.P. Mac

    2006-02-15

    For supersymmetric spacetimes in 11 dimensions admitting a null Killing spinor, a set of explicit necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of any number of arbitrary additional Killing spinors is derived. The necessary and sufficient conditions are comprised of algebraic relationships, linear in the spinorial components, between the spinorial components and their first derivatives, and the components of the spin connection and four-form. The integrability conditions for the Killing spinor equation are also analyzed in detail, to determine which components of the field equations are implied by arbitrary additional supersymmetries and the four-form Bianchi identity. This provides a complete formalism for the systematic and exhaustive investigation of all spacetimes with extended null supersymmetry in 11 dimensions. The formalism is employed to show that the general bosonic solution of 11 dimensional supergravity admitting a G{sub 2} structure defined by four Killing spinors is either locally the direct product of R{sup 1,3} with a seven-manifold of G{sub 2} holonomy, or locally the Freund-Rubin direct product of AdS{sub 4} with a seven-manifold of weak G{sub 2} holonomy. In addition, all supersymmetric spacetimes admitting a (G{sub 2}xR{sup 7})xR{sup 2} structure are classified.

  11. Exoplanet detection and characterization via parallel broadband nulling coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    The contrast and angular resolution required to directly image and characterize mature exoplanetary systems place stringent requirements on the space-based telescopes and starlight suppression systems needed to study spatial distributions of debris disks, exozodiacal dust, and individual planets at multiple epochs in their orbits. A nulling interferometer (nuller) is a coronagraphic suppression system that can be used with all telescope types, including those with obscured and segmented apertures envisioned for upcoming and future observatories. One of the challenges for detection and characterization of exoplanetary signals is achieving high contrast with broad spectral coverage. This work presents design concepts for broadband nulling over four parallel ˜20% bandpasses spanning the visible spectrum. Contrast-limiting effects of stellar angular extent, residual chromaticity of broadband phase shifters, and aperture diffraction are considered to reach simultaneous ≲2×10-8 contrast over separations spanning 0.2 to 0.9 arc sec for a 2.4-m telescope observing a Sun-like star at 10 pc. With added dark hole wavefront control and postprocessing point spread function subtraction techniques to further reduce scattered starlight, such a system could be capable of detecting the very the nearest Earth-like exoplanets and spectral characterization of several nearby extrasolar gas giants.

  12. Osteoclast differentiation and function in aquaglyceroporin AQP9 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangjian; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Rojek, Aleksandra; Nielsen, Søren; Agre, Peter; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Information Osteoclasts are cells specialized for bone resorption and play important roles in bone growth and calcium homeostasis. Differentiation of osteoclasts involves fusion of bone marrow macrophage mononuclear precursors in response to extracellular signals. A dramatic increase in osteoclast cell volume occurs during osteoclast biogenesis and is believed to be mediated by Aquaporin 9 (AQP9), a membrane protein that can rapidly transport water and other small neutral solutes across cell membranes. Results Here we report an increase in expression of AQP9 during differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line into osteoclasts. Bone marrow macrophages from wild type and AQP9 null mice differentiate into osteoclasts that have similar morphology, contain comparable numbers of nuclei, and digest synthetic bone to the same extent. Bones from wild type and AQP9 null mice contain similar numbers of osteoclasts and have comparable density and structure as measured by X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography. Conclusions Our data confirm that AQP9 expression rises during osteoclast biogenesis but indicate that AQP9 is not essential for osteoclast function or differentiation under normal physiological conditions. PMID:18666888

  13. Adaptive Nulling: A New Enabling Technology for Interferometric Exoplanet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Peters, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Deep, stable nulling of starlight requires careful control of the amplitudes and phases of the beams that are being combined. The detection of earth-like planets using the interferometer architectures currently being considered for the Terrestrial Planet Finder mission require that the E-field amplitudes are balanced at the level of approx. 0.1%, and the phases are controlled at the level of 1 mrad (corresponding to approx.1.5 nm for a wavelength of 10 microns). These conditions must be met simultaneously at all wavelengths across the science band, and for both polarization states, imposing unrealistic tolerances on the symmetry between the optical beamtrains. We introduce the concept of a compensator that is inserted into the beamtrain, which can adaptively correct for the mismatches across the spectrum, enabling deep nulls with realistic, imperfect optics. The design presented uses a deformable mirror to adjust the amplitude and phase of each beam as an arbitrary function of wavelength and polarization. A proof-of-concept experiment will be conducted at visible/near-IR wavelengths, followed by a system operating in the Mid-IR band.

  14. Plate with a hole obeys the averaged null energy condition

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Olum, Ken D.

    2005-07-15

    The negative energy density of Casimir systems appears to violate general relativity energy conditions. However, one cannot test the averaged null energy condition (ANEC) using standard calculations for perfectly reflecting plates, because the null geodesic would have to pass through the plates, where the calculation breaks down. To avoid this problem, we compute the contribution to ANEC for a geodesic that passes through a hole in a single plate. We consider both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in two and three space dimensions. We use a Babinet's principle argument to reduce the problem to a complementary finite disk correction to the perfect mirror result, which we then compute using scattering theory in elliptical and spheroidal coordinates. In the Dirichlet case, we find that the positive correction due to the hole overwhelms the negative contribution of the infinite plate. In the Neumann case, where the infinite plate gives a positive contribution, the hole contribution is smaller in magnitude, so again ANEC is obeyed. These results can be extended to the case of two plates in the limits of large and small hole radii. This system thus provides another example of a situation where ANEC turns out to be obeyed when one might expect it to be violated.

  15. A search for optical beacons: implications of null results.

    PubMed

    Blair, David G; Zadnik, Marjan G

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years a series of searches for interstellar radio beacons have taken place using the Parkes radio telescope. Here we report hitherto unpublished results from a search for optical beacons from 60 solar-type stars using the Perth-Lowell telescope. We discuss the significance of the null results from these searches, all of which were based on the interstellar contact channel hypothesis. While the null results of all searches to date can be explained simply by the nonexistence of electromagnetically communicating life elsewhere in the Milky Way, four other possible explanations that do not preclude its existence are proposed: (1) Extraterrestrial civilizations desiring to make contact through the use of electromagnetic beacons have a very low density in the Milky Way. (2) The interstellar contact channel hypothesis is incorrect, and beacons exist at frequencies that have not yet been searched. (3) The search has been incomplete in terms of sensitivity and/or target directions: Beacons exist, but more sensitive equipment and/or more searching is needed to achieve success. (4) The search has occurred before beacon signals can be expected to have arrived at the Earth, and beacon signals may be expected in the future. Based on consideration of the technology required for extraterrestrial civilizations to identify target planets, we argue that the fourth possibility is likely to be valid and that powerful, easily detectable beacons could be received in coming centuries.

  16. A search for optical beacons: implications of null results.

    PubMed

    Blair, David G; Zadnik, Marjan G

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years a series of searches for interstellar radio beacons have taken place using the Parkes radio telescope. Here we report hitherto unpublished results from a search for optical beacons from 60 solar-type stars using the Perth-Lowell telescope. We discuss the significance of the null results from these searches, all of which were based on the interstellar contact channel hypothesis. While the null results of all searches to date can be explained simply by the nonexistence of electromagnetically communicating life elsewhere in the Milky Way, four other possible explanations that do not preclude its existence are proposed: (1) Extraterrestrial civilizations desiring to make contact through the use of electromagnetic beacons have a very low density in the Milky Way. (2) The interstellar contact channel hypothesis is incorrect, and beacons exist at frequencies that have not yet been searched. (3) The search has been incomplete in terms of sensitivity and/or target directions: Beacons exist, but more sensitive equipment and/or more searching is needed to achieve success. (4) The search has occurred before beacon signals can be expected to have arrived at the Earth, and beacon signals may be expected in the future. Based on consideration of the technology required for extraterrestrial civilizations to identify target planets, we argue that the fourth possibility is likely to be valid and that powerful, easily detectable beacons could be received in coming centuries. PMID:12530240

  17. Targeted delivery of antigen to hamster nasal lymphoid tissue with M-cell-directed lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, P J; Boden, J A; Monath, T P

    1997-01-01

    The nasal cavity of a rodent is lined by an epithelium organized into distinct regional domains responsible for specific physiological functions. Aggregates of nasal lymphoid tissue (NALT) located at the base of the nasal cavity are believed to be sites of induction of mucosal immune responses to airborne antigens. The epithelium overlying NALT contains M cells which are specialized for the transcytosis of immunogens, as demonstrated in other mucosal tissues. We hypothesized that NALT M cells are characterized by distinct glycoconjugate receptors which influence antigen uptake and immune responses to transcytosed antigens. To identify glycoconjugates that may distinguish NALT M cells from other cells of the respiratory epithelium (RE), we performed lectin histochemistry on sections of the hamster nasal cavity with a panel of lectins. Many classes of glycoconjugates were found on epithelial cells in this region. While most lectins bound to sites on both the RE and M cells, probes capable of recognizing alpha-linked galactose were found to label the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) almost exclusively. By morphological criteria, the FAE contains >90% M cells. To determine if apical glycoconjugates on M cells were accessible from the nasal cavity, an M-cell-selective lectin and a control lectin in parallel were administered intranasally to hamsters. The M-cell-selective lectin was found to specifically target the FAE, while the control lectin did not. Lectin bound to M cells in vivo was efficiently endocytosed, consistent with the role of M cells in antigen transport. Intranasal immunization with lectin-test antigen conjugates without adjuvant stimulated induction of specific serum immunoglobulin G, whereas antigen alone or admixed with lectin did not. The selective recognition of NALT M cells by a lectin in vivo provides a model for microbial adhesin-host cell receptor interactions on M cells and the targeted delivery of immunogens to NALT following intranasal

  18. Phenotypic Variation of Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Geographically Distinct Regions Detected by Lectin Typing

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Sean O.; Broutet, Nathalie; Wadström, Torkel; Mikelsaar, Marika; O’Toole, Paul W.; Telford, John; Engstrand, Lars; Kamiya, Shigeru; Mentis, Andreas F.; Moran, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    A total of 309 Helicobacter pylori isolates from 18 different countries were analyzed with a previously developed lectin typing system. The system was developed by using a proteolytic pretreatment to enhance the carbohydrate fraction of the sample. Four lectins from Ulex europaeus, Lotus tetragonolobus, Erythrina cristigali, and Triticum vulgaris were used to type the strains. The lectins were chosen for their specificities for sugars commonly encountered in the lipopolysaccharide of H. pylori. The isolates were received from their parent institutions as pellets of biomass and were typed at one of three centers (in Ireland, Sweden, and Estonia). All 16 possible lectin reaction patterns were observed in the study, with the isolates with the predominant pattern exhibiting reactions with all the lectins in the panel. For European patients suffering from gastritis, an association was noted between lectin reaction pattern MH4 and atrophic chronic gastritis; isolates with lectin reaction pattern MH4 were isolated from patients with atrophic chronic gastritis, whereas isolates with this pattern were not isolated from patients with chronic gastritis (P = 0.0006). In addition, statistically significant relationships were noted between the lectin reaction pattern and the associated pathology of isolates from the Swedish population. Isolates with patterns MH13 and MH16, which had low lectin reactivities, correlated with nonulcer disease (P = 0.0025 and P = 0.0002, respectively), and all four isolates from adenocarcinoma patients were characterized as possessing reaction pattern MH16. In contrast, isolates with lectin reaction patterns MH1 and MH10, which had high lectin reactivities, were associated with ulcer disease (P = 0.046 and P = 0.0022, respectively). PMID:11773120

  19. Further characterization and immunochemical studies on the carbohydrate specificity of jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) lectin.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, H; Chatterjee, B P

    1989-06-01

    The lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds has been purified by Rivanol (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate) treatment. The specific activity, molecular weights of parent lectin and its subunit, its glycoprotein nature, and hemagglutination-inhibition assays suggest that this preparation is identical to that obtained by affinity chromatography on melibiose-agarose adsorbent (Ahmed, H., and Chatterjee, B. P. (1986) in Lectins, Biology, Biochemistry, Clinical Biochemistry (Bøg-Hansen, T. C., and van Driessche, E., eds) Vol. 5, pp. 125-133, Walter de Gruyter, New York). The lectin strongly agglutinates human and several animal erythrocytes. The lectin contains five isolectins of pI values 7.1, 6.85, 5.5, 5.3, and 5.1. It is thermally stable and loses its activity above 75 degrees C. The hemagglutinating activity remains unchanged in the presence of bivalent cations viz., Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, etc. It is a metalloprotein. The lectin retains its activity by dialysis with acetic acid followed by EDTA. It agglutinates Ehrlich ascites cells. Equilibrium dialysis of lectin with melibiose and quenching of fluorescence of 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside by the lectin show that homotetrameric jackfruit lectin has two sugar-binding sites. The lectin precipitates well several galactomannans and glycoproteins having terminal D-Gal-alpha-(1----6)- or D-Gal-beta-(1----3)-D-GalNAc residues. It hardly or does not precipitate polysaccharides having terminal D-Gal-alpha-(1----3) residues. Quantitative precipitin-inhibition studies using various haptens suggest that the -OCH2- group at C-1 and -OH groups at C-4 and partially at C-6 in the alpha-glycoside of D-galactose configuration are important for lectin-sugar interaction.

  20. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  1. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  2. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  3. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  4. [Discovery of a novel A2 allel in ABO blood group system and investigation of its distribution in Han population of Chinese Fujian province].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai; Chi, Quan; Ren, Ben-Chun

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of A2 subgroup in Han Population of Chinese Fujian province and its molecular mechanisms. One individual with serologic ABO blood grouping discrepancy was identified with commercially available monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and lectin: anti-A, anti-B, anti-AB, anti-A1, and anti-H reagents according to the routine laboratory methods. DNA sequences of exon 6, 7 and intron 6 of ABO gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction using genomic DNA and direct DNA sequencing or sequencing after gene cloning. Red cells of 3 176 A or AB unrelated individuals were tested with anti-A1. The results showed that this individual was identified as A2 subgroup by serological technology, sequencing analysis indicated the A2 subgroup with novel A variant allele, the novel A allele being different from the allele A101 by 467C > T and 607G > A missense mutation in exon 7, no A2 subgroup was identified from the 3 176 individuals by using standard serological technology. It is concluded that a novel A allele responsible for A2 subgroup composing of 467C > T and 607G > A has been firstly confirmed, and the A2 subgroup is very rare in Chinese Fujian Han population.

  5. Recombinant form of human wild type mannan-binding lectin (MBL/A) but not its structural variant (MBL/C) promotes phagocytosis of zymosan by activating complement.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Rema; Nyaundi, Takazvida; Salvi, Veena P; Rawal, Nenoo

    2010-09-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) mediates innate immune responses, such as activation of the complement lectin pathway and phagocytosis, to help fight infections. In the present study, employing recombinant forms of human MBL (rMBL), the role of wild type MBL (rMBL/A) and its structural variant rMBL/C in mediating THP-1 phagocytosis of fluorescent-labeled zymosan was examined and compared to MBL purified from human plasma (pMBL/A). Flow cytometric analyses revealed that opsonization of zymosan with rMBL/A and pMBL/A (0.5-30microg/ml) resulted in a 1.9- and 2.7-fold enhancement in its uptake by THP-1 cells in the presence of serum that was depleted of both MBL and the classical pathway component, C1q (MBL/C1q Dpl serum). In contrast, no enhancement in phagocytosis was observed when zymosan was opsonized with rMBL/C. Addition of MBL monoclonal antibody, EDTA, or mannan to the opsonization reaction mixture inhibited THP-1 phagocytosis of pMBL/A opsonized zymosan. Heat inactivation of MBL/C1q Dpl serum abolished the 2-fold increase in phagocytosis and in the absence of serum the direct opsonic activity of MBL did not contribute significantly to the uptake of zymosan into THP-1 cells. Activation products of complement components C3 and C4 were deposited on zymosan opsonized with pMBL/A and rMBL/A but not rMBL/C indicating that MBL-mediated phagocytosis of zymosan requires activation of the complement lectin pathway. The findings imply that impaired MBL-mediated phagocytosis may put individuals homozygous for the mutant allele MBL/C but not wild type MBL/A at increased risk to infections such as yeast. PMID:20579738

  6. Genetics of Hemoglobin in the Deer Mouse, PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS . II. Multiple Alleles at Regulatory Loci

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Lee R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Deer mice are polymorphic for electrophoretic hemoglobin phenotypes showing one, two, or three bands. Within the multibanded phenotypes, there is considerable variation in the hemoglobin partitioning, defined as the fraction of total hemoglobin made up by the secondary and tertiary bands. In subspecies sonoriensis, for example, hemoglobin partitionings range from 0.03 to 0.38. The inheritance of partitioning values is under remarkably strict genetic control. The genetic variation is additive and the narrow heritability is close to 1.0. The inheritance data can be modeled in precise detail by postulating multiple-allele polymorphisms at globin regulatory loci. Comparison of simulated versus actual inheritance data demonstrates that the so-called null structural alleles actually produce functional globins.—The genetic controls in Peromyscus may be analogous to those in primates. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms effecting the regulation are unknown. Different subspecies of P. maniculatus show strikingly different arrays of partitioning values, but the role of natural selection in maintaining the quantitative polymorphisms remains obscure. PMID:669256

  7. Error analysis and system optimization of non-null aspheric testing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongjie; Yang, Yongying; Liu, Dong; Tian, Chao; Zhuo, Yongmo

    2010-10-01

    A non-null aspheric testing system, which employs partial null lens (PNL for short) and reverse iterative optimization reconstruction (ROR for short) technique, is proposed in this paper. Based on system modeling in ray tracing software, the parameter of each optical element is optimized and this makes system modeling more precise. Systematic error of non-null aspheric testing system is analyzed and can be categorized into two types, the error due to surface parameters of PNL in the system modeling and the rest from non-null interferometer by the approach of error storage subtraction. Experimental results show that, after systematic error is removed from testing result of non-null aspheric testing system, the aspheric surface is precisely reconstructed by ROR technique and the consideration of systematic error greatly increase the test accuracy of non-null aspheric testing system.

  8. Mechanism of entomotoxicity of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) in Spodoptera littoralis larvae.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-09-01

    Plant lectins have received a lot of attention because of their insecticidal properties. When orally administered in artificial diet or in transgenic plants, lectins provoke a wide range of detrimental effects, including alteration of the digestive enzyme machinery, fecundity drop, reduced feeding, changes in oviposition behavior, growth and development inhibition and mortality. Although many studies reported the entomotoxicity of lectins, only a few of them investigated the mode of action by which lectins exert toxicity. In the present paper we have studied for the first time the insecticidal potential of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) bulbs against the larvae of the cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). Bioassays on neonate larvae showed that this mannose-specific lectin affected larval growth, causing a development retardation and larval weight decrease. Using primary cell cultures from S. littoralis midguts and confocal microscopy we have elucidated FITC-HHA binding and internalization mechanisms. We found that HHA did not exert a toxic effect on S. littoralis midgut cells, but HHA interaction with the brush border of midgut cells interfered with normal nutrient absorption in the S. littoralis midgut, thereby affecting normal larval growth in vivo. This study thus confirms the potential of mannose-specific lectins as pest control agents and sheds light on the mechanism underlying lectin entomotoxicity.

  9. Biosynthesis, primary structure and molecular cloning of snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis L.) lectin.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Kaku, H; Perini, F; Goldstein, I J; Peeters, B; Yagi, F; Decock, B; Peumans, W J

    1991-11-15

    Poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from ripening ovaries of snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis L.) yielded a single 17-kDa lectin polypeptide upon translation in a wheat-germ cell-free system. This lectin was purified by affinity chromatography. Translation of the same RNA in Xenopus leavis oocytes revealed a lectin polypeptide which was about 2 kDa smaller than the in vitro synthesized precursor, suggesting that the oocyte system had removed a 2-kDa signal peptide. A second post-translational processing step was likely to be involved since both the in vivo precursor and the Xenopus translation products were about 2 kDa larger than the mature lectin polypeptide. This hypothesis was confirmed by the structural analysis of the amino acid sequence of the mature protein and the cloned mRNA. Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase Y digestion of the mature protein, and structural analysis of the peptides obtained after chemical cleavage and modification, allowed determination of the complete 105 amino acid sequence of the snowdrop lectin polypeptide. Comparison of this sequence with the deduced amino acid sequence of a lectin cDNA clone revealed that besides the mature lectin polypeptide, the lectin mRNA also encoded a 23 amino acid signal-sequence and a C-terminal extension of 29 amino acids, which confirms the results from in vitro translation experiments.

  10. Purification and characterization of a novel lectin with antiphytovirus activities from the wild mushroom Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou Xian; Zhang, Guo Qing; Zhao, Shuang; Xu, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Li Geng, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wang, He Xiang

    2013-07-01

    A novel lectin was isolated from the dried fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Paxillus involutus. Isolation was conducted by anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Cellulose, Q-Sepharose and gel filtration on Superdex 75 using a fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) system. This lectin had a molecular mass of 28 kDa and was composed of four identical subunits, each with a molecular mass of 7 kDa. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the P. involutus lectin was determined to be CTCAVFLNNTTVKS, which showed a low level of similarity to mushroom lectin sequences reported previously. The biochemical properties of this lectin were determined, and the hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by inulin and O-Nitrophenyl-β-D-galacto-pyranoside. Additionally, Ca2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Fe2+, and Al3+ inhibited its hemagglutinating activity, while Cu2+ promoted this activity. This lectin exhibited poor thermostability and was sensitive to HCl, but it had a high tolerance to NaOH exposure. In terms of biological properties, this lectin manifested antiphytovirus activity towards tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with a 70.61% inhibition at a concentration of 200 µg/mL. This lectin was devoid of inhibitory activities toward pathogenic fungi and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and antiproliferative activities were observed in tumor cell lines including lung cancer A-549 and human colon cancer HCT-8 cells. PMID:23092133

  11. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  12. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. (Anasazi Beans)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arishya; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho; Lin, Peng

    2009-01-01

    A lectin has been isolated from seeds of the Phaseolus vulgaris cv. “Anasazi beans” using a procedure that involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-ion exchange chromatography on Mono S, and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 200. The lectin was comprised of two 30-kDa subunits with substantial N-terminal sequence similarity to other Phaseolus lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was stable within the pH range of 1–14 and the temperature range of 0–80°C. The lectin potently suppressed proliferation of MCF-7 (breast cancer) cells with an IC50 of 1.3 μM, and inhibited the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 7.6 μM. The lectin evoked a mitogenic response from murine splenocytes as evidenced by an increase in [3H-methyl]-thymidine incorporation. The lectin had no antifungal activity. It did not stimulate nitric oxide production by murine peritoneal macrophages. Chemical modification results indicated that tryptophan was crucial for the hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. PMID:19343172

  13. The Lectin Frontier Database (LfDB), and data generation based on frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Tateno, Hiroaki; Shikanai, Toshihide; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are a large group of carbohydrate-binding proteins, having been shown to comprise at least 48 protein scaffolds or protein family entries. They occur ubiquitously in living organisms-from humans to microorganisms, including viruses-and while their functions are yet to be fully elucidated, their main underlying actions are thought to mediate cell-cell and cell-glycoconjugate interactions, which play important roles in an extensive range of biological processes. The basic feature of each lectin's function resides in its specific sugar-binding properties. In this regard, it is beneficial for researchers to have access to fundamental information about the detailed oligosaccharide specificities of diverse lectins. In this review, the authors describe a publicly available lectin database named "Lectin frontier DataBase (LfDB)", which undertakes the continuous publication and updating of comprehensive data for lectin-standard oligosaccharide interactions in terms of dissociation constants (Kd's). For Kd determination, an advanced system of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is used, with which quantitative datasets of interactions between immobilized lectins and >100 fluorescently labeled standard glycans have been generated. The FAC system is unique in its clear principle, simple procedure and high sensitivity, with an increasing number (>67) of associated publications that attest to its reliability. Thus, LfDB, is expected to play an essential role in lectin research, not only in basic but also in applied fields of glycoscience. PMID:25580689

  14. Characterization of quail intestinal mucin as a ligand for endogenous quail lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, R; Mantle, M; Ceri, H

    1993-01-01

    The S-type lectins have been shown to be components of mucosal scrapings, and in avian systems these lectins have been localized immunohistochemically to the mucosal surface and goblet cells of the intestine. The interaction of lectin specifically with purified mucin has not, however, been established. Quail intestinal mucin was purified by two subsequent isopycnic density-gradient centrifugations in CsCl and chromatography on Sepharose Cl-2B. Purified mucin, obtained from the void volume of the Sepharose column, was characterized by SDS/PAGE, amino acid and carbohydrate analyses, sensitivity to thiol reduction, and cross-reactivity with antibody preparations to rat and human intestinal mucins on Western blots. Antibody raised against purified quail mucin partially cross-reacts with purified rat, rabbit and human intestinal mucins, and specifically labels the mucosal surface and goblet cells of quail intestine by the immunoperoxidase technique. Protein eluted by lactose from an affinity matrix composed of quail intestinal mucin possessed the same molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as intestinal lectin and reacted on Western blots with a lectin-specific antibody. The data clearly demonstrate the co-localization of lectin and mucin in the quail intestine and also the ability of the lectin to specifically interact with the purified mucin, raising the question of the role of endogenous lectins in secretions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8352754

  15. Adenovirus carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin induces cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyan; Wu, Liqin; Duan, Xuemei; Cui, Lianzhen; Luo, Jingjing; Li, Gongchu

    2014-06-30

    Lectins exist widely in marine bioresources such as bacteria, algae, invertebrate animals and fishes. Some purified marine lectins have been found to elicit cytotoxicity to cancer cells. However, there are few reports describing the cytotoxic effect of marine lectins on cancer cells through virus-mediated gene delivery. We show here that a replication-deficient adenovirus-carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (Ad.FLAG-HddSBL) suppressed cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, as compared to the control virus Ad.FLAG. A down-regulated level of anti-apoptosis factor Bcl-2 was suggested to be responsible for the apoptosis induced by Ad.FLAG-HddSBL infection. Further subcellular localization studies revealed that HddSBL distributed in cell membrane, ER, and the nucleus, but not in mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. In contrast, a previously reported mannose-binding lectin Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin entered the nucleus as well, but did not distribute in inner membrane systems, suggesting differed intracellular sialylation and mannosylation, which may provide different targets for lectin binding. Further cancer-specific controlling of HddSBL expression and animal studies may help to provide insights into a novel way of anti-cancer marine lectin gene therapy. Lectins may provide a reservoir of anti-cancer genes.

  16. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  17. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  18. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  19. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean H; West, John D

    2016-05-15

    The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera with functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1(-/-) null cells in adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras and determine if Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes in one female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c), this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many adult tissues.

  20. Chromatism compensation in wide-band nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-02-01

    We introduce the concept of chromatism compensation in nulling interferometry that enables a high rejection ratio in a wide spectral band. Therefore the achromaticity condition considered in most nulling interferometers can be relaxed. We show that this chromatism compensation cannot be applied to a two-beam nulling interferometer, and we make an analysis of the particular case of a three-telescope configuration. PMID:16485668

  1. Purification and characterization of a galactose-specific lectin with mitogenic activity from pinto beans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jack H; Wong, Clarence C T; Ng, T B

    2006-05-01

    A galactose-specific dimeric lectin from pinto beans was purified using a procedure that involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-ion exchange chromatography on Mono S, and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 200. The molecular mass of this homodimeric lectin was 62 kDa and that of each of its subunits was 31 kDa. The hemagglutinating activity of pinto bean lectin was stable within the pH range of 3-12 and the temperature range of 0-70 degrees C. By using the [3H-methyl]-thymidine incorporation assay, it was shown that the lectin had the ability to evoke a mitogenic response from murine splenocytes but it did not inhibit proliferation of L1210 leukemia cells. The pinto bean lectin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 3 microM. PMID:16600511

  2. Polyphemin: a teichoic acid-binding lectin from the horseshoe crab, Limulus Polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Brandin, E R; Pistole, T G

    1983-06-15

    A Staphylococcus aureus-agglutinating lectin, capable of binding to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, was isolated from the serum of Limulus polyphemus. The monosaccharide alone was incapable of inhibiting bacterial agglutination by this lectin. Quantitative precipitation studies with purified cell wall-derived teichoic acids, either devoid of or containing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, confirmed the carbohydrate-binding specificity of the lectin and suggested that secondary, non-specific interactions contribute to binding biomolecules containing this sugar. The agglutination pattern with various S. aureus strains having N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-associated teichoic acid, teichoic acid without this sugar, and no teichoic acid indicated that this cell wall component is not the sole binding site for the lectin on intact S. aureus cells. Affinity gel chromatography, using N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-associated teichoic acid as the specific absorbent, has been used to isolate this lectin from Limulus serum.

  3. Strain characterization and grouping of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by interaction with lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K H; Skelton, S K; Feeley, J C

    1986-01-01

    Strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli were characterized and grouped by their distinct reaction patterns with lectins. Heating of the Campylobacter cultures to 100 degrees C and holding for 30 to 60 min greatly enhanced their reactivity with lectins and permitted the grouping of all but 3 of 155 cultures tested in this study without interference of autoagglutination and other nonspecific activities. The lectin reaction patterns of the heated cultures were stable and reproducible. They were strain specific and independent of the heat-stable antigenic types. The lectin-reactive sites of C. jejuni and C. coli may be useful as additional markers for strain characterization. Based on these observations, a simple slide agglutination procedure is described for differentiating strains of C. jejuni and C. coli by their interaction with a selected group of commercially available lectins. PMID:3754264

  4. Mitogenic activity of new lectins from seeds of wild Artocarpus species from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Blasco, E; Ngoc, L D; Aucouturier, P; Preud'Homme, J L; Barra, A

    1996-05-01

    Proliferative response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated by new lectins purified from seeds of differents Artocarpus species from Vietnam (A. asperulus, A. heterophyllus, A. masticata, A. melinoxylus, A. parva and A. petelotii) was studied and compared to those of the lectin jacalin purified from jackfruit (A. heterophyllus) seeds collected in the island La Réunion. All lectins stimulated human PBMC to proliferate, with a variable efficiency of the mitogenic activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells recovered after 7 day-cultures showed that these lectins mostly stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. These results suggest that these lectins from different Artocarpus species are similar in terms of their mitogenic activity although their structural features are not identical.

  5. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from Artocarpus incisa L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreira, R A; Castelo-Branco, C C; Monteiro, A C; Tavares, R O; Beltramini, L M

    1998-04-01

    A lectin was isolated from the saline extract of Artocarpus incisa seed by affinity chromatography on cross-linked Adenanthera pavonina galactomannan in 0.15 M NaCl. The lectin was also retained in a D-gal-agarose resin and had no requirements for divalent metal cations (Ca2+ and Mn2+) for activity. The lectin contains 2.1% of carbohydrate and is characterized by high contents of acidic and hydroxylated amino acids. The lectin presented two protein bands in SDS-PAGE, with M(r) 15.5 and 12 kDa, respectively, and contains no alpha-helix, 64% antiparallel beta-sheet and 21% parallel beta-sheet/beta-turn. When submitted to gel filtration in Superose 12 R (FPLC) and Superdex 75 HR 5/5 (HPLC) columns, the lectin showed an M(r) of 48-49 kDa, suggesting a tetrameric structure.

  6. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope primary-mirror characterization by measurement of the reflective null corrector.

    PubMed

    Furey, L; Dubos, T; Hansen, D; Samuels-Schwartz, J

    1993-04-01

    The reflective null corrector used to manufacture of the Hubble Space Telescope contains valuable information about the prescription of the primary mirror since an excellent null was achieved between the null-corrector wave front and the primary-mirror wave front. During the Phase I measurements, the leading cause of the spherical aberration, the field lens position error, was discovered and remeasured to an accuracy of +/-0.005 mm. To derive the conic constant of the primary mirror to an accuracy of +/-0.0003, we remeasured the parameters of the reflective null corrector that could contribute to the spherical aberration of the primary mirror.

  8. Alignment of optical system components using an ADM beam through a null assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Joseph E. (Inventor); Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for testing an optical surface includes a rangefinder configured to emit a light beam and a null assembly located between the rangefinder and the optical surface. The null assembly is configured to receive and to reflect the emitted light beam toward the optical surface. The light beam reflected from the null assembly is further reflected back from the optical surface toward the null assembly as a return light beam. The rangefinder is configured to measure a distance to the optical surface using the return light beam.

  9. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature.

  10. Lectin(s) extracted from seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit): potent and selective stimulator(s) of distinct human T and B cell functions.

    PubMed

    Bunn-Moreno, M M; Campos-Neto, A

    1981-08-01

    A lectin activity that selectively induces different functions of human lymphocytes has been described in a PBS crude extract obtained from the seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit). Both unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and purified T cells are strongly stimulated to proliferate by this extract, whereas purified B cells are not. However, the lectin induced a potent polyclonal activation of B cells measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay using a multivalent anti-human Fab antibody.

  11. Null space and resolution in dynamic computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Bernadette N.

    2016-02-01

    One major challenge in computerized tomography is to image objects which change during the data acquisition and hence lead to inconsistent data sets. Motion artefacts in the reconstructions can be reduced by applying specially adapted algorithms which take the dynamic behaviour into account. Within this article, we analyse the achievable resolution in the dynamic setting in case of two-dimensional affine deformations. To this end, we characterize the null space of the operator describing the dynamic case, using its singular value decomposition and a necessary dynamic consistency condition. This shows that independent of any reconstruction method, the specimen’s dynamics results in a loss of resolution compared to the stationary setting. Our theoretical results are illustrated at a numerical example.

  12. Dilute Aperture Visible Nulling Coronagraph Imaging (DAViNCI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. M.; Vasisht, G.; Lane, B. F.; Woodruff, R.; Vasudevan, G.; Samuele R.; Harvey, K.; Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.; Guyon, O.; Tolls, V.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation focuses on instrument and mission overview, science case, Team X study, and technology status. Topics include DAViNCI study milestones, number of targets versus inner working angle, planet orbit and IWA, combiner/nuller instrument, DAViNCI Team X costs, technology status and near future plans, and deep laser null 1.23 x 10(exp -7) suppression. Summary points are: dilute aperture concept advantages, lower cost than a comparable 7-8m coronagraph working at 2 lambda/D, technology progress prior to 2008 was seriously limited by available funding but showed 1e-y suppression (2006) of laser light needed for 1e-9 to approximately 1e-10 contrast, and current technology effort is off to a fast date with a demonstration of less than 100pm wavefront measurement in Nov 08.

  13. Five-dimensional null and time-like supersymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, Giulio; Shahbazi, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that there exist supersymmetric solutions of five-dimensional, pure, { N }=1 supergravity such that the norm of the supersymmetric Killing vector, built out of the Killing spinor, is a real not-everywhere analytic function such that all its derivatives vanish at a point where the Killing vector field becomes null. The norm of the Killing vector field then is not an analytic function on a neighborhood around this point. We explicitly construct such solutions by using a multi-center Gibbons–Hawking base. Although many of these solutions have infinite charges, we find explicit examples with finite charges that asymptote to {{AdS}}3× {S}2 and discuss their physical interpretation.

  14. Polarization interferometric nulling coronagraph for high-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoshi; Yokochi, Kaito; Nishikawa, Jun; Tamura, Motohide; Kurokawa, Takashi; Takeda, Mitsuo; Baba, Naoshi

    2010-06-01

    We propose a novel, high-contrast imager called a polarization interferometric nulling coronagraph (PINC) for direct detection of extrasolar planets. The PINC uses achromatic half-wave plates (HWPs) installed in a fully symmetric beam combiner based on polarizing beam splitters. Jones calculus suggests that a stellar halo suppression level of 10(-10) can be achieved at 5 lambda/D for a broad wavelength range from 1.6 to 2.2 microm by using Fresnel-rhomb HWPs made of BK7. Laboratory experiments on the PINC used two laser light sources (wavelengths of lambda=532 and 671 nm), and we obtained a halo suppression level of approximately 10(-6) at 5 lambda/D for both wavelengths. PMID:20517351

  15. On the null trajectories in conformal Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Villanueva, J.R.; Olivares, Marco E-mail: marco.olivaresrubilar@gmail.com

    2013-06-01

    In this work we find analytical solutions to the null geodesics around a black hole in the conformal Weyl gravity. Exact expressions for the horizons are found, and they depend on the cosmological constant and the coupling constants of the conformal Weyl gravity. Then, we study the radial motion from the point of view of the proper and coordinate frames, and compare it with that found in spacetimes of general relativity. The angular motion is also examined qualitatively by means of an effective potential; quantitatively, the equation of motion is solved in terms of wp-Weierstrass elliptic function. Thus, we find the deflection angle for photons without using any approximation, which is a novel result for this kind of gravity.

  16. Status of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph Technology Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development, sensing and control of the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraphy (VNC) for exoplanet detection and characterization. The VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be flown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has an established effort to develop VNC technologies, and an incremental sequence of testbeds to advance this approach and its critical technologies. We will highlight results demonstrating the achievement of our TDEM contrast milestones, and highlight the performance of our wavefront sensing and control concept.

  17. Five-dimensional null and time-like supersymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, Giulio; Shahbazi, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that there exist supersymmetric solutions of five-dimensional, pure, { N }=1 supergravity such that the norm of the supersymmetric Killing vector, built out of the Killing spinor, is a real not-everywhere analytic function such that all its derivatives vanish at a point where the Killing vector field becomes null. The norm of the Killing vector field then is not an analytic function on a neighborhood around this point. We explicitly construct such solutions by using a multi-center Gibbons-Hawking base. Although many of these solutions have infinite charges, we find explicit examples with finite charges that asymptote to {{AdS}}3× {S}2 and discuss their physical interpretation.

  18. Determination of DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification and allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Lepage, V; Ivanova, R; Loste, M N; Mallet, C; Douay, C; Naoumova, E; Charron, D

    1995-10-01

    Molecular genotyping of HLA class II genes is commonly carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with sequence-specific oligotyping (PCR-SSO) or a combination of the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). However, the identification of the DQB1 type by PCR-SSO and PCR-RFLP is very time-consuming which is disadvantageous for the typing of cadaveric organ donors. We have developed a DQB1 typing method using PCR in combination with allele-specific amplification (PCR-ASA), which allows the identification of the 17 most frequent alleles in one step using seven amplification mixtures. PCR allele-specific amplification HLA-DQB1 typing is easy to perform, and the results are easy to interpret in routine clinical practice. The PCR-ASA method is therefore better suited to DQB1 typing for organ transplantation than other methods.

  19. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research. PMID:23828036

  20. Histochemistry to detect Helix pomatia lectin binding in breast cancer: methodology makes a difference.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S A; Lymboura, M; Schumacher, U; Leathem, A J

    1996-05-01

    A number of studies have shown that altered cellular glycosylation, as detected by binding of Helix pomatia lectin to paraffin sections, is associated with metastatic disease and consequent poor patient prognosis in breast and other cancers. In a 24-year retrospective study, sections of 373 primary breast cancers were stained for binding of the lectin using two different histochemical techniques: a direct method (using peroxidase-conjugated lectin) and an indirect method (using native, unconjugated lectin). Similar percentages of cases were positive (79%) and negative (21%) for lectin binding with either technique, but there was enormous inconsistency when individual cases were examined. A total of 38/373 (10.2%) cases that were negative by the indirect method were positive by the direct method, and 37/373 (9.9%) cases that were negative by the direct method were positive by the indirect method. Life tables calculated for lectin staining vs nonstaining cases showed a very strong correlation between lectin binding and long-term survival (p < 0.0001) when staining was performed by the indirect method, but only very weak correlation with prognosis (p < 0.03, borderline significance) when the direct technique was employed. SDS-PAGE revealed that there were differences in breast cancer glycoproteins recognized by native lectin and peroxidase-conjugated lectin immobilized on Sepharose 4B affinity beads. Helix pomatia lectin binding appears to be an intriguing and potentially valuable marker of biological behavior in breast cancer. This study emphasizes the importance of selecting an appropriate immunohistochemical technique for its visualization.