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Sample records for lectin-like antifreeze protein

  1. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; Mot, René

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. Bacteriocins mediate highly selective antagonism among closely related bacteria but such antimicrobial proteins have not yet been reported in Burkholderia. We identified a lectin-like protein of the LlpA family in a Burkholderia cenocepacia human isolate that strain-specifically and selectively kills planktonic and biofilm cells of other Burkholderia cepacia complex members. PMID:23737242

  2. Ice nucleation inhibition: mechanism of antifreeze by antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Du, Ning; Liu, Xiang Y; Hew, Choy Leong

    2003-09-19

    The effect of antifreeze protein type III (one type of fish antifreeze protein) on ice crystallization was examined quantitatively based on a "micro-sized ice nucleation" technique. It was found for the first time that antifreeze proteins can inhibit the ice nucleation process by adsorbing onto both the surfaces of ice nuclei and dust particles. This leads to an increase of the ice nucleation barrier and the desolvation kink kinetics barrier, respectively. Based on the latest nucleation model, the increases in the ice nucleation barrier and the kink kinetics barrier were measured. This enables us to quantitatively examine the antifreeze mechanism of antifreeze proteins for the first time.

  3. Plant lectin-like antibacterial proteins from phytopathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas citri.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Li, Wen; Proost, Paul; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-08-01

    The genomes of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 642 and Xanthomonas citri pv. malvacearum LMG 761 each carry a putative homologue of the plant lectin-like bacteriocin (llpA) genes previously identified in the rhizosphere isolate Pseudomonas putida BW11M1 and the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. The respective purified recombinant proteins, LlpAPss642 and LlpAXcm761 , display genus-specific antibacterial activity across species boundaries. The inhibitory spectrum of the P. syringae bacteriocin overlaps partially with those of the P. putida and P. fluorescens LlpAs. Notably, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 secretes a protein identical to LlpAXcm761 . The functional characterization of LlpA proteins from two different phytopathogenic γ-proteobacterial species expands the lectin-like bacteriocin family beyond the Pseudomonas genus and suggests its involvement in competition among closely related plant-associated bacteria with different lifestyles.

  4. Natural and Artificial Antifreeze Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Soichi; Hirao, Noriko

    In the blood of winter polar fish an antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) occurs which acts to protect the fish from freezing to death. The AFGP has a unique hydrophilic hydrophobic conformation, involved in non-colligative depression of the freezing temperature of water without altering the melting point of ice. This phenomenon is reportedly a reflection of the ice crystal growth inhibition by the adsorption of the AFGP onto a-axial surfaces of the ice crystal. The authors, on the other hand, have developed an enzymatically modified protein (EMG-12) by covalent attachment of leucine dodecyl ester to the C-terminal position of gelation with the aid of a reverse reaction catalyzed by a protease. EMG-12, having a hydrophilic-hydrophobic structure, is highly surface-active and acts to stabilize a supercooling state of water by antinucleation. Discussions are made on similarities and dissimilarities of structure-function relationships of these natural and artificial antifreeze proteins. The significance of using them as antifreeze agents is also discussed.

  5. Local ice melting by an antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Höfinger, Siegfried; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-07-09

    Antifreeze proteins, AFP, impede freezing of bodily fluids and damaging of cellular tissues by low temperatures. Adsorption-inhibition mechanisms have been developed to explain their functioning. Using in silico Molecular Dynamics, we show that type I AFP can also induce melting of the local ice surface. Simulations of antifreeze-positive and antifreeze-negative mutants show a clear correlation between melting induction and antifreeze activity. The presence of local melting adds a function to type I AFPs that is unique to these proteins. It may also explain some apparently conflicting experimental results where binding to ice appears both quasipermanent and reversible.

  6. Hyperactive antifreeze protein in a fish.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher B; Fletcher, Garth L; Davies, Peter L

    2004-05-13

    Fish that live in the polar oceans survive at low temperatures by virtue of 'antifreeze' plasma proteins in the blood that bind to ice crystals and prevent these from growing. However, the antifreeze proteins isolated so far from the winter flounder (Pleuronectes americanus), a common fish in the Northern Hemisphere, are not sufficiently active to protect it from freezing in icy sea water. Here we describe a previously undiscovered antifreeze protein from this flounder that is extremely active (as effective as those found in insects) and which explains the resistance of this fish to freezing in polar and subpolar waters.

  7. A role for a Hevea latex lectin-like protein in mediating rubber particle aggregation and latex coagulation.

    PubMed

    Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun; Pasitkul, Piyaporn; Kanokwiroon, Kamonwan; Wititsuwannakul, Dhirayos

    2008-01-01

    An in vitro aggregation of washed lutoid membrane and rubber particles, respectively, prepared from the bottom (lutoid) fraction and rubber layer of centrifuged fresh latex, leading to the formation of rubber coagulum necessary for a latex coagulation was demonstrated. A Triton X-100 extract of washed lutoid membrane proteins, isolated and prepared from the bottom fraction of centrifuged fresh latex was examined for its role in the latex coagulation process. It induced agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes, indicating the presence of a lectin-like protein. Hevea latex lectin-like protein (HLL) was purified to homogeneity by active chitin binding separation, followed by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography. Its M(r) analyzed by SDS-PAGE was 17 kDa, whereas that determined by gel filtration was 267 kDa. The HLL had a pI value of 7.2. Several glycoproteins were shown to inhibit the HLL-induced hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin activity of HLL was enhanced by Ca(2+). Of most interest was the finding that HLL strongly induced aggregation of the Hevea latex rubber particles (RP). This strong RP aggregation leads to latex coagulation, indicating the possibility that it is involved in the formation of the coagulum that plugs the latex vessel ends and stops the flow of latex upon tapping. In addition, the purified HLL also induced aggregation of RP taken from several other non-Hevea latex producing plants. This might indicate either a common or universal role of this lectin-like protein in RP aggregation and hence latex coagulation. This paper, for the first time, provides clear and unequivocal evidence for either a key biological role or physiological function of an endogenous latex lectin-like protein in the sequential process of latex coagulation.

  8. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  9. In Silico Study to Develop a Lectin-Like Protein from Mushroom Agaricus bisporus for Pharmaceutical Application

    PubMed Central

    Ismaya, Wangsa Tirta; Yunita; Damayanti, Sophi; Wijaya, Caroline; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R.; Retnoningrum, Debbie Sofie; Rachmawati, Heni

    2016-01-01

    A lectin-like protein of unknown function designated as LSMT was recently discovered in the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The protein shares high structural similarity to HA-33 from Clostridium botulinum (HA33) and Ricin-B-like lectin from the mushroom Clitocybe nebularis (CNL), which have been developed as drug carrier and anti-cancer, respectively. These homologous proteins display the ability to penetrate the intestinal epithelial cell monolayer, and are beneficial for oral administration. As the characteristics of LSMT are unknown, a structural study in silico was performed to assess its potential pharmaceutical application. The study suggested potential binding to target ligands such as HA-33 and CNL although the nature, specificity, capacity, mode, and strength may differ. Further molecular docking experiments suggest that interactions between the LSMT and tested ligands may take place. This finding indicates the possible use of the LSMT protein, initiating new research on its use for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27110510

  10. Purification and cDNA cloning of a lectin and a lectin-like protein from Apios americana Medikus tubers.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Irie, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Rikiya; Yonekura, Masami

    2014-01-01

    An Apios americana lectin (AAL) and a lectin-like protein (AALP) were purified from tubers by chromatography on Butyl-Cellulofine, ovomucoid-Cellulofine, and DEAE-Cellulofine columns. AAL showed strong hemagglutinating activity toward chicken and goose erythrocytes, but AALP showed no such activity toward any of the erythrocytes tested. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was not inhibited by mono- or disaccharides, but was inhibited by glycoproteins, such as asialofetuin and ovomucoid, suggesting that AAL is an oligosaccharide-specific lectin. The cDNAs of AAL and AALP consist of 1,093 and 1,104 nucleotides and encode proteins of 302 and 274 amino acid residues, respectively. Both amino acid sequences showed high similarity to known legume lectins, and those of their amino acids involved in carbohydrate and metal binding were conserved.

  11. Synthesis of Lectin-Like Protein in Developing Cotyledons of Normal and Phytohemagglutinin-Deficient Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Alessandro; Zoppè, Monica; Fabbrini, M. Serena; Genga, Annamaria; Rivas, Liliana; Bollini, Roberto

    1989-01-01

    The genome of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris contains a small gene family that encodes lectin and lectin-like proteins (phytohemagglutinin, arcelin, and others). One of these phytohemagglutinin-like genes was cloned by L. M. Hoffman et al. ([1982] Nucleic Acids Res 10: 7819-7828), but its product in bean cells has never been identified. We identified the product of this gene, referred to as lectin-like protein (LLP), as an abundant polypeptide synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of developing bean cotyledons. The gene product was first identified in extracts of Xenopus oocytes injected with either cotyledonary bean RNA or LLP-mRNA obtained by hybrid-selection with an LLP cDNA clone. A tryptic map of this protein was identical with a tryptic map of a polypeptide with the same SDS-PAGE mobility detectable in the ER of bean cotyledons pulse-labeled with either [3H]glucosamine or [3H]amino acids, both in a normal and in a phytohemagglutinin-deficient cultivar (cultivars Greensleeves and Pinto UI 111). Greensleeves LLP has Mr 40,000 and most probably has four asparagine-linked glycans. Pinto UI 111 LLP has Mr 38,500. Unlike phytohemagglutinin which is a tetramer, LLP appears to be a monomer by gel filtration analysis. Incorporation of [3H]amino acids indicates that synthesis of LLP accounts for about 3% of the proteins synthesized on the ER, a level similar to that of phytohemagglutinin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16666845

  12. Characterization of. alpha. -amylase-inhibitor, a lectin-like protein in the seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect {alpha}-amylases but not of plant {alpha}-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it. The primary translation product of {alpha}Al is a polypeptide of M{sub r} 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of M{sub r} 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (M{sub r} 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that {alpha}Al is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmic reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles.

  13. Structural modeling of snow flea antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Hsu; Graham, Laurie A; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2007-03-01

    The glycine-rich antifreeze protein recently discovered in snow fleas exhibits strong freezing point depression activity without significantly changing the melting point of its solution (thermal hysteresis). BLAST searches did not detect any protein with significant similarity in current databases. Based on its circular dichroism spectrum, discontinuities in its tripeptide repeat pattern, and intramolecular disulfide bonding, a detailed theoretical model is proposed for the 6.5-kDa isoform. In the model, the 81-residue protein is organized into a bundle of six short polyproline type II helices connected (with one exception) by proline-containing turns. This structure forms two sheets of three parallel helices, oriented antiparallel to each other. The central helices are particularly rich in glycines that facilitate backbone carbonyl-amide hydrogen bonding to four neighboring helices. The modeled structure has similarities to polyglycine II proposed by Crick and Rich in 1955 and is a close match to the polyproline type II antiparallel sheet structure determined by Traub in 1969 for (Pro-Gly-Gly)(n). Whereas the latter two structures are formed by intermolecular interactions, the snow flea antifreeze is stabilized by intramolecular interactions between the helices facilitated by the regularly spaced turns and disulfide bonds. Like several other antifreeze proteins, this modeled protein is amphipathic with a putative hydrophobic ice-binding face.

  14. Structural Modeling of Snow Flea Antifreeze Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng-Hsu; Graham, Laurie A.; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L.

    2007-01-01

    The glycine-rich antifreeze protein recently discovered in snow fleas exhibits strong freezing point depression activity without significantly changing the melting point of its solution (thermal hysteresis). BLAST searches did not detect any protein with significant similarity in current databases. Based on its circular dichroism spectrum, discontinuities in its tripeptide repeat pattern, and intramolecular disulfide bonding, a detailed theoretical model is proposed for the 6.5-kDa isoform. In the model, the 81-residue protein is organized into a bundle of six short polyproline type II helices connected (with one exception) by proline-containing turns. This structure forms two sheets of three parallel helices, oriented antiparallel to each other. The central helices are particularly rich in glycines that facilitate backbone carbonyl-amide hydrogen bonding to four neighboring helices. The modeled structure has similarities to polyglycine II proposed by Crick and Rich in 1955 and is a close match to the polyproline type II antiparallel sheet structure determined by Traub in 1969 for (Pro-Gly-Gly)n. Whereas the latter two structures are formed by intermolecular interactions, the snow flea antifreeze is stabilized by intramolecular interactions between the helices facilitated by the regularly spaced turns and disulfide bonds. Like several other antifreeze proteins, this modeled protein is amphipathic with a putative hydrophobic ice-binding face. PMID:17158562

  15. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  16. Characterization of α-Amylase-Inhibitor, a Lectin-Like Protein in the Seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Joaquin; Altabella, Teresa; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1990-01-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect α-amylases, but not of plant α-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, α-amylase inhibitor (αAl) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Purified αAl can be resolved by SDS-PAGE into five bands (Mr 15,000-19,000), four of which have covalently attached glycans. These bands represent glycoforms of two different polypeptides. All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it (LM Hoffman [1984] J Mol Appl Genet 2: 447-453; J Moreno, MJ Chrispeels [1989] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86:7885-7889). The primary translation product of αAl is a polypeptide of Mr 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of Mr 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (Mr 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that αAl is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmlc reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:16667338

  17. Effect of antifreeze proteins on frozen primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koushafar, H; Rubinsky, B

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies show that prostate adenocarcinoma cells can survive cryosurgery and that cell destruction depends on the specific thermal parameters used during freezing. The goal of this preliminary study is to determine whether certain chemical compounds, known as antifreeze proteins, can induce complete human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cell destruction by freezing, regardless of the thermal parameters used. The study also examines the mechanism by which antifreeze proteins bring about cell destruction. Antifreeze proteins were added to solutions containing human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were frozen with controlled thermal parameters using a directional solidification apparatus attached to a light microscope. Cell viability was determined after thawing as a function of antifreeze protein concentration and cooling rate during freezing. The dose response study shows that for all the cooling rates tested, 10-mg/mL solutions of antifreeze protein cause the complete destruction of human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells frozen to a temperature at which, without these proteins, the cells survive freezing. Light microscopy shows that the lethal effect of the antifreeze proteins is related to the formation of intracellular ice in the frozen cells. CONCLUSIONS; This preliminary study has demonstrated that antifreeze proteins have the ability to generate complete destruction of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells frozen to high subzero temperatures irrespective of the cooling rates used during freezing. This suggests that introducing antifreeze proteins into undesirable tissues prior to freezing may increase the efficacy and the control over tissue destruction by cryosurgery.

  18. Proteins with an Euonymus lectin-like domain are ubiquitous in Embryophyta

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cloning of the Euonymus lectin led to the discovery of a novel domain that also occurs in some stress-induced plant proteins. The distribution and the diversity of proteins with an Euonymus lectin (EUL) domain were investigated using detailed analysis of sequences in publicly accessible genome and transcriptome databases. Results Comprehensive in silico analyses indicate that the recently identified Euonymus europaeus lectin domain represents a conserved structural unit of a novel family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins, which will further be referred to as the Euonymus lectin (EUL) family. The EUL domain is widespread among plants. Analysis of retrieved sequences revealed that some sequences consist of a single EUL domain linked to an unrelated N-terminal domain whereas others comprise two in tandem arrayed EUL domains. A new classification system for these lectins is proposed based on the overall domain architecture. Evolutionary relationships among the sequences with EUL domains are discussed. Conclusion The identification of the EUL family provides the first evidence for the occurrence in terrestrial plants of a highly conserved plant specific domain. The widespread distribution of the EUL domain strikingly contrasts the more limited or even narrow distribution of most other lectin domains found in plants. The apparent omnipresence of the EUL domain is indicative for a universal role of this lectin domain in plants. Although there is unambiguous evidence that several EUL domains possess carbohydrate-binding activity further research is required to corroborate the carbohydrate-binding properties of different members of the EUL family. PMID:19930663

  19. Polycarboxylates Enhance Beetle Antifreeze Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Amornwittawat, Natapol; Wang, Sen; Duman, John G.; Wen, Xin

    2008-01-01

    Summary Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) lower the noncolligative freezing point of water in the presence of ice below the ice melting point. The temperature difference between the melting point and the noncolligative freezing point is termed thermal hysteresis (TH). The magnitude of the TH depends on the specific activity and the concentration of AFP, and the concentration of enhancers in the solution. Known enhancers are certain low molecular mass molecules and proteins. Here, we investigated a series of polycarboxylates that enhance the TH activity of an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis (DAFP) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Triethylenetetramine-N,N,N′,N″,N‴,N‴-hexaacetate, the most efficient enhancer identified in this work, can increase the TH of DAFP by nearly 1.5 fold over than that of the published best enhancer, citrate. The Zn2+ coordinated carboxylate results in loss of the enhancement ability of the carboxylate on antifreeze activity. There is not an additional increase in TH when a weaker enhancer is added to a stronger enhancer solution. These observations suggest that the more carboxylate groups per enhancer molecule the better the efficiency of the enhancer and that the freedom of motion of these molecules is necessary for them to serve as enhancers for AFP. The hydroxyl groups in the enhancer molecules can also positively affect their TH enhancement efficiency, though not as strongly as carboxylate groups. Mechanisms are discussed. PMID:18620083

  20. Increased flexibility decreases antifreeze protein activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shruti N; Graether, Steffen P

    2010-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins protect several cold-blooded organisms from subzero environments by preventing death from freezing. The Type I antifreeze protein (AFP) isoform from Pseudopleuronectes americanus, named HPLC6, is a 37-residue protein that is a single α-helix. Mutational analysis of the protein showed that its alanine-rich face is important for binding to and inhibiting the growth of macromolecular ice. Almost all structural studies of HPLC6 involve the use of chemically synthesized protein as it requires a native N-terminal aspartate and an amidated C-terminus for full activity. Here, we examine the role of C-terminal amide and C-terminal arginine side chain in the activity, structure, and dynamics of nonamidated Arg37 HPLC6, nonamidated HPLC6 Ala37, amidated HPLC6 Ala37, and fully native HPLC6 using a recombinant bacterial system. The thermal hysteresis (TH) activities of the nonamidated mutants are 35% lower compared with amidated proteins, but analysis of the NMR data and circular dichroism spectra shows that they are all still α-helical. Relaxation data from the two nonamidated mutants indicate that the C-terminal residues are considerably more flexible than the rest of the protein because of the loss of the amide group, whereas the amidated Ala37 mutant has a C-terminus that is as rigid as the wild-type protein and has high TH activity. We propose that an increase in flexibility of the AFP causes it to lose activity because its dynamic nature prevents it from binding strongly to the ice surface. Copyright © 2010 The Protein Society.

  1. Structure and function of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Peter L; Baardsnes, Jason; Kuiper, Michael J; Walker, Virginia K

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures are now available for four of seven non-homologous fish and insect antifreeze proteins (AFPs). For each of these structures, the ice-binding site of the AFP has been defined by site-directed mutagenesis, and ice etching has indicated that the ice surface is bound by the AFP. A comparison of these extremely diverse ice-binding proteins shows that they have the following attributes in common. The binding sites are relatively flat and engage a substantial proportion of the protein's surface area in ice binding. They are also somewhat hydrophobic -- more so than that portion of the protein exposed to the solvent. Surface-surface complementarity appears to be the key to tight binding in which the contribution of hydrogen bonding seems to be secondary to van der Waals contacts. PMID:12171656

  2. The mechanism by which fish antifreeze proteins cause thermal hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Erlend; Zachariassen, Karl Erik

    2005-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins are characterised by their ability to prevent ice from growing upon cooling below the bulk melting point. This displacement of the freezing temperature of ice is limited and at a sufficiently low temperature a rapid ice growth takes place. The separation of the melting and freezing temperature is usually referred to as thermal hysteresis, and the temperature of ice growth is referred to as the hysteresis freezing point. The hysteresis is supposed to be the result of an adsorption of antifreeze proteins to the crystal surface. This causes the ice to grow as convex surface regions between adjacent adsorbed antifreeze proteins, thus lowering the temperature at which the crystal can visibly expand. The model requires that the antifreeze proteins are irreversibly adsorbed onto the ice surface within the hysteresis gap. This presupposition is apparently in conflict with several characteristic features of the phenomenon; the absence of superheating of ice in the presence of antifreeze proteins, the dependence of the hysteresis activity on the concentration of antifreeze proteins and the different capacities of different types of antifreeze proteins to cause thermal hysteresis at equimolar concentrations. In addition, there are structural obstacles that apparently would preclude irreversible adsorption of the antifreeze proteins to the ice surface; the bond strength necessary for irreversible adsorption and the absence of a clearly defined surface to which the antifreeze proteins may adsorb. This article deals with these apparent conflicts between the prevailing theory and the empirical observations. We first review the mechanism of thermal hysteresis with some modifications: we explain the hysteresis as a result of vapour pressure equilibrium between the ice surface and the ambient fluid fraction within the hysteresis gap due to a pressure build-up within the convex growth zones, and the ice growth as the result of an ice surface nucleation event at

  3. Ice structuring proteins - a new name for antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Chris J; Buckley, Sarah L; Lindner, Nigel

    2002-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) have been reported in the academic literature for many years, and are increasingly arousing interest in the technical and popular media, particularly because of their potential applications. However, the term "antifreeze" does not always accurately describe their natural function, or their application in frozen systems, where they do not prevent freezing, but control the size, shape and aggregation of ice crystals. We survey the properties and applications of AFPs and propose a more generally applicable name based on the fact that all AFPs bind to ice and consequently influence crystal growth and interactions: "Ice Structuring Proteins".

  4. Antifreeze Proteins from Diverse Organisms and their Applications: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2017-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins are ice-binding or ice-structuring proteins that prevent water from freezing by adsorbing to the ice surface and stopping the growth of minute ice crystals to large crystals in a non-colligative manner. The antifreeze proteins are found in species like fish, arthropods, plants, algae, fungi, yeasts and bacteria. The diversity, distribution and classification of antifreeze proteins were highlighted in this review. Antifreeze proteins help the organisms adapt to and survive in subzero temperature environments. The distribution of antifreeze proteins in different species appears to be the outcome of a combination of independent evolutionary events, probably the convergent evolution or horizontal gene transfer. Benefits can be derived from the frost resistance of these organisms. Their potential applications have been recognized in food processing, cryopreservation, cryosurgery, fishery and agricultural industries and anti-icing materials development. This review includes information on the current understanding of antifreeze proteins. A discussion on interactions and mechanisms involving ice recognition and adsorption was also included. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Fish antifreeze protein and the freezing and recrystallization of ice.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L; Oolman, L D

    Antifreeze glycopeptide and peptides from the blood of polar fishes prevent the growth of ice crystals in water at temperatures down to approximately 1 degree C below freezing point, but do not appreciably influence the equilibrium freezing point. This freezing point hysteresis must be a disequilibrium effect, or it would violate Gibbs' phase rule, but the separate freezing and melting points are experimentally very definite: ice neither melts nor freezes perceptibly within the 'hysteresis gap', for periods of hours or days. We report here unusual crystal faces on ice crystals grown from solutions of very low concentrations of the anti-freeze glycopeptides and peptides. This is a clue to the mechanism of freezing inhibition, and it may be the basis of a simple, very sensitive test for antifreeze material. Very low concentrations of the antifreeze protein are also remarkably effective in preventing the recrystallization of ice.

  6. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice.

  7. The lectin-like protein 1 in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 mediates tissue-specific adherence to vaginal epithelium and inhibits urogenital pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Lievens, Elke; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Reid, Gregor; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 has been documented to survive implantation onto the vaginal epithelium and interfere with urogenital pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Here, we report for the first time the construction of dedicated knock-out mutants in L. rhamnosus GR-1 to enable the study of gene functions. In a search for genes responsible for the adherence capacity of L. rhamnosus GR-1, a genomic region encoding a protein with homology to lectin-like proteins was identified. Phenotypic analyses of the knock-out mutant of L. rhamnosus GR-1 revealed a two-fold decreased adhesion to the vaginal and ectocervical epithelial cell lines compared to wild-type. In contrast, the adhesion to gastro-intestinal epithelial (Caco2) and endocervical cell lines (Hela and End1/E6E7) was not drastically affected by the mutation, suggesting that the LGR-1_Llp1 lectins mediates tissue tropism. The purified LGR-1_Llp1 protein also inhibited biofilm formation and adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. For the first time, an important role for a novel lectin-like protein in the adhesion capacity and host cell-specific interaction of a vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus strain has been discovered, with an additional role in pathogen inhibition. PMID:27869151

  8. The lectin-like protein 1 in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 mediates tissue-specific adherence to vaginal epithelium and inhibits urogenital pathogens.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; Lievens, Elke; Verhoeven, Tine L A; Macklaim, Jean M; Gloor, Gregory; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Reid, Gregor; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-11-21

    The probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 has been documented to survive implantation onto the vaginal epithelium and interfere with urogenital pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Here, we report for the first time the construction of dedicated knock-out mutants in L. rhamnosus GR-1 to enable the study of gene functions. In a search for genes responsible for the adherence capacity of L. rhamnosus GR-1, a genomic region encoding a protein with homology to lectin-like proteins was identified. Phenotypic analyses of the knock-out mutant of L. rhamnosus GR-1 revealed a two-fold decreased adhesion to the vaginal and ectocervical epithelial cell lines compared to wild-type. In contrast, the adhesion to gastro-intestinal epithelial (Caco2) and endocervical cell lines (Hela and End1/E6E7) was not drastically affected by the mutation, suggesting that the LGR-1_Llp1 lectins mediates tissue tropism. The purified LGR-1_Llp1 protein also inhibited biofilm formation and adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. For the first time, an important role for a novel lectin-like protein in the adhesion capacity and host cell-specific interaction of a vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus strain has been discovered, with an additional role in pathogen inhibition.

  9. Properties, potentials, and prospects of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Venketesh, S; Dayananda, C

    2008-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a group of proteins that protect organisms from deep freezing temperatures and are expressed in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, bacteria, and fungi. The nuclear magnetic resonance, x-ray structure, and many spectroscopic studies with AFPs have been instrumental in determining the structure-function relationship. Mutational studies have indicated the importance of hydrophobic residues in ice binding. Various studies have pointed out that the mechanism of AFP action is through its adsorption on the ice surface, which leads to a curved surface, preventing further growth of ice by the "Kelvin effect." The AFPs have potential industrial, medical, and agricultural application in different fields, such as food technology, preservation of cell lines, organs, cryosurgery, and cold hardy transgenic plants and animals. However, the applications of AFPs are marred by high cost due to low yield. This review deals with the source and properties of AFPs from an angle of their application and their potential. The possibility of production using different molecular biological techniques, which will help increase the yield, is also dealt with.

  10. Peptide backbone circularization enhances antifreeze protein thermostability.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Corey A; Semrau, Joanna; Chiriac, Dragos; Litschko, Morgan; Campbell, Robert L; Langelaan, David N; Smith, Steven P; Davies, Peter L; Allingham, John S

    2017-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a class of ice-binding proteins that promote survival of a variety of cold-adapted organisms by decreasing the freezing temperature of bodily fluids. A growing number of biomedical, agricultural, and commercial products, such as organs, foods, and industrial fluids, have benefited from the ability of AFPs to control ice crystal growth and prevent ice recrystallization at subzero temperatures. One limitation of AFP use in these latter contexts is their tendency to denature and irreversibly lose activity at the elevated temperatures of certain industrial processing or large-scale AFP production. Using the small, thermolabile type III AFP as a model system, we demonstrate that AFP thermostability is dramatically enhanced via split intein-mediated N- and C-terminal end ligation. To engineer this circular protein, computational modeling and molecular dynamics simulations were applied to identify an extein sequence that would fill the 20-Å gap separating the free ends of the AFP, yet impose little impact on the structure and entropic properties of its ice-binding surface. The top candidate was then expressed in bacteria, and the circularized protein was isolated from the intein domains by ice-affinity purification. This circularized AFP induced bipyramidal ice crystals during ice growth in the hysteresis gap and retained 40% of this activity even after incubation at 100°C for 30 min. NMR analysis implicated enhanced thermostability or refolding capacity of this protein compared to the noncyclized wild-type AFP. These studies support protein backbone circularization as a means to expand the thermostability and practical applications of AFPs. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  11. Lebecin, a new C-type lectin like protein from Macrovipera lebetina venom with anti-tumor activity against the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Jed; Fakhfekh, Emna; Morgen, Maram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Majdoub, Hafedh; Gargouri, Ali; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Luis, José; Marrakchi, Naziha; Sarray, Sameh

    2014-08-01

    C-type lectins like proteins display various biological activities and are known to affect especially platelet aggregation. Few of them have been reported to have anti-tumor effects. In this study, we have identified and characterized a new C-type lectin like protein, named lebecin. Lebecin is a heterodimeric protein of 30 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of both subunits were determined by Edman degradation and the entire amino acid sequences were deduced from cDNAs. The precursors of both lebecin subunits contain a 23-amino acid residue signal peptide and the mature α and β subunits are composed of 129 and 131 amino acids, respectively. Lebecin is shown to be a potent inhibitor of MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cells proliferation. Furthermore, lebecin dose-dependently inhibited the integrin-mediated attachment of these cells to different adhesion substrata. This novel C-type lectin also completely blocked MDA-MB231 cells migration towards fibronectin and fibrinogen in haptotaxis assays.

  12. The basis for hyperactivity of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Scotter, Andrew J; Marshall, Christopher B; Graham, Laurie A; Gilbert, Jack A; Garnham, Christopher P; Davies, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) bind to the surface of ice crystals and lower the non-equilibrium freezing temperature of the icy solution below its melting point. We have recently reported the discovery of three novel hyperactive AFPs from a bacterium, a primitive insect and a fish, which, like two hyperactive AFPs previously recognized in beetles and moths, are considerably better at depressing the freezing point than most fish AFPs. When cooled below the non-equilibrium freezing temperature, ice crystals formed in the presence of any of five distinct, moderately active fish AFPs grow suddenly along the c-axis. Ice crystals formed in the presence of any of the five evolutionarily and structurally distinct hyperactive AFPs remain stable to lower temperatures, and then grow explosively in a direction normal to the c-axis when cooled below the freezing temperature. We argue that this one consistent distinction in the behaviour of these two classes of AFPs is the key to hyperactivity. Whereas both AFP classes bind irreversibly to ice, the hyperactive AFPs are better at preventing ice growth out of the basal planes.

  13. Inhibition of Ca2+ and K+ currents by "antifreeze" proteins.

    PubMed

    Rubinsky, B; Mattioli, M; Arav, A; Barboni, B; Fletcher, G L

    1992-03-01

    For the last two decades, the research on fish "antifreeze" proteins has focused exclusively on their ability to depress noncolligatively blood plasma freezing points, presumably by binding to ice crystals. We report evidence that antifreeze polypeptides from the winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) have another special property, the ability to block ion channels. In experiments with porcine granulosa cells we show, using the patch-clamp technique in the whole cell configuration, that these proteins suppress effectively calcium and potassium currents. The results of dose-response studies indicate a protein-protein interaction mechanism.

  14. Salt-induced enhancement of antifreeze protein activity: a salting-out effect.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Erlend; Pedersen, Sindre Andre; Zachariassen, Karl Erik

    2008-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins are a structurally diverse group of proteins characterized by their unique ability to cause a separation of the melting- and growth-temperatures of ice. These proteins have evolved independently in different kinds of cold-adapted ectothermic animals, including insects and fish, where they protect against lethal freezing of the body fluids. There is a great variability in the capacity of different kinds of antifreeze proteins to evoke the antifreeze effect, but the basis of these differences is not well understood. This study reports on salt-induced enhancement of the antifreeze activity of an antifreeze protein from the longhorn beetle Rhagium inquisitor (L.). The results imply that antifreeze activity is predetermined by a steady-state distribution of the antifreeze protein between the solution and the ice surface region. The observed salt-induced enhancement of the antifreeze activity compares qualitatively and quantitatively with salt-induced lowering of protein solubility. Thus, salts apparently enhance antifreeze activity by evoking a solubility-induced shift in the distribution pattern of the antifreeze proteins in favour of the ice. These results indicate that the solubility of antifreeze proteins in the solution surrounding the ice crystal is a fundamental physiochemical property in relation to their antifreeze potency.

  15. Type I Antifreeze Proteins Enhance Ice Nucleation above Certain Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Peter W.; Osterday, Katie E.; Heneghan, Aaron F.; Haymet, Anthony D. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects that antifreeze proteins have on the supercooling and ice-nucleating abilities of aqueous solutions. Very little information on such nucleation currently exists. Using an automated lag time apparatus and a new analysis, we show several dilution series of Type I antifreeze proteins. Our results indicate that, above a concentration of ∼8 mg/ml, ice nucleation is enhanced rather than hindered. We discuss this unexpected result and present a new hypothesis outlining three components of polar fish blood that we believe affect its solution properties in certain situations. PMID:20837472

  16. Helical Antifreeze Proteins Have Independently Evolved in Fishes on Four Occasions

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Laurie A.; Hobbs, Rod S.; Fletcher, Garth L.; Davies, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-rich α-helical (type I) antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are produced by a variety of fish species from three different orders to protect against freezing in icy seawater. Interspersed amongst and within these orders are fishes making AFPs that are completely different in both sequence and structure. The origin of this variety of types I, II, III and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) has been attributed to adaptation following sea-level glaciations that occurred after the divergence of most of the extant families of fish. The presence of similar types of AFPs in distantly related fishes has been ascribed to lateral gene transfer in the case of the structurally complex globular type II lectin-like AFPs and to convergent evolution for the AFGPs, which consist of a well-conserved tripeptide repeat. In this paper, we examine the genesis of the type I AFPs, which are intermediate in complexity. These predominantly α-helical peptides share many features, such as putative capping structures, Ala-richness and amphipathic character. We have added to the type I repertoire by cloning additional sequences from sculpin and have found that the similarities between the type I AFPs of the four distinct groups of fishes are not borne out at the nucleotide level. Both the non-coding sequences and the codon usage patterns are strikingly different. We propose that these AFPs arose via convergence from different progenitor helices with a weak affinity for ice and that their similarity is dictated by the propensity of specific amino acids to form helices and to align water on one side of the helix into an ice-like pattern. PMID:24324684

  17. Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 reduces cardiac fibroblast proliferation by suppressing GATA Binding Protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Ning-Ning; Liu, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Shuang-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Zhi; Li, Ai-Qun; Liu, Shi-Ming

    2016-07-08

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and GATA Binding Protein 4 (GATA4) are important for the growth of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). When deregulated, LOX-1 and GATA4 can cause cardiac remodeling. In the present study, we found novel evidence that GATA4 was required for the LOX-1 regulation of CF proliferation. The inhibition of LOX-1 by RNA interference LOX-1 lentivirus resulted in the loss of PI3K/Akt activation and GATA4 protein expression. The overexpression of LOX-1 by lentivirus rescued CF proliferation, PI3K/Akt activation, and GATA4 protein expression. Moreover, GATA4 overexpression enhanced CF proliferation with LOX-1 inhibition. We also found that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, reduced cell proliferation and protein level of GATA4. In summary, GATA4 may play an important role in the LOX-1 and PI3K/Akt regulation of CF proliferation. -- Highlights: •GATA4 is regulated by LOX-1 signaling in CFs. •GATA4 is involved in LOX-1 regulating CF proliferation. •GATA4 is regulated by PI3K/Akt signaling in CFs.

  18. The antifreeze potential of the spruce budworm thermal hysteresis protein.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, M G; Doucet, D; Davies, P L; Walker, V K

    1997-09-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) inhibit ice growth by surface adsorption that results in a depression of the freezing point below the melting point. The maximum level of this thermal hysteresis shown by the four structurally unrelated fish AFP is approximately 1.5 degrees C. In contrast, hemolymph and crude extracts from insects can have 5 degrees to 10 degrees C of thermal hysteresis. Based on the isolation, cloning, and expression of a thermal hysteresis protein (THP) from spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana), the vastly greater activity is attributable to a 9 kDa protein. This novel, threonine- and cysteine-rich THP has striking effects on ice crystal morphology, both before and during freezing. It is also 10 to 30 times more active than any known fish AFP, offering the prospect of superior antifreeze properties in cryoprotective applications.

  19. Interaction between Lactobacillus kefir and Saccharomyces lipolytica isolated from kefir grains: evidence for lectin-like activity of bacterial surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Golowczyc, Marina Alejandra; Mobili, Pablo; Garrote, Graciela Liliana; de Los Angeles Serradell, María; Abraham, Analía Graciela; De Antoni, Graciela Liliana

    2009-02-01

    Several microbial interactions involving yeast and lactobacilli have been suggested in fermented products. Co-aggregation between Lactobacillus kefir and yeast Saccharomyces lipolytica isolated from kefir grains was studied by scanning electron microscopy and aggregation assays. Six out of twenty Lb. kefir strains were able to co-aggregate with Sacch. lipolytica CIDCA 812 and showed thermolabile non-covalently bound surface molecules involved in this interaction. Co-aggregation inhibition after Lb. kefir pre-treatment with 5 m-LiCl or 20 g SDS/l showed that bacterial S-layer proteins play an important role in this interaction. Presence of different sugar (mannose, sucrose and fructose) or yeast pre-treatment with sodium periodate inhibited co-aggregation between Lb. kefir and Sacch. lipolytica. Co-aggregating Lb. kefir strains were also able to agglutinate with human red blood cells and they lost this ability after treatment with 5 m-LiCl. These results and the capacity of purified S-layer proteins of Lb. kefir to haemagglutinate, strongly suggest that a lectin-like activity of bacterial surface proteins (S-layer) mediates the aggregation with yeast cells.

  20. Molecular Modeling of Lectin-Like Protein from Acacia farnesiana Reveals a Possible Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism in Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β-strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction. PMID:24490151

  1. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, William J.; Kirby, Jonathan M.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism.

  2. Molecular modeling of lectin-like protein from Acacia farnesiana reveals a possible anti-inflammatory mechanism in Carrageenan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β -strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction.

  3. Characterization and sugar-binding properties of arcelin-1, an insecticidal lectin-like protein isolated from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. RAZ-2) seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, C; Causse, H; Mourey, L; Koninkx, J; Rivière, M; Hendriks, H; Puzo, G; Samama, J P; Rougé, P

    1998-01-01

    Arcelin-1 is a lectin-like protein found in the seeds of wild varieties of the kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). This protein displays insecticidal properties, but the mechanism of action is as yet unknown. In the present study we investigated the biochemical and biophysical properties of arcelin-1 from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. RAZ-2. Native arcelin-1 is a dimeric glycoprotein of 60 kDa, built from the non-covalent association of two identical monomers. This dimer resists dissociation by chaotropic agents and is highly resistant to proteolytic enzymes. Each subunit contains 10% (w/w) neutral sugars which belong to the high-mannose and complex-type glycans attached to three glycosylation sites. No interaction of the protein with simple sugars could be detected, but arcelin-1 displays an intrinsic specificity in binding complex glycans. Arcelin-1 therefore differs from the closely related phytohaemagglutinin lectins and alpha-amylase inhibitor in several respects: oligomerization states, sugar-binding affinities and the type and number of glycan chains. These features may be related to the toxicity of arcelin-1. PMID:9445382

  4. A serendipitous discovery of antifreeze protein-specific activity in C-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogs.

    PubMed

    Eniade, Adewale; Purushotham, Madhusudhan; Ben, Robert N; Wang, J B; Horwath, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Structurally diverse carbon-linked (C-linked) analogs of antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) have been prepared via linear or convergent solid phase synthesis. These analogs range in molecular weight from approx 1.5-4.1 KDa and do not possess the beta-D-galactose-1,3-alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine carbohydrate moiety or the L-threonine-L-alanine-L-alanine polypeptide backbone native to the AFGP wild-type. Despite these dramatic structural modifications, the 2.7-KDa and 4.1-KDa analogs possess antifreeze protein-specific activity as determined by recrystallization-inhibition (RI) and thermal hysteresis (TH) assays. These analogs are weaker than the wild-type in their activity, but nanoliter osmometry indicates that these compounds are binding to ice and affecting a localized freezing point depression. This is the first example of a C-linked AFGP analog that possesses TH and RI activity and suggests that the rational design and synthesis of chemically and biologically stable AFGP analogs is a feasible and worthwhile endeavor. Given the low degree of TH activity, these compounds may prove useful for the protection of cells during freezing and thawing cycles.

  5. Anti-virulence properties of an antifreeze protein

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Martin; Abraham, Nabil M.; Liu, Lei; Neelakanta, Girish; Mattessich, Sarah; Sultana, Hameeda; Shang, Zhengling; Ansari, Juliana M.; Killiam, Charlotte; Walker, Wendy; Cooley, Lynn; Flavell, Richard A.; Agaisse, Herve; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Summary As microbial drug-resistance increases, there is a critical need for new classes of compounds to combat infectious diseases. The Ixodes scapularis tick antifreeze glycoprotein, IAFGP, functions as an anti-virulence agent against diverse bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Recombinant IAFGP and a peptide, P1, derived from this protein bind to microbes and alter biofilm formation. Transgenic iafgp-expressing flies and mice challenged with bacteria, as well as wild-type animals administered P1, were resistant to infection, septic shock, or biofilm development on implanted catheter tubing. These data show that an antifreeze protein facilitates host control of bacterial infections and suggest new therapeutic strategies to counter pathogens. PMID:25373896

  6. Hexagonal shaped ice spicules in frozen antifreeze protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P W; Gould, M; DeVries, A L

    2002-06-01

    In the presence of antifreeze proteins from both Antarctic and Arctic fishes, water freezes in the form of long c-axis spikes or spicular-like crystals. Transmission electron microscopy of the Pt/C replicas of the freeze fractured spicular ice in a small capillary revealed the presence of many hexagonally shaped structures whose cross-sectional dimensions were between 0.5 and 10 microm. Well-defined parallel faces were associated with most fractured and etched spicules. When fracture planes occurred near the tip of a spicule, well-defined pyramidal faces were apparent. Steps were sometimes associated with these pyramidal spicular crystal faces. On some of the replicas obvious roughening of certain crystal faces of the spicule was observed, suggesting that the antifreeze proteins may have adsorbed to those faces.

  7. Overexpression of L-type lectin-like protein kinase 1 confers pathogen resistance and regulates salinity response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Ju, Hyun-Woo; Min, Ji-Hee; Zhang, Xia; Kim, Su-Hyun; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2013-04-01

    Plant receptor-like protein kinases are thought to be involved in various cellular processes mediated by signal transduction pathways. There are about 45 lectin receptor kinases in Arabidopsis, but only a few have been studied. Here, we investigated the effect of the disruption and overexpression of a plasma membrane-localized L-type lectin-like protein kinase 1, AtLPK1 (At4g02410), on plant responses to abiotic and biotic stress. Expression of AtLPK1 was strongly induced by abscisic acid, methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid and stress treatments. Overexpression of AtLPK1 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced seed germination and cotyledon greening under high salinity condition, while antisense transgenic lines were more sensitive to salt stress. Activity of three abiotic stress responsive genes, RD29A, RD29B and COR15A, was elevated in AtLPK1-overexpressing plants than that in wild type (WT) plants with salt treatment, whereas the transcript level of these genes in antisense plants decreased compared with WT. Furthermore, AtLPK1-overexpressing plants displayed increased resistance to infection by Botrytis cinerea and exhibited stronger expression of a group of defense-related genes than did WT. The data implicates AtLPK1 plays essential roles at both abiotic and biotic stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  8. Analysis of antifreeze protein activity using colorimetric gold nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xu; Choi, Ho-seok; Park, Ji-In; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-07-01

    High activity and long stability of antifreeze proteins (AFPs), also known as ice-binding proteins (IBPs), are necessary for exerting their physiological functions in biotechnology and cryomedicine. Here we report a simple analysis of antifreeze protein activity and stability based on self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via freezing and thawing cycles. While the mercaptosuccinic acid-capped AuNP (MSA-AuNP) was easily self-assembled after a freezing/thawing cycle, due to the mechanical attack of ice crystal on the MSA-AuNP surface, the presence of AFP impeded the self-assembly of MSA-AuNP via the interaction of AFP with ice crystals via freezing and thawing cycles, which led to a strong color in the MSA-AuNP solution. As a result, the aggregation parameter (E520/E650) of MSA-AuNP showed the rapid detection of both activity and stability of AFPs. We suggest that our newly developed method is very suitable for measuring antifreeze activity and stability in a simple and rapid manner with reliable quantification.

  9. Mirror image forms of snow flea antifreeze protein prepared by total chemical synthesis have identical antifreeze activities.

    PubMed

    Pentelute, Brad L; Gates, Zachary P; Dashnau, Jennifer L; Vanderkooi, Jane M; Kent, Stephen B H

    2008-07-30

    The recently discovered glycine-rich snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP) has no sequence homology with any known proteins. No experimental structure has been reported for this interesting protein molecule. Here we report the total chemical synthesis of the mirror image forms of sfAFP (i.e., L-sfAFP, the native protein, and D-sfAFP, the native protein's enantiomer). The predicted 81 amino acid residue polypeptide chain of sfAFP contains Cys residues at positions 1, 13, 28, and 43 and was prepared from four synthetic peptide segments by sequential native chemical ligation. After purification, the full-length synthetic polypeptide was folded at 4 degrees C to form the sfAFP protein containing two disulfides. Chemically synthesized sfAFP had the expected antifreeze activity in an ice recrystallization inhibition assay. Mirror image D-sfAFP protein was prepared by the same synthetic strategy, using peptide segments made from d-amino acids, and had an identical but opposite-sign CD spectrum. As expected, D-sfAFP displays the same antifreeze properties as L-sfAFP, because ice presents an achiral surface for sfAFP binding. Facile synthetic access to sfAFP will enable determination of its molecular structure and systematic elucidation of the molecular basis of the antifreeze properties of this unique protein.

  10. Basal Plane Affinity of an Insect Antifreeze Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertaya, N.; Gauthier, S. Y.; Davies, P. L.; Braslavsky, I.

    2007-03-01

    sbwAFP is a powerful antifreeze protein (AFP) with high thermal hysteresis activity that protects spruce budworm (sbw) from freezing during harsh winters in the spruce and fir forests of USA and Canada. Different types of antifreeze proteins have been found in many other species and have potential applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation. When an ice crystal is cooled in the presence of AFP below the non-equilibrium freezing point the crystal will suddenly and rapidly grow in specific directions. Hyperactive antifreezes like sbwAFP expand perpendicular to the c-axis (in the plane of the a-axes), whereas moderately active AFPs, like type III from fish, grow in the direction parallel to the c-axis. It has been proposed that the basis for hyperactivity of certain AFPs is that they bind and accumulate on the basal plane to inhibit c-axial growth. By putting fluorescent tags on these two types of AFPs we have been able to directly visualize the binding of different types of AFPs to ice surfaces. We do indeed find that the insect AFP accumulates on the basal plane of an ice crystal while type III AFP does not. Supported by CIHR and BNTI.

  11. Impact of antifreeze proteins and antifreeze glycoproteins on bovine sperm during freeze-thaw.

    PubMed

    Prathalingam, N S; Holt, W V; Revell, S G; Mirczuk, S; Fleck, R A; Watson, P F

    2006-11-01

    There are no reports on the use of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) for the use of bull sperm cryopreservation despite studies in the ram, mouse and chimpanzee. The effect of freezing and thawing on bull sperm viability, osmotic resistance and acrosome integrity were observed following the addition of AFP1, AFPIII and AFGP at four concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 microg/ml). In a second part of the experiment, fluorescein was conjugated to the AFPs and AFGP and observations were made using fluorescence microscopy to determine whether binding occurred between the sperm cell membranes and the proteins. In the final part of the study the cryopreservation media were cooled in the presence of the AFPs and AFGPs at the four concentrations on a cryomicroscope to mimic similar cooling curves as those used in the presence of sperm. Following freeze-thaw, AFPI resulted in increased osmotic resistant cells at 0.1-10 microg/ml compared to the control (P<0.01). AFPI and AFPIII did bind to the sperm cells. There was no visual difference in ice structure between the control, AFPIII and AFGP but AFPI resulted in parallel crystals at 0.1, 1 and 10 microg/ml. We suggest that the increased osmotic resistance in the spermatozoa cryopreserved in AFPI is due to the cells orientating between the ice crystals, reducing mechanical stress to the cell membrane. Previous research has shown that osmotic resistance correlates with bull fertility, suggesting that bull spermatozoa cryopreserved in the presence of AFPI may have increased fertility in vivo.

  12. Contrasting Roles of the Apoplastic Aspartyl Protease APOPLASTIC, ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1-DEPENDENT1 and LEGUME LECTIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 in Arabidopsis Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, Heiko H; Wenig, Marion; Wittek, Finni; Jordá, Lucia; Maldonado-Alconada, Ana M; Sarioglu, Hakan; Colby, Thomas; Knappe, Claudia; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Pabst, Elisabeth; Mackey, David; Parker, Jane E; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-06-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible immune response that depends on ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) EDS1 is required for both SAR signal generation in primary infected leaves and SAR signal perception in systemic uninfected tissues. In contrast to SAR signal generation, local resistance remains intact in eds1 mutant plants in response to Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. We utilized the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant to identify new SAR regulatory proteins in plants conditionally expressing AvrRpm1. Comparative proteomic analysis of apoplast-enriched extracts from AvrRpm1-expressing wild-type and eds1 mutant plants led to the identification of 12 APOPLASTIC, EDS1-DEPENDENT (AED) proteins. The genes encoding AED1, a predicted aspartyl protease, and another AED, LEGUME LECTIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 (LLP1), were induced locally and systemically during SAR signaling and locally by salicylic acid (SA) or its functional analog, benzo 1,2,3-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester. Because conditional overaccumulation of AED1-hemagglutinin inhibited SA-induced resistance and SAR but not local resistance, the data suggest that AED1 is part of a homeostatic feedback mechanism regulating systemic immunity. In llp1 mutant plants, SAR was compromised, whereas the local resistance that is normally associated with EDS1 and SA as well as responses to exogenous SA appeared largely unaffected. Together, these data indicate that LLP1 promotes systemic rather than local immunity, possibly in parallel with SA. Our analysis reveals new positive and negative components of SAR and reinforces the notion that SAR represents a distinct phase of plant immunity beyond local resistance.

  13. Pouterin, a novel potential cytotoxic lectin-like protein with apoptosis-inducing activity in tumorigenic mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Boleti, Ana Paula de A; Ventura, Cláudio A; Justo, Giselle Z; Silva, Rodrigo A; de Sousa, Ana Carolina T; Ferreira, Carmen V; Yano, Tomomasa; Macedo, Maria Lígia R

    2008-06-15

    In this study, the cytotoxicity of pouterin in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammalian cell lines was investigated. We found that HeLa, Hep-2 and HT-29 tumor cells were highly sensitive to pouterin cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas non-tumorigenic Vero cells and human lymphocytes were relatively resistant to the protein. Among the tumor cell lines, HeLa cells showed the highest susceptibility to pouterin cytotoxicity, exhibiting a time-dependent increase in LDH leakage and an IC(50) value of 5mug/mL. Morphological alterations such as rounding, cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation, consistent with apoptotic cell death were observed. Apoptosis induction was demonstrated by DNA fragmentation as detected by terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). Furthermore, HeLa cells incubated with pouterin showed disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Western blot analysis revealed that pouterin caused increased expression of p21, thus indicating cell cycle arrest. Subsequent studies provided evidence that apoptosis may be partially explained in the activation of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling. Interestingly, a time-dependent decrease of the expression of p65 nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) subunit, concomitant with a downregulation of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1) was observed, suggesting that TNFR-mediated apoptosis is the predominant pathway induced by pouterin in HeLa cells.

  14. Gram-positive bacteria are held at a distance in the colon mucus by the lectin-like protein ZG16

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Joakim H.; Katona, Gergely; Schütte, André; Ermund, Anna; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2016-01-01

    The distal colon functions as a bioreactor and harbors an enormous amount of bacteria in a mutualistic relationship with the host. The microbiota have to be kept at a safe distance to prevent inflammation, something that is achieved by a dense inner mucus layer that lines the epithelial cells. The large polymeric nets made up by the heavily O-glycosylated MUC2 mucin forms this physical barrier. Proteomic analyses of mucus have identified the lectin-like protein ZG16 (zymogen granulae protein 16) as an abundant mucus component. To elucidate the function of ZG16, we generated recombinant ZG16 and studied Zg16−/− mice. ZG16 bound to and aggregated Gram-positive bacteria via binding to the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. Zg16−/− mice have a distal colon mucus layer with normal thickness, but with bacteria closer to the epithelium. Using distal colon explants mounted in a horizontal perfusion chamber we demonstrated that treatment of bacteria with recombinant ZG16 hindered bacterial penetration into the mucus. The inner colon mucus of Zg16−/− animals had a higher load of Gram-positive bacteria and showed bacteria with higher motility in the mucus close to the host epithelium compared with cohoused littermate Zg16+/+. The more penetrable Zg16−/− mucus allowed Gram-positive bacteria to translocate to systemic tissues. Viable bacteria were found in spleen and were associated with increased abdominal fat pad mass in Zg16−/− animals. The function of ZG16 reveals a mechanism for keeping bacteria further away from the host colon epithelium. PMID:27849619

  15. Chapter 4 Role of Antioxidants and Antifreeze Proteins in Cryopreservation/Vitrification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seul Ki; Youm, Hye Won; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Suh, Chang Suk

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, supplementation of antioxidants and antifreeze proteins during cryopreservation/vitrification has significantly improved the survival and function of oocytes and ovarian tissues (OT) in animal models. In this chapter, the experimental protocols for the use of antioxidants and antifreeze proteins in cryopreservation/vitrification are described.

  16. Thermolabile antifreeze protein produced in Escherichia coli for structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Hsu; Sun, Tianjun; Fletcher, Garth L; Davies, Peter L

    2012-03-01

    The only hyperactive antifreeze protein (AFP) found to date in fishes is an extreme variant of the 3-kDa, alpha-helical, alanine-rich type I AFP, which is referred to here as type Ih. Purification of the 33-kDa homodimeric AFP Ih from a natural source was hampered by its low levels in fish plasma; by the need to remove the more abundant smaller isoforms; and by its extreme thermolability. Moreover, ice affinity as a purification tool was spoiled by the tendency of fish IgM antibodies to bind to ice in the presence of AFPs. In order to produce enough protein for crystallography we expressed AFP Ih as a recombinant protein in the Arctic Express® strain of Escherichia coli at 12 °C, just below the thermal denaturation temperature of 16-18 °C. His-tags were not useful because they compromised the activity and yield of AFP Ih. But in the absence of fish antibodies we were able to recover 10-mg quantities of the antifreeze protein using two cycles of ice affinity purification followed by anion-exchange chromatography to remove contaminating chaperones. The purified recombinant AFP Ih yielded diffraction-quality crystals with an extremely asymmetrical unit cell. By transferring the genes of the chaperones into a methionine auxotroph we were able to grow this host at low temperatures and produce sufficient selenomethionine-labeled AFP Ih for crystallography.

  17. Utilizing avidity to improve antifreeze protein activity: a type III antifreeze protein trimer exhibits increased thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Özge; Holland, Nolan B

    2013-12-03

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice growth inhibitors that allow the survival of several species living at temperatures colder than the freezing point of their bodily fluids. AFP activity is commonly defined in terms of thermal hysteresis, which is the difference observed for the solution freezing and melting temperatures. Increasing the thermal hysteresis activity of these proteins, particularly at low concentrations, is of great interest because of their wide range of potential applications. In this study, we have designed and expressed one-, two-, and three-domain antifreeze proteins to improve thermal hysteresis activity through increased binding avidity. The three-domain type III AFP yielded significantly greater activity than the one- and two-domain proteins, reaching a thermal hysteresis of >1.6 °C at a concentration of <1 mM. To elucidate the basis of this increase, the data were fit to a multidomain protein adsorption model based on the classical Langmuir isotherm. Fits of the data to the modified isotherms yield values for the equilibrium binding constants for the adsorption of AFP to ice and indicate that protein surface coverage is proportional to thermal hysteresis activity.

  18. Structure and dynamics of a beta-helical antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Daley, Margaret E; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Jia, Zongchao; Davies, Peter L; Sykes, Brian D

    2002-04-30

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect many types of organisms from damage caused by freezing. They do this by binding to the ice surface, which causes inhibition of ice crystal growth. However, the molecular mechanism of ice binding leading to growth inhibition is not well understood. In this paper, we present the solution structure and backbone NMR relaxation data of the antifreeze protein from the yellow mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor (TmAFP) to study the dynamics in the context of structure. The full (15)N relaxation analysis was completed at two magnetic field strengths, 500 and 600 MHz, as well as at two temperatures, 30 and 5 degrees C, to measure the dynamic changes that occur in the protein backbone at different temperatures. TmAFP is a small, highly disulfide-bonded, right-handed parallel beta-helix consisting of seven tandemly repeated 12-amino acid loops. The backbone relaxation data displays a periodic pattern, which reflects both the 12-amino acid structural repeat and the highly anisotropic nature of the protein. Analysis of the (15)N relaxation parameters shows that TmAFP is a well-defined, rigid structure, and the extracted parameters show that there is similar restricted internal mobility throughout the protein backbone at both temperatures studied. We conclude that the hydrophobic, rigid binding site may reduce the entropic penalty for the binding of the protein to ice. The beta-helical fold of the protein provides this rigidity, as it does not appear to be a consequence of cooling toward a physiologically relevant temperature.

  19. Superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Yeliz; Graham, Laurie A.; Mok, Yee-Foong; Bar, Maya; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to stop ice crystal growth, they must irreversibly bind to the ice surface. Surface-adsorbed AFPs should also prevent ice from melting, but to date this has been demonstrated only in a qualitative manner. Here we present the first quantitative measurements of superheating of ice in AFP solutions. Superheated ice crystals were stable for hours above their equilibrium melting point, and the maximum superheating obtained was 0.44 °C. When melting commenced in this superheated regime, rapid melting of the crystals from a point on the surface was observed. This increase in melting temperature was more appreciable for hyperactive AFPs compared to the AFPs with moderate antifreeze activity. For each of the AFP solutions that exhibited superheating, the enhancement of the melting temperature was far smaller than the depression of the freezing temperature. The present findings clearly show that AFPs adsorb to ice surfaces as part of their mechanism of action, and this absorption leads to protection of ice against melting as well as freezing. PMID:20215465

  20. Superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Celik, Yeliz; Graham, Laurie A; Mok, Yee-Foong; Bar, Maya; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2010-03-23

    It has been argued that for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to stop ice crystal growth, they must irreversibly bind to the ice surface. Surface-adsorbed AFPs should also prevent ice from melting, but to date this has been demonstrated only in a qualitative manner. Here we present the first quantitative measurements of superheating of ice in AFP solutions. Superheated ice crystals were stable for hours above their equilibrium melting point, and the maximum superheating obtained was 0.44 degrees C. When melting commenced in this superheated regime, rapid melting of the crystals from a point on the surface was observed. This increase in melting temperature was more appreciable for hyperactive AFPs compared to the AFPs with moderate antifreeze activity. For each of the AFP solutions that exhibited superheating, the enhancement of the melting temperature was far smaller than the depression of the freezing temperature. The present findings clearly show that AFPs adsorb to ice surfaces as part of their mechanism of action, and this absorption leads to protection of ice against melting as well as freezing.

  1. The role of sulfates on antifreeze protein activity.

    PubMed

    Meister, Konrad; Duman, John G; Xu, Yao; DeVries, Arthur L; Leitner, David M; Havenith, Martina

    2014-07-17

    In the present study, we have investigated the effect of sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) buffer on the antifreeze activity of DAFP-1, the primary AFP in the hemolymph of the beetle Dendroides canadensis. In contrast to previous studies, we found evidence that sodium sulfate does not suppress antifreeze activity of DAFP-1. Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) studies were combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the change in collective hydrogen bond dynamics in the vicinity of the AFP upon addition of sodium sulfate. The MD simulations revealed that the gradient of H-bond dynamics toward the ice-binding site is even more pronounced when adding sodium sulfate: The cosolute dramatically slows the hydrogen bond dynamics on the ice-binding plane of DAFP-1, whereas it has a more modest effect in the vicinity of other parts of the protein. These theoretical predictions are in agreement with the experimentally observed increase in THz absorption for solvated DAFP-1 upon addition of sodium sulfate. These studies support our previously postulated mechanism for AF activity, with a preferred ice binding by threonine on nanoice crystals which is supported by a long-range effect on hydrogen bond dynamics.

  2. Biophysical and biochemical aspects of antifreeze proteins: Using computational tools to extract atomistic information.

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-11-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are the key biomolecules that protect species from extreme climatic conditions. Studies of AFPs, which are based on recognition of ice plane and structural motifs, have provided vital information that point towards the mechanism responsible for executing antifreeze activity. Importantly, the use of experimental techniques has revealed key information for AFPs, but the exact microscopic details are still not well understood, which limits the application and design of novel antifreeze agents. The present review focuses on the importance of computational tools for investigating (i) molecular properties, (ii) structure-function relationships, and (iii) AFP-ice interactions at atomistic levels. In this context, important details pertaining to the methodological approaches used in molecular dynamics studies of AFPs are also discussed. It is hoped that the information presented herein is helpful for enriching our knowledge of antifreeze properties, which can potentially pave the way for the successful design of novel antifreeze biomolecular agents.

  3. Using support vector machine and evolutionary profiles to predict antifreeze protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Yin, Minghao

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice-binding proteins. Accurate identification of new AFPs is important in understanding ice-protein interactions and creating novel ice-binding domains in other proteins. In this paper, an accurate method, called AFP_PSSM, has been developed for predicting antifreeze proteins using a support vector machine (SVM) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profiles. This is the first study in which evolutionary information in the form of PSSM profiles has been successfully used for predicting antifreeze proteins. Tested by 10-fold cross validation and independent test, the accuracy of the proposed method reaches 82.67% for the training dataset and 93.01% for the testing dataset, respectively. These results indicate that our predictor is a useful tool for predicting antifreeze proteins. A web server (AFP_PSSM) that implements the proposed predictor is freely available.

  4. Interfacial Adsorption of Antifreeze Proteins: A Neutron Reflection Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Perumal, Shiamalee; Zhao, Xiubo; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Zongchao; Lu, Jian R.

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial adsorption from two antifreeze proteins (AFP) from ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus, type III AFP, AFP III, or maAFP) and spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, isoform 501, or cfAFP) were studied by neutron reflection. Hydrophilic silicon oxide was used as model substrate to facilitate the solid/liquid interfacial measurement so that the structural features from AFP adsorption can be examined. All adsorbed layers from AFP III could be modeled into uniform layer distribution assuming that the protein molecules were adsorbed with their ice-binding surface in direct contact with the SiO2 substrate. The layer thickness of 32 Å was consistent with the height of the molecule in its crystalline form. With the concentration decreasing from 2 mg/ml to 0.01 mg/ml, the volume fraction of the protein packed in the monolayer decreased steadily from 0.4 to 0.1, consistent with the concentration-dependent inhibition of ice growth observed over the range. In comparison, insect cfAFP showed stronger adsorption over the same concentration range. Below 0.1 mg/ml, uniform layers were formed. But above 1 mg/ml, the adsorbed layers were characterized by a dense middle layer and two outer diffuse layers, with a total thickness around 100 Å. The structural transition indicated the responsive changes of conformational orientation to increasing surface packing density. As the higher interfacial adsorption of cfAFP was strongly correlated with the greater thermal hysteresis of spruce budworm, our results indicated the important relation between protein adsorption and antifreeze activity. PMID:18234809

  5. Effects of polyhydroxy compounds on beetle antifreeze protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Amornwittawat, Natapol; Wang, Sen; Banatlao, Joseph; Chung, Melody; Velasco, Efrain; Duman, John G.; Wen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) noncolligatively depress the nonequilibrium freezing point of a solution and produce a difference between the melting and freezing points termed thermal hysteresis (TH). Some low-molecular-mass solutes can affect the TH values. The TH enhancement effects of selected polyhydroxy compounds including polyols and carbohydrates on an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis were systematically investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The number of hydroxyl groups dominates the molar enhancement effectiveness of polyhydroxy compounds having one to five hydroxyl groups. However, the above rule does not apply for polyhydroxy compounds having more than five hydroxyl groups. The most efficient polyhydroxy enhancer identified is trehalose. In a combination of enhancers the strongest enhancer plays the major role in determining the TH enhancement. Mechanistic insights into identification of highly efficient AFP enhancers are discussed. PMID:19038370

  6. Towards a Green Hydrate Inhibitor: Imaging Antifreeze Proteins on Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    Gordienko, Raimond; Ohno, Hiroshi; Singh, Vinay K.; Jia, Zongchao; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possess the ability to modify structure II (sII) tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors. PMID:20161789

  7. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    PubMed

    Gordienko, Raimond; Ohno, Hiroshi; Singh, Vinay K; Jia, Zongchao; Ripmeester, John A; Walker, Virginia K

    2010-02-11

    The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possess the ability to modify structure II (sII) tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  8. Extraction and Isolation of Antifreeze Proteins from Winter Rye (Secale cereale L.) Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Hon, W. C.; Griffith, M.; Chong, P.; Yang, DSC.

    1994-01-01

    Apoplastic extracts of cold-acclimated winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer) leaves were previously shown to exhibit antifreeze activity. The objectives of the present study were to identify and characterize individual antifreeze proteins present in the apoplastic extracts. The highest protein concentrations and antifreeze activity were obtained when the leaf apoplast was extracted with ascorbic acid and either CaCl2 or MgSO4. Seven major polypeptides were purified from these extracts by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions. The five larger polypeptides, of 19, 26, 32, 34, and 36 kD, exhibited significant levels of antifreeze activity, whereas the 11- and 13-kD polypeptides showed only weak activity. Five of these polypeptides migrated with higher apparent molecular masses on SDS gels after treatment with 0.1 M dithiothreitol, which indicated the presence of intramolecular disulfide bonds. The apparent reduction of the disulfide bonds did not eliminate antifreeze activity in four of the polypeptides that contained intramolecular disulfide bonds and exhibited significant levels of antifreeze activity. The amino acid compositions of these polypeptides were similar in that they were all relatively enriched in the residues Asp/Asn, Glu/Gln, Ser, Thr, Gly, and Ala; they all lacked His, except for the 26-kD polypeptide, and they contained up to 5% Cys residues. These polypeptides were examined with antisera to other cystine-containing antifreeze proteins from fish and insects, and no common epitopes were detected. We conclude that cold-acclimated winter rye leaves produce multiple polypeptides with antifreeze activity that appear to be distinct from antifreezes produced by fish and insects. PMID:12232141

  9. Antifreeze Proteins Modify the Freezing Process In Planta12

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Marilyn; Lumb, Chelsey; Wiseman, Steven B.; Wisniewski, Michael; Johnson, Robert W.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.

    2005-01-01

    During cold acclimation, winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer) plants accumulate antifreeze proteins (AFPs) in the apoplast of leaves and crowns. The goal of this study was to determine whether these AFPs influence survival at subzero temperatures by modifying the freezing process or by acting as cryoprotectants. In order to inhibit the growth of ice, AFPs must be mobile so that they can bind to specific sites on the ice crystal lattice. Guttate obtained from cold-acclimated winter rye leaves exhibited antifreeze activity, indicating that the AFPs are free in solution. Infrared video thermography was used to observe freezing in winter rye leaves. In the absence of an ice nucleator, AFPs had no effect on the supercooling temperature of the leaves. However, in the presence of an ice nucleator, AFPs lowered the temperature at which the leaves froze by 0.3°C to 1.2°C. In vitro studies showed that apoplastic proteins extracted from cold-acclimated winter rye leaves inhibited the recrystallization of ice and also slowed the rate of migration of ice through solution-saturated filter paper. When we examined the possible role of winter rye AFPs in cryoprotection, we found that lactate dehydrogenase activity was higher after freezing in the presence of AFPs compared with buffer, but the same effect was obtained by adding bovine serum albumin. AFPs had no effect on unstacked thylakoid volume after freezing, but did inhibit stacking of the thylakoids, thus indicating a loss of thylakoid function. We conclude that rye AFPs have no specific cryoprotective activity; rather, they interact directly with ice in planta and reduce freezing injury by slowing the growth and recrystallization of ice. PMID:15805474

  10. Demonstration of antifreeze protein activity in Antarctic lake bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Hill, Philip J; Dodd, Christine E R; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna

    2004-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse group of proteins that have the ability to modify ice crystal structure and inhibit recrystallization of ice. AFPs are well characterized in fish and insects, but very few bacterial species have been shown to have AFP activity to date. Thirty eight freshwater to hypersaline lakes in the Vestfold Hills and Larsemann Hills of Eastern Antarctica were sampled for AFPs during 2000. Eight hundred and sixty six bacterial isolates were cultivated. A novel AFP assay, designed for high-throughput analysis in Antarctica, demonstrated putative activity in 187 of the cultures. Subsequent analysis of the putative positive isolates showed 19 isolates with significant recrystallization inhibition (RI) activity. The 19 RI active isolates were characterized using ARDRA (amplified rDNA restriction analysis) and 16S rDNA sequencing. They belong to genera from the alpha- and gamma-Proteobacteria, with genera from the gamma-subdivision being predominant. The 19 AFP-active isolates were isolated from four physico-chemically diverse lakes. Ace Lake and Oval Lake were both meromictic with correspondingly characteristic chemically stratified water columns. Pendant Lake was a saline holomictic lake with different chemical properties to the two meromictic lakes. Triple Lake was a hypersaline lake rich in dissolved organic carbon and inorganic nutrients. The environments from which the AFP-active isolates were isolated are remarkably diverse. It will be of interest, therefore, to elucidate the evolutionary forces that have led to the acquisition of functional AFP activity in microbes of the Vestfold Hills lakes and to discover the role the antifreezes play in these organisms.

  11. A root bond between ice and antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Timothy C

    2016-10-01

    It has always been assumed that a three-dimensional protein structure is essential to antifreeze protein (AFP) ice interactions. Using a 9 kDa AFP isolated from the springtail, Gomphiocephalus hodgsoni, it was found that the bond between ice and protein is maintained independent of higher order protein structure. GomplyAFP9 remained bound to ice after denaturing by a range of agents (boiling, extreme pH, DTT, ethanol, urea). Thermal hysteresis was minimal (0.03-0.04 °C), but not lost. Crystal faceting and growth occurred normal to the c-axis, indicating the protein binds primarily to sites along the a-axis. These observations lend additional support to the hypothesis of irreversible binding. More significantly, they suggest that binding to ice and functional hysteresis may be achieved independently (i.e. are different operations). These results are consistent with the view that there is a root bond with ice and it is achieved via an amino acid derived interface that bonds to water molecules in aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antifreeze and ice nucleator proteins in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Duman, J G

    2001-01-01

    Terrestrial arthropods survive subzero temperatures by becoming either freeze tolerant (survive body fluid freezing) or freeze avoiding (prevent body fluid freezing). Protein ice nucleators (PINs), which limit supercooling and induce freezing, and antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which function to prevent freezing, can have roles in both freeze tolerance and avoidance. Many freeze-tolerant insects produce hemolymph PINs, which induce freezing at high subzero temperatures thereby inhibiting lethal intracellular freezing. Some freeze-tolerant species have AFPs that function as cryoprotectants to prevent freeze damage. Although the mechanism of this cryoprotection is not known, it may involve recrystallization inhibition and perhaps stabilization of the cell membrane. Freeze-avoiding species must prevent inoculative freezing initiated by external ice across the cuticle and extend supercooling abilities. Some insects remove PINs in the winter to promote supercooling, whereas others have selected against surfaces with ice-nucleating abilities on an evolutionary time scale. However, many freeze-avoiding species do have proteins with ice-nucleating activity, and these proteins must be masked in winter. In the beetle Dendroides canadensis, AFPs in the hemolymph and gut inhibit ice nucleators. Also, hemolymph AFPs and those associated with the layer of epidermal cells under the cuticle inhibit inoculative freezing. Two different insect AFPs have been characterized. One type from the beetles D. canadensis and Tenebrio molitor consists of 12- and 13-mer repeating units with disulfide bridges occurring at least every six residues. The spruce budworm AFP lacks regular repeat units. Both have much higher activities than any known AFPs.

  13. Solvation structure of ice-binding antifreeze proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wettlaufer, John

    2009-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can be found in organisms which survive at subzero temperatures. They were first discovered in polar fishes since the 1950's [1] and have been isolated meanwhile also from insects, plants, and bacteria. While AFPs shift the freezing point of water below the bulk melting point and hence can prevent recrystallization; the effect is non-colligative and there is a pronounced hysteresis between freezing and melting. For many AFPs it is generally accepted that they function through an irreversible binding to the ice-water interface which leads to a piecewise convex growth front with a lower nonequilibrium freezing point due to the Kelvin effect. Recent molecular dynamics simulations of the AFP from Choristoneura fumiferana reveal that the solvation structures of water at ice-binding and non-ice-binding faces of the protein are crucial for understanding how the AFP binds to the ice surface and how it is protected from being overgrown [2]. We use density functional theory of classical fluids in order to assess the microscopic solvent structure in the vicinity of protein faces with different surface properties. With our method, binding energies of different protein faces to the water-ice-interface can be computed efficiently in a simplified model. [1] Y. Yeh and R.E. Feeney, Chem. Rev. 96, 601 (1996). [2] D.R. Nutt and J.C. Smith, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 13066 (2008).

  14. Influence of antifreeze proteins on the ice/water interface.

    PubMed

    Todde, Guido; Hovmöller, Sven; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-02-26

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) are responsible for the survival of several species, ranging from bacteria to fish, that encounter subzero temperatures in their living environment. AFPs have been divided into two main families, moderately and hyperactive, depending on their thermal hysteresis activity. We have studied one protein from both families, the AFP from the snow flea (sfAFP) and from the winter flounder (wfAFP), which belong to the hyperactive and moderately active family, respectively. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, we have estimated the thickness of the water/ice interface for systems both with and without the AFPs attached onto the ice surface. The calculation of the diffusion profiles along the simulation box allowed us to measure the interface width for different ice planes. The obtained widths clearly show a different influence of the two AFPs on the ice/water interface. The different impact of the AFPs here studied on the interface thickness can be related to two AFPs properties: the protein hydrophobic surface and the number of hydrogen bonds that the two AFPs faces form with water molecules.

  15. [Immuno-cross-reactivity of different antifreeze proteins from Tenebrionidae insects].

    PubMed

    Li, Jieqiong; Hou, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yan; Liu, Xiaoning; Ma, Ji

    2013-09-01

    To prepare the antiserum against antifreeze protein, MpAFP698, from the beetle Microdera punctipennis (M. punctipennis) and determine immunological homology of different antifreeze proteins from different insects in Tenebrionidae. Two New Zealand white rabbits were immunized by DNA prime-protein boost strategy. Firstly, recombinant plasmid pcDNA3-Mpafp698 was used as DNA vaccine to inoculate two rabbits respectively for two times. Then twice boost immunization was performed using recombinant protein His-MpAFP698. ELISA and Western blotting were respectively conducted to determine the titer of MpAFP698 antibody and to detect the specificity of the antibody as well as the immunological cross-reaction of different insect antifreeze proteins with MpAFP698 antibody. The titer of the rabbit antiserum reached 1:400 000. Western blotting showed the specific binding of the antiserum to His-MpAFP698 protein and GST-MpAFP698 protein respectively. The rabbit antiserum also presented specific binding to antifreeze protein MpAFP149 and MpAFPS77 from M.punctipennis, as well as Apafp914 and OcAFP4 from different species. Antifreeze proteins from different beetles in desert region have the same epitope and thus have immunological cross-reaction.

  16. Long-range protein-water dynamics in hyperactive insect antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Meister, Konrad; Ebbinghaus, Simon; Xu, Yao; Duman, John G; DeVries, Arthur; Gruebele, Martin; Leitner, David M; Havenith, Martina

    2013-01-29

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are specific proteins that are able to lower the freezing point of aqueous solutions relative to the melting point. Hyperactive AFPs, identified in insects, have an especially high ability to depress the freezing point by far exceeding the abilities of other AFPs. In previous studies, we postulated that the activity of AFPs can be attributed to two distinct molecular mechanisms: (i) short-range direct interaction of the protein surface with the growing ice face and (ii) long-range interaction by protein-induced water dynamics extending up to 20 Å from the protein surface. In the present paper, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and molecular simulations to prove that long-range protein-water interactions make essential contributions to the high antifreeze activity of insect AFPs from the beetle Dendroides canadensis. We also support our hypothesis by studying the effect of the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate.

  17. Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth.

    PubMed

    Kutschan, B; Morawetz, K; Thoms, S

    2014-08-01

    The fascinating ability of algae, insects, and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). These are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water-ice interface thus preventing complete solidification. We propose a dynamical mechanism on how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau-type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free-energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with a low AFP concentration and one for liquid water with a high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures resulting from phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observed a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected to a locking of grain size by the action of AFP, which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules is inhibited and the further growth of ice grains stopped. The interfacial energy between ice and water is lowered allowing the AFPs to form smaller critical ice nuclei. Similar to a hysteresis in magnetic materials we observe a thermodynamic hysteresis leading to a nonlinear density dependence of the freezing point depression in agreement with the experiments.

  18. Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschan, B.; Morawetz, K.; Thoms, S.

    2014-08-01

    The fascinating ability of algae, insects, and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). These are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water-ice interface thus preventing complete solidification. We propose a dynamical mechanism on how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau-type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free-energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with a low AFP concentration and one for liquid water with a high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures resulting from phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observed a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected to a locking of grain size by the action of AFP, which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules is inhibited and the further growth of ice grains stopped. The interfacial energy between ice and water is lowered allowing the AFPs to form smaller critical ice nuclei. Similar to a hysteresis in magnetic materials we observe a thermodynamic hysteresis leading to a nonlinear density dependence of the freezing point depression in agreement with the experiments.

  19. Transcription of antifreeze protein genes in Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Qin, W; Doucet, D; Tyshenko, M G; Walker, V K

    2007-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are encoded by approximately 17 genes in the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana. Northern analysis using 6 different cDNA probes showed isoform-specific patterns that varied during development. Transcripts for the majority of isoforms were most abundant in the second instar overwintering stage, but some were also detected in first instar and even in egg stages. In situ hybridization using riboprobes corresponding to two 9 kDa protein isoforms showed differential AFP expression even in second instars; CfAFP10 RNA was detected in all tissues, but CfAFP337 RNA distribution was more limited. Two genomic regions encoding three AFP genes have been isolated. Presumptive regulatory regions conferred transcriptional activity when placed upstream of a luciferase reporter sequence and transfected into a C. fumiferana cell line. The CfAFP2.26 core promoter is an 87 bp sequence containing a TATA box, whereas the CfAFP2.7 core promoter is a 76 bp sequence with both a TATA box and CAAT box, which directed higher reporter activities when tested in vitro. Reporter activity was not enhanced with five different hormones, although lower activities were observed with all intron-containing constructs. AFP message half-life, as assessed using reporter assays, was not appreciably influenced by isoform-specific-3'UTRs. These studies successfully demonstrate the temporal and spatial diversity of AFP expression encoded by this small gene family, and underscore the complexity of their regulation.

  20. Ice-binding mechanism of winter flounder antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, A; Merz, K M

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the winter flounder antifreeze protein (AFP) and two of its mutants using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The simulations were performed under four conditions: in the gas phase, solvated by water, adsorbed on the ice (2021) crystal plane in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. This study provided details of the ice-binding pattern of the winter flounder AFP. Simulation results indicated that the Asp, Asn, and Thr residues in the AFP are important in ice binding and that Asn and Thr as a group bind cooperatively to the ice surface. These ice-binding residues can be collected into four distinct ice-binding regions: Asp-1/Thr-2/Asp-5, Thr-13/Asn-16, Thr-24/Asn-27, and Thr-35/Arg-37. These four regions are 11 residues apart and the repeat distance between them matches the ice lattice constant along the (1102) direction. This match is crucial to ensure that all four groups can interact with the ice surface simultaneously, thereby, enhancing ice binding. These Asx (x = p or n)/Thr regions each form 5-6 hydrogen bonds with the ice surface: Asn forms about three hydrogen bonds with ice molecules located in the step region while Thr forms one to two hydrogen bonds with the ice molecules in the ridge of the (2021) crystal plane. Both the distance between Thr and Asn and the ordering of the two residues are crucial for effective ice binding. The proper sequence is necessary to generate a binding surface that is compatible with the ice surface topology, thus providing a perfect "host/guest" interaction that simultaneously satisfies both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. The results also show the relation among binding energy, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the activity. The activity is correlated to the binding energy, and in the case of the mutants we have studied the number of hydrogen bonds. The greater the number of the hydrogen bonds the greater the antifreeze activity. The roles van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic

  1. Using Antifreeze Proteins to understand ice microstructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa; Weikusat, Christian; Kondo, Hidemasa; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2017-04-01

    Polar ice sheets are considered a unique climate archive. The chemical analysis of its impurities and the development of its microstructure with depth give insight in past climate conditions as well as in the development of the ice sheet with time and deformation. Microstructural patterns like small grain size observed in specific depths are thought to be linked to the retarding effect of impurities on ice grain growth. Clear evidence of size or chemical composition of the impurities causing this effect is missing, but in this context a major role of nanoparticles has been suggested. In order to shed light on different mechanisms by which nanoparticles can control microstructure development we used antifreeze proteins (AFPs) as proxies for particles in ice. These proteins are small nanoparticles, approx. 5 nm in size, with the special characteristics of firmly binding to ice through several hydrogen bonds. We used AFPs from the sea-ice microalgae Fragilariopsis cylindrus (fcAFPs) in bubble-free, small-grained polycrystalline ice obtained by the phase-transition size refinement method. We explain how fcAFP bind to ice by presenting the 3-D-protein structure model inferred by X-ray structure analysis, and show the importance of the chemical interaction between particles and ice in controlling normal grain growth, comparing fcAFPs to other protein nanoparticles. We used modifications of fcAFPs for particle localization through fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, the effect of fcAFPs on the driving factors for ice deformation during creep, i.e. on internal dislocations due to incorporation within the lattice and on the mobility of grain boundaries due to pinning, makes these proteins particularly interesting in studying the process of ice deformation.

  2. Antifreeze proteins in winter rye are similar to pathogenesis-related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hon, W C; Griffith, M; Mlynarz, A; Kwok, Y C; Yang, D S

    1995-01-01

    The ability to control extracellular ice formation during freezing is critical to the survival of freezing-tolerant plants. Antifreeze proteins, which are proteins that have the ability to retard ice crystal growth, were recently identified as the most abundant apoplastic proteins in cold-acclimated winter rye (Secale cereale L.) leaves. In the experiments reported here, amino-terminal sequence comparisons, immuno-cross-reactions, and enzyme activity assays all indicated that these antifreeze proteins are similar to members of three classes of pathogenesis-related proteins, namely, endochitinases, endo-beta-1,3-glucanases, and thaumatin-like proteins. Apoplastic endochitinases and endo-beta-1,3-glucanases that were induced by pathogens in freezing-sensitive tobacco did not exhibit antifreeze activity. Our findings suggest that subtle structural differences may have evolved in the pathogenesis-related proteins that accumulate at cold temperatures in winter rye to confer upon these proteins the ability to bind to ice. PMID:8552719

  3. Anchored clathrate waters bind antifreeze proteins to ice.

    PubMed

    Garnham, Christopher P; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2011-05-03

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca(2+)-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFPice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the "anchored clathrate" mechanism of AFP action.

  4. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    SciTech Connect

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  5. Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein gene identification and regulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wensheng; Walker, Virginia K

    2006-02-15

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a freeze susceptible, stored product pest. Its winter survival is facilitated by the accumulation of antifreeze proteins (AFPs), encoded by a small gene family. We have now isolated 11 different AFP genomic clones from 3 genomic libraries. All the clones had a single coding sequence, with no evidence of intervening sequences. Three genomic clones were further characterized. All have putative TATA box sequences upstream of the coding regions and multiple potential poly(A) signal sequences downstream of the coding regions. A TmAFP regulatory region, B1037, conferred transcriptional activity when ligated to a luciferase reporter sequence and after transfection into an insect cell line. A 143 bp core promoter including a TATA box sequence was identified. Its promoter activity was increased 4.4 times by inserting an exotic 245 bp intron into the construct, similar to the enhancement of transgenic expression seen in several other systems. The addition of a duplication of the first 120 bp sequence from the 143 bp core promoter decreased promoter activity by half. Although putative hormonal response sequences were identified, none of the five hormones tested enhanced reporter activity. These studies on the mechanisms of AFP transcriptional control are important for the consideration of any transfer of freeze-resistance phenotypes to beneficial hosts.

  6. Ice-binding structure and mechanism of an antifreeze protein from winter flounder.

    PubMed

    Sicheri, F; Yang, D S

    1995-06-01

    Antifreeze proteins provide fish with protection against the freezing effect of polar environments by binding to ice surfaces and inhibiting growth of ice crystals. We present the X-ray crystal structure at 1.5 A resolution of a lone alpha-helical antifreeze protein from winter flounder, which provides a detailed look at its ice-binding features. These consist of four repeated ice-binding motifs, the side chains of which are inherently rigid or restrained by pair-wise side-chain interactions to form a flat binding surface. Elaborate amino- and carboxy-terminal cap structures are also present, which explain the protein's rich alpha-helical content in solution. We propose an ice-binding model that accounts for the binding specificity of the antifreeze protein along the <0112> axes of the (2021) ice planes.

  7. Cloning and expression of Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chang-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2009-03-01

    A novel antifreeze protein cDNA was cloned by RT-PCR from the larva of the yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor. The coding fragment of 339 bp encodes a protein of 112 amino acid residues and was fused to the expression vectors pET32a and pTWIN1. The resulted expression plasmids were transformed into Escherischia coli strains BL21 (DE3), ER2566, and Origami B (DE3), respectively. Several strategies were used for expression of the highly disulfide-bonded beta-helix-contained protein with the activity of antifreeze in different expression systems. A protocol for production of refolded and active T. molitor antifreeze protein in bacteria was obtained.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a novel antifreeze protein from carrot (Daucus carota).

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, M; Worrall, D; Byass, L; Elias, L; Ashford, D; Doucet, C J; Holt, C; Telford, J; Lillford, P; Bowles, D J

    1999-01-01

    A modified assay for inhibition of ice recrystallization which allows unequivocal identification of activity in plant extracts is described. Using this assay a novel, cold-induced, 36 kDa antifreeze protein has been isolated from the tap root of cold-acclimated carrot (Daucus carota) plants. This protein inhibits the recrystallization of ice and exhibits thermal-hysteresis activity. The polypeptide behaves as monomer in solution and is N-glycosylated. The corresponding gene is unique in the carrot genome and induced by cold. The antifreeze protein appears to be localized within the apoplast. PMID:10333479

  9. Stable, high-level expression of a type I antifreeze protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R G; Appels, R

    1999-06-01

    The type I antifreeze proteins are simple amphipathic helical proteins found in abundance in polar fish species, where they act to prevent freezing of internal fluids by a mechanism of noncolligative freezing point depression. Large-scale production of these proteins for research and biotechnological purposes has been hampered by their apparent instability when expressed in heterologous host systems. This has necessitated their production as fusion proteins, in polymeric form, or as proproteins for secretion, with the concomitant necessity for postpurification processing to generate the mature form of the protein. We have successfully expressed a recombinant variant of type I antifreeze protein (rAFP) in Escherichia coli using the inducible T7 polymerase transcription expression system. The rAFP contains five copies of the 11 amino acid ice-binding repeat motif found in all type I antifreeze proteins. The protein accumulates to high levels intracellularly in the form of inclusion bodies, with no apparent degradation by the cellular proteolytic machinery. We have devised a simple and rapid purification protocol for this recombinant type I antifreeze protein which does not require cellular fractionation, purification of the inclusion bodies, or chromatographic steps. This protocol may be of general use for this class of protein. The protein displays all three activities common to these proteins: recrystallization inhibition, noncolligative freezing point depression, and modification of the morphology of single ice crystals in solution.

  10. Blocking rapid ice crystal growth through nonbasal plane adsorption of antifreeze proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Meister, Konrad; DeVries, Arthur L.; Duman, John G.; Guo, Shuaiqi; Bakker, Huib J.; Voets, Ilja K.

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that bind to growing ice crystal surfaces and arrest further ice growth. AFPs have gained a large interest for their use in antifreeze formulations for water-based materials, such as foods, waterborne paints, and organ transplants. Instead of commonly used colligative antifreezes such as salts and alcohols, the advantage of using AFPs as an additive is that they do not alter the physicochemical properties of the water-based material. Here, we report the first comprehensive evaluation of thermal hysteresis (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity of all major classes of AFPs using cryoscopy, sonocrystallization, and recrystallization assays. The results show that TH activities determined by cryoscopy and sonocrystallization differ markedly, and that TH and IRI activities are not correlated. The absence of a distinct correlation in antifreeze activity points to a mechanistic difference in ice growth inhibition by the different classes of AFPs: blocking fast ice growth requires rapid nonbasal plane adsorption, whereas basal plane adsorption is only relevant at long annealing times and at small undercooling. These findings clearly demonstrate that biomimetic analogs of antifreeze (glyco)proteins should be tailored to the specific requirements of the targeted application. PMID:26936953

  11. Blocking rapid ice crystal growth through nonbasal plane adsorption of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Olijve, Luuk L C; Meister, Konrad; DeVries, Arthur L; Duman, John G; Guo, Shuaiqi; Bakker, Huib J; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-04-05

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that bind to growing ice crystal surfaces and arrest further ice growth. AFPs have gained a large interest for their use in antifreeze formulations for water-based materials, such as foods, waterborne paints, and organ transplants. Instead of commonly used colligative antifreezes such as salts and alcohols, the advantage of using AFPs as an additive is that they do not alter the physicochemical properties of the water-based material. Here, we report the first comprehensive evaluation of thermal hysteresis (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity of all major classes of AFPs using cryoscopy, sonocrystallization, and recrystallization assays. The results show that TH activities determined by cryoscopy and sonocrystallization differ markedly, and that TH and IRI activities are not correlated. The absence of a distinct correlation in antifreeze activity points to a mechanistic difference in ice growth inhibition by the different classes of AFPs: blocking fast ice growth requires rapid nonbasal plane adsorption, whereas basal plane adsorption is only relevant at long annealing times and at small undercooling. These findings clearly demonstrate that biomimetic analogs of antifreeze (glyco)proteins should be tailored to the specific requirements of the targeted application.

  12. Unusual structural properties of water within the hydration shell of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuffel, Anna; Czapiewski, Dariusz; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Many hypotheses can be encountered explaining the mechanism of action of antifreeze proteins. One widespread theory postulates that the similarity of structural properties of solvation water of antifreeze proteins to ice is crucial to the antifreeze activity of these agents. In order to investigate this problem, the structural properties of solvation water of the hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana were analyzed and compared with the properties of solvation water present at the surface of ice. The most striking observations concerned the temperature dependence of changes in water structure. In the case of solvation water of the ice-binding plane, the difference between the overall structural ordering of solvation water and bulk water diminished with increasing temperature; in the case of solvation water of the rest of the protein, the trend was opposite. In this respect, the solvation water of the ice-binding plane roughly resembled the hydration layer of ice. Simultaneously, the whole solvation shell of the protein displayed some features that are typical for solvation shells of many other proteins and are not encountered in the solvation water of ice. In the first place, this is an increase in density of water around the protein. The opposite is true for the solvation water of ice - it is less dense than bulk water. Therefore, even though the structure of solvation water of ice-binding plane and the structure of solvation water of ice seem to share some similarities, densitywise they differ.

  13. Immunolocalization of Antifreeze Proteins in Winter Rye Leaves, Crowns, and Roots by Tissue Printing.

    PubMed Central

    Antikainen, M.; Griffith, M.; Zhang, J.; Hon, W. C.; Yang, DSC.; Pihakaski-Maunsbach, K.

    1996-01-01

    During cold acclimation, antifreeze proteins (AFPs) that are similar to pathogenesis-related proteins accumulate in the apoplast of winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer) leaves. AFPs have the ability to modify the growth of ice. To elucidate the role of AFPs in the freezing process, they were assayed and immunolocalized in winter rye leaves, crowns, and roots. Each of the total soluble protein extracts from cold-acclimated rye leaves, crowns, and roots exhibited antifreeze activity, whereas no antifreeze activity was observed in extracts from nonacclimated rye plants. Antibodies raised against three apoplastic rye AFPs, corresponding to a glucanase-like protein (GLP, 32 kD), a chitinase-like protein (CLP, 35 kD), and a thaumatin-like protein (TLP, 25 kD), were used in tissue printing to show that the AFPs are localized in the epidermis and in cells surrounding intercellular spaces in cold-acclimated plants. Although GLPs, CLPs, and TLPs were present in nonacclimated plants, they were found in different locations and did not exhibit antifreeze activity, which suggests that different isoforms of pathogenesis-related proteins are produced at low temperature. The location of rye AFPs may prevent secondary nucleation of cells by epiphytic ice or by ice propagating through the xylem. The distributions of pathogenesis-induced and cold-accumulated GLPs, CLPs, and TLPs are similar and may reflect the common pathways by which both pathogens and ice enter and propagate through plant tissues. PMID:12226223

  14. An Antifreeze Protein Folds with an Interior Network of More Than 400 Semi-Clathrate Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T.; Lin, F. -H.; Campbell, R. L.; Allingham, J. S.; Davies, P. L.

    2014-02-13

    When polypeptide chains fold into a protein, hydrophobic groups are compacted in the center with exclusion of water. We report the crystal structure of an alanine-rich antifreeze protein that retains ~400 waters in its core. The putative ice-binding residues of this dimeric, four-helix bundle protein point inwards and coordinate the interior waters into two intersecting polypentagonal networks. The bundle makes minimal protein contacts between helices, but is stabilized by anchoring to the semi-clathrate water monolayers through backbone carbonyl groups in the protein interior. The ordered waters extend outwards to the protein surface and likely are involved in ice binding. This protein fold supports both the anchored-clathrate water mechanism of antifreeze protein adsorption to ice and the water-expulsion mechanism of protein folding.

  15. Purification, cDNA cloning and recombinant protein expression of a phloem lectin-like anti-insect defense protein BPLP from the phloem exudate of the wax gourd, Benincasa hispida.

    PubMed

    Ota, Eiji; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Hirayama, Chikara; Konno, Kotaro

    2013-05-01

    Latex and other exudates in plants contain various proteins that are thought to play important defensive roles against herbivorous insects and pathogens. Herein, the defensive effects of phloem exudates against the Eri silkworm, Samia ricini (Saturniidae, Lepidoptera) in several cucurbitaceous plants were investigated. It was found that phloem exudates are responsible for the defensive activities of cucurbitaceous plants, such as the wax gourd Benincasa hispida and Cucumis melo, especially in B. hispida, whose leaves showed the strongest growth-inhibitory activity of all the cucurbitaceous plants tested. A 35 kDa proteinaceous growth-inhibitory factor against insects designated BPLP (B. hispida Phloem Lectin-like Protein) was next isolated and purified from the B. hispida exudate, using anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. A very low concentration (70 μg/g) of BPLP significantly inhibited growth of S. ricini larvae. The full-length cDNA (1076 bp) encoding BPLP was cloned and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of BPLP had 51% identity with a cucurbitaceous phloem lectin (phloem protein 2, PP2), and showed binding specificity to oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine. Some features of BPLP indicated that it does not have a cysteine residue and it is composed of two repeats of similar sequences, suggesting that BPLP is distinct from PP2. Recombinant BPLP, obtained by expressing the cDNA in Escherichia coli, showed both chitin-binding lectin activity and growth-inhibitory activity against S. ricini larvae. The present study thus provides experimental evidence that phloem exudates of Cucurbitaceae plants, analogous to plant latex, play defensive roles against insect herbivores, especially against chewing insects, and contain defensive substances toxic to them.

  16. Modeling studies of binding of sea raven type II antifreeze protein to ice.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, A; Madura, J D; Salmon, C; Sönnichsen, F

    1997-01-01

    Certain plants, insects, and fish living in cold environments prevent tissue damage due to freezing by producing antifreeze proteins or antifreeze glycoproteins that inhibit ice growth below the normal equilibrium freezing point of water in a noncolligative fashion. In polar fish these macromolecules, taking into account their structural characteristics, are grouped into three broad classes, namely Type I, Type II, and Type III. In this paper we report the results of our studies on the stereospecific binding of sea raven, a Type II antifreeze protein (AFP) to (111) hexagonal bipyramidal faces of ice. Earlier studies of Type I and Type III AFPs have shown that stereospecific binding of these proteins, recognizing specific planes of ice, is essential for their noncolligative antifreeze point depression. Moreover, as it has been shown for the AFT of Type I, this binding also occurs along specific vectors on these planes and also is enantioselective, distinguishing between the mirror related directions. In this study we will show, by using molecular modeling, that the fold of Type II AFP could facilitate a stereospecific mode of interaction with (111) planes of ice. Similar to Type I AFP, preferential directionality of binding was also observed in the simulations.

  17. A thaumatin-like protein from larvae of the beetle Dendroides canadensis enhances the activity of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Duman, John G

    2006-01-31

    The levels of thermal hysteresis (antifreeze activity) produced by purified antifreeze proteins (DAFPs) from the larvae of the beetle Dendroides canadensis at endogenous concentrations are lower than what are present in the hemolymph of overwintering larvae. Thermal hysteresis activity of DAFPs is dependent not only on AFP concentration but also on the presence of enhancers that may be either proteins (including other hemolymph DAFPs) or low-molecular mass enhancers such as glycerol. The purpose of this study was to identify endogenous protein enhancers using yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation, and finally the enhancement of antifreeze activity. Here we show that a thaumatin-like protein from D. canadensis, until recently known only from plants, significantly enhances the thermal hysteresis of DAFP-1 and -2. Glycerol can further this enhancement, presumably by promoting the interaction of the DAFPs and thaumatin-like protein.

  18. Cloning and expression of a novel antifreeze protein AFP72 from the beetle Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing-Hua; Yang, Li; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Hui-Rong; Shao, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel antifreeze protein AFP72 cDNA (GenBbank accession No. AY929389) was obtained by RT-PCR from Tenebrio molitor. The 216 bp fragment encodes a protein of 72 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis revealed that the cDNA displays a high degree of homology with T. molitor antifreeze proteins, ranging up to 90.78%. Recombinant plasmids pMAL-p2X-afp72 and pMAL-c2X-afp72 were transferred into E. coil TBI to induce a MBP fusion protein by IPTG. The target fusion protein was released from the periplasm and cytoplasm by the cold osmotic shock procedure and sonication respectively. The content of the fusion protein came up to 38.9 and 41.5% of the total dissolved protein, respectively. The fusion protein was purified through an amylose affinity column, and incised by factor Xa. Molecular sieve chromatography was used to achieve a high state of purity of the target protein. The purified target protein displayed a single band in SDS-PAGE. The fusion protein was shown to increase resistance to low temperatures in bacteria. This finding could help in further investigations of the properties and function of antifreeze proteins.

  19. Calcium interacts with antifreeze proteins and chitinase from cold-acclimated winter rye.

    PubMed

    Stressmann, Maja; Kitao, Satoshi; Griffith, Marilyn; Moresoli, Christine; Bravo, León A; Marangoni, Alejandro G

    2004-05-01

    During cold acclimation, winter rye (Secale cereale) plants accumulate pathogenesis-related proteins that are also antifreeze proteins (AFPs) because they adsorb onto ice and inhibit its growth. Although they promote winter survival in planta, these dual-function AFPs proteins lose activity when stored at subzero temperatures in vitro, so we examined their stability in solutions containing CaCl2, MgCl2, or NaCl. Antifreeze activity was unaffected by salts before freezing, but decreased after freezing and thawing in CaCl2 and was recovered by adding a chelator. Ca2+ enhanced chitinase activity 3- to 5-fold in unfrozen samples, although hydrolytic activity also decreased after freezing and thawing in CaCl2. Native PAGE, circular dichroism, and Trp fluorescence experiments showed that the AFPs partially unfold after freezing and thawing, but they fold more compactly or aggregate in CaCl2. Ruthenium red, which binds to Ca(2+)-binding sites, readily stained AFPs in the absence of Ca2+, but less stain was visible after freezing and thawing AFPs in CaCl2. We conclude that the structure of AFPs changes during freezing and thawing, creating new Ca(2+)-binding sites. Once Ca2+ binds to those sites, antifreeze activity, chitinase activity and ruthenium red binding are all inhibited. Because free Ca2+ concentrations are typically low in the apoplast, antifreeze activity is probably stable to freezing and thawing in planta. Ca2+ may regulate chitinase activity if concentrations are increased locally by release from pectin or interaction with Ca(2+)-binding proteins. Furthermore, antifreeze activity can be easily maintained in vitro by including a chelator during frozen storage.

  20. Calcium Interacts with Antifreeze Proteins and Chitinase from Cold-Acclimated Winter Rye1

    PubMed Central

    Stressmann, Maja; Kitao, Satoshi; Griffith, Marilyn; Moresoli, Christine; Bravo, León A.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.

    2004-01-01

    During cold acclimation, winter rye (Secale cereale) plants accumulate pathogenesis-related proteins that are also antifreeze proteins (AFPs) because they adsorb onto ice and inhibit its growth. Although they promote winter survival in planta, these dual-function AFPs proteins lose activity when stored at subzero temperatures in vitro, so we examined their stability in solutions containing CaCl2, MgCl2, or NaCl. Antifreeze activity was unaffected by salts before freezing, but decreased after freezing and thawing in CaCl2 and was recovered by adding a chelator. Ca2+ enhanced chitinase activity 3- to 5-fold in unfrozen samples, although hydrolytic activity also decreased after freezing and thawing in CaCl2. Native PAGE, circular dichroism, and Trp fluorescence experiments showed that the AFPs partially unfold after freezing and thawing, but they fold more compactly or aggregate in CaCl2. Ruthenium red, which binds to Ca2+-binding sites, readily stained AFPs in the absence of Ca2+, but less stain was visible after freezing and thawing AFPs in CaCl2. We conclude that the structure of AFPs changes during freezing and thawing, creating new Ca2+-binding sites. Once Ca2+ binds to those sites, antifreeze activity, chitinase activity and ruthenium red binding are all inhibited. Because free Ca2+ concentrations are typically low in the apoplast, antifreeze activity is probably stable to freezing and thawing in planta. Ca2+ may regulate chitinase activity if concentrations are increased locally by release from pectin or interaction with Ca2+-binding proteins. Furthermore, antifreeze activity can be easily maintained in vitro by including a chelator during frozen storage. PMID:15122015

  1. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity.

  2. Long-range protein–water dynamics in hyperactive insect antifreeze proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Konrad; Ebbinghaus, Simon; Xu, Yao; Duman, John G.; DeVries, Arthur; Gruebele, Martin; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are specific proteins that are able to lower the freezing point of aqueous solutions relative to the melting point. Hyperactive AFPs, identified in insects, have an especially high ability to depress the freezing point by far exceeding the abilities of other AFPs. In previous studies, we postulated that the activity of AFPs can be attributed to two distinct molecular mechanisms: (i) short-range direct interaction of the protein surface with the growing ice face and (ii) long-range interaction by protein-induced water dynamics extending up to 20 Å from the protein surface. In the present paper, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and molecular simulations to prove that long-range protein–water interactions make essential contributions to the high antifreeze activity of insect AFPs from the beetle Dendroides canadensis. We also support our hypothesis by studying the effect of the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate. PMID:23277543

  3. Function of the hydration layer around an antifreeze protein revealed by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nutt, David; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the mechanism by which the antifreeze protein from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, binds to ice. Comparison of structural and dynamic properties of the water around the three faces of the triangular prism-shaped protein in aqueous solution reveals that at low temperature the water structure is ordered and the dynamics slowed down around the ice-binding face of the protein, with a disordering effect observed around the other two faces. These results suggest a dual role for the solvation water around the protein. The preconfigured solvation shell around the ice-binding face is involved in the initial recognition and binding of the antifreeze protein to ice by lowering the barrier for binding and consolidation of the protein:ice interaction surface. Thus, the antifreeze protein can bind to the molecularly rough ice surface by becoming actively involved in the formation of its own binding site. Also, the disruption of water structure around the rest of the protein helps prevent the adsorbed protein becoming covered by further ice growth.

  4. Applications of type I antifreeze proteins: studies with model membranes & cryoprotectant properties.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Steven R; Turner, Jennifer J; Harding, Margaret M

    2006-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), found in the body fluids of many species of polar fish allow them to survive in waters colder than the equilibrium freezing point of their blood and other internal fluids. Despite their structural diversity, all AF(G)Ps kinetically depress the temperature at which ice grows in a non-colligative manner and hence exhibit thermal hysteresis. AF(G)Ps also share the ability to interact with and protect mammalian cells and tissues from hypothermic damage (e.g., improved storage of human blood platelets at low temperatures), and are able to stabilize or disrupt membrane composition during low temperature and freezing stress (e.g., cryoprotectant properties in stabilization of sperm and oocytes). This review will summarize studies of AFPs with phospholipids and plant lipids, proposed mechanisms for inhibition of leakage from membranes, and cryoprotectant studies with biological samples. The major focus will be on the alpha-helical type I antifreeze proteins, and synthetic mutants, that have been most widely studied. For completeness, data on glycoproteins will also be presented. While a number of models to explain stabilization and destabilization of different lipid systems have been proposed, it is currently not possible to predict whether a particular AFP will stabilize or destabilize a given lipid system. Furthermore the relationship between the antifreeze property of thermal hysteresis and membrane stabilization is unknown. This lack of detailed knowledge about how AFPs function in the presence of different types of materials has hampered progress toward the development of antifreezes for cold storage of cells, tissues, and organs.

  5. HEAT INDUCIBLE EXPRESSION OF ANTIFREEZE PROTEIN GENES FROM THE BEETLES Tenebrio molitor AND Microdera punctipennis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieqiong; Ma, Wenjing; Ma, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) play important roles in protecting poikilothermic organisms from cold damage. The expression of AFP genes (afps) is induced by low temperature. However, it is reported that heat can influence the expression of afps in the desert beetle Microdera punctipennis. To further detect whether heat also induce the expression of afps in other insects, and to determine the expression profiling of insect afps at different temperatures. The expression of antifreeze protein genes in the two beetles, Microdera punctipennis and Tenebrio molitor that have quite different living environment, under different temperatures were studied by using real-time quantitative PCR. Mild low temperatures (5~15 degree C), high temperature (38~47 degree C for M. punctipennis, or 37~42 degree C for T. molitor) and temperature difference (10~30 degree C) all stimulated strongly to the expression of AFP genes (Mpafps) in M. punctipennis which lives in the wild filed in desert. The mRNA level of Mpafps after M. punctipennis were exposed to these temperatures for 1h~5h was at least 30-fold of the control at 25 degree C. For T. molitor which is breeding in door with wheat bran all these temperatures stimulated significantly to the expression of Tmafps, while the extent and degree of the temperature stimulation on Tmafps expression were much lower than on Mpafps. After T. molitor were exposed to 5 degree C and 15 degree C for 1h~5h, the mRNA level of Tmafps was over 6-fold and 45-fold of the control at 25 degree C. High temperature (37~42 degree C) for 1h~3h treatments increased Tmafps mRNA level 4.8-fold of the control. Temperature difference of 10 degree C was effective in stimulating Tmafps expression. The expression of insect antifreeze protein genes both in M. punctipennis and T. molitor was induced by heat, suggesting that this phenomenon may be common in insects; the extent and degree of the influence differ in species that have different living conditions. The heat

  6. Antifreeze Protein (AFP) and Antifreeze Glycoprotein (AFGP) Kinetics at the Ice/Solution Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda, Salvador; Nakaya, Hiroyuki; Uda, Yukihiro; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2007-03-01

    AFPs and AFGPs found in some fish, plants and insects are a necessary tool for surviving sub-freezing environments. They occur in a wide range of compositions and structure, but to some extent they all accomplish the same functions: they suppress the freezing temperature, inhibit recrystallization, and modify ice crystal growth. Here, we observe the exact location of AFGPs, Type I and Type III AFPs by 1-directional growth experiments using fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy as well as free growth experiments using 3-d confocal microscopy. In all cases, the proteins clearly adsorb at the interface. By comparing the fluorescent image with the corresponding phase contrast image we find that AFGPs incorporate only into the solid in veins and not into the ice lattice structure. Type I AFPs show similar behavior as AFGPs, but type III AFPs adsorb to specific planes within the ice lattice. We have also calculated the diffusion constants and the surface adsorption concentration from both types of experiments. Our results indicated that the different types of AFPs or AFGPs accomplish essentially the same function in slightly different ways and that it is not necessary for the protein adsorption to the ice interface to be as rigid as once thought.

  7. Ice Shaping Properties, Similar to That of Antifreeze Proteins, of a Zirconium Acetate Complex

    PubMed Central

    Deville, Sylvain; Viazzi, Céline; Leloup, Jérôme; Lasalle, Audrey; Guizard, Christian; Maire, Eric; Adrien, Jérôme; Gremillard, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The control of the growth morphologies of ice crystals is a critical issue in fields as diverse as biomineralization, medicine, biology, civil or food engineering. Such control can be achieved through the ice-shaping properties of specific compounds. The development of synthetic ice-shaping compounds is inspired by the natural occurrence of such properties exhibited by antifreeze proteins. We reveal how a particular zirconium acetate complex is exhibiting ice-shaping properties very similar to that of antifreeze proteins, albeit being a radically different compound. We use these properties as a bioinspired approach to template unique faceted pores in cellular materials. These results suggest that ice-structuring properties are not exclusive to long organic molecules and should broaden the field of investigations and applications of such substances. PMID:22028886

  8. Marine Antifreeze Proteins: Structure, Function, and Application to Cryopreservation as a Potential Cryoprotectant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Jun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Hur, Young Baek; Lee, Chang Woo; Park, Sun-Ha; Koo, Bon-Won

    2017-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are biological antifreezes with unique properties, including thermal hysteresis (TH), ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI), and interaction with membranes and/or membrane proteins. These properties have been utilized in the preservation of biological samples at low temperatures. Here, we review the structure and function of marine-derived AFPs, including moderately active fish AFPs and hyperactive polar AFPs. We also survey previous and current reports of cryopreservation using AFPs. Cryopreserved biological samples are relatively diverse ranging from diatoms and reproductive cells to embryos and organs. Cryopreserved biological samples mainly originate from mammals. Most cryopreservation trials using marine-derived AFPs have demonstrated that addition of AFPs can improve post-thaw viability regardless of freezing method (slow-freezing or vitrification), storage temperature, and types of biological sample type. PMID:28134801

  9. Ice shaping properties, similar to that of antifreeze proteins, of a zirconium acetate complex.

    PubMed

    Deville, Sylvain; Viazzi, Céline; Leloup, Jérôme; Lasalle, Audrey; Guizard, Christian; Maire, Eric; Adrien, Jérôme; Gremillard, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The control of the growth morphologies of ice crystals is a critical issue in fields as diverse as biomineralization, medicine, biology, civil or food engineering. Such control can be achieved through the ice-shaping properties of specific compounds. The development of synthetic ice-shaping compounds is inspired by the natural occurrence of such properties exhibited by antifreeze proteins. We reveal how a particular zirconium acetate complex is exhibiting ice-shaping properties very similar to that of antifreeze proteins, albeit being a radically different compound. We use these properties as a bioinspired approach to template unique faceted pores in cellular materials. These results suggest that ice-structuring properties are not exclusive to long organic molecules and should broaden the field of investigations and applications of such substances.

  10. Rapid amyloid fibril formation by a winter flounder antifreeze protein requires specific interaction with ice.

    PubMed

    Dubé, André; Leggiadro, Cindy; Ewart, Kathryn Vanya

    2016-05-01

    A typically α-helical antifreeze protein (wflAFP-6) from winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, forms amyloid fibrils during freezing. In this study, the effects of distinct components of the freezing process were examined. Freezing of wflAFP-6 in the presence of template ice was shown to be necessary for rapid conversion to an amyloid conformation. Neither subfreezing temperature nor phase change was sufficient. Thus, specific interaction with the ice surface was essential. The ice-induced formation of amyloid appeared to be unique to this helical antifreeze, it required high concentrations of protein and it occurred over a range of pH values. These results define a method for rapid formation of amyloid by wflAFP-6 on demand under physiological conditions. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Marine Antifreeze Proteins: Structure, Function, and Application to Cryopreservation as a Potential Cryoprotectant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Jun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Hur, Young Baek; Lee, Chang Woo; Park, Sun-Ha; Koo, Bon-Won

    2017-01-27

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are biological antifreezes with unique properties, including thermal hysteresis(TH),ice recrystallization inhibition(IRI),and interaction with membranes and/or membrane proteins. These properties have been utilized in the preservation of biological samples at low temperatures. Here, we review the structure and function of marine-derived AFPs, including moderately active fish AFPs and hyperactive polar AFPs. We also survey previous and current reports of cryopreservation using AFPs. Cryopreserved biological samples are relatively diverse ranging from diatoms and reproductive cells to embryos and organs. Cryopreserved biological samples mainly originate from mammals. Most cryopreservation trials using marine-derived AFPs have demonstrated that addition of AFPs can improve post-thaw viability regardless of freezing method (slow-freezing or vitrification), storage temperature, and types of biological sample type.

  12. A two-dimensional adsorption kinetic model for thermal hysteresis activity in antifreeze proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. Z.; Yeh, Y.; Liu, J. J.; Feeney, R. E.; Krishnan, V. V.

    2006-05-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), collectively abbreviated as AF(G)Ps, are synthesized by various organisms to enable their cells to survive in subzero environments. Although the AF(G)Ps are markedly diverse in structure, they all function by adsorbing to the surface of embryonic ice crystals to inhibit their growth. This adsorption results in a freezing temperature depression without an appreciable change in the melting temperature. The difference between the melting and freezing temperatures, termed thermal hysteresis (TH), is used to detect and quantify the antifreeze activity. Insights from crystallographic structures of a number of AFPs have led to a good understanding of the ice-protein interaction features. Computational studies have focused either on verifying a specific model of AFP-ice interaction or on understanding the protein-induced changes in the ice crystal morphology. In order to explain the origin of TH, we propose a novel two-dimensional adsorption kinetic model between AFPs and ice crystal surfaces. The validity of the model has been demonstrated by reproducing the TH curve on two different β-helical AFPs upon increasing the protein concentration. In particular, this model is able to accommodate the change in the TH behavior observed experimentally when the size of the AFPs is increased systematically. Our results suggest that in addition to the specificity of the AFPs for the ice, the coverage of the AFPs on the ice surface is an equally necessary condition for their TH activity.

  13. A two-dimensional adsorption kinetic model for thermal hysteresis activity in antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Q Z; Yeh, Y; Liu, J J; Feeney, R E; Krishnan, V V

    2006-05-28

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), collectively abbreviated as AF(G)Ps, are synthesized by various organisms to enable their cells to survive in subzero environments. Although the AF(G)Ps are markedly diverse in structure, they all function by adsorbing to the surface of embryonic ice crystals to inhibit their growth. This adsorption results in a freezing temperature depression without an appreciable change in the melting temperature. The difference between the melting and freezing temperatures, termed thermal hysteresis (TH), is used to detect and quantify the antifreeze activity. Insights from crystallographic structures of a number of AFPs have led to a good understanding of the ice-protein interaction features. Computational studies have focused either on verifying a specific model of AFP-ice interaction or on understanding the protein-induced changes in the ice crystal morphology. In order to explain the origin of TH, we propose a novel two-dimensional adsorption kinetic model between AFPs and ice crystal surfaces. The validity of the model has been demonstrated by reproducing the TH curve on two different beta-helical AFPs upon increasing the protein concentration. In particular, this model is able to accommodate the change in the TH behavior observed experimentally when the size of the AFPs is increased systematically. Our results suggest that in addition to the specificity of the AFPs for the ice, the coverage of the AFPs on the ice surface is an equally necessary condition for their TH activity.

  14. Adsorption thermodynamics of two-domain antifreeze proteins: theory and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Narambuena, Claudio F; Sanchez Varretti, Fabricio O; Ramirez-Pastor, Antonio J

    2016-09-21

    In this paper we develop the statistical thermodynamics of two-domain antifreeze proteins adsorbed on ice. We use a coarse-grained model and a lattice network in order to represent the protein and ice, respectively. The theory is obtained by combining the exact analytical expression for the partition function of non-interacting linear k-mers adsorbed in one dimension, and its extension to higher dimensions. The total and partial adsorption isotherms, and the coverage and temperature dependence of the Helmholtz free energy and configurational entropy are given. The formalism reproduces the classical Langmuir equation, leads to the exact statistical thermodynamics of molecules adsorbed in one dimension, and provides a close approximation for two-dimensional systems. Comparisons with analytical data obtained using the modified Langmuir model (MLM) and Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble were performed in order to test the validity of the theoretical predictions. In the MC calculations, the different mechanisms proposed in the literature to describe the adsorption of two-domain antifreeze proteins on ice were analyzed. Indistinguishable results were obtained in all cases, which verifies the thermodynamic equivalence of these mechanisms and allows the choice of the most suitable mechanism for theoretical studies of equilibrium properties. Even though a good qualitative agreement is obtained between MLM and MC data, it is found that the new theoretical framework offers a more accurate description of the phenomenon of adsorption of two-domain antifreeze proteins.

  15. Rational, yet simple, design and synthesis of an antifreeze-protein inspired polymer for cellular cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Cameron, Neil R; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-08-21

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins AF(G)Ps are potent ice recrystallization inhibitors, which is a desirable property to enhance cryopreservation of donor tissue/cells. Here we present the rational synthesis of a new, biomimetic, ice-recrystallization inhibiting polymer derived from a cheap commodity polymer, based on an ampholyte structure. The polymer is used to enhance the cryopreservation of red blood cells, demonstrating a macromolecular solution to tissue storage.

  16. Partitioning of fish and insect antifreeze proteins into ice suggests they bind with comparable affinity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher B; Tomczak, Melanie M; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Kuiper, Michael J; Lankin, Christopher; Walker, Virginia K; Davies, Peter L

    2004-01-13

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of ice by binding to the surface of ice crystals, preventing the addition of water molecules to cause a local depression of the freezing point. AFPs from insects are much more effective at depressing the freezing point than fish AFPs. Here, we have investigated the possibility that insect AFPs bind more avidly to ice than fish AFPs. Because it is not possible to directly measure the affinity of an AFP for ice, we have assessed binding indirectly by examining the partitioning of proteins into a slowly growing ice hemisphere. AFP molecules adsorbed to the surface and became incorporated into the ice as they were overgrown. Solutes, including non-AFPs, were very efficiently excluded from ice, whereas AFPs became incorporated into ice at a concentration roughly equal to that of the original solution, and this was independent of the AFP concentration in the range (submillimolar) tested. Despite their >10-fold difference in antifreeze activity, fish and insect AFPs partitioned into ice to a similar degree, suggesting that insect AFPs do not bind to ice with appreciably higher affinity. Additionally, we have demonstrated that steric mutations on the ice binding surface that decrease the antifreeze activity of an AFP also reduce its inclusion into ice, supporting the validity of using partitioning measurements to assess a protein's affinity for ice.

  17. Direct measurement of the thermal hysteresis of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) using sonocrystallization.

    PubMed

    Gaede-Koehler, Andrea; Kreider, Alexej; Canfield, Peter; Kleemeier, Malte; Grunwald, Ingo

    2012-12-04

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are of great importance for applications in cryomedicine or the food industry. They are frequently used to lower the freezing point by preventing the growth of larger ice crystals; thus, it is paramount to determine their thermal hysteretic characteristics. However, the experimental analysis of the thermal hysteresis-an effect that is characteristic for AFPs-remains a challenging process. An easy-to-use test method for measuring the thermal hysteresis of AFPs was developed and tested with the type III AFPs. Traditional methods that have been used until now have their disadvantages and limitations. The new measurement method described in this paper allows detection of the complete cooling, freezing, heating, and melting process in a single measurement. This makes it possible to directly determine the thermal hysteresis as a functional effect of the antifreeze proteins. Measurements of the thermal hysteresis were performed by applying ultrasound to initiate the crystallization process of the antifreeze protein solution. This ultrasound technique also allows a crystallization process to be performed at defined temperature. The demonstrated results were highly reproducible and could be clearly read off the measurement curves. As a future perspective, this enables the design of automatic test devices that can be also miniaturized.

  18. Hydrophobic ice-binding sites confer hyperactivity of an antifreeze protein from a snow mold fungus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Hanada, Yuichi; Miura, Ai; Tsuda, Sakae; Kondo, Hidemasa

    2016-11-01

    Snow mold fungus, Typhula ishikariensis, secretes seven antifreeze protein isoforms (denoted TisAFPs) that assist in the survival of the mold under snow cover. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a hyperactive isoform, TisAFP8, at 1.0 Å resolution is presented. TisAFP8 folds into a right-handed β-helix accompanied with a long α-helix insertion. TisAFP8 exhibited significantly high antifreeze activity that is comparable with other hyperactive AFPs, despite its close structural and sequence similarity with the moderately active isoform TisAFP6. A series of mutations introduced into the putative ice-binding sites (IBSs) in the β-sheet and adjacent loop region reduced antifreeze activity. A double-mutant A20T/A212S, which comprises a hydrophobic patch between the β-sheet and loop region, caused the greatest depression of antifreeze activity of 75%, when compared with that of the wild-type protein. This shows that the loop region is involved in ice binding and hydrophobic residues play crucial functional roles. Additionally, bound waters around the β-sheet and loop region IBSs were organized into an ice-like network and can be divided into two groups that appear to mediate separately TisAFP and ice. The docking model of TisAFP8 with the basal plane via its loop region IBS reveals a better shape complementarity than that of TisAFP6. In conclusion, we present new insights into the ice-binding mechanism of TisAFP8 by showing that a higher hydrophobicity and better shape complementarity of its IBSs, especially the loop region, may render TisAFP8 hyperactive to ice binding.

  19. JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 Regulates the Nuclear Accumulation of GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7, Influencing the RNA Processing of FLOWERING LOCUS C Antisense Transcripts and Flowering Time in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Chunhua; Xu, Shujuan; Xing, Lijing; Xu, Yunyuan; Chong, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Lectins selectively recognize sugars or glycans for defense in living cells, but less is known about their roles in the development process and the functional network with other factors. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 (AtJAC1) functions in flowering time control. Loss of function of AtJAC1 leads to precocious flowering, whereas overexpression of AtJAC1 causes delayed flowering. AtJAC1 influences flowering through regulation of the key flowering repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Genetic analysis revealed that AtJAC1’s function is mostly dependent on GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7 (GRP7), an upstream regulator of FLC. Biochemical and cell biological data indicated that AtJAC1 interacted physically with GRP7 specifically in the cytoplasm. AtJAC1 influences the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of GRP7, with predominant nuclear localization of GRP7 when AtJAC1 function is lost but retention of GRP7 in the cytoplasm when AtJAC1 is overexpressed. A temporal inducible assay suggested that AtJAC1’s regulation of flowering could be compromised by the nuclear accumulation of GRP7. In addition, GRP7 binds to the antisense precursor messenger RNA of FLC through a conserved RNA motif. Loss of GRP7 function leads to the elevation of total FLC antisense transcripts and reduced proximal-distal polyadenylation ratio, as well as histone methylation changes in the FLC gene body region and increased total functional sense FLC transcript. Attenuating the direct binding of GRP7 with competing artificial RNAs leads to changes of FLC antisense precursor messenger RNA processing and flowering transition. Taken together, our study indicates that AtJAC1 coordinates with GRP7 in shaping plant development through the regulation of RNA processing in Arabidopsis. PMID:26392261

  20. Intermolecular interaction studies of winter flounder antifreeze protein reveal the existence of thermally accessible binding state.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dat H; Colvin, Michael E; Yeh, Yin; Feeney, Robert E; Fink, William H

    2004-10-05

    The physical nature underlying intermolecular interactions between two rod-like winter flounder antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules and their implication for the mechanism of antifreeze function are examined in this work using molecular dynamics simulations, augmented with free energy calculations employing a continuum solvation model. The energetics for different modes of interactions of two AFP molecules is examined in both vacuum and aqueous phases along with the water distribution in the region encapsulated by two antiparallel AFP backbones. The results show that in a vacuum two AFP molecules intrinsically attract each other in the antiparallel fashion, where their complementary charge side chains face each other directly. In the aqueous environment, this attraction is counteracted by both screening and entropic effects. Therefore, two nearly energetically degenerate states, an aggregated state and a dissociated state, result as a new aspect of intermolecular interaction in the paradigm for the mechanism of action of AFP. The relevance of these findings to the mechanism of function of freezing inhibition in the context of our work on Antarctic cod antifreeze glycoprotein (Nguyen et al., Biophysical Journal, 2002, Vol. 82, pp. 2892-2905) is discussed.

  1. Animal ice-binding (antifreeze) proteins and glycolipids: an overview with emphasis on physiological function.

    PubMed

    Duman, John G

    2015-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) assist in subzero tolerance of multiple cold-tolerant organisms: animals, plants, fungi, bacteria etc. IBPs include: (1) antifreeze proteins (AFPs) with high thermal hysteresis antifreeze activity; (2) low thermal hysteresis IBPs; and (3) ice-nucleating proteins (INPs). Several structurally different IBPs have evolved, even within related taxa. Proteins that produce thermal hysteresis inhibit freezing by a non-colligative mechanism, whereby they adsorb onto ice crystals or ice-nucleating surfaces and prevent further growth. This lowers the so-called hysteretic freezing point below the normal equilibrium freezing/melting point, producing a difference between the two, termed thermal hysteresis. True AFPs with high thermal hysteresis are found in freeze-avoiding animals (those that must prevent freezing, as they die if frozen) especially marine fish, insects and other terrestrial arthropods where they function to prevent freezing at temperatures below those commonly experienced by the organism. Low thermal hysteresis IBPs are found in freeze-tolerant organisms (those able to survive extracellular freezing), and function to inhibit recrystallization - a potentially damaging process whereby larger ice crystals grow at the expense of smaller ones - and in some cases, prevent lethal propagation of extracellular ice into the cytoplasm. Ice-nucleator proteins inhibit supercooling and induce freezing in the extracellular fluid at high subzero temperatures in many freeze-tolerant species, thereby allowing them to control the location and temperature of ice nucleation, and the rate of ice growth. Numerous nuances to these functions have evolved. Antifreeze glycolipids with significant thermal hysteresis activity were recently identified in insects, frogs and plants. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Unusual dynamic properties of water near the ice-binding plane of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kuffel, Anna; Czapiewski, Dariusz; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2015-10-07

    The dynamical properties of solvation water of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana (CfAFP) are analyzed and discussed in context of its antifreeze activity. The protein comprises of three well-defined planes and one of them binds to the surface of ice. The dynamical properties of solvation water around each of these planes were analyzed separately; the results are compared with the dynamical properties of solvation water of ice around its two crystallographic planes: basal and prism. Three main conclusions are inferred from our investigations. The first one is that the solvation shell of CfAFP does not seem to be particularly far-ranged, at least not beyond what is usually observed for proteins that do not interact with ice. Therefore, it does not appear to us that the antifreeze activity is enhanced by a long-ranged retardation of water mobility. Also the correlation between the collective mobility of water and the collective mobility of protein atoms highly resembles the one measured for the protein that does not interact with ice. Our second conclusion is that the dynamical properties of solvation water of CfAFP are non-uniform. The dynamics of solvation water of ice-binding plane is, in some respects, different from the dynamics of solvation water of the two remaining planes. The feature that distinguishes the dynamics of solvation water of the three planes is the activation energy of diffusion process. The third conclusion is that—from the three analyzed solvation shells of CfAFP—the dynamical properties of solvation water of the ice-binding plane resemble the most the properties of solvation water of ice; note, however, that these properties still clearly differ from the dynamic properties of solvation water of ice.

  3. Unusual dynamic properties of water near the ice-binding plane of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuffel, Anna; Czapiewski, Dariusz; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The dynamical properties of solvation water of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana (CfAFP) are analyzed and discussed in context of its antifreeze activity. The protein comprises of three well-defined planes and one of them binds to the surface of ice. The dynamical properties of solvation water around each of these planes were analyzed separately; the results are compared with the dynamical properties of solvation water of ice around its two crystallographic planes: basal and prism. Three main conclusions are inferred from our investigations. The first one is that the solvation shell of CfAFP does not seem to be particularly far-ranged, at least not beyond what is usually observed for proteins that do not interact with ice. Therefore, it does not appear to us that the antifreeze activity is enhanced by a long-ranged retardation of water mobility. Also the correlation between the collective mobility of water and the collective mobility of protein atoms highly resembles the one measured for the protein that does not interact with ice. Our second conclusion is that the dynamical properties of solvation water of CfAFP are non-uniform. The dynamics of solvation water of ice-binding plane is, in some respects, different from the dynamics of solvation water of the two remaining planes. The feature that distinguishes the dynamics of solvation water of the three planes is the activation energy of diffusion process. The third conclusion is that—from the three analyzed solvation shells of CfAFP—the dynamical properties of solvation water of the ice-binding plane resemble the most the properties of solvation water of ice; note, however, that these properties still clearly differ from the dynamic properties of solvation water of ice.

  4. Convulxin, a C-type lectin-like protein, inhibits HCASMCs functions via WAD-motif/integrin-αv interaction and NF-κB-independent gene suppression of GRO and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ho; Chiang, Tin-Bin; Wang, Wen-Jeng

    2017-03-15

    Convulxin (CVX), a C-type lectin-like protein (CLPs), is a potent platelet aggregation inducer. To evaluate its potential applications in angiogenic diseases, the multimeric CVX were further explored on its mode of actions toward human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). The N-terminus of β-chain of CVX (CVX-β) contains a putative disintegrin-like domain with a conserved motif upon the sequence comparison with other CLPs. Importantly, native CVX had no cytotoxic activity as examined by electrophoretic pattern. A Trp-Ala-Asp (WAD)-containing octapeptide, MTWADAEK, was thereafter synthesized and analyzed in functional assays. In the case of specific integrin antagonists as positive controls, the anti-angiogenic effects of CVX on HCASMCs were investigated by series of functional analyses. CVX showed to exhibit multiple inhibitory activities toward HCASMCs proliferation, adhesion and invasion with a dose- and integrin αvβ3-dependent fashion. However, the WAD-octapeptide exerting a minor potency could also work as an active peptidomimetic. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated both the intact CVX and synthetic peptide can specifically interact with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and CVX was shown to have a down-regulatory effect on the gene expression of CXC-chemokines, such as growth-related oncogene and interleukin-8. According to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation assay and Western blotting analysis, the NF-κB activation was not involved in the signaling events of CVX-induced gene expression. In conclusion, CVX may act as a disintegrin-like protein via the interactions of WAD-motif in CVX-β with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and it also is a gene suppressor with the ability to diminish the expression of two CXC-chemokines in a NF-κB-independent manner. Indeed, more extensive investigations are needed and might create a new avenue for the development of a novel angiostatic agent.

  5. Heterologous expression, refolding and functional characterization of two antifreeze proteins from Fragilariopsis cylindrus (Bacillariophyceae).

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Christiane; Kabisch, Johannes; Palm, Gottfried J; Valentin, Klaus; Schweder, Thomas; Krell, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) provide protection for organisms subjected to the presence of ice crystals. The psychrophilic diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus which is frequently found in polar sea ice carries a multitude of AFP isoforms. In this study we report the heterologous expression of two antifreeze protein isoforms from F. cylindrus in Escherichia coli. Refolding from inclusion bodies produced proteins functionally active with respect to crystal deformation, recrystallization inhibition and thermal hysteresis. We observed a reduction of activity in the presence of the pelB leader peptide in comparison with the GS-linked SUMO-tag. Activity was positively correlated to protein concentration and buffer salinity. Thermal hysteresis and crystal deformation habit suggest the affiliation of the proteins to the hyperactive group of AFPs. One isoform, carrying a signal peptide for secretion, produced a thermal hysteresis up to 1.53°C±0.53°C and ice crystals of hexagonal bipyramidal shape. The second isoform, which has a long preceding N-terminal sequence of unknown function, produced thermal hysteresis of up to 2.34°C±0.25°C. Ice crystals grew in form of a hexagonal column in presence of this protein. The different sequences preceding the ice binding domain point to distinct localizations of the proteins inside or outside the cell. We thus propose that AFPs have different functions in vivo, also reflected in their specific TH capability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The inhibition of ice nucleators by insect antifreeze proteins is enhanced by glycerol and citrate.

    PubMed

    Duman, J G

    2002-02-01

    Antifreeze proteins depress the freezing point of water while not affecting the melting point, producing a characteristic difference in freezing and melting points termed thermal hysteresis. Larvae of the beetle Dendroides canadensis accumulate potent antifreeze proteins (DAFPs) in their hemolymph and gut, but to achieve high levels of thermal hysteresis requires enhancers, such as glycerol. DAFPs have previously been shown to inhibit the activity of bacterial and hemolymph protein ice nucleators, however, the effect was not large and therefore the effectiveness of the DAFPs in promoting supercooling of the larvae in winter was doubtful. However, this study demonstrates that DAFPs, in combination with the thermal hysteresis enhancers glycerol (1 M) or citrate (0.5 M), eliminated the activity of hemolymph protein ice nucleators and Pseudomonas syringae ice-nucleating active bacteria, and lowered the supercooling points (nucleation temperatures) of aqueous solutions containing these ice nucleators to those of water or buffer alone. This shows that the DAFPs, along with glycerol, play a critical role in promoting hemolymph supercooling in overwintering D. canadensis. Also, DAFPs in combination with enhancers may be useful in applications which require inhibition of ice nucleators.

  7. Significance of conservative asparagine residues in the thermal hysteresis activity of carrot antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dang-Quan; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dong-Ru; He, Yan-Ming; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2004-01-01

    The approximately 24-amino-acid leucine-rich tandem repeat motif (PXXXXXLXXLXXLXLSXNXLXGXI) of carrot antifreeze protein comprises most of the processed protein and should contribute at least partly to the ice-binding site. Structural predictions using publicly available online sources indicated that the theoretical three-dimensional model of this plant protein includes a 10-loop beta-helix containing the approximately 24-amino-acid tandem repeat. This theoretical model indicated that conservative asparagine residues create putative ice-binding sites with surface complementarity to the 1010 prism plane of ice. We used site-specific mutagenesis to test the importance of these residues, and observed a distinct loss of thermal hysteresis activity when conservative asparagines were replaced with valine or glutamine, whereas a large increase in thermal hysteresis was observed when phenylalanine or threonine residues were replaced with asparagine, putatively resulting in the formation of an ice-binding site. These results confirmed that the ice-binding site of carrot antifreeze protein consists of conservative asparagine residues in each beta-loop. We also found that its thermal hysteresis activity is directly correlated with the length of its asparagine-rich binding site, and hence with the size of its ice-binding face. PMID:14531728

  8. Activity of a Two-Domain Antifreeze Protein Is Not Dependent on Linker Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Nolan B.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Sönnichsen, Frank D.

    2007-01-01

    The reported NMR structure of RD3, a naturally occurring two-domain antifreeze protein, suggests that the two nearly identical domains are oriented to allow simultaneous binding of their active regions to the ice surface. It is implied that the nine residues linking the two domains play a role in this alignment, but this has not been established. We have designed and expressed a modified form of RD3 that replaces the nine-residue linker with a generic sequence of one serine and eight glycine residues to test the importance of the linker amino acid sequence. The modified linker is shown to have significantly different characteristics compared to the original linker. Heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect experiments show that the new linker residues have more mobility than the linker residues in the native protein. Further, NMR data show that the folding of the C-terminal domain is somewhat perturbed by the altered linker. Finally, distributions of residual dipolar couplings indicate that the two domains tumble and move independently of each other. Nevertheless, the thermal hysteresis activity of the modified protein is indistinguishable from that of native RD3, proving that increased activity of the two-domain antifreeze protein is not dependent on structure of the linker. PMID:17056724

  9. Extraction, purification and identification of antifreeze proteins from cold acclimated malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiangli; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Haiying; Wang, Li; Qian, Haifeng; Qi, Xiguang

    2015-05-15

    Antifreeze proteins from cold-acclimated malting barley were extracted by infiltration-centrifugation. The infiltration time was optimised, and its extraction effect was evaluated. The effect of cold acclimation on the accumulation of barley antifreeze proteins (BaAFPs) was assessed by comparing the thermal hysteresis activities (THA) of proteins extracted from both cold acclimated and non-cold acclimated barley grain. Ultra-filtration, ammonium precipitation and column chromatography were used successively to purify the BaAFPs, and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS was used for protein identification. The results showed that infiltration-centrifugation was more targeted than the traditional method, and 10h was the optimal infiltration time. THA was observed only after cold acclimation implied that AFPs only began to accumulate after cold acclimation. After purification, BaAFP-I was obtained at an electrophoresis level and its THA was 1.04°C (18.0 mg ml(-1)). The mass fingerprinting and sequencing results indicated the homology of the BaAFP-I to alpha-amylase inhibitor BDAI-1 (Hordeum vulgare).

  10. When are antifreeze proteins in solution essential for ice growth inhibition?

    PubMed

    Drori, Ran; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2015-06-02

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a widespread class of proteins that bind to ice and facilitate the survival of organisms under freezing conditions. AFPs have enormous potential in applications that require control over ice growth. However, the nature of the binding interaction between AFPs and ice remains the subject of debate. Using a microfluidics system developed in-house we previously showed that hyperactive AFP from the Tenebrio molitor beetle, TmAFP, remains bound to an ice crystal surface after exchanging the solution surrounding the ice crystal to an AFP-free solution. Furthermore, these surface-adsorbed TmAFP molecules sufficed to prevent ice growth. These experiments provided compelling evidence for the irreversible binding of hyperactive AFPs to ice. Here, we tested a moderately active type III AFP (AFPIII) from a fish in a similar microfluidics system. We found, in solution exchange experiments that the AFPIIIs were also irreversibly bound to the ice crystals. However, some crystals displayed "burst" growth during the solution exchange. AFPIII, like other moderately active fish AFPs, is unable to bind to the basal plane of an ice crystal. We showed that although moderate AFPs bound to ice irreversibly, moderate AFPs in solution were needed to inhibit ice growth from the bipyramidal crystal tips. Instead of binding to the basal plane, these AFPs minimized the basal face size by stabilizing other crystal planes that converge to form the crystal tips. Furthermore, when access of solution to the basal plane was physically blocked by the microfluidics device walls, we observed enhancement of the antifreeze activity. These findings provide direct evidence that the weak point of ice growth inhibition by fish AFPs is the basal plane, whereas insect AFPs, which can bind to the basal plane, are able to inhibit its growth and thereby increase antifreeze activity.

  11. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and homology modeling of the first caudata amphibian antifreeze-like protein in axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songyan; Gao, Jiuxiang; Lu, Yiling; Cai, Shasha; Qiao, Xue; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2013-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) refer to a class of polypeptides that are produced by certain vertebrates, plants, fungi, and bacteria and which permit their survival in subzero environments. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, sequence analysis and three-dimensional structure of the axolotl antifreeze-like protein (AFLP) by homology modeling of the first caudate amphibian AFLP. We constructed a full-length spleen cDNA library of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). An EST having highest similarity (∼42%) with freeze-responsive liver protein Li16 from Rana sylvatica was identified, and the full-length cDNA was subsequently obtained by RACE-PCR. The axolotl antifreeze-like protein sequence represents an open reading frame for a putative signal peptide and the mature protein composed of 93 amino acids. The calculated molecular mass and the theoretical isoelectric point (pl) of this mature protein were 10128.6 Da and 8.97, respectively. The molecular characterization of this gene and its deduced protein were further performed by detailed bioinformatics analysis. The three-dimensional structure of current AFLP was predicted by homology modeling, and the conserved residues required for functionality were identified. The homology model constructed could be of use for effective drug design. This is the first report of an antifreeze-like protein identified from a caudate amphibian.

  12. Formation of ice-like water structure on the surface of an antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Smolin, Nikolai; Daggett, Valerie

    2008-05-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in different species from polar, alpine, and subarctic regions where they serve to inhibit ice crystal growth by adsorption to ice surfaces. Computational methods have the power to investigate the antifreeze mechanism in atomic detail. Molecular dynamics simulations of water under different conditions have been carried out to test our water model for simulations of biological macromolecules in extreme conditions: very low temperatures (200 K) and at the ice/liquid water interface. We show that the flexible F3C water model reproduces properties of water in the solid phase (ice I(h)), the supercooled liquid phase, and at the ice/liquid water interface. Additionally, the hydration of the type III AFP from ocean pout was studied as a function of temperature. Hydration waters on the ice-binding surface of the AFP were less distorted and more tetrahedral than elsewhere on the surface. More ice-like hydrating water structures formed on the ice-binding surface of the protein such that it created an ice-like structure in water within its first hydration layer but not beyond, suggesting that this portion of the protein has high affinity for ice surfaces.

  13. The importance of dissolved salts to the in vivo efficacy of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert P; Hobbs, Rod S; Goddard, Sally V; Fletcher, Garth L

    2007-11-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) lower the freezing point of marine fish plasma non-colligatively by specifically adsorbing to certain surfaces of ice crystals, modifying their structure and inhibiting further growth. While the freezing point is lowered, the melting point is unaltered and the difference between the two is termed thermal hysteresis (TH). In pure water, the level of TH is directly related to the intrinsic activity of the specific AF(G)P in solution and to their concentration. Results of this study indicate that when AF(G)P are dissolved in salt solutions, such as NaCl, encompassing the range they could encounter in nature, there is a synergistic enhancement of basal TH that is positively related to the salt concentration. This enhancement is likely a result of the hydration shell surrounding the dissolved ions and, as a consequence, reducing freezable water. A secondary reason for the enhancement is that the salt could be influencing the hydration shell surrounding the AF(G)P, increasing their solubility and thus the protein surface area available to adsorb to the ice/water interface. The former hypothesis for the salt enhanced TH has implications for the in vivo function of AF(G)P, particularly at the seawater/external epithelia (gills, skin, stomach) interface. The latter hypothesis is likely only relevant to in vitro situations where freeze dried protein is dissolved in low salt solutions.

  14. Local water dynamics around antifreeze protein residues in the presence of osmolytes: the importance of hydroxyl and disaccharide groups.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Anand Narayanan; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2014-10-09

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) are synthesized by various organisms to enable their cells to survive low temperature environments like in the polar regions. The presence of antifreeze proteins leads to a temperature difference between the melting and freezing point of the solution known as thermal hysteresis. It is nowadays common knowledge that the antifreeze activity of AFPs is mainly determined by a short-range effect which includes a direct binding to the ice phase. Recently, experimental findings also revealed a long-range effect which implies a significant retardation of the water dynamics to facilitate the ice-binding process specifically for AFGPs. The aim of this work is to examine the dynamics of water molecules around different antifreeze protein residues by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A prototype of AFP from antarctic notothenioids with the main subunit alanine-alanine-threonine (AAT) and a mutant (polyalanine) together with the residues of an antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) were simulated and compared with respect to their influence on the local water shell. The analysis of the water hydrogen bond characteristics and the dipolar relaxation times reveals a strong retardation effect of the water dynamics around the AFGP prototype. Our numerical results reveal the significant importance of polar units like threonine and disaccharides for the direct binding of water molecules in terms of hydrogen bonds and a significant retardation of water dynamics. In addition, a considerable change of the hydration dynamics is additionally observed in the presence of osmolytes like urea and hydroxyectoine. Our findings indicate that this effect is even more pronounced in the presence of kosmotropic osmolytes.

  15. Myeloid thrombomodulin lectin-like domain inhibits osteoclastogenesis and inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Lai, Chao-Han; Shieh, Shyh-Jou; Jou, Yin-Bo; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Yang, Ai-Lun; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Ho, Mei-Ling; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2016-06-17

    Osteoclastogenesis is an essential process during bone metabolism which can also be promoted by inflammatory signals. Thrombomodulin (TM), a transmembrane glycoprotein, exerts anti-inflammatory activities such as neutralization of proinflammatory high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) through TM lectin-like domain. This study aimed to identify the role of myeloid TM (i.e., endogenous TM expression on the myeloid lineage) in osteoclastogenesis and inflammatory bone loss. Using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages, we observed that the protein levels of TM were dramatically reduced as these cells differentiated into osteoclasts. In addition, osteoclastogenesis and extracellular HMGB1 accumulation were enhanced in primary cultured monocytes from myeloid-specific TM-deficient mice (LysMcre/TM(flox/flox)) and from TM lectin-like domain deleted mice (TM(LeD/LeD)) compared with their respective controls. Micro-computerized tomography scans showed that ovariectomy-induced bone loss was more pronounced in TM(LeD/LeD) mice compared with controls. Finally, the inhibiting effects of recombinant TM lectin-like domain (rTMD1) on bone resorption in vitro, and bone loss in both the ovariectomized model and collagen antibody-induced arthritis model has been detected. These findings suggested that the myeloid TM lectin-like domain may inhibit osteoclastogenesis by reducing HMGB1 signaling, and rTMD1 may hold therapeutic potential for inflammatory bone loss.

  16. Induced ice melting by the snow flea antifreeze protein from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Todde, Guido; Whitman, Christopher; Hovmöller, Sven; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-11-26

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) allow different life forms, insects as well as fish and plants, to survive in subzero environments. AFPs prevent freezing of the physiological fluids. We have studied, through molecular dynamics simulations, the behavior of the small isoform of the AFP found in the snow flea (sfAFP), both in water and at the ice/water interface, of four different ice planes. In water at room temperature, the structure of the sfAFP is found to be slightly unstable. The loop between two polyproline II helices has large fluctuations as well as the C-terminus. Torsional angle analyses show a decrease of the polyproline II helix area in the Ramachandran plots. The protein structure instability, in any case, should not affect its antifreeze activity. At the ice/water interface the sfAFP triggers local melting of the ice surface. Bipyramidal, secondary prism, and prism ice planes melt in the presence of AFP at temperatures below the melting point of ice. Only the basal plane is found to be stable at the same temperatures, indicating an adsorption of the sfAFP on this ice plane as confirmed by experimental evidence.

  17. The inhibition of tetrahydrofuran clathrate-hydrate formation with antifreeze protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, H.; Wilson, L. D.; Walker, V. K.; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of Type I fish antifreeze protein (AFP) from the winter flounder, Pleuronectes americanus (Walbaum), (WfAFP) on the formation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) clathrate hydrate was studied by observing changes in THF crystal morphology and determining the induction time for nucleation. AFP retarded THF clathrate-hydrate growth at the tested temperatures and modified the THF clathrate-hydrate crystal morphology from octahedral to plate-like. AFP appears to be even more effective than the kinetic inhibitor, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Recombinant AFP from an insect, a spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.), moth, (Cf) was also tested for inhibition activity by observation of the THF-hydrate-crystal-growth habit. Like WfAFP, CfAFP appeared to show adsorption on multiple THF-hydrate-crystal faces. A protein with no antifreeze activity, cytochrome C, was used as a control and it neither changed the morphology of the THF clathrate-hydrate crystals, nor retarded the formation of the hydrate. Preliminary experiments on the inhibition activity of WfAFP on a natural gas hydrate assessed induction time and the amount of propane gas consumed. Similar to the observations for THF, the data indicated that WfAFP inhibited propane-hydrate growth. Taken together, these results support our hypothesis that AFPs can inhibit clathrate-hydrate growth and as well, offer promise for the understanding of the inhibition mechanism.

  18. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  19. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-07

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  20. Structure and interactions of fish type III antifreeze protein in solution.

    PubMed

    Salvay, Andrés G; Gabel, Frank; Pucci, Bernard; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I; Ebel, Christine

    2010-07-21

    It has been suggested that above a critical protein concentration, fish Type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) self-assembles to form micelle-like structures that may play a key role in antifreeze activity. To understand the complex activity of AFP III, a comprehensive description of its association state and structural organization in solution is necessary. We used analytical ultracentrifugation, analytical size-exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the interactions and homogeneity of AFP III in solution. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the low-resolution structure in solution. Our results clearly show that at concentrations up to 20 mg mL(-1) and at temperatures of 20 degrees C, 6 degrees C, and 4 degrees C, AFP III is monomeric in solution and adopts a structure compatible with that determined by crystallography. Surface tension measurements show a propensity of AFP III to localize at the air/water interface, but this surface activity is not correlated with any aggregation in the bulk. These results support the hypothesis that each AFP III molecule acts independently of the others, and that specific intermolecular interactions between monomers are not required for binding to ice. The lack of attractive interactions between monomers may be functionally important, allowing for more efficient binding and covering of the ice surface.

  1. Structure and Interactions of Fish Type III Antifreeze Protein in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Salvay, Andrés G.; Gabel, Frank; Pucci, Bernard; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I.; Ebel, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract It has been suggested that above a critical protein concentration, fish Type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) self-assembles to form micelle-like structures that may play a key role in antifreeze activity. To understand the complex activity of AFP III, a comprehensive description of its association state and structural organization in solution is necessary. We used analytical ultracentrifugation, analytical size-exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the interactions and homogeneity of AFP III in solution. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the low-resolution structure in solution. Our results clearly show that at concentrations up to 20 mg mL−1 and at temperatures of 20°C, 6°C, and 4°C, AFP III is monomeric in solution and adopts a structure compatible with that determined by crystallography. Surface tension measurements show a propensity of AFP III to localize at the air/water interface, but this surface activity is not correlated with any aggregation in the bulk. These results support the hypothesis that each AFP III molecule acts independently of the others, and that specific intermolecular interactions between monomers are not required for binding to ice. The lack of attractive interactions between monomers may be functionally important, allowing for more efficient binding and covering of the ice surface. PMID:20643081

  2. Systematic size study of an insect antifreeze protein and its interaction with ice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Jia, Zongchao; Chen, Guangju; Tung, Chenho; Liu, Ruozhuang

    2005-02-01

    Because of their remarkable ability to depress the freezing point of aqueous solutions, antifreeze proteins (AFPs) play a critical role in helping many organisms survive subzero temperatures. The beta-helical insect AFP structures solved to date, consisting of multiple repeating circular loops or coils, are perhaps the most regular protein structures discovered thus far. Taking an exceptional advantage of the unusually high structural regularity of insect AFPs, we have employed both semiempirical and quantum mechanics computational approaches to systematically investigate the relationship between the number of AFP coils and the AFP-ice interaction energy, an indicator of antifreeze activity. We generated a series of AFP models with varying numbers of 12-residue coils (sequence TCTxSxxCxxAx) and calculated their interaction energies with ice. Using several independent computational methods, we found that the AFP-ice interaction energy increased as the number of coils increased, until an upper bound was reached. The increase of interaction energy was significant for each of the first five coils, and there was a clear synergism that gradually diminished and even decreased with further increase of the number of coils. Our results are in excellent agreement with the recently reported experimental observations.

  3. Hybridization assay of insect antifreezing protein gene by novel multilayered porous silicon nucleic acid biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liangliang; Zhang, Hongyan; Mo, Jiaqing; Zhong, Furu; Lv, Changwu; Ma, Ji; Jia, Zhenhong

    2013-01-15

    A fabrication of a novel simple porous silicon polybasic photonic crystal with symmetrical structure has been reported as a nucleic acid biosensor for detecting antifreeze protein gene in insects (Microdera puntipennis dzhungarica), which would be helpful in the development of some new transgenic plants with tolerance of freezing stress. Compared to various porous silicon-based photonic configurations, porous silicon polytype layered structure is quite easy to prepare and shows more stability; moreover, polybasic photonic crystals with symmetrical structure exhibit interesting optical properties with a sharp resonance in the reflectance spectrum, giving a higher Q factor which causes higher sensitivity for sensing performance. In this experiment, DNA oligonucleotides were immobilized into the porous silicon pores using a standard crosslink chemistry method. The porous silicon polybasic symmetrical structure sensor possesses high specificity in performing controlled experiments with non-complementary DNA. The detection limit was found to be 21.3nM for DNA oligonucleotides. The fabricated multilayered porous silicon-based DNA biosensor has potential commercial applications in clinical chemistry for determination of an antifreeze protein gene or other genes.

  4. Creating Anti-icing Surfaces via the Direct Immobilization of Antifreeze Proteins on Aluminum

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Yunho; Park, Ji-in; Kim, Minjae; Kim, Hong Suk; Kwon, Myong Jong; Oh, Seung Jin; Kim, Young-Pil; Jin, EonSeon

    2015-01-01

    Cryoprotectants such as antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and sugar molecules may provide a solution for icing problems. These anti-icing substances protect cells and tissues from freezing by inhibiting ice formation. In this study, we developed a method for coating an industrial metal material (aluminum, Al) with AFP from the Antarctic marine diatom, Chaetoceros neogracile (Cn-AFP), to prevent or delay ice formation. To coat Al with Cn-AFP, we used an Al-binding peptide (ABP) as a conjugator and fused it with Cn-AFP. The ABP bound well to the Al and did not considerably change the functional properties of AFP. Cn-AFP-coated Al (Cn-AFP-Al) showed a sufficiently low supercooling point. Additional trehalose coating of Cn-AFP-Al considerably delayed AFP denaturation on the Al without affecting its antifreeze activity. This metal surface–coating method using trehalose-fortified AFP can be applied to other metals important in the aircraft and cold storage fields where anti-icing materials are critical. PMID:26153855

  5. Creating Anti-icing Surfaces via the Direct Immobilization of Antifreeze Proteins on Aluminum.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Yunho; Park, Ji-in; Kim, Minjae; Kim, Hong Suk; Kwon, Myong Jong; Oh, Seung Jin; Kim, Young-Pil; Jin, EonSeon

    2015-07-08

    Cryoprotectants such as antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and sugar molecules may provide a solution for icing problems. These anti-icing substances protect cells and tissues from freezing by inhibiting ice formation. In this study, we developed a method for coating an industrial metal material (aluminum, Al) with AFP from the Antarctic marine diatom, Chaetoceros neogracile (Cn-AFP), to prevent or delay ice formation. To coat Al with Cn-AFP, we used an Al-binding peptide (ABP) as a conjugator and fused it with Cn-AFP. The ABP bound well to the Al and did not considerably change the functional properties of AFP. Cn-AFP-coated Al (Cn-AFP-Al) showed a sufficiently low supercooling point. Additional trehalose coating of Cn-AFP-Al considerably delayed AFP denaturation on the Al without affecting its antifreeze activity. This metal surface-coating method using trehalose-fortified AFP can be applied to other metals important in the aircraft and cold storage fields where anti-icing materials are critical.

  6. An Effective Antifreeze Protein Predictor with Ensemble Classifiers and Comprehensive Sequence Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) play a pivotal role in the antifreeze effect of overwintering organisms. They have a wide range of applications in numerous fields, such as improving the production of crops and the quality of frozen foods. Accurate identification of AFPs may provide important clues to decipher the underlying mechanisms of AFPs in ice-binding and to facilitate the selection of the most appropriate AFPs for several applications. Based on an ensemble learning technique, this study proposes an AFP identification system called AFP-Ensemble. In this system, random forest classifiers are trained by different training subsets and then aggregated into a consensus classifier by majority voting. The resulting predictor yields a sensitivity of 0.892, a specificity of 0.940, an accuracy of 0.938 and a balanced accuracy of 0.916 on an independent dataset, which are far better than the results obtained by previous methods. These results reveal that AFP-Ensemble is an effective and promising predictor for large-scale determination of AFPs. The detailed feature analysis in this study may give useful insights into the molecular mechanisms of AFP-ice interactions and provide guidance for the related experimental validation. A web server has been designed to implement the proposed method. PMID:26370959

  7. The biological function of an insect antifreeze protein simulated by molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Michael J; Morton, Craig J; Abraham, Sneha E; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect certain cold-adapted organisms from freezing to death by selectively adsorbing to internal ice crystals and inhibiting ice propagation. The molecular details of AFP adsorption-inhibition is uncertain but is proposed to involve the Gibbs–Thomson effect. Here we show by using unbiased molecular dynamics simulations a protein structure-function mechanism for the spruce budworm Choristoneura fumiferana AFP, including stereo-specific binding and consequential melting and freezing inhibition. The protein binds indirectly to the prism ice face through a linear array of ordered water molecules that are structurally distinct from the ice. Mutation of the ice binding surface disrupts water-ordering and abolishes activity. The adsorption is virtually irreversible, and we confirm the ice growth inhibition is consistent with the Gibbs–Thomson law. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05142.001 PMID:25951514

  8. Microfluidic experiments reveal that antifreeze proteins bound to ice crystals suffice to prevent their growth

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Yeliz; Drori, Ran; Pertaya-Braun, Natalya; Altan, Aysun; Barton, Tyler; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Groisman, Alex; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a subset of ice-binding proteins that control ice crystal growth. They have potential for the cryopreservation of cells, tissues, and organs, as well as for production and storage of food and protection of crops from frost. However, the detailed mechanism of action of AFPs is still unclear. Specifically, there is controversy regarding reversibility of binding of AFPs to crystal surfaces. The experimentally observed dependence of activity of AFPs on their concentration in solution appears to indicate that the binding is reversible. Here, by a series of experiments in temperature-controlled microfluidic devices, where the medium surrounding ice crystals can be exchanged, we show that the binding of hyperactive Tenebrio molitor AFP to ice crystals is practically irreversible and that surface-bound AFPs are sufficient to inhibit ice crystal growth even in solutions depleted of AFPs. These findings rule out theories of AFP activity relying on the presence of unbound protein molecules. PMID:23300286

  9. The biological function of an insect antifreeze protein simulated by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Michael J; Morton, Craig J; Abraham, Sneha E; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-05-07

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect certain cold-adapted organisms from freezing to death by selectively adsorbing to internal ice crystals and inhibiting ice propagation. The molecular details of AFP adsorption-inhibition is uncertain but is proposed to involve the Gibbs-Thomson effect. Here we show by using unbiased molecular dynamics simulations a protein structure-function mechanism for the spruce budworm Choristoneura fumiferana AFP, including stereo-specific binding and consequential melting and freezing inhibition. The protein binds indirectly to the prism ice face through a linear array of ordered water molecules that are structurally distinct from the ice. Mutation of the ice binding surface disrupts water-ordering and abolishes activity. The adsorption is virtually irreversible, and we confirm the ice growth inhibition is consistent with the Gibbs-Thomson law.

  10. Fuzzy oil drop model to interpret the structure of antifreeze proteins and their mutants.

    PubMed

    Banach, Mateusz; Prymula, Katarzyna; Jurkowski, Wiktor; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in proteins introduce structural changes and influence biological activity: the specific effects depend on the location of the mutation. The simple method proposed in the present paper is based on a two-step model of in silico protein folding. The structure of the first intermediate is assumed to be determined solely by backbone conformation. The structure of the second one is assumed to be determined by the presence of a hydrophobic center. The comparable structural analysis of the set of mutants is performed to identify the mutant-induced structural changes. The changes of the hydrophobic core organization measured by the divergence entropy allows quantitative comparison estimating the relative structural changes upon mutation. The set of antifreeze proteins, which appeared to represent the hydrophobic core structure accordant with "fuzzy oil drop" model was selected for analysis.

  11. Structural basis for antifreeze activity of ice-binding protein from arctic yeast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Park, Ae Kyung; Do, Hackwon; Park, Kyoung Sun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Chi, Young Min; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-03-30

    Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. produces a glycosylated ice-binding protein (LeIBP) with a molecular mass of ∼25 kDa, which can lower the freezing point below the melting point once it binds to ice. LeIBP is a member of a large class of ice-binding proteins, the structures of which are unknown. Here, we report the crystal structures of non-glycosylated LeIBP and glycosylated LeIBP at 1.57- and 2.43-Å resolution, respectively. Structural analysis of the LeIBPs revealed a dimeric right-handed β-helix fold, which is composed of three parts: a large coiled structural domain, a long helix region (residues 96-115 form a long α-helix that packs along one face of the β-helix), and a C-terminal hydrophobic loop region ((243)PFVPAPEVV(251)). Unexpectedly, the C-terminal hydrophobic loop region has an extended conformation pointing away from the body of the coiled structural domain and forms intertwined dimer interactions. In addition, structural analysis of glycosylated LeIBP with sugar moieties attached to Asn(185) provides a basis for interpreting previous biochemical analyses as well as the increased stability and secretion of glycosylated LeIBP. We also determined that the aligned Thr/Ser/Ala residues are critical for ice binding within the B face of LeIBP using site-directed mutagenesis. Although LeIBP has a common β-helical fold similar to that of canonical hyperactive antifreeze proteins, the ice-binding site is more complex and does not have a simple ice-binding motif. In conclusion, we could identify the ice-binding site of LeIBP and discuss differences in the ice-binding modes compared with other known antifreeze proteins and ice-binding proteins.

  12. Structural Basis for Antifreeze Activity of Ice-binding Protein from Arctic Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Park, Ae Kyung; Do, Hackwon; Park, Kyoung Sun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Chi, Young Min; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-01-01

    Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. produces a glycosylated ice-binding protein (LeIBP) with a molecular mass of ∼25 kDa, which can lower the freezing point below the melting point once it binds to ice. LeIBP is a member of a large class of ice-binding proteins, the structures of which are unknown. Here, we report the crystal structures of non-glycosylated LeIBP and glycosylated LeIBP at 1.57- and 2.43-Å resolution, respectively. Structural analysis of the LeIBPs revealed a dimeric right-handed β-helix fold, which is composed of three parts: a large coiled structural domain, a long helix region (residues 96–115 form a long α-helix that packs along one face of the β-helix), and a C-terminal hydrophobic loop region (243PFVPAPEVV251). Unexpectedly, the C-terminal hydrophobic loop region has an extended conformation pointing away from the body of the coiled structural domain and forms intertwined dimer interactions. In addition, structural analysis of glycosylated LeIBP with sugar moieties attached to Asn185 provides a basis for interpreting previous biochemical analyses as well as the increased stability and secretion of glycosylated LeIBP. We also determined that the aligned Thr/Ser/Ala residues are critical for ice binding within the B face of LeIBP using site-directed mutagenesis. Although LeIBP has a common β-helical fold similar to that of canonical hyperactive antifreeze proteins, the ice-binding site is more complex and does not have a simple ice-binding motif. In conclusion, we could identify the ice-binding site of LeIBP and discuss differences in the ice-binding modes compared with other known antifreeze proteins and ice-binding proteins. PMID:22303017

  13. Solution structure of an antifreeze protein CfAFP-501 from Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Li, Congmin; Guo, Xianrong; Jia, Zongchao; Xia, Bin; Jin, Changwen

    2005-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are widely employed by various organisms as part of their overwintering survival strategy. AFPs have the unique ability to suppress the freezing point of aqueous solution and inhibit ice recrystallization through binding to the ice seed crystals and restricting their growth. The solution structure of CfAFP-501 from spruce budworm has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. Our result demonstrates that CfAFP-501 retains its rigid and highly regular structure in solution. Overall, the solution structure is similar to the crystal structure except the N- and C-terminal regions. NMR spin-relaxation experiments further indicate the overall rigidity of the protein and identify a collection of residues with greater flexibilities. Furthermore, Pro91 shows a cis conformation in solution instead of the trans conformation determined in the crystal structure.

  14. Improvement of texture properties and flavor of frozen dough by carrot (Daucus carota) antifreeze protein supplementation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Li; Gao, Hong; Guo, Xiao Na; Yao, Hui Yuan

    2007-11-14

    The effects of concentrated carrot protein (CCP) containing 15.4% (w/w) carrot (Daucus carota) antifreeze protein on texture properties of frozen dough and volatile compounds of crumb were studied. CCP supplementation lowered the freezable water content of the dough, resulting in some beneficial effects including holding loaf volume steadily and making the dough softer and steadier during frozen storage. Furthermore, SPME-GC-MS analysis showed CCP supplementation did not give any negative influences on volatile compounds of crumb and gave a pleasant aroma felt like Michelia alba DC from trans-caryophyllene simultaneously. Combining our previous results that CCP supplementation improves the fermentation capacity of the frozen dough, CCP could be used as a beneficial additive for frozen dough processing.

  15. Why ice-binding type I antifreeze protein acts as a gas hydrate crystal inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A; Englezos, Peter

    2015-04-21

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) prevent ice growth by binding to a specific ice plane. Some AFPs have been found to inhibit the formation of gas hydrates which are a serious safety and operational challenge for the oil and gas industry. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the mechanism of action of the winter flounder AFP (wf-AFP) in inhibiting methane hydrate growth. The wf-AFP adsorbs onto the methane hydrate surface via cooperative binding of a set of hydrophobic methyl pendant groups to the empty half-cages at the hydrate/water interface. Each binding set is composed of the methyl side chain of threonine and two alanine residues, four and seven places further down in the sequence of the protein. Understanding the principle of action of AFPs can lead to the rational design of green hydrate inhibitor molecules with potential superior performance.

  16. High water mobility on the ice-binding surface of a hyperactive antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Modig, Kristofer; Qvist, Johan; Marshall, Christopher B; Davies, Peter L; Halle, Bertil

    2010-09-21

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) prevent uncontrolled ice formation in organisms exposed to subzero temperatures by binding irreversibly to specific planes of nascent ice crystals. To understand the thermodynamic driving forces and kinetic mechanism of AFP activity, it is necessary to characterize the hydration behavior of these proteins in solution. With this aim, we have studied the hyperactive insect AFP from Tenebrio molitor (TmAFP) with the (17)O magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) method, which selectively monitors the rotational motion and exchange kinetics of water molecules on picosecond-microsecond time scales. The global hydration behavior of TmAFP is found to be similar to non-antifreeze proteins, with no evidence of ice-like or long-ranged modifications of the solvent. However, two sets of structural water molecules, located within the core and on the ice-binding face in the crystal structure of TmAFP, may have functional significance. We find that 2 of the 5 internal water molecules exchange with a residence time of 8 +/- 1 micros at 300 K and a large activation energy of approximately 50 kJ mol(-1), reflecting intermittent large-scale conformational fluctuations in this exceptionally dense and rigid protein. Six water molecules arrayed with ice-like spacing in the central trough on the ice-binding face exchange with bulk water on a sub-nanosecond time scale. The combination of high order and fast exchange may allow these water molecules to contribute entropically to the ice-binding affinity without limiting the absorption rate.

  17. Crystal structure of an insect antifreeze protein and its implications for ice binding.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Aaron; Nguyen, Jennifer B; Basu, Koli; Zhu, Darren F; Thakral, Durga; Davies, Peter L; Isaacs, Farren J; Modis, Yorgo; Meng, Wuyi

    2013-04-26

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) help some organisms resist freezing by binding to ice crystals and inhibiting their growth. The molecular basis for how these proteins recognize and bind ice is not well understood. The longhorn beetle Rhagium inquisitor can supercool to below -25 °C, in part by synthesizing the most potent antifreeze protein studied thus far (RiAFP). We report the crystal structure of the 13-kDa RiAFP, determined at 1.21 Å resolution using direct methods. The structure, which contains 1,914 nonhydrogen protein atoms in the asymmetric unit, is the largest determined ab initio without heavy atoms. It reveals a compressed β-solenoid fold in which the top and bottom sheets are held together by a silk-like interdigitation of short side chains. RiAFP is perhaps the most regular structure yet observed. It is a second independently evolved AFP type in beetles. The two beetle AFPs have in common an extremely flat ice-binding surface comprising regular outward-projecting parallel arrays of threonine residues. The more active, wider RiAFP has four (rather than two) of these arrays between which the crystal structure shows the presence of ice-like waters. Molecular dynamics simulations independently reproduce the locations of these ordered crystallographic waters and predict additional waters that together provide an extensive view of the AFP interaction with ice. By matching several planes of hexagonal ice, these waters may help freeze the AFP to the ice surface, thus providing the molecular basis of ice binding.

  18. Crystal Structure of an Insect Antifreeze Protein and Its Implications for Ice Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Aaron; Nguyen, Jennifer B.; Basu, Koli; Zhu, Darren F.; Thakral, Durga; Davies, Peter L.; Isaacs, Farren J.; Modis, Yorgo; Meng, Wuyi

    2013-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) help some organisms resist freezing by binding to ice crystals and inhibiting their growth. The molecular basis for how these proteins recognize and bind ice is not well understood. The longhorn beetle Rhagium inquisitor can supercool to below −25 °C, in part by synthesizing the most potent antifreeze protein studied thus far (RiAFP). We report the crystal structure of the 13-kDa RiAFP, determined at 1.21 Å resolution using direct methods. The structure, which contains 1,914 nonhydrogen protein atoms in the asymmetric unit, is the largest determined ab initio without heavy atoms. It reveals a compressed β-solenoid fold in which the top and bottom sheets are held together by a silk-like interdigitation of short side chains. RiAFP is perhaps the most regular structure yet observed. It is a second independently evolved AFP type in beetles. The two beetle AFPs have in common an extremely flat ice-binding surface comprising regular outward-projecting parallel arrays of threonine residues. The more active, wider RiAFP has four (rather than two) of these arrays between which the crystal structure shows the presence of ice-like waters. Molecular dynamics simulations independently reproduce the locations of these ordered crystallographic waters and predict additional waters that together provide an extensive view of the AFP interaction with ice. By matching several planes of hexagonal ice, these waters may help freeze the AFP to the ice surface, thus providing the molecular basis of ice binding. PMID:23486477

  19. Efficiency of beetle (Dendroides canadensis) recombinant antifreeze protein for buffalo semen freezability and fertility.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, S; Khan, M A; Shahzad, Q; Azam, A; Ansari, M S; Rakha, B A; Ejaz, R; Husna, A U; Duman, J G; Akhter, S

    2016-10-15

    Overwintering larvae of the beetle Dendroides canadensis produce potent antifreeze proteins to inhibit inoculative freezing and promote supercooling. We hypothesized that addition of Dendroides canadensis recombinant antifreeze proteins (DAFPs) in the extender will improve the quality and fertility of cryopreserved Nili-Ravi buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) sperm. The study was divided into two parts: (1) Evaluation of the effect of DAFPs on the quality of frozen-thawed buffalo bull sperm and (2) Examination of the fertilizing ability of frozen-thawed buffalo bull sperm. Semen was collected from three bulls using an artificial vagina (42 °C). Qualifying ejaculates from each bull were divided into four aliquots and diluted (at 37 °C, 50 × 10(6) sperm/mL) in tris-citric acid extender containing DAFP (at 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/mL), and the sperm were evaluated for important characteristics relative to a control without DAFP. D canadensis recombinant antifreeze proteins at any of the three concentrations did not affect sperm progressive motility or plasma membrane integrity (PMI), either before or after the semen was cooled to 4 °C in 2 hours. However, after 24 hours of cryostorage at -196 °C, followed by thawing at 37 °C for 30 seconds, sperm progressive motility and PMI were higher (P < 0.05) in extender containing DAFP at 10 μg/mL compared with control. The in vitro-fertilizing ability of cryopreserved (-196 °C) sperm supplemented with DAFP (10 μg/mL) was slightly higher (P = 0.098) compared with control, as assessed through in vitro cleavage rate of in vitro matured buffalo oocytes. Also, the in vivo fertility rate was evaluated by inseminating 100 buffaloes (50 inseminations per extender) 12 hours after standing heat. The fertility rate of cryopreserved buffalo bull sperm in terms of positive pregnancy at 90 days after insemination was clinically higher but remained statistically nonsignificant in extender containing DAFP at 10 μg/mL (52

  20. Re-Evaluation of a Bacterial Antifreeze Protein as an Adhesin with Ice-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuaiqi; Garnham, Christopher P.; Whitney, John C.; Graham, Laurie A.; Davies, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    A novel role for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) may reside in an exceptionally large 1.5-MDa adhesin isolated from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. MpAFP was purified from bacterial lysates by ice adsorption and gel electrophoresis. We have previously reported that two highly repetitive sequences, region II (RII) and region IV (RIV), divide MpAFP into five distinct regions, all of which require mM Ca2+ levels for correct folding. Also, the antifreeze activity is confined to the 322-residue RIV, which forms a Ca2+-bound beta-helix containing thirteen Repeats-In-Toxin (RTX)-like repeats. RII accounts for approximately 90% of the mass of MpAFP and is made up of ∼120 tandem 104-residue repeats. Because these repeats are identical in DNA sequence, their number was estimated here by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Structural homology analysis by the Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (Phyre2) server indicates that the 104-residue RII repeat adopts an immunoglobulin beta-sandwich fold that is typical of many secreted adhesion proteins. Additional RTX-like repeats in RV may serve as a non-cleavable signal sequence for the type I secretion pathway. Immunodetection shows both repeated regions are uniformly distributed over the cell surface. We suggest that the development of an AFP-like domain within this adhesin attached to the bacterial outer surface serves to transiently bind the host bacteria to ice. This association would keep the bacteria within the upper reaches of the water column where oxygen and nutrients are potentially more abundant. This novel envirotactic role would give AFPs a third function, after freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance: that of transiently binding an organism to ice. PMID:23144980

  1. Antifreeze protein from shorthorn sculpin: identification of the ice-binding surface.

    PubMed

    Baardsnes, J; Jelokhani-Niaraki, M; Kondejewski, L H; Kuiper, M J; Kay, C M; Hodges, R S; Davies, P L

    2001-12-01

    Shorthorn sculpins, Myoxocephalus scorpius, are protected from freezing in icy seawater by alanine-rich, alpha-helical antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The major serum isoform (SS-8) has been reisolated and analyzed to establish its correct sequence. Over most of its length, this 42 amino acid protein is predicted to be an amphipathic alpha-helix with one face entirely composed of Ala residues. The other side of the helix, which is more heterogeneous and hydrophilic, contains several Lys. Computer simulations had suggested previously that these Lys residues were involved in binding of the peptide to the [11-20] plane of ice in the <-1102> direction. To test this hypothesis, a series of SS-8 variants were generated with single Ala to Lys substitutions at various points around the helix. All of the peptides retained significant alpha-helicity and remained as monomers in solution. Substitutions on the hydrophilic helix face at position 16, 19, or 22 had no obvious effect, but those on the adjacent Ala-rich surface at positions 17, 21, and 25 abolished antifreeze activity. These results, with support from our own modeling and docking studies, show that the helix interacts with the ice surface via the conserved alanine face, and lend support to the emerging idea that the interaction of fish AFPs with ice involves appreciable hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, our modeling suggests a new N terminus cap structure, which helps to stabilize the helix, whereas the role of the lysines on the hydrophilic face may be to enhance solubility of the protein.

  2. Molecular Recognition of Methyl α-d-Mannopyranoside by Antifreeze (Glyco)Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins [AF(G)Ps] have been well-known for more than three decades for their ability to inhibit the growth and recrystallization of ice through binding to specific ice crystal faces, and they show remarkable structural compatibility with specific ice crystal faces. Here, we show that the crystal growth faces of methyl α-d-mannopyranoside (MDM), a representative pyranose sugar, also show noteworthy structural compatibility with the known periodicities of AF(G)Ps. We selected fish AFGPs (AFGP8, AFGP1–5), and a beetle AFP (DAFP1) with increasing antifreeze activity as potential additives for controlling MDM crystal growth. Similar to their effects on ice growth, the AF(G)Ps can inhibit MDM crystal growth and recrystallization, and more significantly, the effectiveness for the AF(G)Ps are well correlated with their antifreeze activity. MDM crystals grown in the presence of AF(G)Ps are smaller and have better defined shapes and are of higher quality as indicated by single crystal X-ray diffraction and polarized microscopy than control crystals, but no new polymorphs of MDM were identified by single crystal X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The observed changes in the average sizes of the MDM crystals can be related to the changes in the number of the MDM nuclei in the presence of the AF(G)Ps. The critical free energy change differences of the MDM nucleation in the absence and presence of the additives were calculated. These values are close to those of the ice nucleation in the presence of AF(G)Ps suggesting similar interactions are involved in the molecular recognition of MDM by the AF(G)Ps. To our knowledge this is the first report where AF(G)Ps have been used to control crystal growth of carbohydrates and on AFGPs controlling non-ice-like crystals. Our finding suggests MDM might be a possible alternative to ice for studying the detailed mechanism of AF

  3. A hyperactive, Ca2+-dependent antifreeze protein in an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Peter L; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna

    2005-04-01

    In cold climates, some plants and bacteria that cannot avoid freezing use antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to lessen the destructive effects of ice recrystallization. These AFPs have weak freezing point depression activity, perhaps to avoid sudden, uncontrolled growth of ice. Here, we report on an uncharacteristically powerful bacterial AFP found in an Antarctic strain of the bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. It is Ca(2+)-dependent, shows evidence of cooperativity, and can produce over 2 degrees C of freezing point depression. Unlike most AFPs, it does not produce obvious crystal faceting during thermal hysteresis. This AFP might be capable of imparting freezing avoidance to M. primoryensis in ice-covered Antarctic lakes. A hyperactive bacterial AFP has not previously been reported.

  4. Detecting seasonal variation of antifreeze protein distribution in Rhagium mordax using immunofluorescence and high resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buch, J L; Ramløv, H

    2017-02-01

    Larvae of the blackspotted pliers support beetle, Rhagium mordax, were collected monthly, for the duration of 2012 and fixed. The larvae were embedded in paraffin wax and sectioned. Using fluorophore-coupled antibodies specific to the R. mordax antifreeze protein, RmAFP1, sections were visualised with UV reflected light microscopy. An automated software analysis method was developed in order to discard autofluorescence, and quantify fluorescence from bound antibodies. The results show that R. mordax cuticle and gut exhibit a higher degree of fluorophore-bound fluorescence during summer, than in the cold months. It is hypothesised that R. mordax stores RmAFP1 in, or near, the fat body during times when freeze avoidance is not needed.

  5. Polyampholytes as low toxic efficient cryoprotective agents with antifreeze protein properties.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kazuaki; Hyon, Suong-Hyu

    2009-09-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been used for several decades as the most efficient cryoprotective agent (CPA) for many types of cells and tissues in spite of its cytotoxicity and its effects on differentiation. Here we report that polyampholytes with an appropriate ratio of amino and carboxyl groups show higher cryopreservation efficiency and lower cytotoxicity than DMSO. Culture medium solutions of epsilon-poly-L-lysine (PLL) with more than 50 mol% of amino groups carboxylated showed excellent post-thaw survival efficiency of 95% murine L929 cells, and rat mesenchymal stem cells fully retained the potential for differentiation without serum. We also found that carboxylated PLLs showed antifreeze protein properties, such as ice recrystallization inhibition, which may contribute to successful cryopreservation by membrane protection. Thus, these polyampholytes can replace DMSO as new materials for CPAs in various preserving functions and will also be useful in studies elucidating the mechanisms of cryopreservation.

  6. Fluorescence microscopy studies of the hyperactive antifreeze protein from an insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertaya, N.; di Prinzio, C. L.; Wilen, L.; Thomson, E.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Marshall, C. B.; Davies, P. L.; Braslavsky, I.

    2006-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect animals from freezing by binding to extracellular ice and inhibiting its growth. Since the initial discovery of AFPs in fish, non-homologous types have been found in insects, plants, bacteria, fungi, and vertebrates. Different AFP types have diverse structures and varied activities. For example, AFPs produced by insects are much more active in inhibiting ice crystal growth compared to most AFPs found in fish or plants. By putting a fluorescent tag on an insect AFP we were able to visualize AFP binding to ice, to determine the ice crystal surfaces to which the AFP adheres, and to follow the kinetics of AFP binding to ice. We expect this approach will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of AFP activity and in particular the hyperactivity of insect AFPs.

  7. Effects of supplementation with antifreeze proteins on the follicular integrity of vitrified-warmed mouse ovaries: Comparison of two types of antifreeze proteins alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyung; Kong, Hyun Sun; Youm, Hye Won; Jee, Byung Chul

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of supplementing vitrification and warming solutions with two types of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and the combination thereof on the follicular integrity of vitrified-warmed mouse ovaries. Ovaries (n=154) were obtained from 5-week-old BDF1 female mice (n=77) and vitrified using ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide with the supplementation of 10 mg/mL of Flavobacterium frigoris ice-binding protein (FfIBP), 10 mg/mL of type III AFP, or the combination thereof. Ovarian sections were examined by light microscopy after hematoxylin and eosin staining, and follicular intactness was assessed as a whole and according to the type of follicle. Apoptosis within the follicles as a whole was detected by a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assay. The proportion of overall intact follicles was significantly higher in the type III AFP-supplemented group (60.5%) and the combination group (62.9%) than in the non-supplemented controls (43.8%, p<0.05 for each). The proportion of intact primordial follicles was significantly higher in the FfIBP-supplemented (90.0%), type III AFP-supplemented (92.3%), and combination (89.7%) groups than in the non-supplemented control group (46.2%, p<0.05 for each). The proportions of non-apoptotic follicles were similar across the four groups. Supplementation of the vitrification and warming solutions with FfIBP, type III AFP, or the combination thereof was equally beneficial for the preservation of primordial follicles in vitrified mouse ovaries.

  8. Effects of supplementation with antifreeze proteins on the follicular integrity of vitrified-warmed mouse ovaries: Comparison of two types of antifreeze proteins alone and in combination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyung; Kong, Hyun Sun; Youm, Hye Won

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of supplementing vitrification and warming solutions with two types of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and the combination thereof on the follicular integrity of vitrified-warmed mouse ovaries. Methods Ovaries (n=154) were obtained from 5-week-old BDF1 female mice (n=77) and vitrified using ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide with the supplementation of 10 mg/mL of Flavobacterium frigoris ice-binding protein (FfIBP), 10 mg/mL of type III AFP, or the combination thereof. Ovarian sections were examined by light microscopy after hematoxylin and eosin staining, and follicular intactness was assessed as a whole and according to the type of follicle. Apoptosis within the follicles as a whole was detected by a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assay. Results The proportion of overall intact follicles was significantly higher in the type III AFP-supplemented group (60.5%) and the combination group (62.9%) than in the non-supplemented controls (43.8%, p<0.05 for each). The proportion of intact primordial follicles was significantly higher in the FfIBP-supplemented (90.0%), type III AFP-supplemented (92.3%), and combination (89.7%) groups than in the non-supplemented control group (46.2%, p<0.05 for each). The proportions of non-apoptotic follicles were similar across the four groups. Conclusion Supplementation of the vitrification and warming solutions with FfIBP, type III AFP, or the combination thereof was equally beneficial for the preservation of primordial follicles in vitrified mouse ovaries. PMID:28428938

  9. The C-type lectin-like receptors of Dectin-1 cluster in natural killer gene complex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui

    2012-08-01

    Natural killer gene complex (NKC) encodes a group of proteins with a single C-type lectin-like domain, (CTLD) which can be subdivided several subfamilies according to their structures and expression patterns. The receptors containing the conserved calcium binding sites in the CTLD fold belong to group II of C-type lectin superfamily and are expressed on myeloid cells and non- myeloid cells. The receptors lacking conserved calcium binding sites in the CTLD fold have evolved to bind ligands other than carbohydrates independently on calcium and thereby are named as C-type lectin-like receptors. The C-type lectin-like receptors are previously thought to be exclusively expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and enable NK cells to discriminate self, missing self or altered self. However, some C-type lectin-like receptors are identified in myeloid cells and are intensely investigated, recently. These myeloid C-type lectin-like receptors, especially Dectin-1 cluster, have a wide variety of ligands, including those of exogenous origin, and play important roles in the physiological functions and pathological processes including immune homeostasis, immune defenses, and immune surveillance. In this review, we summarize each member of the Dectin-1 cluster, including their structural profiles, expression patterns, signaling properties as well as known physiological functions.

  10. Antifreeze proteins govern the precipitation of trehalose in a freezing-avoiding insect at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Wang, Sen; Duman, John G; Arifin, Josh Fnu; Juwita, Vonny; Goddard, William A; Rios, Alejandra; Liu, Fan; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Abrol, Ravinder; DeVries, Arthur L; Henling, Lawrence M

    2016-06-14

    The remarkable adaptive strategies of insects to extreme environments are linked to the biochemical compounds in their body fluids. Trehalose, a versatile sugar molecule, can accumulate to high levels in freeze-tolerant and freeze-avoiding insects, functioning as a cryoprotectant and a supercooling agent. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), known to protect organisms from freezing by lowering the freezing temperature and deferring the growth of ice, are present at high levels in some freeze-avoiding insects in winter, and yet, paradoxically are found in some freeze-tolerant insects. Here, we report a previously unidentified role for AFPs in effectively inhibiting trehalose precipitation in the hemolymph (or blood) of overwintering beetle larvae. We determine the trehalose level (29.6 ± 0.6 mg/mL) in the larval hemolymph of a beetle, Dendroides canadensis, and demonstrate that the hemolymph AFPs are crucial for inhibiting trehalose crystallization, whereas the presence of trehalose also enhances the antifreeze activity of AFPs. To dissect the molecular mechanism, we examine the molecular recognition between AFP and trehalose crystal interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations. The theory corroborates the experiments and shows preferential strong binding of the AFP to the fast growing surfaces of the sugar crystal. This newly uncovered role for AFPs may help explain the long-speculated role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species. We propose that the presence of high levels of molecules important for survival but prone to precipitation in poikilotherms (their body temperature can vary considerably) needs a companion mechanism to prevent the precipitation and here present, to our knowledge, the first example. Such a combination of trehalose and AFPs also provides a novel approach for cold protection and for trehalose crystallization inhibition in industrial applications.

  11. Antifreeze proteins govern the precipitation of trehalose in a freezing-avoiding insect at low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xin; Wang, Sen; Duman, John G.; Arifin, Josh Fnu; Juwita, Vonny; Goddard, William A.; Rios, Alejandra; Liu, Fan; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Abrol, Ravinder; DeVries, Arthur L.; Henling, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable adaptive strategies of insects to extreme environments are linked to the biochemical compounds in their body fluids. Trehalose, a versatile sugar molecule, can accumulate to high levels in freeze-tolerant and freeze-avoiding insects, functioning as a cryoprotectant and a supercooling agent. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), known to protect organisms from freezing by lowering the freezing temperature and deferring the growth of ice, are present at high levels in some freeze-avoiding insects in winter, and yet, paradoxically are found in some freeze-tolerant insects. Here, we report a previously unidentified role for AFPs in effectively inhibiting trehalose precipitation in the hemolymph (or blood) of overwintering beetle larvae. We determine the trehalose level (29.6 ± 0.6 mg/mL) in the larval hemolymph of a beetle, Dendroides canadensis, and demonstrate that the hemolymph AFPs are crucial for inhibiting trehalose crystallization, whereas the presence of trehalose also enhances the antifreeze activity of AFPs. To dissect the molecular mechanism, we examine the molecular recognition between AFP and trehalose crystal interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations. The theory corroborates the experiments and shows preferential strong binding of the AFP to the fast growing surfaces of the sugar crystal. This newly uncovered role for AFPs may help explain the long-speculated role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species. We propose that the presence of high levels of molecules important for survival but prone to precipitation in poikilotherms (their body temperature can vary considerably) needs a companion mechanism to prevent the precipitation and here present, to our knowledge, the first example. Such a combination of trehalose and AFPs also provides a novel approach for cold protection and for trehalose crystallization inhibition in industrial applications. PMID:27226297

  12. Antifreeze poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The poisonous ingredients in antifreeze are: Ethylene glycol Methanol Propylene glycol ... For ethylene glycol: Death may occur within the first 24 hours. If the patient survives, there may be little or ...

  13. The lectin like domain of thrombomodulin is involved in the defence against pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Lattenist, Lionel; Teske, Gwendoline; Claessen, Nike; Florquin, Sandrine; Conway, Edward M; Roelofs, Joris J T H

    2015-12-01

    Pyelonephritis, a common complication of urinary tract infections, is frequently associated with kidney scarring and may lead to end-stage renal disease. During bacterial infections inflammatory and coagulation pathways and their mutual interaction are playing pivotal roles in the host response. Given that thrombomodulin (TM) is crucially involved in the interplay between coagulation and inflammation, we aimed to investigate the roles of its EGF and lectin-like domains in inflammation during acute pyelonephritis. Indeed, the EGF-like and the lectin-like domains of TM, are especially known to orchestrate inflammation and coagulation in different ways. Acute pyelonephritis was induced by intravesical inoculation of 1 × 10(8) CFU of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in two strains of TM transgenic mice. TM(pro/pro) mice carry a mutation in the EGF-like domain making them unable to activate protein C, an anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory protein. TM(LeD/LeD) mice lack the lectin-like domain of TM, which is critical for its anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties. Mice were sacrificed 24 and 48 h after inoculation. Bacterial loads, the immune response and the activation of coagulation were evaluated in the kidney and the bladder. TM(LeD/LeD) mice showed elevated bacterial load in bladder and kidneys compared to WT mice, whereas TM(pro/pro) had similar bacterial load as WT mice. TM(LeD/LeD) mice displayed a reduced local production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil renal infiltration. Activation of coagulation was comparable in TM(LeD/LeD) and WT mice. From these data, we conclude that the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin is critically involved in host defence against E. coli induced acute pyelonephritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluorescence microscopy evidence for quasi-permanent attachment of antifreeze proteins to ice surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pertaya, Natalya; Marshall, Christopher B; DiPrinzio, Carlos L; Wilen, Larry; Thomson, Erik S; Wettlaufer, J S; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2007-05-15

    Many organisms are protected from freezing by the presence of extracellular antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which bind to ice, modify its morphology, and prevent its further growth. These proteins have a wide range of applications including cryopreservation, frost protection, and as models in biomineralization research. However, understanding their mechanism of action remains an outstanding challenge. While the prevailing adsorption-inhibition hypothesis argues that AFPs must bind irreversibly to ice to arrest its growth, other theories suggest that there is exchange between the bound surface proteins and the free proteins in solution. By conjugating green fluorescence protein (GFP) to a fish AFP (Type III), we observed the binding of the AFP to ice. This was accomplished by monitoring the presence of GFP-AFP on the surface of ice crystals several microns in diameter using fluorescence microscopy. The lack of recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching of the GFP component of the surface-bound GFP-AFP shows that there is no equilibrium surface-solution exchange of GFP-AFP and thus supports the adsorption-inhibition mechanism for this type of AFP. Moreover, our study establishes the utility of fluorescently labeled AFPs as a research tool for investigating the mechanisms underlying the activity of this diverse group of proteins.

  15. Thermodynamics of Hydration Water around an Antifreeze Protein: A Molecular Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Hari Datt; Leitner, David M

    2017-10-05

    We investigate by molecular simulations thermodynamic properties of hydration water and protein, the sensitivity of hydrogen bonds to change in temperature, and hydration water distribution at varying levels of hydration of a hyperactive antifreeze protein, DAFP-1. Hydration water coverage of the protein and partial thermodynamic properties of the hydration water are heterogeneous, different for the water near the ice-binding site (IBS) and the rest of the protein, particularly at low levels of hydration. Overall, we find the partial specific heat of water to be larger at low hydration levels than in the fully hydrated limit, with the separation corresponding roughly to one hydration layer. Differences in the specific heat in the low- and fully hydrated regions are accounted for by the varying sensitivity of water-water and water-protein hydrogen bonds to change in temperature as a function of hydration, most strikingly near the IBS. Using values computed for the specific heat, we estimate the partial entropy of the water and protein. We find the partial entropy of DAFP-1 to be greater in the fully hydrated limit than at low levels of hydration, whereas the partial entropy of water is somewhat smaller.

  16. Fluorescence Microscopy Evidence for Quasi-Permanent Attachment of Antifreeze Proteins to Ice Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Pertaya, Natalya; Marshall, Christopher B.; DiPrinzio, Carlos L.; Wilen, Larry; Thomson, Erik S.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2007-01-01

    Many organisms are protected from freezing by the presence of extracellular antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which bind to ice, modify its morphology, and prevent its further growth. These proteins have a wide range of applications including cryopreservation, frost protection, and as models in biomineralization research. However, understanding their mechanism of action remains an outstanding challenge. While the prevailing adsorption-inhibition hypothesis argues that AFPs must bind irreversibly to ice to arrest its growth, other theories suggest that there is exchange between the bound surface proteins and the free proteins in solution. By conjugating green fluorescence protein (GFP) to a fish AFP (Type III), we observed the binding of the AFP to ice. This was accomplished by monitoring the presence of GFP-AFP on the surface of ice crystals several microns in diameter using fluorescence microscopy. The lack of recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching of the GFP component of the surface-bound GFP-AFP shows that there is no equilibrium surface-solution exchange of GFP-AFP and thus supports the adsorption-inhibition mechanism for this type of AFP. Moreover, our study establishes the utility of fluorescently labeled AFPs as a research tool for investigating the mechanisms underlying the activity of this diverse group of proteins. PMID:17325008

  17. Low thermodynamic but high kinetic stability of an antifreeze protein from Rhagium mordax.

    PubMed

    Friis, Dennis S; Johnsen, Johannes L; Kristiansen, Erlend; Westh, Peter; Ramløv, Hans

    2014-06-01

    The equilibrium heat stability and the kinetic heat tolerance of a recombinant antifreeze protein (AFP) from the beetle Rhagium mordax (RmAFP1) are studied through differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In contrast to other insect AFPs studied with this respect, the RmAFP1 has only one disulfide bridge. The melting temperature, Tm , of the protein is determined to be 28.5°C (pH 7.4), which is much lower than most of those reported for AFPs or globular proteins in general. Despite its low melting temperature, both biophysical and activity measurements show that the protein almost completely refolds into the native state after repeated exposure of 70°C. RmAFP1 thus appears to be kinetically stable even far above its melting temperature. Thermodynamically, the insect AFPs seem to be dividable in three groups, relating to their content of disulfide bridges and widths of the ice binding motifs; high melting temperature AFPs (high disulfide content, TxT motifs), low melting temperature but high refolding capability AFPs (one disulfide bridge, TxTxTxT motifs) and irreversibly unfolded AFPs at low temperatures (no disulfide bridges, TxTxTxTxT motifs). The property of being able to cope with high temperature exposures may appear peculiar for proteins which strictly have their effect at subzero temperatures. Different aspects of this are discussed.

  18. Balance between hydration enthalpy and entropy is important for ice binding surfaces in Antifreeze Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schauperl, Michael; Podewitz, Maren; Ortner, Teresa S; Waibl, Franz; Thoeny, Alexander; Loerting, Thomas; Liedl, Klaus R

    2017-09-19

    Antifreeze Proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of an ice crystal by binding to it. The detailed binding mechanism is, however, still not fully understood. We investigated three AFPs using Molecular Dynamics simulations in combination with Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, exploring their hydration thermodynamics. The observed enthalpic and entropic differences between the ice-binding sites and the inactive surface reveal key properties essential for proteins in order to bind ice: While entropic contributions are similar for all sites, the enthalpic gain for all ice-binding sites is lower than for the rest of the protein surface. In contrast to most of the recently published studies, our analyses show that enthalpic interactions are as important as an ice-like pre-ordering. Based on these observations, we propose a new, thermodynamically more refined mechanism of the ice recognition process showing that the appropriate balance between entropy and enthalpy facilitates ice-binding of proteins. Especially, high enthalpic interactions between the protein surface and water can hinder the ice-binding activity.

  19. Challenges in the expression of disulfide bonded, threonine-rich antifreeze proteins in bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, Michael G; d'Anjou, Marc; Davies, Peter L; Daugulis, Andrew J; Walker, Virginia K

    2006-05-01

    Certain freeze-intolerant insects produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs) during overwintering including the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) and yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) AFP gene families. However, only a few of the isoforms, encoded by their multiple-copy gene families, have been characterized. When expressed in bacterial systems the insect AFPs have to be denatured and refolded in vitro, a procedure that is not uniformly successful, presumably due to the beta-helix structure and the requirement for disulfide bonds. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, bacterial vectors and hosts that have been developed to produce soluble, folded proteins, as well as a yeast expression system (Pichia pastoris) were employed. Bacterial expression resulted in low quantities of active recombinant protein for certain isoforms. In contrast, both small and large-scale fermentation of recombinant AFP in Pichia yielded substantial protein production (100 mg/L) but functional ice binding activity of protein produced in three different transformed yeast strains (KM71, X33 or GS115) was low. Inappropriate O-linked glycosylation of the Thr-rich AFPs appeared to be partially reversed by mild chemical deglycosylation, but activity remained low. Substantial quantities, as well as activity were recovered when a fish AFP, with disulfide bonds, but without potential Thr glycosylation sites was expressed in the yeast system.

  20. Engineering a naturally inactive isoform of type III antifreeze protein into one that can stop the growth of ice.

    PubMed

    Garnham, Christopher P; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Davies, Peter L

    2012-11-02

    Type III antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can be sub-divided into three classes of isoforms. SP and QAE2 isoforms can slow, but not stop, the growth of ice crystals by binding to pyramidal ice planes. The other class (QAE1) binds both pyramidal and primary prism planes and is able to halt the growth of ice. Here we describe the conversion of a QAE2 isoform into a fully-active QAE1-like isoform by changing four surface-exposed residues to develop a primary prism plane binding site. Molecular dynamics analyses suggest that the basis for gain in antifreeze activity is the formation of ice-like waters on the mutated protein surface.

  1. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Congdon, Thomas R; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-09-12

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications-from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action.

  2. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications—from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action. PMID:27476873

  3. Thrombomodulin-mediated cell adhesion: involvement of its lectin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Wu, Chun-Mei; Yang, Hsi-Yuan; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2003-11-21

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an integral membrane glycoprotein that is a potent anticoagulant factor. TM may also possess functions distinct from its anticoagulant activity. Here the influence of TM on cell adhesion was studied in TM-negative melanoma A2058 cells transfected with green fluorescent protein-tagged TM (TMG) or lectin domain-deleted TM (TMG(DeltaL)). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that both TMG and TMG(DeltaL) were distributed in the plasma membrane. TMG-expressed cells grew as closely clustered colonies, with TM localized prominently in the intercellular boundaries. TMG(DeltaL)-expressed cells grew singly. Overexpression of TMG, but not TMG(DeltaL), decreased monolayer permeability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. The cell-to-cell adhesion in TMG-expressed cells was Ca2+-dependent and was inhibited by monoclonal antibody against the lectin-like domain of TM. The effects of TM-mediated cell adhesion were abolished by the addition of mannose, chondroitin sulfate A, or chondroitin sulfate C. In addition, anti-lectin-like domain antibody disrupted the close clustering of the endogenous TM-expressed keratinocyte HaCaT cell line derived from normal human epidermis. Double-labeling immunofluorescence staining revealed similar distributions of TM and actin filament in the cortex region of the TMG-expressed cells. Thus, TM can function as a Ca2+-dependent cell-to-cell adhesion molecule. Binding of specific carbohydrates to the lectin-like domain is essential for this specific function.

  4. Antifreeze proteins in polar sea ice diatoms: diversity and gene expression in the genus Fragilariopsis.

    PubMed

    Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Uhlig, Christiane; John, Uwe; Mock, Thomas; Valentin, Klaus

    2010-04-01

    Fragilariopsis is a dominating psychrophilic diatom genus in polar sea ice. The two species Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Fragilariopsis curta are able to grow and divide below freezing temperature of sea water and above average sea water salinity. Here we show that antifreeze proteins (AFPs), involved in cold adaptation in several psychrophilic organisms, are widespread in the two polar species. The presence of AFP genes (afps) as a multigene family indicated the importance of this group of genes for the genus Fragilariopsis, possibly contributing to its success in sea ice. Protein phylogeny showed the potential mobility of afps, which appear to have crossed kingdom and domain borders, occurring in Bacteria, diatoms, crustaceans and fungi. Our results revealed a broad distribution of AFPs not only in polar organisms but also in taxa apparently not related to cold environments, suggesting that these proteins may be multifunctional. The relevance of AFPs to Fragilariopsis was also shown by gene expression analysis. Under stress conditions typical for sea ice, with subzero temperatures and high salinities, F. cylindrus and F. curta strongly expressed selected afps. An E/G point mutation in the Fragilariopsis AFPs may play a role in gene expression activity and protein function.

  5. Electro-optical properties characterization of fish type III antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Salvay, Andrés G; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I

    2007-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice-binding proteins that depress the freezing point of water in a non-colligative manner without a significant modification of the melting point. Found in the blood and tissues of some organisms (such as fish, insects, plants, and soil bacteria), AFPs play an important role in subzero temperature survival. Fish Type III AFP is present in members of the subclass Zoarcoidei. AFPIII are small 7-kDa-or 14-kDa tandem-globular proteins. In the present work, we study the behavior of several physical properties, such as the low-frequency dielectric permittivity spectrum, circular dichroism, and electrical conductivity of Fish Type III AFP solutions measured at different concentrations. The combination of the information obtained from these measurements could be explained through the formation of AFP molecular aggregates or, alternatively, by the existence of some other type of interparticle interactions. Thermal stability and electro-optical behavior, when proteins are dissolved in deuterated water, were also investigated.

  6. Electro-Optical Properties Characterization of Fish Type III Antifreeze Protein

    PubMed Central

    Salvay, Andrés G.; Santos, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice-binding proteins that depress the freezing point of water in a non-colligative manner without a significant modification of the melting point. Found in the blood and tissues of some organisms (such as fish, insects, plants, and soil bacteria), AFPs play an important role in subzero temperature survival. Fish Type III AFP is present in members of the subclass Zoarcoidei. AFPIII are small 7-kDa—or 14-kDa tandem—globular proteins. In the present work, we study the behavior of several physical properties, such as the low-frequency dielectric permittivity spectrum, circular dichroism, and electrical conductivity of Fish Type III AFP solutions measured at different concentrations. The combination of the information obtained from these measurements could be explained through the formation of AFP molecular aggregates or, alternatively, by the existence of some other type of interparticle interactions. Thermal stability and electro-optical behavior, when proteins are dissolved in deuterated water, were also investigated. PMID:19669526

  7. Differential expression of two antifreeze proteins in the desert beetle Anatolica polita (Coleoptera: Tenebriondae): seasonal variation and environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wang, J; Mao, X F; Wang, Y

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can inhibit and modify the growth of ice crystals. Two antifreeze protein genes, Apafp752 and Apafp914, were cloned from the desert beetle Anatolica polita (Coleoptera: Tenebriondae), and they shared 61.3 percent similarity at the amino acid level. Apafp752 also contained one variation in the most conserved TCT motif of beetle AFPs. Apafp752 and Apafp914 mRNAs had similar seasonal expression pattern. Both were stimulated by cold stress, but they expressed slightly differentially with Apafp752 being more sensitive to cold stress than Apafp914, and no more sensitive to desiccation stress than Apafp914. The thermal hysteresis activity (THA) in the beetle's hemolymph followed approximately the patterns of mRNA seasonal expression and expression upon environmental stress, with a time lag. Summer adults of the desert beetle also express mRNA of Apafp752 and Apafp914, and exhibit some hemolymph THA, suggesting other likely function of these proteins beyond antifreeze.

  8. Isolation and characterization of type I antifreeze proteins from cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus, order Perciformes.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Rod S; Shears, Margaret A; Graham, Laurie A; Davies, Peter L; Fletcher, Garth L

    2011-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are produced by many species of teleost fish that inhabit potentially lethal ice-laden seawater and afford them protection from freezing. To date type I AFPs have been fully characterized in two teleost orders: Pleuronectiformes and Scorpaeniformes. In this study, we report the isolation and complete characterization of a type I AFP present in fish from a third order: cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus), order Perciformes (family Labridae). This protein was purified from blood plasma and found to belong to what is now known as classical type I AFP with their small size (mass 4095.16 Da), alanine richness (> 57 mol%), high α-helicity (> 99%) with the ability to undergo reversible thermal denaturation, 11 amino acid (ThrX(10)) repeat regions within the primary structure, the capacity to impart a hexagonal bipyramidal shaping to ice crystals and the conservation of an ice-binding site found in many of the other type I AFPs. Partial de novo sequencing of the plasma AFP accounted for approximately half of the peptide mass. Sequencing of a combined liver and skin cDNA library indicated that the protein is produced without a signal sequence. In addition the translated product of the AFP cDNA suggests that it codes for the AFP isolated from plasma. These results further solidify the hypothesis that type I AFPs are multiphyletic in origin and suggest that they represent remarkable examples of convergent evolution within three orders of teleost fish.

  9. Hyperactive antifreeze protein from fish contains multiple ice-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Graham, Laurie A; Marshall, Christopher B; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2008-02-19

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are produced to prevent freezing in many fish species that are exposed to icy seawater. There are a number of nonhomologous types of AFPs, diverse in both sequence and structure, which share the function of binding to ice and inhibiting its growth. We recently discovered a hyperactive AFP in the winter flounder and related species that is many-fold more active than other fish AFPs. Like the 3-4-kDa type I AFPs, it is alanine-rich and highly helical, but this 17-kDa protein is considerably larger and forms a dimer. We have sequenced the cDNA encoding this new AFP to gain insight into its structure and evolutionary relationship to the type I AFP family. The gene is clearly homologous to the righteye flounder type I AFP genes. Thus we have designated this protein "hyperactive type I AFP" (hyp-type I). The sequence of hyp-type I AFP supports a structural model in which two extended 195-amino acid alpha-helices form an amphipathic homodimer with a series of linked Ala- and Thr-rich patches on the surface of the dimer, each of which resembles ice-binding sites of type I AFPs. The superior activity of hyp-type I AFP may derive from the large combined surface area of the ice-binding sites, recognition of multiple planes of ice, and protection of the basal plane from ice growth.

  10. Solid-state NMR on a type III antifreeze protein in the presence of ice.

    PubMed

    Siemer, Ansgar B; McDermott, Ann E

    2008-12-24

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in fish, insects, plants, and a variety of other organisms where they serve to prevent the growth of ice at subzero temperatures. Type III AFPs cloned from polar fishes have been studied extensively with X-ray crystallography, liquid-state NMR, and site directed mutagenesis and are, therefore, among the best characterized AFPs. A flat surface on the protein has previously been proposed to be the ice-binding site of type III AFP. The detailed nature of the ice binding remains controversial since it is not clear whether only polar or also hydrophobic residues are involved in ice binding and there is no structural information available of a type III AFP bound to ice. Here we present a high-resolution solid-state NMR study of a type III AFP (HPLC-12 isoform) in the presence of ice. The chemical-shift differences we detected between the frozen and the nonfrozen state agree well with the proposed ice-binding site. Furthermore, we found that the (1)H T(1) of HPLC-12 in frozen solution is very long compared to typical (1)H of proteins in the solid state as for example of ubiquitin in frozen solution.

  11. Antifreeze (glyco)protein mimetic behavior of poly(vinyl alcohol): detailed structure ice recrystallization inhibition activity study.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Thomas; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2013-05-13

    This manuscript reports a detailed study on the ability of poly(vinyl alcohol) to act as a biomimetic surrogate for antifreeze(glyco)proteins, with a focus on the specific property of ice-recrystallization inhibition (IRI). Despite over 40 years of study, the underlying mechanisms that govern the action of biological antifreezes are still poorly understood, which is in part due to their limited availability and challenging synthesis. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) has been shown to display remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity despite its major structural differences to native antifreeze proteins. Here, controlled radical polymerization is used to synthesize well-defined PVA, which has enabled us to obtain the first quantitative structure-activity relationships, to probe the role of molecular weight and comonomers on IRI activity. Crucially, it was found that IRI activity is "switched on" when the polymer chain length increases from 10 and 20 repeat units. Substitution of the polymer side chains with hydrophilic or hydrophobic units was found to diminish activity. Hydrophobic modifications to the backbone were slightly more tolerated than side chain modifications, which implies an unbroken sequence of hydroxyl units is necessary for activity. These results highlight that, although hydrophobic domains are key components of IRI activity, the random inclusion of addition hydrophobic units does not guarantee an increase in activity and that the actual polymer conformation is important.

  12. Investigation of the Ice-Binding Site of an Insect Antifreeze Protein Using Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Meister, Konrad; Lotze, Stephan; Olijve, Luuk L C; DeVries, Arthur L; Duman, John G; Voets, Ilja K; Bakker, Huib J

    2015-04-02

    We study the ice-binding site (IBS) of a hyperactive antifreeze protein from the beetle Dendroides canadensis (DAFP-1) using vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy. We find that DAFP-1 accumulates at the air-water interface due to the hydrophobic character of its threonine-rich IBS while retaining its highly regular β-helical fold. We observe a narrow band at 3485 cm(-1) that we assign to the O-H stretch vibration of threonine hydroxyl groups of the IBS. The narrow character of the 3485 cm(-1) band suggests that the hydrogen bonds between the threonine residues at the IBS and adjacent water molecules are quite similar in strength, indicating that the IBS of DAFP-1 is extremely well-ordered, with the threonine side chains showing identical rotameric confirmations. The hydrogen-bonded water molecules do not form an ordered ice-like layer, as was recently observed for the moderate antifreeze protein type III. It thus appears that the antifreeze action of DAFP-1 does not require the presence of ordered water but likely results from the direct binding of its highly ordered array of threonine residues to the ice surface.

  13. Evaluation of antifreeze protein III for cryopreservation of Nili-Ravi (Bubalus bubalis) buffalo bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, S; Khan, M A; Ansari, M S; Rakha, B A; Ejaz, R; Husna, A U; Ashiq, M; Iqbal, R; Ullah, N; Akhter, S

    2014-07-01

    Lower fertility in buffaloes with frozen-thawed semen is attributed to sperm damage that is believed to be due to formation of ice crystals during freeze/thaw process. It was hypothesized that antifreeze proteins in the extender may improve the post thaw quality of buffalo bull sperm. For this purpose, two separate experiments were conducted to evaluate antifreeze proteins III (AFP III) at 0 (control), 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL (Experiment I) and 0 (control), 0.01, 0.1 and 1 μg/mL (Experiment II) for its effect on post thaw quality of buffalo bull semen. Semen was collected from three Nili-Ravi buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bulls with artificial vagina (42 °C) for three weeks (replicate) per experiment. For each experiment, qualifying ejaculates (6 ejaculates/bull) were divided into four aliquots and diluted (at 37 °C having 50 × 10(6) sperm/mL) in tris-citric acid extender containing above mentioned concentrations of AFP III. Diluted semen was cooled to 4 °C in 2 h, equilibrated for 4 h, filled in 0.5 mL straws, kept over liquid nitrogen vapors for 10 min and plunged in the liquid nitrogen. After 24 h of storage, semen straws were thawed at 37 °C for 30 s to assess sperm progressive motility (SM), plasma membrane integrity (PMI), viability (live sperm with intact acrosome) and normal epical ridge (NAR). In experiment I, improvement (P<0.05) in percentage SM and sperm PMI was recorded in extender containing 0.1 μg/mL AFP III compared to control, the higher concentrations (1 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL) being inefficient. While evaluating the lower concentration (experiment II), 0.01 μg/mL of AFP III in the extender it was found to be ineffective to improve semen quality parameters, while 0.1 μg/mL AFP III in extender was found better in terms of progressive motility and plasma membrane integrity of buffalo bull semen compared to control. Sperm viability and NAR remained similar (P>0.05) in extenders containing different concentrations of AFP III and control in both of

  14. Perturbation of bacterial ice nucleation activity by a grass antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Tomalty, Heather E; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-09-26

    Certain plant-associating bacteria produce ice nucleation proteins (INPs) which allow the crystallization of water at high subzero temperatures. Many of these microbes are considered plant pathogens since the formed ice can damage tissues, allowing access to nutrients. Intriguingly, certain plants that host these bacteria synthesize antifreeze proteins (AFPs). Once freezing has occurred, plant AFPs likely function to inhibit the growth of large damaging ice crystals. However, we postulated that such AFPs might also serve as defensive mechanisms against bacterial-mediated ice nucleation. Recombinant AFP derived from the perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne (LpAFP) was combined with INP preparations originating from the grass epiphyte, Pseudomonas syringae. The presence of INPs had no effect on AFP activity, including thermal hysteresis and ice recrystallization inhibition. Strikingly, the ice nucleation point of the INP was depressed up to 1.9°C in the presence of LpAFP, but a recombinant fish AFP did not lower the INP-imposed freezing point. Assays with mutant LpAFPs and the visualization of bacterially-displayed fluorescent plant AFP suggest that INP and LpAFP can interact. Thus, we postulate that in addition to controlling ice growth, plant AFPs may also function as a defensive strategy against the damaging effects of ice-nucleating bacteria. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dendrimer-Linked Antifreeze Proteins Have Superior Activity and Thermal Recovery.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Corey A; Drori, Ran; Zalis, Shiran; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2015-09-16

    By binding to ice, antifreeze proteins (AFPs) depress the freezing point of a solution and inhibit ice recrystallization if freezing does occur. Previous work showed that the activity of an AFP was incrementally increased by fusing it to another protein. Even larger increases in activity were achieved by doubling the number of ice-binding sites by dimerization. Here, we have combined the two strategies by linking multiple outward-facing AFPs to a dendrimer to significantly increase both the size of the molecule and the number of ice-binding sites. Using a heterobifunctional cross-linker, we attached between 6 and 11 type III AFPs to a second-generation polyamidoamine (G2-PAMAM) dendrimer with 16 reactive termini. This heterogeneous sample of dendrimer-linked type III constructs showed a greater than 4-fold increase in freezing point depression over that of monomeric type III AFP. This multimerized AFP was particularly effective at ice recrystallization inhibition activity, likely because it can simultaneously bind multiple ice surfaces. Additionally, attachment to the dendrimer has afforded the AFP superior recovery from heat denaturation. Linking AFPs together via polymers can generate novel reagents for controlling ice growth and recrystallization.

  16. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Gas Hydrates by α-Helical Antifreeze Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianjun; Davies, Peter L; Walker, Virginia K

    2015-10-20

    Kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs) are used commercially to inhibit gas hydrate formation and growth in pipelines. However, improvement of these polymers has been constrained by the lack of verified molecular models. Since antifreeze proteins (AFPs) act as KHIs, we have used their solved x-ray crystallographic structures in molecular modeling to explore gas hydrate inhibition. The internal clathrate water network of the fish AFP Maxi, which extends to the protein's outer surface, is remarkably similar to the {100} planes of structure type II (sII) gas hydrate. The crystal structure of this water web has facilitated the construction of in silico models for Maxi and type I AFP binding to sII hydrates. Here, we have substantiated our models with experimental evidence of Maxi binding to the tetrahydrofuran sII model hydrate. Both in silico and experimental evidence support the absorbance-inhibition mechanism proposed for KHI binding to gas hydrates. Based on the Maxi crystal structure we suggest that the inhibitor adsorbs to the gas hydrate lattice through the same anchored clathrate water mechanism used to bind ice. These results will facilitate the rational design of a next generation of effective green KHIs for the petroleum industry to ensure safe and efficient hydrocarbon flow.

  17. Antifreeze protein dimer: when two ice-binding faces are better than one.

    PubMed

    Baardsnes, Jason; Kuiper, Michael J; Davies, Peter L

    2003-10-03

    A naturally occurring tandem duplication of the 7-kDa type III antifreeze protein from Antarctic eel pout (Lycodichthys dearborni) is twice as active as the monomer in depressing the freezing point of a solution. We have investigated the basis for this enhanced activity by producing recombinant analogues of the linked dimer that assess the effects of protein size and the number and area of the ice-binding site(s). The recombinant dimer connected by a peptide linker had twice the activity of the monomer. When one of the two ice-binding sites was inactivated by site-directed mutagenesis, the linked dimer was only 1.2 times more effective than the monomer. When the two monomers were linked through a C-terminal disulfide bond in such a way that their two ice-binding sites were opposite each other and unable to engage the same ice surface simultaneously, the dimer was again only 1.2 times as active as the monomer. We conclude from these analyses that the enhanced activity of the dimer stems from the two ice-binding sites being able to engage to ice at the same time, effectively doubling the area of the ice-binding site.

  18. The role of side chain conformational flexibility in surface recognition by Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate the flexibility of the threonine side chains in the β-helical Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) at low temperatures. From measurement of the 3Jαβ 1H-1H scalar coupling constants, the χ1 angles and preferred rotamer populations can be calculated. It was determined that the threonines on the ice-binding face of the protein adopt a preferred rotameric conformation at near freezing temperatures, whereas the threonines not on the ice-binding face sample many rotameric states. This suggests that TmAFP maintains a preformed ice-binding conformation in solution, wherein the rigid array of threonines that form the AFP-ice interface matches the ice crystal lattice. A key factor in binding to the ice surface and inhibition of ice crystal growth appears to be the close surface-to-surface complementarity between the AFP and crystalline ice, and the lack of an entropic penalty associated with freezing out motions in a flexible ligand. PMID:12824479

  19. Hydration behavior at the ice-binding surface of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Midya, Uday Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2014-05-08

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out at two different temperatures (300 and 220 K) to study the conformational rigidity of the hyperactive Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) in aqueous medium and the structural arrangements of water molecules hydrating its surface. It is found that irrespective of the temperature the ice-binding surface (IBS) of the protein is relatively more rigid than its nonice-binding surface (NIBS). The presence of a set of regularly arranged internally bound water molecules is found to play an important role in maintaining the flat rigid nature of the IBS. Importantly, the calculations reveal that the strategically located hydroxyl oxygens of the threonine (Thr) residues in the IBS influence the arrangements of five sets of ordered waters around it on two parallel planes that closely resemble the basal plane of ice. As a result, these waters can register well with the ice basal plane, thereby allowing the IBS to preferentially bind at the ice interface and inhibit its growth. This provides a possible molecular reason behind the ice-binding activity of TmAFP at the basal plane of ice.

  20. A facile method for determining ice recrystallization inhibition by antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Melanie M; Marshall, Christopher B; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Peter L

    2003-11-28

    Ice recrystallization, the growth of large ice crystals at the expense of small ones, stresses freeze tolerant organisms and causes spoilage of frozen foods. This process is inhibited by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). Here, we present a simple method for determining the ice recrystallization inhibition (RI) activity of an AFP under physiological conditions using 10microl glass capillaries. Serial dilutions were prepared to determine the concentration below which RI activity was no longer detected, termed the RI endpoint. For type III AFP this was 200nM. The capillary method allows samples to be aligned and viewed simultaneously, which facilitates RI endpoint determination. Once prepared, the samples can be used reproducibly in subsequent RI assays and can be archived in a freezer for future reference. This method was used to detect the elution of type III AFP from a Sephadex G-75 size-exclusion column. RI activity was found at the expected V(e) for a 7kDa protein and also unexpectedly in the void volume.

  1. Investigation of changes in structure and thermodynamic of spruce budworm antifreeze protein under subfreezing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Le, Ly

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this theoretical work is to investigate of the changes in structure and thermodynamics of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbAFP) at low temperatures by using molecular dynamics simulation. The aqueous solution will form ice crystal network under the vaguely hexagonal shape at low temperature and fully represented the characteristics of hydrophobic interaction. Like ice crystal network, the cyclohexane region (including cyclohexane molecules) have enough of the characteristics of hydrophobic interaction. Therefore, in this research the cyclohexane region will be used as a representation of ice crystal network to investigate the interactions of sbAFP and ice crystal network at low temperature. The activity of sbAFP in subfreezing environment, therefore, can be clearly observed via the changes of the hydrophobic (cyclohexane region) and hydrophilic (water region) interactions. The obtained results from total energies, hydrogen bond lifetime correlation C(t), radial distribution function, mean square deviation and snapshots of sbAFP complexes indicated that sbAFP has some special changes in structure and interaction with water and cyclohexane regions at 278 K, as being transition temperature point of water molecules in sbAFP complex at low temperatures, which is more structured and support the experimental observation that the sbAFP complex becomes more rigid as the temperature is lowered.

  2. New insights into ice growth and melting modifications by antifreeze proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Dolev, Maya; Celik, Yeliz; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) evolved in many organisms, allowing them to survive in cold climates by controlling ice crystal growth. The specific interactions of AFPs with ice determine their potential applications in agriculture, food preservation and medicine. AFPs control the shapes of ice crystals in a manner characteristic of the particular AFP type. Moderately active AFPs cause the formation of elongated bipyramidal crystals, often with seemingly defined facets, while hyperactive AFPs produce more varied crystal shapes. These different morphologies are generally considered to be growth shapes. In a series of bright light and fluorescent microscopy observations of ice crystals in solutions containing different AFPs, we show that crystal shaping also occurs during melting. In particular, the characteristic ice shapes observed in solutions of most hyperactive AFPs are formed during melting. We relate these findings to the affinities of the hyperactive AFPs for the basal plane of ice. Our results demonstrate the relation between basal plane affinity and hyperactivity and show a clear difference in the ice-shaping mechanisms of most moderate and hyperactive AFPs. This study provides key aspects associated with the identification of hyperactive AFPs. PMID:22787007

  3. New insights into ice growth and melting modifications by antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Bar-Dolev, Maya; Celik, Yeliz; Wettlaufer, J S; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2012-12-07

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) evolved in many organisms, allowing them to survive in cold climates by controlling ice crystal growth. The specific interactions of AFPs with ice determine their potential applications in agriculture, food preservation and medicine. AFPs control the shapes of ice crystals in a manner characteristic of the particular AFP type. Moderately active AFPs cause the formation of elongated bipyramidal crystals, often with seemingly defined facets, while hyperactive AFPs produce more varied crystal shapes. These different morphologies are generally considered to be growth shapes. In a series of bright light and fluorescent microscopy observations of ice crystals in solutions containing different AFPs, we show that crystal shaping also occurs during melting. In particular, the characteristic ice shapes observed in solutions of most hyperactive AFPs are formed during melting. We relate these findings to the affinities of the hyperactive AFPs for the basal plane of ice. Our results demonstrate the relation between basal plane affinity and hyperactivity and show a clear difference in the ice-shaping mechanisms of most moderate and hyperactive AFPs. This study provides key aspects associated with the identification of hyperactive AFPs.

  4. Ice restructuring inhibition activities in antifreeze proteins with distinct differences in thermal hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sally O; Brown, Alan; Middleton, Adam J; Tomczak, Melanie M; Walker, Virginia K; Davies, Peter L

    2010-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) share two related properties: the ability to depress the freezing temperature below the melting point of ice (thermal hysteresis; TH); and the ability to inhibit the restructuring of ice into larger crystals. Since the 'hyperactive' AFPs, which have been more recently discovered, show an order of magnitude more TH than previously characterized AFPs, we have now determined their activities in ice restructuring inhibition (IrI) assays. IrI activities of three TH-hyperactive AFPs and three less TH-active AFPs varied over an 8-fold range. There was no obvious correlation between high TH activity and high IrI activity. However, the use of mutant AFPs demonstrated that severe disruption of ice-binding residues diminished both TH and IrI similarly, revealing that that the same ice-binding residues are crucial for both activities. In addition, bicarbonate ions, which are known to enhance the TH activity of AFPs, also enhanced their IrI activity. We suggest that these seemingly contradictory observations can be partially explained by differences in the coverage of ice by TH-hyperactive and non-hyperactive AFPs, and by differences in the stability of AFP-bound ice under supercooled and recrystallization conditions.

  5. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Gas Hydrates by α-Helical Antifreeze Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tianjun; Davies, Peter L.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs) are used commercially to inhibit gas hydrate formation and growth in pipelines. However, improvement of these polymers has been constrained by the lack of verified molecular models. Since antifreeze proteins (AFPs) act as KHIs, we have used their solved x-ray crystallographic structures in molecular modeling to explore gas hydrate inhibition. The internal clathrate water network of the fish AFP Maxi, which extends to the protein’s outer surface, is remarkably similar to the {100} planes of structure type II (sII) gas hydrate. The crystal structure of this water web has facilitated the construction of in silico models for Maxi and type I AFP binding to sII hydrates. Here, we have substantiated our models with experimental evidence of Maxi binding to the tetrahydrofuran sII model hydrate. Both in silico and experimental evidence support the absorbance-inhibition mechanism proposed for KHI binding to gas hydrates. Based on the Maxi crystal structure we suggest that the inhibitor adsorbs to the gas hydrate lattice through the same anchored clathrate water mechanism used to bind ice. These results will facilitate the rational design of a next generation of effective green KHIs for the petroleum industry to ensure safe and efficient hydrocarbon flow. PMID:26488661

  6. A mechanism for stabilization of membranes at low temperatures by an antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tomczak, Melanie M; Hincha, Dirk K; Estrada, Sergio D; Wolkers, Willem F; Crowe, Lois M; Feeney, Robert E; Tablin, Fern; Crowe, John H

    2002-01-01

    Polar fish, cold hardy plants, and overwintering insects produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which lower the freezing point of solutions noncolligatively and inhibit ice crystal growth. Fish AFPs have been shown to stabilize membranes and cells in vitro during hypothermic storage, probably by interacting with the plasma membrane, but the mechanism of this stabilization has not been clear. We show here that during chilling to nonfreezing temperatures the alpha-helical AFP type I from polar fish inhibits leakage across model membranes containing an unsaturated chloroplast galactolipid. The mechanism involves binding of the AFP to the bilayer, which increases the phase transition temperature of the membranes and alters the molecular packing of the acyl chains. We suggest that this change in acyl chain packing results in the reduced membrane permeability. The data suggest a hydrophobic interaction between the peptide and the bilayer. Further, we suggest that the expression of AFP type I in transgenic plants may be significant for thermal adaptation of chilling-sensitive plants. PMID:11806929

  7. Direct Visualization of Spruce Budworm Antifreeze Protein Interacting with Ice Crystals: Basal Plane Affinity Confers Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Pertaya, Natalya; Marshall, Christopher B.; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2008-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect certain organisms from freezing by adhering to ice crystals, thereby preventing their growth. All AFPs depress the nonequilibrium freezing temperature below the melting point; however AFPs from overwintering insects, such as the spruce budworm (sbw) are 10–100 times more effective than most fish AFPs. It has been proposed that the exceptional activity of these AFPs depends on their ability to prevent ice growth at the basal plane. To test the hypothesis that the hyperactivity of sbwAFP results from direct affinity to the basal plane, we fluorescently tagged sbwAFP and visualized it on the surface of ice crystals using fluorescence microscopy. SbwAFP accumulated at the six prism plane corners and the two basal planes of hexagonal ice crystals. In contrast, fluorescently tagged fish type III AFP did not adhere to the basal planes of a single-crystal ice hemisphere. When ice crystals were grown in the presence of a mixture of type III AFP and sbwAFP, a hybrid crystal shape was produced with sbwAFP bound to the basal planes of truncated bipyramidal crystals. These observations are consistent with the blockage of c-axial growth of ice as a result of direct interaction of sbwAFP with the basal planes. PMID:18339740

  8. Direct visualization of spruce budworm antifreeze protein interacting with ice crystals: basal plane affinity confers hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Pertaya, Natalya; Marshall, Christopher B; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2008-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect certain organisms from freezing by adhering to ice crystals, thereby preventing their growth. All AFPs depress the nonequilibrium freezing temperature below the melting point; however AFPs from overwintering insects, such as the spruce budworm (sbw) are 10-100 times more effective than most fish AFPs. It has been proposed that the exceptional activity of these AFPs depends on their ability to prevent ice growth at the basal plane. To test the hypothesis that the hyperactivity of sbwAFP results from direct affinity to the basal plane, we fluorescently tagged sbwAFP and visualized it on the surface of ice crystals using fluorescence microscopy. SbwAFP accumulated at the six prism plane corners and the two basal planes of hexagonal ice crystals. In contrast, fluorescently tagged fish type III AFP did not adhere to the basal planes of a single-crystal ice hemisphere. When ice crystals were grown in the presence of a mixture of type III AFP and sbwAFP, a hybrid crystal shape was produced with sbwAFP bound to the basal planes of truncated bipyramidal crystals. These observations are consistent with the blockage of c-axial growth of ice as a result of direct interaction of sbwAFP with the basal planes.

  9. Determining the Ice-binding Planes of Antifreeze Proteins by Fluorescence-based Ice Plane Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms. PMID:24457629

  10. A mechanism for stabilization of membranes at low temperatures by an antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Melanie M; Hincha, Dirk K; Estrada, Sergio D; Wolkers, Willem F; Crowe, Lois M; Feeney, Robert E; Tablin, Fern; Crowe, John H

    2002-02-01

    Polar fish, cold hardy plants, and overwintering insects produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which lower the freezing point of solutions noncolligatively and inhibit ice crystal growth. Fish AFPs have been shown to stabilize membranes and cells in vitro during hypothermic storage, probably by interacting with the plasma membrane, but the mechanism of this stabilization has not been clear. We show here that during chilling to nonfreezing temperatures the alpha-helical AFP type I from polar fish inhibits leakage across model membranes containing an unsaturated chloroplast galactolipid. The mechanism involves binding of the AFP to the bilayer, which increases the phase transition temperature of the membranes and alters the molecular packing of the acyl chains. We suggest that this change in acyl chain packing results in the reduced membrane permeability. The data suggest a hydrophobic interaction between the peptide and the bilayer. Further, we suggest that the expression of AFP type I in transgenic plants may be significant for thermal adaptation of chilling-sensitive plants.

  11. Hofmeister effects of common monovalent salts on the beetle antifreeze protein activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Amornwittawat, Natapol; Banatlao, Joseph; Chung, Melody; Kao, Yu; Wen, Xin

    2009-10-22

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) noncolligatively depress the freezing point of a solution and produce a difference between the melting and freezing points termed thermal hysteresis (TH). While the mechanism of the enhancement effect is not well understood, various low-molecular-mass solutes including neutral salts have been identified to enhance the TH activities of AFPs. Here, the effect of monovalent salts on salting out an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis (DAFP-1) on the ice was treated using a simple classical theory, and the relationship between the TH activity and the salt concentration was developed. The TH activities of DAFP-1 in the presence of the series of monovalent salts were assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and the salting-out constants of DAFP-1 by these salts were determined. This study demonstrates an indirect way to determine the salting-out constants of AFPs by these salts. The results suggest that the Hofmeister effect is a potential mechanism for the TH enhancement effects of some common monovalent salts.

  12. Investigation of changes in structure and thermodynamic of spruce budworm antifreeze protein under subfreezing temperature

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hung; Le, Ly

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this theoretical work is to investigate of the changes in structure and thermodynamics of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbAFP) at low temperatures by using molecular dynamics simulation. The aqueous solution will form ice crystal network under the vaguely hexagonal shape at low temperature and fully represented the characteristics of hydrophobic interaction. Like ice crystal network, the cyclohexane region (including cyclohexane molecules) have enough of the characteristics of hydrophobic interaction. Therefore, in this research the cyclohexane region will be used as a representation of ice crystal network to investigate the interactions of sbAFP and ice crystal network at low temperature. The activity of sbAFP in subfreezing environment, therefore, can be clearly observed via the changes of the hydrophobic (cyclohexane region) and hydrophilic (water region) interactions. The obtained results from total energies, hydrogen bond lifetime correlation C(t), radial distribution function, mean square deviation and snapshots of sbAFP complexes indicated that sbAFP has some special changes in structure and interaction with water and cyclohexane regions at 278 K, as being transition temperature point of water molecules in sbAFP complex at low temperatures, which is more structured and support the experimental observation that the sbAFP complex becomes more rigid as the temperature is lowered. PMID:28106056

  13. Structure and Evolutionary Origin of Ca2+-Dependent Herring Type II Antifreeze Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, Q.; Kosinski, J.; Seetharaman, J.; Bujnicki, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2007-01-01

    In order to survive under extremely cold environments, many organisms produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs). AFPs inhibit the growth of ice crystals and protect organisms from freezing damage. Fish AFPs can be classified into five distinct types based on their structures. Here we report the structure of herring AFP (hAFP), a Ca2+-dependent fish type II AFP. It exhibits a fold similar to the C-type (Ca2+-dependent) lectins with unique ice-binding features. The 1.7 Angstroms crystal structure of hAFP with bound Ca2+ and site-directed mutagenesis reveal an ice-binding site consisting of Thr96, Thr98 and Ca2+-coordinating residues Asp94 and Glu99, which initiate hAFP adsorption onto the [10-10] prism plane of the ice lattice. The hAFP-ice interaction is further strengthened by the bound Ca2+ through the coordination with a water molecule of the ice lattice. This Ca2+-coordinated ice-binding mechanism is distinct from previously proposed mechanisms for other AFPs. However, phylogenetic analysis suggests that all type II AFPs evolved from the common ancestor and developed different ice-binding modes. We clarify the evolutionary relationship of type II AFPs to sugar-binding lectins.

  14. Comparative modeling of the three-dimensional structure of type II antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sönnichsen, F. D.; Sykes, B. D.; Davies, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Type II antifreeze proteins (AFP), which inhibit the growth of seed ice crystals in the blood of certain fishes (sea raven, herring, and smelt), are the largest known fish AFPs and the only class for which detailed structural information is not yet available. However, a sequence homology has been recognized between these proteins and the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectins. The structure of this domain from rat mannose-binding protein (MBP-A) has been solved by X-ray crystallography (Weis WI, Drickamer K, Hendrickson WA, 1992, Nature 360:127-134) and provided the coordinates for constructing the three-dimensional model of the 129-amino acid Type II AFP from sea raven, to which it shows 19% sequence identity. Multiple sequence alignments between Type II AFPs, pancreatic stone protein, MBP-A, and as many as 50 carbohydrate-recognition domain sequences from various lectins were performed to determine reliably aligned sequence regions. Successive molecular dynamics and energy minimization calculations were used to relax bond lengths and angles and to identify flexible regions. The derived structure contains two alpha-helices, two beta-sheets, and a high proportion of amino acids in loops and turns. The model is in good agreement with preliminary NMR spectroscopic analyses. It explains the observed differences in calcium binding between sea raven Type II AFP and MBP-A. Furthermore, the model proposes the formation of five disulfide bridges between Cys 7 and Cys 18, Cys 35 and Cys 125, Cys 69 and Cys 100, Cys 89 and Cys 111, and Cys 101 and Cys 117.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7540906

  15. Vimentin and desmin possess GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Goto, Mitsuaki; Sato, Takao; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2010-07-01

    Vimentin and desmin are intermediate filament proteins found in various mesenchymal and skeletal muscle cells, respectively. These proteins play an important role in the stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture. Here, we found, using artificial biomimicking glycopolymers, that vimentin and desmin possess N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectin-like properties on the cell surfaces of various vimentin- and desmin-expressing cells such as cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The rod II domain of these proteins was demonstrated to be localized to the cell surface and to directly bind to the artificial biomimicking GlcNAc-bearing polymer, by confocal laser microscopy and surface plasmon resonance analysis. These glycopolymers strongly interact with lectins and are useful tools for the analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions, since glycopolymers binding to lectins can induce the clustering of lectins due to multivalent glycoside ligand binding. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and pull-down assay with His-tagged vimentin-rod II domain protein showed that the vimentin-rod II domain interacts with O-GlcNAc proteins. These results suggest that O-GlcNAc proteins might be one candidate for physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands with which vimentin and desmin interact. These findings demonstrate a novel function of vimentin and desmin that does not involve stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture by which these proteins interact with physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands such as O-GlcNAc proteins on the cell surface through their GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties.

  16. Growth inhibition at the ice prismatic plane induced by a spruce budworm antifreeze protein: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Nada, H; Furukawa, Y

    2011-11-28

    A molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to investigate the growth kinetics at the ice prismatic interface to which a spruce budworm antifreeze protein was bound. Two initial binding conformations of the protein at the interface--one energetically stable and the other energetically unstable--were examined. For both binding conformations, the growth of ice was observed around the protein. A sharp decrease in the rate of ice growth was observed around the protein that initially had the energetically stable binding conformation. Simulation results suggest that the observed decrease in the ice growth rate was attributable to melting point depression caused by the Gibbs-Thomson effect. The protein that initially had the energetically unstable binding conformation markedly relaxed so as to stably bind to the prismatic plane interface of the grown ice; thereafter, a decrease in the ice growth rate was observed as well. However, the binding conformation that the protein approached during the relaxation was different from that of the protein that initially had the energetically stable binding conformation. Thus, the simulation indicates the existence of two binding conformations for inducing a decrease in the ice growth rate. The results are possibly related to the hyperactivity of a spruce budworm antifreeze protein in real systems.

  17. Production of a recombinant type 1 antifreeze protein analogue by L. lactis and its applications on frozen meat and frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Mei; Kao, Bi-Yu; Peng, Hsuan-Jung

    2009-07-22

    In this study, a novel recombinant type I antifreeze protein analogue (rAFP) was produced and secreted by Lactococcus lactis, a food-grade microorganism of major commercial importance. Antifreeze proteins are potent cryogenic protection agents for the cryopreservation of food and pharmaceutical materials. A food-grade expression and fermentation system (BSE- and antibiotic-free) for the production and secretion of high levels of rAFP was developed. Lyophilized, crude rAFP produced by L. lactis was tested in a frozen meat and frozen dough processing model. The frozen meat treated with the antifreeze protein showed less drip loss, less protein loss, and a high score on juiciness by sensory evaluation. Frozen dough treated with the rAFP showed better fermentation capacity than untreated frozen dough. Breads baked from frozen dough treated with rAFP acquired the same consumer acceptance as fresh bread.

  18. Low temperature stress modulated secretome analysis and purification of antifreeze protein from Hippophae rhamnoides, a Himalayan wonder plant.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Deswal, Renu

    2012-05-04

    Plants' distribution and productivity are adversely affected by low temperature (LT) stress. LT induced proteins were analyzed by 2-DE-nano-LC-MS/MS in shoot secretome of Hippophae rhamnoides (seabuckthorn), a Himalayan wonder shrub. Seedlings were subjected to direct freezing stress (-5 °C), cold acclimation (CA), and subzero acclimation (SZA), and extracellular proteins (ECPs) were isolated using vacuum infiltration. Approximately 245 spots were reproducibly detected in 2-DE gels of LT treated secretome, out of which 61 were LT responsive. Functional categorization of 34 upregulated proteins showed 47% signaling, redox regulated, and defense associated proteins. LT induced secretome contained thaumatin like protein and Chitinase as putative antifreeze proteins (AFPs). Phase contrast microscopy with a nanoliter osmometer showed hexagonal ice crystals with 0.13 °C thermal hysteresis (TH), and splat assay showed 1.5-fold ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI), confirming antifreeze activity in LT induced secretome. A 41 kDa polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP), purified by ice adsorption chromatography (IAC), showed hexagonal ice crystals, a TH of 0.19 °C, and 9-fold IRI activity. Deglycosylated PGIP retained its AFP activity, suggesting that glycosylation is not required for AFP activity. This is the first report of LT modulated secretome analysis and purification of AFPs from seabuckthorn. Overall, these findings provide an insight in probable LT induced signaling in the secretome.

  19. X-ray structure of snow flea antifreeze protein determined by racemic crystallization of synthetic protein enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Pentelute, Brad L; Gates, Zachary P; Tereshko, Valentina; Dashnau, Jennifer L; Vanderkooi, Jane M; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Kent, Stephen B H

    2008-07-30

    Chemical protein synthesis and racemic protein crystallization were used to determine the X-ray structure of the snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP). Crystal formation from a racemic solution containing equal amounts of the chemically synthesized proteins d-sfAFP and l-sfAFP occurred much more readily than for l-sfAFP alone. More facile crystal formation also occurred from a quasi-racemic mixture of d-sfAFP and l-Se-sfAFP, a chemical protein analogue that contains an additional -SeCH2- moiety at one residue and thus differs slightly from the true enantiomer. Multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing from quasi-racemate crystals was then used to determine the X-ray structure of the sfAFP protein molecule. The resulting model was used to solve by molecular replacement the X-ray structure of l-sfAFP to a resolution of 0.98 A. The l-sfAFP molecule is made up of six antiparallel left-handed PPII helixes, stacked in two sets of three, to form a compact brick-like structure with one hydrophilic face and one hydrophobic face. This is a novel experimental protein structure and closely resembles a structural model proposed for sfAFP. These results illustrate the utility of total chemical synthesis combined with racemic crystallization and X-ray crystallography for determining the unknown structure of a protein.

  20. X-ray Structure of Snow Flea Antifreeze Protein Determined by Racemic Crystallization of Synthetic Protein Enantiomers

    SciTech Connect

    Pentelute, Brad L.; Gates, Zachary P.; Tereshko, Valentina; Dashnau, Jennifer L.; Vanderkooi, Jane M.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2008-08-20

    Chemical protein synthesis and racemic protein crystallization were used to determine the X-ray structure of the snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP). Crystal formation from a racemic solution containing equal amounts of the chemically synthesized proteins d-sfAFP and l-sfAFP occurred much more readily than for l-sfAFP alone. More facile crystal formation also occurred from a quasi-racemic mixture of d-sfAFP and l-Se-sfAFP, a chemical protein analogue that contains an additional -SeCH2- moiety at one residue and thus differs slightly from the true enantiomer. Multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing from quasi-racemate crystals was then used to determine the X-ray structure of the sfAFP protein molecule. The resulting model was used to solve by molecular replacement the X-ray structure of l-sfAFP to a resolution of 0.98 {angstrom}. The l-sfAFP molecule is made up of six antiparallel left-handed PPII helixes, stacked in two sets of three, to form a compact brick-like structure with one hydrophilic face and one hydrophobic face. This is a novel experimental protein structure and closely resembles a structural model proposed for sfAFP. These results illustrate the utility of total chemical synthesis combined with racemic crystallization and X-ray crystallography for determining the unknown structure of a protein.

  1. Enhancement of insect antifreeze protein activity by solutes of low molecular mass.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Andorfer, C A; Duman, J G

    1998-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) lower the non-equilibrium freezing point of water (in the presence of ice) below the melting point, thereby producing a difference between the freezing and melting points that has been termed thermal hysteresis. In general, the magnitude of the thermal hysteresis depends upon the specific activity and concentration of the AFP. This study describes several low-molecular-mass solutes that enhance the thermal hysteresis activity of an AFP from overwintering larvae of the beetle Dendroides canadensis. The most active of these is citrate, which increases the thermal hysteresis nearly sixfold from 1.2 degrees C in its absence to 6.8 degrees C. Solutes which increase activity approximately fourfold are succinate, malate, aspartate, glutamate and ammonium sulfate. Glycerol, sorbitol, alanine and ammonium bicarbonate increased thermal hysteresis approximately threefold. Interestingly, 0.5 mol l-1 sodium sulfate eliminated activity. Solute concentrations between 0.25 and 1 mol l-1 were generally required to elicit optimal thermal hysteresis activity. Glycerol is the only one of these enhancing solutes that is known to be present at these concentrations in overwintering D. canadensis, and therefore the physiological significance of most of these enhancers is unknown. The mechanism(s) of this enhancement is also unknown. The AFP used in this study (DAFP-4) is nearly identical to previously described D. canadensis AFPs. The mature protein consists of 71 amino acid residues arranged in six 12- or 13-mer repeats with a consensus sequence consisting of Cys-Thr-X3-Ser-X5-X6-Cys-X8-X9-Ala-X11-Thr-X1 3, where X3 and X11 tend to be charged residues, X5 tends to be Thr or Ser, X6 to be Asn or Asp, X9 to be Asn or Lys and X13 to be Ala in the 13-mers. DAFP-4 is shorter by one repeat than previously described D. canadensis AFPs.

  2. Neutron structure of type-III antifreeze protein allows the reconstruction of AFP-ice interface.

    PubMed

    Howard, Eduardo I; Blakeley, Matthew P; Haertlein, Michael; Petit-Haertlein, Isabelle; Mitschler, Andre; Fisher, Stuart J; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Salvay, Andrés G; Popov, Alexandre; Muller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Petrova, Tatiana; Podjarny, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit ice growth at sub-zero temperatures. The prototypical type-III AFPs have been extensively studied, notably by X-ray crystallography, solid-state and solution NMR, and mutagenesis, leading to the identification of a compound ice-binding surface (IBS) composed of two adjacent ice-binding sections, each which binds to particular lattice planes of ice crystals, poisoning their growth. This surface, including many hydrophobic and some hydrophilic residues, has been extensively used to model the interaction of AFP with ice. Experimentally observed water molecules facing the IBS have been used in an attempt to validate these models. However, these trials have been hindered by the limited capability of X-ray crystallography to reliably identify all water molecules of the hydration layer. Due to the strong diffraction signal from both the oxygen and deuterium atoms, neutron diffraction provides a more effective way to determine the water molecule positions (as D(2) O). Here we report the successful structure determination at 293 K of fully perdeuterated type-III AFP by joint X-ray and neutron diffraction providing a very detailed description of the protein and its solvent structure. X-ray data were collected to a resolution of 1.05 Å, and neutron Laue data to a resolution of 1.85 Å with a "radically small" crystal volume of 0.13 mm(3). The identification of a tetrahedral water cluster in nuclear scattering density maps has allowed the reconstruction of the IBS-bound ice crystal primary prismatic face. Analysis of the interactions between the IBS and the bound ice crystal primary prismatic face indicates the role of the hydrophobic residues, which are found to bind inside the holes of the ice surface, thus explaining the specificity of AFPs for ice versus water.

  3. Structural basis for the superior activity of the large isoform of snow flea antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Mok, Yee-Foong; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Graham, Laurie A; Celik, Yeliz; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2010-03-23

    The snow flea (Hypogastrum harveyi) is protected from freezing at sub-zero temperatures by a glycine-rich antifreeze protein (AFP) that binds to seed ice crystals and prevents them from growing larger. This AFP is hyperactive and comprises two isoforms [Graham, L. A., and Davies, P. L. (2005) Science 310, 461]. The larger isoform (15.7 kDa) exhibits several-fold higher activity than the smaller isoform (6.5 kDa), although it is considerably less abundant. To establish the molecular basis for this difference in activity, we determined the sequence of the large isoform. The primary sequences of these two isoforms are surprisingly divergent. However, both contain tripeptide repeats and turn motifs that enabled us to build a three-dimensional model of the large isoform based upon the six-polyproline helix structure of the small isoform. Our model contains 13 polyproline type II helices connected by proline-containing loops stacked into two flat sheets oriented antiparallel to one another. The structure is strictly amphipathic, with a hydrophilic surface on one side and a hydrophobic, putative ice-binding surface on the other. The putative ice-binding site is approximately twice as large in area as that of the small isoform, providing an explanation for the difference in activity that is consistent with other examples noted. By tagging the recombinant AFP with green fluorescent protein, we observed its binding to multiple planes of ice, especially the basal plane. This finding supports the correlation between AFP hyperactivity and basal plane binding first observed with spruce budworm AFP.

  4. Characterization of a gene family encoding SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin)-domain proteins with lectin-like and heme-binding properties from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Yu, Chuanxin; Wakao, Masahiro; Suda, Yasuo; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a novel gene family dispersed in the genome of Schistosoma japonicum by retrotransposon-mediated gene duplication mechanism. Although many transcripts were identified, no homolog was readily identifiable from sequence information. Here, we utilized structural homology modeling and biochemical methods to identify remote homologs, and characterized the gene products as SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin)-domain containing proteins. A common extracellular domain in this family was structurally similar to SEA-domain. SEA-domain is primarily a structural domain, known to assist or regulate binding to glycans. Recombinant proteins from three members of this gene family specifically interacted with glycosaminoglycans with high affinity, with potential implication in ligand acquisition and immune evasion. Similar approach was used to identify a heme-binding site on the SEA-domain. The heme-binding mode showed heme molecule inserted into a hydrophobic pocket, with heme iron putatively coordinated to two histidine axial ligands. Heme-binding properties were confirmed using biochemical assays and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, which showed high affinity heme-binding (K D = 1.605×10(-6) M) and cognate spectroscopic attributes of hexa-coordinated heme iron. The native proteins were oligomers, antigenic, and are localized on adult worm teguments and gastrodermis; major host-parasite interfaces and site for heme detoxification and acquisition. The results suggest potential role, at least in the nucleation step of heme crystallization (hemozoin formation), and as receptors for heme uptake. Survival strategies exploited by parasites, including heme homeostasis mechanism in hemoparasites, are paramount for successful parasitism. Thus, assessing prospects for application in disease intervention is warranted.

  5. Multivalent Display of Antifreeze Proteins by Fusion to Self-Assembling Protein Cages Enhances Ice-Binding Activities.

    PubMed

    Phippen, Sean W; Stevens, Corey A; Vance, Tyler D R; King, Neil P; Baker, David; Davies, Peter L

    2016-12-13

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are small monomeric proteins that adsorb to the surface of ice to inhibit ice crystal growth and impart freeze resistance to the organisms producing them. Previously, monomeric AFPs have been conjugated to the termini of branched polymers to increase their activity through the simultaneous binding of more than one AFP to ice. Here, we describe a superior approach to increasing AFP activity through oligomerization that eliminates the need for conjugation reactions with varying levels of efficiency. A moderately active AFP from a fish and a hyperactive AFP from an Antarctic bacterium were genetically fused to the C-termini of one component of the 24-subunit protein cage T33-21, resulting in protein nanoparticles that multivalently display exactly 12 AFPs. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited freezing point depression >50-fold greater than that seen with the same concentration of monomeric AFP and a similar increase in the level of ice-recrystallization inhibition. These results support the anchored clathrate mechanism of binding of AFP to ice. The enhanced freezing point depression could be due to the difficulty of overgrowing a larger AFP on the ice surface and the improved ice-recrystallization inhibition to the ability of the nanoparticle to simultaneously bind multiple ice grains. Oligomerization of these proteins using self-assembling protein cages will be useful in a variety of biotechnology and cryobiology applications.

  6. Antifreeze protein-induced superheating of ice inside Antarctic notothenioid fishes inhibits melting during summer warming

    PubMed Central

    Cziko, Paul A.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Evans, Clive W.; Cheng, Chi-Hing Christina

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) of polar marine teleost fishes are widely recognized as an evolutionary innovation of vast adaptive value in that, by adsorbing to and inhibiting the growth of internalized environmental ice crystals, they prevent death by inoculative freezing. Paradoxically, systemic accumulation of AFP-stabilized ice could also be lethal. Whether or how fishes eliminate internal ice is unknown. To investigate if ice inside high-latitude Antarctic notothenioid fishes could melt seasonally, we measured its melting point and obtained a decadal temperature record from a shallow benthic fish habitat in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. We found that AFP-stabilized ice resists melting at temperatures above the expected equilibrium freezing/melting point (eqFMP), both in vitro and in vivo. Superheated ice was directly observed in notothenioid serum samples and in solutions of purified AFPs, and ice was found to persist inside live fishes at temperatures more than 1 °C above their eqFMP for at least 24 h, and at a lower temperature for at least several days. Field experiments confirmed that superheated ice occurs naturally inside wild fishes. Over the long-term record (1999–2012), seawater temperature surpassed the fish eqFMP in most summers, but never exceeded the highest temperature at which ice persisted inside experimental fishes. Thus, because of the effects of AFP-induced melting inhibition, summer warming may not reliably eliminate internal ice. Our results expose a potentially antagonistic pleiotropic effect of AFPs: beneficial freezing avoidance is accompanied by melting inhibition that may contribute to lifelong accumulation of detrimental internal ice crystals. PMID:25246548

  7. Antifreeze protein-induced superheating of ice inside Antarctic notothenioid fishes inhibits melting during summer warming.

    PubMed

    Cziko, Paul A; DeVries, Arthur L; Evans, Clive W; Cheng, Chi-Hing Christina

    2014-10-07

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) of polar marine teleost fishes are widely recognized as an evolutionary innovation of vast adaptive value in that, by adsorbing to and inhibiting the growth of internalized environmental ice crystals, they prevent death by inoculative freezing. Paradoxically, systemic accumulation of AFP-stabilized ice could also be lethal. Whether or how fishes eliminate internal ice is unknown. To investigate if ice inside high-latitude Antarctic notothenioid fishes could melt seasonally, we measured its melting point and obtained a decadal temperature record from a shallow benthic fish habitat in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. We found that AFP-stabilized ice resists melting at temperatures above the expected equilibrium freezing/melting point (eqFMP), both in vitro and in vivo. Superheated ice was directly observed in notothenioid serum samples and in solutions of purified AFPs, and ice was found to persist inside live fishes at temperatures more than 1 °C above their eqFMP for at least 24 h, and at a lower temperature for at least several days. Field experiments confirmed that superheated ice occurs naturally inside wild fishes. Over the long-term record (1999-2012), seawater temperature surpassed the fish eqFMP in most summers, but never exceeded the highest temperature at which ice persisted inside experimental fishes. Thus, because of the effects of AFP-induced melting inhibition, summer warming may not reliably eliminate internal ice. Our results expose a potentially antagonistic pleiotropic effect of AFPs: beneficial freezing avoidance is accompanied by melting inhibition that may contribute to lifelong accumulation of detrimental internal ice crystals.

  8. A family of expressed antifreeze protein genes from the moth, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Daniel; Tyshenko, Michael G; Davies, Peter L; Walker, Virginia K

    2002-01-01

    The freeze-intolerant insect, Choristoneura fumiferana (spruce budworm), produces multiple antifreeze protein (AFP) isoforms for protection during the overwintering stage. We now report the cloning of AFP genes from insects; Afp-Lu1 encodes a approximately 9-kDa AFP isoform, and Afp-Iu1 encodes a approximately 12-kDa AFP isoform. Both CfAFP genes have similar structures with a single 3- to 3.6-kb intron interrupting the coding region. The second exon of an additional CfAFP gene, 2.7a, encoding a new approximately 9-kDa isoform, was found 3.7 kb upstream of Afp-Lu1 and demonstrates that some AFP family members are linked in tandem. This gene appears to encode an AFP with 68-76% identity to previously isolated CfAFPs. With its eight Cys residues necessary for disulfide bonding and five perfectly conserved 'Thr button' (Thr-Xaa-Thr) ice-binding motifs, it can be modeled as a functional AFP. Southern blot analysis shows that there are approximately 17 genes in this AFP family, with each of the isoforms represented by two to five gene copies. Transcript accumulation from Afp-Lu1 and Afp-Iu1 (or closely related genes) was maximal during the overwintering stage, while 2.7a transcripts were only detected in first instars, larvae that are normally found only in the summer. Contrary to expectations, this differential expression demonstrates that CfAFP gene family transcripts are primarily regulated during development, rather than by seasonally low temperatures.

  9. Recombinant Dendroides canadensis antifreeze proteins as potential ingredients in cryopreservation solutions

    PubMed Central

    Halwani, Dina O.; Brockbank, Kelvin G.M.; Duman, John G.; Campbell, Lia H.

    2015-01-01

    Expanding cryopreservation methods to include a wider range of cell types, such as those sensitive to freezing, is needed for maintaining the viability of cell-based regenerative medicine products. Conventional cryopreservation protocols, which include use of cryoprotectants such as dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO), have not prevented ice-induced damage to cell and tissue matrices during freezing. A family of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) produced in the larvae of the beetle, Dendroides canadensis allow this insect to survive subzero temperatures as low as −26°C. This study is an assessment of the effect of the four hemolymph D. canadensis AFPs (DAFPs) on the supercooling (nucleating) temperature, ice structure patterns and viability of the A10 cell line derived from the thoracic aorta of embryonic rat. Cryoprotectant solution cocktails containing combinations of DAFPs in concentrations ranging from 0–3mg/mL in Unisol base mixed with 1M Me2SO were first evaluated by cryomicroscopy. Combining multiple DAFPs demonstrated significant supercooling point depressing activity (~9°C) when compared to single DAFPs and/or conventional 1M Me2SO control solutions. Concentrations of DAFPs as low as 1μg/mL were sufficient to trigger this effect. In addition, significantly improved A10 smooth muscle cell viability was observed in cryopreservation experiments with low DAFP-6 and DAFP-2 concentrations in combination with Me2SO. No significant improvement in viability was observed with either DAFP-1 or DAFP-4. Low and effective DAFP concentrations are advantageous because they minimize concerns regarding cell cytotoxicity and manufacturing cost. These findings support the potential of incorporating DAFPs in solutions used to cryopreserve cells and tissues. PMID:24662031

  10. Hydrophobic tendency of polar group hydration as a major force in type I antifreeze protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Sharp, Kim A

    2005-05-01

    The random network model of water quantitatively describes the different hydration heat capacities of polar and apolar solutes in terms of distortions of the water-water hydrogen bonding angle in the first hydration shell (Gallagher and Sharp, JACS 2003;125:9853). The distribution of this angle in pure water is bimodal, with a low-angle population and high-angle population. Polar solutes increase the high-angle population while apolar solutes increase the low-angle population. The ratio of the two populations quantifies the hydrophobicity of the solute and provides a sensitive measure of water structural distortions. This method of analysis is applied to study hydration of type I thermal hysteresis protein (THP) from winter flounder and three quadruple mutants of four threonine residues at positions 2, 13, 24, and 35. Wild-type and two mutants (VVVV and AAAA) have antifreeze (thermal hysteresis) activity, while the other mutant (SSSS) has no activity. The analysis reveals significant differences in the hydration structure of the ice-binding site. For the SSSS mutant, polar groups have a typical polar-like hydration, that is, more high-angle H-bonds than bulk water. For the wild-type and active mutants, polar groups have unusual, very apolar-like hydration, that is, more low-angle H-bonds than bulk water. This pattern of hydration was seen previously in the structurally distinct type III THPs (Yang & Sharp Biophys Chem 2004;109:137), suggesting for the first time a general mechanism for different THP classes. The specific shape, residue size, and clustering of both polar and apoler groups are essential for an active ice binding surface.

  11. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; Imholz, Nicole C E; Verhoeven, Tine L A; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J M; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections.

  12. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. Methods The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. Results The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Conclusions Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections. PMID:27537843

  13. Comparative proteome analysis of cryopreserved flagella and head plasma membrane proteins from sea bream spermatozoa: effect of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Zilli, Loredana; Beirão, José; Schiavone, Roberta; Herraez, Maria Paz; Gnoni, Antonio; Vilella, Sebastiano

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation induces injuries to fish spermatozoa that in turn affect sperm quality in terms of fertilization ability, motility, DNA and protein integrity and larval survival. To reduce the loss of sperm quality due to freezing-thawing, it is necessary to improve these procedures. In the present study we investigated the ability of two antifreeze proteins (AFPI and AFPIII) to reduce the loss of quality of sea bream spermatozoa due to cryopreservation. To do so, we compared viability, motility, straight-line velocity and curvilinear velocity of fresh and (AFPs)-cryopreserved spermatozoa. AFPIII addition to cryopreservation medium improved viability, motility and straight-line velocity with respect to DMSO or DMSO plus AFPI. To clarify the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these findings, the protein profile of two different cryopreserved sperm domains, flagella and head plasma membranes, was analysed. The protein profiles differed between fresh and frozen-thawed semen and results of the image analysis demonstrated that, after cryopreservation, out of 270 proteins 12 were decreased and 7 were increased in isolated flagella, and out of 150 proteins 6 showed a significant decrease and 4 showed a significant increase in head membranes. Mass spectrometry analysis identified 6 proteins (4 from isolated flagella and 2 present both in flagella and head plasma membranes) within the protein spots affected by the freezing-thawing procedure. 3 out of 4 proteins from isolated flagella were involved in the sperm bioenergetic system. Our results indicate that the ability of AFPIII to protect sea bream sperm quality can be, at least in part, ascribed to reducing changes in the sperm protein profile occurring during the freezing-thawing procedure. Our results clearly demonstrated that AFPIII addition to cryopreservation medium improved the protection against freezing respect to DMSO or DMSO plus AFPI. In addition we propose specific proteins of spermatozoa as markers related to

  14. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Cryopreserved Flagella and Head Plasma Membrane Proteins from Sea Bream Spermatozoa: Effect of Antifreeze Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zilli, Loredana; Beirão, José; Schiavone, Roberta; Herraez, Maria Paz; Gnoni, Antonio; Vilella, Sebastiano

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation induces injuries to fish spermatozoa that in turn affect sperm quality in terms of fertilization ability, motility, DNA and protein integrity and larval survival. To reduce the loss of sperm quality due to freezing-thawing, it is necessary to improve these procedures. In the present study we investigated the ability of two antifreeze proteins (AFPI and AFPIII) to reduce the loss of quality of sea bream spermatozoa due to cryopreservation. To do so, we compared viability, motility, straight-line velocity and curvilinear velocity of fresh and (AFPs)-cryopreserved spermatozoa. AFPIII addition to cryopreservation medium improved viability, motility and straight-line velocity with respect to DMSO or DMSO plus AFPI. To clarify the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these findings, the protein profile of two different cryopreserved sperm domains, flagella and head plasma membranes, was analysed. The protein profiles differed between fresh and frozen-thawed semen and results of the image analysis demonstrated that, after cryopreservation, out of 270 proteins 12 were decreased and 7 were increased in isolated flagella, and out of 150 proteins 6 showed a significant decrease and 4 showed a significant increase in head membranes. Mass spectrometry analysis identified 6 proteins (4 from isolated flagella and 2 present both in flagella and head plasma membranes) within the protein spots affected by the freezing-thawing procedure. 3 out of 4 proteins from isolated flagella were involved in the sperm bioenergetic system. Our results indicate that the ability of AFPIII to protect sea bream sperm quality can be, at least in part, ascribed to reducing changes in the sperm protein profile occurring during the freezing-thawing procedure. Our results clearly demonstrated that AFPIII addition to cryopreservation medium improved the protection against freezing respect to DMSO or DMSO plus AFPI. In addition we propose specific proteins of spermatozoa as markers related to

  15. Structure of solvation water around the active and inactive regions of a type III antifreeze protein and its mutants of lowered activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Joanna; Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Water molecules from the solvation shell of the ice-binding surface are considered important for the antifreeze proteins to perform their function properly. Herein, we discuss the problem whether the extent of changes of the mean properties of solvation water can be connected with the antifreeze activity of the protein. To this aim, the structure of solvation water of a type III antifreeze protein from Macrozoarces americanus (eel pout) is investigated. A wild type of the protein is used, along with its three mutants, with antifreeze activities equal to 54% or 10% of the activity of the native form. The solvation water of the ice-binding surface and the rest of the protein are analyzed separately. To characterize the structure of solvation shell, parameters describing radial and angular characteristics of the mutual arrangement of the molecules were employed. They take into account short-distance (first hydration shell) or long-distance (two solvation shells) effects. The obtained results and the comparison with the results obtained previously for a hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana lead to the conclusion that the structure and amino acid composition of the active region of the protein evolved to achieve two goals. The first one is the modification of the properties of the solvation water. The second one is the geometrical adjustment of the protein surface to the specific crystallographic plane of ice. Both of these goals have to be achieved simultaneously in order for the protein to perform its function properly. However, they seem to be independent from one another in a sense that very small antifreeze activity does not imply that properties of water become different from the ones observed for the wild type. The proteins with significantly lower activity still modify the mean properties of solvation water in a right direction, in spite of the fact that the accuracy of the geometrical match with the ice lattice is lost because of the

  16. Experimental investigation of the interactions of hyperactive antifreeze proteins with ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Yeliz

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) evolved in cold-adapted organisms and serve to protect them against freezing cold conditions by arresting ice crystal growth and inhibiting ice recrystallization. The freezing point depression by AFPs is defined as thermal hysteresis (TH) and AFPs are classified as hyperactive (hypAFPs) and moderate according to their TH activities. The mechanism of action of AFPs is not well understood. In particular, it is not clear what determines the concentration dependence of TH and whether the binding of AFP to ice is irreversible. Additionally, it is not known why some types of AFP are hyperactive compared to others and it was suggested that hyperactivity might be related to basal plane affinity of hypAFP to ice. The present study utilizes the techniques of microfluidic devices and fluorescence microscopy to study the interaction of AFPs with ice crystals. With novel temperature controlled microfluidic devices, we showed the accumulation and affinity of hypAFPs on the basal plane of ice. This supports the view that hypAFPs adhere to the basal plane. Additionally, for the first time in literature, small ice crystals of 30-50 mum sizes covered with adsorbed GFP tagged hypAFPs were stabilized in supercooled non-AFP solutions for hours with no observed ice growth in temperature controlled microfluidic devices. Repeated TH experiments of ice crystals incubated in AFP solutions before and after the exchange of liquids in microfluidic devices gave the same TH activity. This finding clarifies our understanding of concentration dependence of TH. Furthermore, we found that hypAFPs protect ice against melting as well as freezing, resulting in superheated ice. Ice crystals were superheated up to 0.5°C above their equilibrium melting temperatures and remained stable in this superheated state for hours. Measurements of fast melting velocities added additional evidence to the observed superheating of ice in AFP solutions. The experimental results of the current

  17. Molecular and comparative analyses of type IV antifreeze proteins (AFPIVs) from two Antarctic fishes, Pleuragramma antarcticum and Notothenia coriiceps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yeon Ju; Park, Kyoung Sun; Shin, Seung Chul; Kim, Hak Jun; Song, Young Hwan; Park, Hyun

    2011-08-01

    Antifreeze protein type IV (AFPIV) cDNAs and genomic DNAs from the Antarctic fishes Pleuragramma antarcticum (Pa) and Notothenia coriiceps (Nc) were cloned and sequenced, respectively. Each cDNA encoded 128 amino acids, with 94% similarity between the two and 83% similarity with AFPIV of the longhorn sculpin, Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus. The genome structures of both genes consisted of four exons and three introns, and were highly conserved in terms of sequences and positions. In contrast, the third intron of PaAFPIV had additional nucleotides with inverted repeats at each end, which appeared to be a MITE-like transposable element. Comparative analysis revealed that fish AFPIVs were widely distributed across teleost fishes, well conserved in their intron positions, but more variable in intron sequences and sizes. However, the intron sequences of two Antarctic fishes were highly conserved, indicating recent radiation of notothenioids in the evolutionary lineage. The recombinant PaAFPIV and NcAFPIV were expressed in E. coli, and examined antifreeze activity. PaAFPIV and NcAFPIV gave ice crystals with star-shaped morphology, and thermal hysteresis (TH) values were 0.08°C at the concentration of 0.5mg/ml.

  18. Gold Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Probe of Antifreeze (Glyco) Protein-Inspired Ice Recrystallization Inhibition and Identification of New IRI Active Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Congdon, Thomas; Rodger, Alison; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-26

    Antifreeze (glyco)proteins are found in polar fish species and act to slow the rate of growth of ice crystals; a property known as ice recrystallization inhibition. The ability to slow ice growth is of huge technological importance especially in the cryopreservation of donor cells and tissue, but native antifreeze proteins are often not suitable, nor easily available. Therefore, the search for new materials that mimic this function is important, but currently limited by the low-throughout assays associated with the antifreeze properties. Here 30 nm gold nanoparticles are demonstrated to be useful colorimetric probes for ice recrystallization inhibition, giving a visible optical response and is compatible with 96 well plates for high-throughout studies. This method is faster, requires less infrastructure, and has easier interpretation than the currently used 'splat' methods. Using this method, a series of serum proteins were identified to have weak, but specific ice recrystallization inhibition activity, which was removed upon denaturation. It is hoped that high-throughput tools such as this will accelerate the discovery of new antifreeze mimics.

  19. Gold Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Probe of Antifreeze (Glyco) Protein-Inspired Ice Recrystallization Inhibition and Identification of New IRI Active Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Daniel E.; Congdon, Thomas; Rodger, Alison; Gibson, Matthew I.

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze (glyco)proteins are found in polar fish species and act to slow the rate of growth of ice crystals; a property known as ice recrystallization inhibition. The ability to slow ice growth is of huge technological importance especially in the cryopreservation of donor cells and tissue, but native antifreeze proteins are often not suitable, nor easily available. Therefore, the search for new materials that mimic this function is important, but currently limited by the low-throughout assays associated with the antifreeze properties. Here 30 nm gold nanoparticles are demonstrated to be useful colorimetric probes for ice recrystallization inhibition, giving a visible optical response and is compatible with 96 well plates for high-throughout studies. This method is faster, requires less infrastructure, and has easier interpretation than the currently used ‘splat’ methods. Using this method, a series of serum proteins were identified to have weak, but specific ice recrystallization inhibition activity, which was removed upon denaturation. It is hoped that high-throughput tools such as this will accelerate the discovery of new antifreeze mimics. PMID:26499135

  20. Expression of insect (Microdera puntipennis dzungarica) antifreeze protein MpAFP149 confers the cold tolerance to transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Qiu, Liming; Dai, Chunying; Wang, Jing; Luo, Jianmin; Zhang, Fuchun; Ma, Ji

    2008-08-01

    To elucidate the function of antifreeze protein from Microdera puntipennis dzhungarica for freezing stress tolerance in plant, the construct of MpAFP149 gene with the signal peptide sequence responsible for secreting the native MpAFP149 into the apoplast space under control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter was introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. The observation of immunogold localization by TEM (transmission electron microscope) showed that the heterologous MpAFP149 protein was mainly distributed on the cell wall in apoplast of the transgenic tobacco plant. T1 generation transgenic tobacco plants displayed a more frost resistant phenotype and kept the lower ion leakage ratio and MDA (malondialdehyde) content in the leaves compared with wild-type ones at -1 degrees C for 3 days. The results showed that MpAFP149 provided protection and conferred cold tolerance to transgenic tobacco plant during freezing stress.

  1. Will It Be Beneficial To Simulate the Antifreeze Proteins at Ice Freezing Condition or at Lower Temperature?

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-09-03

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) enable the polar living species to survive subzero temperature conditions through effective lowering of the freezing point of body fluids. At the molecular level, AFPs directly interact with the growing seeds of ice crystals to inhibit their formation. To understand the structural and dynamic aspects of this interaction at the atomistic level, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out on several type I AFPs at multiple temperatures, including the physiologically relevant temperature of 273 K, a lower temperature of 227 K, and the conventional 300 K. A comparison of the principal component analysis (PCA) and mean squared deviation plots for Winter flounder AFP, HPLC6 (mutant of winter flounder AFP), Sculpin, and peptide 1m AFPs reveals that simulations at 273 and 227 K result in the formation of more conserved metastable states than at 300 K. Other parameters such as root-mean-square deviation (rmsd), solvent accessibility surface area (SASA), H-bonding and residual density function (RDF) also suggest the same. MD simulations with ice crystal, where AFPs are complexed to ice plane with TIP4P/ice water model, help in finding relevance of dynamic behavior, and physiological temperature becomes more pronounced. Additionally, a control study on a nonantifreeze protein (LL37) is included, which aids in exploring significant information. On the basis of this approach, it was found that AFPs at 273 and 227 K display relevant dynamic properties that appear at 300 K for nonantifreeze proteins. The present study hence emphasizes the importance of performing computational simulations for antifreeze proteins at the physiologically relevant temperature (273 K), and even at lower temperatures (like 227 K), rather than at room temperatures (300 K).

  2. Effects of Three Different Types of Antifreeze Proteins on Mouse Ovarian Tissue Cryopreservation and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Hye Won; Kim, Hak Jun; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Ovarian tissue (OT) cryopreservation is effective in preserving fertility in cancer patients who have concerns about fertility loss due to cancer treatment. However, the damage incurred at different steps during the cryopreservation procedure may cause follicular depletion; hence, preventing chilling injury would help maintain ovarian function. Objective This study was designed to investigate the beneficial effects of different antifreeze proteins (AFPs) on mouse ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation. Methodology Ovaries were obtained from 5-week-old B6D2F1 mice, and each ovary was cryopreserved using two-step vitrification and four-step warming procedures. In Experiment I, ovaries were randomly allocated into fresh, vitrification control, and nine experimental groups according to the AFP type (FfIBP, LeIBP, type III) and concentration (0.1, 1, 10 mg/mL) used. After vitrification and warming, 5,790 ovarian follicles were evaluated using histology and TUNEL assays, and immunofluorescence for τH2AX and Rad51 was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and repair (DDR), respectively. In Experiment II, 20 mice were randomly divided into two groups: one where the vitrification and warming media were supplemented with 10 mg/mL LeIBP, and the other where media alone were used (control). Ovaries were then autotransplanted under both kidney capsules 7 days after vitrification together with the addition of 10 mg/mL LeIBP in the vitrification-warming media. After transplantation, the ovarian follicles, the percentage of apoptotic follicles, the extent of the CD31-positive area, and the serum FSH levels of the transplanted groups were compared. Principal Findings In Experiment I, the percentage of total grade 1 follicles was significantly higher in the 10 mg/mL LeIBP group than in the vitrification control, while all AFP-treated groups had significantly improved grade 1 primordial follicle numbers compared with those of the vitrification

  3. Plant Lectin-Like Bacteriocin from a Rhizosphere-Colonizing Pseudomonas Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Parret, Annabel H. A.; Schoofs, Geert; Proost, Paul; De Mot, René

    2003-01-01

    Rhizosphere isolate Pseudomonas sp. strain BW11M1, which belongs to the Pseudomonas putida cluster, secretes a heat- and protease-sensitive bacteriocin which kills P. putida GR12-2R3. The production of this bacteriocin is enhanced by DNA-damaging treatment of producer cells. We isolated a TnMod mutant of strain BW11M1 that had lost the capacity to inhibit the growth of strain GR12-2R3. A wild-type genomic fragment encompassing the transposon insertion site was shown to confer the bacteriocin phenotype when it was introduced into Escherichia coli cells. The bacteriocin structural gene was identified by defining the minimal region required for expression in E. coli. This gene was designated llpA (lectin-like putidacin) on the basis of significant homology of its 276-amino-acid product with mannose-binding lectins from monocotyledonous plants. LlpA is composed of two monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. Several uncharacterized bacterial genes encoding diverse proteins containing one or two MMBL domains were identified. A phylogenetic analysis of the MMBL domains present in eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins assigned the putidacin domains to a new bacterial clade within the MMBL-containing protein family. Heterologous expression of the llpA gene also conveyed bacteriocin production to several Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. In addition, we demonstrated that strain BW11M1 and heterologous hosts secrete LlpA into the growth medium without requiring a cleavable signal sequence. Most likely, the mode of action of this lectin-like bacteriocin is different from the modes of action of previously described Pseudomonas bacteriocins. PMID:12533465

  4. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on the supercooling ability and mining of antifreeze proteins of the Chinese white wax scale insect.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shu-Hui; Yang, Pu; Sun, Tao; Qi, Qian; Wang, Xue-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Ying; Liu, Bo-Wen

    2016-06-01

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, can survive at extremely low temperatures, and some overwintering individuals exhibit supercooling at temperatures below -30°C. To investigate the deep supercooling ability of E. pela, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to delineate the major gene and protein families responsible for the deep supercooling ability of overwintering females. Gene Ontology (GO) classification and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis indicated that genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase, calcium, and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways and pathways associated with the biosynthesis of soluble sugars, sugar alcohols and free amino acids were dominant. Proteins responsible for low-temperature stress, such as cold acclimation proteins, glycerol biosynthesis-related enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) were identified. However, no antifreeze proteins (AFPs) were identified through sequence similarity search methods. A random forest approach identified 388 putative AFPs in the proteome. The AFP gene ep-afp was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein exhibited a thermal hysteresis activity of 0.97°C, suggesting its potential role in the deep supercooling ability of E. pela.

  5. Cold survival in freeze-intolerant insects: the structure and function of beta-helical antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; Sykes, Brian D

    2004-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) designate a class of proteins that are able to bind to and inhibit the growth of macromolecular ice. These proteins have been characterized from a variety of organisms. Recently, the structures of AFPs from the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) and the yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) have been determined by NMR and X-ray crystallography. Despite nonhomologous sequences, both proteins were shown to consist of beta-helices. We review the structures and dynamics data of these two insect AFPs to bring insight into the structure-function relationship and explore their beta-helical architecture. For the spruce budworm protein, the fold is a left-handed beta-helix with 15 residues per coil. The Tenebrio molitor protein consists of a right-handed beta-helix with 12 residues per coil. Mutagenesis and structural studies show that the insect AFPs present a highly rigid array of threonine residues and bound water molecules that can effectively mimic the ice lattice. Comparisons of the newly determined ryegrass and carrot AFP sequences have led to models suggesting that they might also consist of beta-helices, and indicate that the beta-helix might be used as an AFP structural motif in nonfish organisms.

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Growth melt asymmetry in ice crystals under the influence of spruce budworm antifreeze protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertaya, Natalya; Celik, Yeliz; Di Prinzio, Carlos L.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2007-10-01

    Here we describe studies of the crystallization behavior of ice in an aqueous solution of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbwAFP) at atmospheric pressure. SbwAFP is an ice binding protein with high thermal hysteresis activity, which helps protect Choristoneura fumiferana (spruce budworm) larvae from freezing as they overwinter in the spruce and fir forests of the north eastern United States and Canada. Different types of ice binding proteins have been found in many other species. They have a wide range of applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation, as well as the potential to protect plants and vegetables from frost damage through genetic engineering. However, there is much to learn regarding the mechanism of action of ice binding proteins. In our experiments, a solution containing sbwAFP was rapidly frozen and then melted back, thereby allowing us to produce small single crystals. These maintained their hexagonal shapes during cooling within the thermal hysteresis gap. Melt-growth-melt sequences in low concentrations of sbwAFP reveal the same shape transitions as are found in pure ice crystals at low temperature (-22 °C) and high pressure (2000 bar) (Cahoon et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 255502) while both growth and melt shapes display faceted hexagonal morphology, they are rotated 30° relative to one another. Moreover, the initial melt shape and orientation is recovered in the sequence. To visualize the binding of sbwAFP to ice, we labeled the antifreeze protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and observed the sbwAFP-GFP molecules directly on ice crystals using confocal microscopy. When cooling the ice crystals, facets form on the six primary prism planes (slowest growing planes) that are evenly decorated with sbwAFP-GFP. During melting, apparent facets form on secondary prism planes (fastest melting planes), leaving residual sbwAFP at the six corners of the hexagon. Thus, the same general growth-melt behavior of an apparently rotated

  7. Effect of a mutation on the structure and dynamics of an alpha-helical antifreeze protein in water and ice.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Sykes, Brian D

    2006-05-15

    One strategy of psychrophilic organisms to survive subzero temperature is to produce antifreeze protein (AFPs), which inhibit the growth of macromolecular ice. To better understand the binding mechanism, the structure and dynamics of several AFPs have been studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray crystallography. The results have shown that different organisms can use diverse structures (alpha-helix, beta-helix, or different globular folds) to achieve the same function. A number of studies have focused on understanding the relationship between the alpha-helical structure of fish type I AFP and its function as an inhibitor of ice growth. The results have not explained whether the 90% activity loss caused by the conservative mutation of two threonines to serines (Thr13Ser/Thr24Ser) is attributable to a change in protein structure in solution or in ice. We examine here the structure and dynamics of the winter flounder type I AFP and the mutant Thr13Ser/Thr24Ser in both solution and solid states using a wide range of NMR approaches. Both proteins remain fully alpha-helical at all temperatures and in ice, demonstrating that the activity change must therefore not be attributable to changes in the protein fold or dynamics but differences in surface properties.

  8. Distinct molecular features facilitating ice-binding mechanisms in hyperactive antifreeze proteins closely related to an Antarctic sea ice bacterium.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rachana; Chakraborti, Pratim; Bhowmick, Rupa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasish

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins or ice-binding proteins (IBPs) facilitate the survival of certain cellular organisms in freezing environment by inhibiting the growth of ice crystals in solution. Present study identifies orthologs of the IBP of Colwellia sp. SLW05, which were obtained from a wide range of taxa. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of conserved regions (predicted as the 'ice-binding domain' [IBD]) present in all the orthologs, separates the bacterial and archaeal orthologs from that of the eukaryotes'. Correspondence analysis pointed out that the bacterial and archaeal IBDs have relatively higher average hydrophobicity than the eukaryotic members. IBDs belonging to bacterial as well as archaeal AFPs contain comparatively more strands, and therefore are revealed to be under higher evolutionary selection pressure. Molecular docking studies prove that the ice crystals form more stable complex with the bacterial as well as archaeal proteins than the eukaryotic orthologs. Analysis of the docked structures have traced out the ice-binding sites (IBSs) in all the orthologs which continue to facilitate ice-binding activity even after getting mutated with respect to the well-studied IBSs of Typhula ishikariensis and notably, all these mutations performing ice-binding using 'anchored clathrate mechanism' have been found to prefer polar and hydrophilic amino acids. Horizontal gene transfer studies point toward a strong selection pressure favoring independent evolution of the IBPs in some polar organisms including prokaryotes as well as eukaryotes because these proteins facilitate the polar organisms to acclimatize to the adversities in their niche, thus safeguarding their existence.

  9. Antifreeze protein from freeze-tolerant grass has a beta-roll fold with an irregularly structured ice-binding site.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Adam J; Marshall, Christopher B; Faucher, Frédérick; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Campbell, Robert L; Walker, Virginia K; Davies, Peter L

    2012-03-09

    The grass Lolium perenne produces an ice-binding protein (LpIBP) that helps this perennial tolerate freezing by inhibiting the recrystallization of ice. Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are also produced by freeze-avoiding organisms to halt the growth of ice and are better known as antifreeze proteins (AFPs). To examine the structural basis for the different roles of these two IBP types, we have solved the first crystal structure of a plant IBP. The 118-residue LpIBP folds as a novel left-handed beta-roll with eight 14- or 15-residue coils and is stabilized by a small hydrophobic core and two internal Asn ladders. The ice-binding site (IBS) is formed by a flat beta-sheet on one surface of the beta-roll. We show that LpIBP binds to both the basal and primary-prism planes of ice, which is the hallmark of hyperactive AFPs. However, the antifreeze activity of LpIBP is less than 10% of that measured for those hyperactive AFPs with convergently evolved beta-solenoid structures. Whereas these hyperactive AFPs have two rows of aligned Thr residues on their IBS, the equivalent arrays in LpIBP are populated by a mixture of Thr, Ser and Val with several side-chain conformations. Substitution of Ser or Val for Thr on the IBS of a hyperactive AFP reduced its antifreeze activity. LpIBP may have evolved an IBS that has low antifreeze activity to avoid damage from rapid ice growth that occurs when temperatures exceed the capacity of AFPs to block ice growth while retaining the ability to inhibit ice recrystallization.

  10. Hyperactive antifreeze protein from an Antarctic sea ice bacterium Colwellia sp. has a compound ice-binding site without repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Yuichi; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Miura, Ai; Tsuda, Sakae; Kondo, Hidemasa

    2014-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are structurally diverse macromolecules that bind to ice crystals and inhibit their growth to protect the organism from injuries caused by freezing. An AFP identified from the Antarctic bacterium Colwellia sp. strain SLW05 (ColAFP) is homologous to AFPs from a wide variety of psychrophilic microorganisms. To understand the antifreeze function of ColAFP, we have characterized its antifreeze activity and determined the crystal structure of this protein. The recombinant ColAFP exhibited thermal hysteresis activity of approximately 4 °C at a concentration of 0.14 mm, and induced rapid growth of ice crystals in the hexagonal direction. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity analysis showed that ColAFP binds to multiple planes of ice, including the basal plane. These observations show that ColAFP is a hyperactive AFP. The crystal structure of ColAFP determined at 1.6 Å resolution revealed an irregular β-helical structure, similar to known homologs. Mutational and molecular docking studies showed that ColAFP binds to ice through a compound ice-binding site (IBS) located at a flat surface of the β-helix and the adjoining loop region. The IBS of ColAFP lacks the repetitive sequences that are characteristic of hyperactive AFPs. These results suggest that ColAFP exerts antifreeze activity through a compound IBS that differs from the characteristic IBSs shared by other hyperactive AFPs. This study demonstrates a novel method for protection from freezing by AFPs in psychrophilic microorganisms. Structural data for ColAFP have been submitted to the Protein Data Bank (PDB) under accession number 3WP9. © 2014 FEBS.

  11. Characterization of an antifreeze protein from the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus and its relevance in sea ice.

    PubMed

    Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Weikusat, Ilka; Besir, Hüseyin; Dieckmann, Gerhard

    2011-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), characterized by their ability to separate the melting and growth temperatures of ice and to inhibit ice recrystallization, play an important role in cold adaptation of several polar and cold-tolerant organisms. Recently, a multigene family of AFP genes was found in the diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus, a dominant species within polar sea ice assemblages. This study presents the AFP from F. cylindrus set in a molecular and crystallographic frame. Differential protein expression after exposure of the diatoms to environmentally relevant conditions underlined the importance of certain AFP isoforms in response to cold. Analyses of the recombinant AFP showed freezing point depression comparable to the activity of other moderate AFPs and further enhanced by salt (up to 0.9°C in low salinity buffer, 2.5°C at high salinity). However, unlike other moderate AFPs, its fastest growth direction is perpendicular to the c-axis. The protein also caused strong inhibition of recrystallization at concentrations of 1.2 and 0.12 μM at low and high salinity, respectively. Observations of crystal habit modifications and pitting activity suggested binding of AFPs to multiple faces of the ice crystals. Further analyses showed striations caused by AFPs, interpreted as inclusion in the ice. We suggest that the influence on ice microstructure is the main characteristic of these AFPs in sea ice.

  12. Functional Analysis of a Bacterial Antifreeze Protein Indicates a Cooperative Effect between Its Two Ice-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Oliver, Erin E; Christner, Brent C; Luo, Bing-Hao

    2016-07-19

    Antifreeze proteins make up a class of ice-binding proteins (IBPs) that are possessed and expressed by certain cold-adapted organisms to enhance their freezing tolerance. Here we report the biophysical and functional characterization of an IBP discovered in a bacterium recovered from a deep glacial ice core drilled at Vostok Station, Antarctica (IBPv). Our study showed that the recombinant protein rIBPv exhibited a thermal hysteresis of 2 °C at concentrations of >50 μM, effectively inhibited ice recrystallization, and enhanced bacterial viability during freeze-thaw cycling. Circular dichroism scans indicated that rIBPv mainly consists of β strands, and its denaturing temperature was 53.5 °C. Multiple-sequence alignment of homologous IBPs predicted that IBPv contains two ice-binding domains, a feature unique among known IBPs. To examine functional differences between the IBPv domains, each domain was cloned, expressed, and purified. The second domain (domain B) expressed greater ice binding activity. Data from thermal hysteresis and gel filtration assays supported the idea that the two domains cooperate to achieve a higher ice binding effect by forming heterodimers. However, physical linkage of the domains was not required for this effect.

  13. Potential of mean force calculation of the free energy of adsorption of Type I winter flounder antifreeze protein on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Keith; Alan Salter, E.; Wesley Edmunds, R.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej

    2010-04-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that inhibit ice growth without changing the melting point of ice. In this work, we study the detailed molecular mechanism of interactions between the hydrophobic side of the winter flounder (WF) AFP and two mutants, AAAA and SSSS, in which threonine residues are substituted by serines and alanines, respectively. Umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations of the separation of the proteins from the (2 0 1) surface in an explicit water box is carried out to calculate the potential of mean force free energies of adsorption using AMBER10i. We estimate wild-type WF's free energy of adsorption to ice to be about -12.0 kcal/mol. Gas-phase pseudopotential plane-wave calculations of methane adsorption onto select surfaces of ice are also carried out under periodic boundary conditions to address the possible enthalpic role of WF's methyl groups in binding. The contributions of hydrophobic residues to the free energy of adsorption are discussed.

  14. Self-oscillatory ice crystal growth in antifreeze protein (AFP) and glycoprotein (AFGP) solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda, Salvador; Nakaya, Hiroyuki; Uda, Yukihiro; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2006-03-01

    AFPs and AFGPs allow many organisms including fish, plants and insects to survive sub-freezing environments. They occur in a wide range of compositions and structure, but to some extent they all accomplish the same functions: they suppress the freezing temperature, inhibit recrystallization, and modify ice crystal growth. A complete description of the AFGP/AFP surface mechanism as well as other ice surface phenomenon has eluded scientists primarily due to a lack of direct surface studies. We study ice crystal growth in AFGP and AFP solutions with phase contrast microscopy during free solution growth under various conditions including microgravity. Free-solution growth experiments show an anisotropic self-oscillatory growth mode of the steps and interface near the freezing temperature and enhancement of the growth rates in the c-axis. These results contradict the previous ?tight-binding? mechanism thought to be responsible for antifreeze function. To study the effects of temperature driven convective flows on the interface kinetics, microgravity experiments were performed in a jet airplane during a parabolic flight path. Step propagation on the basal plane slows down considerably when entering the microgravity condition and reaches a critical condition just below 0.2g.

  15. Ice-binding site of snow mold fungus antifreeze protein deviates from structural regularity and high conservation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hidemasa; Hanada, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Garnham, Christopher P; Davies, Peter L; Tsuda, Sakae

    2012-06-12

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in organisms ranging from fish to bacteria, where they serve different functions to facilitate survival of their host. AFPs that protect freeze-intolerant fish and insects from internal ice growth bind to ice using a regular array of well-conserved residues/motifs. Less is known about the role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species, which might be to beneficially alter the structure of ice in or around the host. Here we report the 0.95-Å high-resolution crystal structure of a 223-residue secreted AFP from the snow mold fungus Typhula ishikariensis. Its main structural element is an irregular β-helix with six loops of 18 or more residues that lies alongside an α-helix. β-Helices have independently evolved as AFPs on several occasions and seem ideally structured to bind to several planes of ice, including the basal plane. A novelty of the β-helical fold is the nonsequential arrangement of loops that places the N- and C termini inside the solenoid of β-helical coils. The ice-binding site (IBS), which could not be predicted from sequence or structure, was located by site-directed mutagenesis to the flattest surface of the protein. It is remarkable for its lack of regularity and its poor conservation in homologs from psychrophilic diatoms and bacteria and other fungi.

  16. Ice-binding site of snow mold fungus antifreeze protein deviates from structural regularity and high conservation

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hidemasa; Hanada, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Garnham, Christopher P.; Davies, Peter L.; Tsuda, Sakae

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in organisms ranging from fish to bacteria, where they serve different functions to facilitate survival of their host. AFPs that protect freeze-intolerant fish and insects from internal ice growth bind to ice using a regular array of well-conserved residues/motifs. Less is known about the role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species, which might be to beneficially alter the structure of ice in or around the host. Here we report the 0.95-Å high-resolution crystal structure of a 223-residue secreted AFP from the snow mold fungus Typhula ishikariensis. Its main structural element is an irregular β-helix with six loops of 18 or more residues that lies alongside an α-helix. β-Helices have independently evolved as AFPs on several occasions and seem ideally structured to bind to several planes of ice, including the basal plane. A novelty of the β-helical fold is the nonsequential arrangement of loops that places the N- and C termini inside the solenoid of β-helical coils. The ice-binding site (IBS), which could not be predicted from sequence or structure, was located by site-directed mutagenesis to the flattest surface of the protein. It is remarkable for its lack of regularity and its poor conservation in homologs from psychrophilic diatoms and bacteria and other fungi. PMID:22645341

  17. Identification of the ice-binding surface on a type III antifreeze protein with a "flatness function" algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, D S; Hon, W C; Bubanko, S; Xue, Y; Seetharaman, J; Hew, C L; Sicheri, F

    1998-05-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to surfaces of growing ice crystals, thereby arresting their growth. The prevailing hypothesis explains the nature of adsorption in terms of a match between the hydrophilic side chains on the AFP's ice-binding surface (IBS) and the water molecules on the ice surface. The number and spatial arrangement of hydrogen bonds thus formed have been proposed to account, respectively, for the binding affinity and specificity. The crystal structure of a type III AFP from ocean pout (isoform HPLC-3) has been determined to 2.0-A resolution. The structure reveals an internal dyad motif formed by two 19-residue, loop-shaped elements. Based on of the flatness observed on the type I alpha-helical AFP's IBS, an automated algorithm was developed to analyze the surface planarity of the globular type III AFP and was used to identify the IBS on this protein. The surface with the highest flatness score is formed by one loop of the dyad motif and is identical to the IBS deduced from earlier mutagenesis studies. Interestingly, 67% of this surface contains nonpolar solvent-accessible surface area. The success of our approach to identifying the IBS on an AFP, without considering the presence of polar side chains, indicates that flatness is the first approximation of an IBS. We further propose that the specificity of interactions between an IBS and a particular ice-crystallographic plane arises from surface complementarity.

  18. Purification, crystal structure determination and functional characterization of type III antifreeze proteins from the European eelpout Zoarces viviparus.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Casper; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Ramløv, Hans; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2014-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are essential components of many organisms adaptation to cold temperatures. Fish type III AFPs are divided into two groups, SP isoforms being much less active than QAE1 isoforms. Two type III AFPs from Zoarces viviparus, a QAE1 (ZvAFP13) and an SP (ZvAFP6) isoform, are here characterized and their crystal structures determined. We conclude that the higher activity of the QAE1 isoforms cannot be attributed to single residues, but rather a combination of structural effects. Furthermore both ZvAFP6 and ZvAFP13 crystal structures have water molecules around T18 equivalent to the tetrahedral-like waters previously identified in a neutron crystal structure. Interestingly, ZvAFP6 forms dimers in the crystal, with a significant dimer interface. The presence of ZvAFP6 dimers was confirmed in solution by native electrophoresis and gel filtration. To our knowledge this is the first report of dimerization of AFP type III proteins.

  19. Identification of the ice-binding surface on a type III antifreeze protein with a "flatness function" algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D S; Hon, W C; Bubanko, S; Xue, Y; Seetharaman, J; Hew, C L; Sicheri, F

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to surfaces of growing ice crystals, thereby arresting their growth. The prevailing hypothesis explains the nature of adsorption in terms of a match between the hydrophilic side chains on the AFP's ice-binding surface (IBS) and the water molecules on the ice surface. The number and spatial arrangement of hydrogen bonds thus formed have been proposed to account, respectively, for the binding affinity and specificity. The crystal structure of a type III AFP from ocean pout (isoform HPLC-3) has been determined to 2.0-A resolution. The structure reveals an internal dyad motif formed by two 19-residue, loop-shaped elements. Based on of the flatness observed on the type I alpha-helical AFP's IBS, an automated algorithm was developed to analyze the surface planarity of the globular type III AFP and was used to identify the IBS on this protein. The surface with the highest flatness score is formed by one loop of the dyad motif and is identical to the IBS deduced from earlier mutagenesis studies. Interestingly, 67% of this surface contains nonpolar solvent-accessible surface area. The success of our approach to identifying the IBS on an AFP, without considering the presence of polar side chains, indicates that flatness is the first approximation of an IBS. We further propose that the specificity of interactions between an IBS and a particular ice-crystallographic plane arises from surface complementarity. PMID:9591641

  20. Purification of antifreeze protein from wheat bran (Triticum aestivum L.) based on its hydrophilicity and ice-binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Li; Zhang, Junhui; Yao, Huiyuan

    2007-09-19

    Wheat-bran ( Triticum aestivum L.) antifreeze protein ( TaAFP) was purified 323-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity with an overall yield of 1.64% from wheat-bran protein by a specific three-step procedure. The three-step procedure was quicker, cheaper, and more effective than the five-step procedure we used earlier. First, TaAFP was concentrated by a phosphate buffer, on the basis of its strong hydrophilicity that was validated by thermal gravimetric analyses and a surface hydrophobicity analysis. Second, TaAFP was trapped in ice crystals for its specific ice-binding capacity, which was proved by ice-binding protocols. Remarkably, the ice-binding step was the most effective step, and the purification factor of this step was up to 270-fold. Finally, TaAFP was purified by HPLC purification, a complementary step for the specific ice-binding protocol, to electrophoretic homogeneity. Our protocols provide peers a novel and effective way for the search and purification of potential AFPs.

  1. Refined solution structure of type III antifreeze protein: hydrophobic groups may be involved in the energetics of the protein-ice interaction.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; DeLuca, C I; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1996-11-15

    Antifreeze proteins are found in certain fish inhabiting polar sea water. These proteins depress the freezing points of blood and body fluids below that of the surrounding sea water by binding to and inhibiting the growth of seed ice crystals. The proteins are believed to bind irreversibly to growing ice crystals in such a way as to change the curvature of the ice-water interface, leading to freezing point depression, but the mechanism of high-affinity ice binding is not yet fully understood. The solution structure of the type III antifreeze protein was determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Twenty-two structures converged and display a root mean square difference from the mean of 0.26 A for backbone atoms and 0.62 A for all non-hydrogen atoms. The protein exhibits a compact fold with a relatively large hydrophobic core, several short and irregular beta sheets and one helical turn. The ice-binding site, which encompasses parts of the C-terminal sheet and a loop, is planar and relatively nonpolar. The site is further characterized by the low solvent accessibilities and the specific spatial arrangement of the polar side-chain atoms of the putative ice-binding residues Gln9, Asn14, Thr15, Thr18 and Gln44. In agreement with the adsorption-inhibition mechanism of action, interatomic distances between active polar protein residues match the spacing of water molecules in the prism planes (¿10&1macr;0¿) of the hexagonal ice crystal. The particular side-chain conformations, however, limit the number and strength of possible proten-ice hydrogen bonds. This suggests that other entropic and enthalpic contributions, such as those arising from hydrophobic groups, could play a role in the high-affinity protein-ice adsorption.

  2. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Ao, Jingqun; Ding, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Mu, Yinnan; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-12-10

    The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR) from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD), an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1-C6), a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp) and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp). Ca(2+) binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and guppy (Poecilia retitculata) CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR) protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish.

  3. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea)

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Jingqun; Ding, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Mu, Yinnan; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR) from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD), an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1–C6), a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp) and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp). Ca2+ binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and guppy (Poecilia retitculata) CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR) protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca2+-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish. PMID:26690423

  4. Freeze resistance in rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax): seasonal pattern of glycerol and antifreeze protein levels and liver enzyme activity associated with glycerol production.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Johanne M; Ewart, K Vanya; Driedzic, William R

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) inhabit inshore waters along the North American Atlantic coast. During the winter, these waters are frequently ice covered and can reach temperatures as low as -1.9 degrees C. To prevent freezing, smelt accumulate high levels of glycerol, which lower the freezing point via colligative means, and antifreeze proteins (AFP). The up-regulation of the antifreeze response (both glycerol and AFP) occurs in early fall, when water temperatures are 5 degrees -6 degrees C. The accumulation of glycerol appears to be the main mechanism of freeze resistance in smelt because it contributes more to the lowering of the body's freezing point than the activity of the AFP (0.5 degrees C vs. 0.25 degrees C for glycerol and AFP, respectively) at a water temperature of -1.5 degrees C. Moreover, AFP in smelt appears to be a safeguard mechanism to prevent freezing when glycerol levels are low. Significant increases in activities of the liver enzymes glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) during the initiation of glycerol production and significant correlations between enzyme activities and plasma glycerol levels suggest that these enzymes are closely associated with the synthesis and maintenance of elevated glycerol levels for use as an antifreeze. These findings add further support to the concept that carbon for glycerol is derived from amino acids.

  5. Cloning and expression of afpA, a gene encoding an antifreeze protein from the arctic plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida GR12-2.

    PubMed

    Muryoi, Naomi; Sato, Mika; Kaneko, Shoji; Kawahara, Hidehisa; Obata, Hitoshi; Yaish, Mahmoud W F; Griffith, Marilyn; Glick, Bernard R

    2004-09-01

    The Arctic plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida GR12-2 secretes an antifreeze protein (AFP) that promotes survival at subzero temperatures. The AFP is unusual in that it also exhibits a low level of ice nucleation activity. A DNA fragment with an open reading frame encoding 473 amino acids was cloned by PCR and inverse PCR using primers designed from partial amino acid sequences of the isolated AFP. The predicted gene product, AfpA, had a molecular mass of 47.3 kDa, a pI of 3.51, and no previously known function. Although AfpA is a secreted protein, it lacked an N-terminal signal peptide and was shown by sequence analysis to have two possible secretion systems: a hemolysin-like, calcium-binding secretion domain and a type V autotransporter domain found in gram-negative bacteria. Expression of afpA in Escherichia coli yielded an intracellular 72-kDa protein modified with both sugars and lipids that exhibited lower levels of antifreeze and ice nucleation activities than the native protein. The 164-kDa AFP previously purified from P. putida GR12-2 was a lipoglycoprotein, and the carbohydrate was required for ice nucleation activity. Therefore, the recombinant protein may not have been properly posttranslationally modified. The AfpA sequence was most similar to cell wall-associated proteins and less similar to ice nucleation proteins (INPs). Hydropathy plots revealed that the amino acid sequence of AfpA was more hydrophobic than those of the INPs in the domain that forms the ice template, thus suggesting that AFPs and INPs interact differently with ice. To our knowledge, this is the first gene encoding a protein with both antifreeze and ice nucleation activities to be isolated and characterized.

  6. The stability during low-temperature storage of an antifreeze protein isolated from the roots of cold-acclimated carrots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Hong; Wusteman, Monica C; Smallwood, Maggie; Pegg, David E

    2002-06-01

    Natural antifreeze proteins (AFPs) not only inhibit freezing at high subzero temperatures; they have the additional properties of inhibiting the recrystallization of ice during warming and of preventing devitrification. The natural AFP that occurs in the roots of cold-acclimated carrots can be extracted reasonably simply and is non-toxic: it was selected for study as a possible ingredient of the vitrification mixtures that are being developed for use in tissue cryopreservation. For this application, it would be essential for the AFP to remain active during prolonged storage at very low temperatures. For logistic reasons, it would also be essential to have an effective method of storage of the purified AFP itself. In this study, carrot AFP was isolated and purified, and its ability to inhibit recrystallization was monitored over 40 weeks of storage at -80 or -196 degrees C. The data revealed a progressive decrease in activity during storage, reaching half the original activity in 10-20 weeks and only 2-3% of the original activity at 40 week. These data suggest that carrot AFP will not be effective in tissue cryopreservation.

  7. A unique capsular polysaccharide structure from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H that mimics antifreeze (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Casillo, Angela; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Sannino, Filomena; Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W; Lanzetta, Rosa; Marino, Gennaro; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Randazzo, Antonio; Tutino, Maria L; Corsaro, M Michela

    2015-01-14

    The low temperatures of polar regions and high-altitude environments, especially icy habitats, present challenges for many microorganisms. Their ability to live under subfreezing conditions implies the production of compounds conferring cryotolerance. Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, a γ-proteobacterium isolated from subzero Arctic marine sediments, provides a model for the study of life in cold environments. We report here the identification and detailed molecular primary and secondary structures of capsular polysaccharide from C. psychrerythraea 34H cells. The polymer was isolated in the water layer when cells were extracted by phenol/water and characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy together with chemical analysis. Molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations were also performed. The polysaccharide consists of a tetrasaccharidic repeating unit containing two amino sugars and two uronic acids bearing threonine as substituent. The structural features of this unique polysaccharide resemble those present in antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins. These results suggest a possible correlation between the capsule structure and the ability of C. psychrerythraea to colonize subfreezing marine environments.

  8. O serotype-independent susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to lectin-like pyocins

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Dingemans, Jozef; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; De Vos, Daniel; Cornelis, Pierre; De Mot, René

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins of the LlpA family, originally identified in plant-associated bacteria, are narrow-spectrum antibacterial proteins composed of two tandemly organized monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. The LlpA-like bacteriocin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa C1433, pyocin L1, lacks any similarity to known P. aeruginosa bacteriocins. The initial interaction of pyocin L1 with target cells is mediated by binding to d-rhamnose, present in the common polysaccharide antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), but the actual cytotoxic mechanism is unknown. In this study, we characterized the activity range of pyocin L1 and two additional L pyocins revealed by genome mining, representing two highly diverged LlpA groups in P. aeruginosa. The recombinant proteins exhibit species-specific antagonistic activities down to nanomolar concentrations against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa strains, including several multidrug-resistant isolates. The overlap in target strain spectrum between two close homologues of the pyocin L1 group is only minimal, contrasting with the considerable spectral redundancy of LlpA proteins reported for other Pseudomonas species. No correlation was found between L pyocin susceptibility and phylogenetic relatedness of P. aeruginosa isolates. Sensitive strains were retrieved in 13 out of 15 O serotypes tested, excluding the possibility that the highly variable and immunogenic O serotype antigen of the LPS coating would represent a dominant susceptibility-discriminating factor. PMID:25224846

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Antifreeze Protein--Model Membrane Interactions: A Combined Spectroscopic and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Mroue, Kamal H; Kumar, Dinesh; Tejo, Bimo A; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-02-11

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are the key biomolecules that enable species to survive under subzero temperature conditions. The physiologically relevant activities of AFPs are based on the adsorption to ice crystals, followed by the inhibition of subsequent crystal layer growth of ice, routed with depression in freezing point in a noncolligative manner. The functional attributes governing the mechanism by which AFPs inhibit freezing of body fluids in bacteria, fungi, plants, and fishes are mainly attributed to their adsorption onto the surface of ice within the physiological system. Importantly, AFPs are also known for their application in cryopreservation of biological samples that might be related to membrane interaction. To date, there is a paucity of information detailing the interaction of AFPs with membrane structures. Here, we focus on elucidating the biophysical properties of the interactions between AFPs and micelle models that mimic the membrane system. Micelle model systems of zwitterionic DPC and negatively charged SDS were utilized in this study, against which a significant interaction is experienced by two AFP molecules, namely, Peptide 1m and wfAFP (the popular AFP sourced from winter flounder). Using low- and high-resolution biophysical characterization techniques, such as circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy, a strong evidence for the interactions of these AFPs with the membrane models is revealed in detail and is corroborated by in-depth residue-specific information derived from molecular dynamics simulation. Altogether, these results not only strengthen the fact that AFPs interact actively with membrane systems, but also demonstrate that membrane-associated AFPs are dynamic and capable of adopting a number of conformations rendering fluidity to the system.

  10. Successful nonfreezing, subzero preservation of rat liver with 2,3-butanediol and type I antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Soltys, K A; Batta, A K; Koneru, B

    2001-03-01

    Organ cryopreservation is hindered by ice inflicted damage. Nonfreezing preservation of livers at subzero temperatures might offer advantages over current preservation. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. UW livers (n = 6) were stored in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution at +4 degrees C. UWB livers (n = 6) were perfused ex vivo with UW + 10% 2,3-butanediol at < or =7 degrees C and stored at -4 degrees C. AFP livers (n = 4) were preserved identical to UWB livers, except for addition of 1 mg/ml of type I antifreeze protein. After 24 h livers were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer (37 degrees C) for 60 min. Bile production, O(2) consumption (O(2)C), taurocholate extraction, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release during perfusion and liver adenine nucleotide content and energy charge at the end of perfusion were measured. Cell membrane integrity was determined by trypan blue infusion. Ice formation was prevented in all livers stored at -4 degrees C. Bile production, O(2)C, and taurocholate extraction were similar among three groups. Livers stored at -4 degrees C contained significantly more adenine nucleotides than livers stored at +4 degrees C but the energy charge was similar. LDH release was significantly greater (P < 0.05) in the AFP group vs UWB and UW (63 vs 28 and 21 mU/min/g liver, respectively). Hepatocyte and sinusoidal cell trypan blue uptake was similar in all three groups. Butanediol with or without AFP was effective in preventing ice formation up to 24 h in rat livers stored at -4 degrees C. Although as effective as current +4 degrees C protocols, subzero preservation for longer periods needs to be achieved prior to clinical application. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Epithelial dominant expression of antifreeze proteins in cunner suggests recent entry into a high freeze-risk ecozone.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Rod S; Fletcher, Garth L

    2013-01-01

    Most marine teleost fishes residing in a high freeze-risk ecozone, such as the coastal waters of Newfoundland during winter, avoid freezing by secreting high concentrations of antifreeze proteins (AFP) into their blood plasma where they can bind to and prevent the growth of ice that enter the fish. Cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus), which overwinter in such shallow waters are the only known exception. Although this species does produce type I AFP, the plasma levels are too low to be of value as a freeze protectant. Southern and Northern blot analyses carried out in this study establish that the cunner AFP genes belong to a multigene family that is predominantly expressed in external epithelia (skin and gill filaments). These results support the hypothesis that the survival of cunner in icy waters is attributable in part to epithelial AFP that help block ice propagation into their interior milieu. In contrast to the cunner, heterospecifics occupying the same habitat have greater freeze protection because they produce AFP in the liver for export to the plasma as well as in external epithelia. Since the external epithelia would be the first tissue to come into contact with ice it is possible that one of the earliest steps involved in the evolution of freeze resistant fish could have been the expression of AFP in tissues such as the skin. We suggest that this epithelial-dominant AFP expression represents a primitive stage in AFP evolution and propose that cunner began to inhabit "freeze-risk ecozones" more recently than heterospecifics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of the antifreeze protein from the arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. AY30 on cryopreservation of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Yeon; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Han, Se Jong; Park, Hyun; Lee, Sung Gu

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins are a group of proteins that allow organisms to survive in subzero environments. These proteins possess thermal hysteresis and ice recrystallization inhibition activities. In the present study, we demonstrated the efficiency of a recombinant antifreeze protein from the Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. AY30, LeIBP, in cryopreservation of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, which is one of the classical model diatoms and has most widely been studied with regard to its ecology, physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. P. tricornutum cells were frozen by either a fast or two-step freezing method in freezing medium containing 10 % dimethyl sulfoxide, glycerol, propylene glycol, and ethylene glycol, respectively, with or without LeIBP supplement. When cells were frozen using the two-step freezing method, cell survival was significantly increased and statistically the same as that of unfrozen native cells in the presence of 0.1 mg/ml LeIBP in 10 % propylene glycol or 10 % ethylene glycol at day 11 of post-thaw culture. In the presence of LeIBP, the concentration of chlorophyll a was dramatically increased to 14-, 48-, 1.6-, and 8.8-fold when cells were frozen in freezing medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol, propylene glycol (PG), and ethylene glycol (EG), respectively. Scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that the cells were also successfully preserved and epitheca or hypotheca were not deformed. These results demonstrate that LeIBP was successfully applied to improve cryopreservation of the marine diatom P. tricornutum.

  13. Structure-function relationship in the antifreeze activity of synthetic alanine-lysine antifreeze polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, A; Knight, C A; Rutland, T J; Muccio, D D; Pybus, B S; Sikes, C S

    2000-01-01

    Recently antifreeze proteins (AFP) have been the subject of many structure-function relationship studies regarding their antifreeze activity. Attempts have been made to elucidate the structure-function relationship by various amino acid substitutions, but to our knowledge there has been no successful from first principles design of a polypeptide that would bind to designated ice planes along a specific direction. In this paper we show the results of our first attempt on an entirely de novo design of an alanine-lysine-rich antifreeze polypeptide. This 43 residue alanine-lysine peptide exhibits characteristic nonequilibrium freezing point depression and binds to the designated (210) planes of ice along the [122] vector. The structural and thermodynamic properties of this polypeptide were determined using circular dichroism spectroscopy and its nonequilibrium antifreeze properties were investigated using an ice-etching method and nanoliter osmometry.

  14. Structure-function relationship in the globular type III antifreeze protein: identification of a cluster of surface residues required for binding to ice.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, H.; Sönnichsen, F. D.; DeLuca, C. I.; Sykes, B. D.; Davies, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) depress the freezing point of aqueous solutions by binding to and inhibiting the growth of ice. Whereas the ice-binding surface of some fish AFPs is suggested by their linear, repetitive, hydrogen bonding motifs, the 66-amino-acid-long Type III AFP has a compact, globular fold without any obvious periodicity. In the structure, 9 beta-strands are paired to form 2 triple-stranded antiparallel sheets and 1 double-stranded antiparallel sheet, with the 2 triple sheets arranged as an orthogonal beta-sandwich (Sönnichsen FD, Sykes BD, Chao H, Davies PL, 1993, Science 259:1154-1157). Based on its structure and an alignment of Type III AFP isoform sequences, a cluster of conserved, polar, surface-accessible amino acids (N14, T18, Q44, and N46) was noted on and around the triple-stranded sheet near the C-terminus. At 3 of these sites, mutations that switched amide and hydroxyl groups caused a large decrease in antifreeze activity, but amide to carboxylic acid changes produced AFPs that were fully active at pH 3 and pH 6. This is consistent with the observation that Type III AFP is optimally active from pH 2 to pH 11. At a concentration of 1 mg/mL, Q44T, N14S, and T18N had 50%, 25%, and 10% of the activity of wild-type antifreeze, respectively. The effects of the mutations were cumulative, such that the double mutant N14S/Q44T had 10% of the wild-type activity and the triple mutant N14S/T18N/Q44T had no activity. All mutants with reduced activity were shown to be correctly folded by NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, a complete characterization of the triple mutant by 2-dimensional NMR spectroscopy indicated that the individual and combined mutations did not significantly alter the structure of these proteins. These results suggest that the C-terminal beta-sheet of Type III AFP is primarily responsible for antifreeze activity, and they identify N14, T18, and Q44 as key residues for the AFP-ice interaction. PMID:7849594

  15. Saccharide antifreeze compositions

    DOEpatents

    Walters, Kent; Duman, John G; Serianni, Anthony S

    2013-12-10

    The invention provides an antifreeze glycolipid compounds and composition comprising a polysaccharide moiety of Formula I; ##STR00001## wherein D-Manp represents a D-mannopyranose moiety, D-Xylp represents a D-xylopyranose moiety, and n is about 5 to about 70; and one or more lipid moieties covalently linked to the polysaccharide moiety of Formula I or electrostatically associated with the polysaccaride moiety for Formula I. The antifreeze glycolipid compounds and compositions can be used for a variety of industrial, agricultural, medical, and cosmetic applications where recrystallization-inhibition, cyroprotection, or cryopreservation is desired. The antifreeze glycolipid compounds or compositions can be used as, for example, as cryoprotectants for tissue preservation and transplantation, improving the texture of processed frozen food and frozen meats, frostbit protection, crop protection, and green alternatives for land vehicle antifreeze and aircraft de-icing.

  16. Seasonal changes in antifreeze protein gene transcription and water content of beetle Microdera punctipennis (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) from Gurbantonggut desert in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Hou, F; Ma, J; Liu, X; Wang, Y; Liu, X N; Zhang, F C

    2010-01-01

    Desert beetle Microdera punctipennis (Coleoptera: Tenebriondae) is a special species in Gurbantonggut Desert in Central Asia. To investigate the possible strategy it employs for cold survival, seasonal changes in supercooling point (SCP), body water content, haemolymph osmolality and antifreeze protein gene (Mpafp) expression were measured over 13 months. Our results show SCPs in M. punctipennis adults changed from -8.0°C in summer to -18.7°C in winter. During winter, adults endured modest water loss; total water decreased from 65.4 percent in summer to 55.9% in winter. Mpafp mRNAs level increased by 13.1 fold from summer to early winter, and haemolymph osmolality increased accordingly from 550 mOsm to 1486 mOsm. Correlation coefficient of Mpafp mRNAs level and SCP indicates that Mpafp mRNA explained 65.3 percent of the variation in SCPs. The correlation between Mpafp mRNA level and total water reflected an indirect influence of antifreeze protein on water content via reducing SCP.

  17. Developmental and environmental regulation of antifreeze proteins in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Graham, L A; Walker, V K; Davies, P L

    2000-11-01

    The yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, contains a family of small Cys-rich and Thr-rich thermal hysteresis proteins that depress the hemolymph freezing point below the melting point by as much as 5. 5 degrees C (DeltaT = thermal hysteresis). Thermal hysteresis protein expression was evaluated throughout development and after exposure to altered environmental conditions. Under favorable growth conditions, small larvae (11-13 mg) had only low levels of thermal hysteresis proteins or thermal hysteresis protein message, but these levels increased 10-fold and 18-fold, respectively, by the final larval instar (> 190 mg), resulting in thermal hysteresis > 3 degrees C. Exposure of small larvae (11-13 mg) to 4 weeks of cold (4 degrees C) caused an approximately 20-fold increase in thermal hysteresis protein concentration, well in excess of the less than threefold developmental increase seen after 4 weeks at 22 degrees C. Exposure of large larvae (100-120 mg) to cold caused 12-fold and sixfold increases in thermal hysteresis protein message and protein levels, respectively, approximately double the maximum levels they would have attained in the final larval instar at 22 degrees C. Thus, thermal hysteresis increased to similar levels (> 4 degrees C) in the cold, irrespective of the size of the larvae (the overwintering stage). At pupation, thermal hysteresis protein message levels decreased > 20-fold and remained low thereafter, but thermal hysteresis activity decreased much more slowly. Exposure to cold did not reverse this decline. Desiccation or starvation of larvae had comparable effects to cold exposure, but surprisingly, short daylength photoperiod or total darkness had no effect on either thermal hysteresis or message levels. As all environmental conditions that caused increased thermal hysteresis also inhibited growth, we postulate that developmental arrest is a primary factor in the regulation of T. molitor thermal hysteresis proteins.

  18. Structure-based characterization and antifreeze properties of a hyperactive ice-binding protein from the Antarctic bacterium Flavobacterium frigoris PS1.

    PubMed

    Do, Hackwon; Kim, Soon-Jong; Kim, Hak Jun; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2014-04-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) inhibit ice growth through direct interaction with ice crystals to permit the survival of polar organisms in extremely cold environments. FfIBP is an ice-binding protein encoded by the Antarctic bacterium Flavobacterium frigoris PS1. The X-ray crystal structure of FfIBP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution to gain insight into its ice-binding mechanism. The refined structure of FfIBP shows an intramolecular disulfide bond, and analytical ultracentrifugation and analytical size-exclusion chromatography show that it behaves as a monomer in solution. Sequence alignments and structural comparisons of IBPs allowed two groups of IBPs to be defined, depending on sequence differences between the α2 and α4 loop regions and the presence of the disulfide bond. Although FfIBP closely resembles Leucosporidium (recently re-classified as Glaciozyma) IBP (LeIBP) in its amino-acid sequence, the thermal hysteresis (TH) activity of FfIBP appears to be tenfold higher than that of LeIBP. A comparison of the FfIBP and LeIBP structures reveals that FfIBP has different ice-binding residues as well as a greater surface area in the ice-binding site. Notably, the ice-binding site of FfIBP is composed of a T-A/G-X-T/N motif, which is similar to the ice-binding residues of hyperactive antifreeze proteins. Thus, it is proposed that the difference in TH activity between FfIBP and LeIBP may arise from the amino-acid composition of the ice-binding site, which correlates with differences in affinity and surface complementarity to the ice crystal. In conclusion, this study provides a molecular basis for understanding the antifreeze mechanism of FfIBP and provides new insights into the reasons for the higher TH activity of FfIBP compared with LeIBP.

  19. C-type lectin-like receptors of the dectin-1 cluster: ligands and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Plato, Anthony; Willment, Janet A; Brown, Gordon D

    2013-04-01

    Innate immunity is constructed around genetically encoded receptors that survey the intracellular and extracellular environments for signs of invading microorganisms. These receptors recognise the invader and through complex intracellular networks of molecular signaling, they destroy the threat whilst instructing effective adaptive immune responses. Many of these receptors, like the Toll-like receptors in particular, are well-known for their ability to mediate downstream responses upon recognition of exogenous or endogenous ligands; however, the emerging family known as the C-type lectin-like receptors contains many members that have a huge impact on immune and homeostatic regulation. Of particular interest here are the C-type lectin-like receptors that make up the Dectin-1 cluster and their intracellular signaling motifs that mediate their functions. In this review, we aim to draw together current knowledge of ligands, motifs and signaling pathways, present downstream of Dectin-1 cluster receptors, and discuss how these dictate their role within biological systems.

  20. Identification and Evaluation of Cryoprotective Peptides from Chicken Collagen: Ice-Growth Inhibition Activity Compared to That of Type I Antifreeze Proteins in Sucrose Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-06-29

    The ability of chicken collagen peptides to inhibit the growth of ice crystals was evaluated and compared to that of fish antifreeze proteins (AFPs). This ice inhibition activity was assessed using a polarized microscope by measuring ice crystal dimensions in a sucrose model system with and without collagen peptides after seven thermal cycles. The system was stabilized at -25 °C and cycled between -16 and -12 °C. Five candidate peptides with ice inhibition activity were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry and were then synthesized. Their ice inhibition capacity was compared to that of type I AFPs in a 23% sucrose model system. Specific collagen peptides with certain amino acid sequences reduced the extent of ice growth by approximately 70% at a relatively low concentration (1 mg/mL). These results suggest that specific collagen peptides may act in a noncolligative manner, inhibiting ice crystal growth like type I AFPs, but less efficiently.

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates thrombomodulin lectin-like domain shedding in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Hualin; Lin ChiIou; Huang Yuanli; Chen, Pin-Shern; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Shing; Wu, G.C.-C.; Shi, G.-Y.; Yang, H.-Y.; Lee Hsinyu

    2008-02-29

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anticoagulant glycoprotein highly expressed on endothelial cell surfaces. Increased levels of soluble TM in circulation have been widely accepted as an indicator of endothelial damage or dysfunction. Previous studies indicated that various proinflammatory factors stimulate TM shedding in various cell types such as smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator present in biological fluids during endothelial damage or injury. In the present study, we first observed that LPA triggered TM shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By Cyflow analysis, we showed that the LPA-induced accessibility of antibodies to the endothelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain of TM is independent of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), while LPA-induced TM lectin-like domain shedding is MMP-dependent. Furthermore, a stable cell line expressing TM without its lectin-like domain exhibited a higher cell proliferation rate than a stable cell line expressing full-length TM. These results imply that LPA induces TM lectin-like domain shedding, which might contribute to the exposure of its EGF-like domain for EGF receptor (EGFR) binding, thereby stimulating subsequent cell proliferation. Based on our findings, we propose a novel mechanism for the exposure of TM EGF-like domain, which possibly mediates LPA-induced EGFR transactivation.

  2. Computational study on the function of water within a beta-helix antifreeze protein dimer and in the process of ice-protein binding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zuoyin; Zhou, Yanxia; Liu, Kai; Cheng, Yuhua; Liu, Ruozhuang; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2003-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) help many organisms protect themselves from freezing in subzero temperatures. The most active AFPs found to date are those from insects, which possess exceptionally regular beta-helical structures. On the ice-binding surface of these proteins, regularly arrayed water molecules are observed within the repeating Thr-Xxx-Thr motif, but the exact role of these water molecules remains unknown. In this work, we have employed a number of computational methods to examine the role of these water molecules in an AFP from Tenebrio molitor (TmAFP). Our investigation involved a combination of molecular and quantum mechanical approaches. Properties such as stability, interaction energy, orbital overlap, and conformational analysis of various systems, including TmAFP-water, TmAFP-water-ice, and TmAFP-ice, were systematically evaluated and compared. The regularly arrayed water molecules were found to remain associated with TmAFP before ice binding, demonstrating that they are an intrinsic part of the protein. These water molecules may assist TmAFP in the process of ice recognition and binding. However, after facilitating the initial stages of ice recognition and binding, these water molecules are excluded in the final formation of the AFP-ice complex. The departure of these water molecules enables a better two-dimensional match between TmAFP and ice. These results agree with experimental observations showing that although these water molecules are aligned with the ice-binding hydroxyl groups of Thr residues in one dimension, they are in fact positioned slightly off in the second dimension, making a good two-dimensional match impossible.

  3. Intermediate activity of midge antifreeze protein is due to a tyrosine-rich ice-binding site and atypical ice plane affinity.

    PubMed

    Basu, Koli; Wasserman, Samantha S; Jeronimo, Paul S; Graham, Laurie A; Davies, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    An antifreeze protein (AFP) from a midge (Chironomidae) was recently discovered and modelled as a tightly wound disulfide-braced solenoid with a surface-exposed rank of stacked tyrosines. New isoforms of the midge AFP have been identified from RT-PCR and are fully consistent with the model. Although they differ in the number of 10-residue coils, the row of tyrosines that form the putative ice-binding site is conserved. Recombinant midge AFP has been produced, and the properly folded form purified by ice affinity. This monomeric AFP has a distinct circular dichroism spectrum, a melting temperature between 35 and 50 °C and is fully renaturable on cooling. Mutagenesis of the middle tyrosine in the rank of seven eliminates antifreeze activity, whereas mutation of a tyrosine off this predicted ice-binding face had no such effect. This AFP has unusual properties compared to other known AFPs. First, its freezing-point depression activity is intermediate between that of the hyperactive and moderately active AFPs. As with hyperactive AFPs, when midge AFP-bound ice crystals exceed their freezing-point depression, ice grows explosively perpendicular to the c-axis. However, midge AFP does not bind to the basal plane of ice as do hyperactive AFPs, but rather to a pyramidal plane that is at a shallower angle relative to the basal plane than binding planes of moderate AFPs. These properties distinguish midge AFP from all other ice-binding proteins and the intermediate activity level fits well to the modest challenge of protecting newly emerged adult insects from late spring frosts. Nucleotide sequences of new midge AFP isoforms are available in the GenBank database under accession numbers KU094814-8. Sequences will be released after publication. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Engulfment and clearance of apoptotic cells based on a GlcNAc-binding lectin-like property of surface vimentin.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Goto, Mitsuaki; Komura, Kenta; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2012-06-01

    The clearance of apoptotic cells is important to maintain tissue homeostasis. The engulfment of apoptotic cells is performed by professional phagocytes, such as macrophages, and also by non-professional phagocytes, such as mesenchymal cells. Here, we show that vimentin, a cytoskeletal protein, functions as an engulfment receptor on neighboring phagocytes, which recognize O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc)-modified proteins from apoptotic cells as "eat me" ligands. Previously, we reported that vimentin possesses a GlcNAc-binding lectin-like property on cell surface. However, the physiological relevance of the surface localization and GlcNAc-binding property of vimentin remained unclear. In the present study, we observed that O-GlcNAc proteins from apoptotic cells interacted with the surface vimentin of neighboring phagocytes and that this interaction induced serine 71-phosphorylation and recruitment of vimentin to the cell surface of the neighboring phagocytes. Moreover, tetrameric vimentin that was disassembled by serine 71-phosphorylation possessed a GlcNAc-binding activity and was localized to the cell surface. We demonstrated our findings in vimentin-expressing common cell lines such as HeLa cells. Furthermore, during normal developmental processes, the phagocytic engulfment and clearance of apoptotic footplate cells in mouse embryos was mediated by the interaction of surface vimentin with O-GlcNAc proteins. Our results suggest a common mechanism for the clearance of apoptotic cells, through the interaction of surface vimentin with O-GlcNAc-modified proteins.

  5. iAFP-Ense: An Ensemble Classifier for Identifying Antifreeze Protein by Incorporating Grey Model and PSSM into PseAAC.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Hui, Mengjuan; Liu, Zi

    2016-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), known as thermal hysteresis proteins, are ice-binding proteins. AFPs have been found in many fields such as in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, bacteria, and fungi. Although the function of AFPs is common, the sequences and structures of them show a high degree of diversity. AFPs can be adsorbed in ice crystal surface and inhibit the growth of ice crystals in solution. However, the interaction between AFPs and ice crystal is not completely known for human beings. It is vitally significant to propose an automated means as a high-throughput tool to timely identify the AFPs. Analyzing physicochemical characteristics of AFPs sequences is very significant to understand the ice-protein interaction. In this manuscript, a predictor called "iAFP-Ense" was developed. The operation engine to run the AFPs prediction is an ensemble classifier formed by a voting system to fuse eleven different random forest classifiers based on feature extraction. We also compare our predictor with the AFP-PseAAC via the tenfold cross-validation on the same benchmark dataset. The comparison with the existing methods indicates the new predictor is very promising, meaning that many important key features which are deeply hidden in complicated protein sequences. The predictor used in this article is freely available at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iAFP-Ense .

  6. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP interacts with C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 and promotes its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Miaomiao; Li, Lili; Song, Shushu; Wu, Weicheng; Peng, Peike; Yang, Caiting; Zhang, Mingming; Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Ran; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was originally identified as a member of non-classical C-type lectin-like receptors in platelets and immune cells. Activation of CLEC-2 is involved in thrombus formation, lymphatic/blood vessel separation, platelet-mediated tumor metastasis and immune response. Nevertheless, the regulation of CLEC-2 expression is little understood. In this study, we identified that the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) interacted with CLEC-2 by mass spectrometry analysis, and CHIP decreased the protein expression of CLEC-2 through lysine-48-linked ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Deleted and point mutation also revealed that CHIP controlled CLEC-2 protein expression via both tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) domain and Ubox domain in a HSP70/90-independent manner. Moreover, reduced CHIP expression was associated with decreased CLEC-2 polyubiquitination and increased CLEC-2 protein levels in PMA-induced differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages. These results indicate that CLEC-2 is the target substrate of E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP, and suggest that the CHIP/CLEC-2 axis may play an important role in the modulation of immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rational, yet simple, design and synthesis of an antifreeze-protein inspired polymer for cellular cryopreservation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc04647e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Daniel E.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins AF(G)Ps are potent ice recrystallization inhibitors, which is a desirable property to enhance cryopreservation of donor tissue/cells. Here we present the rational synthesis of a new, biomimetic, ice-recrystallization inhibiting polymer derived from a cheap commodity polymer, based on an ampholyte structure. The polymer is used to enhance the cryopreservation of red blood cells, demonstrating a macromolecular solution to tissue storage. PMID:26176027

  8. Antifreeze glycopeptide diastereomers.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Lilly; Budke, Carsten; Dreyer, Axel; Koop, Thomas; Sewald, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGPs) are a special class of biological antifreeze agents, which possess the property to inhibit ice growth in the body fluids of arctic and antarctic fish and, thus, enable life under these harsh conditions. AFGPs are composed of 4-55 tripeptide units -Ala-Ala-Thr- glycosylated at the threonine side chains. Despite the structural homology among all the fish species, divergence regarding the composition of the amino acids occurs in peptides from natural sources. Although AFGPs were discovered in the early 1960s, the adsorption mechanism of these macromolecules to the surface of the ice crystals has not yet been fully elucidated. Two AFGP diastereomers containing different amino acid configurations were synthesized to study the influence of amino acid stereochemistry on conformation and antifreeze activity. For this purpose, peptides containing monosaccharide-substituted allo-L- and D-threonine building blocks were assembled by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The retro-inverso AFGP analogue contained all amino acids in D-configuration, while the allo-L-diastereomer was composed of L-amino acids, like native AFGPs, with replacement of L-threonine by its allo-L-diastereomer. Both glycopeptides were analyzed regarding their conformational properties, by circular dichroism (CD), and their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization in microphysical experiments.

  9. Antifreeze glycopeptide diastereomers

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Lilly; Budke, Carsten; Dreyer, Axel; Koop, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGPs) are a special class of biological antifreeze agents, which possess the property to inhibit ice growth in the body fluids of arctic and antarctic fish and, thus, enable life under these harsh conditions. AFGPs are composed of 4–55 tripeptide units -Ala-Ala-Thr- glycosylated at the threonine side chains. Despite the structural homology among all the fish species, divergence regarding the composition of the amino acids occurs in peptides from natural sources. Although AFGPs were discovered in the early 1960s, the adsorption mechanism of these macromolecules to the surface of the ice crystals has not yet been fully elucidated. Two AFGP diastereomers containing different amino acid configurations were synthesized to study the influence of amino acid stereochemistry on conformation and antifreeze activity. For this purpose, peptides containing monosaccharide-substituted allo-L- and D-threonine building blocks were assembled by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The retro-inverso AFGP analogue contained all amino acids in D-configuration, while the allo-L-diastereomer was composed of L-amino acids, like native AFGPs, with replacement of L-threonine by its allo-L-diastereomer. Both glycopeptides were analyzed regarding their conformational properties, by circular dichroism (CD), and their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization in microphysical experiments. PMID:23209499

  10. Validation of antifreeze properties of glutathione based on its thermodynamic characteristics and protection of baker's yeast during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Li; Yao, Huiyuan

    2007-06-13

    The antifreeze ability of glutathione was evaluated on the basis of its thermodynamic characteristics and protection of baker's yeast during cryopreservation at -30 degrees C. The thermodynamic characteristics and protection of baker's yeast of glutathione were similar to those of known antifreeze proteins, such as carrot antifreeze protein and holly antifreeze protein. These properties included lowering the freezing point at about 0.20 degrees C non-colligatively, decreasing freezable water content, controlling the movement of free water for its strong hydrophilicity, and improving baker's yeast survival during the simulated processing of frozen dough. Therefore, glutathione was viewed to be an antifreeze protein like substance on the basis of its unique thermodynamic characteristics and protection of baker's yeast. The method combining thermodynamic characteristic analysis and protection evaluation is a new and simple way to screen new antifreeze proteins.

  11. Soluble expression of disulfide-bonded C-type lectin like domain of human CD93 in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nativel, Brice; Figuester, Audrey; Andries, Jessica; Planesse, Cynthia; Couprie, Joël; Gasque, Philippe; Viranaicken, Wildriss; Iwema, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    CD93 belongs to the group XIV C-type lectin like domain (CTLD) and is closely related to thrombomodulin (CD141). Although CD93 is known to be involved in the regulation of cell adhesion and phagocytosis, its role in innate immunity remains to be fully investigated. Critically, published data about CD141 suggest that CD93 CTLD could be involved in the control of inflammation. In order to address further functional and structural analyses, we expressed human CD93 CTLD with several disulfide bonds in an E. coli expression system. As the E. coli cytoplasm is a reducing compartment, production of disulfide-bond proteins remains a challenge. Hence, we decided to over express CD93 CTLD in commercially available strains of E. coli and co-expressed a sulfhydryl oxidase (Erv1p) and a disulfide isomerase (DsbC). This strategy led to high yield expression of a native form of CD93 CTLD. NMR studies revealed that Ca(2+) was not able to bind to CD93 CTLD. We also showed that the recombinant protein could alter LPS pro-inflammatory activity on THP1. This work provides new tool for further functional and structural studies to decipher the functions associated to the CTLD of CD93. This approach may also be used for others members of the group XIV C-type lectin like domain (CD141, CD248 and CLec14A). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Serum soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Halac, G; Kilic, E; Cikrikcioglu, M A; Celik, K; Toprak-Erek, A; Keskin, S; Gultepe, I; Celik, R S; Ozaras, N; Yildiz, A; Aydin, S; Akan, O; Karatoprak, C; Sekin, Y; Asil, T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the predisposition for atherosclerosis in patients with RLS through serum sLOX-1 (serum Lectin-Like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1) measurements. Recent epidemiological studies have suggested an association of RLS with certain chronic conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM), obesity, hypertension (HT), and hyperlipidemia. LOX-1 is expressed in endothelial cells, macrophages, and in smooth muscle cells under the effect of proatherogenic conditions. This study was a prospective, cross-sectional, case-controlled. We measured the serum sLOX-1 levels in 37 restless legs syndrome patients and 38 controls. Serum sLOX-1 level was significantly lower in the patient group. The two groups were similar in glucose, HbA1c, creatinine, LDL cholesterol, TG, HDL, total protein, albumin, AST, ALT, GGT, ALP, HGB, HCT, MCV, transferrin saturation rate (TSR), ferritin, CRP, TSH, FT4, FT3, B12, and folic acid levels. Also the two groups were similar with respect to age at menarche, number of previous births, number of abortions and/or curettage, total duration of breastfeeding, percentage of patients in menopause, and age at menopause. Our results may suggest a lower atherosclerotic risk among RLS patients as compared to the general population (Tab. 3, Ref. 33).

  13. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  14. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications.

  15. Antifreeze activity of cold acclimated Japanese radish and purification of antifreeze peptide.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Hidehisa; Fujii, Atsuko; Inoue, Michihiro; Kitao, Satoshi; Fukuoka, Jyoichi; Obata, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    Japanese radish tuber and leaf produced antifreeze proteins (AFPs) having thermal hysteresis activity (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibiting activity (RI). Upon cold acclimation, the apoplastic fluid of the Japanese radish exhibited hexagonal crystal growth, indicating the presence of an antifreeze protein. The induction patterns of protein and the TH activity of apoplastic fraction from both samples were different. The TH activities of apoplastic fraction from tuber and leaves were 0.20 +/- 0.03 and 0.18 +/- 0.02 degree C, respectively. Also, the TH and RI activities of apoplastic fraction of leaves were activated by autoclave treatment at pH 10.0. An antifreeze peptide (molecular weight 1320), was purified using chromatography. Furthermore, the chitinase and beta-1, 3-glucanase activities in the apoplastic fraction of its tuber were induced by the cold acclimation. Some proteins in this apoplastic fraction were reacted with the anti-glucanase-like protein (GLP) antiserum and anti-chitinase-like protein (CLP) antiserum produced against isolated winter rye AFPs. This is the first report on the presence and characterization of AFPs from Japanese radish tuber.

  16. Antifreeze glycopeptide adsorption on single crystal ice surfaces using ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P. W.; Beaglehole, D.; DeVries, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic fishes synthesise antifreeze proteins which can effectively inhibit the growth of ice crystals. The mechanism relies on adsorption of these proteins to the ice surface. Ellipsometry has been used to quantify glycopeptide antifreeze adsorption to the basal and prism faces of single ice crystals. The rate of accumulation was determined as a function of time and at concentrations between 0.0005 and 1.2 mg/ml. Estimates of packing density at saturation coverage have been made for the basal and prism faces. PMID:19431902

  17. Lipopolysaccharide augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by up-regulating lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Takahashi, Miyuki; Mannan, Shahnewaj B; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2015-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence supporting an intimate association of immune activation with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) through scavenging receptors promotes the formation of mature lipid-laden macrophages, which subsequently leads to exacerbation of regional inflammation and atherosclerotic plaque formation. In this study, we first examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and the human PMA-induced macrophage cell line THP-1 after LPS stimulation. LPS significantly up-regulated LOX-1 mRNA in RAW264.7 cells; LOX-1 cell-surface protein expression was also increased. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with LPS stimulation. The augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was almost completely abrogated by treatment with an anti-LOX-1 antibody. Of note, knockdown of Erk1/2 resulted in a significant reduction of LPS-induced LOX-1 up-regulation. Treatment with U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK, significantly suppressed LPS-induced expression of LOX-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, LOX-1 promoter activity was significantly augmented by LPS stimulation; this augmentation was prevented by U0126 treatment. Similar results were also observed in human PMA-induced THP-1 macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that LPS up-regulates LOX-1, at least in part through activation of the Erk1/2 signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of TLR4-mediated aberrant LOX-1 signaling in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  18. C-type lectin-like receptor 2 promotes hematogenous tumor metastasis and prothrombotic state in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Shirai, T; Inoue, O; Tamura, S; Tsukiji, N; Sasaki, T; Endo, H; Satoh, K; Osada, M; Sato-Uchida, H; Fujii, H; Ozaki, Y; Suzuki-Inoue, K

    2017-03-01

    Essentials The role of C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) in cancer progression is unclear. CLEC-2-depleted mouse model is generated by using a rat anti-mouse CLEC-2 monoclonal antibody. CLEC-2 depletion inhibits hematogenous tumor metastasis of podoplanin-expressing B16F10 cells. CLEC-2 depletion prolongs cancer survival by suppressing thrombosis and inflammation.

  19. Seasonal freeze resistance of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is generated by differential expression of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and antifreeze protein genes.

    PubMed

    Liebscher, Ryan S; Richards, Robert C; Lewis, Johanne M; Short, Connie E; Muise, Denise M; Driedzic, William R; Ewart, K Vanya

    2006-01-01

    In winter, rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) accumulate glycerol and produce an antifreeze protein (AFP), which both contribute to freeze resistance. The role of differential gene expression in the seasonal pattern of these adaptations was investigated. First, cDNAs encoding smelt and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and smelt glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were cloned so that all sequences required for expression analysis would be available. Using quantitative PCR, expression of beta actin in rainbow smelt liver was compared with that of GAPDH in order to determine its validity as a reference gene. Then, levels of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), PEPCK, and AFP relative to beta actin were measured in smelt liver over a fall-winter-spring interval. Levels of GPDH mRNA increased in the fall just before plasma glycerol accumulation, implying a driving role in glycerol synthesis. GPDH mRNA levels then declined during winter, well in advance of serum glycerol, suggesting the possibility of GPDH enzyme or glycerol conservation in smelt during the winter months. PEPCK mRNA levels rose in parallel with serum glycerol in the fall, consistent with an increasing requirement for amino acids as metabolic precursors, remained elevated for much of the winter, and then declined in advance of the decline in plasma glycerol. AFP mRNA was elevated at the onset of fall sampling in October and remained elevated until April, implying separate regulation from GPDH and PEPCK. Thus, winter freezing point depression in smelt appears to result from a seasonal cycle of GPDH gene expression, with an ensuing increase in the expression of PEPCK, and a similar but independent cycle of AFP gene expression.

  20. Biomimetic peptoid oligomers as dual-action antifreeze agents

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mia L.; Ehre, David; Jiang, Qi; Hu, Chunhua; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Ward, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of natural peptides and proteins to influence the formation of inorganic crystalline materials has prompted the design of synthetic compounds for the regulation of crystal growth, including the freezing of water and growth of ice crystals. Despite their versatility and ease of structural modification, peptidomimetic oligomers have not yet been explored extensively as crystallization modulators. This report describes a library of synthetic N-substituted glycine peptoid oligomers that possess “dual-action” antifreeze activity as exemplified by ice crystal growth inhibition concomitant with melting temperature reduction. We investigated the structural features responsible for these phenomena and observed that peptoid antifreeze activities depend both on oligomer backbone structure and side chain chemical composition. These studies reveal the capability of peptoids to act as ice crystallization regulators, enabling the discovery of a unique and diverse family of synthetic oligomers with potential as antifreeze agents in food production and biomedicine. PMID:23169638

  1. Frostbite Protection in Mice Expressing an Antifreeze Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Martin; Mattessich, Sarah; Rembisz, Alison; Acar, Ali; Shapiro, Martin; Booth, Carmen J.; Neelakanta, Girish; Fikrig, Erol

    2015-01-01

    Ectotherms in northern latitudes are seasonally exposed to cold temperatures. To improve survival under cold stress, they use diverse mechanisms to increase temperature resistance and prevent tissue damage. The accumulation of anti-freeze proteins that improve cold hardiness occurs in diverse species including plants, arthropods, fish, and amphibians. We previously identified an Ixodes scapularis anti-freeze glycoprotein, named IAFGP, and demonstrated its cold protective function in the natural tick host and in a transgenic Drosophila model. Here we show, in a transgenic mouse model expressing an anti-freeze glycoprotein, that IAFGP protects mammalian cells and mice from cold shock and frostbite respectively. Transgenic skin samples showed reduced cell death upon cold storage ex vivo and transgenic mice demonstrated increased resistance to frostbite injury in vivo. IAFGP actively protects mammalian tissue from freezing, suggesting its application for the prevention of frostbite, and other diseases associated with cold exposure. PMID:25714402

  2. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  3. Antifreeze poisoning: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaofei; Lu, Guoyu; Qi, Benquan; Wang, Ran; Guo, Daohua; Liu, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    The current study reported the case of a 35-year-old male that presented with antifreeze poisoning. The clinical manifestations, laboratory investigations and treatments were analyzed, and the obtained results were compared with those in previous reports. Subsequent to consuming antifreeze, the patient mainly presented nausea and agitation, without disturbance of consciousness. Laboratory investigations indicated severe metabolic acidosis, renal dysfunction and hyperkalemia. The patient underwent hemodialysis and his condition was significantly improved on the day of admission. Renal function gradually deteriorated, but was eventually improved due to treatment, including hemodialysis, mannitol for catharsis, furosemide for diuresis, Xuebijing for the removal of blood stasis and detoxication, and reduced glutathione for the protection of major organs. The patient was discharged 1 month after hospital admission. In conclusion, the significance and clinical manifestations of antifreeze poisoning should be identified in clinical practice, and active hemodialysis should be provided. The aim of the current study was to summarize the clinical manifestations and treatments of patients with antifreeze poisoning, and to advance the recognition of antifreeze poisoning. PMID:28352354

  4. Lectin-Like Bacteriocins from Pseudomonas spp. Utilise D-Rhamnose Containing Lipopolysaccharide as a Cellular Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Josts, Inokentijs; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Waløen, Kai I.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Milner, Joel; Evans, Tom; Kelly, Sharon; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Byron, Olwyn; Smith, Brian; Walker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins consist of tandem monocot mannose-binding domains and display a genus-specific killing activity. Here we show that pyocin L1, a novel member of this family from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, targets susceptible strains of this species through recognition of the common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide that is predominantly a homopolymer of d-rhamnose. Structural and biophysical analyses show that recognition of CPA occurs through the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding domain of pyocin L1 and that this interaction is a prerequisite for bactericidal activity. Further to this, we show that the previously described lectin-like bacteriocin putidacin L1 shows a similar carbohydrate-binding specificity, indicating that oligosaccharides containing d-rhamnose and not d-mannose, as was previously thought, are the physiologically relevant ligands for this group of bacteriocins. The widespread inclusion of d-rhamnose in the lipopolysaccharide of members of the genus Pseudomonas explains the unusual genus-specific activity of the lectin-like bacteriocins. PMID:24516380

  5. Lectin-like bacteriocins from Pseudomonas spp. utilise D-rhamnose containing lipopolysaccharide as a cellular receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Laura C; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Roszak, Aleksander W; Waløen, Kai I; Cogdell, Richard J; Milner, Joel; Evans, Tom; Kelly, Sharon; Tucker, Nicholas P; Byron, Olwyn; Smith, Brian; Walker, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins consist of tandem monocot mannose-binding domains and display a genus-specific killing activity. Here we show that pyocin L1, a novel member of this family from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, targets susceptible strains of this species through recognition of the common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide that is predominantly a homopolymer of D-rhamnose. Structural and biophysical analyses show that recognition of CPA occurs through the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding domain of pyocin L1 and that this interaction is a prerequisite for bactericidal activity. Further to this, we show that the previously described lectin-like bacteriocin putidacin L1 shows a similar carbohydrate-binding specificity, indicating that oligosaccharides containing D-rhamnose and not D-mannose, as was previously thought, are the physiologically relevant ligands for this group of bacteriocins. The widespread inclusion of d-rhamnose in the lipopolysaccharide of members of the genus Pseudomonas explains the unusual genus-specific activity of the lectin-like bacteriocins.

  6. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  7. Laboratory Evaluation of Commercial Antifreezes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    accomplished by atomic absorption spectroscopy . No attempt \\%as made to identify minor components. Conley, James H.’and Jamison, Robert G.. "Evaluation...freeze point depressant. Analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy shows that all products, except Antifreeze G, contain boron. All II commercial

  8. Nontoxic Antifreeze for Insect Traps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Propylene glycol in water is a safe and effective alternative to ethylene glycol as a capture liquid in insect traps (pitfalls, flight intercepts, pan traps). Propylene glycol formulations are readily available because it is the primary (95%) ingredient in certain automotive antifreeze formulations...

  9. Lectin-Like Constituents of Foods Which React with Components of Serum, Saliva, and Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, R. J.; Dankers, I.

    1981-01-01

    Hot and cold aqueous extracts were prepared from 22 commonly ingested fruits, vegetables, and seeds. When tested by agar diffusion, extracts from 13 and 10 of the foods formed precipitin bands with samples of normal rabbit serum and human saliva, respectively; extracts from four of the foods also reacted with antigen extracts of strains of Streptococcus mutans. When added to rabbit antiserum, extracts from 18 of 21 foods tested inhibited reactivity with antigen extracts derived from S. mutans MT3. Extracts from 16 foods agglutinated whole S. mutans cells, whereas those from 10 foods agglutinated human erythrocytes of blood types A and B. The lectin-like activities of extracts which reacted with human saliva were studied further. Pretreatment of saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (S-HA) beads with extracts of bananas, coconuts, carrots, alfalfa, and sunflower seeds markedly reduced the subsequent adsorption of S. mutans MT3. Pretreatment of S-HA with banana extract also strongly inhibited adsorption of S. mutans H12 and S. sanguis C1, but it had little effect on attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii L13 or A. viscosus LY7. Absorption experiments indicated that the component(s) in banana extract responsible for inhibiting streptococcal adsorption to S-HA was identical to that which bound to human erythrocytes. The banana hemagglutinin exhibited highest activity between pH 7 and 8, and it was inhibited by high concentrations of glucosamine, galactosamine, and, to a lesser extent, mannosamine. Other sugars tested had no effect. The selective bacterial adsorption-inhibiting effect noted for banana extract was also observed in studies with purified lectins. Thus, pretreating S-HA with wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A inhibited adsorption of S. mutans MT3 cells, whereas peanut agglutinin, Ulex agglutinin, Dolichos agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin had little effect; none of these lectins affected attachment of A. viscosus LY7. Collectively, the observations suggest that

  10. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes J M; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes.

  11. The association between soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels and patients with isolated coronary artery ectasia.

    PubMed

    Balin, Mehmet; Celik, Ahmet; Kobat, M Ali

    2012-04-01

    Some evidence suggests that chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of coronary artery ectasia. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 is involved in multiple phases of vascular dysfunction, including endothelial dysfunction, atherogenesis, initiation of plaque rupture, and restenosis. The objectives was to study the purpose of the current study was to determine whether soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 is associated with isolated coronary artery ectasia patients. Forty-six patients with isolated coronary artery ectasia without stenosis and 46 control subjects with angiographically normal coronary arteries were included in this study. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels were measured in serum by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. Plasma levels of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 were significantly higher in the coronary artery ectasia group than normal coronary artery group (1.7 ± 0.8 ng/ml vs. 1.1 ± 0.3 ng/ml, P < 0.001, respectively). No correlation was found between plasma soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels and different types of ectasia in patients with coronary artery ectasia. In this study, we found significantly higher levels of soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 in coronary artery ectasia patients when compared to control subjects with normal coronary arteries, suggesting that soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of coronary artery ectasia.

  12. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  13. Expression, purification and characterization of a group of lectin-like peptides from the spider Ornithoctonus huwena.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liping; Peng, Li; Zhang, Yongqun; Chen, Jinjun; Zhang, Dongyi; Liang, Songping

    2009-04-01

    By sequencing random clones from the venom gland cDNA library of the spider Ornithoctonus huwena, a transcript, named SHL-Ib1, encoding a lectin-like peptide was cloned. The amino acid sequence of the putative mature peptide of SHL-Ib1 is identical, except for seven different residues, with that of SHL-I, a lectin found in the venom of O. huwena. The mature peptides of SHL-Ib1b and SHL-Ib1c are the mutants of SHL-Ib1 with two or three amino acid residues truncated at the C-terminal. The recombinant SHL-Ib1b and SHL-Ib1c were expressed successfully by the yeast expression system and purified by using a combination of ion-exchange and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The molecular masses of the two expressed peptides were identified by mass spectrometry, indicating that the C-terminals of the two peptides were not amidated. The two peptides can agglutinate human erythrocytes at minimal concentrations of 0.75 and 1.475mg/ml, respectively. Structure modeling of SHL-Ib1 has given a clue to the low agglutination bioactivities of these recombinant toxins. These lectin-like peptides, due to the small molecular sizes, may have the advantage to investigate the binding mechanism of the lectin and have the potential to be the carrier for drug delivery.

  14. Viable head and neck tumor spheroids stimulate in vitro autologous monocyte MCP-1 secretion through soluble substances and CD14/lectin-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Olsnes, Carla; Heimdal, John-Helge; Kross, Kenneth W; Olofsson, Jan; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

    2005-12-01

    Biopsies from carcinoma tissue and benign control mucosa from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients were used to establish fragment (F)-spheroids in vitro. We have previously shown that autologous monocytes co-cultured with F-spheroids in vitro augment their secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Presently, the aims of the present work were to study whether the metabolic activity, secreted products and/or specific receptor/ligand on the surface of the F-spheroids and monocytes are necessary for stimulation of the monocyte MCP-1 secretion upon F-spheroid co-culture. Actinomycin D (1 mug/ml for 24 h) pre-treatment of the F-spheroids abolished the monocyte MCP-1 co-culture response. Co-culture of monocytes and F-spheroids separated by a semi-permeable membrane showed a decreased, but still present, monocyte MCP-1 co-culture response. Conditioned medium from F-spheroids stimulated allogenous monocytes to secrete MCP-1. The addition of glucose or galactose, but not mannose, to co-cultures partially inhibited the monocyte MCP-1 co-culture response. The addition of anti-CD14 antibody diminished the MCP-1 co-culture response. In conclusion, the monocyte MCP-1 co-culture response is dependent on metabolically active spheroids, secreted stimuli, and is augmented by direct contact with F-spheroids, possibly via lectin-like receptors and the CD14 receptor.

  15. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis. PMID:23454129

  16. C-type lectin-like receptor LOX-1 promotes dendritic cell-mediated class-switched B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeMee; Li, Dapeng; Dullaers, Melissa; Kim, Tae-Whan; Duluc, Dorothee; Upchurch, Katherine; Xue, Yaming; Zurawski, Sandy; Le Grand, Roger; Liu, Yong-Jun; Kuroda, Marcelo; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2014-10-16

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern-recognition receptor for a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. However, LOX-1 function in the host immune response is not fully understood. Here, we report that LOX-1 expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells promotes humoral responses. On B cells LOX-1 signaling upregulated CCR7, promoting cellular migration toward lymphoid tissues. LOX-1 signaling on DCs licensed the cells to promote B cell differentiation into class-switched plasmablasts and led to downregulation of chemokine receptor CXCR5 and upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 on plasmablasts, enabling their exit from germinal centers and migration toward local mucosa and skin. Finally, we found that targeting influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) subunit to LOX-1 elicited HA1-specific protective antibody responses in rhesus macaques. Thus, LOX-1 expressed on B cells and DC cells has complementary functions to promote humoral immune responses.

  17. Cutting edge: lectin-like transcript-1 is a ligand for the inhibitory human NKR-P1A receptor.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David B; Bettadapura, Jayaram; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Mathew, Porunelloor A; Warren, Hilary S; Lanier, Lewis L

    2005-12-15

    Increasingly, roles are emerging for C-type lectin receptors in immune regulation. One receptor whose function has remained largely enigmatic is human NKR-P1A (CD161), present on NK cells and subsets of T cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the lectin-like transcript-1 (LLT1) is a physiologic ligand for NKR-P1A. LLT1-containing liposomes bind to NKR-P1A+ cells, and binding is inhibited by anti-NKR-P1A mAb. Additionally, LLT1 activates NFAT-GFP reporter cells expressing a CD3zeta-NKR-P1A chimeric receptor; reciprocally, reporter cells with a CD3zeta-LLT1 chimeric receptor are stimulated by NKR-P1A. Moreover, LLT1 on target cells can inhibit NK cytotoxicity via interactions with NKR-P1A.

  18. Structure and collective dynamics of hydrated anti-freeze protein type III from 180 K to 298 K by X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Koji; Baron, Alfred Q. R.; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    We investigated hydrated antifreeze protein type III (AFP III) powder with a hydration level h (=mass of water/mass of protein) of 0.4 in the temperature range between 180 K and 298 K using X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). The X-ray diffraction data showed smooth, largely monotonic changes between 180 K and 298 K without freezing water. Meanwhile, the collective dynamics observed by IXS showed a strong change in the sound velocity at 180 K, after being largely temperature independent at higher temperatures (298-220 K). We interpret this change in terms of the dynamic transition previously discussed using other probes including THz IR absorption spectroscopy and incoherent elastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering. This finding suggests that the dynamic transition of hydrated proteins is observable on the subpicosecond time scale as well as nano- and pico-second scales, both in collective dynamics from IXS and single particle dynamics from neutron scattering. Moreover, it is most likely that the dynamic transition of hydrated AFP III is not directly correlated with its hydration structure.

  19. Structure and collective dynamics of hydrated anti-freeze protein type III from 180 K to 298 K by X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Koji; Baron, Alfred Q R; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2016-04-07

    We investigated hydrated antifreeze protein type III (AFP III) powder with a hydration level h (=mass of water/mass of protein) of 0.4 in the temperature range between 180 K and 298 K using X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). The X-ray diffraction data showed smooth, largely monotonic changes between 180 K and 298 K without freezing water. Meanwhile, the collective dynamics observed by IXS showed a strong change in the sound velocity at 180 K, after being largely temperature independent at higher temperatures (298-220 K). We interpret this change in terms of the dynamic transition previously discussed using other probes including THz IR absorption spectroscopy and incoherent elastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering. This finding suggests that the dynamic transition of hydrated proteins is observable on the subpicosecond time scale as well as nano- and pico-second scales, both in collective dynamics from IXS and single particle dynamics from neutron scattering. Moreover, it is most likely that the dynamic transition of hydrated AFP III is not directly correlated with its hydration structure.

  20. GMP-140 binds to a glycoprotein receptor on human neutrophils: Evidence for a lectin-like interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.L.; Varki, A.; McEver, R.P. )

    1991-02-01

    GMP-140 is a rapidly inducible receptor for neutrophils and monocytes expressed on activated platelets and endothelial cells. It is a member of the selectin family of lectin-like cell surface molecules that mediate leukocyte adhesion. We used a radioligand binding assay to characterize the interaction of purified GMP-140 with human neutrophils. Unstimulated neutrophils rapidly bound (125I)GMP-140 at 4 degrees C, reaching equilibrium in 10-15 min. Binding was Ca2+ dependent, reversible, and saturable at 3-6 nM free GMP-140 with half-maximal binding at approximately 1.5 nM. Receptor density and apparent affinity were not altered when neutrophils were stimulated with 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Treatment of neutrophils with proteases abolished specific binding of (125I)GMP-140. Binding was also diminished when neutrophils were treated with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae, which cleaves alpha 2-3-, alpha 2-6-, and alpha 2-8-linked sialic acids, or from Newcastle disease virus, which cleaves only alpha 2-3- and alpha 2-8-linked sialic acids. Binding was not inhibited by an mAb to the abundant myeloid oligosaccharide, Lex (CD15), or by the neoglycoproteins Lex-BSA and sialyl-Lex-BSA. We conclude that neutrophils constitutively express a glycoprotein receptor for GMP-140, which contains sialic acid residues that are essential for function. These findings support the concept that GMP-140 interacts with leukocytes by a lectin-like mechanism.

  1. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Takahashi, Miyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-κB)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-κB inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-κB. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  2. Refolding of β-Stranded Class I Chitinases of Hippophae rhamnoides Enhances the Antifreeze Activity during Cold Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Deswal, Renu

    2014-01-01

    Class I chitinases hydrolyse the β-1,4-linkage of chitin and also acquire antifreeze activity in some of the overwintering plants during cold stress. Two chitinases, HrCHT1a of 31 kDa and HrCHT1b of 34 kDa, were purified from cold acclimated and non-acclimated seabuckthorn seedlings using chitin affinity chromatography. 2-D gels of HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b showed single spots with pIs 7.0 and 4.6 respectively. N-terminal sequence of HrCHT1b matched with the class I chitinase of rice and antifreeze proteins while HrCHT1a could not be sequenced as it was N-terminally blocked. Unlike previous reports, where antifreeze activity of chitinase was cold inducible, our results showed that antifreeze activity is constitutive property of class I chitinase as both HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b isolated even from non-acclimated seedlings, exhibited antifreeze activity. Interestingly, HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b purified from cold acclimated seedlings, exhibited 4 and 2 times higher antifreeze activities than those purified from non-acclimated seedlings, suggesting that antifreeze activity increased during cold acclimation. HrCHT1b exhibited 23–33% higher hydrolytic activity and 2–4 times lower antifreeze activity than HrCHT1a did. HrCHT1b was found to be a glycoprotein; however, its antifreeze activity was independent of glycosylation as even deglycosylated HrCHT1b exhibited antifreeze activity. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that both these chitinases were rich in unusual β-stranded conformation (36–43%) and the content of β-strand increased (∼11%) during cold acclimation. Surprisingly, calcium decreased both the activities of HrCHT1b while in case of HrCHT1a, a decrease in the hydrolytic activity and enhancement in its antifreeze activity was observed. CD results showed that addition of calcium also increased the β-stranded conformation of HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b. This is the first report, which shows that antifreeze activity is constitutive property of class I chitinase and cold

  3. Novel Lectin-Like Bacteriocins of Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Parret, Annabel H. A.; Temmerman, Koen; De Mot, René

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriocin LlpA, produced by Pseudomonas sp. strain BW11M1, is a peculiar antibacterial protein due to its homology to mannose-binding lectins mostly found in monocots (A. H. A. Parret, G. Schoofs, P. Proost, and R. De Mot, J. Bacteriol. 185:897-908, 2003). Biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 contains two llpA-like genes, named llpA1Pf-5 and llpA2Pf-5. Recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing llpA1Pf-5 or llpA2Pf-5 acquired bacteriocin activity and secreted a 31-kDa protein cross-reacting with LlpABW11M1 antibodies. Antibacterial activity of the recombinant proteins was evidenced by gel overlay assays. Analysis of the antimicrobial spectrum indicated that LlpA1Pf-5 and LlpA2Pf-5 are able to inhibit P. fluorescens strains, as well as the related mushroom pathogen Pseudomonas tolaasii. LlpA-type bacteriocins are characterized by a domain structure consisting of tandem monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. Molecular phylogeny of these MMBL domains suggests that the individual MMBL domains within an LlpA protein have evolved separately toward a specific, as yet unknown, function or, alternatively, were acquired from different ancestral sources. Our observations are consistent with earlier observations, which hinted that MMBL-like bacteriocins represent a new family of antibacterial proteins, probably with a novel mode of action. PMID:16151105

  4. Taurine suppresses oxidative stress-potentiated expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor and restenosis in balloon-injured rabbit iliac artery.

    PubMed

    Gokce, G; Ozsarlak-Sozer, G; Oran, I; Oktay, G; Ozkal, S; Kerry, Z

    2011-12-01

    1. In endothelial cells, the major receptor for the binding and internalization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of taurine on intimal thickening and LOX-1 expression under normal and oxidative conditions. 2. The iliac artery of rabbits were subjected to balloon injury and oxidative stress was induced by 14 days treatment of rabbits with 75 mg/kg, s.c., buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a specific inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. Taurine was administered in drinking water (1%, w/v) for 14 days in the presence (BSO + Taurine group) and in the absence of BSO treatment (Taurine group). In taurine and placebo groups, rabbits were injected with 4 mL, s.c., 0.9% NaCl (vehicle for BSO) for 14 days. 3. Taurine (1% in drinking water, w/v) preserved plasma levels of anti-oxidants and lowered the increased blood pressure induced by BSO. The stenosis rate of 29.92% in the placebo group increased to 72.20% in the BSO group, which was significantly reduced to 42.21% by taurine (P < 0.001; n = 5). Localization of LOX-1 to the intima and media of the iliac artery was demonstrated in the present study. Taurine treatment reduced the BSO-induced increase in LOX-1 expression at both the protein and mRNA levels (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). 4. The results demonstrate that the stenosis rate and LOX-1 expression correlate well with oxidative status. Manipulation of LOX-1 expression by taurine may have therapeutic benefits in preventing restenosis.

  5. Enhancement of solubility and yield of a β-glucan receptor Dectin-1 C-type lectin-like domain in Escherichia coli with a solubility-enhancement tag.

    PubMed

    Dulal, Hari Prasad; Nagae, Masamichi; Ikeda, Akemi; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-07-01

    Dectin-1 is a C-type lectin-like pattern recognition receptor for β(1-3)-glucans. It plays a crucial role in protecting against fungal invasion through binding to β-glucans which are commonly present on the fungal cell wall. To probe its ligand binding mechanism by NMR, we expressed the recombinant murine Dectin-1 C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) in E. coli using pCold vector and purified it. However, the high concentration of Dectin-1 CTLD required for NMR analysis could not be attained due to its inherent low solubility and low bacterial expression. In this study, we tried to increase expression and solubility of Dectin-1 CTLD by codon optimization and fusion of a GB1 tag (B1 domain of streptococcal Protein G). GB1 was inserted on either the N-terminal (NT) or C-terminal end as well as both terminal ends of human and mouse Dectin-1 CTLDs. A pure monomeric sample was only obtained with NT-GB1 fused mouse Dectin-1. Expression of mouse Dectin-1 CTLD yielded 0.9 ± 0.2 mg/L culture, codon optimized mouse Dectin-1 CTLD produced 1.4 ± 0.2 mg/L, and the tag-fused domain 7.1 ± 0.3 mg/L. The tag also increased solubility from 0.1 mM to 1.4 mM. The recombinant protein was correctly folded, in a monomeric state, and specifically bound β-glucan laminarin. These results indicate that fusing GB1 to the N-terminus of mouse Dectin-1 domain advantageously increases yield and solubility, allows retention of native structure, and that the site of fusion is critical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Elevated soluble lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (sLOX-1) levels in obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, Tina E; Kume, Noriaki; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Phares, Dana A; Hagberg, James M

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the association between soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (sLOX-1) levels and obesity in older women. Fifty-one postmenopausal women (10 lean, 22 overweight, and 19 obese) were included in this small retrospective analysis. Plasma sLOX-1 levels were measured using a chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunoassay. Plasma levels of sLOX-1 were significantly higher in obese women (55.33 +/- 4.49 pg/ml) compared to lean (30.91 +/- 6.19 pg/ml, P = 0.002) and overweight women (38.31 +/- 4.18 pg/ml, P = 0.017). Plasma sLOX-1 levels were positively associated with body weight, BMI, total body fat, and trunk fat. The relationship between sLOX-1 and BMI was attenuated after adjustment for age, hormone replacement therapy, and body fat. In conclusion, obese women have higher sLOX-1 levels, which may reflect increased LOX-1 expression in adipose tissue.

  7. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 is an enhancer of tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    González-Chavarría, Iván; Cerro, Rita P; Parra, Natalie P; Sandoval, Felipe A; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Omazábal, Valeska A; Lamperti, Liliana I; Jiménez, Silvana P; Fernandez, Edelmira A; Gutiérrez, Nicolas A; Rodriguez, Federico S; Onate, Sergio A; Sánchez, Oliberto; Vera, Juan C; Toledo, Jorge R

    2014-01-01

    Altered expression and function of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) has been associated with several diseases such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and obesity. In these pathologies, oxLDL/LOX-1 activates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, cell motility and angiogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that olr1 mRNA is over-expressed in stage III and IV of human prostatic adenocarcinomas. However, the function of LOX-1 in prostate cancer angiogenesis remains to be determined. Our aim was to analyze the contribution of oxLDL and LOX-1 to tumor angiogenesis using C4-2 prostate cancer cells. We analyzed the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis on prostate cancer tumor xenografts, using prostate cancer cell models with overexpression or knockdown of LOX-1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that the activation of LOX-1 using oxLDL increases cell proliferation, and the expression of the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Noticeably, these effects were prevented in the C4-2 prostate cancer model when LOX-1 expression was knocked down. The angiogenic effect of LOX-1 activated with oxLDL was further demonstrated using the aortic ring assay and the xenograft model of tumor growth on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. Consequently, we propose that LOX-1 activation by oxLDL is an important event that enhances tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

  8. Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 Is an Enhancer of Tumor Angiogenesis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Chavarría, Iván; Cerro, Rita P.; Parra, Natalie P.; Sandoval, Felipe A.; Zuñiga, Felipe A.; Omazábal, Valeska A.; Lamperti, Liliana I.; Jiménez, Silvana P.; Fernandez, Edelmira A.; Gutiérrez, Nicolas A.; Rodriguez, Federico S.; Onate, Sergio A.; Sánchez, Oliberto; Vera, Juan C.; Toledo, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Altered expression and function of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) has been associated with several diseases such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and obesity. In these pathologies, oxLDL/LOX-1 activates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, cell motility and angiogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that olr1 mRNA is over-expressed in stage III and IV of human prostatic adenocarcinomas. However, the function of LOX-1 in prostate cancer angiogenesis remains to be determined. Our aim was to analyze the contribution of oxLDL and LOX-1 to tumor angiogenesis using C4-2 prostate cancer cells. We analyzed the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis on prostate cancer tumor xenografts, using prostate cancer cell models with overexpression or knockdown of LOX-1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that the activation of LOX-1 using oxLDL increases cell proliferation, and the expression of the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Noticeably, these effects were prevented in the C4-2 prostate cancer model when LOX-1 expression was knocked down. The angiogenic effect of LOX-1 activated with oxLDL was further demonstrated using the aortic ring assay and the xenograft model of tumor growth on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. Consequently, we propose that LOX-1 activation by oxLDL is an important event that enhances tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells. PMID:25170920

  9. Identification of lectin-like substances recognizing galactosyl residues of glycoconjugates on the plasma membrane of marrow sinus endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, M.; Tavassoli, M.

    1985-05-01

    Plasma membrane components capable of specific binding to the sugar residues of glycoproteins have recently been identified in several cell systems and implicated in the recognition and specific uptake of soluble or membrane-bound glycoproteins. Because the endothelium of bone marrow sinuses is the site of massive cellular and molecular traffic that is often specific, we studied the surface of sinus endothelium for the presence of sugar-recognizing systems. Neoglycoprotein probes were synthesized by covalently binding bovine serum albumin (BSA) to activated pyrannose form of galactose, fucose, or mannose. The probe was then labeled with colloidal gold. Galactosyl-BSA gold bound to endothelial membrane at 4 degrees C and was internalized at 37 degrees C. Both the binding and the internalization were inhibited in the presence of excess unlabeled galactosyl-BSA. Gold-labeled mannosyl-BSA and fucosyl-BSA did not bind to the endothelium. Nor did BSA-gold without galactosyl residues bind to endothelial membrane, confirming that galactosyl moiety was responsible for the binding. The uptake of galactosyl-BSA was further confirmed by perfusion of /sup 125/I-galactosyl-BSA into the abdominal aorta. Small but highly specific uptake was noted in tibias and femurs. These data provide evidence for the presence of a lectin-like substance on the luminal surface of marrow endothelial membrane capable of specific interaction with galactosyl residues of circulating and cell-bound glycoproteins and may provide a mechanism for specific recognition of these glycoproteins.

  10. A nonprotein thermal hysteresis-producing xylomannan antifreeze in the freeze-tolerant Alaskan beetle Upis ceramboides

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kent R.; Serianni, Anthony S.; Sformo, Todd; Barnes, Brian M.; Duman, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal hysteresis (TH), a difference between the melting and freezing points of a solution that is indicative of the presence of large-molecular-mass antifreezes (e.g., antifreeze proteins), has been described in animals, plants, bacteria, and fungi. Although all previously described TH-producing biomolecules are proteins, most thermal hysteresis factors (THFs) have not yet been structurally characterized, and none have been characterized from a freeze-tolerant animal. We isolated a highly active THF from the freeze-tolerant beetle, Upis ceramboides, by means of ice affinity. Amino acid chromatographic analysis, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, and NMR spectroscopy indicated that the THF contained little or no protein, yet it produced 3.7 ± 0.3 °C of TH at 5 mg/ml, comparable to that of the most active insect antifreeze proteins. Compositional and structural analyses indicated that this antifreeze contains a β-mannopyranosyl-(1→4) β-xylopyranose backbone and a fatty acid component, although the lipid may not be covalently linked to the saccharide. Consistent with the proposed structure, treatment with endo-β-(1→4)xylanase ablated TH activity. This xylomannan is the first TH-producing antifreeze isolated from a freeze-tolerant animal and the first in a new class of highly active THFs that contain little or no protein. PMID:19934038

  11. Threonine side chain conformational population distribution of a type I antifreeze protein on interacting with ice surface studied via ¹³C-¹⁵N dynamic REDOR NMR.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yougang; Jeong, Myongho; Wang, Tieli; Ba, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) provide survival mechanism for species living in subzero environments by lowering the freezing points of their body fluids effectively. The mechanism is attributed to AFPs' ability to inhibit the growth of seed ice crystals through adsorption on specific ice surfaces. We have applied dynamic REDOR (Rotational Echo Double Resonance) solid state NMR to study the threonine (Thr) side chain conformational population distribution of a site-specific Thr ¹³C(γ) and ¹⁵N doubly labeled type I AFP in frozen aqueous solution. It is known that the Thr side chains together with those of the 4th and 8th Alanine (Ala) residues commencing from the Thrs (the 1st) in the four 11-residue repeat units form the peptide ice-binding surface. The conformational information can provide structural insight with regard to how the AFP side chains structurally interact with the ice surface. χ-squared statistical analysis of the experimental REDOR data in fitting the theoretically calculated dynamic REDOR fraction curves indicates that when the AFP interacted with the ice surface in the frozen AFP solution, the conformations of the Thr side chains changed from the anti-conformations, as in the AFP crystal structure, to partial population in the anti-conformation and partial population in the two gauche conformations. This change together with the structural analysis indicates that the simultaneous interactions of the methyl groups and the hydroxyl groups of the Thr side chains with the ice surface could be the reason for the conformational population change. The analysis of the theoretical dynamic REDOR fraction curves shows that the set of experimental REDOR data may fit a number of theoretical curves with different population distributions. Thus, other structural information is needed to assist in determining the conformational population distribution of the Thr side chains.

  12. Crystal structure of extracellular domain of human lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1), the ligand for natural killer receptor-P1A.

    PubMed

    Kita, Shunsuke; Matsubara, Haruki; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Tamaoki, Takaharu; Okabe, Yuki; Fukuhara, Hideo; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Krayukhina, Elena; Uchiyama, Susumu; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence has revealed the pivotal roles of C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) in the regulation of a wide range of immune responses. Human natural killer cell receptor-P1A (NKRP1A) is one of the CTLRs and recognizes another CTLR, lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) on target cells to control NK, NKT and Th17 cells. The structural basis for the NKRP1A-LLT1 interaction was limitedly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the ectodomain of LLT1. The plausible receptor-binding face of the C-type lectin-like domain is flat, and forms an extended β-sheet. The residues of this face are relatively conserved with another CTLR, keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin, which binds to the CTLR member, NKp65. A LLT1-NKRP1A complex model, prepared using the crystal structures of LLT1 and the keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin-NKp65 complex, reasonably satisfies the charge consistency and the conformational complementarity to explain a previous mutagenesis study. Furthermore, crystal packing and analytical ultracentrifugation revealed dimer formation, which supports a complex model. Our results provide structural insights for understanding the binding modes and signal transduction mechanisms, which are likely to be conserved in the CTLR family, and for further rational drug design towards regulating the LLT1 function. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein-1 receptor function by membrane raft disruption.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Sara; Quitadamo, Maria Chiara; Mango, Ruggiero; Ciccone, Sarah; Novelli, Giuseppe; Biocca, Silvia

    2012-08-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1), the primary receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in endothelial cells, is up-regulated in atherosclerotic lesions. Statins are the principal therapeutic agents for cardiovascular diseases and are known to down-regulate LOX-1 expression. Whether the effect on the LOX-1 receptor is related to statin-mediated cholesterol-lowering activity is unknown. We investigate the requirement of cholesterol for LOX-1-mediated lipid particle internalization, trafficking, and processing and the role of statins as inhibitors of LOX-1 function. Disruption of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains by acute exposure of cells to methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chronic exposure to different statins (lovastatin and atorvastatin) led to a spatial disorganization of LOX-1 in plasma membranes and a marked loss of specific LOX-1 function in terms of ox-LDL binding and internalization. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemical studies indicate that LOX-1 is naturally present in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and, by cholesterol reduction, the amount of LOX-1 in this fraction is highly decreased (≥60%). In contrast, isoprenylation inhibition had no effect on the distribution and function of LOX-1 receptors. Furthermore, in primary cultures from atherosclerotic human aorta lesions, we confirm the presence of LOX-1 in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and demonstrate that lovastatin treatment led to down-regulation of LOX-1 in lipid rafts and rescue of the ox-LDL-induced apoptotic phenotype. Taken together, our data reveal a previously unrecognized essential role of membrane cholesterol for LOX-1 receptor activity and suggest that statins protect vascular endothelium against the adverse effect of ox-LDL by disruption of membrane rafts and impairment of LOX-1 receptor function.

  14. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 expresses in mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and stimulates their proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fenxi; Wang, Congrui; Jing, Suhua; Ren, Tongming; Li, Yonghai; Cao, Yulin; Lin, Juntang

    2013-04-15

    The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) have been widely used in cell transplant therapy, and the proliferative ability of bmMSCs is one of the determinants of the therapy efficiency. Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) as a transmembrane protein is responsible for binding, internalizing and degrading oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). It has been identified that LOX-1 is expressed in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and monocytes. In these cells, low concentration of ox-LDL (<40 μg/mL) stimulates their proliferation via LOX-1 activation. However, it is poor understood that whether LOX-1 is expressed in bmMSCs and which role it plays. In this study, we investigated the status of LOX-1 expression in bmMSCs and its function on bmMSC proliferation. Our results showed that primary bmMSCs exhibiting a typical fibroblast-like morphology are positive for CD44 and CD90, but negative for CD34 and CD45. LOX-1 in both mRNA and protein levels is highly expressed in bmMSCs. Meanwhile, bmMSCs exhibit a strong potential to take up ox-LDL. Moreover, LOX-1 expression in bmMSCs is upregulated by ox-LDL with a dose- and time-dependent manner. Presence of ox-LDL also enhances the proliferation of bmMSCs. Knockdown of LOX-1 expression significantly inhibits ox-LDL-induced bmMSC proliferation. These findings indicate that LOX-1 plays a role in bmMSC proliferation. - Highlights: ► LOX-1 expresses in bmMSCs and mediates uptake of ox-LDL. ► Ox-LDL stimulates upregulation of LOX-1 in bmMSCs. ► Ox-LDL promotes bmMSC proliferation and expression of Mdm2, phosphor-Akt, phosphor-ERK1/2 and phosphor-NF-κB. ► LOX-1 siRNA inhibits ox-LDL-induced bmMSC proliferation and expression cell survival signals.

  15. [Dihydrotestosterone inhibits foam cell formation via a lectin-like ox-low-density lipoprotein receptor mediated mechanism in J774.1 cell line].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Hu, H D; Hu, B Q; Chen, X Y; Xu, P Y; Cui, L; Li, P; Liu, C; Li, L

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To investigate the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on lectin-like ox- low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor(LOX-1)expression and foam cell formation in the female macrophage cell line J774.1. Methods: In cultured J774.1 cells, after pretreated with DHT at concentrations of 1×10(-9) mol/L and 1×10(-8) mol/L, ox-LDL-induced LOX-1 expression and foam cell formation were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and oil-red O staining. Results: DHT at concentrations of 1×10(-9) mol/L and 1×10(-8) mol/L inhibited ox-LDL-induced LOX-1 mRNA (2.81±0.46 and 2.29±0.21 vs 4.71±0.31, both P<0.01) and protein expression (1.35±0.06 and 1.09±0.04 vs 1.75±0.11, both P<0.05). The effect was partly reversed by the androgen receptor (AR) blocker flutamide (87.6%, P=0.004). Oil-red O staining also revealed that DHT at concentrations of 1×10(-9) mol/L and 1×10(-8) mol/L suppressed ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation as quantified by the number of foam cells per high-power field (HPF) (36.0±3.0 and 29.1±1.3 vs 45.9±3.7, both P<0.05) and by the area of oil-red O stained particles per HPF (7 983±1 035 and 4 060±390 vs 14 750±2 489, both P<0.05). Conclusion: DHT at concentrations of 1×10(-9) mol/L and 1×10(-8) mol/L decreases LOX-1 expression and foam cell formation via AR.

  16. Modified Antifreeze Liquids for Use on Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, R. O.

    1983-01-01

    Report presents results of evaluation of two antifreeze liquids, dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol and five viscosity modifiers: gelatin, gum tragacanth, starch, agarose powder and citrus pectin. Purpose of evaluation to find best way of dealing with frost formation on Space Shuttle.

  17. Modified Antifreeze Liquids for Use on Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, R. O.

    1983-01-01

    Report presents results of evaluation of two antifreeze liquids, dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol and five viscosity modifiers: gelatin, gum tragacanth, starch, agarose powder and citrus pectin. Purpose of evaluation to find best way of dealing with frost formation on Space Shuttle.

  18. Lectin-like, oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1-deficient mice show resistance to age-related knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Oda, Yutaka; Nakamura, Fumihisa; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Akagi, Masao

    2017-01-01

    The lectin-like, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1)/ox-LDL system contributes to atherosclerosis and may be involved in cartilage degeneration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the LOX-1/ox-LDL system contributes to age-related osteoarthritis (OA) in vivo, using LOX-1 knockout (LOX-1 KO) mice. Knee cartilage from 6, 12, and 18-month old (n = 10/group) C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) and LOX-1 KO mice was evaluated by determining the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) score of Safranin-O stained samples. The prevalence of knee OA in both mouse strains was also investigated. Expression levels of LOX-1, ox-LDL, runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2), type-X collagen (COL X), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in the articular chondrocytes were analyzed immunohistologically. No significant difference was observed in the mean scores of WT (2.00±0.61) and LOX-1 KO mice (2.00±0.49) at 6 months of age (P=1.00, n=10). At 12 and 18 months of age, the mean scores of LOX-1 KO mice (3.75±0.93 and 5.50±0.78) were significantly lower than those of WT mice (5.25±1.14 and 9.00±1.01; P<0.001 in both cases; n=10). The prevalence of OA in LOX-1 KO mice was lower than that in WT mice at 12 and 18 months of age (40 vs 70%, 70 vs 90%, respectively; n=10). The expression levels of Runx2, COL X, and MMP-13 in articular chondrocytes significantly decreased in LOX-1 KO, mice compared with those in WT mice. The study indicated that the LOX-1/ox-LDL system in chondrocytes plays a role in the pathogenesis of age-related knee OA, which is potentially a target for preventing OA progression. PMID:28348422

  19. Variation in blood serum antifreeze activity of Antarctic Trematomus fishes across habitat temperature and depth.

    PubMed

    Fields, Lauren G; DeVries, Arthur L

    2015-07-01

    High latitude waters in the Southern Ocean can be near their freezing point and remain ice-covered throughout the year whereas lower latitude Southern Ocean waters have seasonal ice coverage and comparatively large (6 °C) annual temperature changes. The genus Trematomus (suborder Notothenioidei) is regarded primarily as a high latitude group because of its abundance there, they also inhabit the warmer regions in smaller numbers. Freeze avoidance in the notothenioids is linked to the presence of two antifreeze proteins (AFPs); the antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) and antifreeze potentiating protein (AFPP), both of which adsorb to internal ice crystals inhibiting growth. Both high and low latitude trematomids possess sufficient AFP to lower their blood freezing point below that of seawater (-1.9 °C). We investigated the contributions of AFGPs and AFPP to the blood freezing point depression to determine how they varied with depth, water temperature, and the presence of ice. High latitude trematomids had lower blood freezing points than those inhabiting lower latitude waters indicating differences in their freeze avoidance capacities. Lower freezing points were associated with higher levels of antifreeze activity due to higher levels of both AFGP and AFPP. Populations of Trematomus hansoni and Trematomus bernacchii from shallow depths appear more freeze avoidant than populations inhabiting deep, ice-free water based on their lower freezing points and higher antifreeze activities. Gel electrophoresis of the trichloroacetic acid-soluble AFGPs indicates that only high molecular weight isoforms, which contribute more to AFGP activity, vary across species as well as between individuals of a species.

  20. Clr-a: A Novel Immune-Related C-Type Lectin-like Molecule Exclusively Expressed by Mouse Gut Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Emilia; Leibelt, Stefan; Born, Christina; Friede, Miriam E; Bauer, Stefan; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Steinle, Alexander

    2017-01-15

    The mouse gut epithelium represents a constitutively challenged environment keeping intestinal commensal microbiota at bay and defending against invading enteric pathogens. The complex immunoregulatory network of the epithelial barrier surveillance also involves NK gene complex (NKC)-encoded C-type lectin-like molecules such as NKG2D and Nkrp1 receptors. To our knowledge, in this study, we report the first characterization of the orphan C-type lectin-like molecule Clr-a encoded by the Clec2e gene in the mouse NKC. Screening of a panel of mouse tissues revealed that Clec2e transcripts are restricted to the gastrointestinal tract. Using Clr-a-specific mAb, we characterize Clr-a as a disulfide-linked homodimeric cell surface glycoprotein. Of note, a substantial fraction of Clr-a molecules are retained intracellularly, and analyses of Clr-a/Clr-f hybrids attribute intracellular retention to both the stalk region and parts of the cytoplasmic domain. Combining quantitative PCR analyses with immunofluorescence studies revealed exclusive expression of Clr-a by intestinal epithelial cells and crypt cells throughout the gut. Challenge with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid results in a rapid and strong downregulation of intestinal Clr-a expression in contrast to the upregulation of Clr-f, a close relative of Clr-a, that also is specifically expressed by the intestinal epithelium and acts as a ligand of the inhibitory Nkrp1g receptor. Collectively, we characterize expression of the mouse NKC-encoded glycoprotein Clr-a as strictly associated with mouse intestinal epithelium. Downregulation upon polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid challenge and expression by crypt cells clearly distinguish Clr-a from the likewise intestinal epithelium-restricted Clr-f, pointing to a nonredundant function of these highly related C-type lectin-like molecules in the context of intestinal immunosurveillance.

  1. Artificial antifreeze polypeptides: alpha-helical peptides with KAAK motifs have antifreeze and ice crystal morphology modifying properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Laursen, R A

    1999-07-23

    Antifreeze polypeptides from fish are generally thought to inhibit ice crystal growth by specific adsorption onto ice surfaces and preventing addition of water molecules to the ice lattice. Recent studies have suggested that this adsorption results from hydrogen bonding through the side chains of polar amino acids as well as hydrophobic interactions between the non-polar domains on the ice-binding side of antifreeze polypeptides and the clathrate-like surfaces of ice. In order to better understand the activity of one of the antifreeze polypeptide families, namely the alpha-helical type I antifreeze polypeptides, four alpha-helical peptides having sequences not directly analogous to those of known antifreeze polypeptides and containing only positively charged and non-polar side chains were synthesized. Two peptides with regularly spaced lysine residues, GAAKAAKAAAAAAAKAAKAAAAAAAKAAKAAGGY-NH2 and GAALKAAKAAAAAALKAAKAAAAAALKAAKAAGGY-NH2, showed antifreeze activity, albeit weaker than seen in natural antifreeze polypeptides, by the criteria of freezing point depression (thermal hysteresis) and ice crystal modification to a hexagonal trapezohedron. Peptides with irregular spacing of Lys residues were completely inactive. Up to now, lysine residues have not been generally associated with antifreeze activity, though they have been implicated in some antifreeze polypeptides. This work also shows that lysine residues in themselves, when properly positioned on an alpha-helical polyalanine scaffold, have all the requisite properties needed for such an activity.

  2. An open source cryostage and software analysis method for detection of antifreeze activity.

    PubMed

    Buch, J L; Ramløv, H

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to provide the reader with a simple setup that can detect antifreeze proteins (AFP) by inhibition of ice recrystallisation in very small sample sizes. This includes an open source cryostage, a method for preparing and loading samples as well as a software analysis method. The entire setup was tested using hyperactive AFP from the cerambycid beetle, Rhagium mordax. Samples containing AFP were compared to buffer samples, and the results are visualised as crystal radius evolution over time and in absolute change over 30 min. Statistical analysis showed that samples containing AFP could reliably be told apart from controls after only two minutes of recrystallisation. The goal of providing a fast, cheap and easy method for detecting antifreeze proteins in solution was met, and further development of the system can be followed at https://github.com/pechano/cryostage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 facilitates metastasis of gastric cancer through driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Can; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Li, Lili; Yang, Caiting; Song, Shushu; Peng, Peike; Shao, Miaomiao; Zhang, Mingming; Zhao, Junjie; Zhao, Ran; Wu, Weicheng; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lan; Gu, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern recognition receptor that plays a critical role in vascular diseases and host immune response. Recently, our research discovered that LOX-1 could facilitate the uptake of dying cells and cross-presentation of cellular antigen via binding with heat shock proteins, which have a close relationship with gastric neoplasia. Therefore, we speculated that LOX-1 may serve as an oncogene in gastric cancer (GC) development and progression. In this study, through immunohistochemistry staining assay and cancer-related databases, we found that LOX-1 expression was up-regulated in GC tissues and correlated with a poor prognosis in GC patients. The expression of LOX-1 was an independent prognostic factor for OS in GC patients, and the incorporation of LOX-1 with TNM stage is more accurate for predicting prognosis. Additionally, in vitro study by transwell assay and western blot analysis confirmed that LOX-1 could promote the migration and invasion of GC cells by driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β activation. Taken together, we first explored the expression profiles, clinical significance and biological function of LOX-1 in GC, and these data suggest that LOX-1 may represent a promising prognostic biomarker for GC and offer a novel molecular target for GC therapies. PMID:28345638

  4. Boreal pollen contain ice-nucleating as well as ice-binding 'antifreeze' polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Dreischmeier, Katharina; Budke, Carsten; Wiehemeier, Lars; Kottke, Tilman; Koop, Thomas

    2017-02-03

    Ice nucleation and growth is an important and widespread environmental process. Accordingly, nature has developed means to either promote or inhibit ice crystal formation, for example ice-nucleating proteins in bacteria or ice-binding antifreeze proteins in polar fish. Recently, it was found that birch pollen release ice-nucleating macromolecules when suspended in water. Here we show that birch pollen washing water exhibits also ice-binding properties such as ice shaping and ice recrystallization inhibition, similar to antifreeze proteins. We present spectroscopic evidence that both the ice-nucleating as well as the ice-binding molecules are polysaccharides bearing carboxylate groups. The spectra suggest that both polysaccharides consist of very similar chemical moieties, but centrifugal filtration indicates differences in molecular size: ice nucleation occurs only in the supernatant of a 100 kDa filter, while ice shaping is strongly enhanced in the filtrate. This finding may suggest that the larger ice-nucleating polysaccharides consist of clusters of the smaller ice-binding polysaccharides, or that the latter are fragments of the ice-nucleating polysaccharides. Finally, similar polysaccharides released from pine and alder pollen also display both ice-nucleating as well as ice-binding ability, suggesting a common mechanism of interaction with ice among several boreal pollen with implications for atmospheric processes and antifreeze protection.

  5. Expression of Ixodes scapularis Antifreeze Glycoprotein Enhances Cold Tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Neelakanta, Girish; Hudson, Andrew M.; Sultana, Hameeda; Cooley, Lynn; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster experience cold shock injury and die when exposed to low non-freezing temperatures. In this study, we generated transgenic D. melanogaster that express putative Ixodes scapularis antifreeze glycoprotein (IAFGP) and show that the presence of IAFGP increases the ability of flies to survive in the cold. Male and female adult iafgp-expressing D. melanogaster exhibited higher survival rates compared with controls when placed at non-freezing temperatures. Increased hatching rates were evident in embryos expressing IAFGP when exposed to the cold. The TUNEL assay showed that flight muscles from iafgp-expressing female adult flies exhibited less apoptotic damage upon exposure to non-freezing temperatures in comparison to control flies. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of iafgp increases cold tolerance in flies by preventing apoptosis. This study defines a molecular basis for the role of an antifreeze protein in cryoprotection of flies. PMID:22428051

  6. Nonhepatic origin of notothenioid antifreeze reveals pancreatic synthesis as common mechanism in polar fish freezing avoidance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Hing C; Cziko, Paul A; Evans, Clive W

    2006-07-05

    Phylogenetically diverse polar and subpolar marine teleost fishes have evolved antifreeze proteins (AFPs) or antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) to avoid inoculative freezing by internalized ice. For over three decades since the first fish antifreeze (AF) protein was discovered, many studies of teleost freezing avoidance showed hepatic AF synthesis and distribution within the circulation as pivotal in preventing the blood, and therefore the fish, from freezing. We have uncovered an important twist to this long-held paradigm: the complete absence of liver synthesis of AFGPs in any life stage of the Antarctic notothenioids, indicating that the liver plays no role in the freezing avoidance in these fishes. Instead, we found the exocrine pancreas to be the major site of AFGP synthesis and secretion in all life stages, and that pancreatic AFGPs enter the intestinal lumen via the pancreatic duct to prevent ingested ice from nucleating the hyposmotic intestinal fluids. AFGPs appear to remain undegraded in the intestinal milieu, and the composition and relative abundance of intestinal AFGP isoforms are nearly identical to serum AFGPs. Thus, the reabsorption of intact pancreas-derived intestinal AFGPs, and not the liver, is the likely source of circulatory AFGPs in notothenioid fishes. We examined diverse northern fish taxa and Antarctic eelpouts with hepatic synthesis of bloodborne AF and found that they also express secreted pancreatic AF of their respective types. The evolutionary convergence of this functional physiology underscores the hitherto largely unrecognized importance of intestinal freezing prevention in polar teleost freezing avoidance, especially in the chronically icy Antarctic waters.

  7. Nonhepatic origin of notothenioid antifreeze reveals pancreatic synthesis as common mechanism in polar fish freezing avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Hing C.; Cziko, Paul A.; Evans, Clive W.

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetically diverse polar and subpolar marine teleost fishes have evolved antifreeze proteins (AFPs) or antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) to avoid inoculative freezing by internalized ice. For over three decades since the first fish antifreeze (AF) protein was discovered, many studies of teleost freezing avoidance showed hepatic AF synthesis and distribution within the circulation as pivotal in preventing the blood, and therefore the fish, from freezing. We have uncovered an important twist to this long-held paradigm: the complete absence of liver synthesis of AFGPs in any life stage of the Antarctic notothenioids, indicating that the liver plays no role in the freezing avoidance in these fishes. Instead, we found the exocrine pancreas to be the major site of AFGP synthesis and secretion in all life stages, and that pancreatic AFGPs enter the intestinal lumen via the pancreatic duct to prevent ingested ice from nucleating the hyposmotic intestinal fluids. AFGPs appear to remain undegraded in the intestinal milieu, and the composition and relative abundance of intestinal AFGP isoforms are nearly identical to serum AFGPs. Thus, the reabsorption of intact pancreas-derived intestinal AFGPs, and not the liver, is the likely source of circulatory AFGPs in notothenioid fishes. We examined diverse northern fish taxa and Antarctic eelpouts with hepatic synthesis of bloodborne AF and found that they also express secreted pancreatic AF of their respective types. The evolutionary convergence of this functional physiology underscores the hitherto largely unrecognized importance of intestinal freezing prevention in polar teleost freezing avoidance, especially in the chronically icy Antarctic waters. PMID:16798878

  8. Antifreeze effect of carboxylated ε-poly-L-lysine on the growth kinetics of ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, Dmitry A; Sazaki, Gen; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Matsumura, Kazuaki; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2014-08-28

    Some biological substances control the nucleation and growth of inorganic crystals. Antifreeze proteins, which prohibit ice crystal growth in living organisms, promise are also important as biological antifreezes for medical applications and in the frozen food industries. In this work, we investigated the crystallization of ice in the presence of a new cryoprotector, carboxylated ε-poly-L-lysine (COOH-PLL). In order to reveal the characteristics and the mechanism of its antifreeze effect, free-growth experiments of ice crystals were carried out in solutions with various COOH-PLL concentrations and degrees of supercooling, and the depression of the freezing point and growth rates of the tips of ice dendrites were obtained using optical microscopy. Hysteresis of growth rates and depression of the freezing point was revealed in the presence of COOH-PLL. The growth-inhibition effect of COOH-PLL molecules could be explained on the basis of the Gibbs-Thomson law and the use of Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. Theoretical kinetic curves for hysteresis calculated on the basis of Punin-Artamonova's model were in good agreement with experimental data. We conclude that adsorption of large biological molecules in the case of ice crystallization has a non-steady-state character and occurs more slowly than the process of embedding of crystal growth units.

  9. Conformational and dynamic properties of a 14 residue antifreeze glycopeptide from Antarctic cod.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, A. N.; Hays, L. M.; Feeney, R. E.; Crowe, L. M.; Crowe, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of a 14-residue antifreeze glycopeptide from Antarctic cod (Tetramatomnus borchgrevinki) containing two proline residues have been assigned. 13C NMR relaxation experiments indicate motional anisotropy of the peptide, with a tumbling time in water at 5 degrees C of 3-4 ns. The relaxation data and lack of long-range NOEs are consistent with a linear peptide undergoing significant segmental motion. However, extreme values of some coupling constants and strong sequential NOEs indicate regions of local order, which are most evident at the two ATPA subsequences. Similar spectroscopic properties were observed in the 16-residue analogue containing an Arg-Ala dipeptide added to the C-terminus. Molecular modeling also showed no evidence of long-range order, but the two ATPA subsequences were relatively well determined by the experimental data. These motifs were quite distinct from helical structures or beta turns commonly found in proteins, but rather resemble sections of an extended polyproline helix. Thus, the NMR data provide a description of the local order, which is of relevance to the mechanism of action of the antifreeze activity of the antifreeze glycopeptides as well as their ability to protect cells during hypothermic storage. PMID:9684888

  10. Conformational and dynamic properties of a 14 residue antifreeze glycopeptide from Antarctic cod.

    PubMed

    Lane, A N; Hays, L M; Feeney, R E; Crowe, L M; Crowe, J H

    1998-07-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of a 14-residue antifreeze glycopeptide from Antarctic cod (Tetramatomnus borchgrevinki) containing two proline residues have been assigned. 13C NMR relaxation experiments indicate motional anisotropy of the peptide, with a tumbling time in water at 5 degrees C of 3-4 ns. The relaxation data and lack of long-range NOEs are consistent with a linear peptide undergoing significant segmental motion. However, extreme values of some coupling constants and strong sequential NOEs indicate regions of local order, which are most evident at the two ATPA subsequences. Similar spectroscopic properties were observed in the 16-residue analogue containing an Arg-Ala dipeptide added to the C-terminus. Molecular modeling also showed no evidence of long-range order, but the two ATPA subsequences were relatively well determined by the experimental data. These motifs were quite distinct from helical structures or beta turns commonly found in proteins, but rather resemble sections of an extended polyproline helix. Thus, the NMR data provide a description of the local order, which is of relevance to the mechanism of action of the antifreeze activity of the antifreeze glycopeptides as well as their ability to protect cells during hypothermic storage.

  11. Ethanol extract of propolis protects endothelial cells from oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced injury by inhibiting lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yongqi; Li, Jinguo; Ding, Mingde; Xu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiajun; Jiao, Peng; Han, Ping; Wang, Jiafu; Yao, Shutong

    2014-12-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), as the primary oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) receptor on endothelial cells, plays a crucial role in endothelial injury, which is a driving force in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Our previous studies have shown that ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion development. However, the protective effects of EEP against ox-LDL-induced injury in endothelial cells and the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that EEP attenuates ox-LDL-induced endothelial oxidative injury via modulation of LOX-1-mediated oxidative stress. Our results showed that exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to ox-LDL (100 mg/L) led to the decrease in cell viability and increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis, whereas pretreatment with EEP (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/L) protected against such damages in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, EEP mitigated ox-LDL uptake by HUVECs and attenuated ox-LDL-upregulated LOX-1 expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, EEP suppressed the ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress as assessed by decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) generation as well as increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Similar results were observed in the anti-LOX-1 antibody or diphenyleneiodonium (DPI)-pretreated HUVECs. These data indicate that EEP may protect HUVECs from ox-LDL-induced injury and that the mechanism at least partially involves its ability to inhibit endothelial LOX-1 upregulation and subsequent oxidative stress.

  12. Lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1)-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) interaction and autophagy in CATH.a differentiated cells exposed to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zufeng; Liu, Shijie; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Xiang, David; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2015-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in innate immune response. Expression of TLRs has also been linked to autophagy. As the main receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on the cell surface, lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines and has been linked to the development of autophagy. However, the relationship between LOX-1, autophagy, and TLR4 in neurons has not been defined. Here, we show that Angiotensin II (Ang II) treatment of CATH.a differentiated neuronal cells resulted in the expression of TLR4 (and associated signals MyD88 and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon (TRIF)), LOX-1 autophagy. LOX-1 knockdown (transfection with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA)) resulted in reduced expression of TLR4 (and associated signals MyD88 and TRIF) and P-P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and autophagy. TLR4 knockdown with siRNA resulted in reduced LOX-1 expression and autophagy, indicating a positive feedback between LOX-1 and TLR4. Knockdown of TRIF as well as MyD88 or inhibition of P38 MAPK also inhibited the expression of LOX-1 and TLR4 and autophagy. Importantly, pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (autophagy inhibitor) enhanced while rapamycin (autophagy inducer) decreased the expression of LOX-1, TLR4, and P-P38 MAPK. These studies suggest the presence of a bidirectional link between LOX-1and TLR4 in cultured CATH.a differentiated cells exposed to Ang II with an important role for autophagy in this link.

  13. Inhibition of bacterial ice nucleators by fish antifreeze glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Parody-Morreale, A; Murphy, K P; Di Cera, E; Fall, R; DeVries, A L; Gill, S J

    1988-06-23

    Certain bacteria promote the formation of ice in super-cooled water by means of ice nucleators which contain a unique protein associated with the cell membrane. Ice nucleators in general are believed to act by mimicking the structure of an ice crystal surface, thus imposing an ice-like arrangement on the water molecules in contact with the nucleating surface and lowering the energy necessary for the initiation of ice formation. Quantitative investigation of the bacterial ice-nucleating process has recently been made possible by the discovery of certain bacteria that shed stable membrane vesicles with ice nucleating activity. The opposite effect, inhibition of ice formation, has been described for a group of glycoproteins found in different fish and insect species. This group of substances, termed antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), promotes the supercooling of water with no appreciable effect on the equilibrium freezing point or melting temperature. Substantial evidence now indicates that AFGPs act by binding to a growing ice crystal and slowing crystal growth. As the ice-nucleating protein surface is believed to have a structure similar to an embryonic ice crystal, AFGPs might be predicted to interact directly with a bacterial ice-nucleating site. We report here that AFGPs from the antarctic fish Dissostichus mawsoni inhibit the ice-nucleating activity of membrane vesicles from the bacterium Erwinia herbicola. The inhibition effect shows saturation at high concentration of AFGP and conforms to a simple binding reaction between the AFGP and the nucleation centre.

  14. Variation in the Lectin-like Oxidized LDL Receptor 1 (LOX-1) Gene Is Associated With Plasma Soluble LOX-1 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Brinkley, Tina E.; Kume, Noriaki; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Brown, Michael D.; Phares, Dana A.; Ferrell, Robert. E.; Kita, Toru; Hagberg, James M.

    2009-01-01

    The lectin-like ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) expressed on vascular cells plays a major role in atherogenesis by internalizing and degrading oxidized LDL. LOX-1 can be cleaved from the cell surface and released as soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1), and elevated sLOX-1 levels may be indicative of atherosclerotic plaque instability. We examined associations between the LOX-1 3′UTR-C/T and G501C polymorphisms and plasma sLOX-1 levels in 97 healthy older men and women. The frequencies for the 3′UTR-T and 501C alleles were 46% and 10%, respectively. Plasma sLOX-1 levels were significantly higher in the 3′UTR CC genotype group compared to both the CT (p=0.02) and TT (p=0.002) genotype groups. Plasma sLOX-1 were also significantly higher in the 501GC genotype group compared to the GG genotype group (p=0.004). In univariate analyses, sLOX-1 levels were significantly associated with both the 3′UTR-C/T and G501 C polymorphisms. These associations remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, race, and BMI. In conclusion, variation in the LOX-1 gene is associated with plasma sLOX-1 levels in older men and women. PMID:18469066

  15. Variation in the human lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1) gene is associated with plasma soluble LOX-1 levels.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, Tina E; Kume, Noriaki; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Brown, Michael D; Phares, Dana A; Ferrell, Robert E; Kita, Toru; Hagberg, James M

    2008-09-01

    The lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1) expressed on vascular cells plays a major role in atherogenesis by internalizing and degrading oxidized low-density lipoprotein. LOX-1 can be cleaved from the cell surface and released as soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1), and elevated sLOX-1 levels may be indicative of atherosclerotic plaque instability. We examined associations between the LOX-1 gene 3'UTR-C/T and G501C polymorphisms and plasma sLOX-1 levels in 97 healthy older men and women. The frequencies for the 3'UTR-T and 501C alleles were 46 and 10%, respectively. Plasma sLOX-1 levels were significantly higher in the 3'UTR CC genotype group compared with both the CT (P=0.02) and TT genotype groups (P=0.002). Plasma sLOX-1 levels were also significantly higher in the 501GC genotype group compared with the GG genotype group (P=0.004). In univariate analyses, sLOX-1 levels were significantly associated with both the 3'UTR-C/T and G501C polymorphisms. These associations remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race and body mass index. In conclusion, variation in the LOX-1 gene is associated with plasma sLOX-1 levels in older men and women.

  16. Abrogation of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 attenuates acute myocardial ischemia-induced renal dysfunction by modulating systemic and local inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingjun; Wang, Xianwei; Wang, Wenze; Muniyappa, Harish; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Hu, Changping; Das, Kumuda; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2014-01-01

    It is assumed that acute myocardial infarction affects renal function. To study the mechanism, we used mice following permanent ligation of their left coronary artery that results in extensive myocardial infarction. Soon after ligation, there was a marked rise in circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and malondialdehyde (thiobarbituric acid-positive evidence of lipid peroxidation). Renal function had significantly declined by the third day in association with mild fibrosis, and swelling of glomeruli and tubules. There was a significant increase in the expression of the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), interelukin-1β, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the kidney. Renal function showed some recovery by Day 21; however, there was progressive fibrosis of the kidneys. LOX-1 knockout mice had significantly diminished increases in systemic and renal pro-inflammatory cytokines, malondialdehyde, structural alterations, and decline in renal function than the wild-type mice following ligation of the left coronary artery. Cardiac function and survival rates were also significantly better in the LOX-1 knockout mice than in the wild-type mice. Hence, severe myocardial ischemia results in renal dysfunction and histological abnormalities suggestive of acute renal injury. Thus, LOX-1 is a key modulator among multiple mechanisms underlying renal dysfunction following extensive myocardial infarction. PMID:22673889

  17. Restraint stress up-regulates lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 in aorta of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Irene J; Sankaralingam, Sowndramalingam; Davidge, Sandra T

    2010-09-01

    Psychological stress is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms are unknown. The vascular lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in vascular pathology and early atherogenesis. We hypothesized that LOX-1 is up-regulated by psychological stress via the formation of oxygen-derived free radicals, and that treatment with EUK-8 (a superoxide dismutase and catalase mimetic) prevents production of oxygen-derived free radicals and leads to reduced expression of LOX-1 in the vascular wall. As a model for psychological stress, we exposed male apolipoprotein E-deficient mice to repeated restraint stress by placement in a conical tube for 2 h per day for 14 consecutive days. Stressed and control mice were treated with EUK-8 (n = 4-5) or vehicle (n = 4-5). Reactive oxygen species and peroxynitrite levels, as detected by oxidative fluorescence microscopy, were increased in the aortic root of mice exposed to stress compared to those of controls by 212 +/- 22% (mean +/- SEM; p < 0.001) and 110 +/- 6% (p < 0.001), respectively. LOX-1, as detected by immunohistochemistry, was increased by 443 +/- 63% in stressed mice compared to control mice (p < 0.001). EUK-8 reduced reactive oxygen species, peroxynitrite, and LOX-1 levels in stressed mice compared to vehicle-treated stressed mice. To conclude, LOX-1 induced by reactive oxygen species and/or peroxynitrite could be one mechanism by which stress promotes cardiovascular disease.

  18. The N-terminal of a heparin-binding sperm membrane mitogen possess lectin-like sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, Visesato; Chatterjee, Tapati . E-mail: c_tapati@yahoo.com

    2007-03-02

    Glycosaminoglycans like heparin and heparin sulfate in follicular fluid induce changes in the intracellular environment during the spermatozoal functional maturation. We previously reported the isolation, purification and partial characterization of a heparin binding sperm membrane protein (HBSM). In the present study, the amino acids analysis provided evidence of a single sequence, which suggest the homogeneity of the purified HBSM. Fourteen amino acids-{sup 1} A D T I V A V E L D T Y P N {sup 14}-correspond to the amino terminal sequence of Concanavalin A (Con A) and contain 45.2% carbohydrate by weight. HBSM possess mitogenic property on lymphocytes with comparable magnitude to the well-known mitogen; Con A, inducing 83% radiolabel thymidine incorporation in growing lymphocytes. Unlike Con A, there was no agglutination of cell by HBSM upto 5 ng/ml concentration. Interestingly, we found that heparin and chondroitin sulfate-conjugated HBSM inhibit the proliferative activity. Similar effect was also found with an in-house isolate sulfated glycans; G-I (28% sulfate). In contrast, there was no inhibition by the desulfated form; G-ID. Altogether, our data suggest that the mechanism of cell proliferative pathway may be different for HBSM and Con A.

  19. Lectin-like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor (LOX-1): A Chameleon Receptor for Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Zeya, Bushra; Arjuman, Albina; Chandra, Nimai Chand

    2016-08-16

    LOX-1, one of the main receptors for oxLDL, is found mainly on the surface of endothelial cells. It is a multifacet 52 kDa type II transmembrane protein that structurally belongs to the C-type lectin family. It exists with short intracellular N-terminal and long extracellular C-terminal hydrophilic domains separated by a hydrophobic domain of 26 amino acids. LOX-1 acts like a bifunctional receptor either showing pro-atherogenicity by activating the NFκB-mediated down signaling cascade for gene activation of pro-inflammatory molecules or playing an atheroprotective agent by receptor-mediated uptake of oxLDL in the presence of an anti-inflammatory molecule like IL-10. Mildly, moderately, and highly oxidized LDL show their characteristic features upon LOX-1 activation and its ligand binding indenture. The polymorphic LOX-1 genes are intensively associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial diseases. The splicing variant LOX IN dimerizes with the native form of LOX-1 and protects cells from damage by oxidized LDL. In the developing field of regenerating medicine, LOX-1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  20. High Levels of Soluble Lectin-Like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1 in Acute Stroke: An Age- and Sex-Matched Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sawamura, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Makoto; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Yoshiko; Kakino, Akemi; Nakai, Michikazu; Toyoda, Kazunori; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is known to be a key molecule in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although high levels of serum soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1) were demonstrated in patients with acute coronary syndrome, there are no reports about acute stroke patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the levels of sLOX-1 in acute stroke patients according to different stroke subtypes. Methods: We enrolled a total of 377 patients with a stroke (men/women: 251/126; age: 40–79 years), 250 with ischemic stroke and 127 with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients were admitted to our hospital within 3 days after the onset of stroke. As controls, we randomly selected age- and sex-matched subjects without a past history of cardiovascular disease according to stroke subtype from the community-based cohort of the Suita study. Serum LOX-1 levels were compared between stroke patients and healthy controls according to stroke subtype. Results: Median values of serum sLOX-1 in stroke patients were significantly higher than those in controls (526 vs. 486 ng/L in ischemic stroke and 720 vs. 513 ng/L in ICH, respectively). Among subtypes of ischemic stroke, median sLOX-1 levels in atherothrombotic brain infarction (641 ng/L) only were significantly higher than those in controls (496 ng/L). Ischemic stroke [odds ratio (OR), 3.80; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.86–7.74] and ICH (OR, 5.97; 95% CI, 2.13–16.77) were independently associated with high levels of sLOX-1 by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Higher levels of sLOX-1 were observed in patients with acute stoke than in controls. High levels of sLOX-1 can be useful as biomarker for acute stroke. PMID:27025681

  1. The CD94/NKG2C killer lectin-like receptor constitutes an alternative activation pathway for a subset of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Gumá, Mónica; Busch, Lisa K; Salazar-Fontana, Laura I; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Morte, Carles; García, Pilar; López-Botet, Miguel

    2005-07-01

    The CD94/NKG2C killer lectin-like receptor (KLR) specific for HLA-E is coupled to the KARAP/DAP12 adapter in a subset of NK cells, triggering their effector functions. We have studied the distribution and function of this KLR in T lymphocytes. Like other NK cell receptors (NKR), CD94/NKG2C was predominantly expressed by a CD8(+) T cell subset, though TCRgammadelta(+) NKG2C(+) and rare CD4(+) NKG2C(+) cells were also detected in some individuals. Coculture with the 721.221 HLA class I-deficient lymphoma cell line transfected with HLA-E (.221-AEH) induced IL-2Ralpha expression in CD94/NKG2C+ NK cells and a minor subset of CD94/NKG2C(+) T cells, promoting their proliferation; moreover, a similar response was triggered upon selective engagement of CD94/NKG2C with a specific mAb. CD8(+) TCRalphabeta CD94/NKG2C(+) T cell clones, that displayed different combinations of KIR and CD85j receptors, expressed KARAP/DAP12 which was co-precipitated by an anti-CD94 mAb. Specific engagement of the KLR triggered cytotoxicity and cytokine production in CD94/NKG2C(+) T cell clones, inducing as well IL-2Ralpha expression and a proliferative response. Altogether these results support that CD94/NKG2C may constitute an alternative T cell activation pathway capable of driving the expansion and triggering the effector functions of a CTL subset.

  2. A novel gene silencer, pyrrole-imidazole polyamide targeting human lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 gene improves endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takahiro; Fukuda, Noboru; Tsunemi, Akiko; Yao, En-Hui; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Tahira, Kazunobu; Matsumoto, Taro; Matsumoto, Koichi; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2009-03-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide can be combined in antiparallel side-by-side dimeric complexes along the minor groove of DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are effective inhibitors of transcription factors as well as viral repressors and transactivators. Recently, lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) was reported to be a major factor contributing to the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. In this study, we designed a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide specific for the LOX-1 gene and evaluated its effect on LOX-1 gene transcription. A pyrrole-imidazole polyamide was designed to target the AP-1 binding site of the LOX-1 gene and synthesized by solid phase methods. This pyrrole-imidazole polyamide significantly inhibited LOX-1 promoter activity in HEK293 cells, determined by the luciferase assay. LOX-1 mRNA expression was also inhibited by the pyrrole-imidazole polyamide at a concentration of 10-9 mol/l in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), determined by the real-time PCR method. HUVEC were treated by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide targeting the LOX-1 gene, and apoptosis was assessed using Hoechst stain, terminal deoxy nucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP end labeling method, and dye-uptake bioassay. Treatment of HUVEC for 72 h with LOX-1 targeted pyrrole-imidazole polyamide decreased apoptosis induced by angiotensin II and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) loading in all assays. This novel therapeutic agent, pyrrole-imidazole polyamide, could specifically inhibit LOX-1 gene expression by reducing the promoter activity of the gene. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seems to be a powerful promising new agent that can be used to explore therapies based on inhibition of transcription. Molecular recognition of DNA by small molecules could provide insight into the development of new human medicines.

  3. High Levels of Soluble Lectin-Like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1 in Acute Stroke: An Age- and Sex-Matched Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Chiaki; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Makoto; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Yoshiko; Kakino, Akemi; Nakai, Michikazu; Toyoda, Kazunori; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is known to be a key molecule in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although high levels of serum soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1) were demonstrated in patients with acute coronary syndrome, there are no reports about acute stroke patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the levels of sLOX-1 in acute stroke patients according to different stroke subtypes. We enrolled a total of 377 patients with a stroke (men/women: 251/126; age: 40-79 years), 250 with ischemic stroke and 127 with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients were admitted to our hospital within 3 days after the onset of stroke. As controls, we randomly selected age- and sex-matched subjects without a past history of cardiovascular disease according to stroke subtype from the community-based cohort of the Suita study. Serum LOX-1 levels were compared between stroke patients and healthy controls according to stroke subtype. Median values of serum sLOX-1 in stroke patients were significantly higher than those in controls (526 vs. 486 ng/L in ischemic stroke and 720 vs. 513 ng/L in ICH, respectively). Among subtypes of ischemic stroke, median sLOX-1 levels in atherothrombotic brain infarction (641 ng/L) only were significantly higher than those in controls (496 ng/L). Ischemic stroke [odds ratio (OR), 3.80; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.86-7.74] and ICH (OR, 5.97; 95% CI, 2.13-16.77) were independently associated with high levels of sLOX-1 by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Higher levels of sLOX-1 were observed in patients with acute stoke than in controls. High levels of sLOX-1 can be useful as biomarker for acute stroke.

  4. Modulation of antifreeze activity and the effect upon post-thaw HepG2 cell viability after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Poisson, Jessica S; Boddy, Christopher N; Ben, Robert N

    2015-04-01

    Most antifreeze proteins (AFPs) exhibit two types of "antifreeze activity" - thermal hysteresis (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. The mechanism of TH activity has been studied in depth and is the result of an adsorption of AFPs to the surface of ice with an ice-binding face (IBF). In contrast, the mechanism of ice recrystallization and its inhibition is considerably less understood. In this paper, we examine several different antifreeze proteins, glycoproteins and mutants of the Lolium perenne AFP (LpAFP) to understand how IRI activity is modulated independently of TH activity. This study also examines the ability of the various AF(G)Ps to protect HepG2 cells from cryoinjury. Post-thaw cell viabilities are correlated to TH, IRI activity as well as dynamic ice shaping ability and single ice crystal growth progressions. While these results demonstrate that AF(G)Ps are ineffective as cryoprotectants, they emphasize how ice crystal habit and most importantly, ice growth progression affect HepG2 cell survival during cryopreservation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Caloric restriction, aerobic exercise training and soluble lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 levels in overweight and obese post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, T E; Wang, X; Kume, N; Mitsuoka, H; Nicklas, B J

    2011-06-01

    Elevated circulating levels of soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (sLOX-1) have been observed in obese persons and are reduced by weight loss. However, it is not known whether combining caloric restriction (CR) with exercise training is better in reducing sLOX-1 levels than CR alone. We examined whether the addition of aerobic exercise to a weight loss intervention differentially affects sLOX-1 levels in 61 abdominally obese post-menopausal women randomly assigned to a CR only (n = 22), CR+moderate-intensity exercise (n = 22) or CR+vigorous-intensity exercise (n = 17) intervention for 20 weeks. The caloric deficit was ~2800 kcal per week for all groups. The intervention groups were similar at baseline with respect to body weight, body composition, lipids and blood pressure. However, plasma sLOX-1 levels were higher in the CR-only group (99.90 ± 8.23 pg ml(-1)) compared with both the CR+moderate-intensity exercise (69.39 ± 8.23 pg ml(-1), P = 0.01) and the CR+vigorous-intensity exercise (72.83 ± 9.36 pg ml(-1), P = 0.03) groups. All three interventions significantly reduced body weight (~14%), body fat and waist and hip circumferences to a similar degree. These changes were accompanied by a 23% reduction in sLOX-1 levels overall (-19.00 ± 30.08 pg ml(-1), P < 0.0001), which did not differ among intervention groups (P = 0.13). Changes in body weight, body fat and maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2) max) were not correlated with changes in sLOX-1 levels. In multiple regression analyses in all women combined, baseline sLOX-1 levels (β = -0.70 ± 0.06, P < 0.0001), age (β = 0.92 ± 0.43, P = 0.03) and baseline body mass index (BMI) (β = 1.88 ± 0.66, P = 0.006) were independent predictors of the change in sLOX-1 with weight loss. Weight loss interventions of equal energy deficit have similar effects on sLOX-1 levels in overweight and obese post-menopausal women, with the addition of aerobic exercise having no added benefit when

  6. Bioinspired Antifreeze Secreting Frost-Responsive Pagophobic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoda; Damle, Viraj; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Prevention of ice and frost accumulation is of interest to transportation, power generation, and agriculture industries. Superhydrophobic and lubricant impregnated pagophobic coatings have been proposed, however, they both fail in frosting conditions. Inspired by functional liquid secretion in natural systems, such as toxin secretion by poison dart frost in response to predator presence, we developed frost-responsive antifreeze secreting pagophobic coatings. These are bi-layered coatings with an inner superhydrophilic ``dermis'' infused with antifreeze and an outer permeable superhydrophobic ``epidermis.'' The superhydrophobic epidermis separates the antifreeze from the environment and prevents ice accumulation by repelling impinging water droplets. In frosting conditions, the antifreeze is secreted from the dermis through pores in the epidermis either due to contact with condensed droplets or temporary switch of the epidermis wettability from hydrophobic to hydrophilic caused by surface icing. Here we demonstrate superior performance of this multifunctional coating in simulated frosting, freezing mist/fog, and freezing spray/rain conditions. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  7. The cryoprotective effect of antifreeze glycopeptides from antarctic fishes.

    PubMed

    Rubinsky, B; Arav, A; Devries, A L

    1992-02-01

    Apparently vitrified cells and tissues often fail to survive, probably from damage from growth of microscopically invisible ice crystals. Special biological antifreezes from some polar fishes have been shown to adsorb to specific faces of ice crystals and inhibit crystal growth. Vitrification in the presence of antifreezes therefore may help enhance postvitrification viability of cells and tissues. We report here that the addition of fish antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGPs) to vitrifying solutions increases post-thaw viability in cultured immature pig oocytes and two-cell stage embryos of mice and pigs after rapid cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The criterion for viability is maturation to metaphase for the oocytes and the ability to develop into the four-cell stage for the pig embryo and the blastocyst stage for the mouse embryo. Without AFGPs, or with addition of antifreeze peptides (AFPs), the particular vitrifying solution and cooling/warming/culturing regime used in this study produced zero viability. In the presence of the AFGPs (40 mg/ml), survival of pig oocytes and embryos was increased to about 25%, and that of mouse embryos to 82%. Dose-response studies for the mouse embryos showed that the protective effect of AFGPs shows saturation kinetics and levels off at 20 mg/ml. The AFGPs appeared to preserve cell membrane structural integrity; however, an intact cell membrane did not always lead to viability. The absence of protective effect by AFPs suggests that protection by the AFGPs is unrelated to their common antifreeze property, i.e., inhibition of ice crystal growth, but probably results from interaction with and stabilization of the cell membranes unique to the AFGPs.

  8. Antifreeze and cryoprotective activities of ice-binding collagen peptides from pig skin.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Yu Bing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Song; Yuan, Min

    2016-03-01

    A novel "hyperactive" ice-binding peptide from porcine collagen was prepared by alkaline protease hydrolysis and a series of column chromatography separations, and then its antifreeze and cryoprotective properties were reported. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the thermal hysteresis (TH) of ice-binding collagen peptides was closely related to their concentration and crystal fraction. Collagen hydrolysates with maximal TH were obtained by hydrolysis at pH 8.0, DH 15.0%, and 5% alkaline protease at 55°C. After purification by column chromatography, the AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide (GLLGPLGPRGLL) with 1162.8Da molecular weights exhibited the highest TH (5.28°C), which can be classified as "hyperactive". Recrystallisation and melt-resistance of ice cream were improved by AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide at 0.2% (w/v) in a similar manner to natural antifreeze proteins. Moreover, the addition of AP-3 collagen peptides in ice cream greatly elevated the glass transition temperature (Tg) to -17.64°C.

  9. Variations in macromolecular antifreeze levels in larvae of the darkling beetle, Meracantha contracta.

    PubMed

    Duman, J G

    1977-07-01

    Overwintering larvae of the darkling beetle, Meracantha contracta, produce a macromolecular antifreeze that is similar in activity to the glycoproteinaceous and proteinaceous antifreezes found in some cold-water, marine teleost fishes. The antifreeze is not present in the hemolymph of the Meracantha larvae in summer, but its production begins by late September in the wild population. The antifreeze reaches a maximum concentration in February, decreases slowly through spring, and disappears by early June. The supercooling points of the larvae are lowest in February, when the antifreeze levels are highest, and increase as the antifreeze concentrations in the hemolymph decrease in the spring. Larvae collected in mid-February and warm-acclimated lost the antifreeze with-in 12 days. Larvae collected in early September and cold-acclimated required nearly two months to produce concentrations of antifreeze comparable to those of overwintering larvae. Temperature seems to be the major environmental factor responsible for the control of antifreeze levels in Meracantha; however, other environmental factors may also be involved.

  10. Increased serum soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels in patients with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Oguzhan; Colak, Yasar; Senates, Ebubekir; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Ulasoglu, Celal; Doganay, Levent; Ozkanli, Seyma; Oltulu, Yasemin Musteri; Coskunpinar, Ender; Tuncer, Ilyas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the relationship between the serum lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) levels and clinical and histopathological features of biopsy-confirmed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. METHODS: Fifty-three consecutive, biopsy-proven NAFLD patients (31 males and 22 females, mean age 42.5 ± 9.6 years) and 26 age- and gender-matched, healthy controls (14 males and 12 females, mean age 39 ± 10.7 years) were included. The patients with NAFLD were consecutive patients who had been admitted to the hepatology outpatient clinic within the last year and had been diagnosed with NAFLD as the result of liver biopsy. The healthy controls were individuals who attended the outpatient clinic for routine health control and had no known chronic illnesses. The histological evaluation was conducted according to the NAFLD activity scoring system recommended by The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network. The serum LOX-1 levels were measured using an ELISA kit (Life Science Inc. USCN. Wuhan, Catalog No. E1859Hu) in both patients and healthy controls. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the optimal cutoff value of LOX-1 and thereby distinguish between patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and healthy controls. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: NAFLD and healthy control groups were similar in terms of age and sex. NAFLD patients consisted of 8 patients with simple steatosis (15%), 27 with borderline NASH (51%) and 18 with definitive NASH (34%). Metabolic syndrome was found in 62.2% of the patients with NAFLD. The mean serum LOX-1 level in biopsy-proven NAFLD patients was 8.49 ± 6.43 ng/mL compared to 4.08 ± 4.32 ng/mL in healthy controls (P = 0.001). The LOX-1 levels were significantly different between controls, simple steatosis and NASH (borderline+definite) cases (4

  11. The gene for a lectin-like protein is transcriptionally activated during sexual development, but is not essential for fruiting body formation in the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora

    PubMed Central

    Nowrousian, Minou; Cebula, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Background The filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora forms complex three-dimensional fruiting bodies called perithecia that protect the developing ascospores and ensure their proper discharge. In previous microarray analyses, several genes have been identified that are downregulated in sterile mutants compared to the wild type. Among these genes was tap1 (transcript associated with perithecial development), a gene encoding a putative lectin homolog. Results Analysis of tap1 transcript levels in the wild type under conditions allowing only vegetative growth compared to conditions that lead to fruiting body development showed that tap1 is not only downregulated in developmental mutants but is also upregulated in the wild type during fruiting body development. We have cloned and sequenced a 3.2 kb fragment of genomic DNA containing the tap1 open reading frame and adjoining sequences. The genomic region comprising tap1 is syntenic to its homologous region in the closely related filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. To determine whether tap1 is involved in fruiting body development in S. macrospora, a knockout construct was generated in which the tap1 open reading frame was replaced by the hygromycin B resistance gene hph under the control of fungal regulatory regions. Transformation of the S. macrospora wild type with this construct resulted in a tap1 deletion strain where tap1 had been replaced by the hph cassette. The knockout strain displayed no phenotypic differences under conditions of vegetative growth and sexual development when compared to the wild type. Double mutants carrying the Δtap1 allele in several developmental mutant backgrounds were phenotypically similar to the corresponding developmental mutant strains. Conclusion The tap1 transcript is strongly upregulated during sexual development in S. macrospora; however, analysis of a tap1 knockout strain shows that tap1 is not essential for fruiting body formation in S. macrospora. PMID:16266439

  12. The gene for a lectin-like protein is transcriptionally activated during sexual development, but is not essential for fruiting body formation in the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Nowrousian, Minou; Cebula, Patricia

    2005-11-03

    The filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora forms complex three-dimensional fruiting bodies called perithecia that protect the developing ascospores and ensure their proper discharge. In previous microarray analyses, several genes have been identified that are downregulated in sterile mutants compared to the wild type. Among these genes was tap1 (transcript associated with perithecial development), a gene encoding a putative lectin homolog. Analysis of tap1 transcript levels in the wild type under conditions allowing only vegetative growth compared to conditions that lead to fruiting body development showed that tap1 is not only downregulated in developmental mutants but is also upregulated in the wild type during fruiting body development. We have cloned and sequenced a 3.2 kb fragment of genomic DNA containing the tap1 open reading frame and adjoining sequences. The genomic region comprising tap1 is syntenic to its homologous region in the closely related filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. To determine whether tap1 is involved in fruiting body development in S. macrospora, a knockout construct was generated in which the tap1 open reading frame was replaced by the hygromycin B resistance gene hph under the control of fungal regulatory regions. Transformation of the S. macrospora wild type with this construct resulted in a tap1 deletion strain where tap1 had been replaced by the hph cassette. The knockout strain displayed no phenotypic differences under conditions of vegetative growth and sexual development when compared to the wild type. Double mutants carrying the Deltatap1 allele in several developmental mutant backgrounds were phenotypically similar to the corresponding developmental mutant strains. The tap1 transcript is strongly upregulated during sexual development in S. macrospora; however, analysis of a tap1 knockout strain shows that tap1 is not essential for fruiting body formation in S. macrospora.

  13. Antifreeze glycopeptide analogues: microwave-enhanced synthesis and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Heggemann, Carolin; Budke, Carsten; Schomburg, Benjamin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Wissbrock, Marco; Koop, Thomas; Sewald, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins enable life at temperatures below the freezing point of physiological solutions. They usually consist of the repetitive tripeptide unit (-Ala-Ala-Thr-) with the disaccharide alpha-D-galactosyl-(1-3)-beta-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine attached to each hydroxyl group of threonine. Monoglycosylated analogues have been synthesized from the corresponding monoglycosylated threonine building block by microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis. This method allows the preparation of analogues containing sequence variations which are not accessible by other synthetic methods. As antifreeze glycoproteins consist of numerous isoforms they are difficult to obtain in pure form from natural sources. The synthetic peptides have been structurally analyzed by CD and NMR spectroscopy in proton exchange experiments revealing a structure as flexible as reported for the native peptides. Microphysical recrystallization tests show an ice structuring influence and ice growth inhibition depending on the concentration, chain length and sequence of the peptides.

  14. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, K.; Hallett, J.; Burcham, T. S.; Feeney, R. E.; Kerr, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of different degrees of supercooling on the habit and rates of growth of ice crystals from solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins are reported. To isolate the influence of different solutions and supercooling alone, a system was devised that nucleated crystals in the middle of a uniformly supercooled sample. Alternatively, single crystals of selected orientation were inserted into free liquid surface. A crystallization rate up to five times greater than that in pure water was found. A mechanism explaining these results is suggested.

  15. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, K.; Hallett, J.; Burcham, T. S.; Feeney, R. E.; Kerr, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of different degrees of supercooling on the habit and rates of growth of ice crystals from solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins are reported. To isolate the influence of different solutions and supercooling alone, a system was devised that nucleated crystals in the middle of a uniformly supercooled sample. Alternatively, single crystals of selected orientation were inserted into free liquid surface. A crystallization rate up to five times greater than that in pure water was found. A mechanism explaining these results is suggested.

  16. Isolation of an antifreeze peptide from the Antarctic sponge Homaxinella balfourensis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, S. P.; Blum, A. J.; Burkepile, D. E.; Rutland, T. J.; Wierzbicki, A.; Kelly, M.; Hamann, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Polar plants and animals survive in subzero waters (−2°C) and many of these marine organisms produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to better adapt themselves to these conditions. AFPs prevent the growth of ice crystals which disrupt cellular membranes and destroy cells by inhibiting crystallization of water within the organism. The hydrophilic extract of an Antarctic sponge Homaxinella balfourensis exhibited a non-colligative freezing point depression effect on the crystal morphology of water. The extract was purified by repeated reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, then assayed and shown to contain several AFPs. The major peptide was isolated, analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and the partial structure of the peptide identified through amino acid sequencing. AFPs have potential applications in agriculture, medicine and the food industry. PMID:12568347

  17. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  18. Bacterial ice crystal controlling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lorv, Janet S H; Rose, David R; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  19. Oscillations and accelerations of ice crystal growth rates in microgravity in presence of antifreeze glycoprotein impurity in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoshinori; Nagashima, Ken; Nakatsubo, Shun-Ichi; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tamaru, Haruka; Shimaoka, Taro; Sone, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Zepeda, Salvador; Terasawa, Takanori; Asakawa, Harutoshi; Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Sazaki, Gen

    2017-03-06

    The free growth of ice crystals in supercooled bulk water containing an impurity of glycoprotein, a bio-macromolecule that functions as 'antifreeze' in living organisms in a subzero environment, was observed under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station. We observed the acceleration and oscillation of the normal growth rates as a result of the interfacial adsorption of these protein molecules, which is a newly discovered impurity effect for crystal growth. As the convection caused by gravity may mitigate or modify this effect, secure observations of this effect were first made possible by continuous measurements of normal growth rates under long-term microgravity condition realized only in the spacecraft. Our findings will lead to a better understanding of a novel kinetic process for growth oscillation in relation to growth promotion due to the adsorption of protein molecules and will shed light on the role that crystal growth kinetics has in the onset of the mysterious antifreeze effect in living organisms, namely, how this protein may prevent fish freezing.

  20. Antifreeze Activity of Xylomannan from the Mycelium and Fruit Body of Flammulina velutipes.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Hidehisa; Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Takuya; Arai, Naoki; Koide, Yoshihide

    2016-01-01

    An identified class of antifreeze, a xylomannan-based thermal hysteresis (TH)-producing glycolipid, has been discovered from diverse taxa, including plants, insects, and amphibians. We isolated xylomannan from the mycelium and fruit body of the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes using successive hot extraction with water, 2% and 25% aqueous KOH, and gel filtration chromatography. The xylomannan from the fruit body had a recrystallization inhibiting (RI) activity (RI=0.44) at 0.5 mg/mL. The dried weight yield of the fruit body (7.7×10(-2)%, w/w) was higher than that of the mycelium. Although the purified xylomannan from both soures were composed of mannose and xylose in a 2 : 1 molar ratio, the molecular weight of the xylomannan from the mycelium and fruit body was 320,000 and 240,000, respectively. The RI activity of mycelial xylomannan was higher than that from the fruit body (RI=0.57) at 45 µg/mL. Although this RI activity was able to remain constant after exposure to various conditions, we confirmed that the decrease of RI activity was stimulated by the decrease of molecular weight that was caused by heating during the alkaline condition. The survival rate of the CHO cells at -20℃ for two days increased to 97% due to the addition of 20 µg/mL of purified xylomannan. This was the first report to indicate that xylomannan from the mycelium of Flammulina velutipes had a high level of ice recrystallization inhibiting activity like antifreeze proteins from plants and had rhe potential to become a new material for cell storage.

  1. Respirometry-based evaluation of the fate and possible effects of antifreeze on activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Fall, Cheikh; Cuenca, Felipe M; Bâ, Khalidou M; Solís, Carlos M

    2006-07-01

    This paper focuses on environmental concerns regarding used antifreeze. It shows the results of laboratory respirometric tests conducted to evaluate the potential impact of antifreeze on activated sludge. In this first step of the study, only the components of virgin antifreeze were addressed, i.e. ethylene glycol, and antifoaming and corrosion inhibitory substances. The plateau resulting from oxygen uptake rate measurements of mixed liquor taken at the end of an aeration tank is used as a reference to evaluate the response of biomass to pulse injection of increasing dosages of new antifreeze, compared to that of formaldehyde, a known toxic compound. While 200 mg/L of formaldehyde steadily decreased the biomass activity (7 mg O2/Lh), there were no toxicity effects for doses up to 5000 mg/L of ethylene glycol from new antifreeze coolant (23 mg O2/Lh, compared to the initial 15 mg O2/Lh for the mixed liquor). It is estimated that ethylene glycol concentration in municipal wastewaters should be several order of magnitude lower then the 1000 mg/L shown to be tolerated by the biomass in this work, but at the present stage, the research does not provide enough information to recommend a definitive management scheme for antifreeze discharge. Many other management issues for used antifreeze must be addressed in future studies before any decision on tolerating sewer discharge in Mexico, as a transitory management option that will conciliate the actual practices with legality, can be made.

  2. Directly probing the antifreeze glycoprotein kinetics at the ice/solution interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda, Salvador; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Furukawa, Yoshinor

    2009-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) and glycoproteins (AFGP) help fish, plants, insects and bacteria survive sub-freezing environments. It is well known that these proteins function via some surface interaction, but the exact mechanism has eluded scientists. Aside from mutagenesis experiments directed towards examining the functional importance of specific residues, conclusions about the mechanism have been drawn from indirect studies or more precisely from studies that describe the proteins effects on the ice interface. Our work is aimed at directly studying the protein kinetics at the ice/solution interface. Fluorescent microscopy is used to determine interaction planes, surface concentrations as well as adsorption characteristics and the segregation constants, while fourier transform infra-red attenuated total reßectance (FTIR-ATR) is used to determine the protein structure vs. temperature in the liquid and solid states as well as the ice interface characteristics. All data show that AFGP do not function by the characteristic Gibbs-Thomson mechanism. While the surface coverage is similar for the AFPIII, segregation (amount in ice/amount in solution) is non-zero.

  3. Solution Structure and Sugar-Binding Mechanism of Mouse Latrophilin-1 RBL: a 7TM Receptor-Attached Lectin-Like Domain

    PubMed Central

    Vakonakis, Ioannis; Langenhan, Tobias; Prömel, Simone; Russ, Andreas; Campbell, Iain D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Latrophilin-1 (Lat-1), a target receptor for α-Latrotoxin, is a putative G protein-coupled receptor implicated in synaptic function. The extracellular portion of Lat-1 contains a rhamnose binding lectin (RBL)-like domain of unknown structure. RBL domains, first isolated from the eggs of marine species, are also found in the ectodomains of other metazoan transmembrane proteins, including a recently discovered coreceptor of the neuronal axon guidance molecule SLT-1/Slit. Here, we describe a structure of this domain from the mouse Lat-1. RBL adopts a unique α/β fold with long structured loops important for monosaccharide recognition, as shown in the structure of a complex with L-rhamnose. Sequence alignments and mutagenesis show that residues important for carbohydrate binding are often absent in other receptor-attached examples of RBL, including the SLT-1/Slit coreceptor. We postulate that this domain class facilitates direct protein-protein interactions in many transmembrane receptors. PMID:18547526

  4. Lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin binds to its specific ligand Lewis Y antigen and neutralizes lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chung-Sheng; Hsiao, Shi-Ming; Kao, Yuan-Chung; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Ma, Chih-Yuan; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chang, Bi-Ing; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Lin, Chun-Hung; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2008-01-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM), a widely expressing glycoprotein originally identified in vascular endothelium, is an important cofactor in the protein C anticoagulant system. TM appears to exhibit anti-inflammatory ability through both protein C–dependent and –independent pathways. We presently have demonstrated that recombinant N-terminal lectinlike domain of TM (rTMD1) functions as a protective agent against sepsis caused by Gram-negative bacterial infections. rTMD1 caused agglutination of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and enhanced the macrophage phagocytosis of these Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, rTMD1 bound to the Klebsiella pneumoniae and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by specifically interacting with Lewis Y antigen. rTMD1 inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory mediator production via interference with CD14 and LPS binding. Furthermore, rTMD1 modulated LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway activations and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in macrophages. Administration of rTMD1 protected the host by suppressing inflammatory responses induced by LPS and Gram-negative bacteria, and enhanced LPS and bacterial clearance in sepsis. Thus, rTMD1 can be used to defend against bacterial infection and inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses, suggesting that rTMD1 may be valuable in the treatment of severe inflammation in sepsis, especially in Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:18711002

  5. Inhibition of Condensation Frosting by Arrays of Hygroscopic Antifreeze Drops.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoda; Damle, Viraj G; Uppal, Aastha; Linder, Rubin; Chandrashekar, Sriram; Mohan, Ajay R; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2015-12-29

    The formation of frost and ice can have negative impacts on travel and a variety of industrial processes and is typically addressed by dispensing antifreeze substances such as salts and glycols. Despite the popularity of this anti-icing approach, some of the intricate underlying physical mechanisms are just being unraveled. For example, recent studies have shown that in addition to suppressing ice formation within its own volume, an individual salt saturated water microdroplet forms a region of inhibited condensation and condensation frosting (RIC) in its surrounding area. This occurs because salt saturated water, like most antifreeze substances, is hygroscopic and has water vapor pressure at its surface lower than water saturation pressure at the substrate. Here, we demonstrate that for macroscopic drops of propylene glycol and salt saturated water, the absolute RIC size can remain essentially unchanged for several hours. Utilizing this observation, we demonstrate that frost formation can be completely inhibited in-between microscopic and macroscopic arrays of propylene glycol and salt saturated water drops with spacing (S) smaller than twice the radius of the RIC (δ). Furthermore, by characterizing condensation frosting dynamics around various hygroscopic drop arrays, we demonstrate that they can delay complete frosting over of the samples 1.6 to 10 times longer than films of the liquids with equivalent volume. The significant delay in onset of ice nucleation achieved by dispensing propylene glycol in drops rather than in films is likely due to uniform dilution of the drops driven by thermocapillary flow. This transport mode is absent in the films, leading to faster dilution, and with that facilitated homogeneous nucleation, near the liquid-air interface.

  6. Antifreeze Peptides and Glycopeptides, and Their Derivatives: Potential Uses in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jeong Kyu; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Murugan, Ravichandran N.; Lee, Sung Gu; Do, Hackwon; Koh, Hye Yeon; Shim, Hye-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Hak Jun

    2013-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and glycoproteins (AFGPs), collectively called AF(G)Ps, constitute a diverse class of proteins found in various Arctic and Antarctic fish, as well as in amphibians, plants, and insects. These compounds possess the ability to inhibit the formation of ice and are therefore essential to the survival of many marine teleost fishes that routinely encounter sub-zero temperatures. Owing to this property, AF(G)Ps have potential applications in many areas such as storage of cells or tissues at low temperature, ice slurries for refrigeration systems, and food storage. In contrast to AFGPs, which are composed of repeated tripeptide units (Ala-Ala-Thr)n with minor sequence variations, AFPs possess very different primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. The isolation and purification of AFGPs is laborious, costly, and often results in mixtures, making characterization difficult. Recent structural investigations into the mechanism by which linear and cyclic AFGPs inhibit ice crystallization have led to significant progress toward the synthesis and assessment of several synthetic mimics of AFGPs. This review article will summarize synthetic AFGP mimics as well as current challenges in designing compounds capable of mimicking AFGPs. It will also cover our recent efforts in exploring whether peptoid mimics can serve as structural and functional mimics of native AFGPs. PMID:23752356

  7. Identification of a new pea gene, PsNlec1, encoding a lectin-like glycoprotein isolated from the symbiosomes of root nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Kardailsky, I V; Sherrier, D J; Brewin, N J

    1996-01-01

    A 27-kD glycoprotein antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody MAC266 was purified from isolated symbiosomes derived from pea (Pisum sativum) root nodules containing Rhizobium. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained, and the corresponding cDNA clone was isolated by a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy. The clone contained a single open reading frame, and the gene was termed PsNlec1. Phylogenetic analysis of 31 legume sequences showed that the PsNlec1 protein is related to the legume lectin family but belongs to a subgroup that is very different from pea seed lectin. Expression of the PsNlec1 transcript was much stronger in nodules than in other parts of the plant. It was found in both infected and uninfected cells in the central tissue of the nodule and in the stele of the root near the attachment point of the nodule. When uninfected pea seedlings were grown on medium containing nitrate, weak transcription of PsNlec1 was observed in the root system. The identification of PsNlec1 inside the symbiosome is consistent with the observation that legume lectins are generally vacuolar proteins that may serve as transient storage components. PMID:8685275

  8. Attenuated natural killer (NK) cell activation through C-type lectin-like receptor NKp80 is due to an anomalous hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (HemITAM) with impaired Syk kinase recruitment capacity.

    PubMed

    Rückrich, Thomas; Steinle, Alexander

    2013-06-14

    Cellular cytotoxicity is the hallmark of NK cells mediating both elimination of virus-infected or malignant cells, and modulation of immune responses. NK cytotoxicity is triggered upon ligation of various activating NK cell receptors. Among these is the C-type lectin-like receptor NKp80 which is encoded in the human Natural Killer Gene Complex (NKC) adjacent to its ligand, activation-induced C-type lectin (AICL). NKp80-AICL interaction promotes cytolysis of malignant myeloid cells, but also stimulates the mutual crosstalk between NK cells and monocytes. While many activating NK cell receptors pair with ITAM-bearing adaptors, we recently reported that NKp80 signals via a hemITAM-like sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. Here we molecularly dissect the NKp80 hemITAM and demonstrate that two non-consensus amino acids, in particular arginine 6, critically impair both hemITAM phosphorylation and Syk recruitment. Impaired Syk recruitment results in a substantial attenuation of cytotoxic responses upon NKp80 ligation. Reconstituting the hemITAM consensus or Syk overexpression resulted in robust NKp80-mediated responsiveness. Collectively, our data provide a molecular rationale for the restrained activation potential of NKp80 and illustrate how subtle alterations in signaling motifs determine subsequent cellular responses. They also suggest that non-consensus alterations in the NKp80 hemITAM, as commonly present among mammalian NKp80 sequences, may have evolved to dampen NKp80-mediated cytotoxic responses toward AICL-expressing cells.

  9. Dihydrotanshinone I Attenuates Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice: Role of NOX4/NF-κB Mediated Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 (LOX-1) of the Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenwen; Li, Chunxia; Gao, Hongwei; Wu, Qin; Shi, Jingshan; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrotanshinone I (DHT) is a natural compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge which has been widely used for treating cardiovascular diseases. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, the effect of DHT on atherosclerosis were investigated using apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and endothelial cells. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DHT (10 nM) decreased lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. Silence NOX4 inhibited LPS-induced LOX-1 expression, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. In ApoE(-/-) mice fed with an atherogenic diet, DHT (10 and 25 mg kg(-1)) significantly attenuated atherosclerotic plaque formation, altered serum lipid profile, decreased oxidative stress and shrunk necrotic core areas. The enhanced expression of LOX-1, NOX4, and NF-κB in aorta was also dramatically inhibited by DHT. In conclusion, these results suggested that DHT showed anti-atherosclerotic activity through inhibition of LOX-1 mediated by NOX4/NF-κB signaling pathways both in vitro and in vivo. This finding suggested that DHT might be used as a potential vascular protective candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  10. Dihydrotanshinone I Attenuates Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice: Role of NOX4/NF-κB Mediated Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 (LOX-1) of the Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenwen; Li, Chunxia; Gao, Hongwei; Wu, Qin; Shi, Jingshan; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrotanshinone I (DHT) is a natural compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge which has been widely used for treating cardiovascular diseases. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, the effect of DHT on atherosclerosis were investigated using apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice and endothelial cells. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DHT (10 nM) decreased lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. Silence NOX4 inhibited LPS-induced LOX-1 expression, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. In ApoE-/- mice fed with an atherogenic diet, DHT (10 and 25 mg kg-1) significantly attenuated atherosclerotic plaque formation, altered serum lipid profile, decreased oxidative stress and shrunk necrotic core areas. The enhanced expression of LOX-1, NOX4, and NF-κB in aorta was also dramatically inhibited by DHT. In conclusion, these results suggested that DHT showed anti-atherosclerotic activity through inhibition of LOX-1 mediated by NOX4/NF-κB signaling pathways both in vitro and in vivo. This finding suggested that DHT might be used as a potential vascular protective candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27891092

  11. H2 inhibits TNF-α-induced lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 expression by inhibiting nuclear factor κB activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Guohua; Tian, Hua; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Hongle; Sun, Xuejun; Qin, Shucun

    2011-09-01

    H(2) is a therapeutic antioxidant that can reduce oxidative stress. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein, which plays roles in atherosclerosis, may promote endothelial dysfunction by binding the cell-surface receptor LOX-1. LOX-1 expression can be upregulated by various stimuli, including TNF-α. Thus, we aimed to examine whether the upregulation of LOX-1 by different stimuli could be blocked by H(2) in endothelial cells. H(2) significantly abolished the upregulation of LOX-1 by different stimuli, including TNF-α, at the protein and mRNA levels. The TNF-α-induced upregulation of LOX-1 was also attenuated by the NF-κB inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine. H(2) inhibited the TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB and the phosphorylation of IκB-α. Furthermore, H(2) inhibited the expression of LOX-1 and the activation of NF-κB in apolipoprotein E knockout mice, an animal model of atherosclerosis. Thus, H(2) probably inhibits cytokine-induced LOX-1 gene expression by suppressing NF-κB activation.

  12. C-type lectin-like carbohydrate recognition of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III containing ricin-type -trefoil folds.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Unno, Hideaki; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Eto, Seiichiro; Hidemura, Haruki; Kato, Norihisa; Yonekura, Masami; Kusunoki, Masami

    2007-12-28

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent hemolytic lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata. The three-dimensional structure of CEL-III/GalNAc and CEL-III/methyl alpha-galactoside complexes was solved by x-ray crystallographic analysis. In these complexes, five carbohydrate molecules were found to be bound to two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) located in the N-terminal 2/3 portion of the polypeptide and that contained beta-trefoil folds similar to ricin B-chain. The 3-OH and 4-OH of bound carbohydrate molecules were coordinated with Ca(2+) located at the subdomains 1alpha, 1gamma, 2alpha, 2beta, and 2gamma, simultaneously forming hydrogen bond networks with nearby amino acid side chains, which is similar to carbohydrate binding in C-type lectins. The binding of carbohydrates was further stabilized by aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine and tryptophan, through a stacking interaction with the hydrophobic face of carbohydrates. The importance of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate-binding sites was confirmed by the mutational analyses. The orientation of bound GalNAc and methyl alpha-galactoside was similar to the galactose moiety of lactose bound to the carbohydrate-binding site of the ricin B-chain, although the ricin B-chain does not require Ca(2+) ions for carbohydrate binding. The binding of the carbohydrates induced local structural changes in carbohydrate-binding sites in subdomains 2alpha and 2beta. Binding of GalNAc also induced a slight change in the main chain structure of domain 3, which could be related to the conformational change upon binding of specific carbohydrates to induce oligomerization of the protein.

  13. The dynamics, structure, and conformational free energy of proline-containing antifreeze glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dat H; Colvin, Michael E; Yeh, Yin; Feeney, Robert E; Fink, William H

    2002-01-01

    Recent NMR studies of the solution structure of the 14-amino acid antifreeze glycoprotein AFGP-8 have concluded that the molecule lacks long-range order. The implication that an apparently unstructured molecule can still have a very precise function as a freezing inhibitor seems startling at first consideration. To gain insight into the nature of conformations and motions in AFGP-8, we have undertaken molecular dynamics simulations augmented with free energy calculations using a continuum solvation model. Starting from 10 different NMR structures, 20 ns of dynamics of AFGP were explored. The dynamics show that AFGP structure is composed of four segments, joined by very flexible pivots positioned at alanine 5, 8, and 11. The dynamics also show that the presence of prolines in this small AFGP structure facilitates the adoption of the poly-proline II structure as its overall conformation, although AFGP does adopt other conformations during the course of dynamics as well. The free energies calculated using a continuum solvation model show that the lowest free energy conformations, while being energetically equal, are drastically different in conformations. In other words, this AFGP molecule has many structurally distinct and energetically equal minima in its energy landscape. In addition, conformational, energetic, and hydrogen bond analyses suggest that the intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the N-acetyl group and the protein backbone are an important integral part of the overall stability of the AFGP molecule. The relevance of these findings to the mechanism of freezing inhibition is discussed. PMID:12023212

  14. FT-IR Spectra of Antifreeze Glycoproteins in Heavy Water and D2O Ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, N. M.; Crowe, J. H.; Feeney, R. H.; Fink, W. H.; Yeh, Yin

    2000-03-01

    This work presents FT-IR studies on the antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP)/heavy water (D2O) mixtures during freezing and melting. AFGP in the blood serum of polar fish are known to prevent ice crystal growth by a non-colligative mechanism. There are 8 known fractions of AFGP (1 8) that range in molecular mass from 33.7 to 2.6 kD respectively, each composed of alanine-alanine-threonine repeats, with a disaccharide attached to the threonine residue. The smallest peptide (AFGP-8) is structurally different from fractions 1-5 in that it contains proline substituting for alanine in certain positions. Substantial linewidth change of the D20 bending mode (ca. 1210 cm-1) was measured with solutions containing fractions 2-5 during both freezing and thawing cycles, suggesting significant coupling between protein and water molecules. At the same time, the Amide I band between 1620 and 1675 cm-1 shows that 310 helix and random coils are the main conformations of fractions 2-5 and fraction 8 in the presence of ice. In liquid state, b-sheet dominates the secondary structure of AFGP 8, whereas b-sheet and random coil are the main conformations of AFGP 2-5. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of AFGP 2-5 to affect the surface states of ice.

  15. Concentration-dependent oligomerization of an alpha-helical antifreeze polypeptide makes it hyperactive

    PubMed Central

    Mahatabuddin, Sheikh; Hanada, Yuichi; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Miura, Ai; Kondo, Hidemasa; Davies, Peter L.; Tsuda, Sakae

    2017-01-01

    A supersoluble 40-residue type I antifreeze protein (AFP) was discovered in a righteye flounder, the barfin plaice (bp). Unlike all other AFPs characterized to date, bpAFP transitions from moderately-active to hyperactive with increasing concentration. At sub-mM concentrations, bpAFP bound to pyramidal planes of ice to shape it into a bi-pyramidal hexagonal trapezohedron, similarly to the other moderately-active AFPs. At mM concentrations, bpAFP uniquely underwent further binding to the whole ice crystal surface including the basal planes. The latter caused a bursting ice crystal growth normal to c-axis, 3 °C of high thermal hysteresis, and alteration of an ice crystal into a smaller lemon-shaped morphology, all of which are well-known properties of hyperactive AFPs. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed this activity transition is associated with oligomerization to form tetramer, which might be the forerunner of a naturally occurring four-helix-bundle AFP in other flounders. PMID:28211917

  16. Novel role of the nutraceutical bioactive compound berberine in lectin-like OxLDL receptor 1-mediated endothelial dysfunction in comparison to lovastatin.

    PubMed

    Caliceti, C; Rizzo, P; Ferrari, R; Fortini, F; Aquila, G; Leoncini, E; Zambonin, L; Rizzo, B; Calabria, D; Simoni, P; Mirasoli, M; Guardigli, M; Hrelia, S; Roda, A; Cicero, A F G

    2017-06-01

    Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or pro-inflammatory stimuli lead to increased oxidative stress linked to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. The oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX1) is elevated within atheromas and cholesterol-lowering statins inhibit LOX1 expression. Berberine (BBR), an alkaloid extracted from plants of gender Berberis, has lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory activity. However, its role in regulating LOX1-mediated signaling is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of BBR on oxLDL- and TNFα-induced endothelial dysfunction in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to compare it with that of lovastatin (LOVA). Cytotoxicity was determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Antioxidant capacity was measured with chemiluminescent and fluorescent method and intracellular ROS levels through a fluorescent dye. Gene and protein expression levels were assayed by qRT-PCR and western blot, respectively. HUVECs exposure to oxLDL (30 μg/ml) or TNFα (10 ng/ml) for 24 h led to a significant increase in LOX1 expression, effect abrogated by BBR (5 μM) and LOVA (5 μM). BBR but not LOVA treatment abolished the TNFα-induced cytotoxicity and restored the activation of Akt signaling. In spite of a low direct antioxidant capacity, both compounds reduced intracellular ROS levels generated by treatment of TNFα but only BBR inhibited NOX2 expression, MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling and subsequent NF-κB target genes VCAM and ICAM expression, induced by TNFα. These findings demonstrated for the first time that BBR could prevent the oxLDL and TNFα - induced LOX1 expression and oxidative stress, key events that lead to NOX, MAPK/Erk1/2 and NF-κB activation linked to endothelial dysfunction. Berberine (PubChem CID: 2353); Lovastatin (PubChem CID: 53232). Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and

  17. The Snake Venom Rhodocytin from Calloselasma rhodostoma—A Clinically Important Toxin and a Useful Experimental Tool for Studies of C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor 2 (CLEC-2)

    PubMed Central

    Bruserud, Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    The snake venom, rhodocytin, from the Malayan viper, Calloselasma rhodostoma, and the endogenous podoplanin are identified as ligands for the C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The snakebites caused by Calloselasma rhodostoma cause a local reaction with swelling, bleeding and eventually necrosis, together with a systemic effect on blood coagulation with distant bleedings that can occur in many different organs. This clinical picture suggests that toxins in the venom have effects on endothelial cells and vessel permeability, extravasation and, possibly, activation of immunocompetent cells, as well as effects on platelets and the coagulation cascade. Based on the available biological studies, it seems likely that ligation of CLEC-2 contributes to local extravasation, inflammation and, possibly, local necrosis, due to microthrombi and ischemia, whereas other toxins may be more important for the distant hemorrhagic complications. However, the venom contains several toxins and both local, as well as distant, symptoms are probably complex reactions that cannot be explained by the effects of rhodocytin and CLEC-2 alone. The in vivo reactions to rhodocytin are thus examples of toxin-induced crosstalk between coagulation (platelets), endothelium and inflammation (immunocompetent cells). Very few studies have addressed this crosstalk as a part of the pathogenesis behind local and systemic reactions to Calloselasma rhodostoma bites. The author suggests that detailed biological studies based on an up-to-date methodology of local and systemic reactions to Calloselasma rhodostoma bites should be used as a hypothesis-generating basis for future functional studies of the CLEC-2 receptor. It will not be possible to study the effects of purified toxins in humans, but the development of animal models (e.g., cutaneous injections of rhodocytin to mimic snakebites) would supplement studies in humans. PMID:23594438

  18. The Activating C-type Lectin-like Receptor NKp65 Signals through a Hemi-immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motif (hemITAM) and Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Björn; Wotapek, Tanja; Zöller, Tobias; Rutkowski, Emilia; Steinle, Alexander

    2017-02-24

    NKp65 is an activating human C-type lectin-like receptor (CTLR) triggering cellular cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion upon high-affinity interaction with the cognate CTLR keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin (KACL) selectively expressed by human keratinocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that NKp65-mediated cellular cytotoxicity depends on tyrosine 7, located in a cytoplasmic sequence motif of NKp65 resembling a hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). HemITAMs have been reported for a few activating myeloid-specific CTLRs, including Dectin-1 and CLEC-2, and consist of a single tyrosine signaling unit preceded by a triacidic motif. Upon receptor engagement, the hemITAM undergoes phosphotyrosinylation and specifically recruits spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), initiating cellular activation. In this study, we addressed the functionality of the putative hemITAM of NKp65. We show that NKp65 forms homodimers and is phosphorylated at the hemITAM-embedded tyrosine 7 upon engagement by antibodies or KACL homodimers. HemITAM phosphotyrosinylation initiates a signaling pathway involving and depending on Syk, leading to cellular activation and natural killer (NK) cell degranulation. However, although NKp65 utilizes Syk for NK cell activation, a physical association of Syk with the NKp65 hemITAM could not be detected, unlike shown previously for the hemITAM of myeloid CTLR. Failure of NKp65 to recruit Syk is not due to an alteration of the triacidic motif, which rather affects the efficiency of hemITAM phosphotyrosinylation. In summary, NKp65 utilizes a hemITAM-like motif for cellular activation that requires Syk, although Syk appears not to be recruited to NKp65.

  19. Cyclic tensile stretch load and oxidized low density lipoprotein synergistically induce lectin-like oxidized ldl receptor-1 in cultured bovine chondrocytes, resulting in decreased cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Masao; Nishimura, Shunji; Yoshida, Kohji; Kakinuma, Takumi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Munakata, Hiroshi; Hamanishi, Chiaki

    2006-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation is known to be an essential factor in the regulation of cartilage metabolism. We tested the hypothesis that expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) can be modulated by cyclic tensile stretch load in chondrocytes. Cyclic loading of repeated stretch stress at 10 cycles per minute with 10 kPa of stress for 6 h induced expression of LOX-1 to 2.6 times control in cultured bovine articular chondrocytes, equivalent to the addition of 10 microg/mL oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) (2.4 times control). Application of the cyclic load to the chondrocytes along with 10 microg/mL ox-LDL resulted in synergistically increased LOX-1 expression to 6.3 times control. Individual application of cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL significantly suppressed chondrocytes viability (84.6% +/- 3.4% and 80.9% +/- 3.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; n = 3; p < 0.05) and proteoglycan synthesis [81.0% +/- 7.1% and 85.7% +/- 5.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; p < 0.05 when compared with 94.6% +/- 4.6% for native-LDL (n = 3)]. Cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL synergistically affected cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis, which were significantly suppressed to 45.6% +/- 4.9% and 48.7% +/- 6.7% of control at 24 h, respectively (n = 3; p < 0.01 when compared with individual application of cyclic loading or 10 microg/mL ox-LDL). In this study, we demonstrated synergistic effects of cyclic tensile stretch load and ox-LDL on cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes, which may be mediated through enhanced expression of LOX-1 and which has important implications in the progression of cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis.

  20. Comparison of the solution conformation and dynamics of antifreeze glycoproteins from Antarctic fish.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, A N; Hays, L M; Tsvetkova, N; Feeney, R E; Crowe, L M; Crowe, J H

    2000-01-01

    The (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra of antifreeze glycoprotein fractions 1-5 from Antarctic cod have been assigned, and the dynamics have been measured using (13)C relaxation at two temperatures. The chemical shifts and absence of non-sequential (1)H-(1)H NOEs are inconsistent with a folded, compact structure. (13)C relaxation measurements show that the protein has no significant long-range order, and that the local correlation times are adequately described by a random coil model. Hydroxyl protons of the sugar residues were observed at low temperature, and the presence of exchange-mediated ROEs to the sugar indicate extensive hydration. The conformational properties of AFGP1-5 are compared with those of the previously examined 14-mer analog AFGP8, which contains proline residues in place of some alanine residues (Lane, A. N., L. M. Hays, R. E. Feeney, L. M. Crowe, and J. H. Crowe. 1998. Protein Sci. 7:1555-1563). The infrared (IR) spectra of AFGP8 and AFGP1-5 in the amide I region are quite different. The presence of a wide distribution of backbone torsion angles in AFGP1-5 leads to a rich spectrum of frequencies in the IR spectrum, as interconversion among conformational states is slow on the IR frequency time scale. However, these transitions are fast on the NMR chemical shift time scales. The restricted motions for AFGP8 may imply a narrower distribution of possible o, psi angles, as is observed in the IR spectrum. This has significance for attempts to quantify secondary structures of proteins by IR in the presence of extensive loops. PMID:10827996

  1. Antifreeze acceptability for ground-coupled heat pump ground loops in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Den Braven, K.R.

    1998-10-01

    When designing and installing closed-loop ground-coupled heat pumps systems, it is necessary to be aware of applicable environmental regulations. Within the United States, nearly half of the states have regulations specifying or restricting the use of particular antifreezes or other fluids within the ground loop of a ground-coupled heat pump system. A number of other states have regulations pending. While all of these regulations are based on the need to preserve groundwater and/or aquifer quality, the list of acceptable antifreezes varies among those states with specified fluids. Typical antifreezes in use include ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, brines, alcohols, and potassium acetate. Each of these has its benefits and drawbacks. The status of the regulations has been determined for all of the states. An overview of the regulations is presented in this paper, along with a summary of the states` concerns.

  2. Nonequilibrium antifreeze peptides and the recrystallization of ice.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; Wen, D; Laursen, R A

    1995-02-01

    Evidence is presented that the nonequilibrium antifreeze peptide (AFP) from winter flounder has a special ability to inhibit recrystallization in ice only when an appreciable amount of liquid is present, as is the case when the system contains salts and the temperature is not too low. In this circumstance the AFP binds to the ice surface at the ice-solution interfaces in grain boundaries, preventing migration of the solution and effectively immobilizing the boundaries. In the absence of liquid, recrystallization inhibition appears to be a common property of many peptides. This is consistent with the view that the special effects of AFPs require a structural fit onto ice, and therefore require the AFP molecules to have the mobility to achieve that fit. Since the concentration of salt required to induce the special recrystallization inhibition effects of AFPs is lower (< 10 mM) than that found normally in physiological fluids, AFPs could play a role in the survival of organisms by preventing damage due to recrystallization. The proposition that mobility is needed for AFP molecules to produce their special influence upon ice growth argues against any special effects of AFPs in devitrification.

  3. Evidence for a gamma-turn motif in antifreeze glycopeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, J A; Rowlen, K L

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the secondary structure of antifreeze peptides (AFPs) and glycopeptides (AFGPs) is crucial to understanding the mechanism by which these molecules inhibit ice crystal growth. A polyproline type II helix is perhaps the most widely accepted conformation for active AFGPs; however, random coil and alpha-helix conformations have also been proposed. In this report we present vibrational spectroscopic evidence that the conformation of AFGPs in solution is not random, not alpha-helical, and not polyproline type II. Comparison of AFGP amide vibrational frequencies with those observed and calculated for beta and gamma-turns in other peptides strongly suggests that AFGPs contain substantial turn structure. Computer-generated molecular models were utilized to compare gamma-turn, beta-turn, and polyproline II structures. The gamma-turn motif is consistent with observed amide frequencies and results in a molecule with planar symmetry with respect to the disaccharides. This intriguing conformation may provide new insight into the unusual properties of AFGPs. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8241413

  4. Safe antifreeze: The real difference between ethylene glycol and propylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, T.K.

    1995-04-01

    Antifreeze-coolants are added to the radiators of internal combustion engines to prevent freezing during the winter and boil-over during the summer. Although ethylene glycol is the most commonly used coolant, products containing propylene glycol have been used--at least, experimentally--for years. Both substances have similar characteristics; however, some manufacturers claim that antifreeze-coolants containing propylene glycol are more environmentally friendly and safer to humans and animals than ethylene glycol products. This article examines these two substances, and addresses the similarities and differences of their physical and chemical compounds, thereby enabling users to determine whether such claims are valid or merely advertising hyperbole.

  5. Heterologous expression of type I antifreeze peptide GS-5 in baker's yeast increases freeze tolerance and provides enhanced gas production in frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Panadero, Joaquin; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Prieto, Jose Antonio

    2005-12-28

    The demand for frozen-dough products has increased notably in the baking industry. Nowadays, no appropriate industrial baker's yeast with optimal gassing capacity in frozen dough is, however, available, and it is unlikely that classical breeding programs could provide significant improvements of this trait. Antifreeze proteins, found in diverse organisms, display the ability to inhibit the growth of ice, allowing them to survive at temperatures below 0 degrees C. In this study a recombinant antifreeze peptide GS-5 was expressed from the polar fish grubby sculpin (Myoxocephalus aenaeus) in laboratory and industrial baker's yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Production of the recombinant protein increased freezing tolerance in both strains tested. Furthermore, expression of the GS-5 encoding gene enhanced notably the gassing rate and total gas production in frozen and frozen sweet doughs. These effects are unlikely to be due to reduced osmotic damage during freezing/thawing, because recombinant cells showed growth behavior similar to that of the parent under hypermosmotic stress conditions.

  6. Effect of Antifreeze Peptide Pretreatment on Ice Crystal Size, Drip Loss, Texture, and Volatile Compounds of Frozen Carrots.

    PubMed

    Kong, Charles H Z; Hamid, Nazimah; Liu, Tingting; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi

    2016-06-01

    Ice crystal formation is of primary concern to the frozen food industry. In this study, the effects of antifreeze peptides (AFPs) on ice crystal formation were assessed in carrot during freezing and thawing. Three synthetic analogues based on naturally occurring antifreeze peptides were used in this study. The AFPs exhibited modification of ice crystal morphology, confirming their antifreeze activity in vitro. The ability of the synthetic AFPs to minimize drip loss and preserve color, structure, texture, and volatiles of frozen carrot was evaluated using the techniques of SEM, GC-MS, and texture analysis. The results prove the potential of these AFPs to preserve the above characteristics in frozen carrot samples.

  7. Adsorption of alpha-helical antifreeze peptides on specific ice crystal surface planes.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; Cheng, C C; DeVries, A L

    1991-02-01

    The noncolligative peptide and glycopeptide antifreezes found in some cold-water fish act by binding to the ice surface and preventing crystal growth, not by altering the equilibrium freezing point of the water. A simple crystal growth and etching technique allows determination of the crystallographic planes where the binding occurs. In the case of elongated molecules, such as the alpha-helical peptides in this report, it also allows a deduction of the molecular alignment on the ice surface. The structurally similar antifreeze peptides from winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) and Alaskan plaice (Pleuronectes quadritaberulatus) adsorb onto the (2021) pyramidal planes of ice, whereas the sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) peptide adsorbs on (2110), the secondary prism planes. All three are probably aligned along (0112). These antifreeze peptides have 11-amino acid sequence repeats ending with a polar residue, and each repeat constitutes a distance of 16.5 A along the helix, which nearly matches the 16.7 A repeat spacing along (0112) in ice. This structural match is undoubtedly important, but the mechanism of binding is not yet clear. The suggested mechanism of growth inhibition operates through the influence of local surface curvature upon melting point and results in complete inhibition of the crystal growth even though individual antifreeze molecules bind at only one interface orientation.

  8. Adsorption of alpha-helical antifreeze peptides on specific ice crystal surface planes.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, C A; Cheng, C C; DeVries, A L

    1991-01-01

    The noncolligative peptide and glycopeptide antifreezes found in some cold-water fish act by binding to the ice surface and preventing crystal growth, not by altering the equilibrium freezing point of the water. A simple crystal growth and etching technique allows determination of the crystallographic planes where the binding occurs. In the case of elongated molecules, such as the alpha-helical peptides in this report, it also allows a deduction of the molecular alignment on the ice surface. The structurally similar antifreeze peptides from winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) and Alaskan plaice (Pleuronectes quadritaberulatus) adsorb onto the (2021) pyramidal planes of ice, whereas the sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) peptide adsorbs on (2110), the secondary prism planes. All three are probably aligned along (0112). These antifreeze peptides have 11-amino acid sequence repeats ending with a polar residue, and each repeat constitutes a distance of 16.5 A along the helix, which nearly matches the 16.7 A repeat spacing along (0112) in ice. This structural match is undoubtedly important, but the mechanism of binding is not yet clear. The suggested mechanism of growth inhibition operates through the influence of local surface curvature upon melting point and results in complete inhibition of the crystal growth even though individual antifreeze molecules bind at only one interface orientation. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2009357

  9. Ice Growth Inhibition in Antifreeze Polypeptide Solution by Short-Time Solution Preheating

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Naoto; Miyamoto, Takuya; Waku, Tomonori; Tanaka, Naoki; Hagiwara, Yoshimichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to enhance the inhibition of ice growth in the aqueous solution of a polypeptide, which is inspired by winter flounder antifreeze protein. We carried out measurements on unidirectional freezing of the polypeptide solution. The thickness of the solution was 0.02 mm, and the concentration of polypeptide was varied from 0 to 2 mg/mL. We captured successive microscopic images of ice/solution interfaces, and measured the interface velocity from the locations of tips of the pectinate interface in the images. We also simultaneously measured the temperature by using a small thermocouple. The ice/solution interface temperature was defined by the temperature at the tips. It was found that the interface temperature was decreased with an increasing concentration of polypeptide. To try varying the activity of the polypeptide, we preheated the polypeptide solution and cooled it before carrying out the measurements. Preheating for 1–5 hours was found to cause a further decrease in the interface temperature. Furthermore, wider regions of solution and ice with inclined interfaces in the pectinate interface structure were observed, compared with the case where the solution was not preheated. Thus, the ice growth inhibition was enhanced by this preheating. To investigate the reason for this enhancement, we measured the conformation and aggregates of polypeptide in the solution. We also measured the local concentration of polypeptide. It was found that the polypeptide aggregates became larger as a result of preheating, although the polypeptide conformation was unchanged. These large aggregates caused both adsorption to the interface and the wide regions of supercooled solution in the pectinate interface structure. PMID:27152720

  10. Ice Growth Inhibition in Antifreeze Polypeptide Solution by Short-Time Solution Preheating.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Naoto; Miyamoto, Takuya; Waku, Tomonori; Tanaka, Naoki; Hagiwara, Yoshimichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to enhance the inhibition of ice growth in the aqueous solution of a polypeptide, which is inspired by winter flounder antifreeze protein. We carried out measurements on unidirectional freezing of the polypeptide solution. The thickness of the solution was 0.02 mm, and the concentration of polypeptide was varied from 0 to 2 mg/mL. We captured successive microscopic images of ice/solution interfaces, and measured the interface velocity from the locations of tips of the pectinate interface in the images. We also simultaneously measured the temperature by using a small thermocouple. The ice/solution interface temperature was defined by the temperature at the tips. It was found that the interface temperature was decreased with an increasing concentration of polypeptide. To try varying the activity of the polypeptide, we preheated the polypeptide solution and cooled it before carrying out the measurements. Preheating for 1-5 hours was found to cause a further decrease in the interface temperature. Furthermore, wider regions of solution and ice with inclined interfaces in the pectinate interface structure were observed, compared with the case where the solution was not preheated. Thus, the ice growth inhibition was enhanced by this preheating. To investigate the reason for this enhancement, we measured the conformation and aggregates of polypeptide in the solution. We also measured the local concentration of polypeptide. It was found that the polypeptide aggregates became larger as a result of preheating, although the polypeptide conformation was unchanged. These large aggregates caused both adsorption to the interface and the wide regions of supercooled solution in the pectinate interface structure.

  11. Insect-attracting and antimicrobial properties of antifreeze for monitoring insect pests and natural enemies in stored corn.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xinzhi; Gunawan, Gunawati; Brown, Steve L; Sumner, Paul E; Ruberson, John R; Buntin, G David; Holbrook, C Corley; Lee, R Dewey; Streett, Douglas A; Throne, James E; Campbell, James F

    2008-04-01

    Insect infestations in stored grain cause extensive damage worldwide. Storage insect pests, including the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae); Sitophilus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); and their natural enemies [e.g., Cephalonomia tarsalis (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae), and Anisopteromalus calandrae (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)] inhabit a temporary, but stable ecosystem with constant environmental conditions. The objective of the present experiment was to assess the efficacy of using ethylene glycol antifreeze in combination with nutrient solutions to monitor storage insect pest and natural enemy populations in three bins of corn, Zea mays L. The treatments were deionized water, a diluted (1:5 antifreeze:water) antifreeze solution, 10% honey, 10% honey in the diluted antifreeze solution, 10% beer in the diluted antifreeze solution, 10% sucrose in the diluted antifreeze solution, and a commercial pheromone trap suspended in a 3.8-liter container filled with 300-ml of diluted antifreeze solution. The seven treatments captured storage insect pests and their natural enemies in the bins at 33-36 degrees C and 51-55% RH. The pheromone trap in the container with the diluted antifreeze captured significantly more P. interpunctella than the other treatments, but a lower percentage (7.6%) of these captures were females compared with the rest of the treatments (> 40% females). All trapping solutions also captured Sitophilus spp. and other beetle species, but the captures of the coleopteran pests were not significantly different among the seven treatments (P > 0.05). Two parasitoid wasps also were captured in the study. The number of A. calandrae was different among the seven treatments (P < 0.05), whereas the number of C. tarsalis was not different among the treatments (P > 0.05). Most A. calandrae adults were captured by the 10% honey in the diluted antifreeze, whereas the fewest were captured in the deionized water

  12. Oscillations and accelerations of ice crystal growth rates in microgravity in presence of antifreeze glycoprotein impurity in supercooled water

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Yoshinori; Nagashima, Ken; Nakatsubo, Shun-ichi; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tamaru, Haruka; Shimaoka, Taro; Sone, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Zepeda, Salvador; Terasawa, Takanori; Asakawa, Harutoshi; Murata, Ken-ichiro; Sazaki, Gen

    2017-01-01

    The free growth of ice crystals in supercooled bulk water containing an impurity of glycoprotein, a bio-macromolecule that functions as ‘antifreeze’ in living organisms in a subzero environment, was observed under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station. We observed the acceleration and oscillation of the normal growth rates as a result of the interfacial adsorption of these protein molecules, which is a newly discovered impurity effect for crystal growth. As the convection caused by gravity may mitigate or modify this effect, secure observations of this effect were first made possible by continuous measurements of normal growth rates under long-term microgravity condition realized only in the spacecraft. Our findings will lead to a better understanding of a novel kinetic process for growth oscillation in relation to growth promotion due to the adsorption of protein molecules and will shed light on the role that crystal growth kinetics has in the onset of the mysterious antifreeze effect in living organisms, namely, how this protein may prevent fish freezing. PMID:28262787

  13. Oscillations and accelerations of ice crystal growth rates in microgravity in presence of antifreeze glycoprotein impurity in supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshinori; Nagashima, Ken; Nakatsubo, Shun-Ichi; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tamaru, Haruka; Shimaoka, Taro; Sone, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Zepeda, Salvador; Terasawa, Takanori; Asakawa, Harutoshi; Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Sazaki, Gen

    2017-03-01

    The free growth of ice crystals in supercooled bulk water containing an impurity of glycoprotein, a bio-macromolecule that functions as ‘antifreeze’ in living organisms in a subzero environment, was observed under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station. We observed the acceleration and oscillation of the normal growth rates as a result of the interfacial adsorption of these protein molecules, which is a newly discovered impurity effect for crystal growth. As the convection caused by gravity may mitigate or modify this effect, secure observations of this effect were first made possible by continuous measurements of normal growth rates under long-term microgravity condition realized only in the spacecraft. Our findings will lead to a better understanding of a novel kinetic process for growth oscillation in relation to growth promotion due to the adsorption of protein molecules and will shed light on the role that crystal growth kinetics has in the onset of the mysterious antifreeze effect in living organisms, namely, how this protein may prevent fish freezing.

  14. Evaluation of anti-freeze viscosity modifier for potential external tank applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, R. O. L.

    1981-01-01

    Viscosity modifiers and gelling agents were evaluated in combination with ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide water eutectics. Pectin and agarose are found to gel these eutectics effectively in low concentration, but the anti-freeze protection afforded by these compositions is found to be marginal in simulations of the intended applications. Oxygen vent shutters and vertical metallic surfaces were simulated, with water supplied as a spray, dropwise, and by condensation from the air.

  15. Antifreeze Production and Cold-Tolerance in Overwintering Purple Martin Fleas, Ceratophyllus idius Jordan and Rothschild.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    survival. Can. Entomol. 110: 1167- 1205. Duman, J.G. 1977a. The role of macromolecular antifreeze in the darkling beetle , Meracantha contracta. J. Comp...Physiol. 115: 279-286. Duman, J.G. 1977b. Variations in macromolecular anti- freeze levels in larvae of the darkling beetle , Meracantha contracta. J...1967; Zachariassen and PAsche 1976). Another process has been suggested for cold-hardened Rhagium inquistor, a freeze-sensitive beetle . This insect

  16. Protein-carbohydrate interactions between Lactobacillus salivarius and pig mucins.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez-Palomares, C; Jiménez-Flores, R; Vázquez-Moreno, L; Ramos-Clamont-Montfort, G; Acedo-Félix, E

    2011-10-01

    Adherence to the gastrointestinal tract is a key element desirable for many of the proposed beneficial health effects of probiotic bacteria. The aims of this study were to determine the amounts of adhesion of 3 Lactobacillus salivarius strains (Lb6, Lb9, and Lb10) to porcine small intestinal mucins and to determine whether adhesion is a function of lectin-like activities. Dot and Western blot assays were performed to investigate bacterial adhesion. Several carbohydrates and glycoproteins were evaluated to determine whether they interfered with adhesion of the Lactobacillus strains to intestinal mucins and to determine whether they had lectin-like activities. The Lb9 and Lb10 strains had greater association with piglet mucins than did those from 22- to 24-wk-old finishing pigs (P = 0.021 and 0.037, respectively), whereas the Lb6 strain adhered to both (P = 0.138). Western blot assays showed that bacterial adhesion detected piglet mucosa from the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. In finishing pigs, the adhesion was variable throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Galactose and mannose diminished the interaction of the Lb9 and Lb10 strains in intestinal mucosa (P = 0.028 and 0.026, respectively), whereas pig gastric mucin reduced the adhesion of the Lb6 strain (P = 0.013). Adhesion of the Lb9 and Lb10 strains to intestinal mucosa was less after protease treatment (P = 0.023 and 0.018, respectively), which indicates that proteins are needed for the Lb9 and Lb10 strains to recognize mucin. The Lb6 strain also demonstrated diminished adhesion after periodate treatment (P = 0.038). From these results, we suggest that the nature of the bacterial lectin-like substance is a surface protein that loosely binds to the bacterial cell surface. All the tested strains adhered to specific targets in the small intestinal mucosa of piglets, and the bacteria had lectin-like proteins involved in this adhesion.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of natural and modified antifreeze glycopeptides: glycosylated foldamers.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Lilly; Plattner, Carolin; Budke, Carsten; Majer, Zsuzsanna; DeVries, Arthur L; Berkemeier, Thomas; Koop, Thomas; Sewald, Norbert

    2011-08-01

    In Arctic and Antarctic marine regions, where the temperature declines below the colligative freezing point of physiological fluids, efficient biological antifreeze agents are crucial for the survival of polar fish. One group of such agents is classified as antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) that usually consist of a varying number (n = 4-55) of [AAT]( n )-repeating units. The threonine side chain of each unit is glycosidically linked to β-D: -galactosyl-(1 → 3)-α-N-acetyl-D: -galactosamine. These biopolymers can be considered as biological antifreeze foldamers. A preparative route for stepwise synthesis of AFGP allows for efficient synthesis. The diglycosylated threonine building block was introduced into the peptide using microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. By this versatile solid phase approach, glycosylated peptides of varying sequences and lengths could be obtained. Conformational studies of the synthetic AFGP analogs were performed by circular dichroism experiments (CD). Furthermore, the foldamers were analysed microphysically according to their inhibiting effect on ice recrystallization and influence on the crystal habit.

  18. Solution Structures, Dynamics, and Ice Growth Inhibitory Activity of Peptide Fragments Derived from an Antarctic Yeast Protein

    PubMed Central

    Asmawi, Azren A.; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A.; Murad, Abdul Munir A.; Mahadi, Nor M.; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A.; Salleh, Abu B.; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A.; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities. PMID:23209600

  19. 47 CRYOPRESERVATION OF BOVINE GERM CELL USING ANTIFREEZE POLYAMINO-ACID (CARBOXYLATED POLY-L-LYSINE).

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, T; Kubota, C; Ando, T; Imamura, S; Tokumaru, M; Yamakuchi, H; Gen, Y; Hyon, S-H

    2016-01-01

    Carboxylated poly-l-lysine (CPLL) is an ampholytic polymer compound, and it is obtained by converting 65% amino groups to carboxyl groups after synthesising ε-poly-l-lysine aqueous solution and succinic anhydride. CPLL has cryoprotective property similar to antifreeze protein, and addition of CPLL into cryopreservation medium improves the post-thaw survival rate of cells and embryos. In this research, we examined the effectiveness of CPLL as a bovine germ cell cryoprotective material. In experiment 1 (in sperm), the conventional cryopreservation medium used for control group was consisted of 6.5% (vol/vol) glycerin, and the cryopreservation medium used for CPLL group was consisted of 3.25% (vol/vol) glycerin and 0.5% CPLL (wt/vol). The post-thaw survival and motility were assessed by using Sperm Motility Analysis System (DITECT Corp., Tokyo, Japan). There was no significant difference for post-thaw survival rate and motility (control v. CPLL; 98.8% v. 96.6% and 69.7% v. 62.2%, respectively). Artificial insemination was carried out in 65 cows (control v. CPLL; 34v. 31), and the conception rate of the CPLL group was higher than that of the control group (80.6% v. 67.6%; P=0.23). In experiment 2 (embryos), the conventional cryopreservation medium used for control group was consisted of 5% (vol/vol) ethylene glycol and 6% (vol/vol) propylene glycol in PBS. In the CPLL group, 7% (wt/vol) CPLL was added to the conventional medium. In vitro fertilization embryos were cryopreserved at Day 7 and Day 8. There was no significant difference in survival rate at 0, 24, and 48h and hatched rate until 72h after thawing (control v. CPLL: 93.6% v. 93.2%, 69.0% v. 64.7%, 56.1% v. 56.3%, 12.9% v. 10.2%, respectively). Embryos obtained by superovulation treatment and in vivo fertilization at Day 7 were cryopreserved using above 2 media, and transferred non-surgically into synchronized recipient cows (1 embryo per animal). Embryo transfer (ET) was carried out in 81 cows (control v

  20. The microbubble mediated surface probe and the ice-antifreeze glycoprotein solution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesenka, J. P.; Feeney, R. E.; Yeh, Y.

    1993-05-01

    Microbubble growth and its apparent "shrinkage" during the transient approach to steady-state crystal growth have been monitored by dynamic light scattering in the region immediately ahead of ice crystals growing into aqueous solutions containing dilute concentrations of macromolecules. This interfacial bubble growth occurs in the presence of a solution of globular macromolecules, and is independent of the crystal growth direction. In contrast, bubble growth becomes crystal-facet dependent when the solution contains a biological antifreeze molecule, the antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP-4). This solution elicited an immediate, 100 x increase in bubble size above the prismatic surface of ice, followed by a gradual decrease in the averaged bubble size concomitant with a large increase in the size polydispersity. Furthermore, when the steady-state crystal growth condition is reached (in approximately one hour), the average bubble size was still ˜ 80x the size of those found in the pure ice-water system. However, when the same solution is above the basal facet, after the steady-state growth condition is attained, the microbubble diameter is unchanged from that found in the pure ice-water system. The difference in microbubble growth in the vicinity of the dynamic ice-solution interface between solutions of AFGP-4 samples and that of other molecules suggests facet-specific affinity of AFGP by ice, a condition necessary for facet-specific crystal growth inhibition.

  1. Assessment of antifreeze solutions for ground-source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, E.W.; Tapscott, R.E.; Wildin, M.W.; Beall, A.N.

    1997-12-31

    This paper assesses the risks of using six different fluids (methanol, ethanol, aqueous potassium acetate, propylene glycol, aqueous calcium magnesium acetate, and aqueous urea) as antifreezes in ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems. Areas assessed included fire hazard; corrosion and leakage; health hazard; environmental; detailed heat pump system analysis, resulting in predictions of annual energy use, life-cycle cost, and power plant emissions; and regulatory risk to future use. For each area, each antifreeze was rated as having either significant potential for problems, minor potential for problems, or little or no potential for problems. Propylene glycol had low risk in all areas, despite having higher energy use; potassium acetate, calcium magnesium acetate, and urea had low to medium risk in all areas except leakage, which was high for all three fluids, and corrosion, which was high for urea; ethanol and methanol had high fire risk in their pure forms (but low risk in diluted form) and corrosion problems with iron compounds. In addition, ethanol had high environmental and health risks.

  2. Numerical prediction of micro-channel LD heat sink operated with antifreeze based on CFD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Gang; Tang, Xiaojun

    2014-12-01

    To theoretically study the feasibility of antifreeze coolants applied as cooling fluids for high power LD heat sink, detailed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of liquid cooled micro-channels heat sinks is presented. The performance operated with antifreeze coolant (ethylene glycol aqueous solution) compared with pure water are numerical calculated for the heat sinks with the same micro-channels structures. The maximum thermal resistance, total pressure loss (flow resistance), thermal resistance vs. flow-rate, and pressure loss vs. flow-rate etc. characteristics are numerical calculated. The results indicate that the type and temperature of coolants plays an important role on the performance of heat sinks. The whole thermal resistance and pressure loss of heat sinks increase significantly with antifreeze coolants compared with pure water mainly due to its relatively lower thermal conductivity and higher fluid viscosity. The thermal resistance and pressure loss are functions of the flow rate and operation temperature. Increasing of the coolant flow rate can reduce the thermal resistance of heat sinks; meanwhile increase the pressure loss significantly. The thermal resistance tends to a limit with increasing flow rate, while the pressure loss tends to increase exponentially with increasing flow rate. Low operation temperature chiefly increases the pressure loss rather than thermal resistance due to the remarkable increasing of fluid viscosity. The actual working point of the cooling circulation system can be determined on the basis of the pressure drop vs. flow rate curve for the micro-channel heat sink and that for the circulation system. In the same system, if the type or/and temperature of the coolant is changed, the working point is accordingly influenced, that is, working flow rate and pressure is changed simultaneously, due to which the heat sink performance is influenced. According to the numerical simulation results, if ethylene glycol aqueous

  3. Nanomaterials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of anti-freeze coolants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiping; Zheng, Yingsong; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water/50% anti-freeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water/50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g., NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants.

  4. Assessing the ability of a short fluorinated antifreeze glycopeptide and a fluorinated carbohydrate derivative to inhibit ice recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Chaytor, Jennifer L; Ben, Robert N

    2010-09-01

    A short fluorinated antifreeze glycopeptide (2) was synthesized and evaluated for ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. The activity of 2 was compared to native biological antifreeze AFGP 8 and a rationally designed C-linked AFGP analogue (OGG-Gal, 1). In addition, a simple fluorinated galactose derivative was prepared and its IRI activity was compared to non-fluorinated compounds. The results from this study suggest that the stereochemistry at the anomeric position in the carbohydrate plays a role in imparting ice recrystallization inhibition activity and that incorporation of hydrophobic groups such as fluorine atoms cause a decrease in IRI activity. These observations are consistent with the theory that fluorine atoms increase ordering of bulk water resulting in a decrease of IRI activity, supporting our previously proposed mechanism of ice recrystallization inhibition.

  5. Characterization and cloning of a Tenebrio molitor hemolymph protein with sequence similarity to insect odorant-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Graham, L A; Tang, W; Baust, J G; Liou, Y C; Reid, T S; Davies, P L

    2001-04-27

    The yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, produces a number of moderately abundant low molecular weight hemolymph proteins ( approximately 12 kDa) which behave in a similar manner during purification and share antigenic epitopes. The cDNA sequence of the major component (THP12) was determined and the deduced protein sequence was found to be similar to those of insect odorant-binding proteins. Southern blot analysis suggests that at least some of the diversity in this family of proteins is encoded at the gene level. Both northern and western blot analysis indicate that THP12 is present in a variety of developmental stages and both sexes. THP12 was originally classified as an antifreeze protein, but the lack of antifreeze activity in the recombinant protein, as well as the clear separation of the antifreeze activity from THP12 following HPLC purification, has ruled out this function. The abundance of THP12, the similarity of THP12 to insect odorant-binding proteins, and the presence of hydrophobic cavities inside the protein (Rothemund et al., A new class of hexahelical insect proteins revealed as putative carriers of small hydrophobic ligands. Structure, 7 (1999) 1325-1332.) suggest that THP12 may function to carry non-water soluble compounds in the hemolymph. THP12 is also similar, particularly in structurally important regions, to other insect proteins from non-sensory tissues, suggesting the existence of a large family of carrier proteins which may perform diverse functions throughout the insect.

  6. Gliadins bind to reticulin in a lectin-like manner.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, D J; Leonard, J N; Hobday, C M; Griffiths, C E; Powles, A V; Haffenden, G P; Fry, L

    1987-01-01

    It has previously been reported that gliadins bind to reticulin in tissue sections. Three lines of evidence are reported in this study which indicate that the gliadins bind to reticulins because they are lectins which bind to sugars expressed on glycoproteins in reticulin and other sites. First, immunofluorescence studies on tissue sections showed that although gliadin binding is largely confined to areas rich in reticulin, it is, nonetheless, also seen in one or two other sites devoid of reticulin. Second, by using fluorescein-labelled lectins of known specificity, it has been shown that the areas to which gliadins bind in tissue sections (including those sites devoid of reticulin) are rich in particular sugars. Third, it has been shown that one of these sugars, alpha-D-mannose, partially inhibited gliadin binding to tissue sections.

  7. Ancient climate change, antifreeze, and the evolutionary diversification of Antarctic fishes.

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Dornburg, Alex; Kuhn, Kristen L; Eastman, Joseph T; Pennington, Jillian N; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo; Fernández, Daniel A; Jones, Christopher D

    2012-02-28

    The Southern Ocean around Antarctica is among the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, but has experienced episodic climate change during the past 40 million years. It remains unclear how ancient periods of climate change have shaped Antarctic biodiversity. The origin of antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) in Antarctic notothenioid fishes has become a classic example of how the evolution of a key innovation in response to climate change can drive adaptive radiation. By using a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of notothenioids and reconstructed paleoclimate, we demonstrate that the origin of AFGP occurred between 42 and 22 Ma, which includes a period of global cooling approximately 35 Ma. However, the most species-rich lineages diversified and evolved significant ecological differences at least 10 million years after the origin of AFGPs, during a second cooling event in the Late Miocene (11.6-5.3 Ma). This pattern indicates that AFGP was not the sole trigger of the notothenioid adaptive radiation. Instead, the bulk of the species richness and ecological diversity originated during the Late Miocene and into the Early Pliocene, a time coincident with the origin of polar conditions and increased ice activity in the Southern Ocean. Our results challenge the current understanding of the evolution of Antarctic notothenioids suggesting that the ecological opportunity that underlies this adaptive radiation is not linked to a single trait, but rather to a combination of freeze avoidance offered by AFGPs and subsequent exploitation of new habitats and open niches created by increased glacial and ice sheet activity.

  8. Computational study on the antifreeze glycoproteins as inhibitors of clathrate-hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Armando; Romero-Martínez, Ascención; Galano, Annia

    2008-08-04

    The ability of antifreeze glycoproteins to inhibit clathrate-hydrate formation is studied using DFT. A 5(12) cavity, dodecahedral (H(2)O)(20), and the AATA peptide are used to model the inhibitor-clathrate interaction. The presence of AATA in the vicinity of the water cavities not only leads to the formation of complexes, with different peptide/cavity ratios, but also to the deformation of the cavity and to the elongation of several of the hydrogen bonds responsible for keeping the dodecahedral (H(2)O)(20) together. The complexes are formed through hydrogen bonding between the peptides and the water cavities. The glycoproteins are expected to anchor onto the clathrate surface, blocking the access of new water molecules and preventing the incipient crystals from growing. They are also expected to weaken the clathrate structure. Amide IR bands are associated with the complexes' formation. They are significantly red-shifted in the hydrogen-bonded systems compared to isolated AATA. The amide A band is the most sensitive to hydrogen bonding. In addition a distinctive band around 3100 cm(-1) is proposed for the identification of clathrate-peptide hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  9. Inhibition of ice recrystallization and cryoprotective activity of wheat proteins in liver and pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chow-Shi-Yée, Mélanie; Briard, Jennie G; Grondin, Mélanie; Averill-Bates, Diana A; Ben, Robert N; Ouellet, François

    2016-05-01

    Efficient cryopreservation of cells at ultralow temperatures requires the use of substances that help maintain viability and metabolic functions post-thaw. We are developing new technology where plant proteins are used to substitute the commonly-used, but relatively toxic chemical dimethyl sulfoxide. Recombinant forms of four structurally diverse wheat proteins, TaIRI-2 (ice recrystallization inhibition), TaBAS1 (2-Cys peroxiredoxin), WCS120 (dehydrin), and TaENO (enolase) can efficiently cryopreserve hepatocytes and insulin-secreting INS832/13 cells. This study shows that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are internalized during the freeze-thaw process, while TaBAS1 and WCS120 remain at the extracellular level. Possible antifreeze activity of the four proteins was assessed. The "splat cooling" method for quantifying ice recrystallization inhibition activity (a property that characterizes antifreeze proteins) revealed that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are more potent than TaBAS1 and WCS120. Because of their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization, the wheat recombinant proteins TaIRI-2 and TaENO are promising candidates and could prove useful to improve cryopreservation protocols for hepatocytes and insulin-secreting cells, and possibly other cell types. TaENO does not have typical ice-binding domains, and the TargetFreeze tool did not predict an antifreeze capacity, suggesting the existence of nontypical antifreeze domains. The fact that TaBAS1 is an efficient cryoprotectant but does not show antifreeze activity indicates a different mechanism of action. The cryoprotective properties conferred by WCS120 depend on biochemical properties that remain to be determined. Overall, our results show that the proteins' efficiencies vary between cell types, and confirm that a combination of different protection mechanisms is needed to successfully cryopreserve mammalian cells. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  10. Calreticulin: one protein, one gene, many functions.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Mesaeli, N; Nakamura, K; Opas, M

    1999-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a critical role in the synthesis and chaperoning of membrane-associated and secreted proteins. The membrane is also an important site of Ca(2+) storage and release. Calreticulin is a unique ER luminal resident protein. The protein affects many cellular functions, both in the ER lumen and outside of the ER environment. In the ER lumen, calreticulin performs two major functions: chaperoning and regulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Calreticulin is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone, and it participates during the synthesis of a variety of molecules, including ion channels, surface receptors, integrins and transporters. The protein also affects intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis by modulation of ER Ca(2+) storage and transport. Studies on the cell biology of calreticulin revealed that the ER membrane is a very dynamic intracellular compartment affecting many aspects of cell physiology. PMID:10567207

  11. Inhibition of ice recrystallization and cryoprotective activity of wheat proteins in liver and pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chow‐Shi‐Yée, Mélanie; Briard, Jennie G.; Grondin, Mélanie; Averill‐Bates, Diana A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efficient cryopreservation of cells at ultralow temperatures requires the use of substances that help maintain viability and metabolic functions post‐thaw. We are developing new technology where plant proteins are used to substitute the commonly‐used, but relatively toxic chemical dimethyl sulfoxide. Recombinant forms of four structurally diverse wheat proteins, TaIRI‐2 (ice recrystallization inhibition), TaBAS1 (2‐Cys peroxiredoxin), WCS120 (dehydrin), and TaENO (enolase) can efficiently cryopreserve hepatocytes and insulin‐secreting INS832/13 cells. This study shows that TaIRI‐2 and TaENO are internalized during the freeze–thaw process, while TaBAS1 and WCS120 remain at the extracellular level. Possible antifreeze activity of the four proteins was assessed. The “splat cooling” method for quantifying ice recrystallization inhibition activity (a property that characterizes antifreeze proteins) revealed that TaIRI‐2 and TaENO are more potent than TaBAS1 and WCS120. Because of their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization, the wheat recombinant proteins TaIRI‐2 and TaENO are promising candidates and could prove useful to improve cryopreservation protocols for hepatocytes and insulin‐secreting cells, and possibly other cell types. TaENO does not have typical ice‐binding domains, and the TargetFreeze tool did not predict an antifreeze capacity, suggesting the existence of nontypical antifreeze domains. The fact that TaBAS1 is an efficient cryoprotectant but does not show antifreeze activity indicates a different mechanism of action. The cryoprotective properties conferred by WCS120 depend on biochemical properties that remain to be determined. Overall, our results show that the proteins' efficiencies vary between cell types, and confirm that a combination of different protection mechanisms is needed to successfully cryopreserve mammalian cells. PMID:26889747

  12. Efficiency of antifreeze glycoproteins for cryopreservation of Nili-Ravi (Bubalus bubalis) buffalo bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, S; Khan, M A; Ansari, M S; Rakha, B A; Ejaz, R; Iqbal, R; Younis, M; Ullah, N; DeVries, Arthur L; Akhter, S

    2015-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of Antarctic fish antifreeze glycoproteins, (AFGP) size 1-5 (34-10.5 kDa) and 7-8 (3.2 and 2.4 kDa) in extender on buffalo bull sperm at cooling (4 °C) and at post thawing. Semen was collected from three Nili-Ravi buffalo bulls with artificial vagina for 3 weeks. Qualifying ejaculates from each buffalo bull were diluted (at 37 °C having 50×10(6) sperm/mL) in tris-citric acid extender containing AFGP at 0 (control), 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL. An aliquot of diluted semen was evaluated for sperm progressive motility and plasma membrane integrity, while the remaining fraction was cooled to 4 °C in 2 h. Further, an aliquot of cooled semen was evaluated for the previously described variables and the remaining fraction was cryopreserved (-196 °C). After 24 h of storage, straws were thawed at 37 °C for 30 s to assess post-thaw sperm quality. Inclusion of AFGP in the extender did not affect (P>0.05) sperm progressive motility and plasma membrane integrity of buffalo bull sperm at cooling stage (4 °C). However, at post thawing, improvement (P<0.05) in sperm progressive motility and plasma membrane integrity was recorded in extender containing AFGP 1-5 and AFGP 7-8 at 1 μg/mL compared to the control. Percentage of live sperm with an intact acrosome remained similar (P>0.05) in extenders containing different amounts of AFGP and control. In conclusion, supplementation of 1 μg/ml of AFGP in extender improved the motility and plasma membrane integrity of Nili-Ravi buffalo sperm after thawing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Taste responses of dogs to ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, and ethylene glycol-based antifreeze.

    PubMed

    Marshall, D A; Doty, R L

    1990-12-15

    Although it is widely believed that ethylene glycol-based antifreeze (AF) is an attractive tastant to dogs and other animals, empirical data on this point are not available. In experiment 1, we examined the propensity of 178 adult mixed-breed dogs to approach, sniff, and lick a concentration of AF commonly used in automotive cooling systems (50%). Despite the fact that most of the dogs approached and sniffed the AF in these 5-minute tests, only 9% initiated lick responses and most of these were brief and not followed by additional licking. In experiment 2, the lick responses of five gastric-cannulated dogs to aqueous solutions of 20% sucrose, 50% ethylene glycol, 50% propylene glycol, water, and 50% AF were examined in 14-minute tests before and after periods of food and water deprivation. Under the latter conditions, 2 of the 5 dogs drank amounts of ethylene glycol that would have been lethal to uncannulated dogs. None of the five dogs drank potentially lethal amounts of AF. The preference order for these tastants was sucrose greater than water greater than ethylene glycol greater than AF = propylene glycol. Although these findings question the general belief that AF is highly palatable to most dogs, they do imply that large individual differences in responsiveness exist and that AF ingestion is likely influenced by motivational state. Furthermore, they suggest the possibility that unpleasant-tasting additives could be successfully developed to eliminate the ingestion of AF, because the initial attractiveness of AF is relatively low. Such additives would have to be stable in vehicular cooling systems and not adversely affect the functional aspects of AF performance.

  14. Effects of synthetic antifreeze glycoprotein analogue on islet cell survival and function during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shuichiro; Matsusita, Michiaki; Morita, Tsunehiko; Kamachi, Hirofumi; Tsukiyama, Shusaku; Furukawa, Yoshinori; Koshida, Shuhei; Tachibana, Yuki; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Todo, Satoru

    2006-02-01

    The antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP), found in the blood of polar fish, is known to prevent ice crystal growth and to depress the freezing temperature, which may in turn protect tissues from freezing injury. The chemical synthesis of AFGP is an attractive alternative to its difficult isolation from natural sources, and this would permit quality control and mass production. In spite of recent success in islet transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus, existing methods for the long-term preservation of islets are considered to be suboptimal and inadequate, which indicates the need for the development of improved methods. Rat islets were isolated from male Wistar rats, using intraductal collagenase distention, mechanical dissociation, and Ficoll-Conray gradient purification. Islets were cultured overnight and then cryopreserved in RPMI1640 in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) and 10% FCS with various concentrations of syAFGP, followed by slow cooling (0.3 degrees C/min) and rapid thawing (200 degrees C/min) as described by Rajotte. The freezing process was observed by cryomicroscopy. Islet recovery post-cryopreservation was 85.0 +/- 6.2% with syAFGP and 63.3 +/- 14.2% without syAFGP, both compared with the pre-cryopreservation counts (P < 0.05). The in vitro islet function measured by insulin release was equivalent to a static stimulation index of 3.86+/-0.43 for the islets that were frozen-and-thawed with syAFGP, compared to 2.98 +/- 0.22 without syAFGP (P < 0.05). At a concentration of around 500 microg/ml syAFGP, a strong attenuation of ice crystal growth and formation was observed by cryomicroscopy and these ice crystals did not cause cryoinjury. In conclusion, the attenuation of ice crystallization by syAFGP improves islet survival and function following cryopreservation and thawing.

  15. Ancient climate change, antifreeze, and the evolutionary diversification of Antarctic fishes

    PubMed Central

    Near, Thomas J.; Dornburg, Alex; Kuhn, Kristen L.; Eastman, Joseph T.; Pennington, Jillian N.; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo; Fernández, Daniel A.; Jones, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    The Southern Ocean around Antarctica is among the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, but has experienced episodic climate change during the past 40 million years. It remains unclear how ancient periods of climate change have shaped Antarctic biodiversity. The origin of antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) in Antarctic notothenioid fishes has become a classic example of how the evolution of a key innovation in response to climate change can drive adaptive radiation. By using a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of notothenioids and reconstructed paleoclimate, we demonstrate that the origin of AFGP occurred between 42 and 22 Ma, which includes a period of global cooling approximately 35 Ma. However, the most species-rich lineages diversified and evolved significant ecological differences at least 10 million years after the origin of AFGPs, during a second cooling event in the Late Miocene (11.6–5.3 Ma). This pattern indicates that AFGP was not the sole trigger of the notothenioid adaptive radiation. Instead, the bulk of the species richness and ecological diversity originated during the Late Miocene and into the Early Pliocene, a time coincident with the origin of polar conditions and increased ice activity in the Southern Ocean. Our results challenge the current understanding of the evolution of Antarctic notothenioids suggesting that the ecological opportunity that underlies this adaptive radiation is not linked to a single trait, but rather to a combination of freeze avoidance offered by AFGPs and subsequent exploitation of new habitats and open niches created by increased glacial and ice sheet activity. PMID:22331888

  16. Stabilization of supercooled fluids by thermal hysteresis proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P W; Leader, J P

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported that thermal hysteresis proteins found in many cold-hardy, freeze-avoiding arthropods stabilize their supercooled body fluids. We give evidence that fish antifreeze proteins, which also produce thermal hysteresis, bind to and reduce the efficiency of heterogenous nucleation sites, rather than binding to embryonic ice nuclei. We discuss both possible mechanisms for stabilization of supercooled body fluids and also describe a new method for measuring and defining the supercooling point of small volumes of liquid. PMID:7612853

  17. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of a biological "antifreeze", AFGP 1-5: an explanation in terms of adsorption rate for the concentration dependence of the freezing point.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L

    2009-07-21

    It is widely accepted, and we agree, that the lowering of the temperature at which ice can grow in a water solution of one of the biological antifreezes is a result of adsorption of the antifreeze molecules at the ice surface. However, how this can produce a well-defined "freezing point" that varies with the solution concentration has remained problematical. The results of a series of measurements of ice growing in supercooled solutions of an effective antifreeze are reported and interpreted in terms of this fundamental problem. It seemed that the solution of the problem would have to rely upon adsorption rate, because that appeared to be the only way for the concentration in solution to be so important. The crystal growth results are most unusual, and appear to confirm this. The growth rates over a wide range of antifreeze concentration in solution (about 0.05 to 9 mg ml(-1)) are zero from the thermodynamic freezing point down to the "non-equilibrium" freezing point, where there is a very sudden increase to a plateau value that then remains about constant as the supercooling is increased by about 2 degrees C. The plateau values of growth rate are faster than those from pure water at the lower-supercooling ends of the plateaus, but slower at higher supercooling, until the growth rate starts rising toward that from pure water. These plateau values of growth rate increase markedly with increasing concentration of the antifreeze in solution. Along with these changes there are complex changes in the growth orientations, from c-axis spicules in the plateaus to those more characteristic of growth from pure water at greater supercooling. We conclude that the non-equilibrium freezing point is determined by the adsorption rate. It is the warmest temperature at which the ice growth rate on the basal plane (where the antifreeze does not adsorb) is fast enough to prevent the area of basal face on a growing ice crystal from becoming too small to grow, which is determined in

  18. Characterization of the restricted rotation of the dimethyl groups in chemically N-terminal 13C-labeled antifreeze glycoproteins: A temperature-dependent study in water to ice through the supercooled state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, V. V.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Feeney, Robert E.; Fink, William H.; Yeh, Yin

    2005-07-01

    Site-specific chemical modification, especially with isotopically enriched groups, allows one to study the structure and dynamics of proteins for which uniform enrichment is difficult. When the N-terminal alanine in antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) is replaced with an N,N-dimethyl alanine the methyl groups show signatures of slow rotation about the C-N bond. In order to separate the local dynamics of the N-terminus from the overall protein dynamics, we present a complete characterization of this dynamics. Temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic-resonance experiments from room temperature to subzero temperatures, including the supercooled state and in the presence of ice, are presented. Quantum chemical calculations are also performed on a localized N-terminus of the AFGP. Our results show that in the solution state at room temperature and in the super cooled regime, the dimethyl groups undergo a slow, restricted rotation with an unequal distribution of population between two major conformations. At lower temperatures in the presence of ice, the dynamics become much more complex due to freezing out of several conformational states. Based on these results, we conclude that the segmental dynamics of the N-terminus are local to the first residue and do not affect the overall dynamics of the protein.

  19. Characterization of the restricted rotation of the dimethyl groups in chemically N-terminal 13C-labeled antifreeze glycoproteins: a temperature-dependent study in water to ice through the supercooled state.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V V; Lau, Edmond Y; Tsvetkova, Nelly M; Feeney, Robert E; Fink, William H; Yeh, Yin

    2005-07-22

    Site-specific chemical modification, especially with isotopically enriched groups, allows one to study the structure and dynamics of proteins for which uniform enrichment is difficult. When the N-terminal alanine in antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) is replaced with an N,N-dimethyl alanine the methyl groups show signatures of slow rotation about the C-N bond. In order to separate the local dynamics of the N-terminus from the overall protein dynamics, we present a complete characterization of this dynamics. Temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic-resonance experiments from room temperature to subzero temperatures, including the supercooled state and in the presence of ice, are presented. Quantum chemical calculations are also performed on a localized N-terminus of the AFGP. Our results show that in the solution state at room temperature and in the super cooled regime, the dimethyl groups undergo a slow, restricted rotation with an unequal distribution of population between two major conformations. At lower temperatures in the presence of ice, the dynamics become much more complex due to freezing out of several conformational states. Based on these results, we conclude that the segmental dynamics of the N-terminus are local to the first residue and do not affect the overall dynamics of the protein.

  20. Anaplasma phagocytophilum induces Ixodes scapularis ticks to express an antifreeze glycoprotein gene that enhances their survival in the cold

    PubMed Central

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sultana, Hameeda; Fish, Durland; Anderson, John F.; Fikrig, Erol

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, Ixodes scapularis ticks overwinter in the Northeast and Upper Midwest and transmit the agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, among other pathogens. We now show that the presence of A. phagocytophilum in I. scapularis ticks increases their ability to survive in the cold. We identified an I. scapularis antifreeze glycoprotein, designated IAFGP, and demonstrated via RNAi knockdown studies the importance of IAFGP for the survival of I. scapularis ticks in a cold environment. Transfection studies also show that IAFGP increased the viability of yeast cells subjected to cold temperature. Remarkably, A. phagocytophilum induced the expression of iafgp, thereby increasing the cold tolerance and survival of I. scapularis. These data define a molecular basis for symbiosis between a human pathogenic bacterium and its arthropod vector and delineate what we believe to be a new pathway that may be targeted to alter the life cycle of this microbe and its invertebrate host. PMID:20739755

  1. Observation of ice-like water layers at an aqueous protein surface

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Konrad; Strazdaite, Simona; DeVries, Arthur L.; Lotze, Stephan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Voets, Ilja K.; Bakker, Huib J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the properties of water at the surface of an antifreeze protein with femtosecond surface sum frequency generation spectroscopy. We find clear evidence for the presence of ice-like water layers at the ice-binding site of the protein in aqueous solution at temperatures above the freezing point. Decreasing the temperature to the biological working temperature of the protein (0 °C to −2 °C) increases the amount of ice-like water, while a single point mutation in the ice-binding site is observed to completely disrupt the ice-like character and to eliminate antifreeze activity. Our observations indicate that not the protein itself but ordered ice-like water layers are responsible for the recognition and binding to ice. PMID:25468976

  2. Observation of ice-like water layers at an aqueous protein surface.

    PubMed

    Meister, Konrad; Strazdaite, Simona; DeVries, Arthur L; Lotze, Stephan; Olijve, Luuk L C; Voets, Ilja K; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-12-16

    We study the properties of water at the surface of an antifreeze protein with femtosecond surface sum frequency generation spectroscopy. We find clear evidence for the presence of ice-like water layers at the ice-binding site of the protein in aqueous solution at temperatures above the freezing point. Decreasing the temperature to the biological working temperature of the protein (0 °C to -2 °C) increases the amount of ice-like water, while a single point mutation in the ice-binding site is observed to completely disrupt the ice-like character and to eliminate antifreeze activity. Our observations indicate that not the protein itself but ordered ice-like water layers are responsible for the recognition and binding to ice.

  3. Thermal hysteresis proteins.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J

    2001-02-01

    Extreme environments present a wealth of biochemical adaptations. Thermal hysteresis proteins (THPs) have been found in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, bacteria and fungi and are able to depress the freezing point of water (in the presence of ice crystals) in a non-colligative manner by binding to the surface of nascent ice crystals. The THPs comprise a disparate group of proteins with a variety of tertiary structures and often no common sequence similarities or structural motifs. Different THPs bind to different faces of the ice crystal, and no single mechanism has been proposed to account for THP ice binding affinity and specificity. Experimentally THPs have been used in the cryopreservation of tissues and cells and to induce cold tolerance in freeze susceptible organisms. THPs represent a remarkable example of parallel and convergent evolution with different proteins being adapted for an anti-freeze role.

  4. Molecular Characterization, Structural Modeling, and Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Basrai Thaumatin-Like Protein against Fungal Infection.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Nusrat; Saleem, Mahjabeen; Naz, Mamoona; Gul, Roquyya; Rehman, Hafiz Muzzammel

    2017-01-01

    A thaumatin-like protein gene from Basrai banana was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Amplified gene product was cloned into pTZ57R/T vector and subcloned into expression vector pET22b(+) and resulting pET22b-basrai TLP construct was introduced into E. coli BL21. Maximum protein expression was obtained at 0.7 mM IPTG concentration after 6 hours at 37°C. Western blot analysis showed the presence of approximately 20 kDa protein in induced cells. Basrai antifungal TLP was tried as pharmacological agent against fungal disease. Independently Basrai antifungal protein and amphotericin B exhibited their antifungal activity against A. fumigatus; however combined effect of both agents maximized activity against the pathogen. Docking studies were performed to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of TLP against A. fumigatus by probing binding pattern of antifungal protein with plasma membrane ergosterol of targeted fungal strain. Ice crystallization primarily damages frozen food items; however addition of antifreeze proteins limits the growth of ice crystal in frozen foods. The potential of Basrai TLP protein, as an antifreezing agent, in controlling the ice crystal formation in frozen yogurt was also studied. The scope of this study ranges from cost effective production of pharmaceutics to antifreezing and food preserving agent as well as other real life applications.

  5. Molecular Characterization, Structural Modeling, and Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Basrai Thaumatin-Like Protein against Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yasmin, Nusrat; Naz, Mamoona; Gul, Roquyya; Rehman, Hafiz Muzzammel

    2017-01-01

    A thaumatin-like protein gene from Basrai banana was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Amplified gene product was cloned into pTZ57R/T vector and subcloned into expression vector pET22b(+) and resulting pET22b-basrai TLP construct was introduced into E. coli BL21. Maximum protein expression was obtained at 0.7 mM IPTG concentration after 6 hours at 37°C. Western blot analysis showed the presence of approximately 20 kDa protein in induced cells. Basrai antifungal TLP was tried as pharmacological agent against fungal disease. Independently Basrai antifungal protein and amphotericin B exhibited their antifungal activity against A. fumigatus; however combined effect of both agents maximized activity against the pathogen. Docking studies were performed to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of TLP against A. fumigatus by probing binding pattern of antifungal protein with plasma membrane ergosterol of targeted fungal strain. Ice crystallization primarily damages frozen food items; however addition of antifreeze proteins limits the growth of ice crystal in frozen foods. The potential of Basrai TLP protein, as an antifreezing agent, in controlling the ice crystal formation in frozen yogurt was also studied. The scope of this study ranges from cost effective production of pharmaceutics to antifreezing and food preserving agent as well as other real life applications. PMID:28875151

  6. Aqueous geochemistry in icy world interiors: Equilibrium fluid, rock, and gas compositions, and fate of antifreezes and radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2017-09-01

    The geophysical evolution of many icy moons and dwarf planets seems to have provided opportunities for interaction between liquid water and rock (silicate and organic solids). Here, we explore two ways by which water-rock interaction can feed back on geophysical evolution: the production or consumption of antifreeze compounds, which affect the persistence and abundance of cold liquid; and the potential leaching into the fluid of lithophile radionuclides, affecting the distribution of a long-term heat source. We compile, validate, and use a numerical model, implemented with the PHREEQC code, of the interaction of chondritic rock with pure water and with C, N, S-bearing cometary fluid, thought to be the materials initially accreted by icy worlds, and describe the resulting equilibrium fluid and rock assemblages at temperatures, pressures, and water-to-rock ratios of 0-200 ° C, 1-1000 bar, and 0.1-10 by mass, respectively. Our findings suggest that water-rock interaction can strongly alter the nature and amount of antifreezes, resulting in solutions rich in reduced nitrogen and carbon, and sometimes dissolved H2, with additional sodium, calcium, chlorine, and/or oxidized carbon. Such fluids can remain partially liquid down to 176 K if NH3 is present. The prominence of Cl in solution seems to hinge on its primordial supply in ices, which is unconstrained by the meteoritical record. Equilibrium assemblages, rich in serpentine and saponite clays, retain thorium and uranium radionuclides unless U-Cl or U-HCO3 complexing, which was not modeled, significantly enhances U solubility. However, the radionuclide 40 K can be leached at high water:rock ratio and/or low temperature at which K is exchanged with ammonium in minerals. We recommend the inclusion of these effects in future models of the geophysical evolution of ocean-bearing icy worlds. Our simulation products match observations of chloride salts on Europa and Enceladus; CI chondrites mineralogies; the observation of

  7. Relationship of amino acid composition and molecular weight of antifreeze glycopeptides to non-colligative freezing point depression.

    PubMed

    Schrag, J D; O'Grady, S M; DeVries, A L

    1982-08-06

    Many polar fishes synthesize a group of eight glycopeptides that exhibit a non-colligative lowering of the freezing point of water. These glycopeptides range in molecular weight between 2600 and 33 700. The largest glycopeptides [1-5] lower the freezing point more than the small ones on a weight basis and contain only two amino acids, alanine and threonine, with the disaccharide galactose-N-acetyl-galactosamine attached to threonine. The small glycopeptides, 6, 7, and 8, also lower the freezing point and contain proline, which periodically substitutes for alanine. Glycopeptides with similar antifreeze properties isolated from the saffron cod and the Atlantic tomcod contain an additional amino acid, arginine, which substitutes for threonine in glycopeptide 6. In this study we address the question of whether differences in amino acid composition or molecular weight between large and small glycopeptides are responsible for the reduced freezing point depressing capability of the low molecular weight glycopeptides. The results indicate that the degree of amino acid substitutions that occur in glycopeptides 6-8 do not have a significant effect on the unusual freezing point lowering and that the observed decrease in freezing point depression with smaller glycopeptides can be accounted for on the basis of molecular weight.

  8. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p < 0.05). Finally, an SM-AFP/ice binding model was constructed and results of molecular dynamics simulation suggested that the binding of SM-AFP with ice and prevention of ice crystal growth could be attributed to hydrogen bond formation, hydrophobic interaction and non-bond interactions. Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An antifreeze glycopeptide gene from the antarctic cod Notothenia coriiceps neglecta encodes a polyprotein of high peptide copy number.

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, K C; Cheng, C H; Fernandes, I E; Detrich, H W; DeVries, A L

    1990-01-01

    The antarctic fish Notothenia coriiceps neglecta synthesizes eight antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP 1-8; Mr 2600-34,000) to avoid freezing in its ice-laden freezing habitat. We report here the sequence of one of its AFGP genes. The structural gene contains 46 tandemly repeated segments, each encoding one AFGP peptide plus a 3-amino acid spacer. Most of the repeats (44/46) code for peptides of AFGP 8; the remaining 2 code for peptides of AFGP 7. At least 2 of the 3 amino acids in the spacers could act as substrate for chymotrypsin-like proteases. The nucleotide sequence between the translation initiation codon (ATG) and the first AFGP-coding segment is G + T-rich and encodes a presumptive 37-residue signal peptide of unusual sequence. Primer extension establishes the transcription start site at nucleotide 43 upstream from ATG. CAAT and TATA boxes begin at nucleotides 53 and 49, respectively, upstream from the transcription start site. The polyadenylylation signal, AATAAA, is located approximately 240 nucleotides downstream from the termination codon. A mRNA (approximately 3 kilobases) was found that matches the size of this AFGP gene. Thus, this AFGP gene encodes a secreted, high-copy-number polyprotein that is processed posttranslationally to produce active AFGPs. Images PMID:2251271

  10. Influence of surface groups of proteins on water studied by freezing/thawing hysteresis and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zelent, Bogumil; Bryan, Michael A; Sharp, Kim A; Vanderkooi, Jane M

    2009-05-01

    The influence of proteins and solutes on hysteresis of freezing and melting of water was measured by infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Of the solutes examined, poly-L-arginine and flounder antifreeze protein produced the largest freezing point depression of water, with little effect on the melting temperature. Poly-L-lysine, poly-L-glutamate, cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin had less effect on the freezing of water. Small compounds used to mimic non-polar (trimethylamine N-oxide, methanol), positively charged (guanidinium chloride, NH(4)Cl, urea) and negatively charged (Na acetate) groups on protein surfaces were also examined. These molecules and ions depress water's freezing point and the melting profiles became broad. Since infrared absorption measures both bulk solvent and solvent bound to the solutes, this result is consistent with solutes interacting with liquid water. The amide I absorption bands of antifreeze protein and poly-L-arginine do not detectably change with the phase transition of water. An interpretation is that the antifreeze protein and poly-L-arginine order liquid water such that the water around the group is ice-like.

  11. Mimicking biopolymers on a molecular scale: nano(bio)technology based on engineered proteins.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Ingo; Rischka, Klaus; Kast, Stefan M; Scheibel, Thomas; Bargel, Hendrik

    2009-05-13

    Proteins are ubiquitous biopolymers that adopt distinct three-dimensional structures and fulfil a multitude of elementary functions in organisms. Recent systematic studies in molecular biology and biotechnology have improved the understanding of basic functional and architectural principles of proteins, making them attractive candidates as concept generators for technological development in material science, particularly in biomedicine and nano(bio)technology. This paper highlights the potential of molecular biomimetics in mimicking high-performance proteins and provides concepts for applications in four case studies, i.e. spider silk, antifreeze proteins, blue mussel adhesive proteins and viral ion channels.

  12. Three-dimensional interplay among the ligand-binding domains of the urokinase-plasminogen-activator-receptor-associated protein, Endo180

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Calzada, Angel; Robertson, David; MacFadyen, John R.; Boskovic, Jasminka; Isacke, Clare M.; Llorca, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    Endo180, also known as the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-associated protein (uPARAP), is one of the four members of the mannose receptor family, and is implicated in extracellular-matrix remodelling through its interactions with collagens, sugars and uPAR. The extracellular portion of Endo180 contains an amino-terminal cysteine-rich domain, a single fibronectin type II domain and eight C-type lectin-like domains. We have purified a soluble version of Endo180 and analysed it by single-particle electron microscopy to obtain a three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal part of the protein at a resolution of 17 Å and reveal, for the first time, the interactions between non-adjacent domains in the mannose receptor family. We show that for Endo180, the cysteine-rich domain contacts the second C-type lectin-like domain, thus providing structural insight into how modulation of its several ligand interactions may regulate Endo180 receptor function. PMID:12856000

  13. The effects of antifreeze peptide III (AFP) and insulin transferrin selenium (ITS) on cryopreservation of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Younis, A I; Rooks, B; Khan, S; Gould, K G

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of antifreeze peptides (AFP) and insulin transferrin selenium (ITS) on the motility and membrane integrity of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) spermatozoa after chilling (0-5 degrees C) and thawing. The effects of three thawing procedures, in the presence or absence of AFP and ITS, on sperm motility and on the status of the plasma membrane and acrosome were also examined. During chilling, AFP and ITS seem mildly cytotoxic, as the progressive motility and velocity (curvilinear and straight line) declined significantly at AFP concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 microg/ml and at ITS concentrations of 1 and 10 microg/ml. However, at a concentration of 100 microg/ml, ITS was able to protect sperm during short-term hypothermic storage. Addition of AFP or ITS at 100 microg/ml to test egg yolk-glycerol extender during freezing significantly (P < 0.05) increased postthaw motility, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity. The mean (+/-SE) motility recovery rate increased from 28.9 +/- 3.9%, for the untreated control, to 59.2 +/- 5.8% and 67.8 +/- 7.4%, for ITS and AFP, respectively. The effects of the thawing procedure were influenced by the presence of AFP during the freezing cycle. An improved motility recovery rate of 67 +/- 4.2% was obtained when chimpanzee sperm frozen in test egg yolk-glycerol extender supplemented with AFP were thawed rapidly at 37 degrees C, compared to 47 +/- 5.2% and 44 +/- 8.2% for slow (23 degrees C) and ultrarapid (75 degrees C) thawing, respectively. The motility recovery after thawing of ITS-treated semen at 23 degrees C, 37 degrees C, or 75 degrees C was not significantly different. Semen frozen without AFP or ITS and thawed at 75 degrees C was seriously (P < 0.05) damaged. This study provides evidence that AFP- or ITS-supplemented semen extender improves postthaw sperm motility in the chimpanzee.

  14. Enhanced inactivation of avian influenza virus at -20°C by disinfectants supplemented with calcium chloride or other antifreeze agents.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jiewen; Chan, Maria; Brooks, Brian W; Rohonczy, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Avian influenza outbreaks have occurred during winter months, and effective disinfection of poultry premises at freezing temperatures is needed. The commercial disinfectants Virkon and Accel, supplemented with an antifreeze agent [propylene glycol (PG), methanol (MeOH), or calcium chloride (CaCl₂)], were evaluated for their effectiveness in killing avian influenza virus (AIV) at -20°C or 21°C. An AIV suspension was applied to stainless steel disks, air-dried, and covered with a disinfectant or antifreeze agent for 5 to 30 min. Virkon (2%) and Accel (6.25%) with 30% PG, 20% MeOH, or 20% CaCl₂ inactivated 6 log₁₀ AIV within 5 min at -20°C and 21°C. At these temperatures PG and MeOH alone did not kill AIV, but the 20% CaCl₂ solution alone inactivated 5 log10 AIV within 10 min. The results suggested that CaCl₂ is potentially useful to enhance the effectiveness of disinfection of poultry facilities after outbreaks of AIV infection in warm and cold seasons.

  15. Enhanced inactivation of avian influenza virus at −20°C by disinfectants supplemented with calcium chloride or other antifreeze agents

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jiewen; Chan, Maria; Brooks, Brian W.; Rohonczy, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza outbreaks have occurred during winter months, and effective disinfection of poultry premises at freezing temperatures is needed. The commercial disinfectants Virkon and Accel, supplemented with an antifreeze agent [propylene glycol (PG), methanol (MeOH), or calcium chloride (CaCl2)], were evaluated for their effectiveness in killing avian influenza virus (AIV) at −20°C or 21°C. An AIV suspension was applied to stainless steel disks, air-dried, and covered with a disinfectant or antifreeze agent for 5 to 30 min. Virkon (2%) and Accel (6.25%) with 30% PG, 20% MeOH, or 20% CaCl2 inactivated 6 log10 AIV within 5 min at −20°C and 21°C. At these temperatures PG and MeOH alone did not kill AIV, but the 20% CaCl2 solution alone inactivated 5 log10 AIV within 10 min. The results suggested that CaCl2 is potentially useful to enhance the effectiveness of disinfection of poultry facilities after outbreaks of AIV infection in warm and cold seasons. PMID:26424918

  16. Molecular biology of seed storage proteins and lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, L.M.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The seeds of many plants contain abundant storage protein and lectin which have been the subject of biochemical investigations for over a hundred years. Because these proteins represent abundant gene products translated from abundant messages, they were among the first plant proteins to which the techniques of molecular biology were applied. Many of the proteins have now been purified and characterized and their amino acid sequences have been determined; some have been crystallized and their 3-dimensional structure is known. Studies of their biosynthesis, transport and accumulation in protein bodies have lead to a greater understanding of the dynamics of plant cell organelles. Seed storage proteins and lectins are encoded by small gene families whose members show considerable homology and appear to have been conserved in evolution. The expression of these genes is highly regulated in time (development) and space (tissue). The recent discovery that other plant organs synthesize lectins, or lectin-like proteins which are closely related to the seed lectins, has lent additional support to the search for a function for these intriguing proteins; this finding also indicates that different members of the gene family are expressed in different tissues. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  17. The N-terminal domain of thrombomodulin sequesters high-mobility group-B1 protein, a novel antiinflammatory mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Abeyama, Kazuhiro; Stern, David M.; Ito, Yuji; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Yoshimoto, Yasushi; Tanaka, Motoyuki; Uchimura, Tomonori; Ida, Nobuo; Yamazaki, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Shingo; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Iino, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Noboru; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2005-01-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an endothelial anticoagulant cofactor that promotes thrombin-mediated formation of activated protein C (APC). We have found that the N-terminal lectin-like domain (D1) of TM has unique antiinflammatory properties. TM, via D1, binds high-mobility group-B1 DNA-binding protein (HMGB1), a factor closely associated with necrotic cell damage following its release from the nucleus, thereby preventing in vitro leukocyte activation, in vivo UV irradiation–induced cutaneous inflammation, and in vivo lipopolysaccharide-induced lethality. Our data also demonstrate antiinflammatory properties of a peptide spanning D1 of TM and suggest its therapeutic potential. These findings highlight a novel mechanism, i.e., sequestration of mediators, through which an endothelial cofactor, TM, suppresses inflammation quite distinctly from its anticoagulant cofactor activity, thereby preventing the interaction of these mediators with cell surface receptors on effector cells in the vasculature. PMID:15841214

  18. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-05-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  19. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2,OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase rea