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Sample records for left radial approaches

  1. Comparison of the radial and femoral approaches in left main PCI: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ziakas, A; Klinke, P; Mildenberger, R; Fretz, E; Williams, M B; Della Siega, A; Kinloch, R D; Hilton, J D

    2004-03-01

    Transradial percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a safe and effective method of percutaneous revascularization. However, there are no data on the efficacy of the transradial approach in left main (LM) PCI. We studied 80 patients (pts) who underwent LM PCI between February 1994 and January 2002, and compared the radial (27 pts) and femoral (53 pts) approaches. Patients were considered free of restenosis if they were free of angina and had a negative treadmill or nuclear imaging study 6 months post-PCI. Mean follow-up time was 27.4+/-23.0 months. Reason for PCI (stable angina, unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction) and lesion location (ostial, mid, distal) were similar in both groups (p>0.05), whereas mean ejection fraction was higher in the radial group (56.5+/-11.1% versus 49.2+/-14.7%, respectively; p<0.05). Sheath size (7 or 8 French; 44.4% radial versus 77.3% femoral) and amount of heparin used (9,192+/-3,645 IU versus 11,468+/-5,083 IU) were significantly larger in the femoral group (p<0.05), and the use of intra-aortic balloon pump was significantly more frequent (3.7% versus 22.6%). Mean fluoroscopy time (21.3+/-12.8 minutes versus 16.7+/-8.5 minutes), amount of contrast used (227+/-92 ml versus 225+/-85 ml), mean procedural time (67.0+/-27.6 minutes versus 73.4+/-32.7 minutes), procedure success (96.3% versus 98.1%), in-hospital major adverse cardiac events (MACE; 7.4% versus 5.6%) and 6-month MACE (14.8% versus 25.5%) were similar in the 2 groups (p>0.05). However, major vascular complications occurred only in the femoral group (5.7%). Radial LM PCI is as fast and successful as the femoral approach and results in fewer vascular complications.

  2. Comparative efficacy and safety of the left versus right radial approach for percutaneous coronary procedures: a meta-analysis including 6870 patients.

    PubMed

    Xia, S L; Zhang, X B; Zhou, J S; Gao, X

    2015-08-01

    The radial approach is widely used in the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease. We conducted a meta-analysis of published results on the efficacy and safety of the left and right radial approaches in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary procedures. A systematic search of reference databases was conducted, and data from 14 randomized controlled trials involving 6870 participants were analyzed. The left radial approach was associated with significant reductions in fluoroscopy time [standardized mean difference (SMD)=-0.14, 95% confidence interval (CI)=-0.19 to -0.09; P<0.00001] and contrast volume (SMD=-0.07, 95%CI=-0.12 to -0.02; P=0.009). There were no significant differences in rate of procedural failure of the left and the right radial approaches [risk ratios (RR)=0.98; 95%CI=0.77-1.25; P=0.88] or procedural time (SMD=-0.05, 95%CI=0.17-0.06; P=0.38). Tortuosity of the subclavian artery (RR=0.27, 95%CI=0.14-0.50; P<0.0001) was reported more frequently with the right radial approach. A greater number of catheters were used with the left than with the right radial approach (SMD=0.25, 95%CI=0.04-0.46; P=0.02). We conclude that the left radial approach is as safe as the right radial approach, and that the left radial approach should be recommended for use in percutaneous coronary procedures, especially in percutaneous coronary angiograms.

  3. [Approaches to radial shaft].

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    In the clinical practice, radial shaft may be exposed via two approaches, namely the posterolateral Thompson and volar (anterior) Henry approaches. A feared complication of both of them is the injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve. No consensus has been reached, yet, as to which of the two approaches is more beneficial for the proximal half of radius. According to our anatomical studies and clinical experience, Thompson approach is safe only in fractures of the middle and distal thirds of the radial shaft, but highly risky in fractures of its proximal third. Henry approach may be used in any fracture of the radial shaft and provides a safe exposure of the entire lateral and anterior surfaces of the radius.The Henry approach has three phases. In the first phase, incision is made along the line connecting the biceps brachii tendon and the styloid process of radius. Care must be taken not to damage the lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.In the second phase, fascia is incised and the brachioradialis identified by the typical transition from the muscle belly to tendon and the shape of the tendon. On the lateral side, the brachioradialis lines the space with the radial artery and veins and the superficial branch of the radial nerve running at its bottom. On the medial side, the space is defined by the pronator teres in the proximal part and the flexor carpi radialis in the distal part. The superficial branch of the radial nerve is retracted together with the brachioradialis laterally, and the radial artery medially.In the third phase, the attachment of the pronator teres is identified by its typical tendon in the middle of convexity of the lateral surface of the radial shaft. The proximal half of the radius must be exposed very carefully in order not to damage the deep branch of the radial nerve. Dissection starts at the insertion of the pronator teres and proceeds proximally along its lateral border in interval between this muscle and insertion of the supinator

  4. Randomized comparative study of left versus right radial approach in the setting of primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Hu, Hongyu; Wang, Dezhao; Chen, Wei; Tan, Zhixu; Li, Qun; Chen, Buxing

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that the left radial approach (LRA) is related to decreased coronary procedure duration and fewer cerebrovascular complications as compared to the right radial approach (RRA) in elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, the feasibility of LRA in primary PCI has yet to be studied further. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of LRA compared with RRA for primary PCI in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. Materials and methods A total of 200 consecutive patients with STEMI who received primary PCI were randomized to LRA (number [n]=100) or RRA (n=100). The study endpoint was needle-to-balloon time, defined as the time from local anesthesia infiltration to the first balloon inflation. Radiation dose by measuring cumulative air kerma (CAK) and CAK dose area product, as well as fluoroscopy time and contrast volume were also investigated. Results There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics between the two groups. The coronary procedural success rate was similar between both radial approaches (98% for left versus 94% for right; P=0.28). Compared with RRA, LRA had significantly shorter needle-to-balloon time (16.0±4.8 minutes versus 18.0±6.5 minutes, respectively; P=0.02). Additionally, fluoroscopy time (7.4±3.4 minutes versus 8.8±3.5 minutes, respectively; P=0.01) and CAK dose area product (51.9±30.4 Gy cm2 versus 65.3±49.1 Gy cm2, respectively; P=0.04) were significantly lower with LRA than with RRA. Conclusion Primary PCI can be performed via LRA with earlier blood flow restoration in the infarct-related artery and lower radiation exposure when compared with RRA; therefore, the LRA may become a feasible and attractive alternative to perform primary PCI for STEMI patients. PMID:26150704

  5. Effect of Left Versus Right Radial Artery Approach for Coronary Angiography on Radiation Parameters in Patients With Predictors of Transradial Access Failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Binita; Burdowski, Joseph; Guo, Yu; Velez de Villa, Bryan; Huynh, Andrew; Farid, Meena; Maini, Mansi; Serrano-Gomez, Claudia; Staniloae, Cezar; Feit, Frederick; Attubato, Michael J; Slater, James; Coppola, John

    2016-08-15

    Left transradial approach (TRA) for coronary angiography is associated with lower radiation parameters than right TRA in an all-comers population. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of left versus right TRA on radiation parameters in patients with predictors of TRA failure. Patients with predictors of TRA failure (≥3 of 4 following criteria: age ≥70 years, female gender, height ≤64 inches, and hypertension) referred to TRA operators were randomized to either right (n = 50) or left (n = 50) TRA, whereas those referred to transfemoral approach (TFA) operators were enrolled in a prospective registry (n = 50). The primary end point was the radiation measure of dose-area product (DAP). In an intention-to-treat analysis, DAP (34.1 Gy·cm(2) [24.9 to 45.6] vs 41.9 Gy·cm(2) [27.3 to 58.0], p = 0.08), fluoroscopy time (3.7 minutes [2.4 to 6.3] vs 5.6 minutes [3.1 to 8.7], p = 0.07), and operator radiation exposure (516 μR [275 to 967] vs 730 μR [503 to 1,165], p = 0.06) were not significantly different between left and right TRA, but total dose (411 mGy [310 to 592] vs 537 mGy [368 to 780], p = 0.03) was significantly lower with left versus right TRA. Radiation parameters were lowest in the TFA cohort (DAP 24.5 Gy·cm(2) [15.7 to 33.2], p <0.001; fluoroscopy time 2.3 minutes [1.5 to 3.7], p <0.001; operator radiation exposure 387 μR [264 to 557]; total dose 345 mGy [250 to 468], p = 0.001). Results were similar after adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics. In conclusion, median measurements of radiation were overall not significantly different between left versus right TRA in this select population of patients with predictors of TRA failure. All measurements of radiation were lowest in the TFA group. PMID:27328954

  6. Effect of Left Versus Right Radial Artery Approach for Coronary Angiography on Radiation Parameters in Patients With Predictors of Transradial Access Failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Binita; Burdowski, Joseph; Guo, Yu; Velez de Villa, Bryan; Huynh, Andrew; Farid, Meena; Maini, Mansi; Serrano-Gomez, Claudia; Staniloae, Cezar; Feit, Frederick; Attubato, Michael J; Slater, James; Coppola, John

    2016-08-15

    Left transradial approach (TRA) for coronary angiography is associated with lower radiation parameters than right TRA in an all-comers population. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of left versus right TRA on radiation parameters in patients with predictors of TRA failure. Patients with predictors of TRA failure (≥3 of 4 following criteria: age ≥70 years, female gender, height ≤64 inches, and hypertension) referred to TRA operators were randomized to either right (n = 50) or left (n = 50) TRA, whereas those referred to transfemoral approach (TFA) operators were enrolled in a prospective registry (n = 50). The primary end point was the radiation measure of dose-area product (DAP). In an intention-to-treat analysis, DAP (34.1 Gy·cm(2) [24.9 to 45.6] vs 41.9 Gy·cm(2) [27.3 to 58.0], p = 0.08), fluoroscopy time (3.7 minutes [2.4 to 6.3] vs 5.6 minutes [3.1 to 8.7], p = 0.07), and operator radiation exposure (516 μR [275 to 967] vs 730 μR [503 to 1,165], p = 0.06) were not significantly different between left and right TRA, but total dose (411 mGy [310 to 592] vs 537 mGy [368 to 780], p = 0.03) was significantly lower with left versus right TRA. Radiation parameters were lowest in the TFA cohort (DAP 24.5 Gy·cm(2) [15.7 to 33.2], p <0.001; fluoroscopy time 2.3 minutes [1.5 to 3.7], p <0.001; operator radiation exposure 387 μR [264 to 557]; total dose 345 mGy [250 to 468], p = 0.001). Results were similar after adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics. In conclusion, median measurements of radiation were overall not significantly different between left versus right TRA in this select population of patients with predictors of TRA failure. All measurements of radiation were lowest in the TFA group.

  7. Left Radial Access Is Preferable to Right Radial Access for the Diagnostic or Interventional Coronary Procedures: A Meta-Analysis Involving 22 Randomized Clinical Trials and 10287 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaogang; Ding, Jie; Qi, Yue; Jia, Nan; Chu, Shaoli; Lin, Jinxiu; Su, Jinzi; Peng, Feng; Niu, Wenquan

    2013-01-01

    Objective The transradial approach has been used extensively for both diagnostic and interventional coronary procedures; however, there is no universal consensus hitherto on the optimal choice of radial access from either the left or the right artery. We therefore sought to meta-analyze available randomized clinical trials to compare the left with the right radial access for the diagnostic or interventional coronary procedures. Methods and Results Four electronic databases including the PubMed, EMBASE, Wanfang, and CNKI were searched up to April 2013. In total, there were 22 qualified randomized trials involving 5317 and 4970 patients assigned to the left and the right radial accesses, respectively. Data were extracted independently by two investigators. Analyses of the full data set indicated significant reductions in fluoroscopy time (seconds) (weighted mean difference; 95% confidence interval; P: −36.18; −53.28 to −18.53; <0.0005) and contrast use (mL) (−2.88; −5.41 to −0.34; 0.026) in patients with the left radial access compared to those with the right radial access, and there was strong evidence of heterogeneity but low probability of publication bias. The failure rate of radial access from the left was relatively lower than that from the right (odds ratio: 0.83; 95% confidence interval: 0.68−1.01; P = 0.064). Further in meta-regression analyses, body mass index was found to be a potential source of heterogeneity for both fluoroscopy time (regression coefficient: 35.85; P = 0.025) and catheter number (regression coefficient: 0.35; P = 0.018). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that left radial access is preferable to right radial access in terms of fluoroscopy time and contrast use for the diagnostic or interventional coronary procedures. The import of this study lies in its great shock to the concept of convenient radial access from the right artery. PMID:24223815

  8. ANALYSIS OF RADIAL VELOCITY DATA BY A NOVEL ADAPTIVE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, P.; Stoica, P.; Li, J.; Chen, Z.; Ge, J.

    2010-02-15

    In this paper, we introduce an estimation technique for analyzing radial velocity data commonly encountered in extrasolar planet detection. We discuss the Keplerian model for radial velocity data measurements and introduce a technique named the iterative adaptive approach (IAA) to estimate the three-dimensional spectrum (power versus eccentricity, orbital period and periastron passage time) of the radial velocity data. We then discuss different ways to regularize the IAA algorithm in the presence of noise and measurement errors. We also discuss briefly the computational aspects of the method and introduce a computationally efficient version of IAA. Finally, we establish the significance of the spectral peaks by using a relaxation maximum likelihood algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. Numerical experiments are carried out on both simulated and real life data sets to evaluate the performance of our method. The real life data sets discussed are radial velocity measurements of the stars HD 63454, HD 208487, and GJ 876.

  9. Radial Artery Approach to Salvage Nonmaturing Radiocephalic Arteriovenous Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Mu-Yang; Lin, Lin; Tsai, Kuei-Chin; Wu, Chih-Cheng

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the usefulness of an approach through the radial artery distal to the arteriovenous anastomosis for salvaging nonmaturing radiocephalic arteriovenous fistulas.MethodsProcedures that fulfilled the following criteria were retrospectively reviewed: (1) autogenous radiocephalic fistulas, (2) fistulas less than 3 months old, (3) distal radial artery approach for salvage. From 2005 to 2011, a total of 51 patients fulfilling the above criteria were enrolled. Outcome variables were obtained from angiographic, clinical and hemodialysis records, including the success, complication, and primary and secondary patency rates.ResultsThe overall anatomical and clinical success rates for the distal radial artery approach were 96 and 94 %, respectively. The average procedure time was 36 {+-} 19 min. Six patients (12 %) experienced minor complications as a result of extravasations. No arterial complication or puncture site complication was noted. The postinterventional 6-month primary patency rate was 51 %, and the 6-month secondary patency rate was 90 %. When the patients were divided into a stenosed group (20 patients) and an occluded group (31 patients), there were no differences in the success rate, complication rate, or primary and secondary patency rates.ConclusionAn approach through the radial artery distal to the arteriovenous anastomosis is an effective and safe alternative for the salvage of nonmaturing radiocephalic arteriovenous fistulas, even for occluded fistulas.

  10. A strategic approach for cardiac MR left ventricle segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dakua, Sarada Prasad; Sahambi, J S

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative evaluation of cardiac function from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images requires the identification of the myocardial walls. This generally requires the clinician to view the image and interactively trace the contours. Especially, detection of myocardial walls of left ventricle is a difficult task in CMR images that are obtained from subjects having serious diseases. An approach to automated outlining the left ventricular contour is proposed. In order to segment the left ventricle, in this paper, a combination of two approaches is suggested. Difference of Gaussian weighting function (DoG) is newly introduced in random walk approach for blood pool (inner contour) extraction. The myocardial wall (outer contour) is segmented out by a modified active contour method that takes blood pool boundary as the initial contour. Promising experimental results in CMR images demonstrate the potentials of our approach.

  11. Direction-dependent learning approach for radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Singla, Puneet; Subbarao, Kamesh; Junkins, John L

    2007-01-01

    Direction-dependent scaling, shaping, and rotation of Gaussian basis functions are introduced for maximal trend sensing with minimal parameter representations for input output approximation. It is shown that shaping and rotation of the radial basis functions helps in reducing the total number of function units required to approximate any given input-output data, while improving accuracy. Several alternate formulations that enforce minimal parameterization of the most general radial basis functions are presented. A novel "directed graph" based algorithm is introduced to facilitate intelligent direction based learning and adaptation of the parameters appearing in the radial basis function network. Further, a parameter estimation algorithm is incorporated to establish starting estimates for the model parameters using multiple windows of the input-output data. The efficacy of direction-dependent shaping and rotation in function approximation is evaluated by modifying the minimal resource allocating network and considering different test examples. The examples are drawn from recent literature to benchmark the new algorithm versus existing methods.

  12. Robotic Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation Using Left Thoracotomy Approach in Patients with Previous Sternotomies.

    PubMed

    Khalpey, Zain; Bin Riaz, Irbaz; Marsh, Katherine M; Ansari, Muhammad Zubair Ahmad; Bilal, Jawad; Cooper, Anthony; Paidy, Samata; Schmitto, Jan D; Smith, Richard; Friedman, Mark; Slepian, Marvin J; Poston, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are commonly used as either a bridge-to-transplant or a destination therapy. The traditional approach for LVAD implantation is via median sternotomy, but many candidates for this procedure have a history of failed cardiac surgeries and previous sternotomy. Redo sternotomy increases the risk of heart surgery, particularly in the setting of advanced heart failure. Robotics facilitates a less invasive approach to LVAD implantation that circumvents some of the morbidity associated with a redo sternotomy. We compared the outcomes of all patients at our institution who underwent LVAD implantation via either a traditional sternotomy or using robotic assistance. The robotic cohort showed reduced resource utilization including length of hospital stay and use of blood products. As the appropriate candidates become elucidated, robotic assistance may improve the safety and cost-effectiveness of reoperative LVAD surgery. PMID:25914953

  13. Comparison of Safety of Radial and Femoral Approaches for Coronary Catheterization in Interventional Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Samul, Wojciech; Turowska, Anna; Kwasiborski, Przemysław Jerzy; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Cwetsch, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Background The femoral approach has been the preferably used access in interventional cardiology as well for coronary diagnostics as for percutaneous coronary intervention, being perceived as easy and facilitating quick access with relatively low risk. Due to the results of the latest studies, however, the radial approach has become increasingly popular. The aim of this study was a safety analysis of cardiological interventional procedures (i.e., coronarography and PCI) according to the vessel approach. Material/Methods The 204 coronary interventions done in our Department of Interventional Cardiology were retrospectively analyzed. All the procedures were classified according to femoral or radial access. The incidence of local complications (e.g., major bleedings and hematomas) was assessed as well as the volume of contrast agent administered during the procedure and the radiation dose. Results It has been shown that radial approach, which is obviously more comfortable for patients, reduces the risk of local complications (0 vs. 2.97% and 0 vs. 3.96%) and does not lead to increased radiation exposure (p=0.88). However, there could be a larger volume of contrast agent administered (p=0.029), which in some cases could increase the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy. Conclusions The radial approach should be recommended as a first choice because it is safer than the classical femoral approach, but one must be cautious in choosing radial approach patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:25996689

  14. How to perform distal anchoring technique by 6French radial approach in complex coronary procedures.

    PubMed

    Fiocca, Luigi; Bernelli, Chiara; Sirbu, Vasile; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Guagliumi, Giulio; Vassileva, Angelina; Borghesi, Marco; Valsecchi, Orazio

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable advances in the interventional landscape, device delivery during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can still present technical challenges especially when performed in complex anatomical settings and through radial approach. To overcome difficult coronary stent delivery, several strategies have been developed. A niche option in such complex cases is the anchoring balloon technique, which involves inflation of a balloon non-coaxially in a side branch or distally to the target lesion in a coaxial fashion, to facilitate stent delivery. However, the main limitation of this technique is the requirement of a large guide catheter (≥7French) which may preclude the use of radial approach. We describe, step-by-step, the distal anchoring ballooning technique performed by a 6Fr radial approach to overcome the stent delivery failure in complex anatomical scenarios and to safely and successfully carry out the PCI procedures.

  15. A practical approach to using strain echocardiography to evaluate the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, Harvey; Mastouri, Ronald; Sawada, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) evaluation is the most important use of echocardiography. Speckle tracking strain echocardiography (SE) provides a quantitative regional and global LV assessment, is an independent supplement to wall motion analysis and has been validated over the past 10 years. Despite these facts, SE is not being used routinely, especially in the United States. SE can generate longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain measurements and LV twist. Although intriguing and potentially useful, these measurements also are confusing, complicated, time consuming, and frequently displayed as difficult-to-interpret wave forms. A pragmatic approach to SE simplifies the suggested method for strain calculation to reduce the time required and enhance reproducibility. With this modification the strain calculations take only 2-4 min. The yield is >80% in all patients. Reproducibility is at least as good as ejection fraction. Longitudinal strain is the most sensitive and reproducible of the various strain measurements, so it is the only strain we record. For simplicity, systolic strain is displayed as a positive number. Lastly, we primarily use a bullseye presentation for peak systolic strain. Many clinical examples are illustrated. However, as with all tests, SE is not perfect; there are limitations and potential false positives, but a practical approach to SE eventually should help make it a part of all echocardiographic examinations. PMID:22789972

  16. Morphological Assessment of Cadaveric Radial, Brachial and Subclavian Arteries: A Neurointerventional Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ali; Ozkul, Ayca; Shin, Dong Seong; Im, Soo-Bin; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2015-01-01

    Objective The transradial catheterization (TRC) is becoming widespread, primarily for neurointerventions. Therefore, the evaluation of radial artery puncture in clinical practice and a better understanding of the anatomy are important to improve the safety of neuroendovascular surgery. Methods Ten formalin-fixed adult Korean cadavers were dissected to expose radial artery (RA), brachial artery (BrA) and subclvian artery (ScA), bilaterally. Vessel lengths and diameters were meaured using a caliper and distance between the specific point of vessels and the anatomical landmarks including the radial styloid process, the medial epicondyle of the humerus, the sternoclavicular joint, and the vertebral artery orifice were also measured. Results The average length between the radial (RAPS) and the BrA puncture sites (BrAPS) and between the vertebral artery orifice (VAO) and the BrA bifurcation (BrAB) did not differ between sides (p>0.05). The average length between the radial styloid process (RSP) and the RAPS was 13.41±2.19 mm, and the RSP was 26.85±2.47 mm from the median nerve (MN). The mean length between the medial epicondyle (ME) and the BrAPS as 44.23±5.47 mm, whereas the distance between the ME and the MN was 42.23±4.77 mm. The average VAO-ScA angle was 70.94±6.12°, and the length between the ScA junction (SCJ) and the VAO was 60.30±8.48 mm. Conclusion This study provides basic anatomical information about the radial artery and the brachial route and can help improving new techniques, selection of size and shape of catheters for TRC. This can help neurointerventionists who adopt a transradial neuroendovascular approach and offers comprehensive and safe care to their patients. PMID:26819682

  17. Left ventricular radial colour and longitudinal pulsed-wave tissue Doppler echocardiography in 39 healthy domestic pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Casamian-Sorrosal, Domingo; Saunders, Richard; Browne, William; Elliot, Sarah; Fonfara, Sonja

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports radial colour and longitudinal mitral annulus pulsed-wave tissue Doppler findings in a large cohort of healthy, adult pet rabbits. Thirty-nine rabbits (22 Dwarf Lops, 14 French Lops and three Alaskans) underwent conscious echocardiography. The median age of the rabbits was 22 months and the median weight was 2.8 kg (Dwarf Lop 2.4 kg/French Lop 6.0 kg). Adequate radial colour and longitudinal pulsed-wave tissue Doppler traces were obtained in 100% and 85% of cases, respectively. Most systolic tissue Doppler parameters were significantly higher in French Lops than in Dwarf Lops. Separation of mitral inflow diastolic waves was present in 40% of cases using conventional spectral Doppler and in >60% of cases using pulsed-wave tissue Doppler which could be beneficial when evaluating diastolic function in rabbits. This study can be used as a reference for normal echocardiographic tissue Doppler values for adult rabbits undergoing conscious echocardiography in clinical practice. PMID:25089025

  18. A radial basis function network approach for the computation of inverse continuous time variant functions.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, René V; Carrera, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    This Paper presents an efficient approach for the fast computation of inverse continuous time variant functions with the proper use of Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFNs). The approach is based on implementing RBFNs for computing inverse continuous time variant functions via an overall damped least squares solution that includes a novel null space vector for singularities prevention. The singularities avoidance null space vector is derived from developing a sufficiency condition for singularities prevention that conduces to establish some characterizing matrices and an associated performance index.

  19. Innovative Approach to Preparing Radial Artery Cocktails in Response to Manufacturer Shortages of Nitroglycerin and Verapamil

    PubMed Central

    Parbhoo, Rupal K.; Wetz, Karen; Tschampel, Marva; Pompili, Vincent; Schenko, Elena; Mavko, Lou

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Transradial access has gained popularity over transfemoral access for cardiac catheterization, because of the decreased risk of bleeding, time to ambulation, and length of stay leading to improved patient satisfaction. One disadvantage of the radial artery approach is vasospasm, which can be prevented with the administration of verapamil and nitroglycerin in a pre- and postradial cocktail. Unfortunately, there have been manufacturer shortages for both of these medications. Methods: The utilization of radial artery cocktails and other nitroglycerin compounding practices were evaluated in response to cost containment and waste reduction initiatives and to medication shortages. Results: A modified process for supplying verapamil and nitroglycerin for the transradial approach via separate syringes enabled physicians to have quick access to the medications and to customize the cocktail based on the patient’s needs. This process also decreased costs and minimized wastage. The change in practice decreased waste from 44% for preradial cocktail syringes and 66% for postradial cocktail syringes to 8.7%. Discussion: This process for supplying the medications necessary to perform a radial artery catheterization and intracoronary nitroglycerin has allowed for conservation of commercial product supply. PMID:25477581

  20. pSnakes: a new radial active contour model and its application in the segmentation of the left ventricle from echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    de Alexandria, Auzuir Ripardo; Cortez, Paulo César; Bessa, Jessyca Almeida; da Silva Félix, John Hebert; de Abreu, José Sebastião; de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C

    2014-10-01

    Active contours are image segmentation methods that minimize the total energy of the contour to be segmented. Among the active contour methods, the radial methods have lower computational complexity and can be applied in real time. This work aims to present a new radial active contour technique, called pSnakes, using the 1D Hilbert transform as external energy. The pSnakes method is based on the fact that the beams in ultrasound equipment diverge from a single point of the probe, thus enabling the use of polar coordinates in the segmentation. The control points or nodes of the active contour are obtained in pairs and are called twin nodes. The internal energies as well as the external one, Hilbertian energy, are redefined. The results showed that pSnakes can be used in image segmentation of short-axis echocardiogram images and that they were effective in image segmentation of the left ventricle. The echo-cardiologist's golden standard showed that the pSnakes was the best method when compared with other methods. The main contributions of this work are the use of pSnakes and Hilbertian energy, as the external energy, in image segmentation. The Hilbertian energy is calculated by the 1D Hilbert transform. Compared with traditional methods, the pSnakes method is more suitable for ultrasound images because it is not affected by variations in image contrast, such as noise. The experimental results obtained by the left ventricle segmentation of echocardiographic images demonstrated the advantages of the proposed model. The results presented in this paper are justified due to an improved performance of the Hilbert energy in the presence of speckle noise.

  1. Ovariectomy by left flank approach in prepubertal Nelore (Bos indicus) heifers

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Juliana R.; Nogueira, Geison M.; Nogueira, Guilherme P.; Perri, Silvia H.V.; Cardoso, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate a recumbent left flank approach to bilateral ovariectomy in prepubertal heifers and to develop an optimal surgical technique for this procedure. Both ovaries were removed from 6 Nelore heifers by left flank approach without any complications, except in 1 heifer, which was believed to have had only 1 ovary based on ultrasound and exploration during surgery, but was later found to have a remaining functional ovary. Ovariectomy via left flank approach in recumbent prepubertal heifers is feasible and technically easy. This procedure does not involve special instrumentation and, despite the invasive approach, it allows optimal visualization of the ovaries and uterus. PMID:19794897

  2. Right-and left-brain approaches to death education.

    PubMed

    Fertziger, A P

    1983-01-01

    Some recent advances in the understanding of brain function are considered in terms of their potential impact on death education. The notion of right- and left-brain cognitive styles is examined in terms of the pedagogic impact it may have on an individual's capacity to understand and therefore be educated on the subject of death. The idea that the human brain (mind?) relates to death in two diametrically opposed ways is discussed and a holistic death educational format is proposed based on the synthesis of these two oppositional styles.

  3. On the capabilities of higher-order neurons: a radial basis function approach.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Higher-order neurons with k monomials in n variables are shown to have Vapnik-Chervonenkis (VC) dimension at least nk + 1. This result supersedes the previously known lower bound obtained via k-term monotone disjunctive normal form (DNF) formulas. Moreover, it implies that the VC dimension of higher-order neurons with k monomials is strictly larger than the VC dimension of k-term monotone DNF. The result is achieved by introducing an exponential approach that employs gaussian radial basis function neural networks for obtaining classifications of points in terms of higher-order neurons.

  4. Left-sided approach for mitral valve replacement in a case of dextrocardia with situs solitus.

    PubMed

    Kikon, Mhonchan; Kazmi, Aamir; Gupta, Anubhav; Grover, Vijay

    2013-11-01

    Mitral valve surgery in dextrocardia is technically challenging due to its anatomical malposition. Minor modifications are required in the surgical technique to counteract the problems during cannulation and exposure of the mitral valve. We report a case of a patient with dextrocardia, situs solitus, rheumatic heart disease, severe mitral regurgitation, moderate pulmonary artery hypertension, and severe left ventricular dysfunction who underwent mitral valve replacement using a two-stage right atrial cannulation with left-sided left atrial atriotomy, with the surgeon standing on the left side of the patient. Our approach for mitral valve surgery in this clinical setting is simple.

  5. Distal humeral fractures: impact of lateral approach and fracture-specific plating on radial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Eglseder, W Andrew

    2012-09-01

    We retrospectively reviewed supracondylar distal humeral fractures that had been treated with fracture-specific plating and definitive fixation through a lateral approach with a medial triceps mobilization technique. We determined the incidences of preoperative and postoperative radial nerve palsies (RNP) to evaluate the impact of the plating and fixation technique on RNP. Seventy-three patients treated at our institution from 2006 through 2009 were included in the study. The patients were assigned to 2 groups: 57 to the blunt injury group (motor vehicle collisions, falls, struck pedestrians, throwing) and 16 to the gunshot wound group. The incidence of known preoperative RNP in the blunt injury group was 27% (13 of 48 nonintubated patients); the incidence of known preoperative RNP in the gunshot wound group was 20% (2 of 10 nonintubated patients). The incidence of postoperative RNP for the combined groups of nonintubated patients who had intact radial nerve function preoperatively was 12% (5 of 43 patients). We found a high frequency of preoperative RNP, and we found postoperative RNP rates similar to those reported in the literature despite the use of the lateral approach medial triceps mobilization technique with a fracture-specific plate. PMID:22913991

  6. Automatic determination of radial basis functions: an immunity-based approach.

    PubMed

    de Castro, L N; Von Zuben, F J

    2001-12-01

    The appropriate operation of a radial basis function (RBF) neural network depends mainly upon an adequate choice of the parameters of its basis functions. The simplest approach to train an RBF network is to assume fixed radial basis functions defining the activation of the hidden units. Once the RBF parameters are fixed, the optimal set of output weights can be determined straightforwardly by using a linear least squares algorithm, which generally means reduction in the learning time as compared to the determination of all RBF network parameters using supervised learning. The main drawback of this strategy is the requirement of an efficient algorithm to determine the number, position, and dispersion of the RBFs. The approach proposed here is inspired by models derived from the vertebrate immune system, that will be shown to perform unsupervised cluster analysis. The algorithm is introduced and its performance is compared to that of the random, k-means center selection procedures and other results from the literature. By automatically defining the number of RBF centers, their positions and dispersions, the proposed method leads to parsimonious solutions. Simulation results are reported concerning regression and classification problems.

  7. A New Approach to Radial Basis Function Approximation and Its Application to QSAR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to RBF approximation, which combines two new elements: (1) linear radial basis functions and (2) weighting the model by each descriptor’s contribution. Linear radial basis functions allow one to achieve more accurate predictions for diverse data sets. Taking into account the contribution of each descriptor produces more accurate similarity values used for model development. The method was validated on 14 public data sets comprising nine physicochemical properties and five toxicity endpoints. We also compared the new method with five different QSAR methods implemented in the EPA T.E.S.T. program. Our approach, implemented in the program GUSAR, showed a reasonable accuracy of prediction and high coverage for all external test sets, providing more accurate prediction results than the comparison methods and even the consensus of these methods. Using our new method, we have created models for physicochemical and toxicity endpoints, which we have made freely available in the form of an online service at http://cactus.nci.nih.gov/chemical/apps/cap. PMID:24451033

  8. Central-Approach Surgical Repair of Coarctation of the Aorta with a Back-up Left Ventricular Assist Device for an Infant Presenting with Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Yu Rim; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Do Jung; Kim, Hyohyun; Shin, Hong Ju; Htut, Aung Thein; Park, Han Ki

    2015-01-01

    A two-month-old infant presented with coarctation of the aorta, severe left ventricular dysfunction, and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. Through median sternotomy, the aortic arch was repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass and regional cerebral perfusion. The patient was postoperatively supported with a left ventricular assist device for five days. Left ventricular function gradually improved, eventually recovering with the concomitant regression of mitral regurgitation. Prompt surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta is indicated for patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. A central approach for surgical repair with a back-up left ventricular assist device is a safe and effective treatment strategy for these patients. PMID:26665108

  9. Central-Approach Surgical Repair of Coarctation of the Aorta with a Back-up Left Ventricular Assist Device for an Infant Presenting with Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Yu Rim; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Do Jung; Kim, Hyohyun; Shin, Hong Ju; Htut, Aung Thein; Park, Han Ki

    2015-12-01

    A two-month-old infant presented with coarctation of the aorta, severe left ventricular dysfunction, and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. Through median sternotomy, the aortic arch was repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass and regional cerebral perfusion. The patient was postoperatively supported with a left ventricular assist device for five days. Left ventricular function gradually improved, eventually recovering with the concomitant regression of mitral regurgitation. Prompt surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta is indicated for patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. A central approach for surgical repair with a back-up left ventricular assist device is a safe and effective treatment strategy for these patients.

  10. Relationship of Multidirectional Myocardial Strain with Radial Thickening and Ejection Fraction and Impact of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy. A Study in a Community-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Homma, Shunichi; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) systolic strain provides additional prognostic value to LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and wall motion analysis. However, the relationship between myocardial multidirectional strain and LVEF, and the effect of LV hypertrophy on this relationship, are not completely understood especially in unselected populations. Methods LV global longitudinal (εL) and circumferential (εC) systolic strain analysis was performed by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in 215 participants from a community-based study. LV radial wall thickening was measured as global radial strain (εR), and LVEF was assessed by biplane Simpson’s method. Results εR was significantly associated with εC (β=−0.56, p<0.01) and with εL (β= −0.18, p<0.01). The contribution of εL to εR was especially evident in subjects with lower εC and in presence of LV hypertrophy (β= −0.30, p<0.01). εL and εC were significantly associated with LVEF (β= −0.36 and β=−0.49, both p<0.01) independent of LV mass and other confounders, and their interaction significantly improved the prediction of LVEF (R-square change=0.14) but not of εR (R-square change=0.002). Conclusions εR is mainly related to εC with a smaller contribution of εL, which becomes especially evident in subjects with lower εC and in presence of LV hypertrophy. Therefore, radial thickening may not detect subclinical LV longitudinal function reduction in normal ventricles and when εC is preserved. While a reduction in εL has a limited impact on εR, it exerts a greater effect on global LVEF, therefore for a more accurate LVEF prediction both εL and εC need to be considered. PMID:23360509

  11. Transseptal Approach versus Left Atrial Approach to Mitral Valve: A Propensity Score Matching Study

    PubMed Central

    Rezahosseini, Omid; Rezaei, Mohamadreza; Ahmadi Tafti, Seyed Hossein; Jalali, Arash; Bina, Payvand; Ghiasi, Atefeh; Karimi, Abbasali; Abbasi, Kiomars; Shirzad, Mahmood; Davoodi, Saeed; Salehi Omran, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many patients with mitral valve diseases need surgical procedures for the repair or replacement of their mitral valve. There is a great deal of controversy over the outcomes of the transseptal (TS) and left atrial (LA) approaches to the mitral valve. We sought to evaluate the outcomes of each approach more accurately by eliminating the possible biases in case selection and matching. Methods: This retrospective study included patients who had surgery for mitral valve diseases via either the TS approach or the LA approach between 2004 and 2011 in Tehran Heart Center. Patients with surgical approaches other than the TS and LA were excluded. To control for the confounding effects, a propensity score matching technique was applied and the patients were matched for 14 demographic and preoperative variables. After the selection of controls, the effect of the TS approach (163 patients) versus the LA approach (652 patients) on the outcomes was presented through odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: The mean age of the patients was 53.15 ± 12.02 years in the TS group and 52.93 ± 13.56 years in the LA group. Females comprised 119 (73.0%) patients in the TS group and 462 (70.9%) in the LA group. There was a significant association in the prevalence of new postoperative atrial fibrillation in the two groups (OR = 1.539, 95%CI: 1.072-2.210; p value = 0.019). Temporary pacemaker placement had no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p value = 0.418). The TS patients had significantly longer pump (p value < 0.001) and cross-clamp (p value < 0.001) times. The mortality rate was 4.1% (27 patients) in the LA group and 6.1% (10 patients) in the TS group (p value = 0.274). Conclusion: In our study population, the TS approach was associated with higher pump and cross-clamp times as well as risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation, but it did not increase the rates of permanent pacemaker placement, re-operations, and mortality

  12. Mass predictions of the relativistic mean-field model with the radial basis function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. S.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Niu, Z. M.; Niu, Y. F.; Sun, B.

    2014-07-01

    The radial basis function (RBF) is a powerful tool to improve mass predictions of nuclear models. By combining the RBF approach with the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model, the systematic deviations between mass predictions of the RMF model and the experimental data are eliminated to a large extent and the resulting rms deviation is reduced from 2.217 to 0.488 MeV. Furthermore, it is found that the RBF approach has a relatively reliable extrapolative power along the distance from the β-stability line except for a large uncertainty around the region at magic number. From the deduced neutron separation energies, we found that the description of the nuclear shell structure and shape transition is also significantly improved by the RBF approach, thus improving agreement with the solar r-process abundances before A =130 and speeding up the r-matter flow. Therefore, a shorter irradiation time is enough to reproduce the solar r-process abundance distribution for the improved RMF mass model, which is closer to the irradiation time for those sophisticated mass models.

  13. A multi-method approach to radial-velocity measurement for single-object spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Blomme, R.; Frémat, Y.; Damerdji, Y.; Delle Luche, C.; Gosset, E.; Katz, D.; Viala, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The derivation of radial velocities from large numbers of spectra that typically result from survey work, requires automation. However, except for the classical cases of slowly rotating late-type spectra, existing methods of measuring Doppler shifts require fine-tuning to avoid a loss of accuracy due to the idiosyncrasies of individual spectra. The radial velocity spectrometer (RVS) on the Gaia mission, which will start operating very soon, prompted a new attempt at creating a measurement pipeline to handle a wide variety of spectral types. Aims: The present paper describes the theoretical background on which this software is based. However, apart from the assumption that only synthetic templates are used, we do not rely on any of the characteristics of this instrument, so our results should be relevant for most telescope-detector combinations. Methods: We propose an approach based on the simultaneous use of several alternative measurement methods, each having its own merits and drawbacks, and conveying the spectral information in a different way, leading to different values for the measurement. A comparison or a combination of the various results either leads to a "best estimate" or indicates to the user that the observed spectrum is problematic and should be analysed manually. Results: We selected three methods and analysed the relationships and differences between them from a unified point of view; with each method an appropriate estimator for the individual random error is chosen. We also develop a procedure for tackling the problem of template mismatch in a systematic way. Furthermore, we propose several tests for studying and comparing the performance of the various methods as a function of the atmospheric parameters of the observed objects. Finally, we describe a procedure for obtaining a knowledge-based combination of the various Doppler-shift measurements.

  14. [Artificial Inversion of the Left-Right Visceral Asymmetry in Vertebrates: Conceptual Approaches and Experimental Solutions].

    PubMed

    Truleva, A S; Malashichev, E B; Ermakov, A S

    2015-01-01

    Externally, vertebrates are bilaterally symmetrical; however, left-right asymmetry is observed in the structure of their internal organs and systems of organs (circulatory, digestive, and respiratory). In addition to the asymmetry of internal organs (visceral), there is also functional (i.e., asymmetrical functioning of organs on the left and right sides of the body) and behavioral asymmetry. The question of a possible association between different types of asymmetry is still open. The study of the mechanisms of such association, in addition to the fundamental interest, has important applications for biomedicine, primarily for the understanding of the brain functioning in health and disease and for the development of methods of treatment of certain mental diseases, such as schizophrenia and autism, for which the disturbance of left-right asymmetry of the brain was shown. To study the deep association between different types of asymmetry, it is necessary to obtain adequate animal models (primarily animals with inverted visceral organs, situs inversus totalis). There are two main possible approaches to obtaining such model organisms: mutagenesis followed by selection of mutant strains with mutations in the genes that affect the formation of the left-right visceral asymmetry and experimental obtaining of animals with inverted internal organs. This review focuses on the second approach. We describe the theoretical models for establishing left-right asymmetry and possible experimental approaches to obtaining animals with inverted internal organs.

  15. Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Euler-Bernoulli Beam Problems: A Radial Basis Function Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Phillips, D. R.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    2003-01-01

    A radial basis function implementation of the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method is presented to study Euler-Bernoulli beam problems. Radial basis functions, rather than generalized moving least squares (GMLS) interpolations, are used to develop the trial functions. This choice yields a computationally simpler method as fewer matrix inversions and multiplications are required than when GMLS interpolations are used. Test functions are chosen as simple weight functions as in the conventional MLPG method. Compactly and noncompactly supported radial basis functions are considered. The non-compactly supported cubic radial basis function is found to perform very well. Results obtained from the radial basis MLPG method are comparable to those obtained using the conventional MLPG method for mixed boundary value problems and problems with discontinuous loading conditions.

  16. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  17. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach.

    PubMed

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  18. 10. GIRDER APPROACH ON YORKTOWN SIDE, SHOWING PIERS 8S5S (LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. GIRDER APPROACH ON YORKTOWN SIDE, SHOWING PIERS 8S-5S (LEFT TO RIGHT), AND FLOORBEAM/STRINGER SYSTEM. VIEW LOOKING NORTH. - George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge, Spanning York River at U.S. Route 17, Yorktown, York County, VA

  19. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach.

    PubMed

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well.

  20. The radial basis function finite collocation approach for capturing sharp fronts in time dependent advection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, D.; Power, H.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a node-based local meshless method for advective transport problems that is capable of operating on centrally defined stencils and is suitable for shock-capturing purposes. High spatial convergence rates can be achieved; in excess of eighth-order in some cases. Strongly-varying smooth profiles may be captured at infinite Péclet number without instability, and for discontinuous profiles the solution exhibits neutrally stable oscillations that can be damped by introducing a small artificial diffusion parameter, allowing a good approximation to the shock-front to be maintained for long travel times without introducing spurious oscillations. The proposed method is based on local collocation with radial basis functions (RBFs) in a "finite collocation" configuration. In this approach the PDE governing and boundary equations are enforced directly within the local RBF collocation systems, rather than being reconstructed from fixed interpolating functions as is typical of finite difference, finite volume or finite element methods. In this way the interpolating basis functions naturally incorporate information from the governing PDE, including the strength and direction of the convective velocity field. By using these PDE-enhanced interpolating functions an "implicit upwinding" effect is achieved, whereby the flow of information naturally respects the specifics of the local convective field. This implicit upwinding effect allows high-convergence solutions to be obtained on centred stencils for advection problems. The method is formulated using a high-convergence implicit timestepping algorithm based on Richardson extrapolation. The spatial and temporal convergence of the proposed approach is demonstrated using smooth functions with large gradients. The capture of discontinuities is then investigated, showing how the addition of a dynamic stabilisation parameter can damp the neutrally stable oscillations with limited smearing of the shock front.

  1. GRACE L1b inversion through a self-consistent modified radial basis function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Kusche, Juergen; Rietbroek, Roelof; Eicker, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Implementing a regional geopotential representation such as mascons or, more general, RBFs (radial basis functions) has been widely accepted as an efficient and flexible approach to recover the gravity field from GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment), especially at higher latitude region like Greenland. This is since RBFs allow for regionally specific regularizations over areas which have sufficient and dense GRACE observations. Although existing RBF solutions show a better resolution than classical spherical harmonic solutions, the applied regularizations cause spatial leakage which should be carefully dealt with. It has been shown that leakage is a main error source which leads to an evident underestimation of yearly trend of ice-melting over Greenland. Unlike some popular post-processing techniques to mitigate leakage signals, this study, for the first time, attempts to reduce the leakage directly in the GRACE L1b inversion by constructing an innovative modified (MRBF) basis in place of the standard RBFs to retrieve a more realistic temporal gravity signal along the coastline. Our point of departure is that the surface mass loading associated with standard RBF is smooth but disregards physical consistency between continental mass and passive ocean response. In this contribution, based on earlier work by Clarke et al.(2007), a physically self-consistent MRBF representation is constructed from standard RBFs, with the help of the sea level equation: for a given standard RBF basis, the corresponding MRBF basis is first obtained by keeping the surface load over the continent unchanged, but imposing global mass conservation and equilibrium response of the oceans. Then, the updated set of MRBFs as well as standard RBFs are individually employed as the basis function to determine the temporal gravity field from GRACE L1b data. In this way, in the MRBF GRACE solution, the passive (e.g. ice melting and land hydrology response) sea level is automatically

  2. Assessing assay agreement estimation for multiple left-censored data: a multiple imputation approach.

    PubMed

    Lapidus, Nathanael; Chevret, Sylvie; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu

    2014-12-30

    Agreement between two assays is usually based on the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), estimated from the means, standard deviations, and correlation coefficient of these assays. However, such data will often suffer from left-censoring because of lower limits of detection of these assays. To handle such data, we propose to extend a multiple imputation approach by chained equations (MICE) developed in a close setting of one left-censored assay. The performance of this two-step approach is compared with that of a previously published maximum likelihood estimation through a simulation study. Results show close estimates of the CCC by both methods, although the coverage is improved by our MICE proposal. An application to cytomegalovirus quantification data is provided.

  3. Exchange of DuraHeart left ventricular assist device via a subcostal approach.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Masashi; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Nishi, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Ueno, Takayoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2012-03-01

    We report a successful case of a DuraHeart left ventricular assist device (LVAD) exchange via a subcostal approach. A 35-year-old woman was implanted with a DuraHeart LVAD due to dilated cardiomyopathy. Approximately 8 months after the implantation, the magnetic levitation system failed. The DuraHeart LVAD was exchanged emergently. The pump was freely dissected via a subcostal approach, avoiding redo sternotomy. De-airing of the new pump and the left ventricle was carefully performed. When the systemic flow was transferred from the cardiopulmonary bypass to the DuraHeart LVAD, an adequate flow was not initally obtained. Positional correction of the inflow conduit was needed to obtain full systemic flow. The postoperative course was uneventful. She was successfully discharged and is waiting at home for a heart donation. PMID:21922278

  4. Modeling left and right atrial contributions to the ECG: A dipole-current source approach.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the mathematical formulation, the numerical validation and several illustrations of a forward-modeling approach based on dipole-current sources to compute the contribution of a part of the heart to the electrocardiogram (ECG). Clinically relevant applications include identifying in the ECG the contributions from the right and the left atrium. In a Courtemanche-based monodomain computer model of the atria and torso, 1000 dipoles distributed throughout the atrial mid-myocardium are found to be sufficient to reproduce body surface potential maps with a relative error <1% during both sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation. When the boundary element method is applied to solve the forward problem, this approach enables fast offline computation of the ECG contribution of any anatomical part of the atria by applying the principle of superposition to the dipole sources. In the presence of a right-left activation delay (sinus rhythm), pulmonary vein isolation (sinus rhythm) or left-right differences in refractory period (atrial fibrillation), the decomposition of the ECG is shown to help interpret ECG morphology in relation to the atrial substrate. These tools provide a theoretical basis for a deeper understanding of the genesis of the P wave or fibrillatory waves in normal and pathological cases.

  5. Electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death beyond the left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Arsenos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2016-01-26

    Sudden cardiac death threats ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Anti- arrhythmic protection may be provided to these patients with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD), after an efficient risk stratification approach. The proposed risk stratifier of an impaired left ventricular ejection fraction has limited sensitivity meaning that a significant number of victims will remain undetectable by this risk stratification approach because they have a preserved left ventricular systolic function. Current risk stratification strategies focus on combinations of non invasive methods like T wave alternans, late potentials, heart rate turbulence, deceleration capacity and others, with invasive methods like the electrophysiologic study. In the presence of an electrically impaired substrate with formed post myocardial infarction fibrotic zones, programmed ventricular stimulation provides important prognostic information for the selection of the patients expected to benefit from an ICD implantation, while due to its high negative predictive value, patients at low risk level may also be detected. Clustering evidence from different research groups and electrophysiologic labs support an electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death. PMID:26839662

  6. Electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death beyond the left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Arsenos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2016-01-26

    Sudden cardiac death threats ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Anti- arrhythmic protection may be provided to these patients with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD), after an efficient risk stratification approach. The proposed risk stratifier of an impaired left ventricular ejection fraction has limited sensitivity meaning that a significant number of victims will remain undetectable by this risk stratification approach because they have a preserved left ventricular systolic function. Current risk stratification strategies focus on combinations of non invasive methods like T wave alternans, late potentials, heart rate turbulence, deceleration capacity and others, with invasive methods like the electrophysiologic study. In the presence of an electrically impaired substrate with formed post myocardial infarction fibrotic zones, programmed ventricular stimulation provides important prognostic information for the selection of the patients expected to benefit from an ICD implantation, while due to its high negative predictive value, patients at low risk level may also be detected. Clustering evidence from different research groups and electrophysiologic labs support an electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death.

  7. Optimization of global model composed of radial basis functions using the term-ranking approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Peng; Tao, Chao Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2014-03-15

    A term-ranking method is put forward to optimize the global model composed of radial basis functions to improve the predictability of the model. The effectiveness of the proposed method is examined by numerical simulation and experimental data. Numerical simulations indicate that this method can significantly lengthen the prediction time and decrease the Bayesian information criterion of the model. The application to real voice signal shows that the optimized global model can capture more predictable component in chaos-like voice data and simultaneously reduce the predictable component (periodic pitch) in the residual signal.

  8. Advantages of a workbench reshaped AR1 mod catheter for right coronary angiography by right radial approach.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Cesare; Mirra, Marco; Di Maio, Marco; Attisano, Tiziana; Di Muro, Michele Roberto; Vigorito, Francesco; Farina, Rosario; Polito, Maria Vincenza; Giudice, Pietro; Piscione, Federico

    2014-03-01

    Transradial approach in cardiac catheterization is increasing. In daily practice, coronary angiography via radial artery is usually performed by using catheters designed for femoral approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate advantages in the use of a workbench reshaped AR1 mod catheter, in terms of procedural duration time, number of catheters per procedure, fluoroscopy time, contrast agent administered volume, images quality and costs. Two hundred patients, submitted to coronary angiography via right radial artery in our institution, have been retrospectively reviewed. Patients have been divided in two groups, depending on whether a workbench reshaped Cordis Amplatz AR1 mod catheter (rAR1 mod), or catheters in their original shape (OC) have been employed. In the rAR1 mod group (100 patients) a lower number of catheters per procedure (1.07 ± 0.25 vs. 1.47 ± 1.65; p < 0.001), a more frequent right coronary selective engagement (76.76% vs. 53.12%; p < 0.001), a smaller amount of contrast agent (63.02 ± 27.77 vs. 80.85 ± 29.22 ml, p < 0.001), a reduced fluoroscopy and global procedural time (4.19 ± 2.91 vs. 5.69 ± 3.85 min, p = 0.004; and 34.58 ± 17.05 vs. 42.58 ± 17.26 min, p = 0.001, respectively) were observed. According to our experience, when right coronary angiography via right radial approach is performed, the utilization of rAR1 mod catheter correlates with multiple advantages in terms of procedural parameters.

  9. Radial Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The ejecta surrounding the crater (off image to the left) in this image has undergone significant erosion by the wind. The wind has stripped the surface features from the ejecta and has started to winnow away the ejecta blanket. Near the margin of the ejecta the wind is eroding along a radial pattern -- taking advantage of radial emplacement. Note the steep margin of the ejecta blanket. Most, if not all, of the fine ejecta material has been removed and the wind in now working on the more massive continuous ejecta blanket.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.5, Longitude 197.4 East (162.6 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. On the applicability of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field in a tokamak edge region

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Joseph, I.; Simakov, A. N.

    2013-08-15

    The use of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field E{sub r}, i.e., the Ampere (or gyro-Poisson) equation, requires accurate calculation of the difference between the gyroaveraged electron and ion particle fluxes (or densities). In the core of a tokamak, the nontrivial difference appears only in high-order corrections to a local Maxwellian distribution due to the intrinsic ambipolarity of particle transport. The evaluation of such high-order corrections may be inconsistent with the accuracy of the standard long wavelength gyrokinetic equation (GKE), thus imposing limitations on the applicability of the standard approaches. However, in the edge of a tokamak, charge-exchange collisions with neutrals and prompt ion orbit losses can drive non-intrinsically ambipolar particle fluxes for which a nontrivial (E{sub r}-dependent) difference between the electron and ion fluxes appears already in a low order and can be accurately predicted by the long wavelength GKE. The parameter regimes, where the radial electric field dynamics in the tokamak edge region is dominated by the non-intrinsically ambipolar processes, thus allowing for the use of the standard approaches, are discussed.

  11. On the applicability of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field in a tokamak edge region

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Simakov, A. N.; Joseph, I.

    2013-08-27

    The use of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field Er, i.e., the Ampere (or gyro-Poisson) equation, requires accurate calculation of the difference between the gyroaveraged electron and ion particle fluxes (or densities). In the core of a tokamak, the nontrivial difference appears only in high-order corrections to a local Maxwellian distribution due to the intrinsic ambipolarity of particle transport. The evaluation of such high-order corrections may be inconsistent with the accuracy of the standard long wavelength gyrokinetic equation (GKE), thus imposing limitations on the applicability of the standard approaches. However, in the edge of a tokamak, charge-exchange collisions with neutrals and prompt ion orbit losses can drive non-intrinsically ambipolar particle fluxes for which a nontrivial (Er-dependent) difference between the electron and ion fluxes appears already in a low order and can be accurately predicted by the long wavelength GKE. As a result, the parameter regimes where the radial electric field dynamics in the tokamak edge region is dominated by the non-intrinsically ambipolar processes, thus allowing for the use of the standard approaches, are discussed.

  12. On the applicability of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field in a tokamak edge region

    DOE PAGES

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Simakov, A. N.; Joseph, I.

    2013-08-27

    The use of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field Er, i.e., the Ampere (or gyro-Poisson) equation, requires accurate calculation of the difference between the gyroaveraged electron and ion particle fluxes (or densities). In the core of a tokamak, the nontrivial difference appears only in high-order corrections to a local Maxwellian distribution due to the intrinsic ambipolarity of particle transport. The evaluation of such high-order corrections may be inconsistent with the accuracy of the standard long wavelength gyrokinetic equation (GKE), thus imposing limitations on the applicability of the standard approaches. However, in the edge of a tokamak,more » charge-exchange collisions with neutrals and prompt ion orbit losses can drive non-intrinsically ambipolar particle fluxes for which a nontrivial (Er-dependent) difference between the electron and ion fluxes appears already in a low order and can be accurately predicted by the long wavelength GKE. As a result, the parameter regimes where the radial electric field dynamics in the tokamak edge region is dominated by the non-intrinsically ambipolar processes, thus allowing for the use of the standard approaches, are discussed.« less

  13. Distributed Generators Allocation in Radial Distribution Systems with Load Growth using Loss Sensitivity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Vijay Babu, P.; Murty, V. V. S. N.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly increasing electricity demands and capacity shortage of transmission and distribution facilities are the main driving forces for the growth of distributed generation (DG) integration in power grids. One of the reasons for choosing a DG is its ability to support voltage in a distribution system. Selection of effective DG characteristics and DG parameters is a significant concern of distribution system planners to obtain maximum potential benefits from the DG unit. The objective of the paper is to reduce the power losses and improve the voltage profile of the radial distribution system with optimal allocation of the multiple DG in the system. The main contribution in this paper is (i) combined power loss sensitivity (CPLS) based method for multiple DG locations, (ii) determination of optimal sizes for multiple DG units at unity and lagging power factor, (iii) impact of DG installed at optimal, that is, combined load power factor on the system performance, (iv) impact of load growth on optimal DG planning, (v) Impact of DG integration in distribution systems on voltage stability index, (vi) Economic and technical Impact of DG integration in the distribution systems. The load growth factor has been considered in the study which is essential for planning and expansion of the existing systems. The technical and economic aspects are investigated in terms of improvement in voltage profile, reduction in total power losses, cost of energy loss, cost of power obtained from DG, cost of power intake from the substation, and savings in cost of energy loss. The results are obtained on IEEE 69-bus radial distribution systems and also compared with other existing methods.

  14. KANTBP 2.0: New version of a program for computing energy levels, reaction matrix and radial wave functions in the coupled-channel hyperspherical adiabatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Abrashkevich, A. G.

    2008-11-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program for calculating energy values, reaction matrix and corresponding radial wave functions in a coupled-channel approximation of the hyperspherical adiabatic approach is presented. In this approach, a multi-dimensional Schrödinger equation is reduced to a system of the coupled second-order ordinary differential equations on a finite interval with homogeneous boundary conditions: (i) the Dirichlet, Neumann and third type at the left and right boundary points for continuous spectrum problem, (ii) the Dirichlet and Neumann type conditions at left boundary point and Dirichlet, Neumann and third type at the right boundary point for the discrete spectrum problem. The resulting system of radial equations containing the potential matrix elements and first-derivative coupling terms is solved using high-order accuracy approximations of the finite element method. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the reaction matrix and radial wave functions for 3D-model of a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field. This version extends the previous version 1.0 of the KANTBP program [O. Chuluunbaatar, A.A. Gusev, A.G. Abrashkevich, A. Amaya-Tapia, M.S. Kaschiev, S.Y. Larsen, S.I. Vinitsky, Comput. Phys. Commun. 177 (2007) 649-675]. Program summaryProgram title: KANTBP Catalogue identifier: ADZH_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZH_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 20 403 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 147 563 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: Intel Xeon EM64T, Alpha 21264A, AMD Athlon MP, Pentium IV Xeon, Opteron 248, Intel Pentium IV Operating system: OC Linux, Unix AIX 5.3, SunOS 5.8, Solaris, Windows XP RAM: This depends on the

  15. Segmentation of the left ventricle using distance regularized two-layer level set approach.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chaolu; Li, Chunming; Zhao, Dazhe; Davatzikos, Christos; Litt, Harold

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel two-layer level set approach for segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) short-axis images. In our method, endocardium and epicardium are represented by two specified level contours of a level set function. Segmentation of the LV is formulated as a problem of optimizing the level set function such that these two level contours best fit the epicardium and endocardium. More importantly, a distance regularization (DR) constraint on the level contours is introduced to preserve smoothly varying distance between them. This DR constraint leads to a desirable interaction between the level contours that contributes to maintain the anatomical geometry of the endocardium and epicardium. The negative influence of intensity inhomogeneities on image segmentation are overcome by using a data term derived from a local intensity clustering property. Our method is quantitatively validated by experiments on the datasets for the MICCAI grand challenge on left ventricular segmentation, which demonstrates the advantages of our method in terms of segmentation accuracy and consistency with anatomical geometry.

  16. Discrimination of Venezuelan spirituous beverages by a trace element-radial basis neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Caraballo, Edwin A; Avila de Hernández, Rita M; Rivas-Echeverría, Francklin; Capote-Luna, Tarcisio

    2008-01-15

    Radial basis neural networks (RBNNs) were developed and evaluated for discrimination of specimens of 'aguardiente de Cocuy', a spirituous beverage produced in the northwestern region of Venezuela. The beverage is distilled from the must of Agave cocui Trelease in an artisanship fashion with little quality control. Forty specimens, with known concentrations of copper, iron, and zinc, were used in this study. The specimens were previously collected in various locations around Sucre Municipality (Falcón State) and Urdaneta Municipality (Lara State). The normalized concentrations of these elements served as indirect descriptors of origin (input data). They were presented to the neural networks through 1-3 input nodes in seven different combinations. In addition, two categories (two collection sites) and four categories (two collection sites+two manufacturing conditions) were designated as output data, in order to assess the impact of such selection on the discrimination performance. The overall performance of the four-category RBNNs was as follows (the input data is indicated in parentheses): (Cu-Fe)>(Cu-Zn)>(Cu)>(Zn)>(Fe-Zn)>(Cu-Fe-Zn)>(Fe). In this case, the highest percentage of correct hits was 82.5%. For the two-category RBNNs, the performance decreased as indicated below: (Cu)>(Cu-Fe)>(Cu-Zn)>(Fe-Zn)>(Zn) approximately (Cu-Fe-Zn)>(Fe). The reduction in the number of categories led to an increase in the discrimination performance of all the RBNNs, the best of which was 90.0%. The possibility of discriminating specimens of 'aguardiente de Cocuy' with such an accuracy, based on a single-element determination, is particularly attractive as it would result in a reduction of analysis' costs and laboratory's response time.

  17. Discrimination of Venezuelan spirituous beverages by a trace element-radial basis neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Caraballo, Edwin A; Avila de Hernández, Rita M; Rivas-Echeverría, Francklin; Capote-Luna, Tarcisio

    2008-01-15

    Radial basis neural networks (RBNNs) were developed and evaluated for discrimination of specimens of 'aguardiente de Cocuy', a spirituous beverage produced in the northwestern region of Venezuela. The beverage is distilled from the must of Agave cocui Trelease in an artisanship fashion with little quality control. Forty specimens, with known concentrations of copper, iron, and zinc, were used in this study. The specimens were previously collected in various locations around Sucre Municipality (Falcón State) and Urdaneta Municipality (Lara State). The normalized concentrations of these elements served as indirect descriptors of origin (input data). They were presented to the neural networks through 1-3 input nodes in seven different combinations. In addition, two categories (two collection sites) and four categories (two collection sites+two manufacturing conditions) were designated as output data, in order to assess the impact of such selection on the discrimination performance. The overall performance of the four-category RBNNs was as follows (the input data is indicated in parentheses): (Cu-Fe)>(Cu-Zn)>(Cu)>(Zn)>(Fe-Zn)>(Cu-Fe-Zn)>(Fe). In this case, the highest percentage of correct hits was 82.5%. For the two-category RBNNs, the performance decreased as indicated below: (Cu)>(Cu-Fe)>(Cu-Zn)>(Fe-Zn)>(Zn) approximately (Cu-Fe-Zn)>(Fe). The reduction in the number of categories led to an increase in the discrimination performance of all the RBNNs, the best of which was 90.0%. The possibility of discriminating specimens of 'aguardiente de Cocuy' with such an accuracy, based on a single-element determination, is particularly attractive as it would result in a reduction of analysis' costs and laboratory's response time. PMID:18371722

  18. A restricted branch and bound approach for setting the left turn phase sequences in signalized networks

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, R.S.; Rathi, A.K.; Cohen, S.

    1994-07-01

    The main objective of synchronized signal timing is to keep traffic moving along arterial in platoons throughout the signal system by proper setting of left turn phase sequence at signals along the arterials/networks. The synchronization of traffic signals located along the urban/suburban arterials in metropolitan areas is perhaps one of the most cost-effective method for improving traffic flow along these streets. The popular technique for solving this problem formulates it as a mixed integer linear program and used Land and Powell branch and bound search to arrive at the optimal solution. The computation time tends to be excessive for realistic multiarterial network problems due to the exhaustive nature of the branch and bound search technique. Furthermore, the Land and Powell branch and bound code is known to be numerically unstable, which results in suboptimal solutions for network problems with a range on the cycle time variable. This paper presents the development of a fast and numerically stable heuristic, developed using MINOS linear programming solver. The new heuristic can generate optimal/near-optimal solutions in a fraction of the time needed to compute the optimal solution by Land and Powell code. The solution technique is based on restricted search using branch and bound technique. The efficiency of the heuristic approach is demonstrated by numerical results for a set of test problems.

  19. Radial engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kmicikiewicz, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    A radial engine is described comprising: a housing; equally spaced openings disposed in ring-like arrangement on the periphery of the housing; a piston and cylinder arrangement in each of the opening, a piston rod for each arrangement fixed to and extending radially inwardly from its respective piston and through its respective opening; shoe means pivotally attached at the other end of each of the piston rod; radial guide means extending in the housing in line with each of the piston rods, and the shoe means provided with guide means followers to ensure radial reciprocal movement of the piston rods and shoe means; and a connecting ring journaled on a crankshaft for circular translation motion in the housing, the ring including a circular rim. Each shoe means includes an arcuate follower member being slidably connected to the rim of the connecting ring.

  20. Comparison of the morphometric features of the left and right horse kidneys: a stereological approach.

    PubMed

    Bolat, D; Bahar, S; Tipirdamaz, S; Selcuk, M L

    2013-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the total volume of the horse kidney and volume fractions of its functional subcomponents (cortex, medulla, renal pelvis) using stereological methods and investigate any possible difference in the functional subcomponents of the right and left kidneys that may arise from differences in shape. The study was carried out on the kidneys of 5 horses of different breed and sex. The weight of the kidneys was measured by a digital scale, and kidney volume was calculated by Archimedes' principle. Total kidney volume and volume fractions of subcomponents of the right and left kidneys were estimated by the Cavalieri's principle. The weights of the right and left kidneys were 550 ± 25 g and 585 ± 23 g, respectively. The volumes of the right and left kidneys estimated using the Cavalieri method were 542 ± 46 ml and 581 ± 29 ml. The relative organ weight of the kidneys was calculated as 1:330. The densities of the right and left kidneys were determined to be 1.01 and 1.00, respectively. The mean volume fractions of the cortex, medulla and renal pelvis were determined as 55.6, 42.7 and 1.7 in both kidneys. No statistically significant difference existed between morphometric data pertaining to the right and left kidneys (P > 0.05). To determine precisely whether differences in shape cause any difference in the functional subcomponents of the right and left kidneys requires further investigation of differences in the number of microscopically functional unit of the kidney such as renal glomeruli and nephrons. PMID:23410249

  1. A Change Management, Systems Thinking, or Organizational Development Approach to the No Child Left Behind Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Dominique L.

    2007-01-01

    Problems with implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) can be assessed in light of change management theory. Viewing stakeholders collectively as a corporate entity supports employing change management strategies to make the NCLB work. Examining ways that organizational controls and change management can work together points to…

  2. Application of an Epicardial Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Device by a Robotic-Assisted, Right Chest Approach.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Clifton T P; Stephens, Richard L; Horst, Vernon D; Angelillo, Margaret; Tyndal, Charles M

    2016-05-01

    Closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA) has become a standard part of any mitral valve operation because it is thought to reduce the potential for late thrombus development and for embolic events. To date, surgeons performing robotic mitral valve operations have been limited to an endocardial approach to LAA closure. However, oversewing the orifice of the LAA is time consuming and lengthens the cross-clamp time, and failures to obtain permanent closure have been reported. We describe our technique for an epicardial approach that is safe and efficient and that gives a secure closure of the LAA.

  3. An Intelligent Approach to Educational Data: Performance Comparison of the Multilayer Perceptron and the Radial Basis Function Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayri, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is twofold: (1) to investigate the factors that affect the success of university students by employing two artificial neural network methods (i.e., multilayer perceptron [MLP] and radial basis function [RBF]); and (2) to compare the effects of these methods on educational data in terms of predictive ability. The…

  4. Feasibility and Safety of Transradial Arterial Approach for Simultaneous Right and Left Vertebral Artery Angiographic Studies and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, H.-K.; Youssef, Ali A.; Chang, W.-N.; Lu, C.-H.; Yang, C.-H.; Chen, S.-M.; Wu, C.-J.

    2007-09-15

    Objectives. This study investigated whether the transradial artery (TRA) approach using a 6-French (F) Kimny guiding catheter for right vertebral artery (VA) angiographic study and stenting is safe and effective for patients with significant VA stenosis. Background. The TRA approach is commonly performed worldwide for both diagnostic cardiac catheterization and catheter-based coronary intervention. However, to our knowledge, the safety and feasibility of left and right VA angiographic study and stenting, in the same procedure, using the TRA approach for patients with brain ischemia have not been reported. Methods. The study included 24 consecutive patients (22 male, 2 female; age, 63-78 years). Indications for VA angiographic study and stenting were (1) prior stroke or symptoms related to vertebrobasilar ischemia and (2) an asymptomatic but vertebral angiographic finding of severe stenosis (>70%). A combination of the ipsilateral and retrograde-engagement technique, which involved a looping 6-F Kimny guiding catheter, was utilized for VA angiographic study. For VA stenting, an ipsilateral TRA approach with either a Kimny guiding catheter or a left internal mammary artery guiding catheter was utilized in 22 patients and retrograde-engagement technique in 2 patients. Results. A technically successful procedure was achieved in all patients, including left VA stenting in 15 patients and right VA stenting in 9 patients. The mean time for stenting (from engagement to stent deployment) was 12.7 min. There were no vascular complications or mortality. However, one patient suffered from a transient ischemic attack that resolved within 3 h. Conclusion. We conclude that TRA access for both VA angiographic study and VA stenting is safe and effective, and provides a simple and useful clinical tool for patients unsuited for femoral arterial access.

  5. Pelvic congestion syndrome and left renal compression syndrome - clinical features and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Jeanneret, Christina; Beier, Konstantin; von Weymarn, Alexander; Traber, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the pelvic, gonadal and renal veins is important to understand pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS) and left renal vein compression syndrome (LRCS), which is also known as the nutcracker syndrome. LRCS is related to PCS and to the presence of vulvar, vaginal and pudendal varicose veins. The diagnosis of the two syndromes is difficult, and usually achieved with CT- or phlebography. The gold standard is the intravenous pressure measurement using conventional phlebography. The definition of PCS is described as pelvic pain, aggravated in the standing position and lasting for more than 6 months. Pain in the left flank and microhaematuria is seen in patients with LRCS. Women with multiple pregnancies are at increased risk of developing varicose vein recurrences with pelvic drainage and ovarian vein reflux after crossectomy and stripping of the great saphenous vein. The therapeutic options are: conservative treatment (medroxyprogesteron) or interventional (coiling of the ovarian vein) or operative treatment (clipping of the ovarian vein). Controlled prospective trials are needed to find the best treatment. PMID:27428495

  6. Percutaneous radial intervention for complex bilateral renal artery stenosis using paclitaxel eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Granillo, Gastón A Rodriguez; van Dijk, Lukas C; McFadden, Eugène P; Serruys, Patrick W

    2005-01-01

    Techniques used in the coronary circulation may be useful in peripheral intervention. We report a case of bilateral renal artery stenosis treated via a radial approach by direct stenting with distal protection at a right ostial lesion and modified crush stenting at a left renal bifurcation lesion using paclitaxel-eluting stents.

  7. Integrated genomic approaches implicate osteoglycin (Ogn) in the regulation of left ventricular mass

    PubMed Central

    Petretto, Enrico; Sarwar, Rizwan; Grieve, Ian; Lu, Han; Kumaran, Mande K; Muckett, Phillip J; Mangion, Jonathan; Schroen, Blanche; Benson, Matthew; Punjabi, Prakash P; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pennell, Dudley J; Kiesewetter, Chris; Tasheva, Elena S; Corpuz, Lolita M; Webb, Megan D; Conrad, Gary W; Kurtz, Theodore W; Kren, Vladimir; Fischer, Judith; Hubner, Norbert; Pinto, Yigal M; Pravenec, Michal; Aitman, Timothy J; Cook, Stuart A

    2009-01-01

    Left ventricular mass (LVM) and cardiac gene expression are complex traits regulated by factors both intrinsic and extrinsic to the heart. To dissect the major determinants of LVM, we combined expression quantitative trait locus1 and quantitative trait transcript2 (QTT) analyses of the cardiac transcriptome in the rat. Using these methods and in vitro functional assays, we identified osteoglycin (Ogn) as a major candidate regulator of rat LVM, with increased Ogn protein expression associated with elevated LVM. We also applied genome-wide QTT analysis to the human heart and observed that, out of ~22,000 transcripts, OGN transcript abundance had the highest correlation with LVM. We further confirmed a role for Ogn in the in vivo regulation of LVM in Ogn knockout mice. Taken together, these data implicate Ogn as a key regulator of LVM in rats, mice and humans, and suggest that Ogn modifies the hypertrophic response to extrinsic factors such as hypertension and aortic stenosis. PMID:18443592

  8. A phase conjugate mirror inspired approach for building cloaking structures with left-handed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guoan; Heng, Xin; Yang, Changhuei

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we propose and examine a new cloaking method, which was inspired by the close correspondence between a phase conjugate mirror and the interface between a pair of matched right-handed material (RHM) and left-handed material (LHM) media. Using this method, we show that a symmetric conducting shell embedded in the interface junction of an isotropic RHM layer and an isotropic negative index or LHM layer can serve as a limited cloaking structure. The proposed structure presents an anomalously small scattering cross-section to an incident propagating electromagnetic (EM) field. The interior of the shell can be used to shield small objects from interrogation. We report the results of 2D finite-element-method (FEM) simulations that were performed to verify the principle, and discuss the limitations of the proposed structure.

  9. An Artificial Intelligence Approach to Automatic Left Ventricular Border Detection in 2-D Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Iris; Covvey, H. Dominic; Rakowski, Harry

    1985-01-01

    A program has been developed for left ventricular (LV) border tracking on ultrasound images. For each frame, forty border points at equally-spaced angles around the LV center are found gradually during three passes. Pass 1 uses adaptive thresholding to find the most obvious border points. Pass 2 then uses an artificial intelligence technique of finding possible border path segments, associating a score with each, and, from paths with superior scores, obtaining more of the border points. Pass 3 closes any remaining gaps by interpolation. The program tracks the LV border quite well in spite of dropout and interference from intracardiac structures, except during end-systole. Multi-level passes provide a very useful structure for border tracking, with increasingly slow but more sophisticated algorithms possible at higher levels for use when earlier passes recognise failure.

  10. A Phase-Conjugate-Mirror Inspired Approach for Building Cloaking Structures with Left-handed Materials

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoan; Heng, Xin; Yang, Changhuei

    2009-01-01

    A phase conjugate mirror (PCM) has a remarkable property of cancellation the back-scattering wave of the lossless scatterers. The similarity of a phase conjugate mirror to the interface of a matched RHM (right-handed material) and a LHM (left-handed material) prompts us to explore the potentials of using the RHM-LHM structure to achieve the anti-scattering property of the PCM. In this paper, we present two such structures. The first one is a RHM-LHM cloaking structure with a lossless arbitrary-shape scatterer imbedded in the RHM and its left-handed duplicate imbedded in the matched LHM. It is shown that such a structure is transparent to the incident electromagnetic (EM) field. As a special case of this structure, we proposed an EM tunnel that allows EM waves to spatially transport to another location in space without significant distortion and reflection. The second one is an RHM-PEC (perfect electric conductor)-LHM cloaking structure, which is composed of a symmetric conducting shell embedded in the interface junction of an RHM and the matched LHM layer. Such a structure presents an anomalously small scattering cross-section to an incident propagating EM field, and the interior of the shell can be used to shield small objects (size comparable to the wavelength) from interrogation. We report the results of 2D finite-element-method (FEM) simulations that were performed to verify our idea, and discuss the unique properties of the proposed structures as well as their limitations. PMID:20126415

  11. A Phase-Conjugate-Mirror Inspired Approach for Building Cloaking Structures with Left-handed Materials.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoan; Heng, Xin; Yang, Changhuei

    2009-01-01

    A phase conjugate mirror (PCM) has a remarkable property of cancellation the back-scattering wave of the lossless scatterers. The similarity of a phase conjugate mirror to the interface of a matched RHM (right-handed material) and a LHM (left-handed material) prompts us to explore the potentials of using the RHM-LHM structure to achieve the anti-scattering property of the PCM. In this paper, we present two such structures. The first one is a RHM-LHM cloaking structure with a lossless arbitrary-shape scatterer imbedded in the RHM and its left-handed duplicate imbedded in the matched LHM. It is shown that such a structure is transparent to the incident electromagnetic (EM) field. As a special case of this structure, we proposed an EM tunnel that allows EM waves to spatially transport to another location in space without significant distortion and reflection. The second one is an RHM-PEC (perfect electric conductor)-LHM cloaking structure, which is composed of a symmetric conducting shell embedded in the interface junction of an RHM and the matched LHM layer. Such a structure presents an anomalously small scattering cross-section to an incident propagating EM field, and the interior of the shell can be used to shield small objects (size comparable to the wavelength) from interrogation. We report the results of 2D finite-element-method (FEM) simulations that were performed to verify our idea, and discuss the unique properties of the proposed structures as well as their limitations.

  12. Strategic approach to concurrent aberrant left gastric vein and aberrant left hepatic artery in laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kuwada, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Satoru; Hori, Naoto; Kubota, Tetsushi; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An aberrant left gastric vein (ALGV) directly entering the lateral segment of the liver is a rare variation in the portal vein system, whereas an aberrant left hepatic artery (ALHA) arising from the left gastric artery is observed relatively frequently. Here we report a case in which both ALGV and ALHA were encountered before laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with curative lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. We accurately diagnosed these vessel anomalies preoperatively on abdominal contrast‐enhanced CT. During surgery, we divided the ALGV at the point of entry to the liver and preserved the ALHA by dividing the branches toward the stomach, in consideration of curability and safety. The postoperative course was uneventful overall, although temporary mild liver dysfunction was observed. This case highlights the importance of preoperative evaluation and preparation in a rare case of concurrent ALGV and ALHA. PMID:26708584

  13. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  14. A fast slam approach to freehand 3-d ultrasound reconstruction for catheter ablation guidance in the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Koolwal, Aditya B; Barbagli, Federico; Carlson, Christopher R; Liang, David H

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for real-time, freehand 3D ultrasound (3D-US) reconstruction of moving anatomy, with specific application towards guiding the catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium. Using an intracardiac echo (ICE) catheter with a pose (position/orientation) sensor mounted to its tip, we continually mosaic 2D-ICE images of a left atrium phantom model to form a 3D-US volume. Our mosaicing strategy employs a probabilistic framework based on simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), a technique commonly used in mobile robotics for creating maps of unexplored environments. The measured ICE catheter tip pose provides an initial estimate for compounding 2D-ICE image data into the 3D-US volume. However, we simultaneously consider the overlap-consistency shared between 2D-ICE images and the 3D-US volume, computing a "corrected" tip pose if need be to ensure spatially-consistent reconstruction. This allows us to compensate for anatomic movement and sensor drift that would otherwise cause motion artifacts in the 3D-US volume. Our approach incorporates 2D-ICE data immediately after acquisition, allowing us to continuously update the registration parameters linking sensor coordinates to 3D-US coordinates. This, in turn, enables real-time localization and display of sensorized therapeutic catheters within the 3D-US volume for facilitating procedural guidance.

  15. Ablation of left atrial flutter in a patient surgically treated for atrial fibrillation. Does it indicate a possible hybrid approach?

    PubMed

    Barbato, Gaetano; Marinelli, Giuseppe; Carinci, Valeria; Chiappini, Bruno; Pergolini, Francesco; Bracchetti, Daniele; Di Pasquale, Giuseppe

    2004-12-01

    Surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) has a high success rate and nowadays simpler and faster procedures have been proposed. The following is a description of the case of a patient who, after a modified Maze procedure, developed an atypical left atrial flutter and underwent a successful radiofrequency ablation procedure. A 71-year-old male underwent surgical biological valve replacement and a concomitant modified Maze procedure. After surgery the patient developed a persistent atrial arrhythmia with severe symptoms and refractory to any drug. For this reason, an electrophysiological study was planned. We performed a three-dimensional atrial mapping using the real-time position management system (Boston Scientific). Right atrial mapping indicated an early activation area on the septum. After transseptal puncture, left atrial mapping showed a reentry circuit around the mitral annulus with positive entrainment. A linear lesion was made between the mitral annulus and the superior right pulmonary vein and sinus rhythm was restored. After 7 months of follow-up the patient is asymptomatic and still in stable sinus rhythm. In conclusion, the follow-up of surgical AF may be improved by close collaboration between the surgeon and electrophysiologist. The available data suggest that a combined surgical and percutaneous approach could be the strategy of choice.

  16. A fast slam approach to freehand 3-d ultrasound reconstruction for catheter ablation guidance in the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Koolwal, Aditya B; Barbagli, Federico; Carlson, Christopher R; Liang, David H

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for real-time, freehand 3D ultrasound (3D-US) reconstruction of moving anatomy, with specific application towards guiding the catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium. Using an intracardiac echo (ICE) catheter with a pose (position/orientation) sensor mounted to its tip, we continually mosaic 2D-ICE images of a left atrium phantom model to form a 3D-US volume. Our mosaicing strategy employs a probabilistic framework based on simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), a technique commonly used in mobile robotics for creating maps of unexplored environments. The measured ICE catheter tip pose provides an initial estimate for compounding 2D-ICE image data into the 3D-US volume. However, we simultaneously consider the overlap-consistency shared between 2D-ICE images and the 3D-US volume, computing a "corrected" tip pose if need be to ensure spatially-consistent reconstruction. This allows us to compensate for anatomic movement and sensor drift that would otherwise cause motion artifacts in the 3D-US volume. Our approach incorporates 2D-ICE data immediately after acquisition, allowing us to continuously update the registration parameters linking sensor coordinates to 3D-US coordinates. This, in turn, enables real-time localization and display of sensorized therapeutic catheters within the 3D-US volume for facilitating procedural guidance. PMID:22014856

  17. SU(1 , 1) and SU(2) approaches to the radial oscillator: Generalized coherent states and squeezing of variances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar; Cruz y Cruz, Sara; Enríquez, Marco

    2016-10-01

    It is shown that each one of the Lie algebras su(1 , 1) and su(2) determine the spectrum of the radial oscillator. States that share the same orbital angular momentum are used to construct the representation spaces of the non-compact Lie group SU(1 , 1) . In addition, three different forms of obtaining the representation spaces of the compact Lie group SU(2) are introduced, they are based on the accidental degeneracies associated with the spherical symmetry of the system as well as on the selection rules that govern the transitions between different energy levels. In all cases the corresponding generalized coherent states are constructed and the conditions to squeeze the involved quadratures are analyzed.

  18. A level set approach for left ventricle detection in CT images using shape segmentation and optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieva, Jorge; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) segmentation plays an important role in a subsequent process for the functional analysis of the LV. Typical segmentation of the endocardium wall in the ventricle excludes papillary muscles which leads to an incorrect measure of the ejected volume in the LV. In this paper we present a new variational strategy using a 2D level set framework that includes a local term for enhancing the low contrast structures and a 2D shape model. The shape model in the level set method is propagated to all image sequences corresponding to the cardiac cycles through the optical flow approach using the Hermite transform. To evaluate our strategy we use the Dice index and the Hausdorff distance to compare the segmentation results with the manual segmentation carried out by the physician.

  19. Endoscopic fluorescence mapping of the left atrium: A novel experimental approach for high resolution endocardial mapping in the intact heart

    PubMed Central

    Kalifa, Jérôme; Klos, Matthew; Zlochiver, Sharon; Mironov, Sergey; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Ulahannan, Netha; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Jalife, José; Berenfeld, Omer

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite availability of several mapping technologies to investigate the electrophysiological mechanisms of atrial fibrillation (AF), an experimental tool enabling high resolution mapping of electrical impulse on the endocardial surface of the left atrium is still lacking. Objective To present a new optical mapping approach implementing a steerable cardio-endoscope in isolated hearts. Methods The system consists of a direct or side-view endoscope coupled to a 532 nm excitation Laser for illumination, and to a CCD camera for imaging of potentiometric dye fluorescence (DI-4-ANEPPS, 80×80 pixels, 200–800 frames/sec). The cardio-endoscope was aimed successively at diverse posterior left atrial (PLA) locations to obtain high resolution movies of electrical wave propagation, as well as detailed endocardial anatomical features, in the presence and the absence of atrial stretch. Results We present several examples of high resolution endoscopic PLA recordings of wave propagation patterns during both sinus rhythm and AF with signal-to-noise ratio similar to conventional optical mapping systems. We demonstrate the endoscope’s ability to visualize highly organized AF sources (rotors) at specific locations on the PLA and PLA-pulmonary vein junctions, and present video images of waves emanating from such sources as they propagate into pectinate muscles in the LA appendage. In particular, we demonstrate this approach to be ideally suited for studying the effects of atrial stretch on AF dynamics. Conclusions In isolated hearts, cardio-endoscopic optical mapping of electrical activity should enable comprehensive evaluation of atrial fibrillatory activity in the PLA, of the role of the local anatomy on AF dynamics and of the efficacy of pharmacological and ablative interventions. PMID:17599678

  20. A Bayesian approach to infer the radial distribution of temperature and anisotropy in the transition zone from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drilleau, M.; Beucler, E.; Mocquet, A.; Verhoeven, O.; Moebs, G.; Burgos, G.; Montagner, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mineralogical transformations and matter transfers within the Earth's mantle make the 350-1000 km depth range (considered here as the mantle transition zone) highly heterogeneous and anisotropic. Most of the 3-D global tomographic models are anchored on small perturbations from 1-D models such as PREM, and are secondly interpreted in terms of temperature and composition distributions. However, the degree of heterogeneity in the transition zone can be strong enough so that the concept of a 1-D reference seismic model may be addressed. To avoid the use of any seismic reference model, we developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to directly interpret surface wave dispersion curves in terms of temperature and radial anisotropy distributions, considering a given composition of the mantle. These interpretations are based on laboratory measurements of elastic moduli and Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. An originality of the algorithm is its ability to explore both smoothly varying models and first-order discontinuities, using C1-Bézier curves, which interpolate the randomly chosen values for depth, temperature and radial anisotropy. This parameterization is able to generate a self-adapting parameter space exploration while reducing the computing time. Using a Bayesian exploration, the probability distributions on temperature and anisotropy are governed by uncertainties on the data set. The method was successfully applied to both synthetic data and real dispersion curves. Surface wave measurements along the Vanuatu- California path suggest a strong anisotropy above 400 km depth which decreases below, and a monotonous temperature distribution between 350 and 1000 km depth. On the contrary, a negative shear wave anisotropy of about 2 % is found at the top of the transition zone below Eurasia. Considering compositions ranging from piclogite to pyrolite, the overall temperature profile and temperature gradient are higher for the continental path than for the oceanic

  1. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    minimizing it on the opposite side. The advantage of this configuration is that it makes it possible to approach the theoretical maximum force per unit area that could be exerted by a given amount of permanent-magnet material. The configuration is named after physicist Klaus Halbach, who conceived it for use in particle accelerators. Halbach arrays have also been studied for use in magnetic-levitation ("maglev") railroad trains. In a radial Halbach magnetic bearing, the basic Halbach arrangement is modified into a symmetrical arrangement of sector-shaped permanent magnets mounted on the outer cylindrical surface of a drum rotor (see Figure 2). The magnets are oriented to concentrate the magnetic field on their radially outermost surface. The stator coils are mounted in a stator shell surrounding the rotor.

  2. Finger necrosis after accidental radial artery puncture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun Sik; Lee, Tae Rim; Cha, Won Chul; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Radial artery puncture, an invasive procedure, is frequently used for critical patients. Although considered safe, severe complications such as finger necrosis can occur. Herein, we review the clinical course of finger necrosis after accidental radial artery puncture. A 63-year-old woman visited the emergency department (ED) with left second and third finger pain after undergoing intravenous (IV) access in her wrist for procedural sedation. During the IV access, she experienced wrist pain, which increased during the 12 hours prior to her ED presentation. Emergency angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm in her left radial artery and absence of blood flow to the proper palmar digital artery. Subsequent angiointervention and urokinase thrombolysis failed. The second finger was eventually amputated owing to gangrene. Radial artery puncture can occur accidentally during IV wrist access, resulting in severe morbidity. Providers should carefully examine the puncture site and collateral flow, followed by multiple examinations to ensure distal circulation.

  3. Harvesting the radial artery

    PubMed Central

    Osterday, Robert M.; Brodman, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    The radial artery (RA) has emerged as an important arterial graft for coronary bypass surgery. With improving five-year patency rates and increasing uptake, great attention has been focused on the optimal conduit harvesting technique. We herein present our approach to RA harvesting. Prerequisites of a successful harvest include adherence to important anatomical landmarks, protection of the sensory innervation to the volar forearm, and meticulous handling of the RA branches. Regardless of the harvesting methodology chosen, adherence to a “no-touch” technique will optimize the patency and durability of the RA conduit. PMID:23977633

  4. A Bayesian Approach to Infer Radial and Azimuthal Anisotropy of the Crust and Upper Mantle from Surface-Wave Dispersion Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenna, M.; Lebedev, S.

    2015-12-01

    A reliable approach to quantify non-uniqueness and to provide error estimates in nonlinear inversion problems, as the surface-wave dispersion curves inversion for the seismic velocity structure of the earth, is Monte Carlo sampling in a Bayesian statistical framefork. We develop a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for joint inversion of Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves that is able to yield robust radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear velocity profiles, with resolution to depths down to the transition zone.The inversion technique doesn't involve any linearization procedure or strong a priori bounds around a reference model. In a fixed dimensional Bayesian formulation, we choose to set the number of parameters relatively high, with a more dense parametrization in the uppermost mantle in order to have a good resolution of the Litosphere-Astenosphere Boundary region. We apply the MCMC algorithm to the inversion of surface-wave phase velocities accurately determined in broad period ranges in a few test regions. In the Baikal-Mongolia region we invert Rayleigh- and Love- wave dispersion curves for radially anisotropic structure (Vsv,Vsh) of the crust and upper mantle. In the Tuscany region, where we have phase velocity data with good azimuthal coverage, a different implementation of the algorithm is applied that is able to resolve azimuthal anisotropy; the Rayleigh wave dispersion curves measured at different azimuths have been inverted for the Vsv structure and the depth distribution of the 2-ψ azimuthal anisotropy of the region, with good resolution down to asthenospheric and transition zone depths.

  5. [Extended aortic arch replacement through gull-wing approach to Kommerell's diverticulum and aneurysmal right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery].

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Okonogi, Shuichi

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 76-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital to treat Kommerell's diverticulum and aneurysmal right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery. We performed extended aortic arch replacement using gull-wing approach. He was discharged uneventfully without any complication. Gull-wing approach method has an advantage of wide surgical field and may be useful for extensive thoracic aortic disease.

  6. Differences between left- and right-handers in approach/avoidance motivation: influence of consistency of handedness measures

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, Scott M.; Wright, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Hand preference is often viewed as a troublesome variable in psychological research, with left-handers routinely excluded from studies. Contrary to this, a body of evidence has shown hand preference to be a useful variable when examining human behavior. A recent review argues that the most effective way of using handedness as a variable, is a comparison between individuals who use their dominant hand for virtually all manual activities (consistent handers) versus those who use their other hand for at least one activity (inconsistent handers). The authors contend that researchers should only focus on degree of handedness rather than direction of preference (left versus right). However, we argue that the field suffers from a number of methodological and empirical issues. These include a lack of consensus in choice of cut-off point to divide consistent and inconsistent categories and importantly a paucity of data from left-handers. Consequentially, researchers predominantly compare inconsistent versus consistent right-handers, largely linked to memory, cognition and language. Other research on response style and personality measures shows robust direction of handedness effects. The present study examines both strength and direction of handedness on self-reported behavioral inhibition system (BIS) and behavioral activation system (BAS) scores, using evidence from a large (N = 689) dataset including more than 200 left-handers. There were degree of handedness effects on BIS and BAS-Fun Seeking, but effects are largely driven by differences between consistent left-handers and other groups. Choice of cut-off point substantively influenced results, and suggests that unless a suitable sample of left-handers is included, researchers clarify that their degree of handedness effects are applicable only to right-handers. We concur that strength of hand preference is an important variable but caution that differences related to consistency may not be identical in right and left

  7. Differences between left- and right-handers in approach/avoidance motivation: influence of consistency of handedness measures.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Scott M; Wright, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Hand preference is often viewed as a troublesome variable in psychological research, with left-handers routinely excluded from studies. Contrary to this, a body of evidence has shown hand preference to be a useful variable when examining human behavior. A recent review argues that the most effective way of using handedness as a variable, is a comparison between individuals who use their dominant hand for virtually all manual activities (consistent handers) versus those who use their other hand for at least one activity (inconsistent handers). The authors contend that researchers should only focus on degree of handedness rather than direction of preference (left versus right). However, we argue that the field suffers from a number of methodological and empirical issues. These include a lack of consensus in choice of cut-off point to divide consistent and inconsistent categories and importantly a paucity of data from left-handers. Consequentially, researchers predominantly compare inconsistent versus consistent right-handers, largely linked to memory, cognition and language. Other research on response style and personality measures shows robust direction of handedness effects. The present study examines both strength and direction of handedness on self-reported behavioral inhibition system (BIS) and behavioral activation system (BAS) scores, using evidence from a large (N = 689) dataset including more than 200 left-handers. There were degree of handedness effects on BIS and BAS-Fun Seeking, but effects are largely driven by differences between consistent left-handers and other groups. Choice of cut-off point substantively influenced results, and suggests that unless a suitable sample of left-handers is included, researchers clarify that their degree of handedness effects are applicable only to right-handers. We concur that strength of hand preference is an important variable but caution that differences related to consistency may not be identical in right and left-handers.

  8. Frequency of radial artery anatomic variations in patients undergoing transradial heart catheterization.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Zvonimir; Bulum, Joško; Ernst, Aleksander; Strozzi, Maja; Marić-Bešić, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    Over the last ten years, transradial cardiac catheterization has been increasingly applied, primarily because of its lower incidence of complications compared to the femoral approach. However, one of the greatest flaws of the transradial approach is a relatively high incidence of catheterization failure (1%-5%). Anatomic variations of radial artery are ranked second among the reasons for this. Previous studies have not provided unambiguous data on the frequency of these anomalies. It was therefore the aim of this study to determine the frequency of anatomic variations using routine angiographies of radial artery during left heart catheterization. This was a retrospective study involving examination of 602 images of routine angiographies of radial artery performed during cardiac catheterization. The frequency of anatomic variations of radial artery was 8.8%, exclusive of tortuosities with a frequency of 12.7%. The most frequent anatomic variation was the high origin of radial artery, found in 31 (5.1%) subjects. Radioulnar loops, being one of the potential contraindications for the procedure, were reported in 2% of cases. Regression analysis revealed that age (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.015) and high origin (p = 0.034) considerably contributed to the development of tortuosity. The results indicated the incidence of tortuosity to increase linearly with age. Although it is not a contraindication for continuing with the procedure, we recommend that elderly patients have angiography of radial artery performed at the beginning of the procedure due to the higher frequency of tortuosity. PMID:26058245

  9. Right-Left Approach and Reaching Arm Movements of 4-Month Infants in Free and Constrained Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morange-Majoux, Francoise; Dellatolas, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Recent theories on the evolution of language (e.g. Corballis, 2009) emphazise the interest of early manifestations of manual laterality and manual specialization in human infants. In the present study, left- and right-hand movements towards a midline object were observed in 24 infants aged 4 months in a constrained condition, in which the hands…

  10. RADIAL STABILITY IN STRATIFIED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Rueda, Jorge A. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2015-03-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting any two phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case.

  11. Thoracic duct injury due to left subclavicular vein catheterization: A new conservative approach to a chyle fistula using biological glue

    PubMed Central

    Anestis, Ninos; Christos, Farazi-Chongouki; Ioannis, Pougouras; Christos, Iordanou; Lampros, Palivos; Stephanos, Pierrakakis

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A thoracic duct injury complicated with a chylous fistula is a rather rare occurrence associated with left subclavicular catheterization. We present a new method of its conservative management which seems to be the least interventional described so far. It can be used in cases of this iatrogenic injury irrespective of the rate of chyle loss. PRESENTATION OF CASE Our case report involves a 59-year-old patient with a high-output chyle fistula due to left subclavicular vein catheterization, in which biological cyanoacrylic glue was used through percutaneous infusion to the venous angle, where the thoracic duct was leaking. An extensive review of the relevant literature is presented. DISCUSSION Most of the high-output fistulas require a long time of conservative treatment, which may result in severe complications due to the prolongation of chyle loss. An operation may be needed in selected cases. Our proposed interventional method can be used in cases of percutaneous injury of a chyle duct, with immediate results. CONCLUSION An iatrogenic chyle fistula due to left subclavicular catheterization can be obtained with a percutaneous injection of biological glue directly onto the injured vessel. PMID:22561237

  12. Left-handed DNA: intercalation of the cyanine thiazole orange and structural changes. A kinetic and thermodynamic approach.

    PubMed

    Biver, Tarita; García, Begoña; Leal, José M; Secco, Fernando; Turriani, Elisa

    2010-10-28

    The conditions under which different structures of left-handed DNA (poly(dG-me(5)dC)·poly(dG-me(5)dC)) can exist are investigated by spectrofluorometric, spectrophotometric, circular dichroism and calorimetric measurements and the kinetics of the transformations are analysed. The effects of temperature, salt and ethanol content on the transitions are also studied. The left-handed structure obtained by addition of either Mg(2+) ions or EtOH corresponds to Z-DNA, whereas the structure obtained using the mixture Mg(2+)/EtOH corresponds to the aggregate Z*-DNA. Upon addition of the fluorescent cyanine Thiazole Orange (TO), the transition Z → B immediately starts, whereas Z*-DNA retains its left-handed configuration in the presence of TO provided that the ratio [dye]/[polymer] ≤ 0.1. The equilibria and kinetics of the TO binding to Z*-DNA are investigated under the above conditions using the T-jump technique. The reaction mechanism consists of two series steps, the first one being characterized by the formation of an external electrostatic complex and the second corresponding to the dye penetration between the base pairs. A comparison with the B-DNA/TO system is drawn.

  13. KANTBP: A program for computing energy levels, reaction matrix and radial wave functions in the coupled-channel hyperspherical adiabatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Abrashkevich, A. G.; Amaya-Tapia, A.; Kaschiev, M. S.; Larsen, S. Y.; Vinitsky, S. I.

    2007-10-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program is presented which calculates energy values, reaction matrix and corresponding radial wave functions in a coupled-channel approximation of the hyperspherical adiabatic approach. In this approach, a multi-dimensional Schrödinger equation is reduced to a system of the coupled second-order ordinary differential equations on the finite interval with homogeneous boundary conditions of the third type. The resulting system of radial equations which contains the potential matrix elements and first-derivative coupling terms is solved using high-order accuracy approximations of the finite-element method. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the energy values and reaction matrix for an exactly solvable 2D-model of three identical particles on a line with pair zero-range potentials. Program summaryProgram title: KANTBP Catalogue identifier: ADZH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4224 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 232 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: Intel Xeon EM64T, Alpha 21264A, AMD Athlon MP, Pentium IV Xeon, Opteron 248, Intel Pentium IV Operating system: OC Linux, Unix AIX 5.3, SunOS 5.8, Solaris, Windows XP RAM: depends on (a) the number of differential equations; (b) the number and order of finite-elements; (c) the number of hyperradial points; and (d) the number of eigensolutions required. Test run requires 30 MB Classification: 2.1, 2.4 External routines: GAULEG and GAUSSJ [W.H. Press, B.F. Flanery, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterley, Numerical Recipes: The Art of Scientific Computing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986] Nature of problem: In the hyperspherical adiabatic

  14. Radial Basis Functions for Combining Shape and Speckle Tracking in 4D Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Compas, Colin B.; Wong, Emily Y.; Huang, Xiaojie; Sampath, Smita; Lin, Ben A.; Pal, Prasanta; Papademetris, Xenophon; Thiele, Karl; Dione, Donald P.; Stacy, Mitchel; Staib, Lawrence H.; Sinusas, Albert J.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Duncan, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of left ventricular deformation can provide valuable information about the extent of disease as well as the efficacy of treatment. In this work, we develop an adaptive multi-level compactly supported radial basis approach for deformation analysis in 3D+time echocardiography. Our method combines displacement information from shape tracking of myocardial boundaries (derived from B-mode data) with mid-wall displacements from radio-frequency-based ultrasound speckle tracking. We evaluate our methods on open-chest canines (N=8) and show that our combined approach is better correlated to magnetic resonance tagging-derived strains than either individual method. We also are able to identify regions of myocardial infarction (confirmed by postmortem analysis) using radial strain values obtained with our approach. PMID:24893257

  15. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  16. Left-ventricle segmentation in real-time 3D echocardiography using a hybrid active shape model and optimal graph search approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Abiose, Ademola K.; Campbell, Dwayne N.; Sonka, Milan; Martins, James B.; Wahle, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of the left ventricular shape and motion patterns associated with left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is essential for diagnosis and treatment planning in congestive heart failure. Real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) used for LVMD analysis is frequently limited by heavy speckle noise or partially incomplete data, thus a segmentation method utilizing learned global shape knowledge is beneficial. In this study, the endocardial surface of the left ventricle (LV) is segmented using a hybrid approach combining active shape model (ASM) with optimal graph search. The latter is used to achieve landmark refinement in the ASM framework. Optimal graph search translates the 3D segmentation into the detection of a minimum-cost closed set in a graph and can produce a globally optimal result. Various information-gradient, intensity distributions, and regional-property terms-are used to define the costs for the graph search. The developed method was tested on 44 RT3DE datasets acquired from 26 LVMD patients. The segmentation accuracy was assessed by surface positioning error and volume overlap measured for the whole LV as well as 16 standard LV regions. The segmentation produced very good results that were not achievable using ASM or graph search alone.

  17. Automatic left-atrial segmentation from cardiac 3D ultrasound: a dual-chamber model-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Nuno; Sarvari, Sebastian I.; Orderud, Fredrik; Gérard, Olivier; D'hooge, Jan; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic solution for segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D cardiac ultrasound. A model-based framework is applied, making use of (deformable) active surfaces to model the endocardial surfaces of cardiac chambers, allowing incorporation of a priori anatomical information in a simple fashion. A dual-chamber model (LA and left ventricle) is used to detect and track the atrio-ventricular (AV) plane, without any user input. Both chambers are represented by parametric surfaces and a Kalman filter is used to fit the model to the position of the endocardial walls detected in the image, providing accurate detection and tracking during the whole cardiac cycle. This framework was tested in 20 transthoracic cardiac ultrasound volumetric recordings of healthy volunteers, and evaluated using manual traces of a clinical expert as a reference. The 3D meshes obtained with the automatic method were close to the reference contours at all cardiac phases (mean distance of 0.03+/-0.6 mm). The AV plane was detected with an accuracy of -0.6+/-1.0 mm. The LA volumes assessed automatically were also in agreement with the reference (mean +/-1.96 SD): 0.4+/-5.3 ml, 2.1+/-12.6 ml, and 1.5+/-7.8 ml at end-diastolic, end-systolic and pre-atrial-contraction frames, respectively. This study shows that the proposed method can be used for automatic volumetric assessment of the LA, considerably reducing the analysis time and effort when compared to manual analysis.

  18. Windmill pitcher's radial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sinson, G; Zager, E L; Kline, D G

    1994-06-01

    The authors present two cases of severe radial nerve injury with different sites of pathology but a similar mechanism: the "windmill" pitching motion of competitive softball. Both patients required surgical intervention with neurolysis, and both improved postoperatively. The literature on related radial nerve injuries is briefly reviewed and pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  20. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  1. Support vector analysis of color-Doppler images: a new approach for estimating indices of left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Alvarez, J L; Bermejo, J; Juárez-Caballero, V M; Yotti, R; Cortina, C; García-Fernández, M A; Antoranz, J C

    2006-08-01

    Reliable noninvasive estimators of global left ventricular (LV) chamber function remain unavailable. We have previously demonstrated a potential relationship between color-Doppler M-mode (CDMM) images and two basic indices of LV function: peak-systolic elastance (Emax) and the time-constant of LV relaxation (tau). Thus, we hypothesized that these two indices could be estimated noninvasively by adequate postprocessing of CDMM recordings. A semiparametric regression (SR) version of support vector machine (SVM) is here proposed for building a blind model, capable of analyzing CDMM images automatically, as well as complementary clinical information. Simultaneous invasive and Doppler tracings were obtained in nine mini-pigs in a high-fidelity experimental setup. The model was developed using a test and validation leave-one-out design. Reasonably acceptable prediction accuracy was obtained for both Emax (intraclass correlation coefficient Ric, = 0.81) and tau (Ric, = 0.61). For the first time, a quantitative, noninvasive estimation of cardiovascular indices is addressed by processing Doppler-echocardiography recordings using a learning-from-samples method. PMID:16894996

  2. Late-presenting left internal mammary to great cardiac vein fistula treated with a vascular plug.

    PubMed

    Franco-Gutierrez, Raul; Estevez-Loureiro, Rodrigo; Calviño-Santos, Ramon

    2010-10-01

    A 73-year-old patient, who underwent triple bypass surgery in another hospital in 1991 after suffering an acute myocardial infarction, was admitted to our institution after an episode of unstable angina. Evidence of a left internal mammary artery grafted to the great cardiac anterior interventricular vein (GCV), with Qp:Qs > 1.5:1, was demonstrated by angiography. We report the closure of said fistula using a percutaneous left radial artery access and the deployment of an Amplatzer vascular occlusion device via the antegrade approach. PMID:20944199

  3. Building a radial spoke: flagellar radial spoke protein 3 (RSP3) is a dimer.

    PubMed

    Wirschell, Maureen; Zhao, Feifei; Yang, Chun; Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis; Gaillard, Anne; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Sale, Winfield S

    2008-03-01

    Radial spokes are critical multisubunit structures required for normal ciliary and eukaryotic flagellar motility. Experimental evidence indicates the radial spokes are mechanochemical transducers that transmit signals from the central pair apparatus to the outer doublet microtubules for local control of dynein activity. Recently, progress has been made in identifying individual components of the radial spoke, yet little is known about how the radial spoke is assembled or how it performs in signal transduction. Here we focus on radial spoke protein 3 (RSP3), a highly conserved AKAP located at the base of the radial spoke stalk and required for radial spoke assembly on the doublet microtubules. Biochemical approaches were taken to further explore the functional role of RSP3 within the radial spoke structure and for control of motility. Chemical crosslinking, native gel electrophoresis, and epitope-tagged RSP3 proteins established that RSP3 forms a dimer. Analysis of truncated RSP3 proteins indicates the dimerization domain coincides with the previously characterized axoneme binding domain in the N-terminus. We propose a model in which each radial spoke structure is built on an RSP3 dimer, and indicating that each radial spoke can potentially localize multiple PKAs or AKAP-binding proteins in position to control dynein activity and flagellar motility. PMID:18157907

  4. Radial head arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, M T; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2010-02-01

    In conclusion, radial head fractures with 3 or more fragments have a high incidence of complications when treated with ORIF including hardware failure, malunion, nonunion, and the need for re-operation. Radial head arthroplasty has demonstrated good success in the treatment of complex, comminuted radial head fractures which are not amenable to non-opeative treatment or ORIF. Success can be optimized by diligent surgical dissection, avoiding inadvertent nerve injury, placement of an appropriately sized implant, repair of associated injuries, and early protected motion. PMID:20214854

  5. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  6. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  7. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  8. Mathematical interpretation of radial shearing interferometers.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D

    1974-08-01

    The procedure for computing a radial shearing interferometric pattern is given. The interferometric pattern is analyzed to obtain the wavefront shape. Restricting the discussion to wavefronts having rotational symmetry, we give two different methods of finding the wavefront. One approach is to scan along a diameter of the interferometric pattern and the other is to examine the shape of the fringes. The relative sensitivity of a radial shearing interferometer with respect to that of a Twyman-Green interferometer is also analyzed.

  9. The application of SHERPA (Systematic Human Error Reduction and Prediction Approach) in the development of compensatory cognitive rehabilitation strategies for stroke patients with left and right brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Charmayne M L; Baber, Chris; Bienkiewicz, Marta; Worthington, Andrew; Hazell, Alexa; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 33% of stroke patients have difficulty performing activities of daily living, often committing errors during the planning and execution of such activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the human error identification (HEI) technique SHERPA (Systematic Human Error Reduction and Prediction Approach) to predict errors during the performance of daily activities in stroke patients with left and right hemisphere lesions. Using SHERPA we successfully predicted 36 of the 38 observed errors, with analysis indicating that the proportion of predicted and observed errors was similar for all sub-tasks and severity levels. HEI results were used to develop compensatory cognitive strategies that clinicians could employ to reduce or prevent errors from occurring. This study provides evidence for the reliability and validity of SHERPA in the design of cognitive rehabilitation strategies in stroke populations.

  10. A case of secondary somatosensory epilepsy with a left deep parietal opercular lesion: successful tumor resection using a transsubcentral gyral approach during awake surgery.

    PubMed

    Maesawa, Satoshi; Fujii, Masazumi; Futamura, Miyako; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Iijima, Kentaro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical characteristics of patients with lesions in the deep parietal operculum facing the sylvian fissure, the region recognized as the secondary somatosensory area (SII). Moreover, surgical approaches in this region are challenging. In this paper the authors report on a patient presenting with SII epilepsy with a tumor in the left deep parietal operculum. The patient was a 24-year-old man who suffered daily partial seizures with extremely uncomfortable dysesthesia and/or occasional pain on his right side. MRI revealed a tumor in the medial aspect of the anterior transverse parietal gyrus, surrounding the posterior insular point. Long-term video electroencephalography monitoring with scalp electrodes failed to show relevant changes to seizures. Resection with cortical and subcortical mapping under awake conditions was performed. A negative response to stimulation was observed at the subcentral gyrus during language and somatosensory tasks; thus, the transcortical approach (specifically, a transsubcentral gyral approach) was used through this region. Subcortical stimulation at the medial aspect of the anterior parietal gyrus and the posterior insula around the posterior insular point elicited strong dysesthesia and pain in his right side, similar to manifestation of his seizure. The tumor was completely removed and pathologically diagnosed as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma. His epilepsy disappeared without neurological deterioration postoperatively. In this case study, 3 points are clinically significant. First, the clinical manifestation of this case was quite rare, although still representative of SII epilepsy. Second, the location of the lesion made surgical removal challenging, and the transsubcentral gyral approach was useful when intraoperative mapping was performed during awake surgery. Third, intraoperative mapping demonstrated that the patient experienced pain with electrical stimulation around the posterior insular point

  11. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  12. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  13. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  14. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  15. Axonemal radial spokes

    PubMed Central

    Pigino, Gaia; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The radial spoke (RS) is a complex of at least 23 proteins that works as a mechanochemical transducer between the central‐pair apparatus and the peripheral microtubule doublets in eukaryotic flagella and motile cilia. The RS contributes to the regulation of the activity of dynein motors, and thus to flagellar motility. Despite numerous biochemical, physiological and structural studies, the mechanism of the function of the radial spoke remains unclear. Detailed knowledge of the 3D structure of the RS protein complex is needed in order to understand how RS regulates dynein activity. Here we review the most important findings on the structure of the RS, including results of our recent cryo‐electron tomographic analysis of the RS protein complex. PMID:22754630

  16. Radial Inflow Turboexpander Redesign

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Price

    2001-09-24

    Steamboat Envirosystems, LLC (SELC) was awarded a grant in accordance with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Development. Atlas-Copco Rotoflow (ACR), a radial expansion turbine manufacturer, was responsible for the manufacturing of the turbine and the creation of the new computer program. SB Geo, Inc. (SBG), the facility operator, monitored and assisted ACR's activities as well as provided installation and startup assistance. The primary scope of the project is the redesign of an axial flow turbine to a radial inflow turboexpander to provide increased efficiency and reliability at an existing facility. In addition to the increased efficiency and reliability, the redesign includes an improved reduction gear design, and improved shaft seal design, and upgraded control system and a greater flexibility of application

  17. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  18. Radially inhomogeneous bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of kinetic theory along with self-consistent field equations, the expressions for dielectric tensor of radially inhomogeneous magnetized plasma columns are obtained. The study of dielectric tensor characteristics allows the accurate analysis of the inhomogeneous properties, beyond limitations that exist in the conventional method. Through the Bessel-Fourier transformation, the localized form of material equations in a radially inhomogeneous medium are obtained. In order to verify the integrity of the model and reveal the effect of inhomogeneity, a special case of a cylindrical plasma waveguide completely filled with inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma was considered. The dispersion relation curves for four families of electromagnetic (EH and HE) and electrostatic (SC and C) modes are obtained and compared with the findings of the conventional model. The numerical analysis indicates that the inhomogeneity effect leads to coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes each having different radial eigen numbers. The study also reveals that the electrostatic modes are more sensitive to inhomogeneous effects than the electromagnetic modes.

  19. Radially inhomogeneous bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of kinetic theory along with self-consistent field equations, the expressions for dielectric tensor of radially inhomogeneous magnetized plasma columns are obtained. The study of dielectric tensor characteristics allows the accurate analysis of the inhomogeneous properties, beyond limitations that exist in the conventional method. Through the Bessel–Fourier transformation, the localized form of material equations in a radially inhomogeneous medium are obtained. In order to verify the integrity of the model and reveal the effect of inhomogeneity, a special case of a cylindrical plasma waveguide completely filled with inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma was considered. The dispersion relation curves for four families of electromagnetic (EH and HE) and electrostatic (SC and C) modes are obtained and compared with the findings of the conventional model. The numerical analysis indicates that the inhomogeneity effect leads to coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes each having different radial eigen numbers. The study also reveals that the electrostatic modes are more sensitive to inhomogeneous effects than the electromagnetic modes.

  20. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  1. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  2. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  3. Radial inflow turbine study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, S.; Elder, R. L.

    1992-03-01

    The radial inflow turbine is a primary component used both in small gas turbines and turbochargers. Better understanding of the flow processes occurring within the small passages of the machine could well result in the improved design of units. As most of the detailed aerodynamics is still ill-defined, a joint research project with the objective of improving our understanding has been instigated by Cranfield, the US Army and Turbomach (San Diego). This document gives the seventh report on the project and describes progress and measurements taken.

  4. Radial cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.C.

    1997-01-08

    The project`s aim is to complete development of the Radial Cutting Torch, a pyrotechnic cutter, for use in all downhole tubular cutting operations in the petroleum industry. Project objectives are to redesign and pressure test nozzle seals to increase product quality, reliability, and manufacturability; improve the mechanical anchor to increase its temperature tolerance and its ability to function in a wider variety of wellbore fluids; and redesign and pressure test the RCT nozzle for operation at pressures from 10 to 20 ksi. The proposal work statement is included in the statement of work for the grant via this reference.

  5. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  6. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  7. Fast Radial Flows in Transition Disk Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Chiang, Eugene; Andrews, Sean M.

    2014-02-01

    Protoplanetary "transition" disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  8. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  9. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    PubMed

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  10. Postoperative normalization of left ventricular noncompaction and new echocardiographic signs in aorta to left ventricular tunnel.

    PubMed

    Malakan Rad, Elaheh; Zeinaloo, Ali Akbar

    2013-04-01

    We report postoperative normalization of left ventricular noncompaction in a neonate undergoing successful neonatal surgery for type II aorta to left ventricular tunnel (ALVT) associated with a large patent ductus arteriosus, floppy and extremely redundant anterior mitral leaflet, right coronary artery arising directly from the tunnel, and severe left ventricular noncompaction. We also described 2 novel echocardiographic findings in ALVT including "triple wavy line sign" on M-mode echocardiography which disappeared 1 month after operation and "abnormally increased left ventricular posterior wall motion" on M-mode of standard parasternal long-axis view on color tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) that also normalized postoperatively. We showed that proper definition of endocardial border is extremely important in strain and strain rate imaging in the context of left ventricular noncompaction. Preoperative longitudinal strain and strain rate were significantly decreased in comparison to radial strain and strain rate. Circumferential strain and strain rate were normal. PMID:23346986

  11. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  12. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  13. Closing left gastroschisis with vanishing left testis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ramnik V; Sinha, C K; More, Bharat; Rajimwale, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    We report a baby boy with gastroschisis with left non-palpable undescended testis who had a defect on the left side of an intact and normal umbilical cord and had associated testicular atrophy and abnormalities of the ductus deferens. They were successfully managed by primary repair and had uneventful recovery. Subsequent inguinal exploration confirmed blind ending vas deferens and vanishing left undescended testis. Our case confirms vascular accidents at the narrow abdominal wall defect can lead to vanishing testis following attempts at closing gastroschisis making the defect narrow and compromising the blood supply to the testis.

  14. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  15. Radial distribution function in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygocki, Wladyslaw

    1997-02-01

    Radial distribution function is a very useful tool for determination of the polymer structure. The connection between the scattered X-ray intensity and radial distribution function is presented. Some examples of RDF for polyethylene and for poly(ethylene terephtalate).

  16. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  17. Optimized Linear Prediction for Radial Sampled Multidimensional NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, John M.; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A. Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Radial sampling in multidimensional NMR experiments offers greatly decreased acquisition times while also providing an avenue for increased sensitivity. Digital resolution remains concern and depends strongly upon the extent of sampling of individual radial angles. Truncated time domain data leads to spurious peaks (artifacts) upon FT and 2D FT. Linear prediction is commonly employed to improve resolution in Cartesian sampled NMR experiments. Here, we adapt the linear prediction method to radial sampling. Significantly more accurate estimates of linear prediction coefficients are obtained by combining quadrature frequency components from the multiple angle spectra. This approach results in significant improvement in both resolution and removal of spurious peaks as compared to traditional linear prediction methods applied to radial sampled data. The ‘averaging linear prediction’ (ALP) method is demonstrated as a general tool for resolution improvement in multidimensional radial sampled experiments. PMID:21767968

  18. Surface plasmon polariton compression through radially and linearly polarized source.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; De Angelis, Francesco; Toma, Andrea; Razzari, Luca; Alabastri, Alessandro; Das, Gobind; Liberale, Carlo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2012-02-15

    We report on the possibility of realizing a radial mode on a metallic conical structure by means of a linearly polarized incident wave. This result is utilized for observing surface plasmon polaritons adiabatic compression on a tapered conical nanostructure. The ingredients for radial mode generation are described in terms of phase-matching of the components of the electromagnetic field. We conclude by showing the robustness of this approach, explaining the polaritonic behavior as a function of the device geometry.

  19. Overlapping left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshiro

    2009-06-01

    Cardiac transplantation, a final option of treatment for refractory heart failure, has not been a standard procedure in Japan especially, mainly because of the shortage of donors. However, surgical methods to restore native heart function, such as surgical ventricular restoration (SVR), are often effective for these cases. The Dor procedure has been used for ischemic cardiomyopathy cases presenting with broad akinetic segments. This is a fine method to exclude the scarred septum and to reduce the intraventricular cavity by encircling purse-string suture, but it may produce a postoperative spherical ventricular shape as a result of endoventricular patch repair. Also, partial left ventriculectomy is not recommended for non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy cases for now. A modification of these SVR and surgical approaches to functional mitral regurgitation has been named "overlapping ventriculoplasty" without endoventricular patch and resection of viable cardiac muscle, and "mitral complex reconstruction", which consists of mitral annuloplasty, papillary muscle approximation, and suspension. Although the long-term prognosis of these procedures is undetermined, they could be an important option, at least as an alternative bridge to transplantation. This review will describe the concepts and some technical aspects of these procedures for the end-stage heart. PMID:19474505

  20. Left atrial appendage occlusion.

    PubMed

    Alli, Oluseun; Holmes, David

    2015-06-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion for stroke and thromboembolism prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a significant advancement in the field of cardiovascular disease. Prevention and avoidance of the devastating consequences of thromboembolic complications from AF continues to be central in the management of these patients. The role of LAA as a nidus for thrombus formation is well documented. Multiple approaches to exclude the LAA from the circulation either percutaneously or surgically have been described and are undergoing testing. Although pharmacological therapy for stroke prevention remains the cornerstone of treatment, device and surgical exclusion of the LAA have proven to be viable alternatives in carefully selected patients. Even though current evidence show that LAA occlusion is safe and effective, approval and adoption of this strategy has been quite difficult due to paucity of randomised clinical trial data on the risk and benefit ratio, cost effectiveness and the issues of procedural risk as well as longer-term outcome. This review aims to provide an update on the current status of LAA occlusion, specifically looking at interpretation of current clinical data, available techniques and devices, issues with current devices and future direction. PMID:25518846

  1. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  2. Radial Electromagnetic Press for Ignitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, A.; Capriccioli, A.; Gasparotto, M.; Palmieri, A.; Rita, C.; Roccella, M.; Coppi, B.

    1996-11-01

    The active vertical press included so far in the Ignitor design can be substituted advantageously (e.g. in terms of the machine maintenance procedure) by a radial electromagnetic press, without involving modification of the main machine components. Only the bracing ring of the radial mechanical preloading system that is permanently applied requires some changes. The radial press has to compensate for the reduced ring load (from 200 MN to 120 MN) and the original vertical press load of 35 MN. To get an equivalent preloading system, the radial press load has to be 140 MN, which is 25 MN higher, to account for the lower efficiency of the radial load. The current needed to originate the 140 MN force is about 3.2 MA. The press is active for 2 s starting from the plasma current rise. The temperature increase is about 20 ^oC. The stray field at the plasma border is well within the allowable value and can be easily compensated by varying slightly the current of one couple of poloidal coils. The new machine layout is illustrated and the electromagnetic and mechanical analyses carried out for the new configuration are given. Sponsored by ENEA, CNR and ASP, of Italy, and by the US DoE

  3. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively. PMID:26917105

  4. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively.

  5. Fractures of the Radial Head.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Klaus Josef; Wegmann, Kilian; Müller, Lars P; Gohlke, Frank E

    2015-11-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures around the elbow. Because they are often accompanied by ligamentous injuries, we recommend considering them to be osteoligamentous injuries rather than simple fractures, even in undisplaced or minimally displaced fractures. Surgeons should always suspect and actively exclude concomitant ligament tears. The incidence of these associated injuries increases with greater severity of the radial head fracture. However, the standard Mason classification system does not adequately address this problem, and all attempts to establish a new classification system that provides concise treatment algorithms have failed. This article discusses the current treatment options and the current controversies in nonsurgical therapy, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and radial head replacement. PMID:26498543

  6. On radial flow between parallel disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, A. Y. L.; Gorin, A.

    2015-04-01

    Approximate analytical solutions are presented for converging flow in between two parallel non rotating disks. The static pressure distribution and radial component of the velocity are developed by averaging the inertial term across the gap in between parallel disks. The predicted results from the first approximation are favourable to experimental results as well as results presented by other authors. The second approximation shows that as the fluid approaches the center, the velocity at the mid channel slows down which is due to the struggle between the inertial term and the flowrate.

  7. [Left-handed painters].

    PubMed

    Lanthony, P

    1995-03-01

    The role of the right hemisphere in the building of our visual space is now well established. The purpose of the present research was to determine the proportion of left handed painters, and to identify famous painters which were left-handed. The methods were as follows. First, the study of the portraits of the painters; but self-portraits were worthless (right-handed painters often painting themself as observed in the mirror, i.e. left-handed). Therefore, only portraits of painters made by another painter or by photography were used. Secondly, the orientation of the hatchings used by the artist for the representation of the shadows in the drawing: the right-handed artist making hatchings descending from right to left, and the left-handed artist making hatchings descending from left to right. Thirdly, the study of the relevant literature about history of art. The studied population included 500 painters divided in two groups: a population of 127 painters studied by portraits and hatchings; and a population of 373 painters studied only by hatchings. In the first population, the proportion of left-handed painters was 4.7%. In the second population, the proportion of left-handed painters was 2.1%. Among the 500 painters they were 14 left-handed subjects, i.e. 2.8%. These 14 painters were, in alphabetical order: Cambiaso, Dufy, Escher, Füssli, Grandville, Holbein, Klee, De La Patellière, Léonard de Vinci, Menzel, Montelupo, Papety, Regnault, Van Goyen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma: frequent involvement of the left colon and rectum and late-onset presentation supports a universal screening approach.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Douglas J; Brand, Randall E; Hu, Huankai; Bahary, Nathan; Dudley, Beth; Chiosea, Simon I; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2013-11-01

    The optimal strategy for screening patients with colorectal carcinoma for Lynch syndrome (LS) is a subject of continued debate in the literature with some advocating universal screening while others arguing for selective screening. We evaluated 1292 colorectal carcinomas for DNA mismatch repair protein abnormalities and identified 150 (11.6%) tumors demonstrating high-levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H). MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were divided into sporadic (112/1292, 8.7%) and LS/probable LS-associated (38/1292, 2.9%) groups based on BRAF V600E mutation, MLH1 promoter hypermethylation, cancer history, and germline mismatch repair gene mutation. All MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were analyzed for grade, location, and tumor histology. The utility of the revised Bethesda guidelines and published predictive pathology models for MSI-H colorectal carcinomas (PREDICT and MSPath) were evaluated. Left-sided MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were more frequently associated with LS compared with right-sided MSI-H colorectal carcinomas (12/21, 57% versus 26/129, 20%, P = .0008). There was no significant difference in histology between sporadic MSI-H and LS/probable LS-associated colorectal carcinomas except for a slightly higher proportion of sporadic MSI-H tumors demonstrating tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (81% versus 61%, P = .015). Neither pathology predictive model identified all LS-associated colorectal carcinomas (PREDICT: 33/38, 87%; MSPath: 35/38, 92%). 12/117 (10%) MSI-H colorectal carcinomas identified in patients >60 years were LS/probable LS-associated. Our results demonstrate that models of predicting MSI-H fail to identify LS-associated colorectal carcinoma given their reliance on right-sided location. A significant proportion (32%) of LS-associated colorectal carcinoma is identified in patients >60 years. Finally, our results demonstrate similar morphologic features between LS-associated and sporadic MSI-H colorectal carcinomas.

  9. Clinical assessment of left ventricular rotation and strain: a novel approach for quantification of function in infarcted myocardium and its border zones.

    PubMed

    Helle-Valle, Thomas; Remme, Espen W; Lyseggen, Erik; Pettersen, Eirik; Vartdal, Trond; Opdahl, Anders; Smith, Hans-Jørgen; Osman, Nael F; Ihlen, Halfdan; Edvardsen, Thor; Smiseth, Otto A

    2009-07-01

    Left ventricular (LV) circumferential strain and rotation have been introduced as clinical markers of myocardial function. This study investigates how regional LV apical rotation and strain can be used in combination to assess function in the infarcted ventricle. In healthy subjects (n = 15) and patients with myocardial infarction (n = 23), LV apical segmental rotation and strain were measured from apical short-axis recordings by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and MRI tagging. Infarct extent was determined by late gadolinium enhancement MRI. To investigate mechanisms of changes in strain and rotation, we used a mathematical finite element simulation model of the LV. Mean apical rotation and strain by STE were lower in patients than in healthy subjects (9.0 +/- 4.9 vs. 12.9 +/- 3.5 degrees and -13.9 +/- 10.7 vs. -23.8 +/- 2.3%, respectively, P < 0.05). In patients, regional strain was reduced in proportion to segmental infarct extent (r = 0.80, P < 0.0001). Regional rotation, however, was similar in the center of the infarct and in remote viable myocardium. Minimum and maximum rotations were found at the infarct borders: minimum rotation at the border zone opposite to the direction of apical rotation, and maximum rotation at the border zone in the direction of rotation. The simulation model reproduced the clinical findings and indicated that the dissociation between rotation and strain was caused by mechanical interactions between infarcted and viable myocardium. Systolic strain reflects regional myocardial function and infarct extent, whereas systolic rotation defines infarct borders in the LV apical region. Regional rotation, however, has limited ability to quantify regional myocardial dysfunction.

  10. Loeys-Dietz syndrome with bilateral radial head dislocations: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarush; Agashe, Mandar V; Dhamele, Jaideep; Aroojis, Alaric J; Mehta, Rujuta

    2013-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome is characterised by vascular aneurysms, hypertelorism, and a bifid uvula. We report on an 11-year-old boy with Loeys-Dietz syndrome who presented with bilateral radial head dislocations and severe osteopaenia with changes of avascular necrosis in both hips causing an out-toeing, wide gait. Considering the poor prognosis for elbow movement and possible radial head dysplasia, surgical reduction of the radial heads was deferred. A subtrochanteric de-rotation osteotomy of the left hip was performed to improve the gait.

  11. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  12. Left-Handed Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipson, Alice M.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of left-handedness are discussed: etiology and associated learning and developmental disorders; right-brain dominance and how to detect it; adaptations to the physical learning environment; behavior patterns; and teaching techniques. (JW)

  13. Left heart ventricular angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the left side of the heart. Blood volumes and pressures are also normal. ... of the catheter Heart failure due to the volume of the dye Infection Kidney failure from the dye Low blood pressure Heart attack Hemorrhage Stroke

  14. Parachute drag and radial force

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a combination of old and new wind tunnel data in a format which illustrates the effects of inflated diameter, geometric porosity, reefing line length, suspension line length, number of gores, and number of ribbons on parachute drag. A new definition of radial force coefficient is presented, as well as a universal drag curve for flat circular and conical parachutes.

  15. Outcomes Following Radial Head Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John R; Henry, Sarah E; Xu, Peter; Goitz, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Most current series of radial head arthroplasty include small numbers of patients with short- to medium-term follow-up and significant heterogeneity in patients, treatments, and outcome measures. The purpose of this systematic review was to review outcomes for radial head arthroplasty based on injury chronicity, injury pattern, and type of implant used. The authors systematically searched electronic databases for studies containing radial head arthroplasty or radial head replacement and identified 19 studies for inclusion in the analysis. For each included study, a composite mean was obtained for Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) and range of motion. Outcomes were said to differ significantly if their confidence intervals did not overlap. The MEPS for acute treatment (90) was higher than that for delayed treatment (81). There was no difference in the pooled MEPS between the isolated (89) and complex injury pattern (87) groups or implant material. There was no difference in range of motion between the acute and delayed or isolated and complex groups, but the average degree of pronation was higher in patients treated with titanium implants (76°) compared with cobalt chromium implants (66°). This systematic review suggests that outcomes are improved following acute arthroplasty for treatment of radial head fractures compared with delayed treatment, based on MEPS. The lack of other significant differences detected is likely due to the significant heterogeneity and inadequate power in current studies. Further prospective studies isolating the different variables will be needed to determine their true effect on outcomes. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):153-160.]. PMID:27045484

  16. RADIAL VELOCITY ECLIPSE MAPPING OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-20

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter–McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin–orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  17. Calibration of cameras with radially symmetric distortion.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Jean-Philippe; Sturm, Peter; Trudeau, Martin; Roy, Sébastien

    2009-09-01

    We present algorithms for plane-based calibration of general radially distorted cameras. By this, we understand cameras that have a distortion center and an optical axis such that the projection rays of pixels lying on a circle centered on the distortion center form a right viewing cone centered on the optical axis. The camera is said to have a single viewpoint (SVP) if all such viewing cones have the same apex (the optical center); otherwise, we speak of NSVP cases. This model encompasses the classical radial distortion model [5], fisheyes, and most central or noncentral catadioptric cameras. Calibration consists in the estimation of the distortion center, the opening angles of all viewing cones, and their optical centers. We present two approaches of computing a full calibration from dense correspondences of a single or multiple planes with known euclidean structure. The first one is based on a geometric constraint linking viewing cones and their intersections with the calibration plane (conic sections). The second approach is a homography-based method. Experiments using simulated and a broad variety of real cameras show great stability. Furthermore, we provide a comparison with Hartley-Kang's algorithm [12], which, however, cannot handle such a broad variety of camera configurations, showing similar performance.

  18. Functional connectivity of the left and right hippocampi: Evidence for functional lateralization along the long-axis using meta-analytic approaches and ultra-high field functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer L; Salibi, Nouha; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2016-07-15

    Theories regarding the functional specialization of the hippocampus date back to over a century ago. Two main theories have dominated the field. First, evidence has supported the notion of hemispheric specialization, which appears to be preserved across species. Second, an emergent and mounting set of data has suggested an anterior-posterior neurofunctional gradient. However, no study has examined these theories, and their potential interaction, using objective, robust methodological approaches. Here, we employed an established meta-analytic technique and use ultra-high field, high-resolution functional and structural neuroimaging to examine hippocampal lateralization with consideration for a long-axis differentiation. Data revealed strong support for an evolutionarily preserved hemispheric specialization. Specifically, we found intra- and interhemispheric differences with regard to anterior and posterior functional and structural connectivity, between the right and left hippocampi. For task-independent functional connectivity, we found the right anterior hippocampus to have functional connectivity with a large, distributed network, whereas the left anterior hippocampus demonstrated primarily fronto-limbic connectivity. These patterns were reversed for the posterior segmentations. Not surprisingly, for task-dependent connectivity, we found interhemispheric differences within key ipsilateral structures (i.e., parahippocampal gyrus) for both anterior and posterior segmentations. Furthermore, we identified pivotal neural hubs that share connectivity across behavioral domains, and are supported by structural connectivity (i.e., posterior cingulate cortex). Thus, our data provide evidence for a hemisphere-specific, anterior-posterior specialization of the hippocampal formation. PMID:27132046

  19. Causes of Secondary Radial Nerve Palsy and Results of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Wnukiewicz, Witold; Witkowski, Jarosław; Bocheńska, Aneta; Mizia, Sylwia; Gosk, Jerzy; Zimmer, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the causes that lead to secondary damage of the radial nerve and to discuss the results of reconstructive treatment. Material/Methods The study group consisted of 33 patients treated for radial nerve palsy after humeral fractures. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical examinations, ultrasonography, electromyography, or nerve conduction velocity. During each operation, the location and type of nerve damage were analyzed. During the reconstructive treatment, neurolysis, direct neurorrhaphy, or reconstruction with a sural nerve graft was used. The outcomes were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) scales and the quick DASH score. Results Secondary radial nerve palsy occurs after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) by plate, as well as by closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) by nail. In the case of ORIF, it most often occurs when the lateral approach is used, as in the case of CRIF with an insertion interlocking screws. The results of the surgical treatment were statistically significant and depended on the time between nerve injury and revision (reconstruction) surgery, type of damage to the radial nerve, surgery treatment, and type of fixation. Treatment results were not statistically significant, depending on the type of fracture or location of the nerve injury. Conclusions The potential risk of radial nerve neurotmesis justifies an operative intervention to treat neurological complications after a humeral fracture. Adequate surgical treatment in many of these cases allows for functional recovery of the radial nerve. PMID:26895570

  20. Left colectomy with intracoporeal anastomosis: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Sérgio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney; Bertoncini, Alexandre Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Oncologic laparoscopic colectomy represents a fully validated surgical approach to the management of colorectal cancer. However, laparoscopic surgery for distal transverse and descending colon lesions remains a challenging procedure. A total laparoscopic approach to the left colectomy is an interesting option for critically ill patients although reports in the literature on this subject are scarce and its approach still not standardized because of its selective nature for indication. There are several advantages associated with conduction of totally laparoscopic approach to the left colon. Intracorporeal vessel sealing ensures an adequate lymph node dissection. Moreover, it enables the construction of a well-vascularized anastomosis. Ultimately, the occurrence of late wound complications are possibly reduced for the placement of a low abdominal incision exclusively used for specimen extraction. This paper aimed at describing our technique for a totally laparoscopic left colectomy for distal transverse and descending colon lesions. PMID:25295460

  1. Optimal design of radial Bragg cavities and lasers.

    PubMed

    Ben-Bassat, Eyal; Scheuer, Jacob

    2015-07-01

    We present a new and optimal design approach for obtaining maximal confinement of the field in radial Bragg cavities and lasers for TM polarization. The presented approach outperforms substantially the previously employed periodic and semi-periodic design schemes of such lasers. We show that in order to obtain maximal confinement, it is essential to consider the complete reflection properties (amplitude and phase) of the propagating radial waves at the interfaces between Bragg layers. When these properties are taken into account, we find that it is necessary to introduce a wider ("half-wavelength") layer at a specific radius in the "quarter-wavelength" radial Bragg stack. It is shown that this radius corresponds to the cylindrical equivalent of Brewster's angle. The confinement and field profile are calculated numerically by means of transfer matrix method.

  2. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a congenital heart condition that occurs during the development of the heart in the ... womb. During the heart's development, parts of the left side of the heart (mitral valve, left ventricle ...

  3. Propagation of transverse waves in a radially expanding plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solodyna, C. V.; Belcher, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the properties of low-frequency transverse waves in an expanding plasma. The wave vector, the background magnetic field, and the streaming velocity of the plasma are all assumed to lie along the radial direction. Expressions are presented for the radial dependence of the amplitude and phase of left and right circularly polarized waves, correct to first order in the wave frequency divided by the proton cyclotron frequency. Differences in the phase velocities of these two circular polarizations result in a Faraday rotation that can be substantial for typical interplanetary conditions near 1 AU. The implications of these results for a realistic solar wind model with the interplanetary magnetic field along the spiral direction are also considered.

  4. Free-floating left atrial ball thrombus after mitral valve replacement with patent coronary artery bypass grafts: successful removal by a right minithoracotomy approach without aortic cross-clamp.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Kazuki; Hashizume, Koji; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Miura, Takashi; Matsukuma, Seiji; Yokose, Shogo; Kitamura, Tessho; Shimada, Takashi; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2016-06-01

    A free-floating thrombus in the left atrium without attachment to either the atrial wall or the mitral valve is extremely rare. We describe a case in a 79-year-old woman with chronic atrial fibrillation and a recent stroke who had undergone mitral valve replacement 25 years previously and coronary artery bypass grafting 5 years previously. Redo cardiac surgery represents a clinical challenge due to a higher rate of peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Median re-sternotomy can be particularly difficult in patients with functioning coronary artery grafts, where the risk of graft injury is a significant concern. Prompt surgical intervention was carried out, and to avoid the challenge of re-sternotomy in this patient with two prior thoracotomies, we successfully removed the thrombus by a right minithoracotomy approach without aortic cross-clamping. There was no postoperative occurrence of a new stroke or aggravation of the pre-existing stroke.

  5. Radial coordinates for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogervorst, Matthijs; Rychkov, Slava

    2013-05-01

    We develop the theory of conformal blocks in CFTd expressing them as power series with Gegenbauer polynomial coefficients. Such series have a clear physical meaning when the conformal block is analyzed in radial quantization: individual terms describe contributions of descendants of a given spin. Convergence of these series can be optimized by a judicious choice of the radial quantization origin. We argue that the best choice is to insert the operators symmetrically. We analyze in detail the resulting “ρ-series” and show that it converges much more rapidly than for the commonly used variable z. We discuss how these conformal block representations can be used in the conformal bootstrap. In particular, we use them to derive analytically some bootstrap bounds whose existence was previously found numerically.

  6. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  7. Asymmetry of Radial and Symmetry of Tangential Neuronal Migration Pathways in Developing Human Fetal Brains

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yuta; Song, Jae W.; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-01-01

    The radial and tangential neural migration pathways are two major neuronal migration streams in humans that are critical during corticogenesis. Corticogenesis is a complex process of neuronal proliferation that is followed by neuronal migration and the formation of axonal connections. Existing histological assessments of these two neuronal migration pathways have limitations inherent to microscopic studies and are confined to small anatomic regions of interest (ROIs). Thus, little evidence is available about their three-dimensional (3-D) fiber pathways and development throughout the entire brain. In this study, we imaged and analyzed radial and tangential migration pathways in the whole human brain using high-angular resolution diffusion MR imaging (HARDI) tractography. We imaged ten fixed, postmortem fetal (17 gestational weeks (GW), 18 GW, 19 GW, three 20 GW, three 21 GW and 22 GW) and eight in vivo newborn (two 30 GW, 34 GW, 35 GW and four 40 GW) brains with no neurological/pathological conditions. We statistically compared the volume of the left and right radial and tangential migration pathways, and the volume of the radial migration pathways of the anterior and posterior regions of the brain. In specimens 22 GW or younger, the volume of radial migration pathways of the left hemisphere was significantly larger than that of the right hemisphere. The volume of posterior radial migration pathways was also larger when compared to the anterior pathways in specimens 22 GW or younger. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the radial migration pathways of brains older than 22 GW. Moreover, our study did not identify any significant differences in volumetric laterality in the tangential migration pathways. These results suggest that these two neuronal migration pathways develop and regress differently, and radial neuronal migration varies regionally based on hemispheric and anterior-posterior laterality, potentially explaining regional differences in

  8. Dropwise Condensation on a Radial Gradient Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    In transient dropwise condensation from steam onto a cool surface, distributions of drops evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence. This study examines how surface functionalization affects drop growth and coalescence. Surfaces are treated by silanization to deliver either a spatially uniform contact-angle (hydrophilic, neutral, and hydrophobic) or a radial gradient of contact-angles. The time evolution of number-density and associated drop-size distributions are reported. For a typical condensation experiment on a uniform angle surface, the number-density curves show two regimes: an initial increase in number-density as a result of nucleation and a subsequent decrease in number-density as a result of larger scale coalescence events. Without a removal mechanism, the fractional coverage, regardless of treatment, approaches unity. For the same angle-surface, the associated drop-size distributions progress through four different shapes along the growth curve. In contrast, for a radial gradient surface where removal by sweeping occurs, the number-density increases and then levels off to a value close to the maximum number-density that is well below unity coverage and only two shapes of distributions are observed. Implications for heat transfer will be discussed. This work was supported by a NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  9. The Children Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Sarah A.; Gillard, Sharlett

    2012-01-01

    This article explores some of the deficits in our educational system in regard to non-hearing students. It has become agonizingly clear that non-hearing students are being left out of the gallant sweep to enrich our children's educations. The big five areas of literacy, at best, present unique challenges for non-hearing students and, in some…

  10. Accountability Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testani, Rocco E.; Mayes, Joshua A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the reversal of the dismissal of an "unfunded-mandates" challenge to the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) brought by the National Education Association (NEA), several of its affiliates, and a number of school districts by the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. The decision in "School District of the City of…

  11. No Baby Left behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Dorothy

    2007-01-01

    "No Baby Left Behind" was created to have an impact on the school readiness of children in the community today and in the future. Each year, there are an increasing number of students who have learning difficulties. Many of these problems are preventable. Accidents, poor nutrition (of the mother and/or child), drug use, alcohol use, and lack of…

  12. No Adult Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arndt, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Left out of the conversation for education reform, at least on the level of grade school, secondary school, and college are the adult education programs provided across the country. These programs receive a fraction of the funds and respect as mainstream programs do. However, they are sorely needed in Northwest Indiana. The region's early 21st…

  13. No Cow Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remsen, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    As a principal facing the task of figuring out all the complexities of the No Child Left Behind legislation, Kenneth Remsen, has concluded there is a strong belief that testing students is the answer to bringing about improvements in student performance. Because testing seems to be a cornerstone to improving performance, he doesn't understand why…

  14. No School Left Unscathed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The author maintains that the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 brands good schools with "failing" labels, places the heaviest burdens on states that were already striving to meet challenging education goals, imposes inflexible rules, and fails to make good on promises to pay for programs that would help struggling schools meet the demands…

  15. Copy-left and Copy-right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderPlas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Any discussion of open licensing almost invariably devolves into a debate between copy-left licenses and permissive licenses, both sides defending their views with a nearly religious fervor. Copy-left licenses, typified by the GPL family of licenses, require all derived products to maintain the open, GPL license. Permissive licenses, typified by the BSD family of licenses, do not impose such requirements. I'll briefly explore the common arguments put forth in favor of either approach, and discuss some concrete examples of where these approaches have helped or hindered the software packages that used them.

  16. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  17. [Residual left orbital phlebolith. An anatomic-clinical observation].

    PubMed

    D'hermies, F; Hurbli, T; Berges, O; Meyer, A; Morel, X; Lot, G; Cophignon, J; Renard, G

    2000-05-01

    A 29-year-old female patient displayed a dense and hard left orbital mass, inferiorly, 3 years after she was treated through a neurosurgical approach for a left orbital varix. The lesion was hyperdense on CT-scan and was removed through a trans-conjunctival approach, with an excellent result. The histological diagnosis was a phlebolith. PMID:10844320

  18. Bayesian planet searches in radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Phil

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic stellar variability caused by magnetic activity and convection has become the main limiting factor for planet searches in both transit and radial velocity (RV) data. New spectrographs are under development like ESPRESSO and EXPRES that aim to improve RV precision by a factor of approximately 100 over the current best spectrographs, HARPS and HARPS-N. This will greatly exacerbate the challenge of distinguishing planetary signals from stellar activity induced RV signals. At the same time good progress has been made in simulating stellar activity signals. At the Porto 2014 meeting, “Towards Other Earths II,” Xavier Dumusque challenged the community to a large scale blind test using the simulated RV data to understand the limitations of present solutions to deal with stellar signals and to select the best approach. My talk will focus on some of the statistical lesson learned from this challenge with an emphasis on Bayesian methodology.

  19. Radial propagation of geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Robert; Hallatschek, Klaus

    2009-07-15

    The GAM group velocity is estimated from the ratio of the radial free energy flux to the total free energy applying gyrokinetic and two-fluid theory. This method is much more robust than approaches that calculate the group velocity directly and can be generalized to include additional physics, e.g., magnetic geometry. The results are verified with the gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the two-fluid code NLET[K. Hallatschek and A. Zeiler, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2554 (2000)], and analytical calculations. GAM propagation must be kept in mind when discussing the windows of GAM activity observed experimentally and the match between linear theory and experimental GAM frequencies.

  20. Radial thickness variations of Orientale basin ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordell, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    Moore et al. (1974) measure the thickness of Orientale basin ejecta on the basis of filling of individual prebasin craters and a depth-diameter relation for fresh lunar craters. In the reported investigation the concept of filling of preexisting craters with basin ejecta is utilized somewhat differently to ascertain Orientale basin ejecta thicknesses and volume from the Cordillera ring with a radius of 450 km out to almost 2 radii. Briefly, the approach is to assume a reasonable geometric model for the form of Orientale ejecta, calculate how many pre-Orientale craters would be destroyed by the deposition of the ejecta, and match the model to Orientale crater statistics. The results of the investigation show that a radial ejecta thickness function can be derived from crater statistics.

  1. Radial evolution of power spectra of interplanetary Alfvenic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavassano, B.; Dobrowolny, M.; Mariani, F.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    The radial evolution of the power spectra of the MHD turbulence within the trailing edge of high speed streams in the solar wind was investigated with the magnetic field data of Helios 1 and 2 for heliocentric distance between 0.3 and 0.9 AU. In the analyzed frequency range (.00028 Hz to .0083 Hz) the computed spectra have, near the Earth, values of the spectral index close to that predicted for an incompressible hydromagnetic turbulence in a stationary state. Approaching the Sun the spectral slope remains unchanged for frequencies f or approximately .00 Hz, whereas at lower frequencies, a clear evolution toward a less steep fall off with frequency is found. The radial gradient of the power in Alfvenic fluctuations depends on frequency and it increases upon increasing frequency. For frequencies f or approximately .00 Hz, however, the radial gradient remains approximately the same. Possible theoretical implications of the observational features are discussed.

  2. Design and experimental evaluation of compact radial-inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredmonski, A. J.; Huber, F. W.; Roelke, R. J.; Simonyi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The application of a multistage 3D Euler solver to the aerodynamic design of two compact radial-inflow turbines is presented, along with experimental results evaluating and validating the designs. The objectives of the program were to design, fabricate, and rig test compact radial-inflow turbines with equal or better efficiency relative to conventional designs, while having 40 percent less rotor length than current traditionally-sized radial turbines. The approach to achieving these objectives was to apply a calibrated 3D multistage Euler code to accurately predict and control the high rotor flow passage velocities and high aerodynamic loadings resulting from the reduction in rotor length. A comparison of the advanced compact designs to current state-of-the-art configurations is presented.

  3. Left Atrial Drainage of a Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Muhammad; Malak, Sharp F

    2008-01-01

    Although the most common form of the persistent left superior vena cava anomaly is usually clinically silent and often discovered incidentally, the risk of developing cyanosis, heart failure, and embolic cerebrovascular events is high among cases where the anomaly causes a right to left shunt. A rare case of persistent left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium through the superior left pulmonary vein is presented with a discussion of the embryology, morphologic forms, and clinical significance of the persistent left superior vena cava.

  4. [Initial division of the left renal vein before dissection of left renal vein occluded by intracaval tumor thrombus].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiro; Okita, Ryuji; Motoshima, Takanobu; Fujioka, Masashi; Abe, Hiromitsu; Morikawa, Hirofumi; Okaneya, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Hideki

    2011-09-01

    Between November 2008 and March 2010, we performed initial division of the left renal vein occluded by the tumor thrombus in six cases of left renal cancer at Toranomon Hospital. The left renal vein was completely occluded by the tumor thrombus in all cases. In order to ligate the left renal artery first behind the dilated left renal vein, we must dissect the left kidney with arterial blood flow. Massive bleeding from the numerous engorged collateral veins around the left kidney is inevitable. Furthermore, access to the left renal artery is difficult because of the large tumor. We therefore initially divided the left renal vein without arterial blood flow followed by division of the left renal artery. After nephrectomy by dissecting the tumor without blood flow we extirpated the intracaval tumor thrombus. The median time of the operation was 7 hours 35 minutes and the median amount of blood loss was 2,869 ml. The tumor stage was pT3b in four cases and pT3c in two cases. No complications were observed during and after surgery except for one case of lymphocele and another case of chylous ascites. The initial division of the left renal vein is considered to be a useful surgical approach in left renal cancer with occluded left renal vein, especially when the tumor is large.

  5. Close view looking to left side of statue showing left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view looking to left side of statue showing left hand, shield, and laurel wreath - U.S. Capitol, Statue of Freedom, Intersection of North, South, & East Capitol Streets & Capitol Mall, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. An Exact Formula for Calculating Inverse Radial Lens Distortions

    PubMed Central

    Drap, Pierre; Lefèvre, Julien

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a new approach to calculating the inverse of radial distortions. The method presented here provides a model of reverse radial distortion, currently modeled by a polynomial expression, that proposes another polynomial expression where the new coefficients are a function of the original ones. After describing the state of the art, the proposed method is developed. It is based on a formal calculus involving a power series used to deduce a recursive formula for the new coefficients. We present several implementations of this method and describe the experiments conducted to assess the validity of the new approach. Such an approach, non-iterative, using another polynomial expression, able to be deduced from the first one, can actually be interesting in terms of performance, reuse of existing software, or bridging between different existing software tools that do not consider distortion from the same point of view. PMID:27258288

  7. Weighing Rocky Exoplanets with Improved Radial Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuesong Wang, Sharon; Wright, Jason; California Planet Survey Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The synergy between Kepler and the ground-based radial velocity (RV) surveys have made numerous discoveries of small and rocky exoplanets, opening the age of Earth analogs. However, most (29/33) of the RV-detected exoplanets that are smaller than 3 Earth radii do not have their masses constrained to better than 20% - limited by the current RV precision (1-2 m/s). Our work improves the RV precision of the Keck telescope, which is responsible for most of the mass measurements for small Kepler exoplanets. We have discovered and verified, for the first time, two of the dominant terms in Keck's RV systematic error budget: modeling errors (mostly in deconvolution) and telluric contamination. These two terms contribute 1 m/s and 0.6 m/s, respectively, to the RV error budget (RMS in quadrature), and they create spurious signals at periods of one sidereal year and its harmonics with amplitudes of 0.2-1 m/s. Left untreated, these errors can mimic the signals of Earth-like or Super-Earth planets in the Habitable Zone. Removing these errors will bring better precision to ten-year worth of Keck data and better constraints on the masses and compositions of small Kepler planets. As more precise RV instruments coming online, we need advanced data analysis tools to overcome issues like these in order to detect the Earth twin (RV amplitude 8 cm/s). We are developing a new, open-source RV data analysis tool in Python, which uses Bayesian MCMC and Gaussian processes, to fully exploit the hardware improvements brought by new instruments like MINERVA and NASA's WIYN/EPDS.

  8. Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm perceived as a left lung mass

    PubMed Central

    Yaliniz, Hafize; Gocen, Ugur; Atalay, Atakan; Salih, Orhan Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication of aneurysmectomy. We present a case of a surgically treated left ventricular pseudoaneurysm, which was diagnosed three years after coronary artery bypass grafting and left ventricular aneurysmectomy. The presenting symptoms, diagnostic evaluation, and surgical repair are described. PMID:27516793

  9. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  10. Radial superlattices and single nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Ch.; Jin-Phillipp, N.-Y.; Loa, I.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the wall structure and thermal stability of individual freestanding rolled-up nanotubes (RUNTs) using micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Our studies reveal that the walls of the InAs/GaAs RUNTs consist of a radial superlattice comprising alternating crystalline and noncrystalline layers. Furthermore, we locally heated individual RUNTs with a laser beam, and Raman spectroscopy was used in situ to monitor any structural changes. At about 300 °C the heated part of a RUNT starts to oxidize and eventually transforms into crystalline β-Ga2O3. This result shows that RUNTs can serve as nanoreactors that locally synthesize material at intentional places on a substrate surface.

  11. Percutaneous left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Ige, Mobolaji; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Attizzani, Guilherme; Costa, Marco; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2015-04-01

    The ventricular partitioning device known as Parachute is the first and only percutaneously implantable device aimed at restoration of normal left ventricular geometry in humans. Since its conception, this technology has undergone extensive animal and human testing, with proved feasibility and safety, and is currently being studied in a pivotal randomized clinical trial. This article discusses ventricular remodeling and therapies attempted in the past, details the components of the ventricular partitioning device, describes the implanting technique, and reviews the most current experience of this device in humans.

  12. Percutaneous left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Ige, Mobolaji; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Attizzani, Guilherme; Costa, Marco; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2015-04-01

    The ventricular partitioning device known as Parachute is the first and only percutaneously implantable device aimed at restoration of normal left ventricular geometry in humans. Since its conception, this technology has undergone extensive animal and human testing, with proved feasibility and safety, and is currently being studied in a pivotal randomized clinical trial. This article discusses ventricular remodeling and therapies attempted in the past, details the components of the ventricular partitioning device, describes the implanting technique, and reviews the most current experience of this device in humans. PMID:25834974

  13. Left Atrial Appendage Closure Devices

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Perez, Irving E; Krumerman, Andrew; Garcia, Mario J; Lucariello, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk for thromboembolic stroke five-fold. The left atrial appendage (LAA) has been shown to be the main source of thrombus formation in the majority of strokes associated with AF. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin and novel anticoagulants remains the standard of care; however, it has several limitations, including bleeding and poor compliance. Occlusion of the LAA has been shown to be an alternative therapeutic approach to drug therapy. The purpose of this article is to review the different techniques and devices that have emerged for the purpose of occluding this structure, with a particular emphasis on the efficacy and safety studies published to date in the medical literature. PMID:24963274

  14. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  15. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  16. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina; Bae, Kee Jeong

    2016-10-01

    "Buttonholing" of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. PMID:27502623

  17. The Expansion and Radial Speeds of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Dal Lago, A.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.

    We show the relation between radial (V_{rad}) and expansion (V_{exp}) speeds of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) depends on the CME width. As CME width increases, {V_{rad}/V_{exp}} decreases from a value >1 to <1. For widths approaching 180°, the ratio approaches 0 if the cone has a flat base, while it approaches 0.5 if the base has a bulge (ice cream cone). The speed difference between the limb and disk halos and the spherical expansion of super fast CMEs can be explained by the width dependence.

  18. Surface interpolation with radial basis functions for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.C.; Beatson, R.K.; Fright, W.R.

    1997-02-01

    Radial basis functions are presented as a practical solution to the problem of interpolating incomplete surfaces derived from three-dimensional (3-D) medical graphics. The specific application considered is the design of cranial implants for the repair of defects, usually holes, in the skull. Radial basis functions impose few restrictions on the geometry of the interpolation centers and are suited to problems where interpolation centers do not form a regular grid. However, their high computational requirements have previously limited their use to problems where the number of interpolation centers is small (<300). Recently developed fast evaluation techniques have overcome these limitations and made radial basis interpolation a practical approach for larger data sets. In this paper radial basis functions are fitted to depth-maps of the skull`s surface, obtained from X-ray computed tomography (CT) data using ray-tracing techniques. They are used to smoothly interpolate the surface of the skull across defect regions. The resulting mathematical description of the skull`s surface can be evaluated at any desired resolution to be rendered on a graphics workstation or to generate instructions for operating a computer numerically controlled (CNC) mill.

  19. Trajectory correction for free-breathing radial cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Buonincontri, Guido; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Carpenter, T Adrian; Sawiak, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Radial acquisitions can suffer from trajectory errors leading to reduced image quality. Here we present a new method of trajectory correction that uses all spokes of a radial acquisition and compare it to an existing method that uses a two-spoke pre-scan calibration. For both methods, estimates of the necessary shifts were made using magnitude or phase data and the performances were compared. The additional effect of B0 correction was considered in all cases. Mouse cardiac scans were used for the comparisons and we also compared the quality of navigator signals obtained from the radial data with each technique. The proposed method gave improved image quality over the existing method, as assessed by visual inspection and quantitative evaluation of artifacts. The typical shading artifacts seen in radial scans were significantly reduced with both approaches, with phase-based corrections generally outperforming magnitude-based methods. B0 correction gave further improvements in each case. Furthermore, modulation of navigator signals due to the acquisition angle was significantly reduced with the new technique. We show that our proposed method works well to reduce artifacts seen in mouse cardiac imaging that can make faster imaging feasible. PMID:24848290

  20. [Left-handedness and health].

    PubMed

    Milenković, Sanja; Belojević, Goran; Kocijancić, Radojka

    2010-01-01

    Hand dominance is defined as a proneness to use one hand rather than another in performing the majority of activities and this is the most obvious example of cerebral lateralization and an exclusive human characteristic. Left-handed people comprise 6-14% of the total population, while in Serbia, this percentage is 5-10%, moving from undeveloped to developed environments, where a socio-cultural pressure is less present. There is no agreement between investigators who in fact may be considered a left-handed person, about the percentage of left-handers in the population and about the etiology of left-handedness. In the scientific literature left-handedness has been related to health disorders (spine deformities, immunological disorders, migraine, neurosis, depressive psychosis, schizophrenia, insomnia, homosexuality, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, sleep apnea, enuresis nocturna and Down Syndrome), developmental disorders (autism, dislexia and sttutering) and traumatism. The most reliable scientific evidences have been published about the relationship between left-handedness and spinal deformities in school children in puberty and with traumatism in general population. The controversy of other results in up-to-now investigations of health aspects of left-handedness may partly be explained by a scientific disagreement whether writing with the left hand is a sufficient criterium for left-handedness, or is it necessary to investigate other parameters for laterality assessment. Explanation of health aspects of left-handedness is dominantly based on Geschwind-Galaburda model about "anomalous" cerebral domination, as a consequence of hormonal disbalance.

  1. Left-eigenstate completely renormalized equation-of-motion coupled-cluster methods: Review of key concepts, extension to excited states of open-shell systems, and comparison with electron-attached and ionized approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Piotr; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Włoch, Marta

    The recently proposed left-eigenstate completely renormalized (CR) coupled-cluster (CC) method with singles, doubles, and noniterative triples, termed CR-CC(2,3) Piecuch and Włoch, J Chem Phys, 2005, 123, 224105; Piecuch et al. Chem Phys Lett, 2006, 418, 467 and the companion CR-EOMCC(2,3) methodology, which has been previously applied to singlet excited states of closed-shell molecular systems Włoch et al. Mol Phys, 2006, 104, 2149 and in which relatively inexpensive noniterative corrections due to triple excitations derived from the biorthogonal method of moments of CC equations (MMCC) are added to the CC singles and doubles (CCSD) or equation-of-motion (EOM) CCSD energies, have been extended to excited states of open-shell species. The resulting highly efficient computer codes for the open-shell CR-EOMCC(2,3) approach exploiting the recursively generated intermediates and fast matrix multiplication routines have been developed and interfaced with the GAMESS package, enabling CR-EOMCC(2,3) calculations for singlet as well as nonsinglet ground and excited states of closed- and open-shell systems using the restricted Hartree-Fock or restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock references. A number of important mathematical and algorithmic details related to formal aspects and computer implementation of the CR-EOMCC(2,3) method have been discussed, in addition to overviewing the key concepts behind the CR-EOMCC(2,3) and biorthogonal MMCC methodologies for ground and excited states, and the numerical results involving low-lying states of the CH, CNC, C2N, N3, and NCO species, including states dominated by two-electron transitions, have been presented. The results of the CR-EOMCC(2,3) calculations have been compared with other CC/EOMCC approaches, including the EOMCCSD and EOMCC singles, doubles, and triples methods, and their full and active-space valence counterparts based on the electron-attached and ionized EOMCC methodologies, and the predecessor of CR-EOMCC(2,3) termed

  2. RAndomized Comparison of raDIal vs. femorAL Access for Routine Catheterization of Heart Transplant Patients (RADIAL-heart transplant study).

    PubMed

    Scalone, G; Brugaletta, S; Martín-Yuste, V; Seixo, F; Cotes, C; Gómez-Monterrosas, O; Alvarez-Contreras, L; Campreciós, M; Mirabet, S; Brossa, V; Sabaté, M

    2014-12-01

    Although a transradial approach (TRA) is considered feasible in many clinical situations, no data are available in patients undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Our goal was to randomly compare TRA versus a transfemoral approach (TFA) in this clinical setting. This single-center, prospective, randomized trial was conducted from January to November 2006, and all OHT patients scheduled for a control coronary angiography were randomized to receive TRA or TFA. The primary endpoint was the amount of contrast used during the procedure. The participating interventional cardiologists were intermediate-volume radial operators, and this was their initial experience of TRA in OHT patients. The analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Overall, 49 patients (mean age, 55 ± 13 years; 74% male) were included in the trial: 26 patients were assigned to TRA, and 23 were assigned to TFA. A higher amount of contrast (147 mL [range, 113-175 mL] vs 105 mL [range, 86-127 mL]; P = .009), a longer fluoroscopy time (9.2 minutes [range, 6-12 minutes] vs 3.5 minutes [range, 3-5 minutes]; P < .001), a trend toward increased number of catheters used for left ostium cannulation, and a higher crossover rate (19% vs 0%; P = .03) were associated with TRA compared with TFA. Furthermore, patients treated with TRA exhibit a shorter hospital stay (6 [range 4-8]) compared with the other group (26 [range 24-28]) (P < .001). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups regarding total procedural time, and no vascular complications were reported in either group. For these operators with their first experience of TRA in OHT patients, TFA seemed to be more efficient. PMID:25498035

  3. An efficient method for ectopic beats cancellation based on radial basis function.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Jorge; Torres, Ana; Rieta, José J

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the surface Electrocardiogram (ECG) is the most extended noninvasive technique in cardiological diagnosis. In order to properly use the ECG, we need to cancel out ectopic beats. These beats may occur in both normal subjects and patients with heart disease, and their presence represents an important source of error which must be handled before any other analysis. This paper presents a method for electrocardiogram ectopic beat cancellation based on Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN). A train-able neural network ensemble approach to develop customized electrocardiogram beat classifier in an effort to further improve the performance of ECG processing and to offer individualized health care is presented. Six types of beats including: Normal Beats (NB); Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVC); Left Bundle Branch Blocks (LBBB); Right Bundle Branch Blocks (RBBB); Paced Beats (PB) and Ectopic Beats (EB) are obtained from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Four morphological features are extracted from each beat after the preprocessing of the selected records. Average Results for the RBFNN based method provided an ectopic beat reduction (EBR) of (mean ± std) EBR = 7, 23 ± 2.18 in contrast to traditional compared methods that, for the best case, yielded EBR = 4.05 ± 2.13. The results prove that RBFNN based methods are able to obtain a very accurate reduction of ectopic beats together with low distortion of the QRST complex.

  4. [Primary radial head arthroplasty in trauma : Complications].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Buschbeck, S; Wincheringer, D; Weißenberger, M; Hoffmann, R

    2016-10-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries in elbow trauma. Non-displaced fractures are best treated conservatively. Simple but displaced fractures require anatomic reduction and fixation, typically using screws. The treatment course for complex fractures with multiple fragments is still being debated, as results are less predictable. Radial head resection is not advised if concomitant injuries of the coronoid process or the collateral ligaments with instability are present. Favorable outcomes following open reduction and fixation using plates were reported recently. However, complication rates are very high. Radial head replacement is a valuable tool in treating complex fractures of the radial head with predominantly good and excellent results. Patients who suffer radial head fractures are typically of a younger age, resulting in high functional demands. Certainly, unspecific and specific complications related to radial head arthroplasty were reported in up to 40 % of cases in an acute fracture setting. This article highlights common complications in radial head arthroplasty and aims to present strategies to avoid them. PMID:27600571

  5. Radial head fractures--an update.

    PubMed

    Pike, Jeffrey M; Athwal, George S; Faber, Kenneth J; King, Graham J W

    2009-03-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures occurring around the elbow. Although radial head fractures can occur in isolation, associated fractures and ligament injuries are common. Assembling the clinical presentation, physical examination, and imaging into an effective treatment plan can be challenging. The characteristics of the radial head fracture influence the technique used to optimize the outcome. Fragment number, displacement, impaction, and bone quality are considered when deciding between early motion, fragment excision, and radial head excision, repair, or replacement. Isolated, minimally displaced fractures without evidence of mechanical block can be treated nonsurgically with early active range of motion (ROM). Partial, displaced radial head fractures without evidence of mechanical block can be treated either nonsurgically or with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), as current evidence does not prove superiority of either strategy. For displaced fractures with greater than 3 fragments, radial head replacement is recommended. Radial head arthroplasty may be preferred over tenuous fracture fixation in the setting of associated ligament injuries when maintenance of joint stability could be compromised by ineffective fracture fixation. PMID:19258159

  6. Ion radial transport induced by ICRF waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Vaclavik, J.; Hammett, G.W.

    1987-05-01

    The wave-induced fluxes of energetic-trapped ions during ICRF heating of tokamak plasmas are calculated using quasilinear equations. A simple single particle model of this transport mechanism is also given. Both a convective flux proportional to k/sub phi/vertical bar E/sub +/vertical bar/sup 2/ and a diffusive flux proportional to k/sub phi//sup 2/vertical bar E/sub +/vertical bar/sup 2/ are found. Here, k/sub phi/ is the toroidal wave number and E/sub +/ is the left-hand polarized wave field. The convective flux may become significant for large k/sub phi/ if the wave spectrum is asymmetric in k/sub phi/. But for the conditions of most previous experiments, these calculations indicate that radial transport driven directly by the ICRF wave is unimportant.

  7. The sign of four: a new class of cool non-radially pulsating stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, K.

    The author discusses four early F-type stars whose periods are an order of magnitude slower than known pulsators of comparable luminosity. They cannot be stars undergoing simple radial pulsations. For most of these stars, one can discount the possibility that the variability is due to rotational modulation of star spots, interactions with (or tidal distortions by) a close companion, or obscuration by a rotating lumpy ring of dust orbiting the star. They are certainly not eclipsing binaries. The only possibility left seems to be non-radial pulsations, though this explanation involves difficulties of its own. If they are indeed pulsating stars exhibiting non-radial gravity modes, they would be the first stars on the cool side of the Cepheid instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to be so identified.

  8. Radial Artery Coursing Behind the Biceps Brachii Tendon: Significance for the Transradial Catheterization and a Clinically Oriented Classification of the Radial Artery Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Jelev, L. Surchev, L.

    2008-09-15

    In routine clinical practice the variations of the radial artery are the main reason for technical failure during transradial catheterization. If these variations are well documented, however, they do not represent a problem in the transradial approach. Therefore, we report here a rare case of the radial artery which is very strange but potentially valuable for the clinical practice: it arises at a right angle from the brachial artery and passes behind the biceps brachii tendon. Based on our findings and on an extensive literature review, we propose for the first time a clinically oriented classification of the variations of the radial artery. This classification is related to the catheterization success at the usual access site of the radial artery at the wrist.

  9. 1. Postandbeam garage (far left), oneroom log cabin (left of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Post-and-beam garage (far left), one-room log cabin (left of center), house (right of center), garden shed and outhouse (far right). View to west-southwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  10. 3. Log bunkhouse (far left), log chicken house (left of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Log bunkhouse (far left), log chicken house (left of center), equipment shed (center), and workshop (far right). View to northwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  11. 6. Livestock barn (far left), log drafthorse barn (left of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Livestock barn (far left), log draft-horse barn (left of center), loafing shed (center), log calving barn (right of center). View to west-northwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  12. Radial polar histogram: obstacle avoidance and path planning for robotic cognition and motion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Jen; Keyawa, Nicholas R.; Euler, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve highly accurate motion control and path planning for a mobile robot, an obstacle avoidance algorithm that provided a desired instantaneous turning radius and velocity was generated. This type of obstacle avoidance algorithm, which has been implemented in California State University Northridge's Intelligent Ground Vehicle (IGV), is known as Radial Polar Histogram (RPH). The RPH algorithm utilizes raw data in the form of a polar histogram that is read from a Laser Range Finder (LRF) and a camera. A desired open block is determined from the raw data utilizing a navigational heading and an elliptical approximation. The left and right most radii are determined from the calculated edges of the open block and provide the range of possible radial paths the IGV can travel through. In addition, the calculated obstacle edge positions allow the IGV to recognize complex obstacle arrangements and to slow down accordingly. A radial path optimization function calculates the best radial path between the left and right most radii and is sent to motion control for speed determination. Overall, the RPH algorithm allows the IGV to autonomously travel at average speeds of 3mph while avoiding all obstacles, with a processing time of approximately 10ms.

  13. Radial Velocity Data Analysis with Compressed Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Nathan C.; Boué, G.; Laskar, J.; Correia, A. C. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel approach for analysing radial velocity data that combines two features: all the planets are searched at once and the algorithm is fast. This is achieved by utilizing compressed sensing techniques, which are modified to be compatible with the Gaussian processes framework. The resulting tool can be used like a Lomb-Scargle periodogram and has the same aspect but with much fewer peaks due to aliasing. The method is applied to five systems with published radial velocity data sets: HD 69830, HD 10180, 55 Cnc, GJ 876 and a simulated very active star. The results are fully compatible with previous analysis, though obtained more straightforwardly. We further show that 55 Cnc e and f could have been respectively detected and suspected in early measurements from the Lick observatory and Hobby-Eberly Telescope available in 2004, and that frequencies due to dynamical interactions in GJ 876 can be seen.

  14. Sphericity measurements by the radial method: I. Mathematical fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecki, D.; Stępień, K.; Adamczak, S.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, form errors of spherical components have been assessed on the basis of roundness profiles measured in several randomly selected cross-sections. However, such evaluation is superficial, especially if there are significant local irregularities. A new concept was thus developed at the Kielce University of Technology to enable measurement of spherical specimens along some predefined paths so that the surface is densely covered with a grid of points. This approach assumes that measurements can be performed using a typical radial roundness measuring instrument equipped with a special mechanism for controlled positioning of a measured element. This work discusses the assumptions of the new concept and describes a mathematical model of sphericity measurement by the radial method.

  15. Limits on ion radial diffusion coefficients in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paonessa, M.; Cheng, A. F.

    1986-02-01

    Voyager low energy charged particle (LECP) ion phase space densities at constant first and second adiabatic invariants have been used to place limits on the rate of radial diffusion of energetic ions (30 keV to 1 MeV) in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. Upper and lower limits to the radial diffusion coefficient, DLL, are deduced from physical requirements on the rates of diffusion and loss. If DLL is near the lower limit found in this work, then satellite sweeping accounts for a large fraction of the total ion losses. If DLL is near the upper limit, then ion losses can approach 10% of the strong diffusion rate. In this case, ion losses are dominated by wave-particle interactions, and sweeping losses are relatively unimportant.

  16. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  17. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  18. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic.

  19. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  20. The Left-Handed Writer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloodsworth, James Gaston

    Contrary to the beliefs of many, right-handedness is not a single factor existing in almost all people, with a few exceptions termed left-handed: neither extreme exists independently of the other. During the first 4 years of life there is a period of fluctuation between right and left-handed dominance. Statistics and findings vary in determining…

  1. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-05-15

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  2. Sequential Assembly of Flagellar Radial Spokes

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Pinfen; Geimer, Stefan; Cole, Douglas G.; Sale, Winfield S.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas can assemble two 10 μm flagella in one hour from proteins synthesized in the cell body. Targeting and transporting these proteins to the flagella are simplified by preassembly of macromolecular complexes in the cell body. Radial spokes are flagellar complexes that are partially assembled in the cell body before entering the flagella. On the axoneme, radial spokes are “T” shaped structures with a head of 5 proteins and a stalk of 18 proteins that sediment together at 20S. In the cell body, radial spokes are partially assembled; about half of the radial spoke proteins (RSPs) form a 12S complex. In mutants lacking a single radial spoke protein, smaller spoke subassemblies were identified. When extracts from two such mutants were mixed in vitro the 12S complex was assembled from several smaller complexes demonstrating that portions of the stepwise assembly of radial spoke assembly can be carried out in vitro to elucidate the order of spoke assembly in the cell body. PMID:21692193

  3. Extraction of the radial artery during transradial coronary angiography: an unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ful, Akram; Benharroch, Daniel; Henkin, Yaakov

    2003-06-01

    The transradial approach is currently an accepted alternative for vascular access during percutaneous coronary interventions. Access-site complications, such as mild hematoma, hematic effusions, and reduced or absent radial pulse, have been reported. We report the occurrence of total extraction of the radial artery during sheath removal. The occurrence of this complication emphasizes the need for meticulous attention and prudence when a patient complains of local pain during sheath extraction.

  4. Left ventricular thrombus formation after repair of anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Freud, Lindsay R; Koenig, Peter R; Russell, Hyde M; Patel, Angira

    2014-04-01

    Although thrombus formation following myocardial infarction in adults is well known, intracardiac thrombosis in children is uncommon. We report the case of a large left ventricular thrombus in an infant with ischemic cardiomyopathy secondary to anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery. Given its mobility and protrusion across the aortic valve, the patient underwent urgent thrombus removal through a transaortic approach. There were no embolic or neurologic complications. This case highlights that thrombectomy may be performed safely and successfully in critically ill pediatric patients.

  5. [Open posterior dislocation of the elbow with fractures of the radial head and coronoid process and multiple diaphyseal fractures of the ulna].

    PubMed

    Visna, P; Kalvach, J; Beitl, E; Pilný, J; Cizmár, I

    2008-03-01

    A healthy, right-handed 34-year-old man was injured by repeated direct blows delivered to his left upper arm with a baseball bat. These blows led to a posterior dislocation of the elbow joint, associated with fractures of the radial head and the coronoid process. There was bone loss on the fractured joint surface of the olecranon, with simultaneous ipsilateral trauma to the ulna. The correct surgical approach in the case of such fractures is still the subject of some controversy. The treatment can have serious complications. The results of treatment are often poor, especially because of persisting instability and stiffness of the elbow following a long period of immobilisation. Few studies have been concentrated on this topic up to now. We report on the functional and radiological results 24 months after the treatment of this rare, open "shock triad in the elbow."

  6. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sjue, S K L; Broussard, L J; Makela, M; McGaughey, P L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A

    2015-02-01

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle's helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112-119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a (207)Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed. PMID:25725818

  7. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L. Broussard, L. J.; Makela, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle’s helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112–119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a {sup 207}Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed.

  8. Phase Transformation in Radially Merged Wurtzite GaAs Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    III–V Nanowires (NWs) grown with metal–organic chemical vapor deposition commonly show a polytypic crystal structure, allowing growth of structures not found in the bulk counterpart. In this paper we studied the radial overgrowth of pure wurtzite (WZ) GaAs nanowires and characterized the samples with high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) to reveal the crystal structure of the grown material. In particular, we investigated what happens when adjacent WZ NWs radially merge with each other by analyzing the evolution of XRD peaks for different amounts of radial overgrowth and merging. By preparing cross-sectional lamella samples we also analyzed the local crystal structure of partly merged NWs by transmission electron microscopy. Once individual NWs start to merge, the crystal structure of the merged segments is transformed progressively from initial pure WZ to a mixed WZ/ZB structure. The merging process is then modeled using a simple combinatorial approach, which predicts that merging of two or more WZ NWs will result in a mixed crystal structure containing WZ, ZB, and 4H. The existence large and relaxed segments of 4H structure within the merged NWs was confirmed by XRD, allowing us to accurately determine the lattice parameters of GaAs 4H. We compare the measured WZ and 4H unit cells with an ideal tetrahedron and find that both the polytypes are elongated in the c-axis and compressed in the a-axis compared to the geometrically converted cubic ZB unit cell. PMID:26494983

  9. Intraoperative hemodynamic evaluation of the radial and ulnar arteries during free radial forearm flap procedure.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Fulvio; Giordano, Salvatore; Suominen, Erkki; Asko-Seljavaara, Sirpa; Suominen, Sinikka

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the blood flow of the radial and ulnar arteries before and after radial forearm flap raising. Twenty-two patients underwent radial forearm microvascular reconstruction for leg soft tissue defects. Blood flow of the radial, ulnar, and recipient arteries was measured intraoperatively by transit-time and ultrasonic flowmeter. In the in situ radial artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 47.7 mL/min before, 6.7 +/- 4.1 mL/min after raising the flap, and 5.8 +/- 2.0 mL/min after end-to-end anastomosis to the recipient artery. In the ulnar artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 43.3 mL/min before harvesting the radial forearm flap and significantly increased to 85.7 +/- 57.9 mL/min after radial artery sacrifice. A significant difference was also found between this value and the value of blood flow in the ulnar and radial arteries pooled together ( P < 0.05). The vascular resistance in the ulnar artery decreased significantly after the radial artery flap raising (from 2.7 +/- 3.1 to 1.9 +/- 2.2 peripheral resistance units, P = 0.010). The forearm has a conspicuous arterial vascularization not only through the radial and ulnar arteries but also through the interosseous system. The raising of the radial forearm flap increases blood flow and decreases vascular resistance in the ulnar artery. PMID:19902406

  10. Minimal Left-Right Symmetric Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Heeck, Julian; Patra, Sudhanwa

    2015-09-18

    We show that left-right symmetric models can easily accommodate stable TeV-scale dark matter particles without the need for an ad hoc stabilizing symmetry. The stability of a newly introduced multiplet either arises accidentally as in the minimal dark matter framework or comes courtesy of the remaining unbroken Z_{2} subgroup of B-L. Only one new parameter is introduced: the mass of the new multiplet. As minimal examples, we study left-right fermion triplets and quintuplets and show that they can form viable two-component dark matter. This approach is, in particular, valid for SU(2)×SU(2)×U(1) models that explain the recent diboson excess at ATLAS in terms of a new charged gauge boson of mass 2 TeV.

  11. Radial Tunnel Syndrome, Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2015-07-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome is a disease which we should consider it in elbow and forearm pains. It is diagnosed with lateral elbow and dorsal forearm pain may radiate to the wrist and dorsum of the fingers. The disease is more prevalent in women with the age of 30 to 50 years old. It occurs by intermittent compression on the radial nerve from the radial head to the inferior border of the supinator muscle, without obvious extensor muscle weakness. Compression could happen in five different sites but the arcade of Frose is the most common area that radial nerve is compressed. To diagnosis radial tunnel syndrome, clinical examination is more important than paraclinic tests such as electrodiagnsic test and imaging studies. The exact site of the pain which can more specified by rule of nine test and weakness of the third finger and wrist extension are valuable physical exams to diagnosis. MRI studies my show muscle edema or atrophy along the distribution of the posterior interosseous nerve. Although non-surgical treatments such as rest, NSAIDs, injections and physiotherapy do not believe to have permanent relief, but it is justify undergoing them before surgery. Surgery could diminish pain and symptoms in 67 to 93 percents of patients completely.

  12. Radial Tunnel Syndrome, Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2015-01-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome is a disease which we should consider it in elbow and forearm pains. It is diagnosed with lateral elbow and dorsal forearm pain may radiate to the wrist and dorsum of the fingers. The disease is more prevalent in women with the age of 30 to 50 years old. It occurs by intermittent compression on the radial nerve from the radial head to the inferior border of the supinator muscle, without obvious extensor muscle weakness. Compression could happen in five different sites but the arcade of Frose is the most common area that radial nerve is compressed. To diagnosis radial tunnel syndrome, clinical examination is more important than paraclinic tests such as electrodiagnsic test and imaging studies. The exact site of the pain which can more specified by rule of nine test and weakness of the third finger and wrist extension are valuable physical exams to diagnosis. MRI studies my show muscle edema or atrophy along the distribution of the posterior interosseous nerve. Although non-surgical treatments such as rest, NSAIDs, injections and physiotherapy do not believe to have permanent relief, but it is justify undergoing them before surgery. Surgery could diminish pain and symptoms in 67 to 93 percents of patients completely. PMID:26213698

  13. Helical antimicrobial polypeptides with radial amphiphilicity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Menghua; Lee, Michelle W.; Mansbach, Rachael A.; Song, Ziyuan; Bao, Yan; Peek, Richard M.; Yao, Catherine; Chen, Lin-Feng; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    α-Helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) generally have facially amphiphilic structures that may lead to undesired peptide interactions with blood proteins and self-aggregation due to exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Here we report the design of a class of cationic, helical homo-polypeptide antimicrobials with a hydrophobic internal helical core and a charged exterior shell, possessing unprecedented radial amphiphilicity. The radially amphiphilic structure enables the polypeptide to bind effectively to the negatively charged bacterial surface and exhibit high antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, the shielding of the hydrophobic core by the charged exterior shell decreases nonspecific interactions with eukaryotic cells, as evidenced by low hemolytic activity, and protects the polypeptide backbone from proteolytic degradation. The radially amphiphilic polypeptides can also be used as effective adjuvants, allowing improved permeation of commercial antibiotics in bacteria and enhanced antimicrobial activity by one to two orders of magnitude. Designing AMPs bearing this unprecedented, unique radially amphiphilic structure represents an alternative direction of AMP development; radially amphiphilic polypeptides may become a general platform for developing AMPs to treat drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26460016

  14. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour.

  15. Radial spoke proteins of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Chun; Kohno, Takahiro; Pazour, Gregory J.; Dienes, Jennifer M.; Agrin, Nathan S.; King, Stephen M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The radial spoke is a ubiquitous component of ‘9+2’ cilia and flagella, and plays an essential role in the control of dynein arm activity by relaying signals from the central pair of microtubules to the arms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii radial spoke contains at least 23 proteins, only 8 of which have been characterized at the molecular level. Here, we use mass spectrometry to identify 10 additional radial spoke proteins. Many of the newly identified proteins in the spoke stalk are predicted to contain domains associated with signal transduction, including Ca2+-, AKAP- and nucleotide-binding domains. This suggests that the spoke stalk is both a scaffold for signaling molecules and itself a transducer of signals. Moreover, in addition to the recently described HSP40 family member, a second spoke stalk protein is predicted to be a molecular chaperone, implying that there is a sophisticated mechanism for the assembly of this large complex. Among the 18 spoke proteins identified to date, at least 12 have apparent homologs in humans, indicating that the radial spoke has been conserved throughout evolution. The human genes encoding these proteins are candidates for causing primary ciliary dyskinesia, a severe inherited disease involving missing or defective axonemal structures, including the radial spokes. PMID:16507594

  16. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour. PMID:24664922

  17. Apraxia in left-handers.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Georg

    2013-08-01

    In typical right-handed patients both apraxia and aphasia are caused by damage to the left hemisphere, which also controls the dominant right hand. In left-handed subjects the lateralities of language and of control of the dominant hand can dissociate. This permits disentangling the association of apraxia with aphasia from that with handedness. Pantomime of tool use, actual tool use and imitation of meaningless hand and finger postures were examined in 50 consecutive left-handed subjects with unilateral hemisphere lesions. There were three aphasic patients with pervasive apraxia caused by left-sided lesions. As the dominant hand is controlled by the right hemisphere, they constitute dissociations of apraxia from handedness. Conversely there were also three patients with pervasive apraxia caused by right brain lesions without aphasia. They constitute dissociations of apraxia from aphasia. Across the whole group of patients dissociations from handedness and from aphasia were observed for all manifestations of apraxia, but their frequency depended on the type of apraxia. Defective pantomime and defective tool use occurred rarely without aphasia, whereas defective imitation of hand, but not finger, postures was more frequent after right than left brain damage. The higher incidence of defective imitation of hand postures in right brain damage was mainly due to patients who had also hemi-neglect. This interaction alerts to the possibility that the association of right hemisphere damage with apraxia has to do with spatial aptitudes of the right hemisphere rather than with its control of the dominant left hand. Comparison with data from right-handed patients showed no differences between the severity of apraxia for imitation of hand or finger postures, but impairment on pantomime of tool use was milder in apraxic left-handers than in apraxic right-handers. This alleviation of the severity of apraxia corresponded with a similar alleviation of the severity of aphasia as

  18. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  19. Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of using implantable ventricular assist devices in the treatment of end-stage heart failure. Heart Failure Heart failure is a complex syndrome that impairs the ability of the heart to maintain adequate blood circulation, resulting in multiorgan abnormalities and, eventually, death. In the period of 1994 to 1997, 38,702 individuals in Ontario had a first hospital admission for heart failure. Despite reported improvement in survival, the five-year mortality rate for heart failure is about 50%. For patients with end-stage heart failure that does not respond to medical therapy, surgical treatment or traditional circulatory assist devices, heart transplantation (in appropriate patients) is the only treatment that provides significant patient benefit. Heart Transplant in Ontario With a shortage in the supply of donor hearts, patients are waiting longer for a heart transplant and may die before a donor heart is available. From 1999 to 2003, 55 to 74 people received a heart transplant in Ontario each year. Another 12 to 21 people died while waiting for a suitable donor heart. Of these, 1 to 5 deaths occurred in people under 18 years old. The rate-limiting factor in heart transplant is the supply of donor hearts. Without an increase in available donor hearts, attempts at prolonging the life of some patients on the transplant wait list could have a harmful effect on other patients that are being pushed down the waiting list (knock on effect). LVAD Technology Ventricular assist devices [VADs] have been developed to provide circulatory assistance to patients with end-stage heart failure. These are small pumps that usually assist the damaged left ventricle [LVADs] and may be situated within the body (intracorporeal] or outside the body [extracorporeal). Some of these devices were designed for use in the right ventricle [RVAD] or both

  20. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-11-07

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  1. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  2. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-17

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  3. Generalized radially self-accelerating helicon beams.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-10-31

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a new class of optical beams that are radially self-accelerating and nondiffracting. These beams continuously evolve on spiraling trajectories while maintaining their amplitude and phase distribution in their rotating rest frame. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of radial self-acceleration and prove our findings experimentally. As radially self-accelerating beams are nonparaxial and a solution to the full scalar Helmholtz equation, they can be implemented in many linear wave systems beyond optics, from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and soft matter. Our work generalized the study of classical helicon beams to a complete set of solutions for rotating complex fields. PMID:25396370

  4. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  5. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  6. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  7. Treatment of chronic radial head dislocations in children.

    PubMed

    Belangero, W D; Livani, B; Zogaib, R K

    2007-04-01

    From 1990 to 2005 our department treated nine patients with chronic radial head dislocation by an ulnar osteotomy and indirect reduction by interosseous membrane. The patients varied in age from 2 years and 8 months to 10 years, and the time from the injury to operation ranged from 40 days to 3 years. The range of functional motion and carrying angle was restored in all nine patients, and no complications, such as recurrent dislocation, infection, or neurovascular injury were observed. This technique has proven to be a successful approach to treating such cases, with a low range of complications and good functional results. PMID:16741732

  8. Integration of macromolecular diffraction data using radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Pokrić, B; Allinson, N M; Helliwell, J R

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for intensity calculation of X-ray diffraction spots based on a two-stage radial basis function (RBF) network. The first stage uses pre-determined reference profiles from a database as basis functions in order to locate the diffraction spots and identify any overlapping regions. The second-stage RBF network employs narrow basis functions capable of local modifications of the reference profiles leading to a more accurate observed diffraction spot approximation and therefore accurate determination of spot positions and integrated intensities.

  9. All-frequency lighting with multiscale spherical radial basis functions.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ping-Man; Ho, Tze-Yiu; Leung, Chi-Sing; Wong, Tien-Tsin

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel multiscale spherical radial basis function (MSRBF) representation for all-frequency lighting. It supports the illumination of distant environment as well as the local illumination commonly used in practical applications, such as games. The key is to define a multiscale and hierarchical structure of spherical radial basis functions (SRBFs) with basis functions uniformly distributed over the sphere. The basis functions are divided into multiple levels according to their coverage (widths). Within the same level, SRBFs have the same width. Larger width SRBFs are responsible for lower frequency lighting while the smaller width ones are responsible for the higher frequency lighting. Hence, our approach can achieve the true all-frequency lighting that is not achievable by the single-scale SRBF approach. Besides, the MSRBF approach is scalable as coarser rendering quality can be achieved without reestimating the coefficients from the raw data. With the homogeneous form of basis functions, the rendering is highly efficient. The practicability of the proposed method is demonstrated with real-time rendering and effective compression for tractable storage.

  10. Reconstruction for Type IV Radial Polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-09-01

    Type IV radial polydactyly represents a thumb with an extra proximal and distal phalanx. Assessment of the thumb for surgical reconstruction includes observing thumb function, evaluating thumb size and stability, and assessing the first web space. Reconstruction includes excision of the smaller thumb, typically the radial thumb, and re-creating thumb stability and alignment by addressing tendon insertion and joint orientation. Although surgical results are satisfying and complications are uncommon, additional surgical intervention may be required over time owing to thumb malalignment or instability.

  11. Radial elasticity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Palaci, I; Fedrigo, S; Brune, H; Klinke, C; Chen, M; Riedo, E

    2005-05-01

    We report an experimental and a theoretical study of the radial elasticity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a function of external radius. We use atomic force microscopy and apply small indentation amplitudes in order to stay in the linear elasticity regime. The number of layers for a given tube radius is inferred from transmission electron microscopy, revealing constant ratios of external to internal radii. This enables a comparison with molecular dynamics results, which also shed some light onto the applicability of Hertz theory in this context. Using this theory, we find a radial Young modulus strongly decreasing with increasing radius and reaching an asymptotic value of 30+/-10 GPa.

  12. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements are being made to search for planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The reflex acceleration induced on stars by planets can be sensed by measuring the small, slow changes in the line-of-site velocities of stars. To detect these planetary perturbations, the data series must be made on a uniform instrumental scale for as long as it takes a planet to orbit its star. A spectrometer of extreme stability and unprecedented sensitivity to changes in stellar radial velocities was operated.

  13. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-10-04

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and {beta} during these events.

  14. Determination of the pulmonary capillary wedge position in patients with giant left atrial V waves.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; Neary, M J; Gallagher, J D; Clark, D L

    1987-04-01

    Thirteen patients with giant left atrial V waves during preoperative cardiac catheterization were admitted into the study group. While awake and breathing spontaneously, simultaneous recordings of electrocardiographic leads II and V5, radial arterial traces, and pulmonary arterial or pulmonary capillary wedge traces were obtained. Measurements were made on four consecutive cardiac cycles in the unwedged and wedged positions for the following intervals: Q wave to the radial arterial upstroke (220 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (360 +/- 10 milliseconds), Q wave to the pulmonary arterial upstroke (170 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (350 +/- 20 milliseconds), Q wave to the V wave upstroke (280 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (570 +/- 20 milliseconds), and QT interval (420 +/- 20 milliseconds). These findings indicate that the radial arterial and pulmonary arterial upstrokes and peaks occur nearly simultaneously. Upon wedging, the V wave upstroke occurs significantly later in the cardiac cycle (P less than .05) compared with the pulmonary arterial upstroke, and the V wave peak occurs significantly later compared with both the pulmonary arterial and the radial arterial peak (P less than .05). A rapid, simple beat-to-beat method for differentiating pulmonary arterial from pulmonary capillary wedge positions in the presence of giant left atrial V waves is the superimposition of the pulmonary arterial trace on the radial arterial trace. When a wedge position is attained, there is an immediate rightward shift in the upstroke and peak of the pulmonary arterial pressure trace, which can be easily identified by observing the relationship between the pulmonary arterial and systemic arterial traces.

  15. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  16. Transseptal fine needle aspiration of a large left atrial tumour.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Wing; Ruygrok, Peter; Sutton, Timothy; Ding, Patricia; van Vliet, Chris; Occleshaw, Christopher; Smith, Warren

    2010-07-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac tumours is often based on images without tissue diagnosis or tissue obtained at surgery. Percutaneous myocardial biopsy via a transvenous approach has been described in literatures but this technique is not feasible with left atrial tumours. We report a patient presenting with heart failure and left atrial tumour. The diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasm was established pre-operatively via successful transseptal fine needle aspiration of cells from a left atrial tumour. We believe this technique worth consideration to aid pre-surgery diagnosis.

  17. Why Am I Left-Handed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... does since most hitters are right-handed. In basketball and other sports, a left-handed player can ... change in strategy. For instance, a left-handed basketball player will dribble with his or her left ...

  18. Impact of radial migration on stellar and gas radial metallicity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Kawata, Daisuke; Cropper, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Radial migration is defined as the change in guiding centre radius of stars and gas caused by gains or losses of angular momentum that result from gravitational interaction with non-axisymmetric structure. This has been shown to have significant impact on the metallicity distribution in galactic discs, and therefore affects the interpretation of Galactic archaeology. We use a simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy to examine the effect of radial migration on the star and gas radial metallicity distribution. We find that both the star and gas component show significant radial migration. The stellar radial metallicity gradient remains almost unchanged but the radial metallicity distribution of the stars is broadened to produce a greater dispersion at all radii. However, the metallicity dispersion of the gas remains narrow. We find that the main drivers of the gas metallicity distribution evolution are metal enrichment and mixing: more efficient metal enrichment in the inner region maintains a negative slope in the radial metallicity distribution, and the metal mixing ensures the tight relationship of the gas metallicity with the radius. The metallicity distribution function reproduces the trend in the age-metallicity relation found from observations for stars younger than 1.0 Gyr in the Milky Way.

  19. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  20. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  1. NASA contributions to radial turbine aerodynamic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief description of the radial turbine and its analysis needs is followed by discussions of five analytical areas; design geometry and performance, off design performance, blade row flow, scroll flow, and duct flow. The functions of the programs, areas of applicability, and limitations and uncertainties are emphasized. Both past contributions and current activities are discussed.

  2. Radial wave crystals: radially periodic structures from anisotropic metamaterials for engineering acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate that metamaterials with anisotropic properties can be used to develop a new class of periodic structures that has been named radial wave crystals. They can be sonic or photonic, and wave propagation along the radial directions is obtained through Bloch states like in usual sonic or photonic crystals. The band structure of the proposed structures can be tailored in a large amount to get exciting novel wave phenomena. For example, it is shown that acoustical cavities based on radial sonic crystals can be employed as passive devices for beam forming or dynamically orientated antennas for sound localization.

  3. Fracture of distal humerus: MIPO technique with visualization of the radial nerve

    PubMed Central

    Zogbi, Daniel Romano; Terrivel, Alberto Maranon; Mouraria, Guilherme Grisi; Mongon, Maurício Leal Dias; Kikuta, Fernando Kenji; Filho, Américo Zoppi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the outcomes in patients treated for humerus distal third fractures with MIPO technique and visualization of the radial nerve by an accessory approach, in those without radial palsy before surgery. METHODS: The patients were treated with MIPO technique. The visualization and isolation of the radial nerve was done by an approach between the brachialis and the brachiorradialis, with an oblique incision, in the lateral side of the arm. MEPS was used to evaluate the elbow function. RESULTS: Seven patients were evaluated with a mean age of 29.8 years old. The average follow up was 29.85 months. The radial neuropraxis after surgery occurred in three patients. The sensorial recovery occurred after 3.16 months on average and also of the motor function, after 5.33 months on average, in all patients. We achieved fracture consolidation in all patients (M=4.22 months). The averages for flexion-extension and prono-supination were 112.85° and 145°, respectively. The MEPS average score was 86.42. There was no case of infection. CONCLUSION: This approach allowed excluding a radial nerve interposition on site of the fracture and/or under the plate, showing a high level of consolidation of the fracture and a good evolution of the range of movement of the elbow. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series PMID:25538474

  4. Radial forces analysis and rotational speed test of radial permanent magnetic bearing for horizontal axis wind turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriswanto, Jamari

    2016-04-01

    Permanent magnet bearings (PMB) are contact free bearings which utilize the forces generated by the magnets. PMB in this work is a type of radial PMB, which functions as the radial bearings of the Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) rotor shaft. Radial PMB should have a greater radial force than the radial force HAWT rotor shaft (bearing load). This paper presents a modeling and experiments to calculate the radial force of the radial PMB. This paper also presents rotational speed test of the radial PMB compared to conventional bearings for HAWT applications. Modeling using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b with the magnetic fields physics models. Experiments were conducted by measuring the displacement of the rotor to the stator for a given load variation. Results of the two methods showed that the large displacement then the radial force would be greater. Radial forces of radial PMB is greater than radial forces of HAWT rotor shaft. The rotational speed test results of HAWT that used radial PMB produced higher rotary than conventional bearings with an average increase of 87.4%. Increasing rotational speed occured because radial PMB had no friction. HAWT that used radial PMB rotated at very low wind speeds are 1.4 m/s with a torque of 0.043 Nm, while the HAWT which uses conventional bearing started rotating at a wind speed of 4.4 m/s and required higher torque of 0.104 N.

  5. Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of undersampled radial data: Application to cardiac cine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Chan, Cheong; Stockmann, Jason P.; Tagare, Hemant; Adluru, Ganesh; Tam, Leo K.; Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R. Todd; Kozerke, Sebastian; Peters, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of radial data, applied to accelerated cardiac cine. Methods A GPU-accelerated ART reconstruction was implemented and applied to simulations, point spread functions (PSF) and in twelve subjects imaged with radial cardiac cine acquisitions. Cine images were reconstructed with radial ART at multiple undersampling levels (192 Nr x Np = 96 to 16). Images were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for sharpness and artifacts, and compared to filtered back-projection (FBP), and conjugate gradient SENSE (CG SENSE). Results Radial ART provided reduced artifacts and mainly preserved spatial resolution, for both simulations and in vivo data. Artifacts were qualitatively and quantitatively less with ART than FBP using 48, 32, and 24 Np, although FBP provided quantitatively sharper images at undersampling levels of 48-24 Np (all p<0.05). Use of undersampled radial data for generating auto-calibrated coil-sensitivity profiles resulted in slightly reduced quality. ART was comparable to CG SENSE. GPU-acceleration increased ART reconstruction speed 15-fold, with little impact on the images. Conclusion GPU-accelerated ART is an alternative approach to image reconstruction for parallel radial MR imaging, providing reduced artifacts while mainly maintaining sharpness compared to FBP, as shown by its first application in cardiac studies. PMID:24753213

  6. Radial differential interior tomography and its image reconstruction with differentiated backprojection and projection onto convex sets

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shaojie; Tang, Xiangyang

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Interior tomography has been recognized as one of the most effective approaches in computed tomography (CT) to reduce radiation dose rendered to patients. In this work, the authors propose and evaluate an imaging method of radial differential interior tomography.Methods: In interior tomography, an x-ray beam is collimated to only irradiate the region of interest (ROI) with suspected lesions while the surrounding area/volume of normal tissues/organs is spared. In the proposed imaging method of radial differential interior tomography, the outcome is a ROI image that has gone through a radial differential filtering. The image reconstruction algorithm for the radial differential interior tomography is kept in the fashion of differentiated backprojection and projection onto convex sets, but the required a priori knowledge in a small round area becomes zero and may be more readily available in practice.Results: Using the projection data simulated by computer and acquired by CT scanner, the authors evaluate and verify the performance of the proposed radial differential interior tomography method and its associated image reconstruction algorithm. The preliminary results show that the proposed imaging method can generate an image that is the radial differentiation of a conventional tomographic image and is robust over noise that inevitably exist in practice.Conclusions: It is believed that the proposed imaging method may find its utility in advanced clinical applications wherein a ROI-based image processing and analysis is required for lesion visualization, characterization, and diagnosis.

  7. Entropy generation of radial rotation convective channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alić, Fikret

    2012-03-01

    The exchange of heat between two fluids is established by radial rotating pipe or a channel. The hotter fluid flows through the pipe, while the cold fluid is ambient air. Total length of pipe is made up of multiple sections of different shape and position in relation to the common axis of rotation. In such heat exchanger the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of the hotter and colder fluid occur. Therefore, the total entropy generated within the radial rotating pipe consists of the total entropy of hotter and colder fluid, taking into account all the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of both fluids. Finding a mathematical model of the total generated entropy is based on coupled mathematical expressions that combine hydraulic and thermal effects of both fluids with the complex geometry of the radial rotating pipe. Mathematical model follows the each section of the pipe and establishes the function between the sections, so the total generated entropy is different from section to section of the pipe. In one section of the pipe thermal irreversibility may dominate over the hydraulic irreversibility, while in another section of the pipe the situation may be reverse. In this paper, continuous analytic functions that connect sections of pipe in geometric meaning are associated with functions that describe the thermo-hydraulic effects of hotter and colder fluid. In this way, the total generated entropy of the radial rotating pipe is a continuous analytic function of any complex geometry of the rotating pipe. The above method of establishing a relationship between the continuous function of entropy with the complex geometry of the rotating pipe enables indirect monitoring of unnecessary hydraulic and thermal losses of both fluids. Therefore, continuous analytic functions of generated entropy enable analysis of hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of individual sections of pipe, as well as the possibility of improving the thermal-hydraulic performance of the rotating

  8. Mechanisms governing radial heat fluxes in tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumova, K. A.; Timchenko, N. N.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Lysenko, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    A method for analyzing the characteristics of turbulence responsible for radial heat transport is proposed. The method is based on the previously proposed hypotheses (to a great extent, confirmed experimentally) concerning the consistency of normalized pressure profiles in tokamak plasmas and the mechanism of internal transport barrier formation. Using the proposed approach, it is shown that, under an external action on the plasma, when the plasma heat flux onto the wall grows, the spectrum of turbulent modes broadens due to the excitation of modes with lower poloidal numbers m. Thus, in contrast to the conventional diffusion approach, the transport coefficient depends on the flux intensity. A mechanism of formation of internal transport barriers is proposed.

  9. Mechanics of left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, S; Ghista, D N; Jayaraman, G

    1986-01-01

    When a coronary artery is significantly occluded, the left ventricular myocardial segment, which is perfused by that coronary artery, will become ischaemic and even irreversibly infarcted. An acute infarct has very low stiffness and if it involves the entire wall there is a risk of rupture; however, in the absence of such a critical situation, fibrous tissue is laid into the infarcted myocardial segment. Such an infarcted fibrotic myocardial segment will not be able to contract, and so generate tensile stress. The surrounding intact myocardium will contract and generate wall stress, thereby developing a high intra-chamber systolic pressure; the chronically infarcted and fibrotic segment will have to sustain this high chamber pressure. Its loss of contractility and the resulting reduced systolic stiffness relative to the intact segment, will cause it to deform into a bulge; this is an aneurysm. When a left ventricular chamber with an aneurysm contracts during the systolic phase, some blood also goes into the aneurysm, and this decreases the stroke volume; since the aneurysm wall is passive, stagnant blood flow prevails in the aneurysm itself, which in turn can give rise to the formation of a mural thrombus. These serious consequences provide a justification for the analysis of an infarcted left ventricular chamber, in order to predict the size of the aneurysmic bulge. Such an analysis is presented in this paper. To determine the left ventricular wall deformation, and the stress arising from infarction of a wall segment (which leads to a ventricular aneurysm) the left ventricle is modelled here as a pressurized ellipsoidal shell. Deformations of infarcted wall segments are computed for several damaged wall-thicknesses in left ventricles of different shapes. The analysis involves a derivation of equations for wall-stress equilibrium with the chamber pressure, and myocardial incompressibility before and after infarct formation. The equations are solved by the Newton

  10. Radial tunnel syndrome. A retrospective review of 30 decompressions of the radial nerve.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T; Mobbs, P; Fortems, Y; Stanley, J K

    1995-08-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome results from compression of the radial nerve by the free edge of the supinator muscle or closely related structures in the vicinity of the elbow joint. Despite numerous reports on the surgical management of this disorder, it remains largely unrecognized and often neglected. The symptoms of radial tunnel syndrome can resemble those of tennis elbow, chronic wrist pain or tenosynovitis. Reliable objective criteria are not available to differentiate between these pathologies. These difficulties are discussed in relation to 29 patients who underwent 30 primary explorations and proximal decompressions of the radial nerve. Excellent or good results were obtained in 70%, fair results in 13% and poor results in 17% of patients. The results can be satisfactory despite the prolonged duration of symptoms. We believe that a diagnosis of radial tunnel syndrome should always be born in mind when dealing with patients with forearm and wrist pain that has not responded to more conventional treatment. Patients with occupations requiring repetitive manual tasks seem to be particularly at risk of developing radial tunnel syndrome and it is also interesting to note that 66% of patients with on-going medico-legal claims had successful outcomes following surgery. PMID:7594982

  11. Polymer-based restoration of left ventricular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Randall J; Hinson, Andy; Helgerson, Sam; Bauernschmitt, Robert; Sabbah, Hani N

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure continues to be a major health care concern with relatively few options for severely advanced heart failure patients. The hallmark of heart failure is the progressive dilatation of the left ventricle, thinning of the left ventricular wall leading to increased wall stress and increased myocardial oxygen consumption. Applying Laplace's law to the failing dilated ventricle, left ventricular augmentation utilizes a tissue engineering strategy to increase wall thickness and reduce chamber diameter, resulting in a decrease in wall stress and improved left ventricular function. A review of the rationale for an in situ tissue engineering approach for this treatment of heart failure and early clinical results of the Algisyl-LVR™ program are presented. PMID:22469060

  12. Radial spline assembly for antifriction bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An outer race carrier is constructed for receiving an outer race of an antifriction bearing assembly. The carrier in turn is slidably fitted in an opening of a support wall to accommodate slight axial movements of a shaft. A plurality of longitudinal splines on the carrier are disposed to be fitted into matching slots in the opening. A deadband gap is provided between sides of the splines and slots, with a radial gap at ends of the splines and slots and a gap between the splines and slots sized larger than the deadband gap. With this construction, operational distortions (slope) of the support wall are accommodated by the larger radial gaps while the deadband gaps maintain a relatively high springrate of the housing. Additionally, side loads applied to the shaft are distributed between sides of the splines and slots, distributing such loads over a larger surface area than a race carrier of the prior art.

  13. SpicyNodes Radial Map Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.; Ligierko, G.; Angelov, I.

    2008-10-01

    The need for information has increased exponentially over the past decades. The current systems for constructing, exploring, classifying, organizing, and searching information face the growing challenge of enabling their users to operate efficiently and intuitively in knowledge-heavy environments. This paper presents SpicyNodes, an advanced user interface for difficult interaction contexts. It is based on an underlying structure known as a radial map, which allows users to manipulate and interact in a natural manner with entities called nodes. This technology overcomes certain limitations of existing solutions and solves the problem of browsing complex sets of linked information. SpicyNodes is also an organic system that projects users into a living space, stimulating exploratory behavior and fostering creative thought. Our interactive radial layout is used for educational purposes and has the potential for numerous other applications.

  14. Development of large radial turbine turbochargers

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, K.R.; Hirst, P.; Kay, P.

    1996-12-31

    The use of fully radial turbochargers for medium speed diesel engines have largely been restricted to distillate fuel operation at relatively modest pressure ratios. Pressures on costs per kW have forced the industry to push for increases in rating and range of operation for these machines. The development of a high pressure ratio radial turbocharger with the capability to operate reliably on heavy fuel has become a high priority. This paper discusses the development of a range of such machines to cover engine output of between 500 kW and 1.6 MW. The original design of the first turbocharger in the range, the NAPIER 047, is reviewed together with the development and operational experiences gained to date. These have been incorporated into the latest two turbochargers in the range, the NAPIER 057 and 067. The paper includes descriptions of the means taken to achieve minimum time to market and low cost of manufacture.

  15. Left ventricle motion estimation based on signal-dependent time-frequency representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Weiderpass, Heinar A.; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2003-05-01

    In current clinical practice, the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular deformation can be determined using all the principal imaging modalities, including contrast angiography, echocardiography, cine computed tomography, single photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, since the heart undergoes complex motion, proper characterization of its motion still remains an open and challenging research problem. A number of approaches for nonrigid motion analysis have been studied in the literature. Much of the effort has confined to estimate the displacement vector for each image point or optical flow. This is a challenging problem in image analysis because of a wide range of possible motions and the presence of noise in the image sets. In this work, we present an algorithm for computation of optical flow based on a signal-dependent radially Gaussian kernel that adapts over time. The adaptive kernel obtained from the proposed algorithm is used to estimate a 3D-frequency spectrum for a given pixel in a series of images. The orientation of the spectrum in the frequency domain is totally governed by the pixel velocity. In a recent contribution, a linear regression model is used over the spectrum to obtain the velocity components that are proportional to the pixel movement.

  16. Radial rib antenna surface deviation analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed which analyzes any radial rib antenna with ribs radiating from a central hub. The program has the capability for calculating the antenna surface contour (reversed pillowing effect), the optimum rib shape for minimizing the rms surface error, and the actual rms surface error. Rib deflection due to mesh tension and catenary cable tension can also be compensated for, and the pattern from which the mesh gores are cut can be determined.

  17. Neurons with radial basis like rate functions.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsolt László

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural networks constructed with "locally tuned processing units" and more generally referred to as "radial basis function networks" have been proposed by a number of workers. In this communication, I submit a conjecture, based on indirect experimental and direct computational evidence of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, that there may be biological neurons in nervous systems for which the rate function is locally tuned. If proved to be valid, this conjecture may simplify neurodynamic models of some functions of nervous systems.

  18. Si Radial p-i-n Junction Photovoltaic Arrays with Built-In Light Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Campbell, Ian H; Dayeh, Shadi A; Schuele, Paul; Evans, David; Picraux, S Tom

    2015-05-26

    High-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices require strong light absorption, low reflection and efficient photogenerated carrier collection for high quantum efficiency. Previous optical studies of vertical wires arrays have revealed that extremely efficient light absorption in the visible wavelengths is achievable. Photovoltaic studies have further advanced the wire approach by employing radial p-n junction architectures to achieve more efficient carrier collection. While radial p-n junction formation and optimized light absorption have independently been considered, PV efficiencies have further opportunities for enhancement by exploiting the radial p-n junction fabrication procedures to form arrays that simultaneously enhance both light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Here we report a concept of morphology control to improve PV performance, light absorption and quantum efficiency of silicon radial p-i-n junction arrays. Surface energy minimization during vapor phase epitaxy is exploited to form match-head structures at the tips of the wires. The match-head structure acts as a built-in light concentrator and enhances optical absorptance and external quantum efficiencies by 30 to 40%, and PV efficiency under AM 1.5G illumination by 20% compared to cylindrical structures without match-heads. The design rules for these improvements with match-head arrays are systematically studied. This approach of process-enhanced control of three-dimensional Si morphologies provides a fab-compatible way to enhance the PV performance of Si radial p-n junction wire arrays. PMID:25961330

  19. Si Radial p-i-n Junction Photovoltaic Arrays with Built-In Light Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Campbell, Ian H; Dayeh, Shadi A; Schuele, Paul; Evans, David; Picraux, S Tom

    2015-05-26

    High-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices require strong light absorption, low reflection and efficient photogenerated carrier collection for high quantum efficiency. Previous optical studies of vertical wires arrays have revealed that extremely efficient light absorption in the visible wavelengths is achievable. Photovoltaic studies have further advanced the wire approach by employing radial p-n junction architectures to achieve more efficient carrier collection. While radial p-n junction formation and optimized light absorption have independently been considered, PV efficiencies have further opportunities for enhancement by exploiting the radial p-n junction fabrication procedures to form arrays that simultaneously enhance both light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Here we report a concept of morphology control to improve PV performance, light absorption and quantum efficiency of silicon radial p-i-n junction arrays. Surface energy minimization during vapor phase epitaxy is exploited to form match-head structures at the tips of the wires. The match-head structure acts as a built-in light concentrator and enhances optical absorptance and external quantum efficiencies by 30 to 40%, and PV efficiency under AM 1.5G illumination by 20% compared to cylindrical structures without match-heads. The design rules for these improvements with match-head arrays are systematically studied. This approach of process-enhanced control of three-dimensional Si morphologies provides a fab-compatible way to enhance the PV performance of Si radial p-n junction wire arrays.

  20. Development of a Radial Deconsolidation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Helmreich, Grant W.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Hunn, John D.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experiments have been initiated to determine the retention or mobility of fission products* in AGR fuel compacts [Petti, et al. 2010]. This information is needed to refine fission product transport models. The AGR-3/4 irradiation test involved half-inch-long compacts that each contained twenty designed-to-fail (DTF) particles, with 20-μm thick carbon-coated kernels whose coatings were deliberately fabricated such that they would crack under irradiation, providing a known source of post-irradiation isotopes. The DTF particles in these compacts were axially distributed along the compact centerline so that the diffusion of fission products released from the DTF kernels would be radially symmetric [Hunn, et al. 2012; Hunn et al. 2011; Kercher, et al. 2011; Hunn, et al. 2007]. Compacts containing DTF particles were irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) [Collin, 2015]. Analysis of the diffusion of these various post-irradiation isotopes through the compact requires a method to radially deconsolidate the compacts so that nested-annular volumes may be analyzed for post-irradiation isotope inventory in the compact matrix, TRISO outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC), and DTF kernels. An effective radial deconsolidation method and apparatus appropriate to this application has been developed and parametrically characterized.

  1. Approximate theory for radial filtration/consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, F.M.; Kirby, J.M.; Nguyen, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    Approximate solutions are developed for filtration and subsequent consolidation of compactible cakes on a cylindrical filter element. Darcy`s flow equation is coupled with equations for equilibrium stress under the conditions of plane strain and axial symmetry for radial flow inwards. The solutions are based on power function forms involving the relationships of the solidosity {epsilon}{sub s} (volume fraction of solids) and the permeability K to the solids effective stress p{sub s}. The solutions allow determination of the various parameters in the power functions and the ratio k{sub 0} of the lateral to radial effective stress (earth stress ratio). Measurements were made of liquid and effective pressures, flow rates, and cake thickness versus time. Experimental data are presented for a series of tests in a radial filtration cell with a central filter element. Slurries prepared from two materials (Microwate, which is mainly SrSO{sub 4}, and kaolin) were used in the experiments. Transient deposition of filter cakes was followed by static (i.e., no flow) conditions in the cake. The no-flow condition was accomplished by introducing bentonite which produced a nearly impermeable layer with negligible flow. Measurement of the pressure at the cake surface and the transmitted pressure on the central element permitted calculation of k{sub 0}.

  2. Global existence and boundedness of radial solutions to a two dimensional fully parabolic chemotaxis system with general sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, Kentarou; Senba, Takasi

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with positive radially symmetric solutions of the Neumann boundary value problem for the fully parabolic chemotaxis system, {ut=Δu‑∇ṡ(u∇χ(v))in Ω×(0,∞),τvt=Δv‑v+uin Ω×(0,∞), in a ball Ω \\subset {{{R}}2} with general sensitivity function χ (v) satisfying {χ\\prime}>0 and decaying property {χ\\prime}(s)\\to 0 (s\\to ∞ ), parameter τ \\in ≤ft(0,1\\right] and nonnegative radially symmetric initial data. It is shown that if τ \\in ≤ft(0,1\\right] is sufficiently small, then the problem has a unique classical radially symmetric solution, which exists globally and remains uniformly bounded in time. Especially, this result establishes global existence of solutions in the case χ (v)={χ0}log v for all {χ0}>0 , which has been left as an open problem.

  3. Global existence and boundedness of radial solutions to a two dimensional fully parabolic chemotaxis system with general sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, Kentarou; Senba, Takasi

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with positive radially symmetric solutions of the Neumann boundary value problem for the fully parabolic chemotaxis system, {ut=Δu-∇ṡ(u∇χ(v))in Ω×(0,∞),τvt=Δv-v+uin Ω×(0,∞), in a ball Ω \\subset {{{R}}2} with general sensitivity function χ (v) satisfying {χ\\prime}>0 and decaying property {χ\\prime}(s)\\to 0 (s\\to ∞ ), parameter τ \\in ≤ft(0,1\\right] and nonnegative radially symmetric initial data. It is shown that if τ \\in ≤ft(0,1\\right] is sufficiently small, then the problem has a unique classical radially symmetric solution, which exists globally and remains uniformly bounded in time. Especially, this result establishes global existence of solutions in the case χ (v)={χ0}log v for all {χ0}>0 , which has been left as an open problem.

  4. Left and right in the Bible from a neuropsychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, F

    1994-03-01

    Although in several neuropsychological works dealing with hemispheric specializations a few passages of the Bible referring to the left and the right have been mentioned now and then, a systematical study with a neuropsychological approach to this topic was still a missing link. By using concordance texts from the Bible books of the Hebrew Canon (Old Testament, OT) and from the New Testament (NT), all the verses containing any reference to the left and the right (OT = 151, NT = 49 verses) have been identified and classified into 10 groups: (1) references to space, (2) symmetric sayings, (3) the right hand is the favorite hand, (4) right eye preference, (5) God's right hand, (6) the right side is more prestigious, (7) the right side in liturgy, (8) left hand preference, (9) fatal left-hand shots, and (10) on the left side. Some statistical considerations have been put forward and a neuropsychological, anthropological approach has been suggested for the purpose of interpreting the most interesting verses. According to the author of the present paper, it would be worthwhile commenting on some texts of ancient and modern literature not only from a linguistic, historical, religious and theological point of view, but also by means of a neuropsychological approach.

  5. Total Lip Reconstruction with Tendinofasciocutaneous Radial Forearm Flap

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Eldad; Krieger, Yuval; Shoham, Yaron; Arnon, Ofer; Sagi, Amiram; Bogdanov-Berezovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Squamous cell carcinoma is a common tumour of lower lip. Small defects created by surgical resection may be readily reconstructed by linear closure or with local flaps. However, large tumours resection often results with microstomia and oral incompetence, drooling, and speech incomprehension. The goal of this study is to describe our experience with composite free radial forearm-palmaris longus tendon flap for total or near total lower lip reconstruction. Patients and Methods. This procedure was used in 5 patients with 80–100% lip defect resulting from Squamous cell carcinoma. Patients' age ranged from 46 to 82 years. They are three male patients and two female. In 3 cases chin skin was reconstructed as well and in one case a 5 cm segment of mandible was reconstructed using radius bone. In one case where palmaris longus was missing hemi-flexor carpi radialis tendon was used instead. All patients tolerated the procedure well. Results. All flaps totally survived. No patient suffered from drooling. All patients regained normal diet and normal speech. Cosmetic result was fair to good in all patients accept one. Conclusion. We conclude that tendino-fasciocutaneous radial forearm flap for total lower lip reconstruction is safe. Functional and aesthetic result approaches reconstructive goals. PMID:24672301

  6. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more » TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  7. A Goldilocks principle for modelling radial velocity noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, F.; Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S.

    2016-09-01

    The Doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interpret signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modelling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model with RHK-dependent jitter is used in combination with the moving average model to detect planetary signals for M dwarfs. Our work may also shed light on the noise modelling for hotter stars, and provide a valid approach for finding similar principles in other disciplines.

  8. [Mitral valve replacement after previous coronary artery bypass grafting with functioning left internal thoracic artery graft: effectiveness of the method using a direct vision retrosternal approach; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Junichi; Saito, Tatsuya; Fujii, Akira; Tsukamoto, Masaru; Date, Osamu; Yokoyama, Hideo; Abe, Tomio; Nakase, Atsunobu; Ohori, Katsumi

    2014-08-01

    Performing a redo-sternotomy when a mammary artery graft is patent can be rather difficult. We previously reported a redo-sternotomy technique involving direct visualization with a retrosternal dissection (DR) method using a Kent's retractor. The DR method in detail is as follows: 1) A midline skin incision is extended to the abdomen about 5 cm. 2) The bilateral costal arches are divided from the rectal muscle. 3). A pair of retractors is placed under the costal arch. 4) A stainless steel wire is applied to the previous sternal wire at the center of the sternum. 5) The retractor and sternal wire are lifted up using the Kent's retractor to widen the retrosternal space. 6) The sternum and sub-sternal tissue are carefully divided using an electronic scalpel or metal retractor with an entirely sternal length. 7) Routine sternotomy is performed using a Stryker. Herein, we report a patient who had undergone cardiac surgery, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), using a left internal mammary artery and mitral annuloplasty 2 years previously, and then developed mitral regurgitation caused by infectious endocarditis. He successfully underwent redo-sternotomy and mitral valve replacement using the DR method. In a patient with a patent internal mammary artery, the DR method greatly reduces the risk of graft injury.

  9. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  10. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  11. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  12. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  13. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  14. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  15. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  16. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  17. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  18. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  19. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  20. Comminuted radial head fractures treated by the Acumed anatomic radial head system

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Zhefei; Chen, Maohua; Xiong, Yan; Fan, Zhihang; Wang, Aimin; Wang, Ziming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of comminuted radial head fractures is still challenging. A radial head replacement is more effective in comminuted radial head fractures. The aim of this paper was to present the medium-term results of the Acumed anatomic radial head system (AARHS). Methods: This study was performed on 12 patients with traumatic elbow fracture and instability between 2008 and 2011 of whom 12 were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 60.8 months (19 to 77 months). The evaluation included a record of pain, function, muscle strength, contracture and rotation. The outcome was assessed using the Hospital for Special Surgery total elbow scoring and a modified Disability of Arm Shoulder Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Results: The average flexion and extension arc was 130° (range, 110° to 140°). The mean range of elbow supination was 75° (rang, 60° to 85°) and pronation 80° (range, 65° to 90°). There were no complications such as infection, implant loosening, instability of the elbow, cubitus valgus, osteoporosis of the capitellum, or pain in the forearm and wrist. The mean DASH score was 11.9/100 (0 to 25/100). Conclusion: The radial head replacement with the AARHS can provide effectively stability and good clinic results at the middle term following up. Our experience has encouraged us to continue using the AARHS in comminuted fractures, especially when instability of elbow is a potential problem. PMID:26131250

  1. Dynamic aortomyoplasty to assist left ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Chachques, J C; Grandjean, P A; Cabrera Fischer, E I; Latremouille, C; Jebara, V A; Bourgeois, I; Carpentier, A

    1990-02-01

    The efficacy of skeletal muscle contractile force to augment left ventricular function has been demonstrated experimentally and clinically by the cardiomyoplasty procedure. Another approach in biomechanical cardiac assistance is the use of electrostimulated skeletal muscle in an extracardiac position. We describe an autologous counterpulsating device using the native ascending aorta as a ventricular chamber wrapped by an electrostimulated latissimus dorsi muscle flap (LDMF). This model avoids thrombotic complications observed in skeletal muscle neo-ventricles associated with prosthetic chambers. In 8 goats, a right LDMF was transferred to the thoracic cavity by removal of the second rib. In 4 goats, the diameter of the aorta was enlarged by surgical implantation (using lateral clamping) of an autologous pericardial patch. The LDMF was wrapped around the ascending aorta and electrostimulated using an external diastolic pulse generator connected to a sensing myocardial lead and to LDMF pacing electrodes. Hemodynamic studies were performed (left ventricular, aortic, and pulmonary artery pressures and rate of rise of left ventricular pressure). The LDMF diastolic counterpulsation was performed using a burst of 30 Hz, with a delay from the R wave adjusted to provide optimal diastolic augmentation. Percent increase in the subendocardial viability index was calculated during unassisted and assisted cardiac cycles (1:2) at baseline and after acute heart failure induced by the administration of high doses of propranolol hydrochloride (3 mg/kg intravenously). Diastolic aortic counterpulsation by the stimulated LDMF resulted in a significant improvement in the subendocardial viability index both at baseline and after induced cardiac failure in both groups, though the increase was greater in the group with aortic enlargement.

  2. A demonstration device to simulate the radial velocity method for exoplanet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choopan, W.; Liewrian, W.; Ketpichainarong, W.; Panijpan, B.

    2016-07-01

    A device for simulating exoplanet detection by the radial method based on the Doppler principle has been constructed. The spectral shift of light from a distant star, mutually revolving with the exoplanet, is simulated by the spectral shift of the sound wave emitted by the device’s star approaching and receding relative to the static frequency detector. The detected sound frequency shift reflects the relative velocity of the ‘star’ very well. Both teachers and students benefit from the radial velocity method and the transit method (published by us previously) provided by this device.

  3. Finite element basis for the expansion of radial wavefunction in quantum scattering calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Woonglin; Sup Lee, Yoon; Park, Seung C.

    1991-11-01

    Radial wavefunctions in quantum scattering calculations are expanded in terms of two shape functions for each finite element. This approach is the R matrix version of Kohn's variational method and also directly applicable to S matrix in the log-derivative version. The linear algebra involved amounts to solving definite banded systems. In this basis set method, R matrix or log-derivative matrix is greatly simplified and the computational effort is linearly proportional to the number of radial basis functions, promising computational efficiencies for large scale calculations. Convergences for test vases are also reasonably rapid.

  4. Cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped fiber laser with radially polarized output.

    PubMed

    Lin, Di; Daniel, J M O; Gecevičius, M; Beresna, M; Kazansky, P G; Clarkson, W A

    2014-09-15

    A simple technique for directly generating a radially polarized output beam from a cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped fiber laser is reported. Our approach is based on the use of a nanograting spatially variant waveplate as an intracavity polarization-controlling element. The laser yielded ~32 W of output power (limited by available pump power) with a radially polarized TM (01)-mode output beam at 1040 nm with a corresponding slope efficiency of 66% and a polarization purity of 95%. The beam-propagation factor (M(2)) was measured to be ~1.9-2.1. PMID:26466271

  5. Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting

    DOEpatents

    Bulman, David Edward; Darkins, Jr., Toby George; Stumpf, James Anthony; Schroder, Mark S.; Lipinski, John Joseph

    2012-03-27

    Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

  6. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field Br ˜ (10-4-10-2)(r/ AU)-2 G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ˜1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  7. DESIGN ANALYSIS OF RADIAL INFLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    This program performs a velocity-diagram analysis required for determining geometry and estimating performance for radial-inflow turbines. Input design requirements are power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative rate. The design variables include stator-exit angle, rotor-exit-tip to rotor-inlet radius ratio, rotor-exit-hub to tip radius ratio, and the magnitude and radial distribution of rotor-exit tangential velocity. The program output includes diameters, total and static efficiences, all absolute and relative temperatures, pressures, and velocities, and flow angles at stator inlet, stator exit, rotor inlet, and rotor exit. Losses accounted for in this program by the internal loss model are three-dimensional (profile plus end wall) viscous losses in the stator and the rotor, the disk-friction loss on the back side of the rotor, the loss due to the clearance between the rotor tip and the outer casing, and the exit velocity loss. The flow analysis is one-dimensional at the stator inlet, stator exit, and rotor inlet, each of these calculation stations being at a constant radius. At the rotor exit where there is a variation in flow-field radius, an axisymmetric two-dimensional analysis is made using constant height sectors. Simple radial equilibrium is used to establish the static pressure gradient at the rotor exit. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a memory requirement of approximately 22K of 36 bit words.

  8. Axial and Radial Oxylipin Transport1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Debora; Chauvin, Adeline; Acosta, Ivan F.; Kurenda, Andrzej; Stolz, Stéphanie; Chételat, Aurore; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Farmer, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonates are oxygenated lipids (oxylipins) that control defense gene expression in response to cell damage in plants. How mobile are these potent mediators within tissues? Exploiting a series of 13-lipoxygenase (13-lox) mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that displays impaired jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis in specific cell types and using JA-inducible reporters, we mapped the extent of the transport of endogenous jasmonates across the plant vegetative growth phase. In seedlings, we found that jasmonate (or JA precursors) could translocate axially from wounded shoots to unwounded roots in a LOX2-dependent manner. Grafting experiments with the wild type and JA-deficient mutants confirmed shoot-to-root oxylipin transport. Next, we used rosettes to investigate radial cell-to-cell transport of jasmonates. After finding that the LOX6 protein localized to xylem contact cells was not wound inducible, we used the lox234 triple mutant to genetically isolate LOX6 as the only JA precursor-producing LOX in the plant. When a leaf of this mutant was wounded, the JA reporter gene was expressed in distal leaves. Leaf sectioning showed that JA reporter expression extended from contact cells throughout the vascular bundle and into extravascular cells, revealing a radial movement of jasmonates. Our results add a crucial element to a growing picture of how the distal wound response is regulated in rosettes, showing that both axial (shoot-to-root) and radial (cell-to-cell) transport of oxylipins plays a major role in the wound response. The strategies developed herein provide unique tools with which to identify intercellular jasmonate transport routes. PMID:26338953

  9. Linear stability of radially-heated circular Couette flow with simulated radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randy; Weidman, Patrick D.

    2007-05-01

    The stability of circular Couette flow between vertical concentric cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient is considered with an effective “radial gravity.” In addition to terrestrial buoyancy - ρg e z we include the term - ρg m f(r)e r where g m f(r) is the effective gravitational acceleration directed radially inward across the gap. Physically, this body force arises in experiments using ferrofluid in the annular gap of a Taylor Couette cell whose inner cylinder surrounds a vertical stack of equally spaced disk magnets. The radial dependence f(r) of this force is proportional to the modified Bessel function K 1(κr), where 2π/κ is the spatial period of the magnetic stack and r is the radial coordinate. Linear stability calculations made to compare with conditions reported by Ali and Weidman (J. Fluid Mech., 220, 1990) show strong destabilization effects, measured by the onset Rayleigh number R, when the inner wall is warmer, and strong stabilization effects when the outer wall is warmer, with increasing values of the dimensionless radial gravity γ = g m /g. Further calculations presented for the geometry and fluid properties of a terrestrial laboratory experiment reveal a hitherto unappreciated structure of the stability problem for differentially-heated cylinders: multiple wavenumber minima exist in the marginal stability curves. Transitions in global minima among these curves give rise to a competition between differing instabilities of the same spiral mode number, but widely separated axial wavenumbers.

  10. Acoustic aspects of a radial diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Krasinski, J.; Sun, S.; Wawszczak, W.

    This paper describes experimental research on the acoustical aspects of an axially-symmetrical radial diffuser. Tests were made at high subsonic and supersonic speeds at the diffuser entry, using compressed air. The results are analyzed from the point of view of the internal flow and Lighthill's theory of sound generated aerodynamically. The outstanding features of this diffuser are a high efficiency in subsonic and supersonic ranges and extreme shortness and powerful sound attenuating capacity. The noise level of a supersonic nozzle at Mach 4.0 was reduced from about 110 dB to 80 dB.

  11. Reactive-infiltration instability in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    A planar dissolution front propagating through a homogeneous porous matrix is unstable with respect to small variations in local permeability; regions of high permeability dissolve faster because of enhanced transport of reactants, which leads to increased rippling of the front. This phenomenon, usually referred to known as reactive-infiltration instability is an important mechanism for pattern development in geology, with a range of morphologies and scales, from cave systems running for hundreds of miles to laboratory acidization on the scale of centimeters. In general, this instability is characterized by two length scales: the diffusive length (D/v) and the reactant penetration length (v/r), where v is the Darcy velocity, D - the diffusion constant and r - the dissolution rate. If the latter scale is much smaller than the former one can adopt the so-called thin front limit, where the interface is treated as a discontinuity in porosity, with a completely dissolved phase on one side and an undissolved phase on the other. Linear stability analysis for this case has been carried out by Chadam et al. [1], and the corresponding dispersion relation shows that long wavelengths are unstable, whereas short wavelengths are stabilized by diffusion. In their derivation, Chadam et al. have considered a linear geometry with a uniform pressure gradient applied along one of the directions. However, in many cases (e.g. in the acidization techniques used in oil industry) the reactive fluids are injected through a well and thus the relevant geometry is radial rather than linear. Motivated by this, we have carried out the linear stability analysis of the reactive-infiltration problem in radial geometry, with the fluid injection at the centre of the system. We stay within the thin-front limit and derive the corresponding dispersion relation, which shows the stable regions for both the long-wavelength and short-wavelength modes, and the unstable region in between. Next, we study how

  12. Radial Neck Osteotomy for Malunion of Radial Neck Fracture in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Vandergugten, Simon; Troussel, Serge; Lefebvre, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In a case of a neglected radial neck fracture in childhood, the management of initial fracture and its complications are subjected to discussion. In children, open reduction should be avoided but an angulation less than 30° must be obtained. Several techniques exist to manage symptomatic malunion in adults, including resection, prosthesis, and osteotomy. When performing an osteotomy, it is important first to preserve an intact osseous hinge to avoid avascular necrosis and second to align the edge of the radial head articular surface with the lateral edge of the coronoid process, in order to avoid overstuffing elbow joint. PMID:26347364

  13. Treatment of chronic radial head dislocations in children

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, W. D.; Zogaib, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    From 1990 to 2005 our department treated nine patients with chronic radial head dislocation by an ulnar osteotomy and indirect reduction by interosseous membrane. The patients varied in age from 2 years and 8 months to 10 years, and the time from the injury to operation ranged from 40 days to 3 years. The range of functional motion and carrying angle was restored in all nine patients, and no complications, such as recurrent dislocation, infection, or neurovascular injury were observed. This technique has proven to be a successful approach to treating such cases, with a low range of complications and good functional results. PMID:16741732

  14. Radial basis function networks and complexity regularization in function learning.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, A; Linder, T

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we apply the method of complexity regularization to derive estimation bounds for nonlinear function estimation using a single hidden layer radial basis function network. Our approach differs from previous complexity regularization neural-network function learning schemes in that we operate with random covering numbers and l(1) metric entropy, making it possible to consider much broader families of activation functions, namely functions of bounded variation. Some constraints previously imposed on the network parameters are also eliminated this way. The network is trained by means of complexity regularization involving empirical risk minimization. Bounds on the expected risk in terms of the sample size are obtained for a large class of loss functions. Rates of convergence to the optimal loss are also derived.

  15. Left Brain to Right Brain: Notes from the Human Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumli, Francis

    1982-01-01

    Examines the implications of the left brain-right brain theory on communications styles in male-female relationships. The author contends that women tend to use the vagueness of their emotional responses manipulatively. Men need to apply rational approaches to increase clarity in communication. (AM)

  16. Left-right dissociation of hippocampal memory processes in mice.

    PubMed

    Shipton, Olivia A; El-Gaby, Mohamady; Apergis-Schoute, John; Deisseroth, Karl; Bannerman, David M; Paulsen, Ole; Kohl, Michael M

    2014-10-21

    Left-right asymmetries have likely evolved to make optimal use of bilaterian nervous systems; however, little is known about the synaptic and circuit mechanisms that support divergence of function between equivalent structures in each hemisphere. Here we examined whether lateralized hippocampal memory processing is present in mice, where hemispheric asymmetry at the CA3-CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse has recently been demonstrated, with different spine morphology, glutamate receptor content, and synaptic plasticity, depending on whether afferents originate in the left or right CA3. To address this question, we used optogenetics to acutely silence CA3 pyramidal neurons in either the left or right dorsal hippocampus while mice performed hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. We found that unilateral silencing of either the left or right CA3 was sufficient to impair short-term memory. However, a striking asymmetry emerged in long-term memory, wherein only left CA3 silencing impaired performance on an associative spatial long-term memory task, whereas right CA3 silencing had no effect. To explore whether synaptic properties intrinsic to the hippocampus might contribute to this left-right behavioral asymmetry, we investigated the expression of hippocampal long-term potentiation. Following the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency electrical stimulation, synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons were strengthened only when presynaptic input originated in the left CA3, confirming an asymmetry in synaptic properties. The dissociation of hippocampal long-term memory function between hemispheres suggests that memory is routed via distinct left-right pathways within the mouse hippocampus, and provides a promising approach to help elucidate the synaptic basis of long-term memory.

  17. A simple model for radial expansion reactivity in LMRs (liquid metal reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.S.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Presented in this report is a simple analytical model developed for evaluating the radial expansion reactivity in small modular liquid metal reactors (LMRs). The present model is based on a non-leakage representation of the effective neutron multiplication factor. The resultant analytical expression for the radial expansion reactivity is simple and can be used directly in a system code for safety analyses. Applications of the present model to PRISM and SAFR resulted in a good agreement with the values reported by vendors. This agreement establishes that the large negative reactivity insertion resulting from LMR core radial expansion can be confirmed using a simple analytical approach, and thus is important in the current effort to evaluate the reactor inherent feedbacks for the PRISM and SAFR designs.

  18. Radial Variations in the Io Plasma Torus during the Cassini Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.; Steffl, A.

    2005-01-01

    A radial scan through the midnight sector of the Io plasma torus was made by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on 14 January 2001, shortly after closest approach to Jupiter. From these data, Steffl et al. (2004a) derived electron temperature, plasma composition (ion mixing ratios), and electron column density as a function of radius from L = 6 to 0 as well as the total luminosity. We have advanced our homogeneous model of torus physical chemistry (Delamere and Bagenal, 2003) to include latitudinal and radial variations in a manner similar to the two-dimensional model by Schreier et al. (1998). The model variables include: (1) neutral source rate, (2) radial transport coefficient, (3) the hot electron fraction, (4) hot electron temperature, and (5) the neutral O/S ratio. The radial variation of parameters 1-4 are described by simple power laws, making a total of nine parameters. We have explored the sensitivity of the model results to variations in these parameters and compared the best fit with previous Voyager era models (schreier et al., 1998), galileo data (Crary et al., 1998), and Cassini observations (steffl et al., 2004a). We find that radial variations during the Cassini era are consistent with a neutral source rate of 700-1200 kg/s, an integrated transport time from L = 6 to 9 of 100-200 days, and that the core electron temperature is largely determined by a spatially and temporally varying superthermal electron population.

  19. Renormalized effective actions in radially symmetric backgrounds: Partial wave cutoff method

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Hur, Jin; Lee, Choonkyu

    2006-10-15

    The computation of the one-loop effective action in a radially symmetric background can be reduced to a sum over partial-wave contributions, each of which is the logarithm of an appropriate one-dimensional radial determinant. While these individual radial determinants can be evaluated simply and efficiently using the Gel'fand-Yaglom method, the sum over all partial-wave contributions diverges. A renormalization procedure is needed to unambiguously define the finite renormalized effective action. Here we use a combination of the Schwinger proper-time method, and a resummed uniform DeWitt expansion. This provides a more elegant technique for extracting the large partial-wave contribution, compared to the higher-order radial WKB approach which had been used in previous work. We illustrate the general method with a complete analysis of the scalar one-loop effective action in a class of radially separable SU(2) Yang-Mills background fields. We also show that this method can be applied to the case where the background gauge fields have asymptotic limits appropriate to uniform field strengths, such as, for example, in the Minkowski solution, which describes an instanton immersed in a constant background. Detailed numerical results will be presented in a sequel.

  20. Making Tracks on Mars (left-eye)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been making tracks on Mars for seven months now, well beyond its original 90-day mission. The rover traveled more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) to reach the 'Columbia Hills' pictured here. In this 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain, its wheel tracks can be seen approaching from the northwest (right side of image).

    Spirit's navigation camera took the images that make up this mosaic on sols 210 and 213 (Aug. 5 and Aug. 8, 2004). The rover is now conducting scientific studies of the local geology on the 'Clovis' outcrop of the 'West Spur' region of the 'Columbia Hills.' The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction. This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair. Scientists plan for Spirit to take a color panoramic image from this location.

  1. An analytical estimate of the coefficient for radial charged particle diffusion in Jupiter's magnetosphere using plasma radial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubar, Yu. I.

    2015-11-01

    A radial profile of the plasma mass distribution in Jupiter's magnetosphere in the region beyond Io's orbit up to ˜15 Jupiter radii R J constructed according to the results of measurements on the Voyager 1 and Galileo spacecraft is used to determine the radial dependence and radial diffusion coefficient D LL . The initial profile is approximated by a function decreasing as L -5 ± 1. For this radial mass distribution, radial ion diffusion outside of Io's orbit caused by centrifugal forces is possible. An estimate of (1.2-6.7)10-11 L 6 ± 1 for D LL was obtained.

  2. Facts about Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... left and right sides of the heart: the patent ductus arteriosus and the patent foramen ovale . Normally, these openings will close a ... functioning left side of the heart through the patent ductus arteriosus and the patent foramen ovale. The ...

  3. First results from the Radial Velocity Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabroke, George; Cropper, Mark; Katz, David; Sartoretti, Paola; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Marchal, Olivier; Gueguen, Alain; Benson, Kevin; Dolding, Chris; Huckle, Howard; Smith, Mike; Baker, Steve

    2015-08-01

    Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) has been operating in routine phase for nearly one year since initial commissioning. RVS continues to work well but the higher than expected levels of stray light reduce the limiting magnitude. The end-of-mission radial velocity performance requirements are 15 km/s for G2V stars at V = 16.5 mag. 15 km/s accuracy is achieved at V ~ 15 mag, in agreement with simulations that predict a loss of 1.4 mag. RVS spectra are read out from the Gaia CCDs using windows, currently with a fixed Across Scan (AC) width of 10 pixels. Simulations suggest that adapting the AC window size and limiting magnitude to the observing conditions could recover ~0.1 mag of the faint-end performance loss. Consequently Gaia's onboard software will be upgraded in spring/summer 2015 (TBC) to include two new configurable functionalities: an adaptive RVS AC window size scheme and an adaptive RVS limiting magnitude scheme. The status of this new commissioning period will be presented, as well as the latest scientific performance of the on-ground processing of RVS spectra.

  4. A radial transmission line material measurement apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Moyer, R.D.; Koontz, T.E.; Morris, M.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radial transmission line material measurement sample apparatus (sample holder, offset short standards, measurement software, and instrumentation) is described which has been proposed, analyzed, designed, constructed, and tested. The purpose of the apparatus is to obtain accurate surface impedance measurements of lossy, possibly anisotropic, samples at low and intermediate frequencies (vhf and low uhf). The samples typically take the form of sections of the material coatings on conducting objects. Such measurements thus provide the key input data for predictive numerical scattering codes. Prediction of the sample surface impedance from the coaxial input impedance measurement is carried out by two techniques. The first is an analytical model for the coaxial-to-radial transmission line junction. The second is an empirical determination of the bilinear transformation model of the junction by the measurement of three full standards. The standards take the form of three offset shorts (and an additional lossy Salisbury load), which have also been constructed. The accuracy achievable with the device appears to be near one percent.

  5. Normal threshold values for a monofilament sensory test in sural and radial cutaneous nerves in Indian and Nepali volunteers.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Inge; Brandsma, Wim; Post, Erik; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2014-12-01

    The monofilament test (MFT) is a reliable method to assess sensory nerve function in leprosy and other neuropathies. Assessment of the radial cutaneous and sural nerves, in addition to nerves usually tested, can help improve diagnosis and monitoring of nerve function impairment (NFI). To enable the detection of impairments in leprosy patients, it is essential to know the monofilament threshold of these two nerves in normal subjects. The radial cutaneous, sural, ulnar, median and posterior tibial nerves of 245 volunteers were tested. All nerves were tested at three sites on both left and right sides. Normal monofilament thresholds were calculated per test-site and per nerve. We assessed 490 radial cutaneous and 482 sural nerves. The normal monofilament was 2 g (Filament Index Number (FIN) 4.31) for the radial cutaneous and 4 g (FIN 4.56) for the sural nerve, although heavy manual laborers demonstrated a threshold of 10 g (FIN 5.07) for the sural nerve. For median and ulnar nerves, the 200 mg (FIN 3.61) filament was confirmed as normal while the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filament was normal for the posterior tibial. Age and occupation have an effect on the mean touch sensitivity but do not affect the normal threshold for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves. The normal thresholds for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves are determined as the 2 g (FIN 4.31) and the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filaments, respectively. The addition of the radial cutaneous and sural nerve to sensory nerve assessment may improve the diagnosis of patients with impaired sensory nerve function. PMID:25675652

  6. Left-handed Children in Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Used teacher questionnaires to examine incidence of left-handedness in nearly 2,800 Singaporean children, racial differences in this left-handed population, and educational provisions in preschool and primary school. Findings indicated that 7.5% of preschoolers and 6.3% of primary children were left-handed, with a higher proportion being Chinese…

  7. The Left-Handed: "Their Sinister" History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costas, Elaine Fowler

    The history of left-handedness can provide teachers and parents a better understanding of left-handed children and give those children more pride in their difference. No child should be made to feel that he or she is abnormal because of using the left hand, although some specific instruction for these students is necessary in handwriting. Many…

  8. Effects of radial shockwave therapy on the limb function of dogs with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, M; Bockstahler, B; Skalicky, M; Mlacnik, E; Lorinson, D

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of extracorporeal radial shock wave therapy on the hindlimb function of dogs suffering from hip osteoarthritis. Twenty-four client-owned dogs with hip osteoarthritis were investigated; 18 of them received radial shockwave therapy and six were left untreated as controls. Force plate analysis on a treadmill was used to assess the dogs' hindlimb function before treatment and four weeks after the last treatment, and the treated dogs were re-evaluated three and six months after the treatment. The parameters chosen for evaluation were peak vertical force and vertical impulse, and the calculated symmetry indices. In the treated dogs, differences between the ground reaction forces exerted by the right and left hindlegs disappeared four weeks after the treatment, whereas in the control dogs only the peak vertical force distribution changed significantly. The significant improvement in the treated dogs was confirmed by changes in the symmetry indices. Significant improvements in vertical impulse and peak vertical force were observed three months after the treatment.

  9. Case report: A pulseless radial artery in a child under anesthesia for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Shahram; Javid, Mihan Jafari; Maghsoudloo, Maziar; Faghihnasiri, Sorousg; Etemadi-Aleagha, Afshar

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of cancer in children often requires a combination of chemotherapy, surgery, and/or radiotherapy. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are not painful processes, but children undergoing these procedures must be made motionless through anesthesia or sedation. There are a few reports of complications during these procedures in relation to the procedures themselves or to the anesthesia given. This report describes an unexpected pulseless radial artery which was preliminarily and unduly attributed to anesthesia. A 2.5 year-old male pediatric patient with an acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was scheduled for radiotherapy. Anesthesia with intramuscular ketamine was induced before starting radiotherapy. About 5 minutes after injection of ketamine we found the right radial pulse undetectable. There was no other manifestation of hypoxia or hypo-perfusion. Carotid pulsation was normal. Examination of the left radial pulse and other peripheral pulses showed normal pulsation. The procedure was continued uneventfully. The next follow-up after radiotherapy, showed a scar and swelling on the right antecubital area, caused by extravasation of chemotherapeutic agent in the prior period of chemotherapy. Doppler ultrasonography of the antecubital vein confirmed the diagnosis. This case study therefore demonstrates that proper intravenous cannula establishment before chemotherapy is of great importance. Furthermore, accurate history and physical examination before induction of anesthesia or sedation may be useful in preventing mismanagement in pediatric cancer procedures. PMID:26396727

  10. Long-term results of complex left ventricular reconstruction surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Letsou, George V; Forrester, Matthew; Frazier, O H

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular reconstruction is advocated as a surgical option for patients with severe congestive heart failure. Despite initial enthusiasm for this procedure, reports of long-term results are sparse. Herein, we describe a particularly gratifying case of left ventricular reconstruction in a 43-year-old man, who continues to have excellent left ventricular function 10 years postoperatively. This approach may be a reasonable alternative to cardiac transplantation in patients who lack other treatment options.

  11. Fabricating Radial Groove Gratings Using Projection Photolithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Projection photolithography has been used as a fabrication method for radial grove gratings. Use of photolithographic method for diffraction grating fabrication represents the most significant breakthrough in grating technology in the last 60 years, since the introduction of holographic written gratings. Unlike traditional methods utilized for grating fabrication, this method has the advantage of producing complex diffractive groove contours that can be designed at pixel-by-pixel level, with pixel size currently at the level of 45 45 nm. Typical placement accuracy of the grating pixels is 10 nm over 30 nm. It is far superior to holographic, mechanically ruled or direct e-beam written gratings and results in high spatial coherence and low spectral cross-talk. Due to the smooth surface produced by reactive ion etch, such gratings have a low level of randomly scattered light. Also, due to high fidelity and good surface roughness, this method is ideally suited for fabrication of radial groove gratings. The projection mask is created using a laser writer. A single crystal silicon wafer is coated with photoresist, and then the projection mask, with its layer of photoresist, is exposed for patterning in a stepper or scanner. To develop the photoresist, the fabricator either removes the exposed areas (positive resist) of the unexposed areas (negative resist). Next, the patterned and developed photoresist silicon substrate is subjected to reactive ion etching. After this step, the substrate is cleaned. The projection mask is fabricated according to electronic design files that may be generated in GDS file format using any suitable CAD (computer-aided design) or other software program. Radial groove gratings in off-axis grazing angle of incidence mount are of special interest for x-ray spectroscopy, as they allow achieving higher spectral resolution for the same grating area and have lower alignment tolerances than traditional in-plane grating scheme. This is especially

  12. Mapping the radial structure of AGN tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, M.; Hönig, S. F.; Antonucci, R.; Millour, F.; Tristram, K. R. W.; Weigelt, G.

    2011-12-01

    We present mid-IR interferometric observations of six type 1 AGNs at multiple baseline lengths ranging from 27 m to 130 m, reaching high angular resolutions up to λ/B ~ 0.02 arcsec. For two of the targets, we have simultaneous near-IR interferometric measurements as well, taken within a week. We find that all the objects are partially resolved at long baselines in these IR wavelengths. The multiple-baseline data directly probe the radial distribution of the material on sub-pc scales. We show that for our sample, which is small but spans over ~2.5 orders of magnitudes in the UV/optical luminosity L of the central engine, the radial distribution clearly and systematically changes with luminosity. The brightness distribution at a given mid-IR wavelength seems to be rather well described by a power law, which makes a simple Gaussian or ring size estimation quite inadequate. In this case, a half-light radius R1/2 can be used as a representative size. We show that the higher luminosity objects become more compact in normalized half-light radii R1/2/Rin in the mid-IR, where Rin is the dust sublimation radius empirically given by the L1/2 fit of the near-IR reverberation radii. This means that, contrary to previous studies, the physical mid-IR emission size (e.g. in pc) is not proportional to L1/2, but increases with L much more slowly. With our current datasets, we find that R1/2 ∝ L0.21 ± 0.05 at 8.5 μm, and R1/2 nearly constant at 13 μm. The derived size information also seems to correlate with the properties of the total flux spectrum, in particular the smaller R1/2/Rin objects having bluer mid-IR spectral shape. We use a power-law temperature/density gradient model as a reference, and infer that the radial surface density distribution of the heated dust grains at a radius r changes from a steep ~r-1 structure in high luminosity objects to a shallower ~r0 structure in those of lower luminosity. The inward dust temperature distribution does not seem to smoothly

  13. Left-handed wrestlers are more successful.

    PubMed

    Ziyagil, Mehmet Akif; Gursoy, Recep; Dane, Senol; Yuksel, Ramazan

    2010-08-01

    It has been reported that there is a high proportion of left-handers among top athletes in different sports. In this study, the goal was to examine the rate of left-handedness in the top wrestlers at the world championships for achievement by left-handed wrestlers. The rate of left-handedness was higher in wrestlers with medal honors compared to wrestlers without medals for both men and women. The winning numbers and match degrees were higher in the left-handed wrestlers than in both right- and mixed-handed wrestlers among top international wrestlers.

  14. Conformal approach to cylindrical DLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, A.; Caglioti, E.; Loreto, V.; Pietronero, L.

    2006-09-01

    We extend the conformal mapping approach elaborated for the radial diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) to cylindrical geometry. We introduce in particular a complex function which allows a cylindrical cluster to be grown using as an intermediate step a radial aggregate. The aggregate grown exhibits the same self-affine features as the original cylindrical DLA. The specific choice of the transformation allows us to study the relationship between the radial and the cylindrical geometry. In particular the cylindrical aggregate can be seen as a radial aggregate with particles of size increasing with the radius. On the other hand, the radial aggregate can be seen as a cylindrical aggregate with particles of size decreasing with the height. This framework, which shifts the point of view from the geometry to the size of the particles, can open the way to more quantitative studies on the relationship between radial and cylindrical DLA.

  15. Esophageal assessments of left ventricular filling pressures: A proof-of-concept study

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Markus; Bell, Stephen P; Sardana, Neeraj; Zubarik, Richard; LeWinter, Martin M; Dauerman, Harold L

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We sought to evaluate if left ventricular filling pressures can be assessed from the esophagus. Background: The invasive assessment of left ventricular filling pressures is of importance in the evaluation and monitoring of critically ill patients. The left atrium is in very close proximity to the esophagus. We hypothesized that the temporal pressure decay characteristics of an esophageal fluid volume positioned at the level ofthe left atrium should depend on the atrial and left ventricular filling pressure. Materials and Methods: In five pigs an esophageal balloon was placed at the level ofthe left atrium. The balloon was then pressurized to 50 mmHg followed by an automated release that allowed us to directly record the pressure decay, while simultaneously recording left atrial pressures. An algorithm was developed to estimate atrial pressures. We also tested if invasive transesophageal atrial pressures can be recorded via an ultrasound guided left atrial puncture. Results: Noninvasive transesophageal assessments of left atrial pressures are feasible. The left atrial pressure directly affects the esophageal pressure decay and correlates with the transition point from an exponential pressure decay to a more linear decay (r = 0.949). This approach also allows for the assessment of atrial waveforms. We could also demonstrate that invasive transesophageal pressure measurements are feasible and safe. Conclusions: The esophagus allows for reproducible less invasive assessments of left ventricular filling pressures and atrial pressure waveforms. This close spatial relationship provides an alternative access site for diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac procedures. PMID:24741493

  16. Radial strain assessment of the interventricular septum wall by a new technique in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Moladoust, H; Mokhtari-Dizaji, M; Ojaghi-Haghighi, Z; D'hooge, J; Noohi, F; Khaledifar, A; Khajavi, A

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to design a new approach for the acquisition of regional radial strain from the middle portion of the interventricular septum. We designed and wrote a program in Matlab (computer-assisted method) for use on a personal computer so that the septum thickness throughout the cardiac cycle could be measured instantaneously. Computer-assisted and conventional manual methods were used on the same 2D echocardiography image frames. Then, real-time 2D color Doppler myocardial imaging and conventional 2D imaging of the septum walls of 12 healthy participants at rest using apical four-chamber view were acquired. Wall thickness was measured using both the computerized program and velocity data used for tracking the segment and intensity line profile modification automatically. Then, the radial strain was estimated. Bland-Altman statistical analysis shows good agreement between the computer-assisted method and conventional manual method. The average of the peak and mean radial strains from the mid-septum of 12 healthy participants were 63.5 +/- 10.7 and 31.7 +/- 7.5%, respectively. We introduced a simple approach that is capable of radial strain estimation of the septum wall, which cannot be measured by current Doppler based methods in echocardiography systems. PMID:17657520

  17. Novel Left Ventricular Assist System® II

    PubMed Central

    Liotta, Domingo

    2004-01-01

    The pump's outflow connector of the Novel Left Ventricular Assist System® I (Novel LVAS® I) has been redesigned to be sutured to the infrarenal abdominal aorta either as a procedure of choice (due to its simplicity) or as an alternative in the presence of an unhealthy descending thoracic aorta. The implantation of the Novel Left Ventricular Assist System® II (Novel LVAS® II) requires only a single passage of the pump's inflow connector through the diaphragm. Of still greater importance, the Novel LVAS II enables a considerably shorter (20- or 22-mm) Dacron vascular graft as the outflow connector to the abdominal infrarenal aorta. The electrocardiogram-synchronized Novel LVAS II possibly ensures the most effective approach to the perfusion of visceral organs and kidneys, while avoiding both excessive mechanical stress on the blood and anatomical and functional damage to the native left ventricle. PMID:15562850

  18. Radial expansion for spinning conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Hansen, Tobias; Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio

    2016-07-01

    This paper develops a method to compute any bosonic conformal block as a series expansion in the optimal radial coordinate introduced by Hogervorst and Rychkov. The method reduces to the known result when the external operators are all the same scalar operator, but it allows to compute conformal blocks for external operators with spin. Moreover, we explain how to write closed form recursion relations for the coefficients of the expansions. We study three examples of four point functions in detail: one vector and three scalars; two vectors and two scalars; two spin 2 tensors and two scalars. Finally, for the case of two external vectors, we also provide a more efficient way to generate the series expansion using the analytic structure of the blocks as a function of the scaling dimension of the exchanged operator.

  19. Precise radial velocities in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.

    Since the first detection of a planet outside our Solar System byWolszczan & Frail (1992), over 500 exoplanets have been found to date2, none of which resemble the Earth. Most of these planets were discovered by measuring the radial velocity (hereafter, RV) of the host star, which wobbles under the gravitational influence of any existing planetary companions. However, this method has yet to achieve the sub-m/s precision necessary to detect an Earth-mass planet in the Habitable Zone (the region around a star that can support liquid water; hereafter, HZ) (Kasting et al. 1993) around a Solar-type star. Even though Kepler (Borucki et al. 2010) has announced several Earth-sized HZ candidates, these targets will be exceptionally difficult to confirm with current astrophysical spectrographs (Borucki et al. 2011). The fastest way to discover and confirm potentiallyhabitable Earth-mass planets is to observe stars with lower masses - in particular, late M dwarfs. While M dwarfs are readily abundant, comprising some 70% of the local stellar population, their low optical luminosity presents a formidable challenge to current optical RV instruments. By observing in the near-infrared (hereafter, NIR), where the flux from M dwarfs peaks, we can potentially reach low RV precisions with significantly less telescope time than would be required by a comparable optical instrument. However, NIR precision RV measurements are a relatively new idea and replete with challenges: IR arrays, unlike CCDs, are sensitive to the thermal background; modal noise is a bigger issue in the NIR than in the optical; and the NIR currently lacks the calibration sources like the very successful thorium-argon (hereafter, ThAr) hollow-cathode lamp and Iodine gas cell of the optical. The PSU Pathfinder (hereafter, Pathfinder) was designed to explore these technical issues with the intention of mitigating these problems for future NIR high-resolution spectrographs, such as the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HZPF

  20. Precision Radial Velocities in the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Hugh

    2007-08-01

    The Precision Radial Velocity Spectrometer (PRVS) is designed to provide high throughput Doppler reflex measurements. PRVS is designed to always be available and provide 1.0 to 1.8 micron high-resolution spectroscopy with very high stability over several years. We have constructed models simulating likely candidates and demonstrated the ability to recover exoplanetary RV signals in the infrared. We have conducted limited experiments with a brass-board instrument to explore real-world issues yielding precisions of better than 10 m/s. We are thus confident that PRVS can provide for the detection of terrestrial-mass extra-solar planets in the habitable zones of low-mass stars. PRVS is scheduled to be the next ASPEN-process instrument for the Gemini telescopes and if funded in 2007 first light is expected by 2011.

  1. Fungal keratitis presenting as radial keratoneuritis

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Aditya; Jain, Rajat; Sahu, Srikant; Sangwan, Virender

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with severe pain, redness, watering and photophobia for 10 days in the right eye without any history of trauma. Diagnosis of herpes simplex disciform keratitis was made and he was prescribed topical steroids. The patient showed clinical worsening and presented with ring infiltrate, diffuse stromal oedema and radial keratoneuritis, a finding pathognomic of acanthamoeba keratitis. With two inconclusive corneal scrapings and the patient showing clinical worsening, an urgent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was carried out. Histopathological and microbiological examination of the excised corneal button revealed the presence of fungus. At 5 weeks follow-up, the patient has best-corrected visual acuity 20/40 with no recurrence of infection. PMID:24717856

  2. Radial evolution of ion distribution functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsch, E.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of solar wind ion velocity distributions and derived parameters (temperature, ion differential speed, heat flux, adiabatic invariants) is presented with emphasis on the heliocentric distance range between 0.3 and 1 AU traversed by the Helios solar probe. The radial evolution of nonthermal features are discussed which are observed to be most pronounced at perihelion. Within the framework of quasilinear plasma theory, wave particle interactions that may shape the ion distributions are considered. Some results of a self consistent model calculation are presented accounting for ion acceleration and heating by resonant momentum and energy exchange with ion cyclotron and magnetosonic waves propagating away from the Sun along the interplanetary magnetic field. Another tentative explanation for the occurrence of large perpendicular proton temperatures is offered in terms of heating by Landau damping of lower hybrid waves.

  3. Generalization performance of radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yunwen; Ding, Lixin; Zhang, Wensheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper studies the generalization performance of radial basis function (RBF) networks using local Rademacher complexities. We propose a general result on controlling local Rademacher complexities with the L1 -metric capacity. We then apply this result to estimate the RBF networks' complexities, based on which a novel estimation error bound is obtained. An effective approximation error bound is also derived by carefully investigating the Hölder continuity of the lp loss function's derivative. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the RBF network minimizing an appropriately constructed structural risk admits a significantly better learning rate when compared with the existing results. An empirical study is also performed to justify the application of our structural risk in model selection.

  4. Generalized multiscale radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Billings, Stephen A; Wei, Hua-Liang; Balikhin, Michael A

    2007-12-01

    A novel modelling framework is proposed for constructing parsimonious and flexible multiscale radial basis function networks (RBF). Unlike a conventional standard single scale RBF network, where all the basis functions have a common kernel width, the new network structure adopts multiscale Gaussian functions as the bases, where each selected centre has multiple kernel widths, to provide more flexible representations with better generalization properties for general nonlinear dynamical systems. As a direct extension of the traditional single scale Gaussian networks, the new multiscale network is easy to implement and is quick to learn using standard learning algorithms. A k-means clustering algorithm and an improved orthogonal least squares (OLS) algorithm are used to determine the unknown parameters in the network model including the centres and widths of the basis functions, and the weights between the basis functions. It is demonstrated that the new network can lead to a parsimonious model with much better generalization property compared with the traditional single width RBF networks.

  5. Nonlinear radial oscillations of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gabler, Michael; Sperhake, Ulrich; Andersson, Nils

    2009-09-15

    The effects of nonlinear oscillations in compact stars are attracting considerable current interest. In order to study such phenomena in the framework of fully nonlinear general relativity, highly accurate numerical studies are required. A numerical scheme specifically tailored for such a study is based on formulating the time evolution in terms of deviations from a stationary equilibrium configuration. Using this technique, we investigate over a wide range of amplitudes nonlinear effects in the evolution of radial oscillations of neutron stars. In particular, we discuss mode coupling due to nonlinear interaction, the occurrence of resonance phenomena, shock formation near the stellar surface as well as the capacity of nonlinearities to stabilize perturbatively unstable neutron star models.

  6. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention.

  7. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. PMID:26225205

  8. Asymptomatic post-rheumatic giant left atrium

    PubMed Central

    Özkartal, Tardu; Tanner, Felix C; Niemann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our clinic for a second opinion regarding indication for mitral valve surgery. An echocardiogram showed a moderate mitral stenosis with a concomitant severe regurgitation. The most striking feature, however, was a giant left atrium with a parasternal anteroposterior diameter of 79 mm and a left atrial volume index of 364 mL/m². There are various echocardiographic definitions of a giant left atrium, which are mainly based on measurements of the anteroposterior diameter of the left atrium using M-mode in the parasternal long axis view. Since the commonly accepted method for echocardiographic evaluation of left atrial size is left atrial volume index, we propose a cut-off value of 140 mL/m2 for the definition of a “giant left atrium”. PMID:27354895

  9. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. PMID:26225205

  10. Asymptomatic post-rheumatic giant left atrium.

    PubMed

    Özkartal, Tardu; Tanner, Felix C; Niemann, Markus

    2016-06-26

    A 78-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our clinic for a second opinion regarding indication for mitral valve surgery. An echocardiogram showed a moderate mitral stenosis with a concomitant severe regurgitation. The most striking feature, however, was a giant left atrium with a parasternal anteroposterior diameter of 79 mm and a left atrial volume index of 364 mL/m². There are various echocardiographic definitions of a giant left atrium, which are mainly based on measurements of the anteroposterior diameter of the left atrium using M-mode in the parasternal long axis view. Since the commonly accepted method for echocardiographic evaluation of left atrial size is left atrial volume index, we propose a cut-off value of 140 mL/m(2) for the definition of a "giant left atrium".

  11. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  12. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Császár, Nikolaus B. M.; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Milz, Stefan; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed; Furia, John P.; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland) and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA). To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms. Results FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices. Clinical Relevance Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that “kick-starts” the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating

  13. Origin of the radial nerve branch innervating the brachialis muscle.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Won, Hyung-Sun; Lee, Kyu-Seok; Chung, In-Hyuk

    2009-05-01

    The brachialis muscle is dually innervated by the musculocutaneous nerve running via the anterior division of the brachial plexus and the radial nerve running via the posterior division of the plexus. There have been inconsistent descriptions of the pathway of the radial nerve branch at the brachial plexus. This study investigated the route of the radial nerve branch innervating the brachialis muscle at the brachial plexus. In 20 samples, the radial nerve branch innervating the brachialis muscle was separated and traced up to the cervical nerve under a surgical microscope. All the radial nerve branches innervating the muscle ran via the posterior cord, the posterior division, and the superior or middle trunk at the brachial plexus. The radial nerve branches arose from C5 in 5 cases, C6 in 11 cases, C5 and C6 in 3 cases, and C6 and C7 in 1 case. PMID:19260072

  14. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells.

  15. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  16. In vivo porcine left atrial wall stress: Computational model.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Elena S; Bellini, Chiara; Schwartzman, David S

    2011-10-13

    Most computational models of the heart have so far concentrated on the study of the left ventricle, mainly using simplified geometries. The same approach cannot be adopted to model the left atrium, whose irregular shape does not allow morphological simplifications. In addition, the deformation of the left atrium during the cardiac cycle strongly depends on the interaction with its surrounding structures. We present a procedure to generate a comprehensive computational model of the left atrium, including physiological loads (blood pressure), boundary conditions (pericardium, pulmonary veins and mitral valve annulus movement) and mechanical properties based on planar biaxial experiments. The model was able to accurately reproduce the in vivo dynamics of the left atrium during the passive portion of the cardiac cycle. A shift in time between the peak pressure and the maximum displacement of the mitral valve annulus allows the appendage to inflate and bend towards the ventricle before the pulling effect associated with the ventricle contraction takes place. The ventricular systole creates room for further expansion of the appendage, which gets in close contact with the pericardium. The temporal evolution of the volume in the atrial cavity as predicted by the finite element simulation matches the volume changes obtained from CT scans. The stress field computed at each time point shows remarkable spatial heterogeneity. In particular, high stress concentration occurs along the appendage rim and in the region surrounding the pulmonary veins. PMID:21907340

  17. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  18. Reelin signaling directly affects radial glia morphology and biochemical maturation.

    PubMed

    Hartfuss, Eva; Förster, Eckart; Bock, Hans H; Hack, Michael A; Leprince, Pierre; Luque, Juan M; Herz, Joachim; Frotscher, Michael; Götz, Magdalena

    2003-10-01

    Radial glial cells are characterized, besides their astroglial properties, by long radial processes extending from the ventricular zone to the pial surface, a crucial feature for the radial migration of neurons. The molecular signals that regulate this characteristic morphology, however, are largely unknown. We show an important role of the secreted molecule reelin for the establishment of radial glia processes. We describe a significant reduction in ventricular zone cells with long radial processes in the absence of reelin in the cortex of reeler mutant mice. These defects were correlated to a decrease in the content of brain lipid-binding protein (Blbp) and were detected exclusively in the cerebral cortex, but not in the basal ganglia of reeler mice. Conversely, reelin addition in vitro increased the Blbp content and process extension of radial glia from the cortex, but not the basal ganglia. Isolation of radial glia by fluorescent-activated cell sorting showed that these effects are due to direct signaling of reelin to radial glial cells. We could further demonstrate that this signaling requires Dab1, as the increase in Blbp upon reelin addition failed to occur in Dab1-/- mice. Taken together, these results unravel a novel role of reelin signaling to radial glial cells that is crucial for the regulation of their Blbp content and characteristic morphology in a region-specific manner.

  19. Analysis of radial velocities in the Antlia cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faifer, F. R.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Calderón, J. P.; Caso, J. P.; Bassino, L. P.; Cellone, S. A.; Richtler, T.

    We present preliminary results of a radial velocity survey in the central re- gion of the Antlia cluster. These velocities have been measured on spec- tra obtained, in the 2008A and 2009A semesters, with GMOS (GEMINI South). In this way, several dwarf galaxies that had no previous radial ve- locities, have been confirmed as cluster members. Our work is based on the Ferguson & Sandage (1990) catalogue, in which originally only 6% of the catalogued galaxies (375) had radial velocities. Thanks to the newly determined radial velocities we are able to begin to disentangle the cluster internal structure. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  20. Current concepts in the management of radial head fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kodde, Izaäk F; Kaas, Laurens; Flipsen, Mark; van den Bekerom, Michel PJ; Eygendaal, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Fracture of the radial head is a common injury. Over the last decades, the radial head is increasingly recognized as an important stabilizer of the elbow. In order to maintain stability of the injured elbow, goals of treatment of radial head fractures have become more and more towards restoring function and stability of the elbow. As treatment strategies have changed over the years, with an increasing amount of literature on this subject, the purpose of this article was to provide an overview of current concepts of the management of radial head fractures. PMID:26716091

  1. Should Radial Modes Always Be Regarded as p-Modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, M.

    2013-12-01

    As standard textbooks of stellar oscillations say, the only restoring force of radial modes in spherically symmetric stars is the pressure gradient, whereas the buoyancy force does not operate because no horizontal inhomogeneity is generated by radial oscillations. This is the physical reason why all radial modes should be classified as p-modes. In this presentation, however, we numerically demonstrate that unstable (adiabatic) radial modes should not be regraded as p-modes, because they are closely related to f-modes or g-modes of nonradial oscillations.

  2. Carbon star radial velocities and dark matter in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1986-01-01

    Optical radial velocities of carbon stars in the Milky Way are compared to center-of-mass velocities derived from CO radio emission produced in their circumstellar envelopes. It seems that there is an intrinsic velocity dispersion in the optically measured radial velocities. If the carbon stars in the dwarf spheroidals behave in a fashion similar to those in the Milky Way, then the use of their optical radial velocities to infer the mass-to-light ratio of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and the nature of the dark matter in the universe is suspect. Measurement of the radial velocities of K giants may possibly avoid these uncertainties associated with atmospheric motions.

  3. Aberrant left subclavian artery associated with a Kommerell's diverticulum and a left-sided aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pey-Jen; Balsam, Leora B; Mussa, Firas F; DeAnda, Abe

    2012-09-01

    Kommerell's diverticulum is most commonly associated with either an aberrant left subclavian artery from a right-sided aortic arch or an aberrant right subclavian artery from a left-sided aortic arch. We describe an exceedingly rare case of an aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum in a patient with a left-sided aortic arch, the "nonaberrant aberrant left subclavian artery."

  4. Radial Versus Femoral Access for Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Helen; Sastry, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility and safety of transradial coronary intervention was demonstrated soon after the description of the transfemoral approach, despite which the use of the femoral artery still dominates in acute coronary syndrome intervention. The advantages of using the radial artery are virtual elimination of access site complications and an important reduction in bleeding, both of which are of utmost importance to the patient with myocardial infarction. Randomised controlled trials have now documented what seems inherent; that transradial intervention should bring with it an advantage in terms of morbidity and mortality in this cohort. The potential disadvantages in terms of speed of procedure and radiation exposure are negated by operator experience. Registries have illustrated that conversion on a large scale from the femoral to the transradial approach is safe and saves lives, most convincingly so in acute coronary syndrome intervention. This review discusses the potential benefits and risks of the alternative access sites in acute patients and explores how these are borne out in the published data.

  5. Spectrographs for the Measurement of Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.

    A radial-velocity measurement derives from a shift in position of spectral features at the focus of a spectrographic instrument. We do not often think about how small these shifts are. It is not generally appreciated that the accuracy to which this shift must be measured is a tiny fraction of a pixel. Or, if we prefer to calculate in microns a surprising minuteness. What precautions should we be taking for the measurement of such small shifts? It is true that, thanks to computers, modern reduction methods allows us to correct for a wide variety of pertubations, provided that these are foreseen and understood; but such reduction procedures will give the best results if such pertubations are kept very small. We must therefore analyse these pertubations and think about how we can control them. The correlation method initiated in its modern form by Roger Griffin, and which we developed further with an optical mask in CORAVEL twenty-five years ago and more recently with a numerical mask in ELODIE, has demonstrated its power. In terms of these methods, the problem of high precision is to improve the correlation peak. Can this be done? Does the correlation method allow us to distinguish the overall radial velocity of the object from possible distortions of the lines? This is certainly a major problem which must be solved. The luminous efficiency of high-precision spectrographs is low. If the use of an optical fibre with scrambling for feeding the spectrograph seems inevitable to us today, it seems to me that the transmission of this system can be considerably improved by a better choice of the F-ratio of the image beam of the telescope which is to be matched with that of the spectrograph. This problem, common to all spectrographs, could be resolved with a specialised focal-plane instrument, giving a much greater than usual F-ratio, resulting in a simplification of the spectrograph optics, and hence an improvement in transmission and a serious decrease in size (which is

  6. Combining axial and radial nanowire heterostructures: radial Esaki diodes and tunnel field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anil W; Svensson, Johannes; Ek, Martin; Lind, Erik; Thelander, Claes; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing demand on high-performance electronics has generated transistors with very impressive figures of merit (Radosavljevic et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2009, 1-4 and Cho et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2011, 15.1.1-15.1.4). The continued scaling of the supply voltage of field-effect transistors, such as tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), requires the implementation of advanced transistor architectures including FinFETs and nanowire devices. Moreover, integration of novel materials with high electron mobilities, such as III-V semiconductors and graphene, are also being considered to further enhance the device properties (del Alamo, Nature 2011, 479, 317-323, and Liao et al., Nature 2010, 467, 305-308). In nanowire devices, boosting the drive current at a fixed supply voltage or maintaining a constant drive current at a reduced supply voltage may be achieved by increasing the cross-sectional area of a device, however at the cost of deteriorated electrostatics. A gate-all-around nanowire device architecture is the most favorable electrostatic configuration to suppress short channel effects; however, the arrangement of arrays of parallel vertical nanowires to address the drive current predicament will require additional chip area. The use of a core-shell nanowire with a radial heterojunction in a transistor architecture provides an attractive means to address the drive current issue without compromising neither chip area nor device electrostatics. In addition to design advantages of a radial transistor architecture, we in this work illustrate the benefit in terms of drive current per unit chip area and compare the experimental data for axial GaSb/InAs Esaki diodes and TFETs to their radial counterparts and normalize the electrical data to the largest cross-sectional area of the nanowire, i.e. the occupied chip area, assuming a vertical device geometry. Our data on lateral devices show that radial Esaki diodes deliver almost 7 times higher peak

  7. Combining axial and radial nanowire heterostructures: radial Esaki diodes and tunnel field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anil W; Svensson, Johannes; Ek, Martin; Lind, Erik; Thelander, Claes; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing demand on high-performance electronics has generated transistors with very impressive figures of merit (Radosavljevic et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2009, 1-4 and Cho et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2011, 15.1.1-15.1.4). The continued scaling of the supply voltage of field-effect transistors, such as tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), requires the implementation of advanced transistor architectures including FinFETs and nanowire devices. Moreover, integration of novel materials with high electron mobilities, such as III-V semiconductors and graphene, are also being considered to further enhance the device properties (del Alamo, Nature 2011, 479, 317-323, and Liao et al., Nature 2010, 467, 305-308). In nanowire devices, boosting the drive current at a fixed supply voltage or maintaining a constant drive current at a reduced supply voltage may be achieved by increasing the cross-sectional area of a device, however at the cost of deteriorated electrostatics. A gate-all-around nanowire device architecture is the most favorable electrostatic configuration to suppress short channel effects; however, the arrangement of arrays of parallel vertical nanowires to address the drive current predicament will require additional chip area. The use of a core-shell nanowire with a radial heterojunction in a transistor architecture provides an attractive means to address the drive current issue without compromising neither chip area nor device electrostatics. In addition to design advantages of a radial transistor architecture, we in this work illustrate the benefit in terms of drive current per unit chip area and compare the experimental data for axial GaSb/InAs Esaki diodes and TFETs to their radial counterparts and normalize the electrical data to the largest cross-sectional area of the nanowire, i.e. the occupied chip area, assuming a vertical device geometry. Our data on lateral devices show that radial Esaki diodes deliver almost 7 times higher peak

  8. Nomogram for calculation of left ventricular volumes.

    PubMed Central

    Saksena, F B; Saksena, G B

    1977-01-01

    A nomogram has been devised for the rapid derivation of left ventricular volumes from single-plane angiograms obtained in the 30 degrees right anterior oblique projection. The left ventricular volumes are derived from the use of the area-length formula of Dodge. The computed left ventricular volumes may then be adjusted to correspond to the actual volumes by an appropriate conversion chart. PMID:911567

  9. Outcome of Radial Head Arthroplasty in Comminuted Radial Head Fractures: Short and Midterm Results

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Raven, Tim Friedrich; Dremel, Eike; Studier-Fischer, Stefan; Grutzner, Paul Alfred; Biglari, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Comminuted radial head fractures are often associated with secondary injuries and elbow instability. Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate how well the modular metallic radial head implant EVOLVE® prosthesis restores functional range of motion (ROM) and stability of the elbow in acute care. Patients and Methods: Eighty-five patients with comminuted radial head fractures and associated injuries received treatment with an EVOLVE® prosthesis between May 2001 and November 2009. Seventy-five patients were available for follow-up. On average, patients were followed for 41.5 months (33.0: 4.0 - 93.0). Outcome assessment was done on the basis of pain, ROM, strength, radiographic findings, and functional rating scores such as Broberg and Morrey, the Mayo elbow performance index (MEPI), and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH). Our study is currently the largest analysis of clinical outcome of a modular radial head replacement in the literature. Results: Overall, there were 2 (2.7%) Mason II fractures, 21 (28%) Mason III fractures, and 52 (69.3%) Mason IV fractures. Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur osteosynthesefragen (AO) classification was also determined. Of the 85 patients in our study, 75 were available for follow-up. Follow-up averaged 41.5 months (range, 4 - 93 months). Average scores for the cohort were as follows: Morrey, 85.7 (median 90.2; range 44.4 - 100); MEPI, 83.3 (85.0; 40.0 - 100); and DASH 26.1 points (22.5; 0.0 - 75.8). Mean flexion/extension in the affected joint was 125.7°/16.5°/0° in comparison to the noninjured side 138.5°/0°/1.2°. Mean pronation/supination was 70.5°/0°/67.1° in comparison to the noninjured side 83.6°/0°/84.3°. Handgrip strength of the injured compared to the non-injured arm was 78.8%. The following complications were also documented: 58 patients had periprosthetic radioluceny shown to be neither clinically significant nor relevant according to evaluated scores; 26 patients had

  10. RADIAL VELOCITY VARIABILITY OF FIELD BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, L.; Mace, G. N.; Rice, E. L.; McLean, I. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, A. J.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-07-20

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity (RV) precision of ∼2 km s{sup −1}, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1σ upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included seven known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant RV variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant fraction of the orbital period. Specialized techniques are required to reach the high precisions sensitive to motion in orbits of very low-mass systems. For eight objects, including six T dwarfs, we present the first published high-resolution spectra, many with high signal to noise, that will provide valuable comparison data for models of brown dwarf atmospheres.

  11. The ITER Radial Neutron Camera Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Marocco, D.; Belli, F.; Esposito, B.; Petrizzi, L.; Riva, M.; Bonheure, G.; Kaschuck, Y.

    2008-03-12

    A multichannel neutron detection system (Radial Neutron Camera, RNC) will be installed on the ITER equatorial port plug 1 for total neutron source strength, neutron emissivity/ion temperature profiles and n{sub t}/n{sub d} ratio measurements [1]. The system is composed by two fan shaped collimating structures: an ex-vessel structure, looking at the plasma core, containing tree sets of 12 collimators (each set lying on a different toroidal plane), and an in-vessel structure, containing 9 collimators, for plasma edge coverage. The RNC detecting system will work in a harsh environment (neutron fiux up to 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} s, magnetic field >0.5 T or in-vessel detectors), should provide both counting and spectrometric information and should be flexible enough to cover the high neutron flux dynamic range expected during the different ITER operation phases. ENEA has been involved in several activities related to RNC design and optimization [2,3]. In the present paper the up-to-date design and the neutron emissivity reconstruction capabilities of the RNC will be described. Different options for detectors suitable for spectrometry and counting (e.g. scintillators and diamonds) focusing on the implications in terms of overall RNC performance will be discussed. The increase of the RNC capabilities offered by the use of new digital data acquisition systems will be also addressed.

  12. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillen, R. S.; Smith, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Stars are observed with a ground-based instrument designed to measure small changes in the line-of-sight velocities. The purpose of the observations is to detect large planets by the oscillatory reflex motion they induce on the stars they are orbiting. The instrument is an optical spectrometer for which wavelengths are first calibrated by transmission through a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon interferometer. Changes in the line-of-sight velocities are revealed by changes in the Doppler shift of the absorption-line spectra of stars. The scrambling of incident light by an optical fiber and the stability of wavelength calibration by a tilt-tunable Fabry-Perot etalon provide immunity to systematic errors that historically have effected more conventional radial velocity spectrographs. A cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph spatially separates the orders of constructive interference transmitted through the etalon. Selecting several echelle diffraction orders in the vicinity of 4250 to 4750 A, which are imaged on a CCD, about 350 points on the profile of the stellar spectrum are sampled by successive orders of interferometric transmission through the etalon.

  13. Fabrication of cooled radial turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, A. N.; Aigret, G. G.; Psichogios, T. P.; Rodgers, C.

    1986-01-01

    A design and fabrication program was conducted to evaluate a unique concept for constructing a cooled, high temperature radial turbine rotor. This concept, called split blade fabrication was developed as an alternative to internal ceramic coring. In this technique, the internal cooling cavity is created without flow dividers or any other detail by a solid (and therefore stronger) ceramic plate which can be more firmly anchored within the casting shell mold than can conventional detailed ceramic cores. Casting is conducted in the conventional manner, except that the finished product, instead of having finished internal cooling passages, is now a split blade. The internal details of the blade are created separately together with a carrier sheet. The inserts are superalloy. Both are produced by essentially the same software such that they are a net fit. The carrier assemblies are loaded into the split blade and the edges sealed by welding. The entire wheel is Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIPed), braze bonding the internal details to the inside of the blades. During this program, two wheels were successfully produced by the split blade fabrication technique.

  14. Radially uniform circular sweep of ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmetov, T.D.; Davydenko, V.I.; Ivanov, A.A.; Kobets, V.V.; Medvedko, A.S.; Skorobogatov, D.N.; Tiunov, M.A.

    2006-03-15

    A spiral sweep of the ion beam was suggested to provide sufficiently uniform irradiation of a circular target. It is shown that if the beam radius is small enough, the radius of the beam center should increase as a square root of time to provide uniform radial irradiation of the target. In the complex for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, the proton beam sweep will be performed by a sweeper with uniform magnetic field with strength up to 500 G and axial length {approx}20 cm, rotating at 100-2000 Hz, and scanning over the radius at a 1-10 Hz frequency. The sweeper field is produced by four longitudinal flat current windings placed near the inner walls of a box-shaped yoke with the inner opening of a square cross section. A similar sweeping technique can be used in a 200 keV oxygen implanter, which is also under development at the Budker Institute.

  15. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  16. Camera Calibration with Radial Variance Component Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélykuti, B.; Kruck, E. J.

    2014-11-01

    Camera calibration plays a more and more important role in recent times. Beside real digital aerial survey cameras the photogrammetric market is dominated by a big number of non-metric digital cameras mounted on UAVs or other low-weight flying platforms. The in-flight calibration of those systems has a significant role to enhance the geometric accuracy of survey photos considerably. It is expected to have a better precision of photo measurements in the center of images then along the edges or in the corners. With statistical methods the accuracy of photo measurements in dependency of the distance of points from image center has been analyzed. This test provides a curve for the measurement precision as function of the photo radius. A high number of camera types have been tested with well penetrated point measurements in image space. The result of the tests led to a general consequence to show a functional connection between accuracy and radial distance and to give a method how to check and enhance the geometrical capability of the cameras in respect to these results.

  17. A case of dextrocardia, radial ray malformation and renal anomaly.

    PubMed

    Nallegowda, M; Singh, U; Shivananda; Shukla, R; Kabra, M

    2003-10-01

    A 12-year-old boy is described with bilateral radial club hands, scoliosis, hypospadias, isolated dextrocardia, hypoplastic ribs, an ectopic kidney and spina bifida occulta. Although some of the clinical features of this patient are seen in VATER association and sacrococcygeal dysgenesis, the presence of dextrocardia, facial dysmorphism, radial, renal and vertebral anomalies preclude these diagnoses.

  18. Detail of elevation gauge, radial gate hoist mechanism, and concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of elevation gauge, radial gate hoist mechanism, and concrete walkway on top of the gate. View to the south-southwest - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Radial Gate Check with Drop, Wellton Canal 9.9, West of Avenue 34 East & north of County Ninth Street, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  19. Outlet side of gate, showing the Radial Gate, hoist mechanism ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Outlet side of gate, showing the Radial Gate, hoist mechanism and concrete walkway across the canal. The concrete baffle separating the afterbay and the cipoletti weir is in the foreground - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Radial Gate Check with Drop, Wellton Canal 9.9, West of Avenue 34 East & north of County Ninth Street, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  20. Improved photographic prints with a linear radial transmission filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, L. M.

    1973-01-01

    Linear Radial Transmission Filter (LRTF) is easy to use and yet results in prints which depict more information contained in negative than can be shown by direct printing. LRTF is optical-quality filter which has maximum transmission in center and linear drop in transmission radially out from center.

  1. Off-Design Performance of Radial-Inflow Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.; Glassman, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Computer code determines rotor exit flow from hub to tip. RTOD (Radial Turbine Off-Design), computes off-design performance of radial turbine by modeling flow with stator viscous and trailing-edge losses, and with vaneless space loss between stator and rotor, and with rotor incidence, viscous, clearance, trailing-edge, and disk friction losses.

  2. Production of plasma with variable, radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kustom, B.; Merlino, R. L.; Dangelo, N.

    1984-01-01

    A device is described suitable for plasma wave experiments requiring relatively large, variable, radial electric fields perpendicular to a static magnetic field. By separately adjusting the potentials of two independent, coaxial discharge plasmas, the authors produced plasmas with a radial electric field E sub r less than approximately 5 V/cm.

  3. Asymmetrical Cortical Processing of Radial Expansioncontraction in Infants and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirai, Nobu; Birtles, Deirdre; Wattam-Bell, John; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Kanazawa, So; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    We report asymmetrical cortical responses (steady-state visual evoked potentials) to radial expansion and contraction in human infants and adults. Forty-four infants (22 3-month-olds and 22 4-month-olds) and nine adults viewed dynamic dot patterns which cyclically (2.1 Hz) alternate between radial expansion (or contraction) and random directional…

  4. Development of an endoscopic probe for radial metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this work was to design and build a prototype for conducting stress analysis and making spectroscopic measurements inside cavities. The objectives were as follows: (1) to develop a prototype for radial profilometry; (2) to explore the possibility of using the radial profilometer for spectroscopic analysis; and (3) to interface the prototype with various combinations of data acquisition and image processing equipment.

  5. The mean hydration of carbohydrates as studied by normalized two-dimensional radial pair distributions.

    PubMed

    Andersson, C; Engelsen, S B

    1999-04-01

    The hydration of carbohydrates plays a key role in many biological processes. Molecular dynamics simulations provide an effective tool for investigating the hydration of complex solutes such as carbohydrates. In this article we devise an algorithm for the calculation of two-dimensional radial pair distributions describing the probability of finding a water molecule in a site defined by two reference atoms. The normalized 2D radial pair distribution is proposed as an effective tool for investigating and comparing localized or ordered water sites around flexible molecules such as carbohydrates when analyzing molecular dynamics simulations and the utility of 2D radial pair distributions is demonstrated using sucrose as an example. In this relatively simple structure, 2D radial pair distributions were able to characterize and quantify the importance of two unique interresidue hydration sites in which a water molecule is forming a bridge between the glycopyranosyl and fructofuranosyl residues. The approach is proposed to be a valuable tool for comparing and understanding the hydration of flexible biomolecules such as carbohydrates. PMID:10680115

  6. Dust and gas density evolution at a radial pressure bump in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Masaki; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the simultaneous evolution of dust and gas density profiles at a radial pressure bump located in a protoplanetary disk. If dust particles are treated as test particles, a radial pressure bump traps dust particles that drift radially inward. As the dust particles become more concentrated at the gas pressure bump, however, the drag force from dust to gas (back-reaction), which is ignored in a test-particle approach, deforms the pressure bump. We find that the pressure bump is completely deformed by the back-reaction when the dust-to-gas mass ratio reaches ~ 1 for a slower bump restoration. The direct gravitational instability of dust particles is inhibited by the bump destruction. In the dust-enriched region, the radial pressure support becomes ~ 10-100 times lower than the global value set initially. Although the pressure bump is a favorable place for streaming instability (SI), the flattened pressure gradient inhibits SI from forming large particle clumps corresponding to 100-1000 km sized bodies, which has been previously proposed. If SI occurs there, the dust clumps formed would be 10-100 times smaller, that is, of about 1-100 km.

  7. A numerical study of the temperature field in a cooled radial turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Baskharone, E.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    The three dimensional temperature distribution in the cooled rotor of a radial inflow turbine is determined numerically using the finite element method. Through this approach, the complicated geometries of the hot rotor and coolant passage surfaces are handled easily, and the temperatures are determined without loss of accuracy at these convective boundaries. Different cooling techniques with given coolant to primary flow ratios are investigated, and the corresponding rotor temperature fields are presented for comparison.

  8. Optimal Space Station solar array gimbal angle determination via radial basis function neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Daniel J.; Oezguener, Uemit; Graham, Ronald E.

    1994-01-01

    The potential for excessive plume impingement loads on Space Station Freedom solar arrays, caused by jet firings from an approaching Space Shuttle, is addressed. An artificial neural network is designed to determine commanded solar array beta gimbal angle for minimum plume loads. The commanded angle would be determined dynamically. The network design proposed involves radial basis functions as activation functions. Design, development, and simulation of this network design are discussed.

  9. Combined genetic algorithm optimization and regularized orthogonal least squares learning for radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Wu, Y; Luk, B L

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents a two-level learning method for radial basis function (RBF) networks. A regularized orthogonal least squares (ROLS) algorithm is employed at the lower level to construct RBF networks while the two key learning parameters, the regularization parameter and the RBF width, are optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA) at the upper level. Nonlinear time series modeling and prediction is used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of this hierarchical learning approach.

  10. Thoracoscopic left ventricular lead implantation in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong Seop; Park, Pyo Won; Lee, Young Tak; Park, Seung-Jung; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is known to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced heart failure as a result of dyssynchrony and systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead via the coronary sinus can be difficult. When LV lead implantation is difficult, a video-assisted epicardial approach can be a good alternative. Although there are several reports of video-assisted epicardial LV lead implantation, mini-thoracotomy and lead implantation under direct vision have been used in most series. A 49-yr-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent the video-assisted epicardial LV lead implantation because percutaneous transvenous approach was difficult due to small cardiac veins. The patient was discharged without problems and showed improved cardiac function at the 3 follow-up months. We report the first successful total thoracoscopic LV lead implantation (without mini-thoracotomy) in Korea. PMID:23255865

  11. Neuronal or glial progeny: regional differences in radial glia fate.

    PubMed

    Malatesta, Paolo; Hack, Michael A; Hartfuss, Eva; Kettenmann, Helmut; Klinkert, Wolfgang; Kirchhoff, Frank; Götz, Magdalena

    2003-03-01

    The precursor function of the ubiquitous glial cell type in the developing central nervous system (CNS), the radial glia, is largely unknown. Using Cre/loxP in vivo fate mapping studies, we found that radial glia generate virtually all cortical projection neurons but not the interneurons originating in the ventral telencephalon. In contrast to the cerebral cortex, few neurons in the basal ganglia originate from radial glia, and in vitro lineage analysis revealed intrinsic differences in the potential of radial glia from the dorsal and ventral telencephalon. This shows that the progeny of radial glia not only differs profoundly between brain regions but also includes the majority of neurons in some parts of the CNS.

  12. Radial vibrations of a sodium ion inside icosahedral C60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballester, J. L.; Dunlap, B. I.

    1992-01-01

    The very high symmetry of icosahedral C60 suggests that, as a first approximation, an atom trapped inside C60 would be subject to a potential that is radially symmetric about the center. All-electron local-density-functional calculations of the total energy of a sodium ion as a function of radial displacement from the center along the fivefold axis of C60 serve to refine such a radial potential. In particular, the calculations suggest studying potentials that have minima displaced from the center. An analytic functional form for a radial potential having a positive cusp at the origin is proposed, and the s-wave radial solutions of the corresponding Schroedinger equation are examined.

  13. Inner zone and slot electron radial diffusion revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. P.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Guild, T. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    Using recent data from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we estimate the quiet time radial diffusion coefficients for electrons in the inner radiation belt (L < 3) with energies from ~50 to 750 keV. The observations are consistent with dynamics dominated by pitch angle scattering and radial diffusion. We use a coordinate system in which these two modes of diffusion are separable. Then we integrate phase space density over pitch angle to obtain a "bundle content" that is invariant to pitch angle scattering, except for atmospheric loss. We estimate the effective radial diffusion coefficient from the temporal and radial variation of the bundle content. We show that our diffusion coefficients agree well with previously determined values obtained in the 1960s and 1970s and follow the form one expects for radial diffusion caused by exponentially decaying impulses in the large-scale electrostatic potential.

  14. The Carina Project. IV. Radial Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, M.; Nonino, M.; Bono, G.; Ferraro, I.; François, P.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Thévenin, F.; Stetson, P. B.; Walker, A. R.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Corsi, C. E.; Dall'Ora, M.; Gilmozzi, R.; James, C. R.; Merle, T.; Pulone, L.; Romaniello, M.

    2011-04-01

    We present new and accurate radial velocity (RV) measurements of luminous stars of all ages (old horizontal branch, intermediate-age red clump, and young blue plume, as well as red giants of a range of ages: 20.6 <= V <= 22) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on low-resolution spectra collected with the FORS2 multiobject slit spectrograph at the VLT. This data set was complemented by RV measurements based on medium- and high-resolution archive spectra of brighter (V lsim 20.6) Carina targets collected with the GIRAFFE multiobject fiber spectrograph at the VLT. The combined sample includes more than 21,340 individual spectra of ≈2000 stars covering the entire body of the galaxy. The mean (langRVrang = 220.4 ± 0.1 km s-1) and the dispersion (σ = 11.7 ± 0.1 km s-1) of the RV distribution of candidate Carina stars (~1210 objects, 180 <= RV <= 260 km s-1, 4σ) agree quite well with similar measurements available in the literature. To further improve the statistics, the accurate RV measurements recently provided by Walker et al. were also added to the current data set. We ended up with a sample of ~1370 RV measurements of candidate Carina stars that is ≈75% larger than any previous Carina RV sample. We found that the hypothesis that the Carina RV distribution is Gaussian can be discarded at 99% confidence level. The mean RV across the body of the galaxy varies from ~220 km s-1 at a distance of 7' (~200 pc) from the center to ~223 km s-1 at 13' (~400 pc, 6σ level) and flattens out to a constant value of ~221 km s-1 at larger distances (600 pc, 4σ level). Moreover, and even more importantly, we found that in the Carina regions where the mean RV is smaller, the dispersion is also smaller, and the RV distribution is more centrally peaked (i.e., the kurtosis attains larger values). The difference in mean RV is more than 4 km s-1 (9σ level) when moving from east to west and more than 3 km s-1 (~7σ level) when moving from north to south. The RV gradient

  15. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, D. R.; Hart, J. E.; Weidman, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial laboratory experiments studying various fluid dynamical processes are constrained, by being in an Earth laboratory, to have a gravitational body force which is uniform and unidirectional. Therefore fluid free-surfaces are horizontal and flat. Such free surfaces must have a vertical solid boundary to keep the fluid from spreading horizontally along a gravitational potential surface. In atmospheric, oceanic, or stellar fluid flows that have a horizontal scale of about one-tenth the body radius or larger, sphericity is important in the dynamics. Further, fluids in spherical geometry can cover an entire domain without any sidewall effects, i.e. have truly periodic boundary conditions. We describe spherical body-force laboratory experiments using ferrofluid. Ferrofluids are dilute suspensions of magnetic dipoles, for example magnetite particles of order 10 nm diameter, suspended in a carrier fluid. Ferrofluids are subject to an additional body force in the presence of an applied magnetic field gradient. We use this body force to conduct laboratory experiments in spherical geometry. The present study is a laboratory technique improvement. The apparatus is cylindrically axisymmetric. A cylindrical ceramic magnet is embedded in a smooth, solid, spherical PVC ball. The geopotential field and its gradient, the body force, were made nearly spherical by careful choice of magnet height-to-diameter ratio and magnet size relative to the PVC ball size. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics by immersing the "planet" and its ferrofluid "ocean" in an immiscible silicone oil/freon mixture of the same density. Thus the earth gravity is removed from the dynamics of the ferrofluid/oil interface and the only dynamically active force there is the radial magnetic gravity. The entire apparatus can rotate, and waves are forced on the ferrofluid surface by exterior magnets. The biggest improvement in technique is in the wave visualization. Fluorescing dye is added to

  16. Left Second Rib Exostosis, Spinal Cord Compression and Left Upper Thoracic Scoliosis: A Rare Triad

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Krishnan; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2012-01-01

    Exostosis of the rib with neural foraminal extension as a cause of spinal cord compression and scoliosis has to the best of our knowledge not been reported. We describe a young male with hereditary multiple exostosis who presented with a spastic gait, lower limb weakness and a deformity of the upper back. Radiographic imaging revealed a lesion arising from the left second rib which was encroaching the spinal canal and a scoliotic deformity of the upper thoracic spine. Through a single T shaped posterior approach he underwent a decompressive laminectomy of T1 and T2 vertebra and excision of the lesion. The diagnosis of osteochondroma was confirmed by histopathological studies. He was followed up at one year when his neurological condition had returned to normal however the scoliosis had increased. PMID:22977702

  17. Radial Breathing Modes in Cosmochemistry and Meteoritics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T.L.; Wilson, K.B.

    2009-01-01

    One area of continuing interest in cosmochemistry and meteoritics (C&M) is the identification of the nature of Q-phase, although some researchers in C&M are not reporting relevant portions of Raman spectral data. Q is the unidentified carrier of noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites (CCs). Being carbonaceous, the focus has been on any number of Q-candidates arising from the sp2 hybridization of carbon (C). These all derive from various forms of graphene, a monolayer of C atoms packed into a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal honeycomb lattice that is the basic building block for graphitic materials of all other dimensions for sp2 allotropes of C. As a basic lattice, 2D graphene can be curled into fullerenes (0D), wrapped into carbon nanotubes or CNTs (1D), and stacked into graphite (3D). These take such additional forms as scroll-like carbon whiskers, carbon fibers, carbon onions, GPCs (graphite polyhedral crystals) [6], and GICs (graphite intercalation compounds). Although all of these have been observed in meteoritics, the issue is which can explain the Q-abundances. In brief, one or more of the 0D-3D sp2 hybridization forms of C is Q. For some Q-candidates, the radial breathing modes (RBMs) are the most important Raman active vibrational modes that exist, and bear a direct relevance to solving this puzzle. Typically in C&M they are ignored when present. Their importance is addressed here as smoking-gun signatures for certain Q-candidates and are very relevant to the ultimate identification of Q.

  18. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  19. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Kepler Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Thompson, Susan E.; Prša, Andrej; Kurtz, Donald W.; Howard, Andrew W.; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity-period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  20. TRUE MASSES OF RADIAL-VELOCITY EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    We study the task of estimating the true masses of known radial-velocity (RV) exoplanets by means of direct astrometry on coronagraphic images to measure the apparent separation between exoplanet and host star. Initially, we assume perfect knowledge of the RV orbital parameters and that all errors are due to photon statistics. We construct design reference missions for four missions currently under study at NASA: EXO-S and WFIRST-S, with external star shades for starlight suppression, EXO-C and WFIRST-C, with internal coronagraphs. These DRMs reveal extreme scheduling constraints due to the combination of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, image blurring due to orbital motion, and the “nodal effect,” which is the independence of apparent separation and inclination when the planet crosses the plane of the sky through the host star. Next, we address the issue of nonzero uncertainties in RV orbital parameters by investigating their impact on the observations of 21 single-planet systems. Except for two—GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b, which are observable only by the star-shade missions—we find that current uncertainties in orbital parameters generally prevent accurate, unbiased estimation of true planetary mass. For the coronagraphs, WFIRST-C and EXO-C, the most likely number of good estimators of true mass is currently zero. For the star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, the most likely numbers of good estimators are three and four, respectively, including GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b. We expect that uncertain orbital elements currently undermine all potential programs of direct imaging and spectroscopy of RV exoplanets.

  1. Performance improvement: a "left brain meets right brain" approach.

    PubMed

    Hammarstedt, Ross; Bulger, Deborah

    2006-12-01

    Clinical analytics--the use of data to tie clinical quality to financial performance--strengthens hospitals' ability to compete in five ways: Enables clinical performance to be measured using clinical data. Supports a metric-driven culture. Allows hospitals to better manage regulatory initiatives. Enables hospitals to document the value of their IT investment. Provides a basis for redefining business strategy.

  2. One School's Approach to No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A.

    2005-01-01

    The NO VACANCY sign has been hanging out at the Columbia-Montour Area Vocational-Technical School (CMAVTS) for the past several years. A variety of reasons may have contributed to the building being at full capacity. A new administrative director, Steve Walk, was hired in 1999 to change the image of the school. Since his arrival, High Schools That…

  3. Time Components of the Left Ventricle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, B. Don

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of the time components of the left ventricle. Since one of the ways to investigate cardiac function is to analyze the time intervals between particular events of the cardiac cycle, various time intervals of systole and diastole of the left ventricle were measured from simultaneous…

  4. A Conversation about No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brian

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with J. Michael Ortiz, a member of the Aspen Institute's Commission on No Child Left Behind, on the issues concerning the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Aspen Institute's Commission is an independent panel that was established in 2006 to conduct a high-level review of the federal government's signature…

  5. Pure Left Neglect for Arabic Numerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priftis, Konstantinos; Albanese, Silvia; Meneghello, Francesca; Pitteri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Arabic numerals are diffused and language-free representations of number magnitude. To be effectively processed, the digits composing Arabic numerals must be spatially arranged along a left-to-right axis. We studied one patient (AK) to show that left neglect, after right hemisphere damage, can selectively impair the computation of the spatial…

  6. Coronary haemodynamics in left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Wallbridge, D. R.; Cobbe, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have shown that patients with left ventricular hypertrophy develop electrocardiographic changes and left ventricular dysfunction during acute hypotension, and suggest that the lower end of autoregulation may be shifted upwards. AIM: To measure coronary blood flow (velocity) and flow reserve during acute hypotension in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. PATIENTS: Eight patients with atypical chest pain and seven with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy; all with angiographically normal epicardial vessels. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre. METHODS: The physiological range of blood pressure was determined by previous ambulatory monitoring. Left ventricular mass was determined by echocardiography. At cardiac catheterisation, left coronary blood flow velocity was measured using a Judkins style Doppler tipped catheter. During acute hypotension with sodium nitroprusside, coronary blood flow velocity was recorded at rest and during maximal hyperaemia induced by intracoronary injection of adenosine. Quantitative coronary angiography was performed manually. RESULTS: For both groups coronary blood flow velocity remained relatively constant over a range of physiological diastolic blood pressures and showed a steep relation with diastolic blood pressure during maximal hyperaemia with intracoronary adenosine. Absolute coronary blood flow (calculated from quantitative angiographic data), standardised for left ventricular mass, showed reduced flow in the hypertensive group at rest and during maximal vasodilatation. CONCLUSION: The results are consistent with an inadequate blood supply to the hypertrophied heart, but no upward shift of the lower end of the autoregulatory range was observed. PMID:8705764

  7. Pure Left Neglect for Arabic Numerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priftis, Konstantinos; Albanese, Silvia; Meneghello, Francesca; Pitteri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Arabic numerals are diffused and language-free representations of number magnitude. To be effectively processed, the digits composing Arabic numerals must be spatially arranged along a left-to-right axis. We studied one patient (AK) to show that left neglect, after right hemisphere damage, can selectively impair the computation of the spatial…

  8. Are Some of Your Students "Left" Out?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kathryn

    1986-01-01

    This article examines the role that handedness may play in skill development in typewriting and shorthand courses. Teaching procedures that appear to discriminate against the left-handed student will be examined. Also, the positioning of supplies--left or right side--and the use of right-handed equipment are examined. (CT)

  9. Teaching Left Handers the Write Stuff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasylyk, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    Suggests several strategies for producing fluent, legible penmanship for both left and right handed students. Observes that reading readiness skills can be reinforced through handwriting instruction. Describes several physical considerations for successful writing, and notes the modifications needed for left handed writers. (MM)

  10. Unprotected left main distal bifurcation lesion.

    PubMed

    Karavolias, George; Karyofillis, Panagiotis; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Voudris, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Left main coronary artery disease is a high-risk condition with significant mortality. Currently, bypass surgery is considered the gold-standard treatment for unprotected left main disease. The introduction of drugeluting stents for the treatment of coronary artery disease has proved to reduce the rates of restenosis and, consequently, the need for repeat revascularisation; therefore, recently, percutaneous coronary intervention in the unprotected left main using drug-eluting stents has been considered another therapeutic option for patients at high risk for bypass surgery, or for patients who simply refuse bypass surgery. Based on the updated guidelines on myocardial revascularisation of the European Society of Cardiology, treating left main lesions by angioplasty is feasible and safe in selected patients. In this case report we demonstrate the successful implantation of drug-eluting stents for the treatment of an unprotected left main bifurcation lesion in an 85-year-old patient with high perioperative risk.

  11. Partial left pericardial defect with herniation of the left atrial appendage

    PubMed Central

    Pernot, C.; Hoeffel, J C.; Henry, M.; Frisch, R.; Brauer, B.

    1972-01-01

    A case is reported of herniation of the left atrial appendage through a partial pericardial defect, probably congenital. The diagnosis was suggested by the history of chest pain and bulging of the middle segment of the left heart border on the plain chest film, without other signs. Angiography revealed a dilated left atrial appendage. An artificial left pneumothorax confirmed the presence of a pleuropericardial defect. The surgical procedure included excision of the appendage and closure of the defect. Images PMID:5034603

  12. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for a Patient with Left-sided Gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Tamura, Kohei; Morita, Masao; Tamura, Seihei; Maeda, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Usui, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    A 47-year-old man who presented with epigastric pain after a meal was diagnosed with biliary sludge present in the gallbladder. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed normal anatomy of the biliary tree. During the exploratory phase of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy using four ports positioned as usual, surgeons observed a left-sided gallbladder. A review of the preoperative imaging by computed tomography confirmed a round ligament connected to the right portal umbilical portion. It also established that the gallbladder was located to the left of the round ligament, and attached to the left lateral segment of the liver. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed successfully in this patient with the usual port site and careful dissection with a normograde approach. The patient was discharged on the second postoperative day with an uneventful course. Prior identification of a left-sided gallbladder is possible with cautious attention. In particular, it is important for the surgeon to be aware of unusual alterations in the portal and biliary anatomy associated with this anomaly to safely complete a laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  13. Constraints on Average Radial Anisotropy in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampert, J.; De Wit, R. W. L.; Kaeufl, P.; Valentine, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying uncertainties in seismological models is challenging, yet ideally quality assessment is an integral part of the inverse method. We invert centre frequencies for spheroidal and toroidal modes for three parameters of average radial anisotropy, density and P- and S-wave velocities in the lower mantle. We adopt a Bayesian machine learning approach to extract the information on the earth model that is available in the normal mode data. The method is flexible and allows us to infer probability density functions (pdfs), which provide a quantitative description of our knowledge of the individual earth model parameters. The parameters describing shear- and P-wave anisotropy show little deviations from isotropy, but the intermediate parameter η carries robust information on negative anisotropy of ~1% below 1900 km depth. The mass density in the deep mantle (below 1900 km) shows clear positive deviations from existing models. Other parameters (P- and shear-wave velocities) are close to PREM. Our results require that the average mantle is about 150K colder than commonly assumed adiabats and consist of a mixture of about 60% perovskite and 40% ferropericlase containing 10-15% iron. The anisotropy favours a specific orientation of the two minerals. This observation has important consequences for the nature of mantle flow.

  14. Signal detection using the radial basis function coupled map lattice.

    PubMed

    Leung, H; Hennessey, G; Drosopoulos, A

    2000-01-01

    Conventional detection methods used in current marine radar systems do not perform efficiently in detecting small targets embedded in a clutter environment. Based on a recent observation that sea clutter, radar echoes from a sea surface, is chaotic rather than random, we propose using a spatial temporal predictor to reconstruct the chaotic dynamic of sea clutter because electromagnetic wave scattering is a spatial temporal phenomenon which is physically modeled by partial differential equations. The spatial temporal predictor used here is called radial basis function coupled map lattice (RBF-CML) which uses a linear combiner to fuse either measurements in different spatial domains for an RBF prediction or predictions from several RBF nets operated on different spatial regions. Using real-life radar data, it is shown that the RBF-CML is an effective method to reconstruct the sea clutter dynamic. The RBF-CML predictor is then applied to detect small targets in sea clutter using the constant false alarm rate (CFAR) principle. The spatial temporal approach is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, to be superior to a conventional CFAR detector.

  15. Radial microstrip slotline feed network for circular mobile communications array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Kelly, Eron S.; Lee, Richard Q.; Taub, Susan R.

    1994-01-01

    In mobile and satellite communications there is a need for low cost and low profile antennas which have a toroidal pattern. Antennas that have been developed for mobile communications include a L-Band electronically steered stripline phased array, a Ka-Band mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna and a Ka-Band printed dipole. In addition, a L-Band mechanically steered microstrip array, a L-Band microstrip phased array tracking antenna for mounting on a car roof and an X-Band radial line slotted waveguide antenna have been demonstrated. In the above electronically scanned printed arrays, the individual element radiates normally to the plane of the array and hence require a phase shifter to scan the beam towards the horizon. Scanning in the azimuth is by mechanical or electronic steering. An alternate approach is to mount microstrip patch radiators on the surface of a cone to achieve the required elevation angle. The array then scans in the azimuth by beam switching.

  16. TMS over the Left Angular Gyrus Impairs the Ability to Discriminate Left from Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirnstein, Marco; Bayer, Ulrike; Ellison, Amanda; Hausmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The underlying cognitive and neural mechanisms of the ability to discriminate left from right are hardly explored. Clinical studies from patients with impairments of left-right discrimination (LRD) and neuroimaging data suggest that the left angular gyrus is particularly involved in LRD. Moreover, it is argued that the often reported sex…

  17. Radar Wind Profiler Radial Velocity: A Comparison with Doppler Lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Stephen A.; Goodrich, R. Kent

    2002-12-01

    The accuracy of the radial wind velocity measured with a radar wind profiler will depend on turbulent variability and instrumental noise. Radial velocity estimates of a boundary layer wind profiler are compared with those estimated by a Doppler lidar over 2.3 h. The lidar resolution volume was much narrower than the profiler volume, but the samples were well matched in range and time. The wind profiler radial velocity was computed using two common algorithms [profiler online program (POP) and National Center for Atmospheric Research improved moments algorithm (NIMA)]. The squared correlation between radial velocities measured with the two instruments was R2 = 0.99, and the standard deviation of the difference was about r = 0.20-0.23 m s1 for radial velocities of greater than 1 m s1 and r = 0.16-0.35 m s1 for radial velocities of less than 1 m s1. Small radial velocities may be treated differently in radar wind profiler processing because of ground-clutter mitigation strategies. A standard deviation of r = 0.23 m s1 implies an error in horizontal winds from turbulence and noise of less than 1 m s1 for a single cycle through the profiler beam directions and of less than 0.11-0.27 m s1 for a 30-min average measurement, depending on the beam pointing sequence. The accuracy of a wind profiler horizontal wind measurement will also depend on assumptions of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of the atmosphere, which are not considered in this comparison. The wind profiler radial velocities from the POP and NIMA are in good agreement. However, the analysis does show the need for improvements in wind profiler processing when radial velocity is close to zero.

  18. Radial ion transport in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.L.

    1989-02-01

    An experimental study of radial ion transport in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic mirror is presented. It is found that the ion confinement time perpendicular to the magnetic field is an order of magnitude shorter than predicted by classical and neoclassical theories, and that radial transport can be the dominant ion loss mechanism. Transport experiments are performed in hydrogen, helium and argon plasmas by measuring equilibrium radial profiles of plasma density, ionization source, end loss current, electric field, electron temperature and ion temperature. The radial profiles of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient (D/perpendicular/) are presented, and range from a radial average of approx. =5 /times/ 10/sup 3/ cm/sup 2//sec for hydrogen to approx. =2 /times/ 10/sup 4/ cm/sup 2//sec for argon. These coefficients are a factor of ten larger than the maximum possible classical and neoclassical diffusion coefficients in all three gases. The effect of low frequency RF power in the ion cyclotron range on the radial ion transport rate is also investigated. RF power increases the ion perpendicular transport, which then becomes the dominant loss mechanism. With sufficient RF power, the ion perpendicular loss rate exceeds the ionization source, with a resultant loss of plasma equilibrium. Application of RF power increases the radial transport rate of plasmas with resonant ions, which are also heated by the RF waves, as well as plasmas whose ion cyclotron resonance is not inside the confinement region. The increased transport rate during application of RF power shows up as an increased D/perpendicular/. This indicates that the radial ion transport is due to a direct interaction between the ions and the RF field, rather than to radial profile changes or enhanced ambipolar potential which are other RF effects. The effect of RF power on plasma potential is also studied. 64 refs., 57 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Correlation of Global Strain Rate and Left Ventricular Filling Pressure in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A 2-D Speckle-Tracking Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Wu, Wei-Chun; Xie, Rong-Ai; Gao, Li-Jian; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of 2-D speckle-tracking imaging in the prediction of left ventricular filling pressure in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Eighty-four patients with CAD and 30 healthy controls were recruited prospectively. The longitudinal strain rate (SR) curves were determined in three apical views of the left ventricle long axis. Circumferential and radial SR curves were determined in three short-axis views. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was invasively obtained by left heart catheterization. Compared with the 30 controls, the patients with CAD had significantly lower global SR during early diastole (SRe) and higher E/SRe in three directions of myocardial deformation. CAD patients with elevated LVEDP had significantly lower SRe and higher E/SRe of three deformations. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that LVEDP correlated positively with E/E' ratio, radial SRe and longitudinal and circumferential E/SRe. LVEDP correlated negatively with longitudinal and circumferential SRe and radial E/SRe. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that these SR indexes predicted elevated LVEDP (areas under the curve: longitudinal E/SRe = 0.74, circumferential E/SRe = 0.74, circumferential SRe = 0.70, longitudinal SRe = 0.69, radial E/SRe = 0.68, radial SRe = 0.65), but neither was superior to the tissue Doppler imaging index E/E' (area under the curve = 0.84). The present study indicates that 2-D speckle-tracking imaging is a practical method for evaluating LV filling pressure, but it might not provide additional advantages compared with E/E' in CAD patients.

  20. Trans-radial Carotid Artery Stenting in a Patient with Abdominal Aortic Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jin Heon; Kim, Hoon; Park, Ik Seong

    2016-01-01

    We report transradial access (TRA) for emergency carotid artery stenting (CAS) as a useful alternative when the femoral artery cannot be accessed. A 63-year-old man arrived at our emergency room 30 minutes after left hemiplegia and loss of consciousness. Brain computed tomography (CT) anigograpy showed occlusion of the right interntal carotid artery (ICA) and CT perfusion revealed delayed time-to-peak in the territory of the middle cerebral artery. For, endovascular treatment, trans-femoral access (TFA) was attempted but failed due to occlusion of the abdominal aorta. So, we changed access route via radial artery and confirmed proximal ICA dissection. CAS was attempted via TRA and it was successfully performed. Final angiography showed recanalization of ICA and patient was clinically improved. PMID:27790405

  1. Animal trials of a Magnetically Levitated Left-Ventricular Assist Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paden, Brad; Antaki, James; Groom, Nelson

    2000-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh/Magnetic Moments mag-lev left-ventricular assist devices (LVADs), the Streamliner HG3b and HG3c, have successfully been implanted in calves. The first was implanted for 4 hours on July 10, 1998 and the second for 34 days on August 24, 1999 respectively. The tests confirmed the feasibility of low power levitation (1.5 watts coil power) and very low blood damage in a mag-lev ventricular assist device. In this paper, we describe the unique geometry of this pump and its design. Key features of this LVAD concept are the passive radial suspension and active voice-coil thrust bearing.

  2. A case of left ventricular aneurysm caused by localized myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Iwai-Takano, Masumi; Ohto, Yuriko; Abe, Haruna; Saitoh, Hiromi; Ujiie, Michio; Nozaki, Yoko; Noda, Shigeko

    2013-09-01

    A 73-year-old man was hospitalized for unstable angina pectoris with no history of myocardial infarction. After undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, left ventriculography incidentally revealed a cavity in the anterior wall, and echocardiography found the cavity wall to be dyskinetic. Myocardial contrast echocardiography revealed that the wall of the cavity was surrounded by myocardial tissue with low perfusion. Furthermore, radial strain in the wall of the cavity was low. Myocardial scintigraphy showed a localized defect on the anterior wall. The patient was finally diagnosed as true aneurysm after asymptomatic and localized myocardial infarction, and has since been followed up by echocardiography in the outpatient clinic. PMID:27278616

  3. Study of left-handed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiangfeng

    Left handed materials (LHMs) are artificial materials that have negative electrical permittivity, negative magnetic permeability, and negative index of refraction across a common frequency band. They possess electromagnetic (EM) properties not found in nature. LHMs have attracted tremendous attention because of their potential applications to build the perfect lens and cloaking devices. In the past few years there has been ample proof for the existence of LHMs in the microwave frequency range. Recently, researchers are trying hard to push the operating frequency of LHMs into terahertz and the optical regime. In this thesis, we start with the theoretical prediction of left handed materials made by Veselago 40 years ago, introducing the unique electromagnetic properties of the left handed materials. After discussing the realization of LHMs by the split ring resonators (SRRs) and wire designs, we briefly review the development of LHMs from microwave frequency to the optical regime. We discuss the chiral metamaterial, which provides an alternative approach to realize negative refractive index. In Chapter 2, we discuss the electromagnetic properties of the SRRs and the breakdown of linear scaling properties of SRRs at infrared and optical frequencies. By discussing the current modes, and the electric and magnetic moments, we study three resonance modes of SRR with respect to different polarizations of EM waves. Through numerical simulations, we find the breakdown of linear scaling, due to the free electron kinetic energy for frequencies above 100 THz. This result is important. It proves that researchers cannot push metamaterials into the optical regime by just scaling down the geometrical size of metamaterial designs used at low frequency. Due to the breakdown of the linear scaling property, a much smaller structure size of LHMs design is required in the optical regime, so new designs with simpler topology are needed. In Chapter 3, we discuss a short wire pair design

  4. A radial basis function Galerkin method for inhomogeneous nonlocal diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Rowe, Stephen T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a discretization for a nonlocal diffusion problem using a localized basis of radial basis functions. The stiffness matrix entries are assembled by a special quadrature routine unique to the localized basis. Combining the quadrature method with the localized basis produces a well-conditioned, sparse, symmetric positive definite stiffness matrix. We demonstrate that both the continuum and discrete problems are well-posed and present numerical results for the convergence behavior of the radial basis function method. As a result, we explore approximating the solution to anisotropic differential equations by solving anisotropic nonlocal integral equations using the radial basis function method.

  5. Radial nerve palsy: a complication of walker usage.

    PubMed

    Ball, N A; Stempien, L M; Pasupuleti, D V; Wertsch, J J

    1989-03-01

    A patient with diabetic peripheral neuropathy experienced the acute onset of a proximal radial nerve palsy after prolonged use of a walker. Nerve conduction and electromyographic studies confirmed an isolated, severe neurapraxic lesion distal to branches innervating the triceps and anconeus muscles. The acute onset and severity of this lesion suggests that it was caused by mechanical compression of the radial nerve as it exits the spiral groove. Radial mononeuropathy has been reported in conjunction with muscular effort of the triceps muscle. Previous case studies and a review of the literature are discussed. Awareness of this complication in patients using walkers and wheelchairs is important for prevention and diagnosis in rehabilitation.

  6. Dynamic optical angiography of mouse anatomy using radial projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Richard B.; Kruger, Robert A.; Reinecke, Daniel R.; DelRio, Stephen P.; Thornton, Michael M.; Picot, Paul A.; Morgan, Timothy G.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of optical angiography on live mice using a new photoacoustic computed tomography (PCT) scanner. The scanner uses a sparse array of discrete ultrasound detectors geometrically arranged to capture 128 simultaneous radial "projections" through a 25-mm-diameter volume of interest. Denser sets of interleaved radial projections are acquired by rotating the sparse array continuously about its vertical axis during data acquisition. The device has been designed specifically for imaging laboratory mice, which remain stationary during data collection. Angiographic data are acquired at a rate of 1280 radial projections per second following a bolus injection of 2 mg/mL of indocyanine green (ICG).

  7. Thumb ulnar collateral and radial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Nicole S; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Thumb metacarpophalangeal ulnar and radial collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the competitive athlete. Collateral ligament integrity is essential to joint stability, pinch strength, and pain-free motion. Acute rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament is due to a sudden radial deviation force on the abducted thumb and is referred to as skier's thumb. An ulnar-directed force causes injury to the radial collateral ligament. The degree of joint instability on clinical examination allows classification of these injuries and guides management. Surgical repair of acute, complete tears results in good outcomes and allows for return to sporting activity.

  8. Analytical design of an advanced radial turbine. [automobile engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Large, G. D.; Finger, D. G.; Linder, C. G.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mechanical potential of a single stage ceramic radial inflow turbine was evaluated for a high temperature single stage automotive engine. The aerodynamic analysis utilizes a turbine system optimization technique to evaluate both radial and nonradial rotor blading. Selected turbine rotor configurations were evaluated mechanically with three dimensional finite element techniques. Results indicate that exceptionally high rotor tip speeds (2300 ft/sec) and performance potential are feasible with radial bladed rotors if the projected ceramic material properties are realized. Nonradial rotors reduced tip speed requirements (at constant turbine efficiency) but resulted in a lower cumulative probability of success due to higher blade and disk stresses.

  9. Radial Distributions of Dusty Plasma Parameters in a Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, A. V.; Sukhinin, G. I.

    2011-11-29

    A self-consistent model for radial distributions of dusty plasma parameters in a DC glow discharge based on the non-local Boltzmann equation for EEDF, the drift-diffusion equation for ions, and the Poisson equation for self-consistent electric field is presented. The results show that for the case of high dust particles density when the recombination of electrons and ions exceeds the ionization near the tube axis, radial electron and ion fluxes change their direction toward the center of the tube, and the radial electric field is reversed.

  10. Radial head dislocation with acute plastic bowing of the ulna.

    PubMed

    Sai, Shigaku; Fujii, Katsuyuki; Chino, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Junichi

    2005-01-01

    Five radial head dislocations with acute plastic bowing of the ulna in patients aged 6-12 years were reviewed. Closed reduction was successful in two, and open reduction was required in three patients in whom treatment was started more than 2 weeks after injury. In one child who presented 2 months after injury, realignment by osteotomy of the ulna as well as open reduction of the radial head was necessary. Follow-up evaluations at 6-24 months revealed good clinical outcomes in all patients. Awareness of this type of radial head dislocation is important to avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:15666132

  11. Supine Extensile Approach to the Anterolateral Humerus.

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Michael A; Friess, Darin

    2016-01-01

    The radial nerve is at risk of injury during surgical approaches to the humeral shaft. Previous authors have described an anterolateral approach to the humerus limited by the radial nerve, requiring that distal dissection be carried anterior into a neurovascularly crowded interval. A novel extensile approach is described using a neuromuscular bridge to protect the radial nerve, thus enabling safe distal extension of the anterolateral humerus approach. The authors present a case series of 7 patients who required an extensile humeral exposure. To date, there have been no complications, including loss of reduction, malunion, nonunion, or nerve palsy. PMID:26726979

  12. Radial basis function interpolation in the limit of increasingly flat basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindelan, Manuel; Moscoso, Miguel; González-Rodríguez, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new approach to study Radial Basis Function (RBF) interpolation in the limit of increasingly flat functions. The new approach is based on the semi-analytical computation of the Laurent series of the inverse of the RBF interpolation matrix described in a previous paper [3]. Once the Laurent series is obtained, it can be used to compute the limiting polynomial interpolant, the optimal shape parameter of the RBFs used for interpolation, and the weights of RBF finite difference formulas, among other things.

  13. Relating left ventricular dimension to maximum elastance by fiber mechanics.

    PubMed

    Beyar, R; Sideman, S

    1986-09-01

    The dependence of the pressure-volume slope, which defines the maximum elastance (Emax) and the zero pressure-volume intercept (Vd) on the size and dimensions of the left ventricle (LV), is theoretically studied, and a normalizing parameter for Emax is suggested for normal and hypertrophied hearts. The study is based on our earlier model of the mechanics of the LV contraction, which assumes a nested-shell spheroidal shape, Streeter's fiber angle distribution, given stress-length and stress-strain rate functions of the sarcomeres, a radial propagation of the electrical activation front, and a windkessel arterial model. The study shows that Emax is linearly related to the maximum force that the optimal length sarcomeres can develop (sigma o), which is a characteristic measure of the contractility. Emax decreases and Vd increases with an increase in ventricular size, at a constant end-diastolic ratio (h/b)ed, where h is the wall thickness, and b is the semiminor axis of the prolate spheroidal LV. When the reference unstressed volume (V0) is held constant and the wall thickness increases, as in pure concentric hypertrophy, Emax decreases slightly and shifts to the left to a lower Vd value. In pure eccentric hypertrophy, wherein chamber size increases while the wall thickness remains constant, Emax decreases and Vd increases. A good index for myocardial function at constant configuration ratio (h/b)ed is obtained by multiplying Emax with the LV muscle volume (Vm). (h/b)ed is constant (= 0.45) for the normal heart but increases for concentric hypertrophy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. On the Voyager 1 Zero Radial Velocity Measurements in the Inner Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Borovikov, S. N.; Kryukov, I.; Zank, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical analysis of the Voyager 1 data revealed a very small, or even negative, value of the solar wind (SW) radial velocity component. This should not be surprising if we take into account time-dependent processes that take place in the inner heliosheath (IHS). We analyze solar cycle modeling of the SW interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) and demonstrate the existence of small and negative values of the SW radial velocity. It shown that, in reality, a similar picture can be observed in the outer heliosheath (OHS), where on the contrary, extended regions of the positive radial velocity are observed. Another scenario discussed in this talk is related to effects of transients, such as global merged interaction regions and corotating interacting regions. Numerical results are obtained with the SW-LISM interaction model developed in the UAHuntsville and implemented in the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite. This model treats ions magnetohydrodynamically while the transport of neutral atoms is performed kinetically by solving the Boltzmann equation with a Monte Carlo approach or using a multi-fluid approach developed in mid-90's by G. P. Zank. Pickup ions (PUIs) can be treated as a separate fluid. The evolution of the PUI-generated turbulence is addressed on the differential level by adding three additional equations, which are solved self-consistently with the MHD-kinetic system of equations.

  15. Repair of right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery and left ligamentum arteriosum.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L

    1990-07-01

    A case of right aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum of the descending thoracic aorta with a left ligamentum arteriosum completing a vascular ring about the trachea and esophagus is presented. A posterolateral left thoracotomy alone is sufficient to provide an excellent exposure for the division of the ligamentum arteriosum and the resection of the Kommerell's diverticulum. Furthermore, the development of a subclavian steal syndrome is prevented by the reimplantation of the divided left subclavian artery into the left common carotid artery through this same incision.

  16. Radial Anisotropy in the Lithosphere and Asthenosphere Beneath the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau from Surface Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanbi, O. E.; Li, A.; Li, L.; Murphy, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed Rayleigh and Love wave data from distant earthquakes recorded by 36 broadband stations that were operated in two years in the NE Tibetan Plateau. Phase velocity variations were determined in a period range of 20 to 91 s for Love wave and 20 to 100 s for Rayleigh wave using a two-plane-wave method, which can accounts for non-planar energy in the incoming wave field caused by structures outside the study area. 3-D shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy models were constructed from the obtained Rayleigh and Love wave dispersions. The mid-lower crust is characterized by strong positive anisotropy (VSH>VSV) beneath the Qilian-Qinling Orogen and relative weak radial anisotropy beneath the Kunlun Mountains. The mantle above 90 km is largely isotropic while positive anisotropy increases gradually with depth below 90 km, which probably marks the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). In contrast, shear wave velocity does not show an obvious reduction at 90 km and fails to detect the LAB. A low shear wave velocity anomaly and relatively negative radial anisotropy are imaged in the entire lithosphere under the Kunlun restraining bend, indicating a weak lithosphere under compressional deformation. The asthenosphere here is characterized by significantly lower velocity and stronger positive anisotropy than the surrounding region, suggesting a warmer and weaker asthenosphere block. Our observations are consistent with a geologic model in which the lithosphere under the restraining bend was thickened and subsequently delaminated, and the warm asthenosphere then filled up the space left by the delamination.

  17. The M 4 Core Project with HST - IV. Internal kinematics from accurate radial velocities of 2771 cluster members★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Sneden, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Sommariva, V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed study of the internal kinematics of the Galactic globular cluster M 4 (NGC 6121), by deriving the radial velocities from 7250 spectra for 2771 stars distributed from the upper part of the red giant branch down to the main sequence. We describe new approaches to determine the wavelength solution from day-time calibrations and to determine the radial velocity drifts that can occur between calibration and science observations when observing with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at Very Large Telescope. Two techniques to determine the radial velocity are compared, after a qualitative description of their advantages with respect to other commonly used algorithm, and a new approach to remove the sky contribution from the spectra obtained with fibre-fed spectrograph and further improve the radial velocity precision is presented. The average radial velocity of the cluster is = 71.08 ± 0.08 km s-1 with an average dispersion of μ _{v_c} = 3.97 km s-1. Using the same data set and the same statistical approach of previous analyses, 20 additional binary candidates are found, for a total of 87 candidates. A new determination of the internal radial velocity dispersion as a function of cluster distance is presented, resulting in a dispersion of 4.5 km s-1 within 2 arcmin from the centre of cluster and steadily decreasing outward. We statistically confirm the small amplitude of the cluster rotation, as suggested in the past by several authors. This new analysis represents a significant improvement with respect to previous results in literature and provides a fundamental observational input for the modelling of the cluster dynamics.

  18. Optical design and tolerancing of freeform surfaces using anisotropic radial basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    We investigate use of the anisotropic radial basis functions expansion as a means to represent surface errors on aspheric and freeform surfaces. We show how the optimal choice of the shape parameter and the placement of radial basis function (RBF) nodes can increase accuracy of the surface approximation. We show an example of the adaptive grid refinement. In our approach, complex surfaces are modeled with general arbitrary representation while the anisotropic RBFs expansion models perturbation of the base surface. We show how both the global and the localized surface errors can be modeled across a wide spatial frequency range. With our method, the impact of the structured surface errors on the arbitrary surfaces when applied on the standardized image quality metrics can be assessed for the purpose of optical tolerancing.

  19. Amplitude-phase methods for analyzing the radial Dirac equation: calculation of scattering phase shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylwe, Karl-Erik

    2008-06-01

    Approaches inspired by a recent amplitude-phase method for analyzing the radial Dirac equation are presented to calculate phase shifts. Regarding the spin- and pseudo-spin symmetries of relativistic spectra, the coupled first-order and the decoupled second-order differential forms of the radial Dirac equation are investigated by using a novel and the 'classical' amplitude-phase methods, respectively. The quasi non-relativistic limit c\\rightarrow +\\infty of the amplitude-phase formulae is discussed for both positive and negative energies. In the positive (E> mc2) low-energy region, the relativistic effects of scattering phase shifts are discussed based on two scattering potential models. Results are compared with those of non-relativistic calculations. In particular, the numerical results obtained from a rational approximation of the Thomas-Fermi potential are discussed in some detail.

  20. Near-unity broadband absorption designs for semiconducting nanowire arrays via localized radial mode excitation.

    PubMed

    Fountaine, Katherine T; Kendall, Christian G; Atwater, Harry A

    2014-05-01

    We report design methods for achieving near-unity broadband light absorption in sparse nanowire arrays, illustrated by results for visible absorption in GaAs nanowires on Si substrates. Sparse (<5% fill fraction) nanowire arrays achieve near unity absorption at wire resonant wavelengths due to coupling into 'leaky' radial waveguide modes of individual wires and wire-wire scattering processes. From a detailed conceptual development of radial mode resonant absorption, we demonstrate two specific geometric design approaches to achieve near unity broadband light absorption in sparse nanowire arrays: (i) introducing multiple wire radii within a small unit cell array to increase the number of resonant wavelengths, yielding a 15% absorption enhancement relative to a uniform nanowire array and (ii) tapering of nanowires to introduce a continuum of diameters and thus resonant wavelengths excited within a single wire, yielding an 18% absorption enhancement over a uniform nanowire array.

  1. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Single Coronary Artery from Right Sinus: Radial Route is Right

    PubMed Central

    Mahla, Rakesh; Mahla, Himanshu; Choudhary, Dinesh; Nahata, Pintu

    2015-01-01

    We present percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using radial approach in a rare case of single coronary artery originating from the right sinus. Although these anomalies and stenosis of anomalous vessels have been described previously, treatment of atherosclerotic lesions by PCI has rarely been reported. There is a definite procedural risk during PCI in patients with a single ostium because dissection with the guiding catheter would result in a catastrophic event. Additionally, technical difficulties may occur due to the ostial configuration and course of the branch to be stented. The patient suffered an acute coronary syndrome-inferior wall STEMI, and was thrombolysed elsewhere within a window period of 4 h. He had post myocardial infarction (MI) angina and was referred to our center after 3 days of thrombolysis. We present this technically challenging and rare case in which PCI of right coronary artery was performed through the radial route. PMID:26713181

  2. Radial Basis Function Networks: Generalization in Over-realizable and Unrealizable Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Saad, David; Freeman, Jason A. S.

    1996-12-01

    Learning and generalization in a two-layer radial basis function network, with fixed centres of the basis functions, is examined within a stochastic training paradigm. Employing a Bayesian approach, expressions for generalization error are derived under the assumption that the generating mechanism (teacher) for the training data is also a radial basis function network, but one for which the basis function centres and widths need not correspond to those of the student network. The effects of regularization, via a weight decay term, are examined. The cases in which the student has greater representational power than the teacher (over-realizable), and in which the teacher has greater power than the student (unrealizable) are studied. Dependence on knowing the centres of the teacher is eliminated by introducing a single degree-of-confidence parameter. Finally, simulations are performed which validate the analytic results. Copyright 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and evidence for radial orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1986-01-01

    Published observational data on the tail orientations (TOs) of 60 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters of galaxies are analyzed statistically using a maximum-likelihood approach. The results are presented in a table, and it is found that the observed TO distributions in the whole sample and in subsamples of morphologically regular NATs and NATs with pericentric distances d greater than 500 kpc are consistent with isotropic orbits, whereas the TOs for NATs with d less than 500 kpc are consistent with highly radial orbits. If radial orbits were observed near the centers of other types of cluster galaxies as well, it could be inferred that violent relaxation during cluster formation was incomplete, and that clusters form by spherical collapse and secondary infall, as proposed by Gunn (1977).

  4. What Lies Ahead (left-eye)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the left-eye version of the 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic showing the view south of the martian crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The image was taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  5. Warrants for left-turn lanes

    SciTech Connect

    Agent, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Most states use accident, traffic-volume, or delay data as guidelines for installing left-turn lanes. Computer simulation of these data compares statistics of intersections with left-turn lanes to those without. The study found that special lanes always lead to improvement in traffic flow, but noted that all intersections cannot accommodate a special lane. The recommendations specify the accident rate, critical-volume determination, and the rate of traffice conflicts which warrant a separate left-turn lane. 10 references, 6 figures, 4 tables. (DCK)

  6. Anomalous Feeding of the Left Upper Lobe.

    PubMed

    Hazzard, Christopher; Itagaki, Shinobu; Lajam, Fouad; Flores, Raja M

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old woman who presented with massive hemoptysis. Computed tomographic angiography revealed an anomalous vessel arising from the abdominal aorta, coursing anteriorly and through the diaphragm, and feeding the left upper lobe. At operation the vessel was found to anastomose to the left upper lobe lingula, which contained multiple vascular abnormalities and arteriovenous fistulas. The vessel was ligated, and the affected portion of the left upper lobe was resected. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of an upper lobe is an especially rare form of a Pryce type 1 abnormality. Recognition of these unusual anatomic variants is crucial to successful treatment and avoidance of adverse events.

  7. Glycine receptors influence radial migration in the embryonic mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Nimmervoll, Birgit; Denter, Denise G; Sava, Irina; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2011-07-13

    To investigate whether glycine receptors influence radial migration in the neocortex, we analyzed the effect of glycine and the glycinergic antagonist strychnine, on the distribution of 5-bromo-2'deoxyuridine-labeled neurons in organotypic slice cultures from embryonic mice cortices. Application of glycine impeded radial migration only in the presence of the glycine-transport blockers, ALX-5407 and ALX-1393. This effect was blocked by the specific glycine receptor antagonist strychnine, whereas application of strychnine in the absence of glycine was without effect. We conclude from these observations that an activation of glycine receptors can impede radial migration, but that the glycinergic system is not directly implicated in the regulation of radial migration in organotypic slice cultures.

  8. Radial Keratotomy Surgery: What Health Educators Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Kenley; Page, Randy M.

    1988-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the safety and potential side effects of radial keratotomy, a surgical procedure that results in a flattening of the cornea and a reduction of refractive myopia (nearsightedness). (JD)

  9. 13. RADIAL DRILL, ENGINE LATHE, DRILL PRESS, AND GRINDER (L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. RADIAL DRILL, ENGINE LATHE, DRILL PRESS, AND GRINDER (L TO R)-LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - W. A. Young & Sons Foundry & Machine Shop, On Water Street along Monongahela River, Rices Landing, Greene County, PA

  10. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CARLTON RADIAL ARM DRILL PRESS (THE CARLTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CARLTON RADIAL ARM DRILL PRESS (THE CARLTON MACHINE TOOL CO., CINCINNATI, OHIO) WITH MACHINE OPERATOR, EDDIE BURTTRAM. - O'Neal Steel, Incorporated, Fabrication Shop, 744 Forty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. 14. PIPE MACHINE, WORK BENCH, SCALE, RADIAL DRILL AND STOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. PIPE MACHINE, WORK BENCH, SCALE, RADIAL DRILL AND STOVE (L TO R) LOOKING WEST. - W. A. Young & Sons Foundry & Machine Shop, On Water Street along Monongahela River, Rices Landing, Greene County, PA

  12. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  13. Analyzing radial acceleration with a smartphone acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    This paper continues the sequence of experiments using the acceleration sensor of smartphones (for description of the function and the use of the acceleration sensor, see Ref. 1) within this column, in this case for analyzing the radial acceleration.

  14. Radial furnace shows promise for growing straight boron carbide whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feingold, E.

    1967-01-01

    Radial furnace, with a long graphite vaporization tube, maintains a uniform thermal gradient, favoring the growth of straight boron carbide whiskers. This concept seems to offer potential for both the quality and yield of whiskers.

  15. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE RADIAL GATE AT THE OUTLET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE RADIAL GATE AT THE OUTLET WORKS AT DAM 96, LOOKING WEST. THE GATE IS IN THE DOWN POSITION, ALLOWING PARTIAL DISCHARGE. - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 96, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  16. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF THE HANDOPERATED HOIST FOR THE RADIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF THE HAND-OPERATED HOIST FOR THE RADIAL GATE ON THE OUTLET WORKS AT DAM 96, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 96, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  17. Yellow giants - A new class of radial velocity variable

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.A.H.; Yang, S.; Campbell, B.; Irwin, A.W.; Victoria Univ. )

    1989-08-01

    The five K giants and one K supergiant included in a precise (HF) radial velocity program all show significant long-term (about 1 yr), low-amplitude (30-300 m/s rms) radial velocity variations which make them unsuitable as precise radial velocity standars. Arcturus has been discussed in detail elsewhere, and the supergiant Epsilon Peg is probably a semiregular variable. The sampling in the five years of data is inadequate to say whether the giants are related to the Cepheid or Mira variables or form an independent class. The amplitudes of the long-term radial velocity variations of the giants and supergiant are correlated with the level of chromospheric activity shown by K line emission intensity and its fluctuation as seen in He I 10830-A. 19 refs.

  18. The vergence eye movements induced by radial optic flow

    PubMed Central

    Kodaka, Y.; Sheliga, B. M.; FitzGibbon, E. J.; Miles, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Radial optic flow applied to large random dot patterns is known to elicit horizontal vergence eye movements at short latency, expansion causing convergence and contraction causing divergence: the Radial Flow Vergence Response (RFVR). We elicited RFVRs in human subjects by applying radial motion to concentric circular patterns whose radial luminance modulation was that of a square wave lacking the fundamental: the missing fundamental (mf) stimulus. The radial motion consisted of successive ¼-wavelength steps, so that the overall pattern and the 4n+1 harmonics (where n=integer) underwent radial expansion (or contraction), whereas the 4n-1 harmonics—including the strongest Fourier component (the 3rd harmonic)—underwent the opposite radial motion. Radial motion commenced only after the subject had fixated the center of the pattern. The initial RFVRs were always in the direction of the 3rd harmonic, e.g., expansion of the mf pattern causing divergence. Thus, the earliest RFVRs were strongly dependent on the motion of the major Fourier component, consistent with early spatio-temporal filtering prior to motion detection, as in the well-known energy model of motion analysis. If the radial mf stimulus was reduced to just two competing harmonics—the 3rd and 5th—the initial RFVRs showed a nonlinear dependence on their relative contrasts: when the two harmonics differed in contrast by more than about an octave then the one with the higher contrast completely dominated the RFVRs and the one with lower contrast lost its influence: winner-take-all. We suggest that these nonlinear interactions result from mutual inhibition between the mechanisms sensing the motion of the different competing harmonics. If single radial-flow steps were used, a brief inter-stimulus interval resulted in reversed RFVRs, consistent with the idea that the motion detectors mediating these responses receive a visual input whose temporal impulse response function is strongly biphasic. Lastly, all

  19. Calculation of a realistic gradient as a function of radial distance from the sun. [for galactic proton distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lezniak, J. A.; Webber, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical calculations of radial gradients of galactic cosmic ray protons have been performed for a model of the interplanetary cavity which includes processes of diffusion along the spiral interplanetary magnetic field lines, convection, and adiabatic energy change. The increasing spiral nature of the field lines with increasing distance from the sun results in the bulk of the modulation region being beyond the earth. The radial gradients for this model are found to be small near the earth and out to a few AU, increasing as one approaches the boundary.

  20. High-Speed Tests of Conventional Radial-Engine Cowlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Russell G; Becker, John V

    1942-01-01

    The drag characteristics of eight radial-engine cowlings have been determined over a wide speed range in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel. The pressure distribution over all cowlings was measured, to and above the speed of the compressibility burble, as an aid in interpreting the force tests. One-fifth-scale models of radial-engine cowlings on a wing-nacelle combination were used in the tests.

  1. Low cost, radial flow, solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, M. A.

    The Interscience Radial Flow (IRF) SOFC is designed to minimize problems in high-temperature operation and for low-cost fabrication. The cell has planar, non-sintered construction, uses particulate materials to form porous electrodes, and has internal radial flow. The object of this phase was to demonstrate feasibility of multi-cell stack operation. Performance milestone was 15% DC HHV efficiency with hydrogen at greater than 50 mW/sq cm over 100 h.

  2. Focal spot analysis of radially polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenchao; Hu, Wenhua; Qi, Junli; Wang, Weiming; Liao, Jiali; Yi, Wenjun; Jia, Hui; Li, Xiujian

    2014-09-01

    When radially polarized light beams focus through high numerical-aperture lens, there will be a very strong longitudinal component of the light field near the focus. And, under the condition of certain system parameters, they can shape a spot which is over the focusing spot of the diffraction limit, which are the superiorities that linearly polarized light and circularly polarized light do not have. Besides, what we have found in the experiment is that radially polarized femtosecond laser pulses own the same superiorities, which provides the basis for using the focusing characteristics of radially polarized light beams under the condition of shorter and more powerful laser pulses. So far, although people have studied a lot on radially polarized light beams, this kind of light beams' focusing characters are rarely researched. What is worse, most research of its focusing characters still stays in the stage of theoretical simulation,and it seems that none of people have really studied it by the way of experiments. This article is precisely based on this. On the basis of predecessors' a lot of theoretical research, the article pays more attention on analyzing radially polarized light beams' focusing character through experiments. What's more, the article, based on femtosecond laser pulses, compares the differences of the focusing nature among linearly polarized light, circularly polarized light and radially polarized light. And it gets the conclusion that radially polarized femtosecond laser pulses have better focusing character in longitudinal light field, confirming the feasibility that radially polarized light beams can be used in the fields of pulling, catching, and accelerating particles, metal cutting and high-density storage.

  3. Radial evolution of the energy density of solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of transport theories appropriate to a radially expanding solar wind, we describe new results for the radial evolution of the energy density in solar wind fluctuations at MHD scales. These models include the effects of 'mixing' and driving as well as the possibility of non-isotropic MHD turbulence. Implications of these results for solar wind heating, cosmic ray diffusion and interstellar pick-up ions will also be addressed.

  4. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  5. Radial basis function neural networks applied to NASA SSME data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Dhawan, Atam P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a brief report on the application of Radial Basis Function Neural Networks (RBFNN) to the prediction of sensor values for fault detection and diagnosis of the Space Shuttle's Main Engines (SSME). The location of the Radial Basis Function (RBF) node centers was determined with a K-means clustering algorithm. A neighborhood operation about these center points was used to determine the variances of the individual processing notes.

  6. The Radial Velocity Method for the Detection of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.

    The radial velocity (RV) method has provided the foundation for the research field of exoplanets. It created the field by discovering the first exoplanets and then blazed a trail by detecting over 1000 exoplanets in orbit around other stars. The method also plays a vital role in transit searches by providing the planetary mass needed to calculate the bulk density of the exoplanet. The RV method requires a wide range of techniques: novel instrumentation for making precise RV measurements, clever techniques for extracting the periodic signals due to planets from the RV data, tools for assessing their statistical significance, and programs for calculating the Keplerian orbital parameters. Finally, RV measurements have become so precise that the measurement error is now dominated by the intrinsic stellar noise. New tools have to be developed to extract planetary signals from RV variability originating from the star. In these series of lectures I will cover (1) basic instrumentation for stellar radial velocity methods, (2) methods for achieving high radial velocity precision, (3) finding periodic signals in radial velocity data, (4) Keplerian orbits, (5) sources of errors for radial velocity measurements, and (6) dealing with the contribution of stellar noise to the radial velocity measurement.

  7. Effect of the radial buoyancy on a circular Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Antoine; Yoshikawa, Harunori N.; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2015-11-01

    The effect of a radial temperature gradient on the stability of a circular Couette flow is investigated when the gravitational acceleration is neglected. The induced radial stratification of the fluid density coupled with the centrifugal acceleration generates radial buoyancy which is centrifugal for inward heating and centripetal for outward heating. This radial buoyancy modifies the Rayleigh discriminant and induces the asymmetry between inward heating and outward heating in flow behavior. The critical modes are axisymmetric and stationary for inward heating while for outward heating, they can be oscillatory axisymmetric or nonaxisymmetric depending on fluid diffusion properties, i.e., on the Prandtl number Pr. The dependence of the critical modes on Pr is explored for different values of the radius ratio of the annulus. The power input of the radial buoyancy is compared with other power terms. The critical frequency of the oscillatory axisymmetric modes is linked to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency due to the density stratification in the radial gravity field induced by the rotation. These modes are associated with inertial waves. The dispersion relation of the oscillatory axisymmetric modes is derived in the vicinity of the critical conditions. A weakly nonlinear amplitude equation with a forcing term is proposed to explain the domination of these axisymmetric oscillatory modes over the stationary centrifugal mode.

  8. Radial ion transport measurements in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.L.; Petty, C.C.; Post, R.S. )

    1990-09-01

    Experimental radial ion transport rates and diffusion coefficients are presented for the Constance-B magnetic mirror (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 58}, 1853 (1987)). The transport experiments are performed by measuring steady state equilibrium radial profiles of plasma density, ionization source, end loss current, electric field, electron temperature, and ion temperature. A charge coupled device (CCD) camera system (Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 60}, 2835 (1989)) is used to measure the two-dimensional radial density, source, and electron temperature profiles. End loss diagnostics including movable Faraday cups, electrostatic end loss analyzers, and an ion time-of-flight analyzer (Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 59}, 601 (1988)) are used to measure radial profiles of potential and ion temperature. The ion confinement time perpendicular to the magnetic field is found to be an order of magnitude shorter than predicted by classical and neoclassical transport theories. The radial profiles of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient ({ital D}{sub {perpendicular}}) are presented for hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas. The coefficients are a factor of 10 larger than the maximum classical and neoclassical coefficients in all three plasmas. Plasma fluctuations resulting from whistler mode microinstability (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 59}, 1821 (1987)) as well as nonaxisymmetric potentials are suggested as possible explanations for the experimentally measured radial transport rate.

  9. Radial Localization of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode in Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhixuan; Lin, Zhihong; Heidbrink, William; Tobias, Benjamin; van Zeeland, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) with radially extended structures can be driven unstable by pressure gradients of energetic particles (EP). These unstable Alfveneigenmodes (AE) have been routinely observed in fusion experiments to induce a large EP transport, whichcould degrade overall plasma confinement and damagefusion devices.In the well-accepted paradigm, the growth rate of the AEs can be calculated from a perturbative EP contribution to a fixedmode structure and real frequency given by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) properties of thermal plasmas. However, linear and nonlinear kinetic effects of both EP and thermal plasmasare important and should be treated on the same footing. The gyrokinetic simulation has thus emerged as anecessary and powerful tool for studying the linear andnonlinear dynamics of AEs. In the current work, the gyrokinetic toroidal code(GTC) linear simulation of the tokamakexperiment finds a radial localization of the TAE dueto the non-perturbative EP contribution. The EP-drivenTAE has a radial mode width much smaller than thatpredicted by the MHD theory. The TAE radial positionpeaks at and moves with the location of the strongest EPpressure gradients. Experimental data confirms that the eigenfunction drifts quicklyoutward radially. The non-perturbativeEP contribution also breaks the radial symmetry of the mode structure and induces a TAE frequency dependence on the toroidal mode number, in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements.

  10. 3D MHD simulations of radial wire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, C.; Ampleford, D.; Ciardi, A.; Chittenden, J.; Bland, S.; Niasse, N.

    2008-04-01

    We present 3D resistive MHD simulations evaluating multi-MA radial wire arrays as a potential compact, high intensity source for inertial confinement fusion and laboratory astrophysics. A radial wire array consists of wires running radially outwards from a central electrode, and was first investigated at the 1 MA level on the MAGPIE generator at Imperial College. Originally used as a method of producing magnetic tower laboratory jets relevant to astrophysics[1], they have also shown potential as a high power x-ray source. Able to produce x-ray pulses with a rise time and peak power comparable to cylindrical wire arrays, radial arrays occupy a smaller volume and may consequently be able to access higher power densities. We discuss simulation results reproducing radial array experiments performed on the MAGPIE facility as a means of benchmarking our model. This model is then used to evaluate radial wire arrays in the multi-MA regime for planned experiments on the Saturn generator of Sandia National Laboratories. [1] A. Ciardi et al, Phys. Plasmas 14, 056501 (2007)

  11. Idiopathic left ventricular hypertrophy in an infant.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Bhardwaj, Praveen

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy in infancy has been a subject of considerable interest. We present a case of significant left ventricular hypertrophy without any associated cause, presenting in infancy. PMID:23550435

  12. Left atrial myxoma masquerading as viral flu

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Kiernan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is a rare cardiac tumor that may be diagnosed incidentally on cardiac imaging or may present with life-threatening cardiac symptoms. We present a case of giant left atrial myxoma that presented as a flulike illness.

  13. Differences in Left and Right Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Jocelyn M.; Nisbet, Alan A.; Wuerstle, Melanie C.; Tran, Viet Q.; Kwon, Eric O.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The classic belief is that right-sided laparoscopic adrenalectomy is technically more difficult to perform than left-sided. The purpose of this study was to determine whether objective outcomes are different for the right- versus left- sided operation. Methods: A retrospective review of 163 laparoscopic adrenalectomies was performed to compare outcomes. Variables extracted included age, demographics, body mass index (BMI), laterality, indication, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), gland size, complications, open conversion rates, and length of stay. Results: Of the adrenalectomies performed, 109 were on the left and 54 on the right. Age, BMI, and indication were similar for each group. The mean EBL on the left side was 113mL (range, 2 to 3000) and 84mL (range, 10 to 700) for the right (P=0.85). The mean operative time on the left side was 187 minutes (range, 62 to 475) and on the right was 156 minutes (range, 50 to 365) (P=0.02). There was no difference in complication or conversion rate. Conclusions: There was no difference in complication or conversion rates between each side, and we observed a trend toward lower blood loss for the right side. Although we report generally similar outcomes, the mean operative time for a right-sided laparoscopic adrenalectomy was significantly less (31 minutes) than the left side. PMID:21333190

  14. Aberrant radial-ulnar nerve communication in the upper arm presenting as an unusual radial nerve palsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Daniel J; Buzas, David; Siegel, Geoffrey; Afsari, Alan

    2015-05-01

    An unusual communication between the radial and ulnar nerves was observed during repair of a fracture of the humerus in an adult patient who presented with unusual physical exam findings. The patient had loss of radial and ulnar nerve motor function, as well as decreased sensation in both nerve distributions. Radial nerve injury following fracture of the humerus is a common condition, and anatomic variations are therefore of importance to clinicians. Communications between branches of the brachial plexus are also not uncommon findings; however there is very little mention of communication between the radial and ulnar nerves in the literature. An appreciation of unusual nerve anatomy is important in explaining unusual finding in patients. PMID:25481257

  15. Instantaneous frequency time analysis of physiology signals: The application of pregnant women’s radial artery pulse signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Chuan-Chen; Wu, Tzuyin; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Tang, Feng-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This study used the Hilbert-Huang transform, a recently developed, instantaneous frequency-time analysis, to analyze radial artery pulse signals taken from women in their 36th week of pregnancy and after pregnancy. The acquired instantaneous frequency-time spectrum (Hilbert spectrum) is further compared with the Morlet wavelet spectrum. Results indicate that the Hilbert spectrum is especially suitable for analyzing the time series of non-stationary radial artery pulse signals since, in the Hilbert-Huang transform, signals are decomposed into different mode functions in accordance with signal’s local time scale. Therefore, the Hilbert spectrum contains more detailed information than the Morlet wavelet spectrum. From the Hilbert spectrum, we can see that radial artery pulse signals taken from women in their 36th week of pregnancy and after pregnancy have different patterns. This approach could be applied to facilitate non-invasive diagnosis of fetus’ physiological signals in the future.

  16. Individual differences in left parietal white matter predict math scores on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test.

    PubMed

    Matejko, Anna A; Price, Gavin R; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Ansari, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Mathematical skills are of critical importance, both academically and in everyday life. Neuroimaging research has primarily focused on the relationship between mathematical skills and functional brain activity. Comparatively few studies have examined which white matter regions support mathematical abilities. The current study uses diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to test whether individual differences in white matter predict performance on the math subtest of the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT). Grades 10 and 11 PSAT scores were obtained from 30 young adults (ages 17-18) with wide-ranging math achievement levels. Tract based spatial statistics was used to examine the correlation between PSAT math scores, fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial diffusivity (AD). FA in left parietal white matter was positively correlated with math PSAT scores (specifically in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, left superior corona radiata, and left corticospinal tract) after controlling for chronological age and same grade PSAT critical reading scores. Furthermore, RD, but not AD, was correlated with PSAT math scores in these white matter microstructures. The negative correlation with RD further suggests that participants with higher PSAT math scores have greater white matter integrity in this region. Individual differences in FA and RD may reflect variability in experience dependent plasticity over the course of learning and development. These results are the first to demonstrate that individual differences in white matter are associated with mathematical abilities on a nationally administered scholastic aptitude measure.

  17. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. VIII. Testing for the presence of planets with CRIRES infrared radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Trifon; Reffert, Sabine; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Context. We have been monitoring 373 very bright (V ≤ 6 mag) G and K giants with high precision optical Doppler spectroscopy for more than a decade at Lick Observatory. Our goal was to discover planetary companions around those stars and to better understand planet formation and evolution around intermediate-mass stars. However, in principle, long-term, g-mode nonradial stellar pulsations or rotating stellar features, such as spots, could effectively mimic a planetary signal in the radial velocity data. Aims: Our goal is to compare optical and infrared radial velocities for those stars with periodic radial velocity patterns and to test for consistency of their fitted radial velocity semiamplitudes. Thereby, we distinguish processes intrinsic to the star from orbiting companions as reason for the radial velocity periodicity observed in the optical. Methods: Stellar spectra with high spectral resolution have been taken in the H-band with the CRIRES near-infrared spectrograph at ESO's VLT for 20 stars of our Lick survey. Radial velocities are derived using many deep and stable telluric CO2 lines for precise wavelength calibration. Results: We find that the optical and near-infrared radial velocities of the giant stars in our sample are consistent. We present detailed results for eight stars in our sample previously reported to have planets or brown dwarf companions. All eight stars passed the infrared test. Conclusions: We conclude that the planet hypothesis provides the best explanation for the periodic radial velocity patterns observed for these giant stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under program IDs 088.D-0132, 089.D-0186, 090.D-0155 and 091.D-0365.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. THE RADIAL METALLICITY GRADIENTS IN THE MILKY WAY THICK DISK AS FOSSIL SIGNATURES OF A PRIMORDIAL CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Curir, A.; Serra, A. L.; Spagna, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Re Fiorentin, P.; Diaferio, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this Letter we examine the evolution of the radial metallicity gradient induced by secular processes, in the disk of an N-body Milky Way-like galaxy. We assign a [Fe/H] value to each particle of the simulation according to an initial, cosmologically motivated, radial chemical distribution and let the disk dynamically evolve for ∼6 Gyr. This direct approach allows us to take into account only the effects of dynamical evolution and to gauge how and to what extent they affect the initial chemical conditions. The initial [Fe/H] distribution increases with R in the inner disk up to R ≈ 10 kpc and decreases for larger R. We find that the initial chemical profile does not undergo major transformations after ∼6 Gyr of dynamical evolution. The final radial chemical gradients predicted by the model in the solar neighborhood are positive and of the same order as those recently observed in the Milky Way thick disk. We conclude that (1) the spatial chemical imprint at the time of disk formation is not washed out by secular dynamical processes and (2) the observed radial gradient may be the dynamical relic of a thick disk originated from a stellar population showing a positive chemical radial gradient in the inner regions.

  19. On the nature of the radial and cross track errors for artificial earth satellites. [GEOS 2 and OAR-901

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Gordon, R. A.; Marsh, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis of the radial and cross track errors of artificial earth satellites is discussed in terms of the interference of two one-dimensional celestial mechanical wave trains. Resulting equations for these tracking errors describe the behavior of the uncertainties in the orbital parameters as oscillatory in nature, with a rapidly oscillating term, which is a function of the sum of the observed and computed orbital frequencies, modulated in amplitude by a slowly varying oscillation. This latter term is itself a function of either the difference between these orbital frequencies or between the values of the computed and observed right ascensions, depending upon whether it is the radial or cross track case under consideration. These results indicate that the cross track calculation describes the behavior of uncertainties in the right ascension of the ascending node and the inclination, while the radial calculation gives information on uncertainties in the semi-major axis, the eccentricity, and the argument of perigee. In addition, expressions for the radial and cross track oscillatory frequencies are obtained in terms of the orbital frequencies of the satellites. Data show that the time average of the radial and cross track errors in any case, will both approach zero.

  20. Kepler beaming binaries radial velocity follow-up with WIYN/Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Stassun, Keivan; Faigler, Simchon; Boyajian, Tabetha; Mazeh, Tsevi; Tal-Or, Lev; Prsa, Andrej

    2015-12-01

    High-quality space-based time series photometry reveals the minute photometric modulations induced by orbital motion in short-period binary systems with stellar and substellar secondaries. Those modulations are induced by both gravitational and atmospheric processes. Gravitational processes include the beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and the atmospheric processes include reflected light and thermal emission by the secondary atmosphere. Therefore, non-eclipsing (non-transiting) systems are detectable using photometry alone. The availability of Kepler data for a large sample of stars combined with the sensitivity to non-eclipsing systems (which are at least an order of magnitude more common than eclipsing systems) has the potential of transforming the Kepler survey into the equivalent of a radial velocity survey of a large sample of stars. This allows detecting intrinsically rare systems, where traditional approaches, e.g., radial velocity and transit surveys, are highly inefficient. Those include systems where the companion is a brown-dwarf or a massive planet, or even a white dwarf. As this approach is still in its infancy, we are carrying out radial velocity follow-up of Kepler photometric detections, to confirm the nature of the system and accurately measure the orbit and the companion’s mass. Here we present our results from an radial velocity campaign with the WIYN/Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph, where we used 26 nights during the 2014 and 2015 Kepler observing seasons to observe five Hydra one-degree diameter fields within the Kepler field. Our list of targets includes 131 Kepler beaming binaries, and we used additional fibers to observe 85 Kepler eclipsing binaries and 31 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). A detailed comparison between the photometrically predicted companion’s mass and the mass measured through radial velocities will improve our understanding of this young approach, and will support similar projects

  1. The Potential Effects of a Biofeedback Writing Exercise on Radial Artery Blood Flow and Neck Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Krullaards, Rob L.; Pel, Johan J. M.; Snijders, Chris J.; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that sustained contraction of the deep neck muscles may reduce axial cervical range of motion (CROM) and radial artery blood flow velocity (vrad.art.mean). No studies have reported both phenomena in relation to acute hand, shoulder or neck trauma. Procedures: The CROM and vrad.art.mean were measured in 20 police officers prior to and immediately after a 2-hours drive on a motorcycle and immediately after a 1-minute writing exercise using biofeedback. The CROM was measured using separate inclinometers and the vrad.art.mean was measured in both arms just proximal to the wrist using echo-Doppler. Findings: During the study, one officer had a motorcycle accident resulting in acute symptoms of neck trauma. His vrad.art.mean was acutely reduced by 73% (right arm) and 45% (left arm). Writing with biofeedback increased his vrad.art.mean by 150% (right arm) and 80% (left arm). In the remaining 19 officers, the CROM to the right was significantly increased after the 2-hours driving task (p<0.05; paired subject t-test). Writing with biofeedback increased their CROM in both directions and vrad.art.mean in both arms (p<001). Conclusions: A 2-hours drive showed modest physical changes in the upper extremities. Biofeedback in writing tasks might relate to the influence of relaxation and diverting attention for neck mobility and arterial blood flow improvement. PMID:23675136

  2. Management of the congenital aneurysm of the left ventricle associated with mitral insufficiency in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mitsomoy, Michel Francklyn; Ajaja, Mohomed Reda; Fkiri, Btisam; Haddour, L; Cheikhaoui, Younes

    2013-01-01

    The combination of congenital left ventricular aneurysm associated with mitral insufficiency is rare. We describe the case of a girl aged 11 years, bearing these two entities simultaneously. Aneurysmal resection of the left ventricle was performed with Dor technic to allow remodelation of the anatomy of the left ventricle. Mitral annuloplasty was performed through a transseptal approach. Three months after surgery, the child presents a good myocardial contractility without mitral regurgitation and normal ejection fraction. PMID:24251007

  3. Management of the Congenital Aneurysm of the Left Ventricle Associated with Mitral Insufficiency in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mitsomoy, Michel Francklyn; Ajaja, Mohomed Reda; Fkiri, Btisam; Haddour, L; Cheikhaoui, Younes

    2013-01-01

    The combination of congenital left ventricular aneurysm associated with mitral insufficiency is rare. We describe the case of a girl aged 11 years, bearing these two entities simultaneously. Aneurysmal resection of the left ventricle was performed with Dor technic to allow remodelation of the anatomy of the left ventricle. Mitral annuloplasty was performed through a transseptal approach. Three months after surgery, the child presents a good myocardial contractility without mitral regurgitation and normal ejection fraction. PMID:24251007

  4. The Importance of Premotor Cortex for Supporting Speech Production after Left Capsular-Putaminal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bagdasaryan, Juliana; Jung, Dorit E.; Price, Cathy J.

    2014-01-01

    The left putamen is known to be important for speech production, but some patients with left putamen damage can produce speech remarkably well. We investigated the neural mechanisms that support this recovery by using a combination of techniques to identify the neural regions and pathways that compensate for loss of the left putamen during speech production. First, we used fMRI to identify the brain regions that were activated during reading aloud and picture naming in a patient with left putamen damage. This revealed that the patient had abnormally high activity in the left premotor cortex. Second, we used dynamic causal modeling of the patient's fMRI data to understand how this premotor activity influenced other speech production regions and whether the same neural pathway was used by our 24 neurologically normal control subjects. Third, we validated the compensatory relationship between putamen and premotor cortex by showing, in the control subjects, that lower connectivity through the putamen increased connectivity through premotor cortex. Finally, in a lesion-deficit analysis, we demonstrate the explanatory power of our fMRI results in new patients who had damage to the left putamen, left premotor cortex, or both. Those with damage to both had worse reading and naming scores. The results of our four-pronged approach therefore have clinical implications for predicting which patients are more or less likely to recover their speech after left putaminal damage. PMID:25339747

  5. Retroaortic left renal vein in a case of left adrenal adenoma: radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Dilli, Alper; Ayaz, Umit Yasar; Karabacak, Osman Raif; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2011-01-01

    It is important to diagnose retroaortic left renal vein (RLRV) before a probable retroperitoneal surgery in a case of a suspicious adrenal mass. Our purpose is to present the ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a case of left adrenal adenoma with a coincidental RLRV and to discuss the clinical importance of their imaging. Abdominal and scrotal US, abdominal CT and MRI were performed for a 50-year-old male patient who was referred with continuous abdominal pain, intractable hypertension, high levels of blood cortisol and proteinuria. On US, a hypoechoic solid mass measuring 4 × 3 cm in the left adrenal location and coincidental RLRV, besides multiple renal cysts, hepatomegaly, left-sided varicocele, and small-sized left testis were detected. CT and MRI also revealed the mass in the left adrenal gland which was consistent with adenoma. With CT and MRI, presence of RLRV was also verified.

  6. Reconstructing the magnetosphere from data using radial basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Varvara A.; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A.

    2016-03-01

    A new method is proposed to derive from data magnetospheric magnetic field configurations without any a priori assumptions on the geometry of electric currents. The approach utilizes large sets of archived satellite data and uses an advanced technique to represent the field as a sum of toroidal and poloidal parts, whose generating potentials Ψ1 and Ψ2 are expanded into series of radial basis functions (RBFs) with their nodes regularly distributed over the 3-D modeling domain. The method was tested by reconstructing the inner and high-latitude field within geocentric distances up to 12RE on the basis of magnetometer data of Geotail, Polar, Cluster, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and Van Allen space probes, taken during 1995-2015. Four characteristic states of the magnetosphere before and during a disturbance have been modeled: a quiet prestorm period, storm deepening phase with progressively decreasing SYM-H index, the storm maximum around the negative peak of SYM-H, and the recovery phase. Fitting the RBF model to data faithfully resolved contributions to the total magnetic field from all principal sources, including the westward and eastward ring current, the tail current, diamagnetic currents associated with the polar cusps, and the large-scale effect of the field-aligned currents. For two main phase conditions, the model field exhibited a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry of the low-latitude magnetic depression, extending to low altitudes and partly spreading sunward from the terminator plane in the dusk sector. The RBF model was found to resolve even finer details, such as the bifurcation of the innermost tail current. The method can be further developed into a powerful tool for data-based studies of the magnetospheric currents.

  7. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  8. Judet type-IV radial neck fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Margarita; Eberl, Robert; Castellani, Christoph; Kraus, Tanja; Till, Holger; Singer, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Heavily displaced radial neck fractures in children are sometimes associated with poor outcome. A substantial number of these fractures require open reduction. We hypothesized that Judet type-IV fractures with a completely displaced radial head would result in a worse outcome than radial neck fractures with remaining bony contact. Patients and methods We analyzed 19 children (median age 9.7 (4–13) years) who were treated for Judet type-IV radial neck fractures between 2001 and 2014. The outcome was assessed at the latest outpatient visit using the Linscheid-Wheeler score at a median time of 3.5 (1–8) years after injury. The patients were assigned either to group A (9 fractures with remaining bony contact between the radial head and the radial neck) or to group B (10 fractures without any bony contact). Results The 2 groups were similar concerning age and sex. The rate of additional injuries was higher in group B (7/10 vs. 1/9 in group A; p = 0.009). The rate of open reduction was higher in group B (5/10 vs. 0/9 in group A; p = 0.01). Poor outcome was more common in group B (4/10 vs. 0/9 in group A; p = 0.03). In group B, the proportion of children with poor outcome (almost half) was the same irrespective of whether open or closed reduction had been done. Interpretation The main causes of unfavorable results of radial neck fracture in children appear to be related to the energy of the injury and the amount of displacement—and not to whether open reduction was used. PMID:27348024

  9. Effects of radial motion on interchange injections at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Achilleos, N.; Andriopoulou, M.; Badman, S. V.; Hospodarsky, G.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kennelly, T.; Khurana, K.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Louarn, P.; Roussos, E.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle injections are regularly observed in Saturn's inner magnetosphere by Cassini. They are attributed to an ongoing process of flux-tube interchange driven by the strong centrifugal force associated with Saturn's rapid rotation. Numerical simulations suggest that these interchange injections can be associated with inward flow channels, in which plasma confined to a narrow range of longitudes moves radially toward the planet, gaining energy, while ambient plasma in the adjacent regions moves more slowly outward. Most previous analyses of these events have neglected this radial motion and inferred properties of the events under the assumption that they appear instantaneously at the spacecraft's L-shell and thereafter drift azimuthally. This paper describes features of injections that can be related to their radial motion prior to observation. We use a combination of phase space density profiles and an updated version of a test-particle model to quantify properties of the injection. We are able to infer the longitudinal width of the injection, the radial travel time from its point of origin, and the starting L shell of the injection. We can also predict which energies can remain inside the channel during the radial transport. To highlight the effects of radial propagation at a finite speed, we focus on those interchange injections without extensive features of azimuthal dispersion. Injections that have traveled radially for one or more hours prior to observation would have been initiated at a different local time than that of the observation. Finally, we describe an injection where particles have drifted azimuthally into a flow channel prior to observation by Cassini.

  10. Submarine radial vents on Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanless, V. Dorsey; Garcia, M.O.; Trusdell, F.A.; Rhodes, J.M.; Norman, M.D.; Weis, Dominique; Fornari, D.J.; Kurz, M.D.; Guillou, Herve

    2006-01-01

    A 2002 multibeam sonar survey of Mauna Loa's western flank revealed ten submarine radial vents and three submarine lava flows. Only one submarine radial vent was known previously. The ages of these vents are constrained by eyewitness accounts, geologic relationships, Mn-Fe coatings, and geochemical stratigraphy; they range from 128 years B.P. to possibly 47 ka. Eight of the radial vents produced degassed lavas despite eruption in water depths sufficient to inhibit sulfur degassing. These vents formed truncated cones and short lava flows. Two vents produced undegassed lavas that created “irregular” cones and longer lava flows. Compositionally and isotopically, the submarine radial vent lavas are typical of Mauna Loa lavas, except two cones that erupted alkalic lavas. He-Sr isotopes for the radial vent lavas follow Mauna Loa's evolutionary trend. The compositional and isotopic heterogeneity of these lavas indicates most had distinct parental magmas. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter results, along with photography and sampling during four JASON2 dives, are used to produce a detailed geologic map to evaluate Mauna Loa's submarine geologic history. The new map shows that the 1877 submarine eruption was much larger than previously thought, resulting in a 10% increase for recent volcanism. Furthermore, although alkalic lavas were found at two radial vents, there is no systematic increase in alkalinity among these or other Mauna Loa lavas as expected for a dying volcano. These results refute an interpretation that Mauna Loa's volcanism is waning. The submarine radial vents and flows cover 29 km2 of seafloor and comprise a total volume of ∼2×109 m3 of lava, reinforcing the idea that submarine lava eruptions are important in the growth of oceanic island volcanoes even after they emerged above sea level.

  11. Toroidal flow and radial particle flux in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.

    2009-08-01

    Many effects influence toroidal flow evolution in tokamak plasmas. Momentum sources and radial plasma transport due to collisional processes and microturbulence-induced anomalous transport are usually considered. In addition, toroidal flow can be affected by nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields; resonant components cause localized electromagnetic toroidal torques near rational surfaces in flowing plasmas and nonresonant components induce "global" toroidal flow damping torque throughout the plasma. Also, poloidal magnetic field transients on the magnetic field diffusion time scale can influence plasma transport. Many of these processes can also produce momentum pinch and intrinsic flow effects. This paper presents a comprehensive and self-consistent description of all these effects within a fluid moment context. Plasma processes on successive time scales (and constraints they impose) are considered sequentially: compressional Alfvén waves (Grad-Shafranov equilibrium and ion radial force balance), sound waves (pressure constant along a field line and incompressible flows within a flux surface), and ion collisions (damping of poloidal flow). Finally, plasma transport across magnetic flux surfaces is induced by the many second order (in the small gyroradius expansion) toroidal torque effects indicated above. Nonambipolar components of the induced particle transport fluxes produce radial plasma currents. Setting the flux surface average of the net radial current induced by all these effects to zero yields the transport-time-scale equation for evolution of the plasma toroidal flow. It includes a combination of global toroidal flow damping and resonant torques induced by nonaxisymmetric magnetic field components, poloidal magnetic field transients, and momentum source effects, as well as the usual collision- and microturbulence-induced transport. On the transport time scale, the plasma toroidal rotation determines the radial electric field for net ambipolar particle transport

  12. Radial artery vasomotor function following transradial cardiac catheterisation

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, A J; Mills, N L; Newby, D E; Cruden, N L M

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine the reproducibility of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD) in the assessment of radial artery vasomotor function, and to examine the effect of transradial catheterisation on radial artery injury and recovery. Methods Radial artery FMD and NMD were examined in 20 volunteers and 20 patients on four occasions (two visits at least 24 hours apart, with two assessments at each visit). In a further 10 patients, radial artery FMD was assessed in the catheterised arm prior to, at 24 hours and 3 months following cardiac catheterisation. Results There were no differences in baseline radial artery diameter (2.7±0.4 mm vs 2.7±0.4 mm), FMD (13.4±6.4 vs 12.89±5.5%) or NMD (13.6±3.8% vs 10.1±4.3%) between healthy volunteers and patients (p>0.05 for all comparisons). Mean differences for within and between day FMD were 2.53% (95% CIs −15.5% to 20.5%) and −4.3% (−18.3% to 9.7%) in patients. Compared to baseline, radial artery FMD was impaired at 24 hours (8.7±4.1% vs 3.9±2.9%, p=0.015) but not 3 months (8.7±4.1% vs 6.2±4.4, p=0.34) following transradial catheterisation. Conclusions Radial FMD is impaired early after transradial catheterisation but appears to recover by 3 months. While test–retest variability was demonstrated, our findings suggest that transradial access for cardiac catheterisation may afford a potential model of vascular injury and repair in vivo in man. PMID:27752330

  13. Postmortem Evaluation of Left Flank Laparoscopic Access in an Adult Female Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    Pizzi, R; Cracknell, J; Dalrymple, L

    2010-01-01

    There are still few reports of laparoscopy in megavertebrates. The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is the tallest land mammal, and the largest ruminant species. An 18-year-old multiparous female hybrid giraffe, weighing 650 kg, was euthanized for chronic health problems, and left flank laparoscopy was performed less than 30 minutes after death. Safe primary access was achieved under visualisation using an optical bladed trocar (Visiport Plus, Tyco healthcare UK Ltd) without prior abdominal insufflation. A left paralumbar fossa approach allowed access to the spleen, rumen, left kidney, and intestines, but did not allow access to the reproductive tract which in nongravid females is intrapelvic in nature. PMID:20445792

  14. Assessment and management of right ventricular failure in left ventricular assist device patients.

    PubMed

    Holman, William L; Acharya, Deepak; Siric, Franjo; Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support devices, including ventricular assist devices (VADs) and the total artificial heart, have evolved to become accepted therapeutic options for patients with severe congestive heart failure. Continuous-flow left VADs are the most prevalent option for mechanical circulatory assistance and reliably provide years of support. However, problems related to acute and chronic right heart failure in patients with left VADs continue to cause important mortality and morbidity. This review discusses the assessment and management of right ventricular failure in left VAD patients. The goal is to summarize current knowledge and suggest new approaches to managing this problem.

  15. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine resting longitudinal and radial pumping in elderly athletes, sedentary elderly and young sedentary subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate determinants of maximal cardiac output in elderly. Eight elderly athletes (63 ± 4 years), seven elderly sedentary (66 ± 4 years) and ten young sedentary subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using a dye dilution technique. Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups (longitudinal left ventricle (LV) 52-65%, P = 0.12, right ventricle (RV) 77-87%, P = 0.16, radial 7.9-8.6%, P = 1.0). Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement (LVAVPD) was higher in elderly athletes and young sedentary compared with elderly sedentary subjects (14 ± 3, 15 ± 2 and 11 ± 1 mm, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no difference between groups for RVAVPD (P = 0.2). LVAVPD was an independent predictor of maximal cardiac output (R(2) = 0.61, P < 0.01, β = 0.78). Longitudinal and radial contributions to stroke volume did not differ between groups. However, how longitudinal pumping was achieved differed; elderly athletes and young sedentary subjects showed similar AVPD whereas this was significantly lower in elderly sedentary subjects. Elderly sedentary subjects achieved longitudinal pumping through increased short-axis area of the ventricle. Large AVPD was a determinant of maximal cardiac output and exercise capacity.

  16. Left ventricular strain and its pattern estimated from cine CMR and validation with DENSE.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Allan, Andrew; McComb, Christie; Luo, Xiaoyu; Berry, Colin

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of local strain provides insight into the biomechanical significance of viable myocardium. We attempted to estimate myocardial strain from cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images by using a b-spline deformable image registration method. Three healthy volunteers and 41 patients with either recent or chronic myocardial infarction (MI) were studied at 1.5 Tesla with both cine and DENSE CMR. Regional circumferential and radial left ventricular strains were estimated from cine and DENSE acquisitions. In all healthy volunteers, there was no difference for peak circumferential strain (- 0.18 ± 0.04 versus - 0.18 ± 0.03, p = 0.76) between cine and DENSE CMR, however peak radial strain was overestimated from cine (0.84 ± 0.37 versus 0.49 ± 0.2, p < 0.01). In the patient study, the peak strain patterns predicted by cine were similar to the patterns from DENSE, including the strain evolution related to recovery time and strain patterns related to MI scar extent. Furthermore, cine-derived strain disclosed different strain patterns in MI and non-MI regions, and regions with transmural and non-transmural MI as DENSE. Although there were large variations with radial strain measurements from cine CMR images, useful circumferential strain information can be obtained from routine clinical CMR imaging. Cine strain analysis has potential to improve the diagnostic yield from routine CMR imaging in clinical practice.

  17. Left ventricular strain and its pattern estimated from cine CMR and validation with DENSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hao; Allan, Andrew; McComb, Christie; Luo, Xiaoyu; Berry, Colin

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of local strain provides insight into the biomechanical significance of viable myocardium. We attempted to estimate myocardial strain from cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images by using a b-spline deformable image registration method. Three healthy volunteers and 41 patients with either recent or chronic myocardial infarction (MI) were studied at 1.5 Tesla with both cine and DENSE CMR. Regional circumferential and radial left ventricular strains were estimated from cine and DENSE acquisitions. In all healthy volunteers, there was no difference for peak circumferential strain (- 0.18 ± 0.04 versus - 0.18 ± 0.03, p = 0.76) between cine and DENSE CMR, however peak radial strain was overestimated from cine (0.84 ± 0.37 versus 0.49 ± 0.2, p < 0.01). In the patient study, the peak strain patterns predicted by cine were similar to the patterns from DENSE, including the strain evolution related to recovery time and strain patterns related to MI scar extent. Furthermore, cine-derived strain disclosed different strain patterns in MI and non-MI regions, and regions with transmural and non-transmural MI as DENSE. Although there were large variations with radial strain measurements from cine CMR images, useful circumferential strain information can be obtained from routine clinical CMR imaging. Cine strain analysis has potential to improve the diagnostic yield from routine CMR imaging in clinical practice.

  18. RADIAL VELOCITY ALONG THE VOYAGER 1 TRAJECTORY: THE EFFECT OF SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Borovikov, S. N.; Burlaga, L. F.; Decker, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2012-05-01

    As Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are approaching the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the solar wind (SW) and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-we expect new, unknown features of the heliospheric interface to be revealed. A seeming puzzle reported recently by Krimigis et al. concerns the unusually low, even negative, radial velocity components derived from the energetic ion distribution. Steady-state plasma models of the inner heliosheath (IHS) show that the radial velocity should not be equal to zero even at the surface of the HP. Here we demonstrate that the velocity distributions observed by Voyager 1 are consistent with time-dependent simulations of the SW-LISM interaction. In this Letter, we analyze the results from a numerical model of the large-scale heliosphere that includes solar cycle effects. Our simulations show that prolonged periods of low to negative radial velocity can exist in the IHS at substantial distances from the HP. It is also shown that Voyager 1 was more likely to observe such regions than Voyager 2.

  19. AN AFFINE-INVARIANT SAMPLER FOR EXOPLANET FITTING AND DISCOVERY IN RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Fengji; Hogg, David W.; Goodman, Jonathan; Weare, Jonathan; Schwab, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the nonlinear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. This new sampler has only one free parameter, and does not require much tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. This novel sampler would be ideal for projects involving large data sets such as statistical investigations of planet distribution. The biggest obstacle to ensemble samplers is the existence of multiple local optima; we present a clustering technique to deal with local optima by clustering based on the likelihood of the walkers in the ensemble. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampler on real radial velocity data.

  20. Radial diffusion in Saturn's radiation belts - A modeling analysis assuming satellite and ring E absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    A modeling analysis is carried out of six experimental phase space density profiles for nearly equatorially mirroring protons using methods based on the approach of Thomsen et al. (1977). The form of the time-averaged radial diffusion coefficient D(L) that gives an optimal fit to the experimental profiles is determined under the assumption that simple satellite plus Ring E absorption of inwardly diffusing particles and steady-state radial diffusion are the dominant physical processes affecting the proton data in the L range that is modeled. An extension of the single-satellite model employed by Thomsen et al. to a model that includes multisatellite and ring absorption is described, and the procedures adopted for estimating characteristic satellite and ring absorption times are defined. The results obtained in applying three representative solid-body absorption models to evaluate D(L) in the range where L is between 4 and 16 are reported, and a study is made of the sensitivity of the preferred amplitude and L dependence for D(L) to the assumed model parameters. The inferred form of D(L) is then compared with that which would be predicted if various proposed physical mechanisms for driving magnetospheric radial diffusion are operative at Saturn.